Podcasts about Joseph Stalin

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Leader of the Soviet Union from 1924 to 1953

  • 2,574PODCASTS
  • 4,791EPISODES
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  • 2DAILY NEW EPISODES
  • Nov 27, 2021LATEST
Joseph Stalin

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Best podcasts about Joseph Stalin

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Latest podcast episodes about Joseph Stalin

Robots For Eyes Podcast
Eps 280. The Kim Dynasty Part 1 – The Making of North Korea

Robots For Eyes Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 27, 2021 136:39


After a generation of Japanese rule, intimidation and political schemes, in 1945 when the Japanese empire collapsed, the peninsula of Korea was split in two and taken over by the Soviet Union to the north, and the USA to the south. To the north communism took effect and Stalin enrolled a guerrilla fighter named Kim Il Sung to take charge! To the south capitalism, and well we all know how that went. In part one we talk in depth about Kim Il Sung's rule and actions on the people of North Korea! FB/IG @robotsforeyespodcast podbelly.com retrovague.com suikerapparel.com robotsforeyespodcast.com  

The Eastern Border
Man of Steel: Holodomor

The Eastern Border

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 33:53


Greetings, Comrades! We welcome the return of the Stalin series with an episode about Holodomor, one of the first and lesser known mass acts of tyranny that Uncle Joe committed. This one...this one's dark. Extra dark. It's about the man-made famine of 1932-1933, a genocide of the Ukrainian nation. But I couldn't speak about anything else, as this...this is Holodomor rememberance month. Вічна пам'ять!Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/theeasternborder. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Loving Liberty Radio Network
2021 November 24 The Bryan Hyde Show

Loving Liberty Radio Network

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 85:19


I don't think I've seen a more clear warning about what the unvaxxed are facing. CJ Hopkins lays out the case for resisting pathologized totalitarianism and the reality of the violence it will bring. If you're being actively hated on by the New Normal masses, you're doing something right. Sometimes it feels as though things are hopelessly stacked against those of us who are willing to stand for individual rights. Joanna Miller has some encouraging news about the small victories in the fight for freedom that we may have missed. When domestic troubles begin to pile up at home, politicians have historically used war as a distraction to keep the populace in line. Pat Buchanan questions the wisdom of U.S. officials who are playing with fire on Russia's borders and where it may lead us. It's shocking how quickly governments around the world are working to implement some form of Covid apartheid. Joseph Kulve explains the cruel lesson we can learn from Austria's Covid vax insanity and why it's more important than ever that we stand firm in defense of our right of informed consent. If you're waiting for the right time to take a stand, here's an unpopular truth: The right time will never come. Paul Rosenberg has some sage advice regarding the decision to take action and how it doesn't have to be a perfect plan to make an appreciable difference. The terms "kulak" and "Holodomor" are unfamiliar to many Americans. Only those who have studied enough history to know about Stalin's decision to starve to death millions of Ukrainians in the 1920s and 1930s will know what these terms mean. Revolver News asks, are you ready to become an American kulak? www.thebryanhydeshow.com --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/loving-liberty/support

The Bryan Hyde Show
2021 November 24 The Bryan Hyde Show hour two

The Bryan Hyde Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 42:27


  When domestic troubles begin to pile up at home, politicians have historically used war as a distraction to keep the populace in line. Pat Buchanan questions the wisdom of U.S. officials who are playing with fire on Russia's borders and where it may lead us. It's shocking how quickly governments around the world are working to implement some form of Covid apartheid. Joseph Kulve explains the cruel lesson we can learn from Austria's Covid vax insanity and why it's more important than ever that we stand firm in defense of our right of informed consent. If you're waiting for the right time to take a stand, here's an unpopular truth: The right time will never come. Paul Rosenberg has some sage advice regarding the decision to take action and how it doesn't have to be a perfect plan to make an appreciable difference. The terms "kulak" and "Holodomor" are unfamiliar to many Americans. Only those who have studied enough history to know about Stalin's decision to starve to death millions of Ukrainians in the 1920s and 1930s will know what these terms mean. Revolver News asks, are you ready to become an American kulak? Show some love to my sponsors: Monticello College Lifesaving Food (use the coupon code "HYDE" at checkout for a 25% discount) The Heather Turner Team at Patriot Home Mortgage HSL Ammo Sewing & Quilting Center Govern Your Income Solar Patriots

Pop & Locke
Death of Stalin

Pop & Locke

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 56:27


In 1953, under the Great Terror's heavy cloak of state paranoia, the ever‐​watchful Soviet leader, Joseph Stalin, collapses. When they discover his body the following morning, a frenetic surge of raw panic starts spreading like a virus amongst the senior members of the Politburo, as they scramble to maintain order, weed out the competition, and take power. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

OTR Detective – The Great Detectives of Old Time Radio
EP3617: Man Called X: Stalin Plus Seven

OTR Detective – The Great Detectives of Old Time Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 37:52


Bill Pringle goes behind the iron curtain to Romania to rescue an American businessman being held by the Communist Government for a show trial. Original Air Dat Read more ...

Mainstreet Halifax \x96 CBC Radio
Halifax Ukrainian community marks 88th anniversary of Holodomor genocide

Mainstreet Halifax \x96 CBC Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 8:04


Holodomor is a Ukrainian word meaning starvation by hunger. The tragedy happened in 1932-33 when several million Ukrainians died during a famine engineered by Joseph Stalin. Lyubov Zhyznomirska tells Mainstreet about plans to mark the event this Saturday, including a documentary screening and candlelight vigil.

London Review Podcasts
A History of Revolution

London Review Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 59:16


Enzo Traverso talks to Adam Shatz about his new book on the history of revolutionary passions, images and ideas, from Haiti's emancipatory slave rebellion in 1791 to Stalin's top-down authoritarianism. Are revolutions, as Marx suggested, the ‘locomotives of history', or, as Walter Benjamin saw it, the emergency brake? And what can modern political movements learn from their revolutionary forebears?Find further reading on the episode page: https://lrb.me/revolutionpodSubscribe to the LRB from just £1 per issue: https://mylrb.co.uk/podcast20bMusic by Kieran Brunt / Produced by Anthony Wilks See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Escuchando Documentales
La IIGM de Principio a Fin: 2- Guerra Relámpago #documental #historia #podcast

Escuchando Documentales

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 50:04


Exploramos los primeros años de la segunda guerra mundial en el campo de batalla europeo. Después de la invasión de Polonia, Hitler se pone como objetivo principal la invasión de su enemigo histórico, Francia. Veremos cómo las fuerzas aliadas casi son derrotadas a no ser por la posterior evacuación de Dunkerque, y conoceremos la traición de Hitler a su pacto con Stalin, mientras marchaba con sus fuerzas hacia la Unión Soviética.

Dejepis Inak
Dejiny #103 Muž z ocele | Josif Stalin

Dejepis Inak

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2021 16:54


Pomohol poraziť nacizmus a štvrť storočie bol najvyššie postaveným mužom Sovietskeho zväzu. Premenil zaostalú krajinu na svetovú superveľmoc. S jeho menom sa dodnes spája teror a strach, pričom v skutočnosti znamenalo muž z ocele. Toto je Josif Stalin.

Stil
Krigsfotografen som lurade Stalin att le – Margaret Bourke-White

Stil

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 55:10


Hon var USA:s första kvinnliga krigskorrespondent och den första västerländska fotografen att släppas in i Sovjetunionen. Margaret Bourke-Whites bilder är världsberömda, hennes namn inte lika känt. Margaret Bourke-White räknas av många som en av dem allra främsta bildjournalisterna genom tiderna. Hon var den första kvinnliga fotografen att anställas av den inflytelserika tidningen Life. Att som kvinna i 1930-talets USA skippa ett mer traditionellt hemmafruliv och satsa på sin karriär hörde inte till vanligheterna. Men det ledde Margaret Bourke-White till ett liv som kan mäta sig med fiktiva hjältar som Indiana Jones. Dessutom hade hon en påfallande stilsäkerhet både framför och bakom kameran, och en enastående förmåga att vara där det hände, när det hände över hela världen. I veckans Stil berättar vi historien om en pionjär, vars namn dock kommit att hamna något i skymundan.Dessutom tittar vi tillsammans med fotografen Martin von Krogh närmare på krigskorrespondent-stilen, för det finns en tydlig klädkod inom kåren.Vi djupdyker även in i bildjournalistikens värld. Trots att användandet av fotografier ökar, avskedas fotografer och det talas om att bildjournalistiken är utrotningshotad. Detta pratar vi med bildjournalisten Joey Abrait och Journalistförbundets ordförande Ulrika Hyllert om. Och så träffar vi dokumentärfilmaren och loppisentusiasten Rasmus Wassberg, som upptäckte att många begagnade kameror innehåller oframkallad film. Något som fick honom att bestämma sig för att försöka återlämna dessa kvarglömda fotografier. Veckans gäst är Eva Dahlman, fotohistoriker och etnolog.  

Outsider Theory
The Paper of Record's Dismal Record

Outsider Theory

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 79:50


Critics often present recent ideological convulsions at the New York Times as an embarrassing deviation from the paper's illustrious history. Ashley Rindsberg, author of The Gray Lady Winked, joins me to explain why they're wrong. The Times, as he documents, has been plagued by scandal after scandal over the past hundred years, and its journalistic and editorial failures reveal more continuity than declining standards. Rindsberg also explains why the standard critiques of the paper from the right and the left are incomplete: far more than any consistent ideological agenda, the Times pursues the agenda of the powerful dynastic family that owns and controls it, whose interests are in tension with the paper's supposed commitment to truth and the public good. https://www.thegrayladywinked.com/

CIA Files: True Stories of U.S Intelligence
Frank Wisner: Local Boy Makes Good

CIA Files: True Stories of U.S Intelligence

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 49:26


Were it not for a handful of loud, persistent voices shouting “Fire” about Stalin's intentions toward Western Values, the Cold War may well have never occurred, or may at least have been less brutal, less deadly. And maybe the United States wouldn't have compromised its stated moral codes so egregiously in the decades following the end of the Second World War. A liberal Southern lawyer was one of those few, loud voices. Frank Wisner, a man socially ahead of his time, did what he thought was necessary to stop what he considered a spreading scourge of tyranny and violence. And in doing so, he enabled innumerable crimes against humanity.

