Podcasts about Egyptian

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  • 5,625PODCASTS
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  • Oct 19, 2021LATEST

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Best podcasts about Egyptian

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Latest podcast episodes about Egyptian

Freedom.
Freedom Fighters | P. Jason Lozano

Freedom.

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 48:28


Ex 3:7-10 (tlb) Then the Lord told him, “I have seen the deep sorrows of my people in Egypt and have heard their cries for freedom from their harsh taskmasters. 8 I have come to deliver them from the Egyptians and to take them out of Egypt into a good land, a large land, a land ‘flowing with Abundance 9 Yes, the cries of the people has risen to me in heaven, and I have seen how harshly the Egyptians abuse and oppress them. 10 Now I am sending you to Pharaoh, to demand that he let my people Go1. We Demand - God's A Mighty Warrior And Chain Breaker, So Are YouZep 3:17 (amp) The LORD God is in your midst, A Warrior who savesPS 24:10 The LORD strong and mighty, the LORD mighty in battle...Prov 24:11 Rescue those being led away to death, and restrain those stumbling toward the slaughter● Save – Rescue, to strip, plunder, be delivered, and snatch away Matt 11:12 The kingdom of heaven suffers violent assault, and violentmen seize it by force [as a precious prize]● Violent - A forceful, violent man; one who is eager in pursuitIs 49:25 (nlt) Even those taken away by the strong man will be taken from him. Those taken by the powerful ruler will be saved. For I will fight with the one who fights with you, and I will save your children. Ps 107:10,13-16 Some sat in darkness, in utter darkness, prisoners suffering in iron chains, 13 Then they cried to the Lord in their trouble, and he saved them . 14 He brought them out of darkness, the utter darkness, and broke away their chains. 15 Let them give thanks tothe Lord for his unfailing love and his wonderful deeds for mankind, 16 for he breaks down gates of bronze and cuts through bars of iron2. Jesus Always Sends You Back – Staying Broken And DependentEx 4:19 Go back to Egypt, all the men who wanted to kill you are deadPs 107:2 Has the LORD redeemed (saved) you? Then speak out! Tell others he has redeemed (Saved) you from your enemiesPs 66:16 Come and hear And I will tell of what He has done for my soul Ps 34:6 This poor man cried out, and the LORD heard him, and saved himout of all his troublesMk 5:19-20 “Go home to your own people and tell them how much the Lord has done for you, and how he has had mercy on you.” 20 So the man went away and began to proclaim throughout the Decapolis how much Jesus had done for him. And everyone was amazed3. Now More Than Ever We Must Boldly Proclaim This Gospel Of Freedom1 Cor 9:16 If I spread the Good News, I have nothing to brag about because I have an obligation to do this. How horrible it will be for me if I don't spread the Good NewsLk 9:62 No man, having put his hand to the plough, and looking back, is fit for the kingdom of GodProv 24:10-12 (mess,lb) If you faint in a crisis, you are weak. Rescue the perishing; don't hesitate to step in and help. If you say, “Hey, that's none of my business,” will that get you off the hook? Someone is watching you closely, you know Someone not impressed with weak excusesActs 26:17-19 (nlt) I am sending you to open their eyes, so they may turn from darkness to light and from the power of Satan to God. Then they will receive forgiveness for their sins and be given an inheritance among God's people 19 And so, King Agrippa, I obeyed that vision from heavenEsther 4:14 For if you remain completely silent at this time, relief and deliverance will arise from another place, but you and your father's house will perish. Yet who knows whether you have come to the kingdom for such a time as this

The Morning Toast
175: All The Fall Tings: Tuesday, October 19th, 2021

The Morning Toast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 65:40


Lala Kent dumps Randall Emmett 3 years after engagement (Page Six) Beyonce and JAY-Z Cozy Up in Romantic Tiffany & Co. Ad Inspired by Breakfast at Tiffanys (PEOPLE) Kim Kardashian's Met Gala photo helped solve looted gold Egyptian coffin case (NY Post) Netflix's To All the Boys Franchise to Get Spinoff Series Titled XO, Kitty Starring Anna Cathcart (PEOPLE) Addison Rae to Star in Snapchat Show About Returning to Her Louisiana Roots (Variety) Dear Toasters Advice Segment The Morning Toast with Claudia (@girlwithnojob) and Jackie Oshry (@jackieoshry) Merch: https://shopmorningtoast.com/ The Morning Toast Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/themorningtoast Girl With No Job by Claudia Oshry: https://www.girlwithnojob.com/book

The Land of Israel Network
Rejuvenation: Does the Tanakh talk like an Egyptian?

The Land of Israel Network

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 68:37


Is an “outstretched arm” more than just a phrase? Bar Ilan University Professor of Tanakh Rabbi Dr. Joshua Berman joins Eve Harow to speak about his research into the Bible and it's Egyptian context and ‘cultural appropriation'. He's leading a trip to Egypt in January to see ancient carvings and texts that are familiar to us from our Bible study. The trip is wait listed and Eve is not giving up her room, but Rabbi Dr. Berman is available to give lectures and seminars on his fascinating work and its ramifications for Biblical understanding and criticism. Email Eve for more information.

Spicy PL Podcast
Spicy PL Podcast - Ahmed Hassanin

Spicy PL Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 64:48


The fellas are joined by Ahmed Hassanin, the Egyptian American super-heavyweight, who will be representing Egypt this year at IPF Open Worlds in Stavanger, Norway. Ahmed shares stories of beginning his lifting career in Egypt, his first IPF world championship with the newly formed Egyptian team, starting a new life in America, his weight loss journey and more. Ahmed trains out of Ogre Compound and has recently put up some massive numbers at USAPL Nationals where he squatted 485 kg. We're all excited to see him and Joe compete in Stavanger.    Send us questions at: www.bitly.com/spicypl   Sponsors: Quest Nutrition & Athletics www.quest-nutrition.com Use coupon code: SPICY2021 for 5% off Use coupon code: CAPP2021 for 10% off the Capp Stack   Instagram: @bigjoecapp @big_baval @ahmedhassaninn

Men In Blazers
Men in Blazers 10/18/21

Men In Blazers

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 74:09


Rog and Davo on the surreal scenes at Newcastle as they hosted Tottenham in front of their new Saudi Arabian owners. Plus, Mo Salah's ethereal Egyptian wonder goal (another one). And, Brodge's Hubris trumps Ole's Humility.

Planet FPL - The Fantasy Football Podcast
Son On The Tyne | Planet #FPL S. 5 Ep. 14

Planet FPL - The Fantasy Football Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 91:48


On the Planet FPL Gameweek 8 Review... Son gets covid but doesn't, many big name players fail to show and Mo Salah saves Gameweek scores again. So are we now in a position to consider perma capping The Egyptian every week? Or is Romelu Lukaku at home to Norwich to hard to ignore this coming weekend? Plus, the budget midfield option seemingly on everyone's mind, new emerging options, concerns grow for Leeds, Newcastle are still woeful, Mendy saves Chelsea, Suj is in a position of strength having rolled a transfer, a very hungover James finally gives up on his midfield flop and lots more.... ... Coming up on Tuesday, Ask James 3pm (UK) on YouTube with an audio version to follow around 5pm. ____________________________________________ Want to become a member of our FPL community? Join us on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/planetfpl Follow James on Twitter: https://twitter.com/PlanetFPLPod Follow Suj on Twitter: https://twitter.com/sujanshah Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/planetfpl Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/planetfpl Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC8043oOKTB4uP8Nq15Kz6bg

Sarah and Vinnie Full Show
October 15th, 2021 8am Alice News Network

Sarah and Vinnie Full Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 16:14


A woman is arrested for robbing homes that have been evacuated due to wildfires,  a half-shredded Banksy piece is auctioned for $25.4 million which is a record for the artist, a family in England decided to sell replicas of Egyptian artifacts but then found out they were real, and the self driving cars in San Francisco keep turning up in a random cul de sac!  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Hitting The Marks Podcast Network
Garden Of Doom: Vampires

Hitting The Marks Podcast Network

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2021 84:45


This week, we're joined by C the Superior who introduces us to the likely first piece of Vampire literature, We discuss books including Bram Stoker's classic, Bernard Lumpley, Anne Rice, Twilight, The Strain, and more. We also talk about movies including Blade, Underworld, the Lost Boys; TV shows from Buffy to True Blood to The Vampire Diaries. Of course, we explore connections to The Bible, Egyptian and African mythos. And more. Yes, really. Lots more.

Our Daily Bread Podcast | Our Daily Bread

As the French soldier dug in the desert sand, reinforcing the defenses of his army’s encampment, he had no idea he would make a momentous discovery. Moving another shovel-full of sand he saw a stone. Not just any stone. The Rosetta Stone, containing laws and governance from King Ptolemy V written in three languages. That stone (now housed in the British Museum) would be one of the most important archaeological finds of the nineteenth century, helping to unlock the mysteries of the ancient Egyptian writing known as hieroglyphics. For many of us, much of Scripture is also wrapped in deep mystery. Still, the night before the cross, Jesus promised His followers that He would send the Holy Spirit. He told them, “But when he, the Spirit of truth, comes, he will guide you into all the truth. He will not speak on his own; he will speak only what he hears, and he will tell you what is yet to come” (John 16:13). The Holy Spirit is, in a sense, our divine Rosetta Stone, shedding light on the truth—including truths behind the mysteries of the Bible. While we are not promised absolute understanding of everything given to us in the Scriptures, we can have confidence that, by the Spirit, we can comprehend everything necessary for us to follow Jesus. He will guide us into those vital truths.

Moments of The Heart
Episode 113: Avraham and YOU

Moments of The Heart

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2021 9:26


When Dorice reads stories from the Torah (the first five books of the bible), she always tries to glean messages that inspire her in my own life's journey and also help others with whom she is connected to benefit from centuries old wisdom. Even Avraham was not without saboteurs! Even HE, known for his ability to bring peace, had fears playing constantly in his head. “The Egyptian will kill me if they found out sarai is my wife.” “Where is my promised legacy..I am old with no children.” It happens to all of us. Our brains' priority is to protect us. And how does it do it? By keeping us reacting in ways that it knows…ways that is expected…But new way of thinking-- forget it! And so God himself presents his words to Avrahm ...."do not fear." Take this message and personalize it. Fear holds us back from trying somethings new, and sends us into cycle of judgments. Judging ourselves, judging others and judging the circumstances. It prevents us from allowing in joy, curiosity, love a seat at the table of our brains. Just think what is possible if fear did not stop you from something you desperately wish to do…and we are not talking about jumping from airplanes…we are talking about being paralyzed with fear to take the necessary steps to your own happiness. Since Dorice left her work as an education director, she has had her own fearful thoughts. No one can escape it. It takes practice to make our brains find new to-go thoughts… Dorice is inviting you to join her in this journey- The Journey of Positive Intelligence, gleaning tools and practices to handle life's challenges and fears in a positive rather than negative mindset? Are you in?

The Classic Tales Podcast
Ep. 754, The Knight of the Necropolis, Part 2 of 8, by Sax Rohmer

The Classic Tales Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 51:57


Why exactly does Antony Ferrara keep ancient brain-eating beetles? Sax Rohmer, today on The Classic Tales Podcast. Welcome to The Classic Tales Podcast. Thank you for listening. Thank you to all of our financial supporters. We couldn't do this without you, and we really appreciate your support. We've set it up so that for a five-dollar monthly donation, you get a monthly code for $8 off any audiobook order. Give more, and you get more! This way you can easily build out your classic audiobook library, and you help to give more folks like you the chance to discover the classics in a curated and easily accessible format. Go to http://classictalesaudiobooks.com today, and become a financial supporter. You'll be glad you did. Thank you so much. And if you can't support us financially right now, please rate and review us, so more folks can find us. Go now to http://classictalesaudiobooks.com and become a financial supporter today. 813, the fourth novel in the Arsène Lupin series is also now available! Head on over to classictalesaudiobooks.com and pick up this fantastic adventure! And if you'd like to save 2 dollars when you get 813, simply enter the coupon code: podcast. No subscription, no additional purchase necessary, just enter the word podcast, and save 2 bucks. Thank you for your support! And now, The Knight of the Necropolis, Part 2 of 8, by Sax Rohmer. Tap here to purchase 813, Arsène Lupin Vol. 4, by Maurice Leblanc!   Tap here to purchase your copy of The Black Tulip, by Alexandre Dumas!   Tap here to go to www.classictalesaudiobooks.com and become a financial supporter!   Tap here to go to our merchandise store!   Tap here to visit our YouTube Channel:  

Women Who Travel
Author Nadia Wassef on Life as a Cairo Bookseller

Women Who Travel

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 27:04


“Bookstores typically have been a place where I escape myself—and [a place where] I find a new self,” says this week's podcast guest, Nadia Wassef. “I feel like I walk in there and the world is open to me.” The author of the newly released Shelf Life: Chronicles of a Cairo Bookseller knows a thing or two about bookstores: she co-founded Diwan—the Egyptian capital's leading bookstore—with her sister and friend back in 2002. We caught up with Nadia, who now lives in London, to talk about the power of the bookstore and the books within them, how she stays connected with Cairo, and what books she hopes travelers read before visiting her home country.  Read a transcription of the episode and find links to the books mentioned here: https://www.cntraveler.com/story/nadia-wassef-women-who-travel-podcast Follow Nadia: @nadia_the_bibliophile Follow Lale: @lalehannah Follow Meredith: @ohheytheremere Follow Women Who Travel: @womenwhotravel All products featured on Condé Nast Traveler are independently selected by our editors. If you buy something through our retail links, we may earn an affiliate commission. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Storytellers of STEMM
#138 - Jarrod McKenna: The Egyptian Spiny Mouse and Reproductive Biology

Storytellers of STEMM

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 55:28


Today's storyteller is Dr Jarrod McKenna! Jarrod is a reproductive biologist at Monash University in Australia and today we talk about the Egyptian spiny mouse and studying reproductive biology. The Egyptian spiny mouse is a rare example of menstruation in mammals, especially a small prey sized mammal, as opposed to large mammals with few to no actual predators (such humans and primates). In the lab they can use this mouse as a test subject of sorts or a surrogate for studying human reproductive health, which is part of what Jarrod's research is focused on. So today to sum it up, we talk about the Egyptian spiny mouse, mammal reproductive biology, about conservation and the ethics of whether we SHOULD do certain things; how captive spiny mice populations might be different after 20-40 years in captivity and how that differs from wild populations potentially. It was a very fascinating conversation and I hope you enjoy! --- You can find Rachel Villani on Twitter @flyingcypress and Storytellers of STEMM on Facebook and Twitter @storytellers42. You can find Jarrod on Twitter @jarrod_mckenna. Recorded on 15 August 2021.

