Podcasts about Poland

Share on
Share on Facebook
Share on Twitter
Share on Reddit
Copy link to clipboard

Country in Europe

  • 6,634PODCASTS
  • 13,758EPISODES
  • 43mAVG DURATION
  • 9DAILY NEW EPISODES
  • Jan 26, 2022LATEST
Poland

POPULARITY

20122013201420152016201720182019202020212022


Best podcasts about Poland

Show all podcasts related to poland

Latest podcast episodes about Poland

Dave Lukas, The Misfit Entrepreneur_Breakthrough Entrepreneurship
286: Building Unicorns, How Andy Mowat Helped Build 3 $1 Billion+ Companies

Dave Lukas, The Misfit Entrepreneur_Breakthrough Entrepreneurship

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 26, 2022 42:53


This week's Misfit Entrepreneur is Andy Mowat. Andy has helped build 3 $1Billion+ companies, Upwork, Boc, and Culture Amp. He is a serial entrepreneur who knows how to build a scalable company that gets results. His specialty is building successful sales and marketing organizations. But, at the core, he's a great entrepreneur. He knows how to spot a trend, create the vehicle to capitalize on the opportunity, and make it go. Most recently, he is doing that in his latest company, Gated, which is a unique twist on how people can access you. I want to discuss all of this with him today and squeeze all of the wisdom I can from him on how to start, grow, and build a brand. https://www.gated.com/ Andy's path was not a straight line. He went to college on the East Coast and ended up in finance and banking. He took Czech while he was in college and ended up going into private equity in eastern Europe. He ended up running the finance function for every grocery store chain in Czech Republic, Slovakia, and Poland. It was early in the days of coming out of Communism and was eye opening. He then went to business school but came out in 2001 and things were slow. He found a family office to work for and they tasked him with finding a new business to buy and get into. He suggested health clubs and ended up building high end athletic clubs throughout the west. He knew tech was where it was at, so he then reached out Elance and others and cold called the CEO's ending up working for Elance. He ran sales and marketing operations. He then went to work for a company as a co-founder outsourcing administration assistants. He then went to work for BOCs running all their post-sale operations and then leading marketing. He then went to work for CultureAmp taking it from $5 mil to $80m. Along the way, he noticed the need to need to better guard a person's email, so he built Gated. At the 7:30 mark, Andy shares what Gated is. It is an email management system that keeps people from getting to your inbox unless they are willing to give a donation to charity. It helps to make sure you are communicating with people that genuinely want to communicate with you. What elements are needed to build a unicorn – a billion-dollar company? Product/Market fit Brand If you don't have those 2 things, it's almost impossible. Andy gives an example of ow this happened with CultureAmp. Talk to us about Go to Market Machines. How do you build a successful, scalable business? It is a custom fit each time. It is not “cookie-cutter.” Andy starts with marketing because you must have the demand generation. Pattern recognition is important, but a marketing strategy must be customized to each company. Andy has a 6-part article series on his LinkedIn that lays out how to build the Go to Market engine. Any specific part of the 6 that you feel is most important? The team is the most important aspect of a growth engine. What are the key elements to building a successful sales team and growth engine? Read Jason Lumpkin's stuff around hiring and building sales teams. Invest deeply in sales-enablement vs. throwing people at the problem. From a sales enablement standpoint, the managers are your customers, not the reps. If the managers aren't deeply invested in the training and asking for what is needed to make their people better, it won't do well. Invest in good managers and support them well. What should business owners and entrepreneurs do from the start to avoid some of the common mistakes in building a sales organization? The classic mistake is that founder's hire a salesperson thinking they can figure out how to go to market. The founder needs to do that and figure it out. The founder needs to be selling the first half million to a million of ARR. You need to be able figure what the repeatable sales process is before you bring someone into to sell. At the 17 min mark, Andy talks about being a non-technical founder…. What type of data should people be looking at to maximize the impact of a sales team? Systems that are good are Hubspot for smaller organizations and Salesforce for larger ones. Look for all the ways you can scale and find leverage. Key metrics to look at include: Client retention Funnel conversation Time for the sales process. (How long it takes from lead to sale) Lead flow. MQL to Opportunity conversion. The opportunity to win conversation. Customer acquisition costs. What does it take to build a great brand? Brand starts with what you name your company. Naming matters. Being very clear around what your company does and what you stand for is critical. People should understand very clearly and quickly your value to them. Product marketing and differentiation is very clear. The last important piece is the experience people have when they interact with your brand. Most unexpected thing that you have found on your entrepreneur journey? Andy shares how Gated has surprised in that people give more than required and how much people want it. Routines or best practices you do every day to help you maximize your success? Andy writes down his Top 3 things he has to do on a notepad each day. He spends each evening reviewing what he needs to do and accomplish the next day.   Best Quote: The classic mistake is that founder's hire a salesperson thinking they can figure out how to go to market. The founder needs to do that and figure it out.   Andy's Misfit 3: Have a career thesis. Get clear around the path that is most likely for your career. Don't worry about the steps you make in your career. You can always tell a good story about your career. Don't take too many steps at one. Take one step and pivot, then the next and so on. Have a side-hustle to give you an outlet.   Show Sponsors LinkedIn Jobs (Free Job Posting) www.LinkedIn.com/Misfit 5 Minute Journal www.MisfitEntrepreneur.com/Journal  