New Books Network
Nora Krug and Timothy Snyder, "On Tyranny Graphic Edition: Twenty Lessons from the Twentieth Century" (Ten Speed Press, 2021)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 70:42


Nora Krug and Timothy Snyder have published On Tyranny: Twenty Lessons from the Twentieth Century, Graphic Edition with Ten Speed Press, 2021. The book contains the slightly updated text from Professor Snyder's best-selling 2017 edition but now gorgeously illustrated with Professor Krug's artwork. Timothy Snyder, the Levin Professor of History at Yale University, is a prolific historian of Eastern and Central Europe in the 20th century who focuses on the violence of totalitarian regimes. He has published too many books to list here his 2010 Bloodlands: Europe Between Hitler and Stalin and 2015 Black Earth: The Holocaust as History and Warning deserve special mention. Nora Krug is a graphic artist, author, and Associate Professor of Illustrations at Parsons School of Design. Her 2019 autobiography Belonging: A German Reckons with History and Home received substantial acclaim and was the recipient of the 2018 National Book Critics Circle Award in autobiography. Nora Krug was named Illustrator of the Year by the Victoria and Albert Museum in 2019. Her drawings and visual narratives have appeared in The New York Times, The Guardian, and Le Monde diplomatique. Michael G. Vann is a professor of world history at California State University, Sacramento. A specialist in imperialism and the Cold War in Southeast Asia, he is the author of The Great Hanoi Rat Hunt: Empires, Disease, and Modernity in French Colonial Vietnam (Oxford University Press, 2018). When he's not reading or talking about new books with smart people, Mike can be found surfing in Santa Cruz, California. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in World Affairs
Nora Krug and Timothy Snyder, "On Tyranny Graphic Edition: Twenty Lessons from the Twentieth Century" (Ten Speed Press, 2021)

New Books in World Affairs

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 70:42


Nora Krug and Timothy Snyder have published On Tyranny: Twenty Lessons from the Twentieth Century, Graphic Edition with Ten Speed Press, 2021. The book contains the slightly updated text from Professor Snyder's best-selling 2017 edition but now gorgeously illustrated with Professor Krug's artwork. Timothy Snyder, the Levin Professor of History at Yale University, is a prolific historian of Eastern and Central Europe in the 20th century who focuses on the violence of totalitarian regimes. He has published too many books to list here his 2010 Bloodlands: Europe Between Hitler and Stalin and 2015 Black Earth: The Holocaust as History and Warning deserve special mention. Nora Krug is a graphic artist, author, and Associate Professor of Illustrations at Parsons School of Design. Her 2019 autobiography Belonging: A German Reckons with History and Home received substantial acclaim and was the recipient of the 2018 National Book Critics Circle Award in autobiography. Nora Krug was named Illustrator of the Year by the Victoria and Albert Museum in 2019. Her drawings and visual narratives have appeared in The New York Times, The Guardian, and Le Monde diplomatique. Michael G. Vann is a professor of world history at California State University, Sacramento. A specialist in imperialism and the Cold War in Southeast Asia, he is the author of The Great Hanoi Rat Hunt: Empires, Disease, and Modernity in French Colonial Vietnam (Oxford University Press, 2018). When he's not reading or talking about new books with smart people, Mike can be found surfing in Santa Cruz, California. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/world-affairs

New Books in History
Nora Krug and Timothy Snyder, "On Tyranny Graphic Edition: Twenty Lessons from the Twentieth Century" (Ten Speed Press, 2021)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 70:42


Nora Krug and Timothy Snyder have published On Tyranny: Twenty Lessons from the Twentieth Century, Graphic Edition with Ten Speed Press, 2021. The book contains the slightly updated text from Professor Snyder's best-selling 2017 edition but now gorgeously illustrated with Professor Krug's artwork. Timothy Snyder, the Levin Professor of History at Yale University, is a prolific historian of Eastern and Central Europe in the 20th century who focuses on the violence of totalitarian regimes. He has published too many books to list here his 2010 Bloodlands: Europe Between Hitler and Stalin and 2015 Black Earth: The Holocaust as History and Warning deserve special mention. Nora Krug is a graphic artist, author, and Associate Professor of Illustrations at Parsons School of Design. Her 2019 autobiography Belonging: A German Reckons with History and Home received substantial acclaim and was the recipient of the 2018 National Book Critics Circle Award in autobiography. Nora Krug was named Illustrator of the Year by the Victoria and Albert Museum in 2019. Her drawings and visual narratives have appeared in The New York Times, The Guardian, and Le Monde diplomatique. Michael G. Vann is a professor of world history at California State University, Sacramento. A specialist in imperialism and the Cold War in Southeast Asia, he is the author of The Great Hanoi Rat Hunt: Empires, Disease, and Modernity in French Colonial Vietnam (Oxford University Press, 2018). When he's not reading or talking about new books with smart people, Mike can be found surfing in Santa Cruz, California. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

Dan Snow's History Hit
We Didn't Start the Fire: Dien Bien Phu

Dan Snow's History Hit

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 36:13


This episode of the podcast comes from a show called ‘We Didn't Start The Fire' which is a modern history podcast inspired by the lyrics of the legend that is Billy Joel. In this episode, Dan chats with the wonderful Katie Puckrik and Tom Fordyce about the Battle of Dien Bien Phu, which took place in 1954 in Vietnam. If any place on Earth symbolises the end of the European Empire, it's here.If you want more of those episodes, go and look up the rest of the series right now. They've got loads of great episodes from Nixon, Eisenhower and Stalin to Marlon Brando and Marilyn Monroe. There's a new episode out every Monday, so go and search for ‘We Didn't Start The Fire' and follow or subscribe now. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

La Linterna
La Linterna (15/11/2021) de 20:00-21:00: "No entiendo cómo el comunismo y Stalin tienen buena prensa"

La Linterna

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 60:05


Drinkin' Bros Podcast
Episode 933 - Stalin‘s Secret Gorilla Army

Drinkin' Bros Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 75:32


The prosecution in the Kyle Rittenhouse trial is hilariously incompetent, which movies are better than the books they're based on (Jurassic Park, The Princess Bride), and apparently Joseph Stalin was trying to breed an army of half gorilla, half-human soldiers during World War 2.   Go to ghostbed.com/drinkinbros and use code DRINKINBROS for 30% off EVERYTHING (Mattresses, Adjustable Base, and more) -- plus a 101 Night Sleep Trial and Mattresses Made in the USA!   Go to CardoMAX.com and use promo code DB, and you get Buy One Get One FREE on your first order.   Go to TRYFirstleaf.com/DRINKINBROS and join today and you'll get 6 bottles of wine for $29.95 and free shipping!

Hard Factor
11/12/21: Dictators End the Week Extremely Strong

Hard Factor

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 79:18


Wow dictators really threw their weight around to end the week. China's Xi Jinping decided to make a resolution on top of his decree a little while back that he could be President for life. Now he is considered as powerful as the founding father of the People's Republic of China Mao Zedong. That story here (00:23:45) (00:00:00) - Timestamps Cup of Coffee in the Big Time (00:05:12) - Fun Fact: The designer of the Pringles can is buried in one (00:06:35)- Holidays: National Pneumonia Day, National French Onion Dip Day (00:07:55) - This Day in History: in 1927 Joseph Stalin took over as undisputed leader of the Soviet Union (00:09:05) - Famous Deaths on November 12th: 1035 Cnut the Great, 2003 Jonathan Brandis, 2018 Stan Lee (00:10:39) - Trending Mentions: NFL trades: Cam Newton back to the Panthers, Odell Beckham Jr is on the Rams. The Hard Factor NFL weekly parlay is awesome. (00:13:13) - #3 - The death toll has raised to nine from the Astroworld concert. Also a nine year old is in a medically induced coma and Travis Scott has been sued more than 50 times (00:17:39) - #2 - Congress wants to eliminate drunk drivers by 2026 (00:23:45) - #1 - Grand Emperor Xi Jinping has made a resolution making him as powerful as Mao Zedong the founding father of the People's Republic of China TikTok International Moment (00:31:45) - Eastern EU - Belarus/Poland/Ukraine borders. The EU is thinking about building a wall, and is worried about Vladimir Putin and Alexander Lukashenko instigating conflicts at the border (00:36:34) - Yemen - Biden administration is calling for the immediate release of the Yemeni staff of the U.S. Embassy in Sana'a who are being detained by Iran-backed Houthi separatists who control the city (00:38:18) - Taiwan - A police officer got his thumb bit off by a very drunk driver who fought him (00:44:40) - Listener submitted voice mail and reviews These stories, and much more, brought to you by our incredible sponsors: http://AdamAndEve.com - Use Promo Code: HARDFACTOR for 50% off 1 Item http://JoinFightCamp.com/FACTOR - To get an additional pair of gloves for free all November with your new Fight Camp system http://Talkspace.com - Promo Code: HARDFACTOR for $100 off http://Birddogs.com - Promo Code: Factor - Free Whistle Ball w/ Order Go to store.hardfactor.com and patreon.com/hardfactor to support the pod with incredible merch and bonus podcasts Leave us a Voicemail at 512-270-1480, send us a voice memo to hardfactorvoicemail@gmail.com, and/or leave a 5-Star review on Apple Podcasts to hear it on Friday's show Other Places to Listen: Spotify, Google Podcasts, Stitcher, Lots More... Watch Full Episodes on YouTube Follow @HardFactorNews on Instagram, Twitter, TikTok, and Facebook

Seriously…
How America Learned to Laugh Again

Seriously…

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 58:12


Twenty years ago - in the mind-numbing aftermath of the terrorist attacks on America - the immediate, mind-numbing response of the media was to ban laughter. All laughter, including jokes, chuckles and guffaws. This is the story of what happened next. With contributions from Private Eye to The Onion, via David Letterman, the News Quiz and Have I Got News for You. As well as 9/11 and the death of Bin Laden, Joe Queenan explores the pandemic and the US retreat from Afghanistan. "What a year 2021 has been – from the storming of the capitol in Washington to the fall of Kabul to the Taliban, this has not been a good time in the US. Probably not so great in the UK either. Throw in some riots, add in the climate crisis and the plague – none of this is worth the slightest lame joke. But is it worth a good joke?" With contributions from three US presidents, plus Ian Hislop and Adam MacQueen from Private Eye, Armando Iannuci (creator of The Death of Stalin), Susan Morrison of the New Yorker, and Robert Siegal editor of The Onion in 2001 - the first US publication to break the laughter ban with the headline, US Vows To Defeat Whoever It Is We Are At War With. A copy of that magazine is now in the Library of Congress. Also includes archive from David Letterman, Linda Grant, Michael Rosen, Rich Hall on Have I Got News for You, plus the News Quiz from September 2001. Joe Queenan is an Emmy Award-winning US broadcaster. His previous contributions to Archive on Four include Brief Histories on Blame, Shame and Failure. The producer for BBC Audio in Bristol is Miles Warde.

RNZ: Nine To Noon
Growing up in Europe's last communist state: Albania

RNZ: Nine To Noon

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 30:56


Lea Ypi grew up in one of the most isolated countries on earth. Albania was Europe's last outpost of communism; nearly impossible to visit, and even more difficult to leave. It was a place of queuing and scarcity, and of political executions and secret police.... But to Lea it was home. Her new book Free: Coming of Age at the End of History is a memoir about growing up in the last days of the last Stalinist outpost. She uncovers the trauma of discovering the truth about her family, her country, and her two favourite uncles; Albanian leader Enver Hoxha and Joseph Stalin. Susie speaks with Lea Ypi, who is now a professor in political theory at the London School of Economics and an adjunct associate professor in philosophy at the Australian National University.

Spectator Radio
The Book Club: Armando Iannucci

Spectator Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 24:50


Sam's guest on this week's Book Club podcast is Armando Iannucci – the satirist behind Alan Partridge, The Thick of It, Veep and The Death of Stalin. What many of his fans might not know is that he's also a devoted scholar of Milton – whose influence is to be found in his first published poem Pandemonium: Some Verses on the Current Predicament. Armando tells Sam what hurt him into verse, identifies the moment that led him to abandon an English Literature PhD for a career in comedy – and explains why there's as much sadness as savagery in his mock-epic description of the Covid epidemic.