ESV: Through the Bible in a Year
October 14: Isaiah 46–48; Psalm 97; Acts 21

ESV: Through the Bible in a Year

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 14:53


Old Testament: Isaiah 46–48 Isaiah 46–48 (Listen) The Idols of Babylon and the One True God 46   Bel bows down; Nebo stoops;    their idols are on beasts and livestock;  these things you carry are borne    as burdens on weary beasts.2   They stoop; they bow down together;    they cannot save the burden,    but themselves go into captivity. 3   “Listen to me, O house of Jacob,    all the remnant of the house of Israel,  who have been borne by me from before your birth,    carried from the womb;4   even to your old age I am he,    and to gray hairs I will carry you.  I have made, and I will bear;    I will carry and will save. 5   “To whom will you liken me and make me equal,    and compare me, that we may be alike?6   Those who lavish gold from the purse,    and weigh out silver in the scales,  hire a goldsmith, and he makes it into a god;    then they fall down and worship!7   They lift it to their shoulders, they carry it,    they set it in its place, and it stands there;    it cannot move from its place.  If one cries to it, it does not answer    or save him from his trouble. 8   “Remember this and stand firm,    recall it to mind, you transgressors,9     remember the former things of old;  for I am God, and there is no other;    I am God, and there is none like me,10   declaring the end from the beginning    and from ancient times things not yet done,  saying, ‘My counsel shall stand,    and I will accomplish all my purpose,'11   calling a bird of prey from the east,    the man of my counsel from a far country.  I have spoken, and I will bring it to pass;    I have purposed, and I will do it. 12   “Listen to me, you stubborn of heart,    you who are far from righteousness:13   I bring near my righteousness; it is not far off,    and my salvation will not delay;  I will put salvation in Zion,    for Israel my glory.” The Humiliation of Babylon 47   Come down and sit in the dust,    O virgin daughter of Babylon;  sit on the ground without a throne,    O daughter of the Chaldeans!  For you shall no more be called    tender and delicate.2   Take the millstones and grind flour,    put off your veil,  strip off your robe, uncover your legs,    pass through the rivers.3   Your nakedness shall be uncovered,    and your disgrace shall be seen.  I will take vengeance,    and I will spare no one.4   Our Redeemer—the LORD of hosts is his name—    is the Holy One of Israel. 5   Sit in silence, and go into darkness,    O daughter of the Chaldeans;  for you shall no more be called    the mistress of kingdoms.6   I was angry with my people;    I profaned my heritage;  I gave them into your hand;    you showed them no mercy;  on the aged you made your yoke exceedingly heavy.7   You said, “I shall be mistress forever,”    so that you did not lay these things to heart    or remember their end. 8   Now therefore hear this, you lover of pleasures,    who sit securely,  who say in your heart,    “I am, and there is no one besides me;  I shall not sit as a widow    or know the loss of children”:9   These two things shall come to you    in a moment, in one day;  the loss of children and widowhood    shall come upon you in full measure,  in spite of your many sorceries    and the great power of your enchantments. 10   You felt secure in your wickedness;    you said, “No one sees me”;  your wisdom and your knowledge led you astray,  and you said in your heart,    “I am, and there is no one besides me.”11   But evil shall come upon you,    which you will not know how to charm away;  disaster shall fall upon you,    for which you will not be able to atone;  and ruin shall come upon you suddenly,    of which you know nothing. 12   Stand fast in your enchantments    and your many sorceries,    with which you have labored from your youth;  perhaps you may be able to succeed;    perhaps you may inspire terror.13   You are wearied with your many counsels;    let them stand forth and save you,  those who divide the heavens,    who gaze at the stars,  who at the new moons make known    what shall come upon you. 14   Behold, they are like stubble;    the fire consumes them;  they cannot deliver themselves    from the power of the flame.  No coal for warming oneself is this,    no fire to sit before!15   Such to you are those with whom you have labored,    who have done business with you from your youth;  they wander about, each in his own direction;    there is no one to save you. Israel Refined for God's Glory 48   Hear this, O house of Jacob,    who are called by the name of Israel,    and who came from the waters of Judah,  who swear by the name of the LORD    and confess the God of Israel,    but not in truth or right.2   For they call themselves after the holy city,    and stay themselves on the God of Israel;    the LORD of hosts is his name. 3   “The former things I declared of old;    they went out from my mouth, and I announced them;    then suddenly I did them, and they came to pass.4   Because I know that you are obstinate,    and your neck is an iron sinew    and your forehead brass,5   I declared them to you from of old,    before they came to pass I announced them to you,  lest you should say, ‘My idol did them,    my carved image and my metal image commanded them.' 6   “You have heard; now see all this;    and will you not declare it?  From this time forth I announce to you new things,    hidden things that you have not known.7   They are created now, not long ago;    before today you have never heard of them,    lest you should say, ‘Behold, I knew them.'8   You have never heard, you have never known,    from of old your ear has not been opened.  For I knew that you would surely deal treacherously,    and that from before birth you were called a rebel. 9   “For my name's sake I defer my anger;    for the sake of my praise I restrain it for you,    that I may not cut you off.10   Behold, I have refined you, but not as silver;    I have tried1 you in the furnace of affliction.11   For my own sake, for my own sake, I do it,    for how should my name2 be profaned?    My glory I will not give to another. The Lord's Call to Israel 12   “Listen to me, O Jacob,    and Israel, whom I called!  I am he; I am the first,    and I am the last.13   My hand laid the foundation of the earth,    and my right hand spread out the heavens;  when I call to them,    they stand forth together. 14   “Assemble, all of you, and listen!    Who among them has declared these things?  The LORD loves him;    he shall perform his purpose on Babylon,    and his arm shall be against the Chaldeans.15   I, even I, have spoken and called him;    I have brought him, and he will prosper in his way.16   Draw near to me, hear this:    from the beginning I have not spoken in secret,    from the time it came to be I have been there.”  And now the Lord GOD has sent me, and his Spirit. 17   Thus says the LORD,    your Redeemer, the Holy One of Israel:  “I am the LORD your God,    who teaches you to profit,    who leads you in the way you should go.18   Oh that you had paid attention to my commandments!    Then your peace would have been like a river,    and your righteousness like the waves of the sea;19   your offspring would have been like the sand,    and your descendants like its grains;  their name would never be cut off    or destroyed from before me.” 20   Go out from Babylon, flee from Chaldea,    declare this with a shout of joy, proclaim it,  send it out to the end of the earth;    say, “The LORD has redeemed his servant Jacob!”21   They did not thirst when he led them through the deserts;    he made water flow for them from the rock;    he split the rock and the water gushed out. 22   “There is no peace,” says the LORD, “for the wicked.” Footnotes [1] 48:10 Or I have chosen [2] 48:11 Hebrew lacks my name (ESV) Psalm: Psalm 97 Psalm 97 (Listen) The Lord Reigns 97   The LORD reigns, let the earth rejoice;    let the many coastlands be glad!2   Clouds and thick darkness are all around him;    righteousness and justice are the foundation of his throne.3   Fire goes before him    and burns up his adversaries all around.4   His lightnings light up the world;    the earth sees and trembles.5   The mountains melt like wax before the LORD,    before the Lord of all the earth. 6   The heavens proclaim his righteousness,    and all the peoples see his glory.7   All worshipers of images are put to shame,    who make their boast in worthless idols;    worship him, all you gods! 8   Zion hears and is glad,    and the daughters of Judah rejoice,    because of your judgments, O LORD.9   For you, O LORD, are most high over all the earth;    you are exalted far above all gods. 10   O you who love the LORD, hate evil!    He preserves the lives of his saints;    he delivers them from the hand of the wicked.11   Light is sown1 for the righteous,    and joy for the upright in heart.12   Rejoice in the LORD, O you righteous,    and give thanks to his holy name! Footnotes [1] 97:11 Most Hebrew manuscripts; one Hebrew manuscript, Septuagint, Syriac, Jerome Light dawns (ESV) New Testament: Acts 21 Acts 21 (Listen) Paul Goes to Jerusalem 21 And when we had parted from them and set sail, we came by a straight course to Cos, and the next day to Rhodes, and from there to Patara.1 2 And having found a ship crossing to Phoenicia, we went aboard and set sail. 3 When we had come in sight of Cyprus, leaving it on the left we sailed to Syria and landed at Tyre, for there the ship was to unload its cargo. 4 And having sought out the disciples, we stayed there for seven days. And through the Spirit they were telling Paul not to go on to Jerusalem. 5 When our days there were ended, we departed and went on our journey, and they all, with wives and children, accompanied us until we were outside the city. And kneeling down on the beach, we prayed 6 and said farewell to one another. Then we went on board the ship, and they returned home. 7 When we had finished the voyage from Tyre, we arrived at Ptolemais, and we greeted the brothers2 and stayed with them for one day. 8 On the next day we departed and came to Caesarea, and we entered the house of Philip the evangelist, who was one of the seven, and stayed with him. 9 He had four unmarried daughters, who prophesied. 10 While we were staying for many days, a prophet named Agabus came down from Judea. 11 And coming to us, he took Paul's belt and bound his own feet and hands and said, “Thus says the Holy Spirit, ‘This is how the Jews3 at Jerusalem will bind the man who owns this belt and deliver him into the hands of the Gentiles.'” 12 When we heard this, we and the people there urged him not to go up to Jerusalem. 13 Then Paul answered, “What are you doing, weeping and breaking my heart? For I am ready not only to be imprisoned but even to die in Jerusalem for the name of the Lord Jesus.” 14 And since he would not be persuaded, we ceased and said, “Let the will of the Lord be done.” 15 After these days we got ready and went up to Jerusalem. 16 And some of the disciples from Caesarea went with us, bringing us to the house of Mnason of Cyprus, an early disciple, with whom we should lodge. Paul Visits James 17 When we had come to Jerusalem, the brothers received us gladly. 18 On the following day Paul went in with us to James, and all the elders were present. 19 After greeting them, he related one by one the things that God had done among the Gentiles through his ministry. 20 And when they heard it, they glorified God. And they said to him, “You see, brother, how many thousands there are among the Jews of those who have believed. They are all zealous for the law, 21 and they have been told about you that you teach all the Jews who are among the Gentiles to forsake Moses, telling them not to circumcise their children or walk according to our customs. 22 What then is to be done? They will certainly hear that you have come. 23 Do therefore what we tell you. We have four men who are under a vow; 24 take these men and purify yourself along with them and pay their expenses, so that they may shave their heads. Thus all will know that there is nothing in what they have been told about you, but that you yourself also live in observance of the law. 25 But as for the Gentiles who have believed, we have sent a letter with our judgment that they should abstain from what has been sacrificed to idols, and from blood, and from what has been strangled,4 and from sexual immorality.” 26 Then Paul took the men, and the next day he purified himself along with them and went into the temple, giving notice when the days of purification would be fulfilled and the offering presented for each one of them. Paul Arrested in the Temple 27 When the seven days were almost completed, the Jews from Asia, seeing him in the temple, stirred up the whole crowd and laid hands on him, 28 crying out, “Men of Israel, help! This is the man who is teaching everyone everywhere against the people and the law and this place. Moreover, he even brought Greeks into the temple and has defiled this holy place.” 29 For they had previously seen Trophimus the Ephesian with him in the city, and they supposed that Paul had brought him into the temple. 30 Then all the city was stirred up, and the people ran together. They seized Paul and dragged him out of the temple, and at once the gates were shut. 31 And as they

Tides of History
Egypt's Middle Kingdom

Tides of History

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 53:14


The Middle Kingdom, beginning around 2000 BC, was the second of ancient Egypt's classical ages. Powerful pharaohs ruled from the cataracts of the Nile to the Mediterranean, building enormous monuments and patronizing exceptional art and literature. But on either side of the Middle Kingdom lay two ages of chaos, the Intermediate Periods, when the pharaoh's rule - the defining feature of ancient Egyptian history - essentially disappeared.Patrick's book is now available! Get The Verge: Reformation, Renaissance, and Forty Years that Shook the World in hardcopy, ebook, or audiobook (read by Patrick) here.Listen to new episodes 1 week early, to exclusive seasons 1 and 2, and to all episodes ad free with Wondery+. Join Wondery+ for exclusives, binges, early access, and ad free listening. Available in the Wondery App https://wondery.app.link/tidesofhistory.Indeed - Get started a $75 credit at indeed.com/TIDESTheragun - Try Theragun for 30 days starting at only $199 dollars. Go to therabody.com/TIDES RIGHT NOW and get your Gen 4 Theragun TODAY.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Commuter Bible OT
Jeremiah 32-33, Proverbs 12:15-28

Commuter Bible OT

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 20:59


Jeremiah 32 - 1:04 . Jeremiah 33 - 11:46 . Proverbs 12:15 - 18:19 . This part of the text may be a little confusing, so let me give a little historical context. The Babylonian siege began after King Zedekiah had been in office for nine years. This siege was lifted for a small window of time when the troops caught word that an Egyptian army was approaching. During this break, Zedekiah arrested Jeremiah because he was encouraging the men of Judah to surrender, but God commanded Jeremiah to tell them to do exactly that, to surrender. During this time, the Lord sends Jeremiah's cousin to sell Him property, and at the Lord's direction, Jeremiah buys it. Confused about the transaction, Jeremiah turns to the Lord for clarity.:::Christian Standard Bible translation.All music written and produced by John Burgess Ross.Co-produced by the Christian Standard Bible.facebook.com/commuterbibleinstagram.com/commuter_bibletwitter.com/CommuterPodpatreon.com/commuterbibleadmin@commuterbible.org

Let's Get Haunted
Episode 88: The Mummy's Curse: Pharaoh Tutankhamun's Gold

Let's Get Haunted

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 93:32


This week Nat leads Aly down a rabbit hole about Ancient Egyptian curses! Even before humans could translate the hieroglyphs on ancient Egyptian tombs, rumors existed that curses were written on the entrance to a Pharaoh's final resting place. The most famous of ancient Egyptian curses was enacted in 1922 after the discovery of King Tutankhamen's 3,300 year old sealed tomb. 9 of the 52 people present at the tomb's opening ended up dying of sudden illness or freak accidents immediately following the opening of the tomb. Join us on this haunted adventure through the past, if you dare! Important Stuff: Buy Our Merch: https://www.letsgethaunted.com Donate to our stupid show: https://ko-fi.com/dogmomusa Donate to our Charity Fundraiser: https://www.bit.ly/LGHCharity21 Buy Venterra Farms CBD Products: https://www.venterrafarms.com & use code “HAUNTED15” at checkout for 15% off Check out the photo dump for this week's episode: https://www.instagram.com/letsgethaunted Send us mail: PO BOX 1658 Camarillo, CA 93011 Send us your listener stories: LetsGetHauntedPod@gmail.com *SOURCES* Book: “King Tutankhamen's Gold”, Strange Stories, Amazing Facts, Reader's Digest, 1975: Article: “Daily Life in Ancient Egypt”, World History Encyclopedia, Joshua J. Mark, Sep 21. 2016 Website: Heka - Magic or Meaningful Speech - Ancient Egypt thewhitegoddess.co.uk Article: “Invisible Egypt”, New Acropolis, Sabine Leitner, May 17, 2016 Article: “How Does The Sun Work?”Howitworksdaily.com - Article: https://www.thegreatcoursesdaily.com/the-story-of-the-valley-of-the-kings/ Article: https://www.dw.com/en/conserved-glories-of-egypts-ancient-tutankhamun-tomb-revealed/a-47317793 Article:https://www.smithsonianjourneys.org/blog/the-curse-of-king-tuts-tomb-180950898/ Article:https://www.mentalfloss.com/article/23321/victims-king-tuts-curse YT Video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nut50vmRyVM Article: Egypt's Saqqara Tombs Have Mummy Curses Inscribed on Walls, "Business Insider"

Today in the Word Devotional

Greed, sex, arrogance, power. These are all examples of idolatry that are as true today as they were in biblical times, said Christopher J. H. Wright. The author of “Here Are Your Gods”: Faithful Discipleship in Idolatrous Times added: “Idolatry often involves the perversion of something good in itself, like family, work, beauty, or sex.” Moses confronted idolatry and other sins many times during the Exodus, but the golden calf episode was the most significant. The covenant had just been affirmed by the nation (Exodus 19). Moses had communicated the Law, including the Ten Commandments (Exodus 20). The initial instructions for the tabernacle had even been given. Nonetheless, the people made and worshiped an idol, including the “revelry” of sexual immorality (Ex. 32:6). Moses was on top of Mount Sinai for 40 days. The people had grown impatient, and their already weak faith dried up. Instead of standing his ground, Aaron, the new high priest (Exodus 29), went along with their idolatry. When Moses confronted him later, he offered the ridiculous excuse seen in Exodus 32:24. The golden calf may have represented the Egyptian bull god Apis. In any case, the people had flagrantly broken the second commandment. Moses conveyed God’s righteous anger by literally breaking the two tablets of the Law (v. 19). He also enacted a beautiful piece of poetic justice by grinding up the idol into powder, sprinkling it in the water, and forcing the Israelites to drink it (v. 20). Yet the sin continued and the people were “running wild” (v. 25). So Moses called out, “Whoever is for the Lord, come to me” (v. 26). The Levites answered and went through the camp, killing the idolaters. Their zeal helped consecrate or set them apart for special service (v. 29). >> While we may not bow down to a golden calf, the temptation to idolatry is very much alive in our day! Do we serve the three Ps—personal freedom, political power, and prosperity—or the Lord?