Photography Radio
Jerzy Durczak

Photography Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 25, 2022 39:37


On today's episode W. Scott Olsen is talking to Jerzy Durczak, photographer from Poland, professor and Chair of the Department of American Literature and Culture at Marie Curie-Sklodowska University (UMCS) in Lublin, Poland.Jerzy Durczak's work was featured in the 4th edition of FRAMES Magazine.This podcast is brought to you by FRAMES - high quality quarterly printed photography magazine.Click here to find out more about FRAMES Magazine and join our community.

Mark Levin Podcast
Mark Levin Audio Rewind - 1/24/22

Mark Levin Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 25, 2022 114:44


On Monday's Mark Levin Show, in the 1950's there were isolationists on the right and radicals on the far left, and today we have a similar dynamic. Within the conservative movement, there are pro-Russia activists that think Vladimir Putin isn't so bad. Putin is working very closely with Xi in China. Biden's weakness and mental deterioration have invited our enemies to become more aggressive toward the United States and our allies. In 1994 Ukraine relinquished its nuclear weapons in exchange for the U.S, Russia, and England to provide security assurances under the Budapest memorandum. Some say that this is not the U.S's problem. By that logic, was Poland our problem? Did Russia develop hypersonic missiles to attack Ukraine? Of course not, they developed them for use against the U.S.  Then, it's imperative that the United States begin producing automobile chips and semiconductors outside of China since making so much of our critical components is a national security threat. This would lower the overall cost of cars for all Americans from an estimated 33% to 12%. Democrats are currently blocking legislation on this and helping China's interest. Later, the leftwing author Jane Mayer is on the attack against Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas and his wife Ginni. Mayer is criticizing Ginni Thomas for having a life apart from her husband's career. Despite there being no ethical requirement or law for one's spouse to recuse themselves from having any personal opinions on social issues, or from engaging in free speech activism, Mayer insists that Thomas should step aside. This flawed thinking would institutionalize the practice of 'judge shopping' by simply questioning any judge's partiality as a means to get a more favorable judge. Afterward, Project Veritas Founder James O'Keefe joins the show to discuss his new book, American Muckraker: Rethinking Journalism for the 21st Century.

PRI's The World
Biden considers NATO troop reinforcement amid Russia-Ukraine standoff

PRI's The World

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 24, 2022 47:46


Amid the standoff between Russia and Ukraine, the US and other Western countries continue to provide Ukraine with military assistance. Now, the Biden administration is weighing sending more troops to countries like Poland and Romania to reinforce NATO allies in Eastern Europe. Also, the rate of global chemical pollution exceeds the planet's ability to absorb it, threatening the stability of ecosystems and human health. Plastic pollution, pesticides, and industrial materials are top concerns, according to a new study. Plus, the tiny Pacific island of Tuvalu has struck a deal with US-based internet company Go Daddy to manage its highly coveted internet address: .tv.

MTR Podcasts
Charlie Visconage

MTR Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 24, 2022 47:48


Brief summary of episode:Charlie Visconage is an American self-taught artist. When other kids told him he was a “bad drawer” in school, he believed it for a long time. In 2014, a friend suggested he paint just for the hell of it, and Charlie found a new means of expression that he loved, breaking out of the false beliefs of the past. By working to capture the soul of his portrait subjects, Charlie is on a lifelong quest to better understand people by painting them. Charlie's work seeks to capture people at their most vibrant, with portraits featuring neon-drenched features, bulging eyes, clenched teeth, and never-ending energy, with many layers of thick color. Each portrait has an accompanying piece of text, showcasing the subject's soul; good, bad, best, worst, absurd, shameful, and joyful. Charlie's work has been shown locally in the DC and Baltimore area and internationally in Poland, Slovenia, and Japan. Every few years, Charlie recharges his creative energy with long-term artistic residency programs, including those in Slovenia, Japan, and in 2022,Portugal. Charlie currently lives and works in Washington, DC.The Truth In This ArtThe Truth In This Art is a podcast interview series supporting vibrancy and development of Baltimore & beyond's arts and culture.Mentioned in this episode:Charlie's website1/29-2/22 - LAID BARE at the Notre Dame University Gormley Gallery (https://www.gormleygallery.com/exhibitions)May 6-22 at Homme Gallery (@homme_DC on IG) my solo show "POSITIVE FURY", Opening May 6th from 6-9 PMTo find more amazing stories from the artist and entrepreneurial scenes in & around Baltimore, check out my episode directory.Stay in TouchNewsletter sign-upSupport my podcastShareable link to episode★ Support this podcast ★