Spectator Books
Armando Iannucci: Pandemonium

Spectator Books

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 24:50


My guest on this week's Book Club podcast is Armando Iannucci – the satirist behind Alan Partridge, The Thick of It, Veep and The Death of Stalin. What many of his fans might not know is that he's also a devoted scholar of Milton – whose influence is to be found in his first published poem Pandemonium: Some Verses on the Current Predicament. Armando tells me what hurt him into verse, identifies the moment that led him to abandon an English Literature PhD for a career in comedy – and explains why there's as much sadness as savagery in his mock-epic description of the Covid epidemic. 

Your Brain on Facts
Secret Cities (do-over, ep 170)

Your Brain on Facts

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 33:46


Quick, switch over to Vodacast to see the pictures I talk about in the episode! We all lose things -- keys, wallets, patience -- but how do you lose an entire city?  Hear the stories of three American towns built in a hurry but kept off the map, secure Soviet enclaves known by their post codes, ancient cities found by modern technology, and the ingenious engineering of underground dwellings. YBOF Book; Audiobook (basically everywhere but Audible); Merch Reach out and touch Moxie on Facebook, Twitter,  or Instagram. Hang out with your fellow Brainiacs. Support the show Music by Kevin MacLeod, .   Links to all the research resources are on our website.    In the opal-mining region of South Australia, lies the town of Coober Peedy.  You're welcome to visit, but don't expect to see much.  There aren't many buildings, though the landscape is dotted with ventilation shafts.  There's almost no movement at all.  So if the town is here, where are its 3500 residents?  Look down.  My name's Moxie and this is your brain on facts.   In 1943, three ordinary-looking US cities were constructed at record speed, but left off all maps.  Oak Ridge, Tennessee; Richland, Washington; and Los Alamos, New Mexico held laboratories and sprawling industrial plants, as well as residential neighborhoods, schools, churches, and stores.  The three cities had a combined population of more than 125,000 and one extraordinary purpose: to create nuclear weapons as part of the Manhattan project, the U.S. military's initiative to develop nuclear weapons.     Their design was driven by unique considerations, such as including buffer zones for radiation leaks or explosions. In each case, there were natural features, topographical features, that were considered to be favorable. In all three cases, they were somewhat remote—in the case of Richland and Los Alamos, very remote—which offered a more secure environment, of course. But also, in the event of a disaster, an explosion or a radiation leak, that would also minimize the potential exposure of people outside the project to any sort of radiation danger.  The sites were  selected far from one another in case German or Japanese bombers somehow managed to penetrate that far into the United States, it would be harder for them in a single bombing run to take out more than one facility.  K-25 plant at Oak Ridge, which was where they enriched uranium using the gaseous diffusion method, was the largest building in the world under a single roof, spanning more than 40 acres.    Before you being any building project, you have to clear the site of things like trees, high spots, people. In 1942, the government approached the families that lived near the Clinch river in Tennessee, some of whom had farmed there for generations, and kicked them out, telling them the land was needed for a “demolition range,” so as to scare off hold-outs with the threat of adjacent explosions.  The town scaled up fast.   Oak Ridge was initially conceived as a town for 13,000 people but grew to 75,000 by the end of the war, the biggest of the secret cities. The laboratories took up most of the space, but rather than constructing basic dormitories for employees, the architects and designers settled on a suburban vision.  To pull this off quickly and secretly, the architects relied on prefabricated housing, in some cases, a house might come in two halves on the back of a truck to be assembled on-site. These were called “alphabet houses;” A houses were the most modest (read: tiny), while D houses included dining rooms.  Housing was assigned based on seniority, though allowances were sometimes made for large families.     And race.  This was the early 40's, after all.  The secret suburbs for factories manufacturing megadeaths were segregated by design.  Their houses were called “hutments,” little more than plywood frames without indoor plumbing, insulation or glass in the windows.  Though two of the first public schools in the south to be desegregated were in Oak Ridge. They even threatened to secede from Tennessee in order to desegregate, so at least there's that.  There were white families in the hutments as well and all of the residents of that lower-class neighborhood were under more surveillance and stricter rules than the families in better housing.  Married couples may be forbidden to live together.  By the end of the war, most of the white families had been moved out of the hutments and but many of the African American families continued to live in the basic dwellings until the early 1950s.    These towns didn't appear on any official maps, and visitors were screened by guards posted at the entrances.  Anyone over 12 had to have official ID.  Firearms, cameras, and even binoculars were prohibited.  Billboards were installed all over town to remind workers to keep their mouths shut about their work, even though most workers knew very little about the project's true scope.  For example, you job may be to watch a gauge for eight hours and flip a switch if it goes to high.  You don't know what you're measuring or what the machine is doing.  All you've been told is to flip the switch when the needle hits a certain number.  In Los Alamos and Richland, the entire neighborhood may have the same mailing address.  At Oak Ridge, street addresses were designed to be confusing to outsiders. Bus routes might be called X-10 or K-25 while dorms had simple names such as M1.  There were no signs on buildings. The town was full of such ciphers, and even employees didn't know how to decode them all.  The use of words such as “atomic” or “uranium” was taboo lest it tip off the enemy.   When the US dropped the atom bomb on Hiroshima, Japan, in 1945, the city's secret was out. Many residents celebrated at this turning point in the war, but not all.  Mary Lowe Michel, a typist in Oak Ridge, is quoted in an exhibit on display now at the National Building Museum in DC: “The night that the news broke that the bombs had been dropped, there was joyous occasions in the streets, hugging and kissing and dancing and live music and singing that went on for hours and hours. But it bothered me to know that I, in my very small way, had participated in such a thing, and I sat in my dorm room and cried.”  All three cities remained part of the military industrial complex, continuing to work on nuclear weapons during the cold war as well as broader scientific research.  Today Oak Ridge is heavily involved in renewable energy, minus the barbed wire fence.   For most of the twentieth century, if the US was doing it, so was the USSR.  We had closed cities to build nuclear weapons, and so did the Soviet Union.  We had three, they had….lots. Like, a lot a lot.  Like, multiple screens on the Wikipedia list.  Where the US began to open its closed cities after the war, the USSR was building more and more, and not just for nuclear weapons.  These closed cities were nicknamed “post boxes,” because they would be named for the nearest non-secret city and the end of their post code; or simply “boxes” for their closed nature. During the two decades following World War II, dozens of closed cities were built around the country. Some were naukogradi (“science cities”) or akademgorodoki (“academic cities”), while others developed military technology and later spacecraft.  The official name was closed administrative-territorial formations or zakrytye administrativno-territorial'nye obrazovaniya, or ZATOs.    The cities were largely built by slave labor from the Gulag prison camps, which at the time accounted for 23% of the non-agricultural labor force in the Soviet Union.  They were guarded like gulags, too - surrounded by barbed wire and guards, with no one was allowed to enter or leave without official authorization.  Many residents did not leave the city once between their arrival and their death.  That being said, the captive residents enjoyed access to housing, food, and health care better than Soviet citizens elsewhere.  While most towns in the Soviet Union were run by local communist party committees, military officials oversaw the secret cities that would eventually be home to over 100,000 people.  Even during construction, officials were ordered to use trusted prisoners only, meaning no Germans, POWs, hard criminals, political prisoners.  Nevertheless, even living alongside Gulag prisoners, residents believed they were making a valuable contribution to their country. Nikolai Rabotnov, a resident of Chelyabinsk-65, remembered, “I was sure that within our barbed labyrinth, I inhaled the air of freedom!”   Arzamas-16, today known by its original name Sarov, was one of the most important sites in the early development of the first Soviet atomic bomb and hydrogen and was roughly the Soviet equivalent of Los Alamos.  Scientists, workers, and their families enjoyed privileged living conditions and were sheltered from difficulties like military service and economic crisis.  Leading researchers were paid a very large salary for those times.  Chelyabinsk-65 or Ozersk was home to a plutonium production plant similar to the American facilities built at Richland.  Located near a collective farm in the southern Ural Mountains, Chelyabinsk-65 was more or less built from nothing, where Arzamas-16 was an existing town that was taken over.  After the basics of the city were completed, early years were very difficult for the residents. The cities lacked basic infrastructure and suffered from high rates of alcoholism and poor living conditions. The Mayak Plutonium Plant dumped nuclear waste in the nearby Techa River, causing a health crisis not only for the residents of Chelyabinsk-65 but for all the villages which ran along it.   Conditions at Chelyabinsk-65/Ozersk would not improve until after the death of Joseph Stalin in 1953.  You remember that story, it was in our episode For Want of a Nail.  Owing to the plutonium plant, Chelyabinsk-65 is still one of the most polluted places in the world. Some residents refer to it as the “graveyard of the Earth.”  Somehow, though, it's considered a prestigious place to live where.  When the government polled residents after the Cold War had thawed over whether to open the city, they voted to keep it closed.  In fact, half of the nuclear scientists said they would refuse to stay if it was opened.  As one resident explained, “We take pride in the fact that the state trusts us enough to live and work in Ozersk.”   In 1991, the Soviet Union officially disbanded and its fifteen republics became independent, four of which had nuclear weapons deployed on their territories. This was of great concern to the West, as these newly formed nations did not have the financial or technological means to properly store and safeguard these weapons.  