Daily Devos with Pastor Joe Focht
Being Misunderstood - Acts 7:24-25

Daily Devos with Pastor Joe Focht

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021


7:24 And seeing one of them suffer wrong, he defended him, and avenged him that was oppressed, and smote the Egyptian: 7:25 For he supposed his brethren would have understood how that God by his hand would deliver them: but they understood not.

Jean & Mike Do The New York Times Crossword
Tuesday, October 12, 2021 - All Hail AMUNRA, God of Dubious Spelling!

Jean & Mike Do The New York Times Crossword

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 9:59


Today's crossword included the reappearance of 2D, Egyptian king of the Gods, AMNUNRA, whose alternative spellings are so legendary - AMUNRA, AMENRA, AMONRA , to name just three -- that he has earned the unofficial moniker, God of Dubious Spelling. The rest of the grid was entertaining, focused on the concept of 37A, Portmanteau coinage describing this puzzle's theme, ALLITERNATION. Examples of these include 17A, Game that has only a single round, RUSSIANROULETTE, 23A, Single item seemingly always found at the bottom of a McDonald's bag, FRENCHFRY (cute!), and 49A, Entrance divided in half horizontally, DUTCHDOOR. In other news, it's Triplet Tuesday, and Mike gets 2 out of 3, only striking out on DOW. To hear that and more, download and listen up!

An Even Bigger Fly On The Wall
1306. Ebook Preview. Life after death, by Alan Segal. (10/12/21)

An Even Bigger Fly On The Wall

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 11:03


"A magisterial work of social history, Life After Death illuminates the many different ways ancient civilizations grappled with the question of what exactly happens to us after we die. In a masterful exploration of how Western civilizations have defined the afterlife, Alan F. Segal weaves together biblical and literary scholarship, sociology, history, and philosophy. A renowned scholar, Segal examines the maps of the afterlife found in Western religious texts and reveals not only what various cultures believed but how their notions reflected their societies' realities and ideals, and why those beliefs changed over time. He maintains that the afterlife is the mirror in which a society arranges its concept of the self. The composition process for Judaism, Christianity, and Islam begins in grief and ends in the victory of the self over death. Arguing that in every religious tradition the afterlife represents the ultimate reward for the good, Segal combines historical and anthropological data with insights gleaned from religious and philosophical writings to explain the following mysteries: why the Egyptians insisted on an afterlife in heaven, while the body was embalmed in a tomb on earth; why the Babylonians viewed the dead as living in underground prisons; why the Hebrews remained silent about life after death during the period of the First Temple, yet embraced it in the Second Temple period (534 B.C.E. –70 C.E.); and why Christianity placed the afterlife in the center of its belief system. He discusses the inner dialogues and arguments within Judaism and Christianity, showing the underlying dynamic behind them, as well as the ideas that mark the differences between the two religions. In a thoughtful examination of the influence of biblical views of heaven and martyrdom on Islamic beliefs, he offers a fascinating perspective on the current troubling rise of Islamic fundamentalism. In tracing the organic, historical relationships between sacred texts and communities of belief and comparing the visions of life after death that have emerged throughout history, Segal sheds a bright, revealing light on the intimate connections between notions of the afterlife, the societies that produced them, and the individual's search for the ultimate meaning of life on earth." (Educational and inspirational materials. The Creators own their content and music/songs).

JERE UNFILTERED
Banned Human History: Religion, Thoth and Enoch Deception

JERE UNFILTERED

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 61:40


In this sixth episode of Season 2, Dr. Jere discloses the  "Banned Human History: Religion, Thoth and Enoch Deception." Human history on Earth goes back much further than the pre-ancient Sumerian and Egyptian cultures of historical record. For several thousands of years, legends and myths have existed in which the realities of advanced pre-ancient human civilizations were viewed in terms of legitimate historical record. If you follow the teachings of "Thoth" or "Enoch" or believe that the Anunnaki are our "Creator Gods", you do not want to miss this disruptive disclosure episode!IN ADDITION, WE HAVE LAUNCHED:Jere Unfiltered LIVE:https://www.jrdltdconsulting.com/product-page/jere-unfiltered-liveOn the last Sunday of each month, Jere Unfiltered LIVE is an hour-long, subscription-based conversation with Dr. Jere Rivera-Dugenio. These Live broadcasts offer the perfect opportunity to ask Dr. Jere questions that might arise while listening to Jere Unfiltered Podcast, and about the application of this work.Thank you for listening to the Jere Unfiltered Podcast!Highest Oscillations!

Testing Normal
#117 - Digital Identity and Currency = Control

Testing Normal

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021


Living in the digital age has brought us many improvements, but until recently some of our daily lives haven't resided in a way digitally that is outside of our control completely. We want to talk about the good and the bad of currency, identity, ownership and so much more is affected by having it only live in a digital space. If you like the music check out the artist here: theearthonfireIntro song links: Spotify Apple MusicPlease subscribe to us on YouTube and Rumble to watch videos after they are published.Follow us on Instagram for random funny picsFollow us on Facebook to get notified of LIVE! episode recordings and to join the chat!Links discussed in episode:Oregon temporarily drops college degree requirement for substitute teachers to alleviate shortageJUST IN

Commuter Bible
Jeremiah 32-34, Psalm 119:113-128

Commuter Bible

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 27:44


Jeremiah 32 - 1:16 . Jeremiah 33 - 11:57 . Jeremiah 34 - 19:12 . Psalm 119:129 - 25:01 . This part of the text may be a little confusing, so let me give a little historical context. The Babylonian siege began after King Zedekiah had been in office for nine years. This siege was lifted for a small window of time when the troops caught word that an Egyptian army was approaching. During this break, Zedekiah arrested Jeremiah because he was encouraging the men of Judah to surrender, but God commanded Jeremiah to tell them to do exactly that. During this time, the Lord sends Jeremiah's cousin to sell Him property, and at the Lord's direction, Jeremiah buys it. Confused about the transaction, Jeremiah turns to the Lord for clarity.:::Christian Standard Bible translation.All music written and produced by John Burgess Ross.Co-produced by Bobby Brown, Eric Williamson & the Christian Standard Biblefacebook.com/commuterbibleinstagram.com/commuter_bibletwitter.com/CommuterPodpatreon.com/commuterbibleadmin@commuterbible.org

Clever
Ep. 157: Designing for Dramatic Effect with Yasmine Ghoniem

Clever

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 54:12


Interior designer and self-described “cocktail,” Yasmine Ghoniem has lived a whirlwind life across continents, cultures, and careers. Born in Kuwait to Australian and Egyptian parents, she lived throughout the Middle East before moving to the United States to attend Savannah College of Art and Design. She always had a deep love for music, feeling destined to be a performer, she formed indie rock bands with family and friends throughout the years. Yasmine eventually put down roots in Sydney, Australia where she founded and leads YSG Studio, an interior design studio focusing on residential and hospitality. She brings her eclectic influences and flair for the theatrical drama of staging and storytelling to all of her spaces. Intoxicating indeed! Images, links and more from Yasmine!Please say Hi on social! Twitter, Instagram and Facebook - @CleverPodcast, @amydevers, @designmilkIf you enjoy Clever we could use your support! Please consider leaving a review, making a donation, becoming a sponsor, or introducing us to your friends! We love and appreciate you!Clever is hosted by Amy Devers and produced by 2VDE Media, with editing by Rich Stroffolino, production assistance from Ilana Nevins and Anouchka Stephan, and music by El Ten Eleven.Clever is proudly distributed by Design Milk.Clever is a member of the Airwave Media podcast network. Visit airwavemedia.com to discover more great shows. Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/clever. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Don't Look Now
139 - The Chinchorro Mummies

Don't Look Now

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 33:12


The Chinchorro culture of South America created the world's first man made mummies roughly 7000 years ago, or 2000 years before the Egyptians.  Listen in and find out about these ancient mummies, how and why they were made, and what is threatening their continued existence today.

Freedom.
Freedom's Great Call | All About Sunday | P. Jason Lozano

Freedom.

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 41:24


Freedom's Great Call Ex 3:7-10 (tlb) Then the Lord told him, “I have seen the deep sorrows of my people in Egypt and have heard their cries for freedom from their harsh taskmasters. 8 I have come to deliver them from the Egyptians and to take them out of Egypt into a good land, a large land, a land ‘flowing with Abundance 9 Yes, the cries of the people has risen to me in heaven, and I have seen how harshly the Egyptians abuse and oppress them. 10 Now I am sending you to Pharaoh, to demand that he let my people Go 1. Hear The Cries Of The People - Called To Be A Compassionate Warrior Matt 9:36 When he saw the crowds, he had compassion on them because they were confused and helpless Prov 24:11 Rescue those being led away to death, and restrain those stumbling toward the slaughter ● Save – Rescue, to strip, plunder, be delivered, and snatch away Ps 82:3-4 (amp) Do justice to the weak and fatherless; maintain the rights of the afflicted and needy. 4 Deliver the poor and needy; rescue them out of the hand of the wicked (wrong and bad people) Matt 11:12 the kingdom of heaven suffers violent assault, and violent men seize it by force [as a precious prize] ● Violent - A forceful, violent man; one who is eager in pursuit Is 49:25 (nlt) “Even those taken away by the strong man will be taken from him. Those taken by the powerful ruler will be saved. For I will fight with the one who fights with you, and I will save your children 2. Jesus Always Sends You Back – Staying Broken And Dependent Ex 4:19 "Go back to Egypt, because all the men who wanted to kill you are dead" Ps 66:16 Come and hear, all who fear God, And I will tell of what He has done for my soul. (God will use all our stories to bring His Freedom) Ps 34:6 This poor man cried out, and the LORD heard him, and saved him out of all his troubles Mk 5:19 -20 “Go home to your own people and tell them how much the Lord has done for you, and how he has had mercy on you.” 20 So the man went away and began to proclaim throughout the Decapolis how much Jesus had done for him. And everyone was amazed. 3. Now More Than Ever We Must Boldly Proclaim This Gospel Of Freedom 1 Cor 9:16 If I spread the Good News, I have nothing to brag about because I have an obligation to do this. How horrible it will be for me if I don't spread the Good News! Lk 9:62 No man, having put his hand to the plough, and looking back, is fit for the kingdom of God Prov 24:10-12 (MSG) If you faint in a crisis, you are weak. Rescue the perishing; don't hesitate to step in and help. If you say, “Hey, that's none of my business,” will that get you off the hook? Someone is watching you closely, you know Someone not impressed with weak excuses Acts 26:17-19 (nlt) I am sending you to open their eyes, so they may turn from darkness to light and from the power of Satan to God. Then they will receive forgiveness for their sins and be given an inheritance among God's people 19 And so, King Agrippa, I obeyed that vision from heaven Esther 4:14 For if you remain completely silent at this time, relief and deliverance will arise from another place, but you and your father's house will perish. Yet who knows whether you have come to the kingdom for such a time as this?” Amos 3:8 The lion hath roared, who will not fear? the Lord GOD hath spoken, who can but prophesy? 

Radically Normal
#80 - Season 4 Kickoff in the Book of Exodus (Ex. 1-2)

Radically Normal

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 35:42


The beginning of season 4! In today's episode we introduce the book of Exodus and discuss the first two chapters of the book: threads between Genesis and Exodus: it's one story the fruitful multiplication of God's people in Egypt Pharaoh who fears man and the midwives who fear God the saving of Moses' life how Moses and Noah were both on an ark Moses growing up how Moses killing the Egyptian was not a sin Moses, Elijah, and Jesus all in the wilderness Moses' life foreshadowing Israel's story later in Exodus God's covenant faithfulness     Join us this season for a journey through Exodus (every Monday) and some incredible interview guests (every other Thursday).   References Episode on Genesis w/ Rob Snyder — see episode #16     Helpful Resources on Exodus: Exodus commentary by Douglas Stuart (intermediate/advanced) Exodus For You commentary by Tim Chester (devotional/introductory) Exodus commentary by Peter Enns (intermediate) The God Who Makes Himself Known: The Missionary Heart of the Book of Exodus (W. Ross Blackburn) — see episode #70 for our interview w/ Dr. Blackburn!     Radically Normal YouTube // IG: @radicallynormalpod // Email: radicallynormalpod@gmail.com

The Anti Empire Project with Justin Podur
Scramble for Africa 4: Britain Takes Egypt with Finance (and War), 1882

The Anti Empire Project with Justin Podur

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 102:27


In 1882 at the battle of Tel el Kabir, Garnet Wolesley (who had suppressed the Riel Resistance in 1870) defeated the Egyptian nationalists led by al-Arabi. This was the final blow in a long imperialist campaign to take Egypt from the ambitious modernizers that had ruled it from the 1820s. The epic financial swindle involved … Continue reading "Scramble for Africa 4: Britain Takes Egypt with Finance (and War), 1882"

New Collective Church
VIBES: Anger

New Collective Church

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2021 49:09


Emotions aren't bad - they're built-in.    God is emotional - we are created in the image of God.   Mark 3:5  He looked around at them in anger . . .   ‭‭Proverbs‬ ‭14:29‬ ‭NLT‬‬ “People with understanding control their anger; a hot temper shows great foolishness.” ‭‭Exodus‬ ‭2:11-12‬ ‭NIV‬‬ 11 One day, after Moses had grown up, he went out to where his own people were and watched them at their hard labor. He saw an Egyptian beating a Hebrew, one of his own people. 12 Looking this way and that and seeing no one, he killed the Egyptian and hid him in the sand.   Frame It   Why do I feel this way?    What does it reveal about my character and calling?  Funnel It    Where should I direct it?    Exodus 14:13–16 NIV 13 Moses answered the people, “Do not be afraid. Stand firm and you will see the deliverance the Lord will bring you today. The Egyptians you see today you will never see again.  14 The Lord will fight for you; you need only to be still.”   15 Then the Lord said to Moses, “Why are you crying out to me? Tell the Israelites to move on. 16 Raise your staff and stretch out your hand over the sea to divide the water so that the Israelites can go through the sea on dry ground.   Numbers 20:11–12 NIV 11 Then Moses raised his arm and struck the rock twice with his staff. Water gushed out, and the community and their livestock drank.  12 But the Lord said to Moses and Aaron, “Because you did not trust in me enough to honor me as holy in the sight of the Israelites, you will not bring this community into the land I give them.”   Filter It   What does the gospel say to it? Matthew‬ ‭5:21-24‬ ‭NIV‬‬ ““You have heard that it was said to the people long ago, ‘You shall not murder, and anyone who murders will be subject to judgment.' But I tell you that anyone who is angry with a brother or sister will be subject to judgment. Again, anyone who says to a brother or sister, ‘Raca,' is answerable to the court. And anyone who says, ‘You fool!' will be in danger of the fire of hell. “Therefore, if you are offering your gift at the altar and there remember that your brother or sister has something against you, leave your gift there in front of the altar. First go and be reconciled to them; then come and offer your gift.” Mark 3:1-6 Another time Jesus went into the synagogue, and a man with a shriveled hand was there.  2 Some of them were looking for a reason to accuse Jesus, so they watched him closely to see if he would heal him on the Sabbath.  3 Jesus said to the man with the shriveled hand, “Stand up in front of everyone.” 4 Then Jesus asked them, “Which is lawful on the Sabbath: to do good or to do evil, to save life or to kill?” But they remained silent. 5 He looked around at them in anger and, deeply distressed at their stubborn hearts, said to the man, “Stretch out your hand.” He stretched it out, and his hand was completely restored.  6 Then the Pharisees went out and began to plot with the Herodians how they might kill Jesus.