Modern Cowboy
Episode 178 Kayla LaSalle / Team Roper / Pursuing Her Dreams With A Relentless Passion…

Modern Cowboy

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 24, 2022 41:10


Had a great time and was so inspired talking with Kayla on the Podcast. She has overcome many challenges in her life and pursues her dreams with a relentless passion... Kayla's Story of Pro Rodeo Dreams I would like to begin with my story and it all starts on June 16, 1994. This day is the day I was born. On this day I was born I came out weighing just 1 lb. 16 oz. and started fighting for my life as a child that was immediately put through a lot in just the first days I was born and it has continued through my life. I was put into the NICU right away since I was so small and lived there for 3 months which put me at coming home right around the time I was originally supposed to come into this world around September 30. I came home with oxygen and very little lung capacity living on monitors for quite awhile. As a child I was diagnosed with Cerebral Palsy which has really only affected my legs putting me in a wheelchair and the right side is my weaker side. I was put through many surgeries and therapy to try and help the condition and to help me maintain a normal life living with this condition. Even though I was diagnosed with this condition I grew up on a ranch south of my hometown 15 miles and we were ranchers so it was without a doubt that I was going to be horseback starting at just the young age of 3 years old I was put on a horse with someone because I didn't have the muscles or strength to know how to hold on. The physical therapists even said it was great therapy for me so I continued and currently I'm waiting for my next horse to be ready for me to ride. Now lets go to the age of 7 years old where I was able to receive intensive therapy in Poland for one month. This trip was definitely a culture shock to me at such a young age but it was one that was truly life changing. To summarize this intensive therapy it was physical therapy that children were put through some rigorous therapy sessions that were 8 hours a day, 6 days a week with only Sundays off. In this therapy children are given many therapy sessions but the most intensive part of this therapy is when the children are put into what is called an Adeli Suit otherwise known as a space suit that the astronauts used in Russia to go into space. With this suit that children are put into its all connected with bungee cords that are able to be moved in different places to help the brain and body be able to communicate with what the legs and limbs are really supposed to do to be able to walk. It not only helps with the physical aspect but also helps the mental aspect. When we first arrived my first day of therapy we had shipped by current walker that I had been using at the time for physical therapy. The first thing one of the therapists told us was why do you have this? You aren't going to need this when you are done with your therapy here and we will not be using that here in your therapy sessions at all you might as well get rid of it. Well by the time I left there at the end of the one month session I came home walking with arm crutches first time ever that I was able to walk with no help from anyone while walking. I could have went back for a second round which could have put me in the next phase of the therapy which is walking with canes and the third part of it is walking with no assistive devices at all. Unfortunately this is around the time that the war broke out and we didn't go back again. I believe this is truly where I gained the mental confidence of you can do anything that you put your mind to. My parents even videoed the stuff that I did while on therapy there for guidance for the physical therapists back home and we tried to do as much as we could, even though I was going to school and still trying to live a normal life but nothing compared to that intensive therapy that I got while there. Fast forward to my middle school years I had a surgery done to lengthen my hamstring tendons which we thought at the time it would work well after the surgery I...

Verfassungsblog: Corona Constitutional
EU v. Polen, Teil 5 - An den Grenzen des Rechts