With budgets a fraction of what they were in the decades before, the standard of living in the ZATOs quickly declined.  Security went with it, as the soldiers who guarded the ZATOs also saw their wages slashed.   With little prospect of employment and limited security, scientists suddenly had the freedom not only to leave their cities but to leave the country.  Fear quickly spread in the United States that they could help develop nuclear programs in other countries, such as Iran.  In 1991, the Nunn-Lugar Act financed the transportation and dismantlement of the scattered nukes to not only reduce the number of nuclear weapons in the world but to provide the scientists with proper employment.  One result of this effort was the International Science and Technology Center in Moscow, which employed many former atomic scientists on non-weapons programs and still exists today.      If you need to hide a city from your enemies, you'd do well to move it underground.  Built in the late 50s in Wiltshire, England, the massive complex, codename Burlington was designed to safely house up to 4,000 central government personnel in the event of a nuclear strike.  In a former Bath stone quarry the city was to be the site of the main Emergency Government War Headquarters, the country's alternative seat of power if the worst happened.  Over 2/3mi/1km in length, and boasting over 60mi/97km  of roads, the underground site was designed to accommodate the Prime Minister, the Cabinet Office, civil servants and an army of domestic support staff.   Blast proof and completely self-sufficient the secret underground site could accommodate up to 4,000 people  in complete isolation from the outside world  for up to three months.  Though it was fortunately never used, the grid of roads and avenues ran between underground hospitals, canteens, kitchens, warehouses of supplies, dormitories, and offices.  The city was also equipped with the second largest telephone exchange in Britain, a BBC studio from which the PM could address the nation and a pneumatic tube system that could relay messages, using compressed air, throughout the complex.  An underground lake and treatment plant could provide all the drinking water needed.  A dozen huge tanks could store the fuel required to keep the generators in the underground power station running for up to three months.  The air within the complex could also be kept at a constant humidity and heated to around 68F/20C degrees.   The complex was kept on standby in case of future nuclear threats to the UK, until 2005, when the underground reservoir was drained, the supplies removed, the fuel tanks were emptied and the skeleton staff of four were dismissed. Some cities were not secret in their heyday, but were lost to time until recently.  In what's being hailed as a “major breakthrough” for Maya archaeology in February 2018, researchers have identified the ruins of more than 60,000 buildings hidden for centuries under the jungles of Guatemala.  Using LiDAR, or Light Detection And Ranging, scholars digitally removed the tree canopy from aerial images of the area, revealing the ruins of a sprawling pre-Columbian civilization that was far more complex and interconnected than most Maya specialists had supposed.   Mounted on a helicopter, the laser continually aims pulses toward the ground below, so many that a large number streak through the spaces between the leaves and branches, and are reflected back to the aircraft and registered by a GPS unit. By calculating the precise distances between the airborne laser and myriad points on the earth's surface, computer software can generate a three-dimensional digital image of what lies below.  To put the density of this jungle into perspective, archaeologists have been searching the area on foot for years, but did not find a single man-made feature.   “LiDAR is revolutionizing archaeology the way the Hubble Space Telescope revolutionized astronomy,” said Francisco Estrada-Belli, a Tulane University archaeologist and National Geographic Explorer. “We'll need 100 years to go through all [the data] and really understand what we're seeing.”  The project mapped more than 800 sq mi/2,100 sq km of the Maya Biosphere Reserve in the Petén region of northern Guatemala, producing the largest LiDAR data set ever obtained for archaeological research.  The old school of that held that Mayan civilization existed as scattered city-states, but these findings suggest that Central America supported an advanced civilization that was, with as many as 14 million people at its peak around 1,200 years ago, comparable to sophisticated cultures like ancient Greece or China.  The LiDAR even revealed raised highways connecting urban centers and complex irrigation and agricultural terracing systems.  And that was without the use of the wheel or beasts of burden   Despite standing for millennia, these sites are in danger from looting and environmental degradation.  Guatemala is losing more than 10 percent of its forests annually, and habitat loss has accelerated along its border with Mexico as trespassers burn and clear land for agriculture and human settlement.  “By identifying these sites and helping to understand who these ancient people were, we hope to raise awareness of the value of protecting these places,” Marianne Hernandez, president of the Foundation for Maya Cultural and Natural Heritage.   Lidar has also helped scientists to redraw a settlement located on the outskirts of Johannesburg, South Africa, and it tells the beginnings of a fascinating story.  Scientists from the University of Witwatersrand believe the newly discovered city was occupied in the 15th century by Tswana-speaking people who lived in the northern parts of South Africa.  Many similar Tswana city-states fell during regional wars and forced migration in the 1820s, and there was little oral or physical evidence to prove their existence.  Though archaeologists excavated some ancient ruins in the area in the 1960s, they couldn't comprehend the full extent of the settlement. By using LiDAR technology, the team was able to virtually remove vegetation and recreate images of the surrounding landscape, allowing them to produce aerial views of the monuments and buildings in a way that could not have been imagined a generation ago.    Using these new aerial photographs, they can now estimate that as many as 850 homesteads had once existed in and around the city they've given the temporary designation of SKBR.  It's likely that most homesteads housed several family members, meaning this was a city with a large population.  There are also stone towers outside some homesteads, as high as 8ft2.5m high with bases 16ft/5m wide.  The academics believe these may have been bases for grain bins or even burial markers for important people.  Though the team estimates they are still another decade or two away from fully understanding the city's inhabitants and how the city came to be, and ceased to exist.   Modern technology has also helped us find an ancient city in Cambodia.  Constructed around 1150, the palaces and temples of Angkor Wat were, and still are, the biggest religious complex on Earth, covering an area four times larger than Vatican City.   In the 15th Century, the Khmer kings abandoned their city and moved to the coast.  They built a new city, Phnom Penh, the present-day capital of Cambodia.  Life in Angkor slowly ebbed away.  Everything made of wood rotted away; everything made of stone was reclaimed by the jungle.   An international team, led by the University of Sydney's Dr Damian Evans, was able to map out /370 sq km around Angkor in unprecedented detail in less than two weeks - no mean feat given the density of the jungle.  Rampant illegal logging of valuable hardwoods had stripped away much of the primary forest, allowing dense new undergrowth to fill in the gaps. It was unclear whether the lasers could locate enough holes in the canopy to penetrate to the forest floor.  The prevalence of landmines from Cambodia's civil war are another area where shooting Lidar from a helicopter really shines. The findings were staggering.  The archaeologists found undocumented cityscapes etched on to the forest floor, with remnants of boulevards, reservoirs, ponds, dams, dikes, irrigation canals, agricultural plots, low-density settlement complexes and orderly rows of temples. They were all clustered around what the archaeologists realized must be a royal palace, a vast structure surrounded by a network of earthen dikes—the ninth-century fortress of King Jayavarman II. “To suspect that a city is there, somewhere underneath the forest, and then to see the entire structure revealed with such clarity and precision was extraordinary,” Evans told me. “It was amazing.”     These new discoveries have profoundly transformed our understanding of Angkor, the greatest medieval city on Earth.  Most striking of all was evidence of large-scale hydraulic engineering, the defining signature of the Khmer empire, used to store and distribute seasonal monsoon water using a complex network of huge canals and reservoirs.  Harnessing the monsoon provided food security - and made the ruling elite fantastically rich. For the next three centuries they channelled their wealth into the greatest concentration of temples on Earth.  Angkor was a bustling metropolis at its peak, covering /1,000 sq km; It would be another 700 years before London reached a similar size.     Bonus fact: and not to be a pedant, but “monsoon” refers no to the heavy rains in the rainy season from May to September, but to the strong, sustained winds that bring them.   And that's where we run out of ideas, at least for today.  Some cities are hidden, not for reasons of subterfuge or dereliction, but by necessity.  80% of the world's opal comes from the area of Coober Peedy, but that wealth is nothing to the sun it's going to continue with the Mad Max motif.  It may be 115 degrees F/47C outside, but it's only 74F/23C underground.  When heavy mining equipment was introduced a century ago, people took advantage of it to dug themselves homes, a church, hotels and B&Bs, a museum, casino, a gift shop, and, of course, a pub.  Remember...thanks... Source: http://www.nationalgeographic.com.au/history/laser-scans-reveal-maya-megalopolis-below-guatemalan-jungle.aspx https://www.smithsonianmag.com/history/lost-city-cambodia-180958508/ https://www.bbc.com/news/magazine-29245289 https://www.citylab.com/design/2018/05/inside-the-secret-cities-that-created-the-atomic-bomb/559601/ https://www.atlasobscura.com/articles/how-to-build-secret-nuclear-city https://www.theguardian.com/cities/2018/may/03/off-the-map-the-secret-cities-behind-the-atom-bomb-manhattan-project https://www.atomicheritage.org/history/soviet-closed-cities https://metro.co.uk/2015/05/28/theres-a-whole-town-in-australia-that-lives-underground-5219091/ https://www.nationalgeographic.com/photography/proof/2016/09/coober-pedy-opal-mining/ https://www.outback-australia-travel-secrets.com/coober-pedy-underground-homes.html http://www.bbc.co.uk/wiltshire/content/articles/2005/12/14/burlington_nuclear_bunker_feature.shtml https://theculturetrip.com/africa/south-africa/articles/a-lost-african-city-has-just-been-discovered-by-scientists/ https://www.historicmysteries.com/derinkuyu-underground-city-cappadocia/