The Abracast
Exodus: The Night of the Tenth Plague and Impending Freedom

The Abracast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2021 46:40


What happened the night Pharaoh acquiesced and let the Hebrew slaves go? What happened before the Hebrews left Egypt? Did they rob Egyptian nobles? Did they cook dinner? Did Moses find the bones of Joseph? We also discuss possibilities of why the Hebrews had to wander around the wilderness for 40 years… Was it to give them time to go to Hebrew School? Was it because they needed time for the lease to run out? Was it because someone gave them wrong directions? Featured Books: BibleLegends of the Jews - Ginsburg***Credits***The voice of The Abracast – Hila Assor https://hilaassor.com/Theme Song “Red Horse Rising” by X-Proph3t: http://www.reverbnation.com/xproph3tWritten / Produced / researched / Performed – Jon Towers www.abracast.com***Contact***Visit Website: www.abracast.comEmail Jon: Towers113@gmail.com Find Jon on Twitter: @jonnyaxx https://twitter.com/JonnyAxx Find Jon on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/jon.towers.925Find Jon On Instagram: http://instagram.com/stigmatastudios***Storefront*** If you enjoy the show, learned something new, or was inspired you might consider supporting the show! https://abracast.com/store-front***Support*** If you enjoy the show, learned something new, or was inspired you might consider supporting the show!Become a subscriber: www.subscribestar.com/abracast Just wanna buy me a drink?: paypal.me/stigmatastudios ***Advertise*** Got a book, Product or Podcast? Would you would like to get your message to The Abracast audience?Advertise on The Abracast: https://www.advertisecast.com/TheAbracastAdvertise on The Abracast: https://intellifluence.com/influencer/jon-towers-61030

Today in the Word Devotional

There are hundreds of college fight songs. One of the oldest is Boston College’s “For Boston” which was written in 1885. These songs are memorized by generations of loyal alumni and sung at sporting events or college reunions, claiming victory for their alma mater. After their victorious deliverance from Egypt, Moses, Miriam, and the people of Israel celebrated with a song, giving God glory for the victory! They had time to stop and rejoice because there were literally no Egyptian soldiers left to stop them. Until now, we didn’t know Moses had a musical side, but he led the people in singing (v. 1). His sister Miriam led the women in dancing and singing the chorus (v. 21) Their song, punctuated by statements of God’s supreme greatness (vv. 11, 18), has at least three main themes. First, God is a Divine Warrior who singlehandedly won the victory. He had fought for His people and demonstrated His majesty, power, and righteous anger (vv. 3–8; see Ps. 18:6–19). Second, God’s enemies severely miscalculate. They presumptuously boast that the prize is already in their hands, but they’re wrong. In the end, they will tremble with the fear of the Lord. The song mocks not only the Egyptians (v. 9) but also future enemies (vv. 14–16) in this regard. Third, God is relational. He once again saved His chosen people. He is “my father’s God” (v. 2). He will continue to lead and guide because of His unfailing covenant love (v. 13). The Red Sea deliverance is just the beginning: He is bringing His people— the people He Himself “bought” or “created”—to the promised land, where he will “plant them” securely (vv. 16–17). >> It’s always a good day to sing to the Lord! Why not put on a favorite praise album and worship the Lord in music today? Or, check out our TITW Spotify playlist.

Foundations of Amateur Radio
Standard Information Exchange in Amateur Radio

Foundations of Amateur Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2021 7:19


Foundations of Amateur Radio The art of storing information in such a way that it doesn't devolve into random gibberish is an ongoing battle in the evolution of the human race. Egyptians five thousand years ago were perfectly happy storing information using hieroglyphs. They used it for well over three thousand years, but today you'd be hard pressed bumping into anyone on the street who knows one, let alone one thousand characters. Latin fared a little better. It's been in use for over two thousand years, but other than fields like biology, medicine and of course some religions, the best you can hope for is et cetera, mea culpa and my favourite, carpe noctum, that and a few mottos scattered about. Using technology to store information is no better. If you have a 3.5 inch floppy disc tucked away in a drawer, can you still read it today and do you know why it's called a floppy disc? What about a 5.25 inch, or 8 inch floppy. What about tape. Do you still have backups stored on DAT? Even if you could physically read the information, could you still make sense of it? Can you open a VisiCalc spreadsheet file today? That was invented during my lifetime, first released in 1979. The latest release was in 1983. My point being that storing and retrieving information is hard. Amateur Radio is an activity that has been around since the early 1900's, over a century of information. We describe our collective wisdom in books, magazines, audio recordings, websites, podcasts, videos and tweets. One of the more consistent sources of information coming from our activity is logging, specifically QSO or contact logging. There are bookshelves full of paper log files, but since the advent of home computing, logging now is primarily an electronic affair. If you've upgraded the software on your computer, you know the pains associated with maintaining your log across those transitions. If you've changed operating systems, the problem only got worse. Currently there are primarily two standards associated with logging, the ADIF and Cabrillo specifications. Both are published ways of describing how to store information in such a way that various bits of software can read the information and arrive at the same interpretation. As you might expect, things change over time and any standard needs to be able to adopt changes as they occur. How that happens is less than transparent and in an open community like amateur radio, that's a problem. Used primarily for logging contacts, the Amateur Data Interchange Format or ADIF is published on a website, adif.org. There's lively discussion in a mailing list and since its inception in 1996, it's evolved through many versions, incorporating change as it happens. Like the adoption of new digital modes, new country codes and administrative subdivisions. Used for contest logging, Cabrillo is published on the World Wide Radio Operators Foundation, or WWROF web site which assumed administration for the specification in 2014. It documents changes as they occurred, like adding contest names, station types and contest overlays. While there's clearly activity happening, there doesn't appear to be a public forum where this is discussed. Speaking of public. The DXCC, or DX Century Club is a radio award for working countries on a list. ADIF stores those country codes using the DXCC country code number, which is part of the specification published by the ARRL, the American Radio Relay League. The list of DXCC entities is copyrighted by the ARRL, which is fair enough, but you have to actually buy it from the ARRL to get a copy. This is a problem because it means that any future archivist, you included, needs access to a specific version of both the ADIF and the then valid DXCC list, just to read the information in a log file. To put it mildly, in my opinion, that's bonkers. Relying on external information isn't limited to ADIF. Cabrillo relies on external data for the format of the Location field which indicates where the station was operating from. Among others, it refers to the RSGB, the Radio Society of Great Britain who maintains a list of IOTA, or Islands on the Air, published on a web site that no longer exists. There are other issues. It appears that for the Cabrillo specification there is no incremental version number associated with any changes. Version 3 of Cabrillo was released in 2006. There are 31 changes published to update Version 3, but as far as I can tell, they're all called Version 3, so anyone attempting to read a Version 3 log will not actually know what they're dealing with. To give you a specific example of three changes. In 2016 the 119G band name was changed to 123G, which was changed in 2021 to 122G. All three labels refer to the same band, but until you actually start looking at the file will you have any indication about the version used to generate the file. Let's move on. Contesting. Not the logging or the on-air activity, but how to score a contest. What activity gets points and what incurs a penalty? Do you get different points for different bands, for different station prefixes, for low power, for multiple operators, for being portable and plenty more. Can you make contact with the same station more than once, if so, how often and under which circumstances? What is the exchange, how does it change, if at all? Each of these choices are weighed by contest managers all over the globe and they do it every time they run their contest. For some contests that means that there are dozens of rule versions across the years. To give you some idea of scale, the modern CQWW was first run in 1948 and there's at least one amateur contest every weekend. Now imagine that you're writing contest logging software that keeps track of your score and alerts you if the contact you're about to make is valid or not, or if it incurs a penalty if you were to log it. That software is driven by the rules that govern a particular contest. Some contest software is updated by the author every time a major contest is held to incorporate the latest changes. Other contest tools use external definition files, which specify how a particular contest is scored. As you might suspect, that too is information and it too is in flux and to make matters worse, there is no standard. So far, the tools that I've found that make any concerted attempt at this all use different file formats to specify how a contest is scored and of those, one explicitly points out that their file format doesn't incorporate all of the possible variation, leaving it to updating the software itself in order to incorporate changes that aren't covered by their own file format. That is sub-optimal to say the least. Personally, I think that there is a place for a global standards body for amateur radio, one that coordinates all these efforts, one that has a lively discussion, one that uses modern tools to publish its specifications and one that does this using public information with an eye on record keeping. I'm Onno VK6FLAB

Today in the Word Devotional

Earlier this year, the home of Harriet Tubman was located by archaeologists after decades of searching. Tubman became known as the “Moses of her people” because she helped many slaves escape to freedom. State officials planned to put artifacts from the dig on display at the nearby Harriet Tubman Underground Railroad Visitor Center. In Exodus 13, Moses, leading the Israelites out of Egypt, thought the hard part was done. Not quite yet! In their story, as so often in ours, there is always “one more crisis” that calls for God to act and for us to respond in faith and obedience. In this case, the crisis came when they found themselves trapped between the Red Sea and the Egyptian army. Actually, God directed them to step into the trap in order to provide another opportunity to display His glory and to teach everyone that “I am the LORD” (14:1–4). God Himself led them in a pillar of fire by night and a pillar of cloud by day (13:20–22). When the people realized the trap they’d stepped into, they complained (14:11–12), while Moses’ faith remained exemplary (14:13–14). Matters unfolded just as God said they would: The Israelites walked through the divided waters on dry ground, while the Egyptian soldiers were swept away and drowned. The nation was once again miraculously delivered, and the people’s faith in God and Moses was strengthened (14:31). The people carried with them the bones of Joseph (13:19). Centuries before, Joseph had prophesied the Exodus and made his descendants vow to take his body with them (Gen. 50:24–25; Heb. 11:22). Later, his remains would be buried at Shechem, on land originally purchased by his father Jacob and allotted to the tribes of Ephraim and Manasseh, his sons (Josh. 24:32). >> Is waiting on the Lord something that’s easy or hard for you? How can you take steps to practice an attitude of godly waiting? The book On Waiting Well discusses this topic and is written by this month’s author!