Dave Lukas, The Misfit Entrepreneur_Breakthrough Entrepreneurship
275: Lessons for Hannah - Knowing Your Rights

Dave Lukas, The Misfit Entrepreneur_Breakthrough Entrepreneurship

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 19:26


Hello Misfit Nation! Welcome to another edition of "Lessons for Hannah!" Many years ago, I introduced a new format that alongside our regular episodes called “Lessons for Hannah.” Hannah is my daughter and one of the main inspirations for the Misfit Entrepreneur. I wanted to have a place where she could go and learn from her daddy and his Misfit friends throughout her life….even after I am gone. If you haven't listened to the first episode of "Lessons for Hannah," I urge you to as it gives some more background and tells the amazing story of how Hannah came to be in our lives. Lessons for Hannah are short, very useful, and sometimes comical lessons, that I want to share with you and give to Hannah to help in your lives. Because I want Hannah to have these for her life, I'm going to speak as though I am talking directly to her. These episodes are a lot of fun and if you think there is a lesson that we should include in these episodes, please don't hesitate to send it over to us at support@misfitentrepreneur.com. We'd love to share it. This Weeks' Lesson for Hannah Hannah, Hannah, this lesson is a little more academic, but very important. I want to talk to you about your rights as a citizen of the United States. Most people will never read the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution Including the Bill of Rights during their life – or at least only read some of it. I believe that everyone should study these documents throughout their lives. I know, I know. They were written by people 200+ years ago, so how could they make sense today, right? Well, if you study history, especially that of the human species, you'd find that there are some things that don't really change about us over time. Things like craving power and control or dominating over others never really change. And neither do things like wanting the best for yourself and your family or striving to better your life. And don't forget the urge to be free. These tendencies and many more have been around since beginning of man. And through time they have suppressed or taken away by kings, tyrants, dictators, and warlords to name a few. The last century alone saw this in Hitler, Stalin, Mussolini, Mao, Polpot, and countless others and it goes on around the world today. The genius of the founders is that they knew the tendencies of mankind and they knew that needed to create a way to put a “check” on them so that future generations could truly have a chance to prosper and reach their full potential. That is what they did with the Declaration, Constitution and Bill of Rights. First and foremost, the Declaration of Independence may be the best “break up letter” of all time. It starts out by stating When in the Course of human events, it becomes necessary for one people to dissolve the political bands which have connected them with another, and to assume among the powers of the earth, the separate and equal station to which the Laws of Nature and of Nature's God entitle them, a decent respect to the opinions of mankind requires that they should declare the causes which impel them to the separation. Basically, this says that it is necessary for them to break up with England and to provide for themselves in the way God intended with the rights that are God given. But, out of respect they should state the reasons why they are breaking up. It then goes on to say what the founders believe should be evident to everyone and that is that “We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness. That to secure these rights, Governments are instituted among Men, deriving their just powers from the consent of the governed, --That whenever any Form of Government becomes destructive of these ends, it is the Right of the People to alter or to abolish it, and to institute new Government, laying its foundation on such principles and organizing its powers in such form, as to them shall seem most likely to affect their Safety and Happiness. Prudence, indeed, will dictate that Governments long established should not be changed for light and transient causes; and accordingly, all experience hath shewn, that mankind are more disposed to suffer, while evils are sufferable, than to right themselves by abolishing the forms to which they are accustomed. But when a long train of abuses and usurpations, pursuing invariably the same Object evinces a design to reduce them under absolute Despotism, it is their right, it is their duty, to throw off such Government, and to provide new Guards for their future security.--Such has been the patient sufferance of these Colonies; and such is now the necessity which constrains them to alter their former Systems of Government. The history of the present King of Great Britain is a history of repeated injuries and usurpations, all having in direct object the establishment of an absolute Tyranny over these States. To prove this, let Facts be submitted to a candid world. The founders were saying that we have the right from God to life, liberty (freedom), and to pursue our happiness and that governments should secure these rights for the citizens to do so. But, when the government doesn't secure these rights and the becomes destructive or outright hostile to them, then the people have the ability to change or get rid of the government so as to put one in that does. But, they go on to say that this should not be done lightly and if possible, it is better to suffer through things than to go this route. And they end with stating that there comes a point where suffering can no longer be tolerated, and it is time to end the King's rule. They then go in the rest of the document to list all of the things the King has done to them to cause this happen. Now fast forward a decade or so and the colonies have won the war of Independence and have tried one way of governing that didn't work, so they have come together to create the United States and form a constitution for governing. The Constitution is an amazing document in that in just a short few pages, it lays out everything needed to govern our country. Contrast that with congress nowadays who passes most bills that are in the thousands of pages. The Constitution is the “check” on the tendencies of mankind that I mentioned before and may be the greatest one ever. But, even when they were done with it, the founders felt it didn't have everything it needed, so they came up with the first set of amendments to the constitution just to make sure. Remember, they had just fought for independence and were very wary of giving government any major power at all. They were smart. They created the first 10 Amendments which are as follows: Amendment I Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances. This one, most have heard and allows for freedom of religion and the press as well as the t people peaceable assemble and petition the govern for changes based on the grievances they have with it. It does not mean burning down cities, looting and beating other people in the streets, or cancelling someone because you don't like what they say or stand for or aren't getting your way. Amendment II A well regulated Militia, being necessary to the security of a free State, the right of the people to keep and bear Arms, shall not be infringed. This gives the right for people to own guns and be armed and states that it shall not infringed which means it shall not be tampered with any way. You'll notice this amendment is the only place that word is used. Another thing that is important to note that in all the instances where dictators took over and/or took control of society in the past century, they did everything they could to abolish the ability for the citizens to own guns in their countries. All of those dictators and tyrants I mentioned earlier did this on their way to slaughtering their citizens by the millions. It is another check on the tendency of mankind. Amendment III No Soldier shall, in time of peace be quartered in any house, without the consent of the Owner, nor in time of war, but in a manner to be prescribed by law. This is an interesting one today because we don't put soldiers in homes, but there is debate on what is considered a soldier in today's world. If the government is watching you in your home through your internet searches or phones calls and is using the military to do so, aren't they essentially camped in your home? I think this debate will rage on. Amendment IV The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated, and no Warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by Oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized. This goes with the last one in that the government is not allowed to “Search” without probably cause with a warrant that defines what they are searching for and why. Again, there is major debate about the government's ability to search what you are doing through your devices and a host of other mediums without a warrant – especially under the Patriot Act. There are cases in court all the time around this. Amendment V No person shall be held to answer for a capital, or otherwise infamous crime, unless on a presentment or indictment of a Grand Jury, except in cases arising in the land or naval forces, or in the Militia, when in actual service in time of War or public danger; nor shall any person be subject for the same offence to be twice put in jeopardy of life or limb; nor shall be compelled in any criminal case to be a witness against himself, nor be deprived of life, liberty, or property, without due process of law; nor shall private property be taken for public use, without just compensation. This states that someone cannot be tried again for the same crime if found not guilty of it. Additionally, it states that you cannot be compelled to incriminate yourself. This what is happening when you hear someone say they won't answer and “plead the 5th.” It also states that any property taken by the government or law enforcement can only be done with giving just compensation. There are a lot of lawsuits that happen around that every year. Amendment VI In all criminal prosecutions, the accused shall enjoy the right to a speedy and public trial, by an impartial jury of the State and district wherein the crime shall have been committed, which district shall have been previously ascertained by law, and to be informed of the nature and cause of the accusation; to be confronted with the witnesses against him; to have compulsory process for obtaining witnesses in his favor, and to have the Assistance of Counsel for his defence. This amendment states that you have a right to trial when accused of a crime and that shall be with an impartial court and jury as well as give you the right to confront those accusing you. This is critical to having a solid justice system. Amendment VII In Suits at common law, where the value in controversy shall exceed twenty dollars, the right of trial by jury shall be preserved, and no fact tried by a jury, shall be otherwise re-examined in any Court of the United States, than according to the rules of the common law. This just sets the value for going to court in common law cases and having a jury. Amendment VIII Excessive bail shall not be required, nor excessive fines imposed, nor cruel and unusual punishments inflicted. This makes sure that the courts can't hold you by imposing a bail sum so high no one could pay it. It also doesn't allow excessive fines or cruel and unusual punishment. A lot of lawsuits are files around this on each year as well. Amendment IX The enumeration in the Constitution, of certain rights, shall not be construed to deny or disparage others retained by the people. This is a big one as it states that the just because they aren't in the constitution, there are other rights that people have, and they are retained by them. Amendment X The powers not delegated to the United States by the Constitution, nor prohibited by it to the States, are reserved to the States respectively, or to the people. The 10th amendment is very important in that it basically says that the powers not stated in the constitution to the Federal Government or prohibited from the states, are given to the states, effectively the people because they make up the states. In other words, the Federal Government can only have the powers in these documents and the states have the all the rest. That was the point of the US. To keep the Federal Government small and let the states govern themselves the way their people wanted to govern. The states were little laboratories of Democracy and Republicanism and if a state did something their citizens didn't like, they could change or move to another state doing the things they liked. It was never intended to have an overarching Federal Government in control of the states and in some ways instituted in some aspect or another of people's every day lives. Along the way, the US drifted from it and that is conversation for another day. But knowing your Declaration, Constitution, and Bill of Rights will help you clearly see where they are being violated and where you can help to get thing back on track as a citizen. The United States became the greatest country ever created because of these simple documents and principles and the more we understand them, even in our world today so many years later, the better our country will be and continue to be the greatest place for everyone on earth to come and pursue their happiness. Hannah, I hope you read these documents and reflect on them often as you go through life to uphold them and teach them to others. I love you, Daddy   Best Quote: The genius of the founders is that they knew the tendencies of mankind and they knew that needed to create a way to put a “check” on them so that future generations could truly have a chance to prosper and reach their full potential.   Misfit 3: Most people will never read the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution Including the Bill of Rights during their life – or at least only read some of it. I believe that everyone should study these documents throughout their lives. The Declaration of Independence may be the best “break up letter” of all time. Basically, this says that it is necessary for them to break up with England and to provide for themselves in the way God intended with the rights that are God given. But, out of respect they should state the reasons why they are breaking up. The United States became the greatest country ever created because of these simple documents and principles and the more we understand them, even in our world today so many years later, the better our country will be and continue to be the greatest place for everyone on earth to come and pursue their happiness.   HeyLaika Go to www.HeyLaika.com/misfit (lower case) to get 20% off! Five Minute Journal www.MisfitEntrepreneur.com/Journal

Shakespeare and Company
Armando Iannucci on Pandemonium

Shakespeare and Company

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 36:56


This week Adam Biles is joined by comedy-legend Armando Iannucci to discuss Pandemonium, his riotously funny, but also deeply affecting mock-epic about the mistakes made and palms-greased during the British government's handling of the pandemic. Buy Pandemonium here: https://shakespeareandcompany.com/I/9781408715086/pandemonium-some-verses-on-the-current-predicament Browse our online store here: https://shakespeareandcompany.com/15/online-store/16/bookstore Become a Friend of S&Co here: https:/.friendsofshakespeareandcompany.com * Tell, Mighty Wit, how the highest in forethought and, That tremendous plus, The Science, Saw off our panic and Globed vexation Until a drape of calmness furled around the earth And beckoned a new and greater normal into each life For which we give plenty gratitude and pay Willingly for the vict'ry triumph Merited by these wisest gods. Pandemonium is an epic mock-heroic poem, written in response to the pandemic with all the anger and wit that Armando Iannucci brings to his vision of contemporary events. It tells the story of how Orbis Rex, Young Matt and his Circle of Friends, Queen Dido and the blind Dom'nic did battle with 'a wet and withered bat' from Wuhan. * Armando Iannucci is a writer and broadcaster who has written, directed and produced numerous critically acclaimed films, television and radio comedy shows. His screenplay for the film 'In The Loop' was nominated for an Oscar at the Academy Awards. His iconic series for the BBC – 'The Thick of It' – was nominated for 13 BAFTA Awards, winning 5 during its four series run. Among his own award-winning shows, he is also the co-creator and writer of the popular Steve Coogan character Alan Partridge. Armando's HBO comedy 'Veep' has picked up numerous awards, including four Emmys for Outstanding Comedy Series over the last four years. His film adaptation of Charles Dickens' 'The Personal History of David Copperfield' was released in January 2020, which that year won Best Screenplay at BIFA, was also nominated for a Golden Globe and won a 'Seal of Distinction' from the US Critics' Choice Association. In 2017 he published 'Hear Me Out', a new book on classical music, and released the feature film 'The Death of Stalin', which was nominated for 2 BAFTAs and won Best Comedy at the European Film Awards.
His latest HBO series, 'Avenue 5', which stars Hugh Laurie and Josh Gad, aired on SKY in January 2020, and is currently in production for the second series. Adam Biles is Literary Director at Shakespeare and Company. Buy a signed copy of his novel FEEDING TIME here: https://shakespeareandcompany.com/S/9781910296684/feeding-time Listen to Alex Freiman's Play It Gentle here: https://open.spotify.com/album/4gfkDcG32HYlXnBqI0xgQX?si=mf0Vw-kuRS-ai15aL9kLNA&dl_branch=1

Jouissance Vampires
Trotskyism Today with Ian Parker

Jouissance Vampires

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 100:23


Marxist theorist, literary critic, military leader and exiled opponent of Stalin, Leon Trotsky is one of the most important figures of 20th century Marxism. But how are Trotsky's ideas being lived out today by revolutionary socialists? To help us understand Trotskyism, its history and legacy today we are joined by Ian Parker, Lacanian psychoanalyst and revolutionary socialist. He has written over 25 books to his name and he works in the fields of critical psychology, Marxist psychology, and psychoanalytic theory.  Parker is a fellow of the British psychological society, Emeritus Professor at the University of Leicester, and the managing editor of the Annual Review of Critical Psychology. Parker is also a practicing psychoanalyst analyst. For those interested, you can see Ian Parker and his co-author David Pavón-Cuellár this Friday November 12th at 2 pm EST for a conference hosted by Study Groups on Psychoanalysis and Politics centered around their new work, Revolution: Critical Psychology for Liberation movements. Join us with speakers Isabel Millar, Gabriel Tupinambá and Nadia Bou Ali to discuss this work at 2 pm this coming Friday November 12th - RSVP (on Zoom): https://psychoanalysis-revolution.eventbrite.com In this episode, we discuss history of Trotskyism and its main ideas and how Trotsky's ideas can help us address creeping fascism and build and world that has gone beyond capitalism.  Chip in $5 - $10 to support us and help keep us going: https://t.co/hBNOnpQKnp?amp=1

Les Cours du Collège de France
Épisode 12 : La crise turque et les débuts de la guerre froide

Les Cours du Collège de France

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 58:45


durée : 00:58:45 - Les Cours du Collège de France - par : Merryl Moneghetti - Comment les Américains ont-ils acquis la conviction que l'URSS de Staline voulait satelliser la Turquie pour étendre son influence au Moyen-Orient? Henry Laurens analyse de quelle façon la Guerre Froide, "affrontement mondialisé" entre les Etats-Unis et l'URSS, a pu naître de la crise turque. - invités : Henry Laurens Professeur au Collège de France, titulaire de la chaire d'Histoire contemporaine du monde arabe.