Christian Natural Health
Israel's Demand for a King, 1 Sam 8-10

Christian Natural Health

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 26:53


Today's podcast is a meditation and retelling of 1 Samuel 8-10.   Introduction How disappointing for God. He had chosen this nation, and had a special relationship with them, promising nothing but blessings galore (Deuteronomy 28), if only they would obey Him. He always intended to lead them personally, through one judge as His liaison. He knew they wouldn't be faithful to Him, but I doubt that made it any less heartbreaking when time and time again, the people abandoned Him and worshipped false gods. He was covenant-bound to withdraw from them when this happened, leaving them open to the enemy to steal, kill, and destroy. When they'd had enough finally, the people would cry out and God would send the deliverer who was to be their next judge—whoever was the best option He had at the time.   Samuel had been one of the good judges, and perhaps it wouldn't have ended as it did if his sons had been like him. It is strange that Samuel thought his sons would succeed him though, since God's judges were never meant to be a dynasty. Presumably Samuel also knew of his son's shortcomings.    It's very clear in this story that God didn't think a king was a good idea, and took it as a personal rejection (Hosea 13:11). Yet He granted what the people wanted anyway. It's interesting how often in Old Testament stories God gives the people what they demand, even though He knows it isn't for the best. God chose to make creatures with free will, and because of it, God rarely gets His first choice. I'm thinking of the story of Balaam: God told him not to go with Balak's messengers the first two times he asked. Balaam should have left it at that, instead of pressing God to give in! But, Balaam wanted financial gain, just as the Israelites wanted to govern themselves rather than having to rely on God. Moses also permitted divorce, even though Jesus said that wasn't God's first choice either (Matthew 19:8). God gave the people what they asked for, consequences and all.   At the same time, I have to wonder whether the Israelites' desire for a king was somehow premature. Saul reigned for forty years, Acts 13:21, and David began to rule when he was thirty years old, just after Saul's death, 2 Samuel 5:4. That means David wasn't even born until the tenth year of Saul's reign, though God began to look for a “man after His own heart” (1 Samuel 13:14) in the second year of Saul's reign. Saul's beginning was certainly less than illustrious, and we can see seeds of the cause of his downfall, insecurity and fear of man, from the very beginning. It almost seems like Saul was just a placeholder, until David was old enough to be anointed and trained up in the “school of hard knocks,” as it were, to become ready for the throne.    That said, it's interesting how God used natural circumstances (Saul's father lost his donkeys and had sent him and a servant to look for them) to bring Saul and Samuel together. Samuel's prophetic insight to set aside the best cut of meat, expecting Saul to show up the next day, surely primed Saul to accept Samuel's proclamation that he would become king. God knew that a man like Saul wouldn't just believe such a word; he would need to be convinced. Then Samuel gave him a number of other confirmatory events to look for in the subsequent seven days, so that he would be ready for the big “reveal” of the man God had anointed a week later. Unfortunately, Samuel's presentation fell flat when their new king was literally hiding among the baggage. Presumably his absurd behavior was why some of the men of Israel despised him. Shortly after this, God used an attack from their enemies as a means to galvanize Israel to fight under Saul's leadership (1 Samuel 11). Thus Saul redeemed himself, earning a new and better coronation.    Yet only a year later, in the second year of Saul's reign, Saul disobeyed God for the first time, causing God to proclaim through Samuel that God would take the kingdom away from Saul and give it to a “man after His own heart” (1 Samuel 13:14). A decade or so later, after Saul again disobeyed, God formally rejected Saul as king. Saul's response to this was interesting: he asked Samuel to at least continue to honor him before the people (1 Samuel 15:30), indicating what really mattered to him. He wanted the honor and respect of men, not God (Proverbs 29:25). This was exactly why God chose David instead.    Fictionalized Retelling:    I couldn't help wondering, in the quiet of night, whether it was all my fault.  The Lord had never told me that the position of judge should be hereditary, nor had it ever been so in Israel's history. Yet I'd had it in my mind since my sons were born that as soon as they were old enough, they could share my load. I suppose I had this idea because Eli had practically raised me, and the priesthood was hereditary.  Eli's sons had turned out poorly too, though. I don't know why I thought that would be a good model to follow.  Yes, I did know. I had wanted to believe it.  I wanted the latter part of my life to be easier than the first part had been, but I also had a romanticized ideal of sharing what mattered most to me with Joel and Abijah. I was so focused on this goal that I failed to see—I refused to see—the men my sons had become, just as Eli had done. The elders of Israel all assembled before me one day and shouted their accusations from all directions.  “Look, you're an old man, and your sons aren't following in your footsteps!” one called. Old? I winced inwardly. I was barely sixty—but I was certainly tired, after forty-eight years of ministry. I felt old.  “They cheat us!” another of the elders cried. “They'll rule in favor of whoever bribes them the most!” These words struck me like a blow. I'd seen this tendency in my sons from their youths. I didn't think either of them had ever heard from the Lord. Secretly I had worried that they did not truly fear Him, but I'd hidden those fears even from myself. Now, here was the proof. “Appoint a king to rule us, just like every other nation!”  I cannot vouch for my expression when I heard this demand. I was not a man given to tears, but after all I had done for them—after devoting forty-eight years to judging these people, delivering them from the Philistines and bringing them back to true worship of the Lord, they had rejected me. Their words felt like a personal betrayal. “I will bring your request before the Lord,” was all I could manage before I retreated from them, slamming the door to my home in their faces.    I'd continued in prayer from then until now, on my knees in the temple before the Lord. It was now past midnight, but the Lord never spoke according to my timeline.  “Go ahead and do what they're asking,” came the Lord's whisper at last. “They are not rejecting you. They are rejecting Me as their King.”  I swallowed, somehow both saddened and soothed to hear that the Lord felt exactly as I did.  “From the day I brought them out of Egypt until this very day they've been behaving like this, leaving Me for other gods. And now they're doing it to you.” I nodded. “I know they have, Lord,” I murmured, “they are a stubborn people. I don't know what they think a king is going to do for them that a judge won't do.” But as soon as I'd said this, I realized I did know. The judge acted in the position of Moses, constantly returning for the Lord's direction before every decision, both militarily and in government. The king would not be in such communion. He would do as he thought best, without need to consult the Lord. He would be dependent upon human wisdom, though—and because of this, he would probably be even more prone to corruption than my sons were.  “Let them have their own way,” the Lord said. “But warn them of what they're in for. Tell them what they're likely to get from a king.” I knew enough of how kings of neighboring nations behaved to be able to guess what He meant, but He gave me a vision of it anyway.  When the Lord's vision finished, I rose, feeling desolate. I wasn't entirely sure if I was now sharing in the Lord's own heartbreak, or because my own vision for the latter part of my life had been destroyed, or because I had been forced to confront my sons' corruption. I splashed water on my face and went to my own home, walking the dark, empty streets illuminated only by moonlight. I always imagined that the Lord Himself walked beside me on these moonlit strolls. Tonight, I needed the company.  The next morning I sent for Joel and Abijah. I told them first what the people had said, so that they could get their own initial outrage out of the way before they encountered the news publicly. It went precisely as I had imagined it would. Joel sulked and turned stony and silent. Abijah threw a fit, shouting, throwing, and breaking things.  “What are we supposed to do now, then?” he demanded. “You raised us to be Israel's judges!”  “That was my own fault,” I sighed heavily. “You both have other skills—Joel, you have some knowledge as a farmer, and Abijah, you can work for your brother—” “Work for my brother?” Abijah ranted, “it's his fault the elders of Israel rejected us! He's the cheater!”  Joel leapt to his feet, and the boys almost came to blows in a pattern they had repeated hundreds of times since they were children. I always inserted myself between them to force them apart, if I was present at the time. If not, someone got bloody. I played my role again now, but felt too tired to engage with their accusations.  “The elders will assemble to hear the word of the Lord in one hour,” I told them. “It would be seemly if you were both present and in one piece. If you are not… well. That will be your choice.” Then I turned and walked away, ignoring their shouts and protests.  My sons did not appear with the elders in front of the temple an hour later, to my sorrow but not to my surprise. To do so would have required a measure of humility I knew they did not possess. If they had, we might not be in this situation in the first place. “This is the way the kind of king you desire would operate,” I called out to the people in warning once they quieted down. “He'll take your sons and make soldiers of them—cavalry, infantry, regimented in battalions and squadrons. He'll put some to forced labor on his farms, plowing and harvesting, and others to making either weapons of war or chariots in which he can ride in luxury. He'll put your daughters to work as beauticians and waitresses and cooks. He'll conscript your best fields, vineyards, and orchards and hand them over to his special friends. He'll tax your harvests and vintage to support his extensive bureaucracy. Your prize workers and best animals he'll take for his own use. He'll lay a tax on your flocks and you'll end up no better than slaves. The day will come when you will cry in desperation because of this king you so much want for yourselves. But don't expect God to answer.” The elders in the front row cried out, “We will have a king to rule us!” Another voice rose above the clamor of agreement, adding, “Then we'll be just like all the other nations. Our king will rule us and lead us and fight our battles!” My heart felt so heavy. Didn't they know that until now, God had fought their battles for them? Yet they wanted a leader they could see.  Do as they say, I heard the Lord whisper to me. Make them a king. I took a deep breath and cried, “The Lord has heard you! Go home, each of you to your own city.” They dispersed slowly, and I stood there on the temple steps until the last of them had gone. Last of all, I wandered away.  “Who, Lord?” I asked aloud once I was alone. “What man is there in Israel whom You would trust with such power?” I heard no response that day, nor the next, nor the day after that. This silence, I knew, and the wait, were the very reasons why the people wanted a king in the first place. Hearing from the Lord was unpredictable. His timing was His own. I knew enough of Him to wait in peace, but the elders tended to fret in the silence, wanting to take matters into their own hands. A king would do just that.  About a week later, the Lord finally spoke to me.  “This time tomorrow, I'm sending a man from the land of Benjamin to meet you. You're to anoint him as commander over my people Israel. He will free my people from Philistine oppression. I have heard their cries for help.” “Huh,” I replied aloud. “Benjamin?” It was the smallest of the tribes, ever since the concubine incident several generations earlier which had almost wiped them out. I'd have expected the Lord's anointed to come from any tribe but that one.  The next day was a local sacrifice in the land of Zuph, where I lived. Tradition held that I should go and bless the people's sacrifice to the Lord so that they could eat of it. Since the Lord had told me I would meet His anointed before the sacrifice would occur, I told the people to set aside the best portion of the sacrifice and give it the following day to the one I indicated to them. The day of the sacrifice, I went my way up to the high place, and stopped just as I exited the city. Two men approached: one was clearly a servant, and the other was a sight to behold. He was taller than any man of Israel I had ever seen, powerfully built, and had a head of thick dark hair and a full beard. He practically radiated with health and beauty.  He's the one, the man I told you about, the Lord said to me. He is the man who will reign over my people.  Though I had previously been heartbroken when the people asked for a king, I'd gotten used to the idea in the intervening week of silence from the Lord. Now, the moment I beheld this incredible specimen of a man, I felt a throb of pride, almost as if he were my son.  The man approached me directly. “Pardon me, but can you tell me where the Seer lives?” “I'm the Seer,” I told him. “Accompany me to the shrine and eat with me. In the morning I'll tell you all about what's on your mind, and send you on your way.” Then in a flash of insight, the Lord revealed to me why they were here and what concerned them. “By the way, your lost donkeys—the ones you've been hunting for the last three days—have been found, so don't worry about them. At this moment, Israel's future is in your hands.” The magnificent man looked thunderstruck. “But I'm only a Benjaminite, from the smallest of Israel's tribes, and from the most insignificant clan in the tribe at that,” he stammered. I was struck by the strange contrast between his looks and his manner. “Why are you talking to me like this?” I regarded him, but despite the temptation to reveal all now, I obeyed the prompting of the Lord.  “I will tell you in the morning,” I reiterated, and let the way to the high place for the feast.  When we arrived and found that all the people were already assembled, I gestured for the man, whose name turned out to be Saul, and his servant to take their seats among the people. I noticed how the people stared at him in awe, yet Saul did not seem to notice. Presumably he'd grown used to the stares over a lifetime.  I pulled the cook aside and whispered, “Bring the choice cut I pointed out to you, the one I told you to reserve.”  The cook looked slightly bemused, but did as I had asked, and brought out the thigh, placing it before Saul.  “This meal was kept aside just for you,” I announced to Saul, loudly enough that all who were assembled could hear. “Eat! It was especially prepared for this time and occasion with these guests.” Saul looked terribly embarrassed, but after a feeble protest or two, he eventually did as I had bid him. The rest of us took our portions of the sacrifice from what was left. We all ate and drank merrily before the Lord, and then Saul and his servant returned with me back to my house. I prepared a bed for them in the top of the house cooled by the breeze, and slept little that night myself.  At daybreak I called to Saul, “Get up and I'll send you off.” I offered them breakfast, and walked with them to the outskirts of the city, but then at last told Saul, “Tell your servant to go on ahead of us. You stay with me for a bit. I have a word of God to give you.” After my promise the day before, and also my strange behavior at the feast, Saul had evidently been expecting this. He simply nodded to his servant, who sped up while we hung back.  When the servant was far enough ahead that Saul and I were alone, I withdrew from my cloak a flask of anointing oil, and gestured for Saul to kneel before me. He did so, and I poured the oil over his thick black hair until it ran down his beard. He looked astonished, as I took his face in my hands, kissing him on both cheeks.  “Do you see what this means?” I proclaimed, “God has anointed you commander over his people. This sign will confirm God's anointing of you as king over his inheritance: After you leave me today, as you get closer to your home country of Benjamin, you'll meet two men near Rachel's Tomb. They'll say, ‘The donkeys you went to look for are found. Your father has forgotten about the donkeys and is worried about you, wringing his hands—quite beside himself!' Leaving there, you'll arrive at the Oak of Tabor. There you'll meet three men going up to worship God at Bethel. One will be carrying three young goats, another carrying three sacks of bread, and the third a jug of wine. They'll say, ‘Hello, how are you?' and offer you two loaves of bread, which you will accept. Next, you'll come to Gibeah of God, where there's a Philistine garrison. As you approach the town, you'll run into a bunch of prophets coming down from the high place, playing harps and tambourines, flutes and drums. And they'll be prophesying. Before you know it, the Spirit of God will come on you and you'll be prophesying right along with them. And you'll be transformed into a new person! When these confirming signs are accomplished, you'll know that you're ready: Whatever job you're given to do, do it. God is with you! Now, go down to Gilgal and I will follow. I'll come down and join you in worship by sacrificing burnt offerings and peace offerings. Wait seven days. Then I'll come and tell you what to do next.”  Saul stared at me in mute amazement as I said all of this; I could almost see his brain spinning as he tried to process all that I had said. I gestured for Saul to rise to his feet, which he did as if in a daze. I marveled once again, now that he was right next to me, at what a tower of a man he was. Then I patted him on the back to give him the indication to get going and to catch up with his servant.  Seven days later, I called all the people together at Mizpah. I was excited: today was to be the great day of the Lord's unveiling of the people's king. My sons, once again, were conspicuously absent—sulking, no doubt—but I did not let this bother me. I wondered if, after the Spirit of the Lord had come upon Saul, I would even recognize him as the timid man I had met on the road.  When all the people were assembled, I stood up and spoke to all of them as I had weeks ago spoken to the elders.  “This is God's personal message to you: ‘I brought Israel up out of Egypt. I delivered you from Egyptian oppression—yes, from all the bullying governments that made your life miserable. And now you want nothing to do with your God, the very God who has a history of getting you out of troubles of all sorts. And now you say, ‘No! We want a king; give us a king!' Well, if that's what you want, that's what you'll get! Present yourselves formally before God, ranked in tribes and families.” I wanted to maximize the impact of this ceremony—not just announce Saul as the king, but to really give the moment the build-up it deserved. When I chose the tribe of Benjamin, I heard the whispers. They were my own reaction, and Saul's as well. I waited for the whispers to subside, and then announced, “Tribe of Benjamin, now arrange yourselves by families!” They did so, and I frowned—Saul was a head taller than all the men of Israel. I should have been able to spot him easily. Where was he? Yet I felt the Lord lead me to the family of Matri, so I chose them. The men of the family came forward, and I scanned the lot of them, searching for the face I expected.  “Saul, son of Kish, is the man!” I cried out, with rather less impact than I had hoped. “But where is he?”  I felt the Lord draw my attention to a pile of baggage brought by their tribe, since they had to come from all over Israel for this ceremony. I heard the Lord say to me, he's right over there—hidden in that pile of baggage. I felt a wave of—dread? embarrassment?—but I walked toward the pile of baggage with my head held high, gesturing for some of Saul's own family to help me move the bags one by one. I uncovered Saul's chagrined face, which was bright red, as well it should be.  “Get up,” I hissed. “Fortunately for you, not everyone in Israel has a good view of this ridiculousness!”  Saul crawled out from under the pile in which he'd been hiding, and brushed himself off. I pulled him up to the raised area from which I had been speaking, and added under my breath, “Head high, and for goodness' sake, try to look like a king!” Then I cried to the people, trusting that Saul's extraordinary looks would be the first thing they would notice, “Take a good look at whom God has chosen: the best! No one like him in the whole country!” “Long live the king!” the people cried out, their voices joining together and rising in a crescendo. “Long live the king!”  That was a good start. I hoped it meant the story of the baggage wouldn't spread, but as I left, I overheard the whispers.  “Deliverer? Don't make me laugh!”  “How can this man save us? He hid himself at his own coronation!”  “What a marvelous leader he must be!”  I closed my eyes but chose not to rebuke them on Saul's behalf. He would have to do that himself.  He was Israel's leader now, after all—not me. 

Today in the Word Devotional

Before the American Civil War, The Liberator was an influential weekly newspaper that campaigned for abolition. For 35 years, founder William Lloyd Garrison demanded the immediate emancipation of all American slaves. Though controversial, he stood his ground. As he wrote in the very first issue: “I will be as harsh as truth, and as uncompromising as justice.” The paper ceased publication at the end of 1865, its goal accomplished. Moses was chosen by God to accomplish the liberation of the Israelites from slavery. On October 3rd, he looked like a somewhat pathetic choice, but with God on his side, the slaves’ freedom was won, and decisively so. Everything happened just as the Lord decreed: The firstborn of Egypt were struck down, but Israelites with the lamb’s blood on their doorposts were spared (vv. 29–30). Egypt’s defeat was total and humiliating (vv. 31–32). Pharaoh who had said he would never see Moses again, on pain of death, was forced to summon him to the palace and set the Israelites free. He even requested that Moses bless him! The former slaves’ departure was rushed, just as God had said it would be (vv. 33–36). The Egyptians were somehow both afraid—please leave or we’ll all die—and “favorably disposed” toward the Israelites, showering them with gold, silver, and clothing: “So they plundered the Egyptians” (v. 36). The Israelites numbered 600,000 men, or in total probably about two million people. “Many other people” left with them, perhaps other slaves or even some converted Egyptians (vv. 37–39). There was no doubt who had won the victory: “The Lord kept vigil that night to bring them out of Egypt” (v. 42). Four hundred and thirty years of slavery came to a dramatic end! >> Though they take some artistic license, movies such as The Ten Commandments and The Prince of Egypt can help the life of Moses come alive for you and your family. Why not plan to watch one together?

ESV: Every Day in the Word
October 8: Isaiah 31–33; Hebrews 13:20–25; Psalm 91; Proverbs 25:11–14

ESV: Every Day in the Word

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 11:15


Old Testament: Isaiah 31–33 Isaiah 31–33 (Listen) Woe to Those Who Go Down to Egypt 31   Woe1 to those who go down to Egypt for help    and rely on horses,  who trust in chariots because they are many    and in horsemen because they are very strong,  but do not look to the Holy One of Israel    or consult the LORD!2   And yet he is wise and brings disaster;    he does not call back his words,  but will arise against the house of the evildoers    and against the helpers of those who work iniquity.3   The Egyptians are man, and not God,    and their horses are flesh, and not spirit.  When the LORD stretches out his hand,    the helper will stumble, and he who is helped will fall,    and they will all perish together. 4   For thus the LORD said to me,  “As a lion or a young lion growls over his prey,    and when a band of shepherds is called out against him  he is not terrified by their shouting    or daunted at their noise,  so the LORD of hosts will come down    to fight2 on Mount Zion and on its hill.5   Like birds hovering, so the LORD of hosts    will protect Jerusalem;  he will protect and deliver it;    he will spare and rescue it.” 6 Turn to him from whom people3 have deeply revolted, O children of Israel. 7 For in that day everyone shall cast away his idols of silver and his idols of gold, which your hands have sinfully made for you. 8   “And the Assyrian shall fall by a sword, not of man;    and a sword, not of man, shall devour him;  and he shall flee from the sword,    and his young men shall be put to forced labor.9   His rock shall pass away in terror,    and his officers desert the standard in panic,”  declares the LORD, whose fire is in Zion,    and whose furnace is in Jerusalem. A King Will Reign in Righteousness 32   Behold, a king will reign in righteousness,    and princes will rule in justice.2   Each will be like a hiding place from the wind,    a shelter from the storm,  like streams of water in a dry place,    like the shade of a great rock in a weary land.3   Then the eyes of those who see will not be closed,    and the ears of those who hear will give attention.4   The heart of the hasty will understand and know,    and the tongue of the stammerers will hasten to speak distinctly.5   The fool will no more be called noble,    nor the scoundrel said to be honorable.6   For the fool speaks folly,    and his heart is busy with iniquity,  to practice ungodliness,    to utter error concerning the LORD,  to leave the craving of the hungry unsatisfied,    and to deprive the thirsty of drink.7   As for the scoundrel—his devices are evil;    he plans wicked schemes  to ruin the poor with lying words,    even when the plea of the needy is right.8   But he who is noble plans noble things,    and on noble things he stands. Complacent Women Warned of Disaster 9   Rise up, you women who are at ease, hear my voice;    you complacent daughters, give ear to my speech.10   In little more than a year    you will shudder, you complacent women;  for the grape harvest fails,    the fruit harvest will not come.11   Tremble, you women who are at ease,    shudder, you complacent ones;  strip, and make yourselves bare,    and tie sackcloth around your waist.12   Beat your breasts for the pleasant fields,    for the fruitful vine,13   for the soil of my people    growing up in thorns and briers,  yes, for all the joyous houses    in the exultant city.14   For the palace is forsaken,    the populous city deserted;  the hill and the watchtower    will become dens forever,  a joy of wild donkeys,    a pasture of flocks;15   until the Spirit is poured upon us from on high,    and the wilderness becomes a fruitful field,    and the fruitful field is deemed a forest.16   Then justice will dwell in the wilderness,    and righteousness abide in the fruitful field.17   And the effect of righteousness will be peace,    and the result of righteousness, quietness and trust4 forever.18   My people will abide in a peaceful habitation,    in secure dwellings, and in quiet resting places.19   And it will hail when the forest falls down,    and the city will be utterly laid low.20   Happy are you who sow beside all waters,    who let the feet of the ox and the donkey range free. O Lord, Be Gracious to Us 33   Ah, you destroyer,    who yourself have not been destroyed,  you traitor,    whom none has betrayed!  When you have ceased to destroy,    you will be destroyed;  and when you have finished betraying,    they will betray you. 2   O LORD, be gracious to us; we wait for you.    Be our arm every morning,    our salvation in the time of trouble.3   At the tumultuous noise peoples flee;    when you lift yourself up, nations are scattered,4   and your spoil is gathered as the caterpillar gathers;    as locusts leap, it is leapt upon. 5   The LORD is exalted, for he dwells on high;    he will fill Zion with justice and righteousness,6   and he will be the stability of your times,    abundance of salvation, wisdom, and knowledge;    the fear of the LORD is Zion's5 treasure. 7   Behold, their heroes cry in the streets;    the envoys of peace weep bitterly.8   The highways lie waste;    the traveler ceases.  Covenants are broken;    cities6 are despised;    there is no regard for man.9   The land mourns and languishes;    Lebanon is confounded and withers away;  Sharon is like a desert,    and Bashan and Carmel shake off their leaves. 10   “Now I will arise,” says the LORD,    “now I will lift myself up;    now I will be exalted.11   You conceive chaff; you give birth to stubble;    your breath is a fire that will consume you.12   And the peoples will be as if burned to lime,    like thorns cut down, that are burned in the fire.” 13   Hear, you who are far off, what I have done;    and you who are near, acknowledge my might.14   The sinners in Zion are afraid;    trembling has seized the godless:  “Who among us can dwell with the consuming fire?    Who among us can dwell with everlasting burnings?”15   He who walks righteously and speaks uprightly,    who despises the gain of oppressions,  who shakes his hands, lest they hold a bribe,    who stops his ears from hearing of bloodshed    and shuts his eyes from looking on evil,16   he will dwell on the heights;    his place of defense will be the fortresses of rocks;    his bread will be given him; his water will be sure. 17   Your eyes will behold the king in his beauty;    they will see a land that stretches afar.18   Your heart will muse on the terror:    “Where is he who counted, where is he who weighed the tribute?    Where is he who counted the towers?”19   You will see no more the insolent people,    the people of an obscure speech that you cannot comprehend,    stammering in a tongue that you cannot understand.20   Behold Zion, the city of our appointed feasts!    Your eyes will see Jerusalem,    an untroubled habitation, an immovable tent,  whose stakes will never be plucked up,    nor will any of its cords be broken.21   But there the LORD in majesty will be for us    a place of broad rivers and streams,  where no galley with oars can go,    nor majestic ship can pass.22   For the LORD is our judge; the LORD is our lawgiver;    the LORD is our king; he will save us. 23   Your cords hang loose;    they cannot hold the mast firm in its place    or keep the sail spread out.  Then prey and spoil in abundance will be divided;    even the lame will take the prey.24   And no inhabitant will say, “I am sick”;    the people who dwell there will be forgiven their iniquity. Footnotes [1] 31:1 Or Ah, [2] 31:4 The Hebrew words for hosts and to fight sound alike [3] 31:6 Hebrew they [4] 32:17 Or security [5] 33:6 Hebrew his [6] 33:8 Masoretic Text; Dead Sea Scroll witnesses (ESV) New Testament: Hebrews 13:20–25 Hebrews 13:20–25 (Listen) Benediction 20 Now may the God of peace who brought again from the dead our Lord Jesus, the great shepherd of the sheep, by the blood of the eternal covenant, 21 equip you with everything good that you may do his will, working in us1 that which is pleasing in his sight, through Jesus Christ, to whom be glory forever and ever. Amen. Final Greetings 22 I appeal to you, brothers,2 bear with my word of exhortation, for I have written to you briefly. 23 You should know that our brother Timothy has been released, with whom I shall see you if he comes soon. 24 Greet all your leaders and all the saints. Those who come from Italy send you greetings. 25 Grace be with all of you. Footnotes [1] 13:21 Some manuscripts you [2] 13:22 Or brothers and sisters (ESV) Psalm: Psalm 91 Psalm 91 (Listen) My Refuge and My Fortress 91   He who dwells in the shelter of the Most High    will abide in the shadow of the Almighty.2   I will say1 to the LORD, “My refuge and my fortress,    my God, in whom I trust.” 3   For he will deliver you from the snare of the fowler    and from the deadly pestilence.4   He will cover you with his pinions,    and under his wings you will find refuge;    his faithfulness is a shield and buckler.5   You will not fear the terror of the night,    nor the arrow that flies by day,6   nor the pestilence that stalks in darkness,    nor the destruction that wastes at noonday. 7   A thousand may fall at your side,    ten thousand at your right hand,    but it will not come near you.8   You will only look with your eyes    and see the recompense of the wicked. 9   Because you have made the LORD your dwelling place—    the Most High, who is my refuge2—10   no evil shall be allowed to befall you,    no plague come near your tent. 11   For he will command his angels concerning you    to guard you in all your ways.12   On their hands they will bear you up,    lest you strike your foot against a stone.13   You will tread on the lion and the adder;    the young lion and the serpent you will trample underfoot. 14   “Because he holds fast to me in love, I will deliver him;    I will protect him, because he knows my name.15   When he calls to me, I will answer him;    I will be with him in trouble;    I will rescue him and honor him.16   With long life I will satisfy him    and show him my salvation.” Footnotes [1] 91:2 Septuagint He will say [2] 91:9 Or For you, O Lord, are my refuge! You have made the Most High your dwelling place (ESV) Proverb: Proverbs 25:11–14 Proverbs 25:11–14 (Listen) 11   A word fitly spoken    is like apples of gold in a setting of silver.12   Like a gold ring or an ornament of gold    is a wise reprover to a listening ear.13   Like the cold of snow in the time of harvest    is a faithful messenger to those who send him;    he refreshes the soul of his masters.14   Like clouds and wind without rain    is a man who boasts of a gift he does not give. (ESV)

ESV: Through the Bible in a Year
October 8: Isaiah 31–33; Psalm 91; Acts 15

ESV: Through the Bible in a Year

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 15:12


Old Testament: Isaiah 31–33 Isaiah 31–33 (Listen) Woe to Those Who Go Down to Egypt 31   Woe1 to those who go down to Egypt for help    and rely on horses,  who trust in chariots because they are many    and in horsemen because they are very strong,  but do not look to the Holy One of Israel    or consult the LORD!2   And yet he is wise and brings disaster;    he does not call back his words,  but will arise against the house of the evildoers    and against the helpers of those who work iniquity.3   The Egyptians are man, and not God,    and their horses are flesh, and not spirit.  When the LORD stretches out his hand,    the helper will stumble, and he who is helped will fall,    and they will all perish together. 4   For thus the LORD said to me,  “As a lion or a young lion growls over his prey,    and when a band of shepherds is called out against him  he is not terrified by their shouting    or daunted at their noise,  so the LORD of hosts will come down    to fight2 on Mount Zion and on its hill.5   Like birds hovering, so the LORD of hosts    will protect Jerusalem;  he will protect and deliver it;    he will spare and rescue it.” 6 Turn to him from whom people3 have deeply revolted, O children of Israel. 7 For in that day everyone shall cast away his idols of silver and his idols of gold, which your hands have sinfully made for you. 8   “And the Assyrian shall fall by a sword, not of man;    and a sword, not of man, shall devour him;  and he shall flee from the sword,    and his young men shall be put to forced labor.9   His rock shall pass away in terror,    and his officers desert the standard in panic,”  declares the LORD, whose fire is in Zion,    and whose furnace is in Jerusalem. A King Will Reign in Righteousness 32   Behold, a king will reign in righteousness,    and princes will rule in justice.2   Each will be like a hiding place from the wind,    a shelter from the storm,  like streams of water in a dry place,    like the shade of a great rock in a weary land.3   Then the eyes of those who see will not be closed,    and the ears of those who hear will give attention.4   The heart of the hasty will understand and know,    and the tongue of the stammerers will hasten to speak distinctly.5   The fool will no more be called noble,    nor the scoundrel said to be honorable.6   For the fool speaks folly,    and his heart is busy with iniquity,  to practice ungodliness,    to utter error concerning the LORD,  to leave the craving of the hungry unsatisfied,    and to deprive the thirsty of drink.7   As for the scoundrel—his devices are evil;    he plans wicked schemes  to ruin the poor with lying words,    even when the plea of the needy is right.8   But he who is noble plans noble things,    and on noble things he stands. Complacent Women Warned of Disaster 9   Rise up, you women who are at ease, hear my voice;    you complacent daughters, give ear to my speech.10   In little more than a year    you will shudder, you complacent women;  for the grape harvest fails,    the fruit harvest will not come.11   Tremble, you women who are at ease,    shudder, you complacent ones;  strip, and make yourselves bare,    and tie sackcloth around your waist.12   Beat your breasts for the pleasant fields,    for the fruitful vine,13   for the soil of my people    growing up in thorns and briers,  yes, for all the joyous houses    in the exultant city.14   For the palace is forsaken,    the populous city deserted;  the hill and the watchtower    will become dens forever,  a joy of wild donkeys,    a pasture of flocks;15   until the Spirit is poured upon us from on high,    and the wilderness becomes a fruitful field,    and the fruitful field is deemed a forest.16   Then justice will dwell in the wilderness,    and righteousness abide in the fruitful field.17   And the effect of righteousness will be peace,    and the result of righteousness, quietness and trust4 forever.18   My people will abide in a peaceful habitation,    in secure dwellings, and in quiet resting places.19   And it will hail when the forest falls down,    and the city will be utterly laid low.20   Happy are you who sow beside all waters,    who let the feet of the ox and the donkey range free. O Lord, Be Gracious to Us 33   Ah, you destroyer,    who yourself have not been destroyed,  you traitor,    whom none has betrayed!  When you have ceased to destroy,    you will be destroyed;  and when you have finished betraying,    they will betray you. 2   O LORD, be gracious to us; we wait for you.    Be our arm every morning,    our salvation in the time of trouble.3   At the tumultuous noise peoples flee;    when you lift yourself up, nations are scattered,4   and your spoil is gathered as the caterpillar gathers;    as locusts leap, it is leapt upon. 5   The LORD is exalted, for he dwells on high;    he will fill Zion with justice and righteousness,6   and he will be the stability of your times,    abundance of salvation, wisdom, and knowledge;    the fear of the LORD is Zion's5 treasure. 7   Behold, their heroes cry in the streets;    the envoys of peace weep bitterly.8   The highways lie waste;    the traveler ceases.  Covenants are broken;    cities6 are despised;    there is no regard for man.9   The land mourns and languishes;    Lebanon is confounded and withers away;  Sharon is like a desert,    and Bashan and Carmel shake off their leaves. 10   “Now I will arise,” says the LORD,    “now I will lift myself up;    now I will be exalted.11   You conceive chaff; you give birth to stubble;    your breath is a fire that will consume you.12   And the peoples will be as if burned to lime,    like thorns cut down, that are burned in the fire.” 13   Hear, you who are far off, what I have done;    and you who are near, acknowledge my might.14   The sinners in Zion are afraid;    trembling has seized the godless:  “Who among us can dwell with the consuming fire?    Who among us can dwell with everlasting burnings?”15   He who walks righteously and speaks uprightly,    who despises the gain of oppressions,  who shakes his hands, lest they hold a bribe,    who stops his ears from hearing of bloodshed    and shuts his eyes from looking on evil,16   he will dwell on the heights;    his place of defense will be the fortresses of rocks;    his bread will be given him; his water will be sure. 17   Your eyes will behold the king in his beauty;    they will see a land that stretches afar.18   Your heart will muse on the terror:    “Where is he who counted, where is he who weighed the tribute?    Where is he who counted the towers?”19   You will see no more the insolent people,    the people of an obscure speech that you cannot comprehend,    stammering in a tongue that you cannot understand.20   Behold Zion, the city of our appointed feasts!    Your eyes will see Jerusalem,    an untroubled habitation, an immovable tent,  whose stakes will never be plucked up,    nor will any of its cords be broken.21   But there the LORD in majesty will be for us    a place of broad rivers and streams,  where no galley with oars can go,    nor majestic ship can pass.22   For the LORD is our judge; the LORD is our lawgiver;    the LORD is our king; he will save us. 23   Your cords hang loose;    they cannot hold the mast firm in its place    or keep the sail spread out.  Then prey and spoil in abundance will be divided;    even the lame will take the prey.24   And no inhabitant will say, “I am sick”;    the people who dwell there will be forgiven their iniquity. Footnotes [1] 31:1 Or Ah, [2] 31:4 The Hebrew words for hosts and to fight sound alike [3] 31:6 Hebrew they [4] 32:17 Or security [5] 33:6 Hebrew his [6] 33:8 Masoretic Text; Dead Sea Scroll witnesses (ESV) Psalm: Psalm 91 Psalm 91 (Listen) My Refuge and My Fortress 91   He who dwells in the shelter of the Most High    will abide in the shadow of the Almighty.2   I will say1 to the LORD, “My refuge and my fortress,    my God, in whom I trust.” 3   For he will deliver you from the snare of the fowler    and from the deadly pestilence.4   He will cover you with his pinions,    and under his wings you will find refuge;    his faithfulness is a shield and buckler.5   You will not fear the terror of the night,    nor the arrow that flies by day,6   nor the pestilence that stalks in darkness,    nor the destruction that wastes at noonday. 7   A thousand may fall at your side,    ten thousand at your right hand,    but it will not come near you.8   You will only look with your eyes    and see the recompense of the wicked. 9   Because you have made the LORD your dwelling place—    the Most High, who is my refuge2—10   no evil shall be allowed to befall you,    no plague come near your tent. 11   For he will command his angels concerning you    to guard you in all your ways.12   On their hands they will bear you up,    lest you strike your foot against a stone.13   You will tread on the lion and the adder;    the young lion and the serpent you will trample underfoot. 14   “Because he holds fast to me in love, I will deliver him;    I will protect him, because he knows my name.15   When he calls to me, I will answer him;    I will be with him in trouble;    I will rescue him and honor him.16   With long life I will satisfy him    and show him my salvation.” Footnotes [1] 91:2 Septuagint He will say [2] 91:9 Or For you, O Lord, are my refuge! You have made the Most High your dwelling place (ESV) New Testament: Acts 15 Acts 15 (Listen) The Jerusalem Council 15 But some men came down from Judea and were teaching the brothers, “Unless you are circumcised according to the custom of Moses, you cannot be saved.” 2 And after Paul and Barnabas had no small dissension and debate with them, Paul and Barnabas and some of the others were appointed to go up to Jerusalem to the apostles and the elders about this question. 3 So, being sent on their way by the church, they passed through both Phoenicia and Samaria, describing in detail the conversion of the Gentiles, and brought great joy to all the brothers.1 4 When they came to Jerusalem, they were welcomed by the church and the apostles and the elders, and they declared all that God had done with them. 5 But some believers who belonged to the party of the Pharisees rose up and said, “It is necessary to circumcise them and to order them to keep the law of Moses.” 6 The apostles and the elders were gathered together to consider this matter. 7 And after there had been much debate, Peter stood up and said to them, “Brothers, you know that in the early days God made a choice among you, that by my mouth the Gentiles should hear the word of the gospel and believe. 8 And God, who knows the heart, bore witness to them, by giving them the Holy Spirit just as he did to us, 9 and he made no distinction between us and them, having cleansed their hearts by faith. 10 Now, therefore, why are you putting God to the test by placing a yoke on the neck of the disciples that neither our fathers nor we have been able to bear? 11 But we believe that we will be saved through the grace of the Lord Jesus, just as they will.” 12 And all the assembly fell silent, and they listened to Barnabas and Paul as they related what signs and wonders God had done through them among the Gentiles. 13 After they finished speaking, James replied, “Brothers, listen to me. 14 Simeon has related how God first visited the Gentiles, to take from them a people for his name. 15 And with this the words of the prophets agree, just as it is written, 16   “‘After this I will return,  and I will rebuild the tent of David that has fallen;  I will rebuild its ruins,     and I will restore it,17   that the remnant2 of mankind may seek the Lord,    and all the Gentiles who are called by my name,    says the Lord, who makes these things 18 known from of old.' 19 Therefore my judgment is that we should not trouble those of the Gentiles who turn to God, 20 but should write to them to abstain from the things polluted by idols, and from sexual immorality, and from what has been strangled, and from blood. 21 For from ancient generations Moses has had in every city those who proclaim him, for he is read every Sabbath in the synagogues.” The Council's Letter to Gentile Believers 22 Then it seemed good to the apostles and the elders, with the whole church, to choose men from among them and send them to Antioch with Paul and Barnabas. They sent Judas called Barsabbas, and Silas, leading men among the brothers, 23 with the following letter: “The brothers, both the apostles and the elders, to the brothers3 who are of the Gentiles in Antioch and Syria and Cilicia, greetings. 24 Since we have heard that some persons have gone out from us and troubled you4 with words, unsettling your minds, although we gave them no instructions, 25 it has seemed