Risktory: The Story of Risk
How they did it... Operation Varsity Blues

Risktory: The Story of Risk

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 14:24


Coming up on this week's episode, the story of Operation Varsity Blues. An FBI investigation into a criminal conspiracy to influence undergraduate admissions at American colleges. It is estimated that more than $25 million exchanged hands between thirty three parents – including actors Lori Laughlin and Felicity Huffman – and William Singer, a College Adminissions Coach.You have often heard me speak about risk being agnostic. That some of history's biggest monsters – Adolf Hitler, Che Guevara, Josef Stalin – they were all superb risk practitioners. But they used our discipline for the most evil of purposes. Operation Varsity Blues is a great example of the opportunity side of the risk coin, being used for malevolent intent. To gain privilege at the expense of others. On this week's episode of the Risktory Podcast, I look at how the wealthy and powerful used risk, to grasp what was not theirs to have.The Risktory Podcast is created, written, hosted and produced by Jacinthe A Galpin.All rights reserved.Bibligraphyhttps://www.monstersandcritics.com/movies/rick-singer-update-where-is-he-now-and-what-was-the-key-on-operation-varsity-blues/https://www.yahoo.com/entertainment/operation-varsity-blues-detailed-timeline-192801210.htmlhttps://themilsource.com/2020/05/24/who-is-william-singer/https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2019_college_admissions_bribery_scandal

No Pasa Nada
Episodio 110: Recomendaciones para ver el 7 de noviembre (día que muere la democracia)

No Pasa Nada

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 6, 2021 62:13


Episodio 110 del podcast No Pasa Nada: Recomendaciones para ver el 7 de noviembre (día que muere la democracia) En este episodio, hablamos de: Marvel se monta en el tren de lo políticamente correcto con “The Eternals”...y se descarrila. “Last Night in Soho”: Edgar Wright se introduce en el horror, adaptándolo a la era del #MeToo. “Niña Furia”: la Rebelión de Abril y el exilio llegan al mundo vía HBO Max, por una serie creada por talento nicaragüense. El servicio de streaming para cinéfilos MUBI.COM ofrece una retrospectiva de los documentales históricos de Sergei Loznitsa, para entender mejor a Rusia, el nuevo viejo amigo del Comandante. “La Muerte de Stalin”: la comedia que te muestra lo que pasa cuando los dictadores “pasan a la inmortalidad”. “The French Dispatch”: la nueva película de Wes Anderson trae varias historias y viejos amigos. Acción mutante: el horror folklórico de “Lamb”. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/no-pasa-nada/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/no-pasa-nada/support

Profiles In Eccentricity
The Most Formidable Spy In History: Richard Sorge

Profiles In Eccentricity

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 167:04


This week Johnboy shares the story of "Stalin's James Bond" the heavy drinking, womanizing Soviet spy who's intelligence work may have changed the outcome of the second world war and is considered by many the greatest spy who ever lived! Plus a 1980s strip club owner is murdered in the OC! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Worthy House
Stalin's War: A New History of World War II (Sean McMeekin)

The Worthy House

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 29:27


Sean McMeekin's Stalin-centric history of World War II, in which Stalin is very bad, but the real villain is Franklin Roosevelt and the philo-Communists (and actual Communists) who surrounded him. With, as always, lessons for today. The written version of this review can be found here. We strongly encourage, in these days of censorship and deplatforming, all readers to bookmark our main site (https://www.theworthyhouse.com). You can also subscribe for email notifications. The Worthy House does not solicit donations or other support, or have ads. 

Büchermarkt - Deutschlandfunk
Olga Gromowa "Zuckerkind" - Eine Kindheit unter Stalin

Büchermarkt - Deutschlandfunk

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 5:37


Russland 1936: In Olga Gromowas Roman "Zuckerkind" erzählt die russische Journalistin die Geschichte der kleinen Stella, die mit ihrer Mutter nach Kirgisien verbannt wird. Der Vater wurde unter Stalins Regime als Volksfeind verhaftet. Es ist eine wahre und exemplarische Geschichte aus dunkler Zeit. Von Claudia Kramatschek www.deutschlandfunk.de, Büchermarkt Hören bis: 19.01.2038 04:14 Direkter Link zur Audiodatei

Supernatural with Ashley Flowers
MYSTICAL: Wolf Messing

Supernatural with Ashley Flowers

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 33:17


Born in Poland in 1899, Wolf Messing could reportedly read minds, control people's thoughts, and tell the future. But he wasn't any ordinary psychic. When he met Joseph Stalin in 1940, his powers might've become weapons of war. To view this episode's full list of sources, please visit parcast.com/supernatural Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

The Daily Gardener
November 2, 2021 Happier with Horticulture, Carnegie Cactus, Daniil Andreyev, Potpourri, Tom Perrotta, The Art of the Islamic Garden by Emma Clark, and 1975 Book Recommendations

The Daily Gardener

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 36:51


Today in botanical history, we celebrate the botanical name of the Saguaro Cactus, a Russian writer and mystic, and November potpourri. We'll hear an excerpt from Tom Perrotta's best-selling 2011 book. We Grow That Garden Library™ with a book that celebrates the Islamic Garden. And then we'll wrap things up with some hip Book Recommendations from 1975.   Subscribe Apple | Google | Spotify | Stitcher | iHeart To listen to the show while you're at home, just ask Alexa or Google to “Play the latest episode of The Daily Gardener Podcast.” And she will. It's just that easy.   The Daily Gardener Friday Newsletter Sign up for the FREE Friday Newsletter featuring: A personal update from me Garden-related items for your calendar The Grow That Garden Library™ featured books for the week Gardener gift ideas Garden-inspired recipes Exclusive updates regarding the show Plus, each week, one lucky subscriber wins a book from the Grow That Garden Library™ bookshelf.   Gardener Greetings Send your garden pics, stories, birthday wishes, and so forth to Jennifer@theDailyGardener.org   Facebook Group If you'd like to check out my curated news articles and original blog posts for yourself, you're in luck. I share all of it with the Listener Community in the Free Facebook Group - The Daily Gardener Community. So, there's no need to take notes or search for links. The next time you're on Facebook, search for Daily Gardener Community, where you'd search for a friend... and request to join. I'd love to meet you in the group.   Curated News Getting Happier with Horticulture: The Healthy Benefits of Gardening | gradynewsource.uga.edu | Gianna Perani   Important Events November 2, 1902 On this day, Nathaniel Britton, one of the founders of the New York Botanical Garden, wrote to the industrialist and philanthropist Andrew Carnegie asking for permission to name a genus of Giant Cactus native to Arizona and northern Mexico in his honor. Three days later, Mr. Carnegie's secretary responded:   “Mr. Carnegie has yours of November 2nd and asks me to say he is greatly honored by the proposal and will do his best to live up to it.”  And so, the majestic Saguaro ("suh-GWAR-oh") Cactus, the largest cactus in the United States and a plant synonymous with the American West, was christened the Carnegiea gigantea.   Saguaros can live for over two centuries. The Saguaro root system has one large tap root accompanied by a very intricate and shallow root system that lies within the top three inches of the soil. Any precious drops of rain are guided down to the ground beneath its mighty arms.  After thirty-five years of life, Saguaro's produce a white night-blooming flower that is bat-pollinated. Saguaros begin to develop their arms after reaching the age of fifty. The average Saguaro weighs three tons. The largest Saguaro ever recorded was called "Granddaddy." Granddaddy stood forty feet tall, had over 52 limbs, and was estimated to be three hundred years old.   November 2, 1906 Birth of Daniil Andreyev ("Da-NEEL An-drave"), Russian writer, poet, and mystic. He wrote a book called The Rose of the World over eight-and-a-half years as a prisoner in a Stalin prison camp. Daniil once wrote, "Perhaps the worst will never come to pass, and tyranny on such a scale will never recur. Perhaps humanity will forevermore retain the memory of  Russia's terrible historical experience. Every heart nurses that hope, and without it life would be unbearable." Daniil had uncanny powers of recall and memory. He was also a voracious reader and grew his personal library to over 2,000 books by the time he was arrested in 1947. Daniil suffered from a spinal defect and wore an iron corset while in prison to cope with the pain. Daniil began having mystic experiences as an adolescent. His first poem was called The Garden. In 1949, at the Vladimir high-security prison, Daniil started to have regular spiritual encounters and visions. And so he used those experiences to write Rose of the World at night. He had his final transcendent revelation in November of 1953 and then finished the book after his release from prison in 1957. And then, Daniil kept the book to himself - hiding it from the government in order to keep it from being destroyed. Daniil's Rose of the World remained hidden before finally getting published in 1991 under Gorbachev. The Rose of the World was an instant bestseller. Daniel H. Shubin wrote the latest English translation in 2018. Shubin writes that, “[Daniil] Envisioned the reign of rows of the world on Earth in the twenty-third century, the future Epoch being a golden age of humanity, whose essence will develop… into a close connection between God and people. It includes a society that consists of a worldwide ecclesiastical fraternity.” Daniil himself explained Rose of the World this way: Rose of the World can be compared to an inverted flower whose root is in heaven, while the petal bowl is here, among Humanity, on Earth. Its stem is the revelation through which the spiritual sap flows, sustaining and strengthening its petals... But other than the petals, it also has a pith; this is its individual teaching.   November 2, 1954 On this day, The Journal Herald (Dayton, Ohio) ran a little snippet on the wonder of Potpourri from the November garden. The November garden has her odors. In most instances, they are not so beguiling as those of spring and summer, yet they are far from displeasing.  There is the sharp, vinegary tang that rises from leaves, sodden and cold.  There is the odor of soil on which frost has laid whiteness; an odor, which seems different from that of earth newly turned in spring.  There is the pungence that rises from rotting apples and pears; and the heavy fragrance which issues from the chrysanthemum leaf and blossom.  Occasionally a flower remains whose breath is that of July. Even though the hand of chill has pressed heavily on the garden, the sweet alyssum has summer perfume. And a rose, spared, has a scent which speaks nostalgically of June.  But in the main, the odor of the November garden is distinctive, sharp, penetrating, and has something of that element of age, which cannot be associated with redolence but rather with a potpourri.   Unearthed Words She felt strong and blissfully empty, gliding through the crisp November air, enjoying the intermittent warmth of the sun as it filtered down through the overhanging trees, which were mostly stripped of their foliage. It was that trashy, post-Halloween part of the fall, yellow and orange leaves littering the ground. ― Tom Perrotta, The Leftovers   Grow That Garden Library The Art of the Islamic Garden by Emma Clark This book came out in 2011 - so an oldie, but goodie. (It's already ten years old.) And here's what Emma wrote at the beginning of this book: Even a glimmer of understanding of traditional Islamic art and architecture clearly reveals that its beauty is not simply surface decoration, but is a reflection of a deep knowledge and understanding of the natural order and of the divine unity that penetrates all of our lives. Studying Islamic art and architecture and completing a master's thesis on Islamic gardens and garden carpet at the Royal college of art opened my eyes to the meaning of art.  Understanding something of the religion of Islam in general and Islamic art in particular, it became clear that all art to a greater or lesser degree should be a vehicle of hope.  It should remind us what it means to be human of our place in the universe and our role as is said in Islam as God's vice-regent on earth. And then she writes, and bear in mind; this is 2011: In the increasingly difficult times in which we live, it is good to be reminded that gardens and nature, transcend nationality, race, religion, color, and ideology. The Islamic garden is not only for Muslims, it's beauty is apparent to  everyone.  In her book, Emma offers an introduction to the design, the symbolism, and the planting of the traditional Islamic garden. Emma also gives some practical tips if you're interested in creating an Islamic garden for yourself. Emma points out that we all have different starting points for our gardens. We have different garden sizes and situations (urban garden or a country garden), obviously different climates and soils, etc.  And so, she spends a couple of chapters offering up ideas for plants and trees and shrubs that you might want to consider incorporating into an Islamic-inspired garden. Now there is a pattern to Islamic gardens. They're often constructed around a central pool or fountain with four streams flowing symbolically to the earth's four corners. My favorite part of this book is exploring the symbolism behind Islamic art and gardens. And by the way, there is a magnificent chapter in this book that is all about the prince of Wales carpet garden. It's just spectacular. Now this book is out of print, and I predict that copies of this book will only get harder to get as time goes on. So if you have any interest, you should make sure that this one gets on your list. You can get a copy of The Art of the Islamic Garden by Emma Clark and support the show using the Amazon Link in today's Show Notes for around $26.   Today's Botanic Spark Reviving the little botanic spark in your heart November 2, 1975 On this day, The New York Times Around the Garden segment recommended some new garden books. Some bright newcomers have been added to the trowel‐watering can library. Here they are.  Masakuni Kawasumi spent three years in this country adapting his Japanese methods of bonsai growing to American species of trees. His “Bonsai With American Trees” ($10, Kodansha International) is the result, an excellent basic primer... Tapeworm plant, living stones bead vine, spiderweb, and polka dot are a few of the off‐beat plants described in “Fun With Growing Odd and Curious House Plants” Virginie and George Elbert ($8.95, Crown). The odd‐sized book, 6½ x 11 inches, gives brief biographies and how‐to‐grow tips for many unusual house plants, delightful changes from the tried‐and‐true. And while on the subject of fun, there is Jack Kramer's “How to Identify & Care for House Plants” ($8.95, Doubleday). The fun comes in matching line‐drawings and silhouettes to the author's organizational key. Though probably not meant to be a puzzle book, it is. ...a plant number 8‐1‐3 turns out to be none other than a cattleya orchid. Thalassa Cruso, television “lady of the trowel” has done it again. This time she is telling about “Making Vegetables Grow” ($8.95, Knopf), one of her best with chatty helpful tips on bringing the crop in abundantly.  Light gardens are booming, especially among those who have dark apartments and want some greenery indoors. “The Complete Book of Houseplants Under Lights” by Charles Marden Fitch ($9.95, Hawthorn) updates the hobby and is full of ideas.  Joining the series of “state” books on wildflowers by John E. Klimas Jr., is “A Pocket Guide to the Common Wild Flowers of New York” ($5.95, Walker). Compact tuck in a backpack, Descriptions are in everyday language, not botanist's twang. Environmental awareness has come full circle with “Organic Flower Gardening” by Catherine Osgood Foster ($12.95, Rodale Press). An organic gardener's book on raising flowers? Mrs. Foster explains why,  “One is for the sake of the bees, wasps and other beneficial insects and butterflies … another good reason is to protect the birds … the most important is that you avoid starting chain reactions in the environment from poisonous chemical sprays and dusts you might introduce.”  And for winter reading by the fireplace, here are a few:  “A Gardener Touched With Genius, The Life of Luther Burbank” by Peter Dreyer ($10, Coward, McCann & Geoghegan):  “The Best of American Gardening” by Ken and Pat Kraft ($10, Walker), a clip hook of garden tips gleaned from 100‐year‐old seed catalogues;  “The Plant Hunters” by B. J. Healey ($8.95, Scribners), a brief biography of discoverers of exotic species from the 17th century to the present. And for reference; “Ornamental Grasses” by Mary Hockenberry Meyer ($9.95, Scribners), an excellent well-illustrated guide to this unusual group of plants.  “The Personal Garden, Its Architecture and Design” by Bernard Wolgensinger and Jose Daidone ($30, Van Nostrand Reinhold), beautifully illustrated with design concepts from European, Western and Japanese gardens.  “Plant A Tree” by Michael A. Weiner ($15.95, Macmillan) subtitled, “A working guide to regreening America.”  Good reference book for city planners, libraries, and schools on tree planting and care, nationwide. Florida, Texas, and California where the avocado is grown commercially, the trees do not start flowering until six years old, or sooner if grafted. One rare exception was reported by Barbara Stimson, a gardener in Maine, who wrote in a recent Letters to the Editor, Flower and Garden, that her indoor avocado did flower, but no fruit, when it was about two years old and four feet high.   Thanks for listening to The Daily Gardener. And remember: "For a happy, healthy life, garden every day."