ESV: Digging Deep into the Bible
October 8: Psalm 68; 1 Kings 3; Ezekiel 29–30; Romans 3:9–20

ESV: Digging Deep into the Bible

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 18:09


Psalms and Wisdom: Psalm 68 Psalm 68 (Listen) God Shall Scatter His Enemies To the choirmaster. A Psalm of David. A Song. 68   God shall arise, his enemies shall be scattered;    and those who hate him shall flee before him!2   As smoke is driven away, so you shall drive them away;    as wax melts before fire,    so the wicked shall perish before God!3   But the righteous shall be glad;    they shall exult before God;    they shall be jubilant with joy! 4   Sing to God, sing praises to his name;    lift up a song to him who rides through the deserts;  his name is the LORD;    exult before him!5   Father of the fatherless and protector of widows    is God in his holy habitation.6   God settles the solitary in a home;    he leads out the prisoners to prosperity,    but the rebellious dwell in a parched land. 7   O God, when you went out before your people,    when you marched through the wilderness, Selah8   the earth quaked, the heavens poured down rain,    before God, the One of Sinai,    before God,1 the God of Israel.9   Rain in abundance, O God, you shed abroad;    you restored your inheritance as it languished;10   your flock2 found a dwelling in it;    in your goodness, O God, you provided for the needy. 11   The Lord gives the word;    the women who announce the news are a great host:12     “The kings of the armies—they flee, they flee!”  The women at home divide the spoil—13     though you men lie among the sheepfolds—  the wings of a dove covered with silver,    its pinions with shimmering gold.14   When the Almighty scatters kings there,    let snow fall on Zalmon. 15   O mountain of God, mountain of Bashan;    O many-peaked3 mountain, mountain of Bashan!16   Why do you look with hatred, O many-peaked mountain,    at the mount that God desired for his abode,    yes, where the LORD will dwell forever?17   The chariots of God are twice ten thousand,    thousands upon thousands;    the Lord is among them; Sinai is now in the sanctuary.18   You ascended on high,    leading a host of captives in your train    and receiving gifts among men,  even among the rebellious, that the LORD God may dwell there. 19   Blessed be the Lord,    who daily bears us up;    God is our salvation. Selah20   Our God is a God of salvation,    and to GOD, the Lord, belong deliverances from death.21   But God will strike the heads of his enemies,    the hairy crown of him who walks in his guilty ways.22   The Lord said,    “I will bring them back from Bashan,  I will bring them back from the depths of the sea,23   that you may strike your feet in their blood,    that the tongues of your dogs may have their portion from the foe.” 24   Your procession is4 seen, O God,    the procession of my God, my King, into the sanctuary—25   the singers in front, the musicians last,    between them virgins playing tambourines:26   “Bless God in the great congregation,    the LORD, O you5 who are of Israel's fountain!”27   There is Benjamin, the least of them, in the lead,    the princes of Judah in their throng,    the princes of Zebulun, the princes of Naphtali. 28   Summon your power, O God,6    the power, O God, by which you have worked for us.29   Because of your temple at Jerusalem    kings shall bear gifts to you.30   Rebuke the beasts that dwell among the reeds,    the herd of bulls with the calves of the peoples.  Trample underfoot those who lust after tribute;    scatter the peoples who delight in war.731   Nobles shall come from Egypt;    Cush shall hasten to stretch out her hands to God. 32   O kingdoms of the earth, sing to God;    sing praises to the Lord, Selah33   to him who rides in the heavens, the ancient heavens;    behold, he sends out his voice, his mighty voice.34   Ascribe power to God,    whose majesty is over Israel,    and whose power is in the skies.35   Awesome is God from his8 sanctuary;    the God of Israel—he is the one who gives power and strength to his people.  Blessed be God! Footnotes [1] 68:8 Or before God, even Sinai before God [2] 68:10 Or your congregation [3] 68:15 Or hunch-backed; also verse 16 [4] 68:24 Or has been [5] 68:26 The Hebrew for you is plural here [6] 68:28 By revocalization (compare Septuagint); Hebrew Your God has summoned your power [7] 68:30 The meaning of the Hebrew verse is uncertain [8] 68:35 Septuagint; Hebrew your (ESV) Pentateuch and History: 1 Kings 3 1 Kings 3 (Listen) Solomon's Prayer for Wisdom 3 Solomon made a marriage alliance with Pharaoh king of Egypt. He took Pharaoh's daughter and brought her into the city of David until he had finished building his own house and the house of the LORD and the wall around Jerusalem. 2 The people were sacrificing at the high places, however, because no house had yet been built for the name of the LORD. 3 Solomon loved the LORD, walking in the statutes of David his father, only he sacrificed and made offerings at the high places. 4 And the king went to Gibeon to sacrifice there, for that was the great high place. Solomon used to offer a thousand burnt offerings on that altar. 5 At Gibeon the LORD appeared to Solomon in a dream by night, and God said, “Ask what I shall give you.” 6 And Solomon said, “You have shown great and steadfast love to your servant David my father, because he walked before you in faithfulness, in righteousness, and in uprightness of heart toward you. And you have kept for him this great and steadfast love and have given him a son to sit on his throne this day. 7 And now, O LORD my God, you have made your servant king in place of David my father, although I am but a little child. I do not know how to go out or come in. 8 And your servant is in the midst of your people whom you have chosen, a great people, too many to be numbered or counted for multitude. 9 Give your servant therefore an understanding mind to govern your people, that I may discern between good and evil, for who is able to govern this your great people?” 10 It pleased the Lord that Solomon had asked this. 11 And God said to him, “Because you have asked this, and have not asked for yourself long life or riches or the life of your enemies, but have asked for yourself understanding to discern what is right, 12 behold, I now do according to your word. Behold, I give you a wise and discerning mind, so that none like you has been before you and none like you shall arise after you. 13 I give you also what you have not asked, both riches and honor, so that no other king shall compare with you, all your days. 14 And if you will walk in my ways, keeping my statutes and my commandments, as your father David walked, then I will lengthen your days.” 15 And Solomon awoke, and behold, it was a dream. Then he came to Jerusalem and stood before the ark of the covenant of the Lord, and offered up burnt offerings and peace offerings, and made a feast for all his servants. Solomon's Wisdom 16 Then two prostitutes came to the king and stood before him. 17 The one woman said, “Oh, my lord, this woman and I live in the same house, and I gave birth to a child while she was in the house. 18 Then on the third day after I gave birth, this woman also gave birth. And we were alone. There was no one else with us in the house; only we two were in the house. 19 And this woman's son died in the night, because she lay on him. 20 And she arose at midnight and took my son from beside me, while your servant slept, and laid him at her breast, and laid her dead son at my breast. 21 When I rose in the morning to nurse my child, behold, he was dead. But when I looked at him closely in the morning, behold, he was not the child that I had borne.” 22 But the other woman said, “No, the living child is mine, and the dead child is yours.” The first said, “No, the dead child is yours, and the living child is mine.” Thus they spoke before the king. 23 Then the king said, “The one says, ‘This is my son that is alive, and your son is dead'; and the other says, ‘No; but your son is dead, and my son is the living one.'” 24 And the king said, “Bring me a sword.” So a sword was brought before the king. 25 And the king said, “Divide the living child in two, and give half to the one and half to the other.” 26 Then the woman whose son was alive said to the king, because her heart yearned for her son, “Oh, my lord, give her the living child, and by no means put him to death.” But the other said, “He shall be neither mine nor yours; divide him.” 27 Then the king answered and said, “Give the living child to the first woman, and by no means put him to death; she is his mother.” 28 And all Israel heard of the judgment that the king had rendered, and they stood in awe of the king, because they perceived that the wisdom of God was in him to do justice. (ESV) Chronicles and Prophets: Ezekiel 29–30 Ezekiel 29–30 (Listen) Prophecy Against Egypt 29 In the tenth year, in the tenth month, on the twelfth day of the month, the word of the LORD came to me: 2 “Son of man, set your face against Pharaoh king of Egypt, and prophesy against him and against all Egypt; 3 speak, and say, Thus says the Lord GOD:   “Behold, I am against you,    Pharaoh king of Egypt,  the great dragon that lies    in the midst of his streams,  that says, ‘My Nile is my own;    I made it for myself.'4   I will put hooks in your jaws,    and make the fish of your streams stick to your scales;  and I will draw you up out of the midst of your streams,    with all the fish of your streams    that stick to your scales.5   And I will cast you out into the wilderness,    you and all the fish of your streams;  you shall fall on the open field,    and not be brought together or gathered.  To the beasts of the earth and to the birds of the heavens    I give you as food. 6 Then all the inhabitants of Egypt shall know that I am the LORD. “Because you1 have been a staff of reed to the house of Israel, 7 when they grasped you with the hand, you broke and tore all their shoulders; and when they leaned on you, you broke and made all their loins to shake.2 8 Therefore thus says the Lord GOD: Behold, I will bring a sword upon you, and will cut off from you man and beast, 9 and the land of Egypt shall be a desolation and a waste. Then they will know that I am the LORD. “Because you3 said, ‘The Nile is mine, and I made it,' 10 therefore, behold, I am against you and against your streams, and I will make the land of Egypt an utter waste and desolation, from Migdol to Syene, as far as the border of Cush. 11 No foot of man shall pass through it, and no foot of beast shall pass through it; it shall be uninhabited forty years. 12 And I will make the land of Egypt a desolation in the midst of desolated countries, and her cities shall be a desolation forty years among cities that are laid waste. I will scatter the Egyptians among the nations, and disperse them through the countries. 13 “For thus says the Lord GOD: At the end of forty years I will gather the Egyptians from the peoples among whom they were scattered, 14 and I will restore the fortunes of Egypt and bring them back to the land of Pathros, the land of their origin, and there they shall be a lowly kingdom. 15 It shall be the most lowly of the kingdoms, and never again exalt itself above the nations. And I will make them so small that they will never again rule over the nations. 16 And it shall never again be the reliance of the house of Israel, recalling their iniquity, when they turn to them for aid. Then they will know that I am the Lord GOD.” 17 In the twenty-seventh year, in the first month, on the first day of the month, the word of the LORD came to me: 18 “Son of man, Nebuchadnezzar king of Babylon made his army labor hard against Tyre. Every head was made bald, and every shoulder was rubbed bare, yet neither he nor his army got anything from Tyre to pay for the labor that he had performed against her. 19 Therefore thus says the Lord GOD: Behold, I will give the land of Egypt to Nebuchadnezzar king of Babylon; and he shall carry off its wealth4 and despoil it and plunder it; and it shall be the wages for his army. 20 I have given him the land of Egypt as his payment for which he labored, because they worked for me, declares the Lord GOD. 21 “On that day I will cause a horn to spring up for the house of Israel, and I will open your lips among them. Then they will know that I am the LORD.” A Lament for Egypt 30 The word of the LORD came to me: 2 “Son of man, prophesy, and say, Thus says the Lord GOD:   “Wail, ‘Alas for the day!'3     For the day is near,    the day of the LORD is near;  it will be a day of clouds,    a time of doom for5 the nations.4   A sword shall come upon Egypt,    and anguish shall be in Cush,  when the slain fall in Egypt,    and her wealth6 is carried away,    and her foundations are torn down. 5 Cush, and Put, and Lud, and all Arabia, and Libya,7 and the people of the land that is in league,8 shall fall with them by the sword. 6   “Thus says the LORD:  Those who support Egypt shall fall,    and her proud might shall come down;  from Migdol to Syene    they shall fall within her by the sword,  declares the Lord GOD.7   And they shall be desolated in the midst of desolated countries,    and their cities shall be in the midst of cities that are laid waste.8   Then they will know that I am the LORD,    when I have set fire to Egypt,    and all her helpers are broken. 9 “On that day messengers shall go out from me in ships to terrify the unsuspecting people of Cush, and anguish shall come upon them on the day of Egypt's doom;9 for, behold, it comes! 10 “Thus says the Lord GOD:   “I will put an end to the wealth of Egypt,    by the hand of Nebuchadnezzar king of Babylon.11   He and his people with him, the most ruthless of nations,    shall be brought in to destroy the land,  and they shall draw their swords against Egypt    and fill the land with the slain.12   And I will dry up the Nile    and will sell the land into the hand of evildoers;  I will bring desolation upon the land and everything in it,    by the hand of foreigners;  I am the LORD; I have spoken. 13 “Thus says the Lord GOD:   “I will destroy the idols    and put an end to the images in Memphis;  there shall no longer be a prince from the land of Egypt;    so I will put fear in the land of Egypt.14   I will make Pathros a desolation    and will set fire to Zoan    and will execute judgments on Thebes.15   And I will pour out my wrath on Pelusium,    the stronghold of Egypt,    and cut off the multitude10 of Thebes.16   And I will set fire to Egypt;    Pelusium shall be in great agony;  Thebes shall be breached,    and Memphis shall face enemies11 by day.17   The young men of On and of Pi-beseth shall fall by the sword,    and the women12 shall go into captivity.18   At Tehaphnehes the day shall be dark,    when I break there the yoke bars of Egypt,  and her proud might shall come to an end in her;    she shall be covered by a cloud,    and her daughters shall go into captivity.19   Thus I will execute judgments on Egypt.    Then they will know that I am the LORD.” Egypt Shall Fall to Babylon 20 In the eleventh year, in the first month, on the seventh day of the month, the word of the LORD came to me: 21 “Son of man, I have broken the arm of Pharaoh king of Egypt, and behold, it has not been bound up, to heal it by binding it with a bandage, so that it may become strong to wield the sword. 22 Therefore thus says the Lord GOD: Behold, I am against Pharaoh king of Egypt and will break his arms, both the strong arm and the one that was broken, and I will make the sword fall from his hand. 23 I will scatter the Egyptians among the nations and disperse them through the countries. 24 And I will strengthen the arms of the king of Babylon and put my sword in his hand, but I will break the arms of Pharaoh, and he will groan before him like a man mortally wounded. 25 

Daily Devos with Pastor Joe Focht

7:22 And Moses was learned in all the wisdom of the Egyptians, and was mighty in words and in deeds.