The John Batchelor Show
1814: When Stalin didn't show up for FDR; when Putin doesn't show up for Biden. H.J. Mackinder, International Relations.

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 13:15


Photo:   Police photograph of Ioseb Besarionis dzе Jughashvili (who became Stalin), taken in 1902, when he was 23 years old. . @Batchelorshow When Stalin didn't show up for FDR; when Putin doesn't show up for Biden. H.J. Mackinder, International Relations. #FriendsofHistoryDebatingSociety https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Casablanca_Conference

MyLife: Chassidus Applied
Ep. 377: What Can Couples Experiencing Difficulties Having Children Learn From Yitzchak and Rivkah?

MyLife: Chassidus Applied

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 78:40


Rabbi Jacobson will discuss the following topics: Chassidus applied to Rosh Chodesh Kislev What is the significance of this day and can we learn from it? What is the theme and energy of Kislev? How to grow through setbacks? What was the origin of the Kinus Hashluchim? Lessons from Toldos What can couples experiencing difficulties having children learn from Yitzchak and Rivkah? What do we learn from the battle of Esau and Yaakov in Rivkah's womb? Why did Yaakov have to dress up as Esau in order to steal the blessings? What justification is there for Yaakov to steal Esau's blessings? Why did only Rivkah, and not Yitzchak understand the status of Esau? Why couldn't Yitzchak correct himself and bless Esau with the brochos he mistakenly gave Yaakov? Why was Yitzchak not spared the pain of seeing Esau become a wicked person as Abraham was by having him pass away earlier? What was the yeshiva of Shem and Eiver? Ways to find a shidduch – follow-up Comments: The importance of asking questions Women in the Torah Why does the Torah rarely mention the girls in the families? How should I respond to someone who criticizes the Torah for being a patriarchal system that keeps men in power? Why don't women wear a yarmulke? Chassidus question: Based on the rule that the highest levels fall to the lowest ones, 1) why did Rivkah and Yaakov give up on Esau and not let him receive the blessings in the hope he would do teshuva? 2) Does this rule apply to the monsters in history as well, like Stalin?

Today In History
Today In History - Stalin's body removed from Lenin's tomb

Today In History

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2021


https://www.history.com/this-day-in-history/stalins-body-removed-from-lenins-tombSupport the show on Patreon

Midlife Male by Greg Scheinman
Episode 166 - Stalin Colinet - Former NFL Player, Entrepreneur, & Cancer Survivor

Midlife Male by Greg Scheinman

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2021 77:03


Stalin Colinet was born and raised in the Bronx, and during his high school years, he excelled in football, basketball, and track. However, his heart was set on becoming a professional football player, and he accepted a scholarship to Boston College, where he became the captain of the football team. In 1997, Stalin signed with the Minnesota Vikings and went on to enjoy a 7-year career in the NFL. Today, Stalin is a software executive, a committed family man, and a born-again vegan who continues to apply the lessons he learned in his football career to his personal and professional life.

American Conservative University
Dinesh D'Souza. Kyle Rittenhouse Trial Update, FBI Jack Boots, January 6th Stalin Show Trials and Eric Metaxas' New Book- Is Atheism Dead?

American Conservative University

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 42:23


Dinesh D'Souza. Kyle Rittenhouse Trial Update, FBI Jack Boots, January 6th Stalin Show Trials and Eric Metaxas' New Book- Is Atheism Dead? A CASE OF SELF DEFENSE? Dinesh D'Souza Podcast Ep206 https://youtu.be/ZeS2DNegTgI Oct 28, 2021 Dinesh D'Souza 629K subscribers In this episode, Dinesh reviews the lead-up to the Kyle Rittenhouse trial, which does not seem to be off to a good start for the prosecution.  In what Dinesh considers a move worthy of the Stalin show trials, an Obama judge rewards a January 6 defendant for publicly repenting for his previous support for Trump. Dinesh examines the full scope of Trump's new platform and makes the case for signing up now on all the alternative free speech platforms. Author Eric Metaxas joins Dinesh for a lively discussion of his new book, "Is Atheism Dead?" — Dinesh D'Souza is an author and filmmaker. A graduate of Dartmouth College, he was a senior domestic policy analyst in the Reagan administration. He also served as a research fellow at the American Enterprise Institute and the Hoover Institution at Stanford University. He is the author of many bestselling books, including "Illiberal Education," "What's So Great About Christianity," "America: Imagine a World Without Her," "The Roots of Obama's Rage," "Death of a Nation," and "United States of Socialism." His documentary films "2016: Obama's America," "America," "Hillary's America," "Death of a Nation," and "Trump Card" are among the highest-grossing political documentaries of all time. He and his wife Debbie are also executive producers of the acclaimed feature film "Infidel." — Want to connect with Dinesh D'Souza online for more hard-hitting analysis of current events in America? Here's how: Get Dinesh unfiltered, uncensored and unchained on Locals: https://dinesh.locals.com/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/dsouzadinesh Twitter: https://twitter.com/dineshdsouza Rumble: https://rumble.com/dineshdsouza Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/dineshjdsouza Parler: https://parler.com/user/DineshDSouza GETTR: https://gettr.com/user/dineshdsouza Email: https://dineshdsouza.com/contact-us/ We would like to thank our advertisers for Today's podcast: http://www.mypillow.com​ http://www.birchgold.com​ https://www.expressvpn.com/dinesh https://www.relieffactor.com https://reliefband.com https://genesis950.com Send your audio or video questions at QuestionDinesh@gmail.com Please make them around 30 seconds so we can use it on the podcast! Books mentioned in podcast: https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/is-a... Help our friend Terrence Williams make his dream come true! Go to www.cousints.com and order some great gourmet pancakes! Trump Card DVD: http://salemnowstore.com/ Our movie Infidel https://www.infidel911.com Watch Danielle D'Souza Gill Counter Culture Show -click below: https://www.theepochtimes.com/anti-am... Articles: Debbie's articles in El American https://elamerican.com/author/debbie-... Latest : https://elamerican.com/crossing-over-... Movies https://www.trumpcardthemovie.com https://www.infidel911.com https://salemnow.com/no-safe-spaces/ Promo code DINESH FOR NO SAFE SPACES MOVIE ON SALEMNOW.COM https://watch.salemnow.com/products/w... https://watch.salemnow.com/products/c... PROMO Code Dinesh Songs Debbie D'Souza sings America The Beautiful music video https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t03R3... Trump Card Original Soundtrack available on iTunes Danielle D'Souza Gill books The Choice: The Abortion Divide in America – Danielle D'Souza Gill https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/the-... More of Dinesh D'Souza Books: https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/what... https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/the-... https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/amer... https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/unit... https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/deat... https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/the-... https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/rona...