The Classic Tales Podcast
Ep. 753, The Knight of the Necropolis, Part 1 of 8, by Sax Rohmer

The Classic Tales Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 77:56


Antony Ferrara heats his quarters like an inferno, collects brain-eating beetles, and wears an Egyptian ring. So, why does Cairn suspect him of killing a swan? Sax Rohmer, today on The Classic Tales Podcast. Welcome to The Classic Tales Podcast. Thank you for listening. Thank you to all of our financial supporters. We couldn't do this without you, and we really appreciate your support. We've set it up so that for a five-dollar monthly donation, you get a monthly code for $8 off any audiobook order. Give more, and you get more! This way you can easily build out your classic audiobook library, and you help to give more folks like you the chance to discover the classics in a curated and easily accessible format. Go to http://classictalesaudiobooks.com today, and become a financial supporter. You'll be glad you did. Thank you so much. Go now to http://classictalesaudiobooks.com and become a financial supporter today. We won a podcast award! The Academy of Interactive and Visual Arts has awarded The Classic Tales Podcast with a Gold Award! Juried by some titans from the top media firms, (Disney, Conde Nast, Microsoft, etc.), I share this honor with Trevor Noah's Daily Show Podcast, MTV's Official Challenge Podcast, Broadway Podcast Network and a few others. Only the top 10% of those who entered were awarded the Gold Award. We are super psyched about that. 813, the fourth novel in the Arsène Lupin series is also now available! Head on over to classictalesaudiobooks.com and pick up this fantastic adventure! And if you'd like to save 2 dollars when you get 813, simply enter the coupon code: podcast. No subscription, no additional purchase necessary, just enter the word podcast, and save 2 bucks. Thank you for your support! Today's story is from the creator of the Fu-Manchu series, Sax Rohmer. It was originally titled, The Brood of the Witch-Queen. I think that the unfortunate title is the reason that this book is not more well know today. That, and the ending isn't super great. Just putting that out there right now. But H.P. Lovecraft compared this book with Bram Stoker's Dracula, and many critics of the time considered it one of Rohmer's best. I've taken the liberty of releasing it as Knight of the Necropolis. Hopefully ol' Sax isn't turning too much in his grave at that. One of the things that really draws me to classic Halloween monsters is that they are steeped in literature. Obviously, Dracula and Frankenstein immediately come to mind with their respective baddies. There are many werewolf short stories, from Kipling's The Mark of the Beast, to Murryat's The White Wolf of the Harz Mountains. Alexandre Dumas even wrote a full length, lack luster novel about a werewolf, clumsily translated as The Wolf Leader. I'm told Steinbeck also wrote a werewolf yarn. Mummy tales also abound in short fiction. Among the best are Conan Doyle's Lot No. 249, Louisa May Alcott's The Ring of Thoth, and H.P. Lovecraft's Imprisoned with the Pharaohs. Among the less successful is Bram Stoker's novel Jewel of the Seven Stars. Now, today's story isn't perfect by any means. It's not high literature. But when I read it, I felt that it really delivered the same feeling that I get when I watch the original movie of The Mummy, with Boris Karloff. It's set up as a series of adventures where we can eventually piece together the identity of that devotee of ancient sorcery: Antony Ferrara. The similarities to Dracula are evident. Nobody believes in Egyptian sorcery, there's only one scholar who's studied enough to stop him, etc.. But what can I say, when it comes to magic rings, brain-eating beetles, vampires, ancient curses, Egyptian mummies, and the like, I'm always up for it. I hope you are, too. And now, The Knight of the Necropolis, Part 1 of 8, by Sax Rohmer. Tap here to purchase 813, Arsène Lupin Vol. 4, by Maurice Leblanc!   Tap here to purchase your copy of The Black Tulip, by Alexandre Dumas! Tap here to go to www.classictalesaudiobooks.com and become a financial supporter!   Tap here to go to our merchandise store!   Tap here to visit our YouTube Channel:  

Smarty Pants
#200: A Literary Love Letter to Egypt

Smarty Pants

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 24:45


In 2002, literacy was at an all-time low in Egypt, revolution was a few short years away, and Nadia Wassef opened an independent bookstore named Diwan in Cairo. With her sister Hind and her friend Nihal, Wassef built an oasis for lovers of the written word, whether Arabic, English, French, or German. Diwan now has seven locations—and two mobile book trucks—having survived recessions, censorship, misogyny, and political turmoil. Wassef joins the podcast to talk about the story of the store in her new book, Shelf Life.Go beyond the episode:Nadia Wassef's Shelf Life: Chronicles of a Cairo BooksellerIf you're ever in Egypt, visit DiwanRead your way through Egypt with these recommendations in The GuardianDive into the golden age of Egyptian cinema, or watch Souad, the first film by a female Egyptian director to be screened at CannesTune in every week to catch interviews with the liveliest voices from literature, the arts, sciences, history, and public affairs; reports on cutting-edge works in progress; long-form narratives; and compelling excerpts from new books. Hosted by Stephanie Bastek.Subscribe: iTunes • Feedburner • Stitcher • Google Play • AcastHave suggestions for projects you'd like us to catch up on, or writers you want to hear from? Send us a note: podcast [at] theamericanscholar [dot] org. And rate us on iTunes! See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Free Library Podcast
Andrea Elliott | Invisible Child: Poverty, Survival & Hope in an American City

Free Library Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 57:09


In conversation with Reginald Dwayne Betts, essayist, poet, and author of the award-winning collection, Felon An investigative reporter at The New York Times, Andrea Elliott won the 2007 Pulitzer Prize for Feature Writing for a series of articles on Sheik Reda Shata, an Egyptian-born imam living in Brooklyn. She formerly worked as a staff writer at the Miami Herald, where she covered immigration and Latin American politics. The winner of Columbia University's Medal for Excellence, the George K. Polk Award, the Scripps Howard Award, and a prize from the American Society of Newspaper Editors, Elliott was a visiting journalist at the Russell Sage Foundation, an Emerson Fellow at New America, and received a Whiting Foundation Grant. Based on her 2013 five-part series for the Times on the plight of children experiencing homelessness in New York City, Elliot's debut book follows eight challenging years in the life of a girl guiding her siblings as they experience the effects of widening income inequality and a disappearing social safety net. (recorded 10/6/2021)

Mornings with Jeff & Rebecca
Finding Hope For The Future By Looking At The Past

Mornings with Jeff & Rebecca

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 1:59


Jen Wilkin recently tweeted saying:"The antidote to anxiety about the future is not to discern the future, but to remember the past. Instead of straining your gaze forward, look over your shoulder and rehearse God's faithfulness to you, and to all generations."What I love about this quote is that this is what the Bible encourages us to do. If you read the entire Old Testament, you'll realize that they would rehearse what God had done for them. They would remember the Exodus, they would remember the Passover, and they would remember that the same God who brought them out of Egyptian slavery, miraculously through the Red Sea, who fed them consistently manna from Heaven during their 40 years of wilderness. As they were wandering for so long, they would also remember the God who always makes sure made sure they had water and who made sure their clothes never wore out.That is the same God that is with us today and this is also the God who has always been so faithful to watch over you. H is not going to quit on you now.It doesn't matter what the future is going to bring because God is going to be there with you. If the one who spoke the universe into being has you in His hand, what in the world do we have to fear? Absolutely nothing. So when we are afraid of the future, all we have to do is remember who God has always been in the past because He is the same yesterday, today, and forever (Hebrews 13:8). 

Ron's Amazing Stories
RAS #511 - Whence Came You

Ron's Amazing Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 59:55


On we begin The Month Of Spooky 2021. We have so much to get to this month that “it” will make your head spin! (And On In A Linda Blair kind of way!) I just mean we have a lot of stuff. This month we will have a Ghost Story With Sylvia that will focus on a prankster ghost boy. Then Sylvia and I will sit down and listen to our classic Halloween story, The Thing On The Fourble Board. We have some of the best stories ever from you guys that should curl toes. And on today's show, we debut one of the top 30 scariest radio broadcasts of all time with a story called Whence Came You! It all begins as soon as you press that play button.  Featured Story - Whence Came You Our featured story this week is creepy. Are you a fan of the old Egyptian mummy tale? You know, when the monster is awoken and brought back to complete some insidious plan or maybe for a bloodthirsty rage of terror. Well, that is NOT what we have for you today. We have another side of that story that takes creepy to a whole new level. It comes from the mind of Willis Cooper and the OTR series Quiet Please. It is listed as one of the top 30 scariest radio broadcasts of all time and is titled Whence Came You. It first aired on February 16, 1948.  Other Stories Include - The Principals Of Murder, Clive Barker's First Tales, The Man Who Wasn't There, The Home Invasion, The Halloween Ghost, and Whence Came you. Ron's Amazing Stories Sponsored by: Audible - You can get a free audiobook and a 30 day free trial at   and - Good Treats for your dog to eat. Social Links:Contact Links:

Daily Emunah Podcast - Daily Emunah By Rabbi David Ashear

There is a statement in Chazal, Baba Kama, daf 60, "כיון שניתנה רשות למשחית להשחית, אינו מבחין בין צדיק לרשע", which means, once Hashem gives permission to a destroying angel to destroy, it does not distinguish between good people and bad people. On the surface level, this sounds like a frightening statement, as if to say a tzaddik could get hurt without deserving it. The mefarshim, however, explain otherwise. Everybody has a certain amount of sin, even tzaddikim, but Hashem in His infinite kindness delays the consequences of the sin in the hope that the people will do teshuva. This statement is saying that when Hashem gives the destroyer permission to destroy, it is able to administer the consequences even to the tzaddik, which he deserves, without giving him that extra time for teshuva. But it is important to know, Hashem is in charge of the destroying angel as well and nothing happens unless it is His will. In the mabul, the entire world perished, but Hashem wanted to keep Noach and his family alive, as well as all the animals. Some explain, it was Hashem Himself who brought the mabul, not the destroying angel, and therefore Hashem distinguished between the tzaddik and the rasha. Others explain, Hashem told Noach to go into the teiva, because that was a place where the destroying angel did not have authority. The same concept is brought up during makat bechorot in Mitzrayim where all the firstborn Egyptians died but the Jewish firstborns remained alive. Some say Hashem Himself brought the plague, so He Himself distinguished between the Mitzrim and the Jews. Others say Hashem told the Jewish People to stay inside, a place where the destroying angel did not have authority over. Either way, it was and is Hashem who makes all decisions, and nothing ever happens to a person if it's not the will of Hashem for him, whether it is a bodily injury or the loss of money, it's always Hashem. In the beginning of September, the residual effects of Hurricane Ida were felt in the New York area. Many homes were destroyed, some people reported up to 12 feet of water inside their homes. There were people with valuable merchandise in their basements, losing hundreds of thousands of dollars from the flooding. There were other homes that were not affected at all. In fact, there were homes next door to each other, one completely flooded, and one untouched. Of course, we have no idea of the workings of Heaven, why Hashem does what He does. But we do know that although the hurricane barreled through the city, it wasn't just whoever was in its path got affected. It was whoever Hashem determined needed to be affected got affected, and for the best reasons possible. But nothing happened haphazardly. A man who recently built a new home in Brooklyn told me he was in his New Jersey house for the summer when the hurricane hit. That day, his wife needed to be in Brooklyn and she got delayed there. She called him in the early evening saying she didn't want to drive back as she was exhausted and heavy rain was expected that night. He told her, although in the thirty years they have been married, his wife has never stayed alone at home without him, this time he told her to stay. That night, she locked all the doors and put on the alarm. Some time later, the alarm went off. She went downstairs and saw water was coming from the outside into their basement. It was a very large, fully furnished basement in a brand new home. She called her husband who told her to go outside and check the source of the flooding, and see if it could be stopped. She opened the front door and went outside and, without realizing, the front door closed behind her and was locked. Now, she was stuck outside in the pouring rain. What seemed to be a bad situation got much worse. The only way back into the house was a padlock on their garage door, but the garage was at the bottom of a slope and the water was piled up many feet there, making access impossible. Her husband told her to call the contractor who built their home, asking him what to do. He answered the phone although it was late at night and told her there was a drain by the garage which must have gotten clogged. He advised her to go there, stick her hand in the water and try to pull out the debris that was clogging the drain. She followed his instructions and a few minutes later, all the water went down the drain and stopped coming into their home. The basement was saved with close to no damage at all. The man told me, it's clear for whatever reason Hashem did not want my home to be flooded that night. Firstly, he made my wife stay in Brooklyn, out of the ordinary. Secondly, she got locked out of the house, which forced her to call the contractor and discover the remedy. Everything that happens is determined only by Hashem, and so we should always feel comfortable knowing that for sure whatever happened was the best outcome possible.

Today in the Word Devotional

Have you ever wondered why we set off fireworks on the Fourth of July? The tradition goes back to the start of America’s nationhood. In 1777, one year after the Declaration of Independence was signed, the anniversary was celebrated in Philadelphia with a parade, speeches, and fireworks. Boston was the first city to declare July 4th an official holiday in 1783. Congress finally made it a national holiday in 1870. Even before it took place, the Passover was declared by God to be Month One Year One on Israel’s calendar (vv. 2, 14). The tenth day would be their Independence Day! Passover was the flip side of the tenth plague: The Egyptian firstborn would die—”judgment on all the gods of Egypt” (v. 12)—but God had determined that the Israelites would live. Because they sacrificed a lamb and put its blood on their doorposts, the angel of death would “pass over” that house and spare the family inside (vv. 7, 13). The lamb would then be roasted and served as the main dish of the Passover meal. Bread without yeast was another symbolic part of that meal (v. 15). No yeast indicated haste or hurry, that is, how quickly the Egyptians wanted them gone! The absence of yeast also came to signify holiness, purity, or consecration. Moses proclaimed Passover as a national holiday, to be celebrated in the future in the Promised Land (vv. 24–27). This declaration was an act of faith—Moses trusted completely that what God said would happen. And his obedience matched his faith. He told the elders of Israel to “go at once” to carry out the instructions (vv. 21–23). The Israelites would remember, through the ages, the mighty work of God on their behalf. That’s why Jewish people still celebrate Passover today! >> Just as the Israelites were saved by a lamb’s blood, so we are saved by the blood of Christ (1 Cor. 5:7). If you’ve never done so, we urge you to trust Him for your salvation!

British History: Royals, Rebels, and Romantics
None but Witches Do Inhabit Here: History of Witches (ep 67)

British History: Royals, Rebels, and Romantics

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 29:06


Show Notes:Credits:Host: Carol Ann Lloydwww.carolannlloyd.comCreative Director: Lindsey LindstromMusic: Historical Documentary licensed through Audio Jungle/Envato MarketsSources Mentioned:Borman, Tracy. Witches: James I and the English Witch Hunts.Davies, Owen. "A Spell-binding History of Witches" (History Extra).Lipscomb, Suzannah (Presenter). Witches: a Century of Murder.Lipscomb, Suzannah. Witchcraft: A Ladybird Expert Book.  Summary:From early days in Jewish and Egyptian cultures to the middle ages, and from the surge of witch hunts across Europe in the 16th and 17th century to a new resurgence in self-identified witches today, the notion of witches and witchcraft is part of our history. As Alice Hoffman wrote in Practical Magic, “There's a little witch in all of us.”

Thy Strong Word from KFUO Radio
Leviticus 18 — Be holy as the LORD is holy: A sexually pure and decent life in what I say and do.

Thy Strong Word from KFUO Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 57:04


Rev. Dr. John Hellwege, professor of theology at Concordia Lutheran Seminary in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada joins host Rev. Brady Finnern to study Leviticus 18. The LORD calls you to sexual holiness. The LORD God calls us to live not as the Egyptians, Canaanites, other believers, and the culture. This is difficult because we want to live in the world, but we are called to not “be of the world.” As a loving father guides His children, our LORD guides us to live sexually holy lives out of love for Him and for our neighbor. “Lord God, fill us with Your Holy Spirit to lead a sexually holy life with our bodies, hearts, and eyes. Lead us to Your grace in Christ that we receive forgiveness for our sins, immorality, and lust all on account of Christ. Lord have mercy. Amen”

SmartLess
"Jon Stewart"

SmartLess

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 60:36


Day bartender and Egyptian silk connoisseur Jon Stewart joins us for a chat. Comedian, writer, director, and television host, Jon shares so much with us, from the invention of the combustion engine to MC Hammer quotes. This is a man who knows how to think, knows how to talk, and knows his Judge Judy. Plus, Sean gets put in the penalty box!... on another arousing episode of SmartLess.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.