American Conservative University
Dinesh D'Souza. Kyle Rittenhouse Trial Update, FBI Jack Boots, January 6th Stalin Show Trials and Eric Metaxas' New Book- Is Atheism Dead?

American Conservative University

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 42:23


Dinesh D'Souza. Kyle Rittenhouse Trial Update, FBI Jack Boots, January 6th Stalin Show Trials and Eric Metaxas' New Book- Is Atheism Dead? A CASE OF SELF DEFENSE? Dinesh D'Souza Podcast Ep206 https://youtu.be/ZeS2DNegTgI Oct 28, 2021 Dinesh D'Souza 629K subscribers In this episode, Dinesh reviews the lead-up to the Kyle Rittenhouse trial, which does not seem to be off to a good start for the prosecution.  In what Dinesh considers a move worthy of the Stalin show trials, an Obama judge rewards a January 6 defendant for publicly repenting for his previous support for Trump. Dinesh examines the full scope of Trump's new platform and makes the case for signing up now on all the alternative free speech platforms. Author Eric Metaxas joins Dinesh for a lively discussion of his new book, "Is Atheism Dead?" — Dinesh D'Souza is an author and filmmaker. A graduate of Dartmouth College, he was a senior domestic policy analyst in the Reagan administration. He also served as a research fellow at the American Enterprise Institute and the Hoover Institution at Stanford University. He is the author of many bestselling books, including "Illiberal Education," "What's So Great About Christianity," "America: Imagine a World Without Her," "The Roots of Obama's Rage," "Death of a Nation," and "United States of Socialism." His documentary films "2016: Obama's America," "America," "Hillary's America," "Death of a Nation," and "Trump Card" are among the highest-grossing political documentaries of all time. He and his wife Debbie are also executive producers of the acclaimed feature film "Infidel." — Want to connect with Dinesh D'Souza online for more hard-hitting analysis of current events in America? Here's how: Get Dinesh unfiltered, uncensored and unchained on Locals: https://dinesh.locals.com/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/dsouzadinesh Twitter: https://twitter.com/dineshdsouza Rumble: https://rumble.com/dineshdsouza Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/dineshjdsouza Parler: https://parler.com/user/DineshDSouza GETTR: https://gettr.com/user/dineshdsouza Email: https://dineshdsouza.com/contact-us/ We would like to thank our advertisers for Today's podcast: http://www.mypillow.com​ http://www.birchgold.com​ https://www.expressvpn.com/dinesh https://www.relieffactor.com https://reliefband.com https://genesis950.com Send your audio or video questions at QuestionDinesh@gmail.com Please make them around 30 seconds so we can use it on the podcast! Books mentioned in podcast: https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/is-a... Help our friend Terrence Williams make his dream come true! Go to www.cousints.com and order some great gourmet pancakes! Trump Card DVD: http://salemnowstore.com/ Our movie Infidel https://www.infidel911.com Watch Danielle D'Souza Gill Counter Culture Show -click below: https://www.theepochtimes.com/anti-am... Articles: Debbie's articles in El American https://elamerican.com/author/debbie-... Latest : https://elamerican.com/crossing-over-... Movies https://www.trumpcardthemovie.com https://www.infidel911.com https://salemnow.com/no-safe-spaces/ Promo code DINESH FOR NO SAFE SPACES MOVIE ON SALEMNOW.COM https://watch.salemnow.com/products/w... https://watch.salemnow.com/products/c... PROMO Code Dinesh Songs Debbie D'Souza sings America The Beautiful music video https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t03R3... Trump Card Original Soundtrack available on iTunes Danielle D'Souza Gill books The Choice: The Abortion Divide in America – Danielle D'Souza Gill https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/the-... More of Dinesh D'Souza Books: https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/what... https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/the-... https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/amer... https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/unit... https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/deat... https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/the-... https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/rona...

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast
A CASE OF SELF DEFENSE?

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 56:32


In this episode, Dinesh reviews the lead-up to the Kyle Rittenhouse trial, which does not seem to be off to a good start for the prosecution.  In what Dinesh considers a move worthy of the Stalin show trials, an Obama judge rewards a January 6 defendant for publicly repenting for his previous support for Trump. Dinesh examines the full scope of Trump's new platform and makes the case for signing up now on all the alternative free speech platforms. Author Eric Metaxas joins Dinesh for a lively discussion of his new book, "Is Atheism Dead?" See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Unleashed the Jeremy Hanson show
Bombshell report Elitists using Stalin Communist plan from cannibal island to implement global communism!

Unleashed the Jeremy Hanson show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 50:49


Unleashed Jeremy Hanson 10/27/21 Todays show we talk about the chilling similarities between Stalins implementation of communism using passports and visas with what the elitists in America are doing. We talk about the roadmap used to rid Russia of what they considered political dissidents and socially harmful citizens. We also discuss the implementation of his policies here in America to push for the societal change the global elite want!!

Freedom Seeds
Mao Zedong is the REAL Communist Killer!

Freedom Seeds

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 1:25


Joseph Stalin's tyrannical rule doesn't come close to the horrors of Mao Zedong!

History Extra podcast
How a ballerina survived the Gulag

History Extra podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 52:55


Christina Ezrahi speaks to Elinor Evans about the story of Nina Anisimova, one of the most famous ballerinas in Stalin's Soviet Union. After being arrested for supposed counter-revolutionary activity, Anisimova was transported to a forced labour camp, only to make a remarkable return to the stage. (Ad) Christina Ezrahi is the author of Dancing for Stalin: A Dancer's Story of Courage and Survival in Soviet Russia (Elliott & Thompson Ltd, 2021). Buy it now from Amazon:https://www.amazon.co.uk/Dancing-Stalin-Dancers-Courage-Survival/dp/1783965576#:~:text=Dancing%20for%20Stalin%20is%20a,of%20courage%2C%20resilience%20and%20triumph.&text=of%20Bolshoi%20Confidential-,Nina%20Anisimova%20was%20one%20of%20Russia's%20most%20renowned%20ballerinas%20and,career%20concealed%20a%20dark%20secret./?tag=bbchistory045-21&ascsubtag=historyextra-social-viewingguide See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The John Batchelor Show
1786: Canceling the Rolling Stones with Soviet Socialist Realism, 2021. @ThadMcCotter HFN

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2021 13:19


Photo: No known restrictions on publication. @Batchelorshow Canceling the Rolling Stones with Soviet Socialist Realism, 2021.  @ThadMcCotter HFN https://porteakademik.itu.edu.tr/docs/librariesprovider181/Yayın-Arşivi/17.sayı/porte-akademik-17-7.pdf Following the meetings, a humiliating public apology was published, bearing the signatures of the accused composers. Composers stated that they were “tremendously grateful” to the Central Committee and Comrade Stalin for the “severe but profoundly just criticism of the present state of Soviet music” (Slonimsky, 1994: 1065). In this letter, the composers acknowledged that they moved away from socialist realism and confirmed that they would use their artistic mastery to reflect the lives and struggles of the Soviet people: Not for the snobs should sound our music, but for our whole great people... We shall give all our strength to the new and unparalleled great flowering of Soviet musical art... We give to you and to the whole Soviet people a sworn pledge that we shall direct our work along the path  of socialist realism, tirelessly laboring to create, in all musical forms, models worthy of our great epoch, striving to make our music beloved by the whole great Soviet people, so that the great ideas that inspire our nation in its universally historic deeds of valor shall find living and vivid expression in our art... Long live our leader and teacher, father of the nation, great Stalin! (Slonimsky, 1994: 1066).

History Unplugged Podcast
Winston Churchill: Political Master, Military Commander

History Unplugged Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 51:40


From his earliest days Winston Churchill was an extreme risk taker and he carried this into adulthood. Today he is widely hailed as Britain's greatest wartime leader and politician. Deep down though, he was foremost a warlord. Just like his ally Stalin, and his arch enemies Hitler and Mussolini, Churchill could not help himself and insisted on personally directing the strategic conduct of World War II. For better or worse he insisted on being political master and military commander. Again like his wartime contemporaries, he had a habit of not heeding the advice of his generals. The results of this were disasters in Norway, North Africa, Greece, and Crete during 1940–41. His fruitless Dodecanese campaign in 1943 also ended in defeat. Churchill's pig-headedness over supporting the Italian campaign in defiance of the Riviera landings culminated in him threatening to resign and bring down the British Government. Yet on occasions he got it just right, his refusal to surrender in 1940, the British miracle at Dunkirk and victory in the Battle of Britain, showed that he was a much-needed decisive leader. Nor did he shy away from difficult decisions, such as the destruction of the French Fleet to prevent it falling into German hands and his subsequent war against Vichy France.To talk about these different aspects of his leadership is today's guest, Anthony Tucker-Jones, author of Winston Churchill: Master and commander. He explores the record of Winston Churchill as a military commander, assessing how the military experiences of his formative years shaped him for the difficult military decisions he took in office. He assesses his choices in the some of the most controversial and high-profile campaigns of World War II, and how in high office his decision making was both right and wrong.

Apocalist Book Club
Apocalist Book Club Ep. 36: The Strange Invaders by Alun Lywellyn

Apocalist Book Club

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 61:12


We're back in 1934 with THE STRANGE INVADERS by Alun Llewellyn! If you can here on the promise of dinosaurs, I regret to inform you, so did we. New t-shirt idea: I survived the Apocalypse and all I got was this lousy herd of big man-eating lizards. Come for Alun's dislike of Stalin's communism, stay for the sexiest of lamps.  Support us at https://www.patreon.com/nellachronism Follow the progress of the Apocalist here. Follow us on twitter @ApocalistC, Email us at ApocalistBookClub@gmail.com CREDITS: Art by Michael Vincent Bramley. Music by Robare Pruyn. Sound editing by Crutch Phrase Studio.

The Remnant with Jonah Goldberg
Mutually Assured Derangement

The Remnant with Jonah Goldberg

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 103:20


In light of the reaction to his call for anti-Trump conservatives to form a third party, Jonah invites Michael Brendan Dougherty onto The Remnant to discuss the potential benefits and drawbacks of such an approach. Things don't entirely go as planned, as their conversation swiftly moves beyond that into the broader strangeness of contemporary politics and the conservative movement. With the American people increasingly defecting from the norms of constitutional government, what can be done to prevent our institutions from collapsing? Show Notes: - Michael's author page at National Review - My Father Left Me Ireland, Michael's recent book - Jonah's uncontroversial column - Michael's response - Charlie Cooke's response - Dan McLaughlin's response - The Wednesday G-File - Trump urges Republicans not to vote  - Bill Kristol: “What About Joe?” - The Remnant with George Will - Remember the Obamacons? - Yuval Levin on nationalism and exceptionalism - Stalin's War, by Sean McMeekin - Macron's plan to reindustrialize France - Ross Douthat: “How Conservatives Can Reshape Education” - Charlie Kirk at his worst - Joe Rogan debates Sanjay Gupta - The Merrick Garland letter - The National School Boards Association letter - The Daily Signal's bathroom story - The latest Dispatch Podcast - Norse mythology - David Harsanyi debates Sohrab Ahmari See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.