Verfassungsblog: Corona Constitutional

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 24, 2022 51:44


Der Konflikt zwischen der EU und Polen ist bereits viel weiter eskaliert, als man bis vor kurzem für vorstellbar gehalten hätte. Und immer noch ist kein Ende in Sicht. Aus dem innerpolnischen Verfassungskonflikt um Rechtsstaat und unabhängige Justiz ist ein europäischer Verfassungskonflikt um den Vorrang des EU-Rechts geworden. Wie konnte das passieren? Was für Kräfte sind da am Werk? Und wie kommen wir da wieder heraus? Diesen Fragen wollten wir in diesem Podcast-Projekt auf den Grund gehen. Wir haben Interviews mit Jurist_innen, Politikwissenschaftler_innen und Historiker_innen geführt, haben recherchiert, diskutiert und nachgedacht. In den Folgen 1 bis 3 geht es um Entstehung und Verlauf des Konflikts – zuerst auf der innerpolnischen Bühne (1), dann die Reaktion der EU (2) und die Gegenreaktion der polnischen Regierung (3). Dabei wird ein viel älterer Konflikt, der die ganze Integrationsgeschichte der EU durchzieht, in mächtige Resonanzschwingungen versetzt (4). Er präfiguriert die Möglichkeiten, den Konflikt zu lösen (5, 6). Teil 1: Projekt Imposybilizm In Polen kommt 2015 eine neue rechtspopulistische Regierung an die Macht, die von Tag 1 an beginnt, ihren Plan zur Unterwerfung der unabhängigen Justiz in die Tat umzusetzen, und dabei auf die Institutionen und Verfahren der polnischen Verfassung keinerlei Rücksicht nimmt. Wir rekonstruieren, was es mit diesem Plan auf sich hat, wo er herkommt und wie es der PiS-Regierung gelang, ihn umzusetzen – und bis zu welchem Punkt. Teil 2: Hase und Igel Spätestens 2017/18, als die PiS-Regierung ihr Gesetzespaket zur Übernahme der Justiz vorlegt, wird der auf Dialog und Ausgleich bedachten EU-Kommission bewusst, dass sie ein Riesenproblem hat. Während die anderen Mitgliedstaaten keinerlei Interesse zeigen, das Problem auf politischem Weg zu lösen, bringt sich der Europäische Gerichtshof in Luxemburg mit einer Kette von revolutionären Urteilen in eine Position, die gegen die Zerstörung der unabhängigen Justiz in Polen wirksame Hilfe verspricht. Doch die PiS-Regierung reagiert anders als erhofft. Teil 3: Der große Crackdown 2019 - 2021 lässt die PiS-Regierung ihr eigens zu diesem Zweck errichtetes Disziplinarregime auf die polnischen Richter_innen los, um ihren vom EuGH ermutigten Widerstand zu ersticken. Die wenden sich an den anderen Europäischen Gerichtshof, den für Menschenrechte in Straßburg, der erklärt, dass die von der PiS-Regierung mit ihren Gefolgsleuten infiltrierten Gerichte nicht "auf Gesetz beruhen" und also gar keine Gerichte sind. Die PiS-Regierung wiederum bestellt sich bei dem von ihr kontrollierten "Verfassungsgericht" Urteile, wonach Polen der Rechtsprechung beider Europäischer Gerichtshöfe und dem Recht, auf das sie sich stützen, aus angeblichen verfassungsrechtlichen Gründen keinen Gehorsam schuldet. Teil 4: Der Kampf um den Vorrang Damit ist aus dem polnischen Verfassungskonflikt endgültig ein europäischer Verfassungskonflikt geworden: Es geht um den Vorrang des EU-Rechts und damit um den Grundpfeiler der Verfassung der Europäischen Union. Der ist allerdings weniger unumstritten als viele meinen. Der Kampf zwischen EuGH und nationalen Verfassungsgerichten, an die PiS-Regierung anzuknüpfen behauptet, durchzieht die ganze Geschichte der EU – und das deutsche Bundesverfassungsgericht hat dabei immer wieder eine Schlüsselrolle gespielt. Teil 5: An den Grenzen des Rechts Was also tun? Ist der Versuch, Polen mit rechtlichen Mitteln zum Gehorsam gegenüber dem EU-Recht zu zwingen, gescheitert? Oder war er nur noch nicht entschlossen genug? Wie kann die EU ihre Grundwerte verteidigen, wenn die Mitgliedstaaten das offenbar gar nicht so wichtig finden? Werden sie erst aktiv, wenn es um die Verteidigung ihrer Beiträge zum EU-Haushalt gegen Korruption und Misswirtschaft geht? Und was verrät uns das über die Verfasstheit der Europäischen Union selbst? 00:00 bis 14:30: Strafgelder 14:31 bis 22:00: Rechtsbruch mit System 22:01 bis 30:00: Schutz des Rechtsstaats durch Schutz des EU-Haushalts - und umgekehrt 30:01 bis 40:12: Konditionalität 40:13 bis 44:50: Der Mechanismus vor dem EuGH 44:51 bis 51:44: Der stärkste Trumpf der Kommission Teil 6: Den Kuchen haben und ihn essen Wenn die Mitgliedstaaten eine gerichtlich durchsetzbare Verfassungspflicht zur Wahrung der Rechtsstaatlichkeit in der EU nicht wollen – was wollen sie dann? Warum machen sie von den politischen Möglichkeiten keinen Gebrauch, die die EU-Verträge ihnen geben? Warum ist das Artikel-7-Verfahren so ein stumpfes Schwert? Wenn Polen kein Rechtsstaat mehr ist – kann es dann überhaupt Mitglied der EU bleiben? Folgt demnächst! Unterstützen Sie uns! Um dieses Projekt auch finanziell stemmen zu können, sind wir auf Ihre Unterstützung angewiesen. Für nur 5 Euro im Monat werden Sie Mitglied in unserer Steady-Fördercommunity (https://bit.ly/3lyrmOu). Dafür bekommen Sie auch eine unserer beliebten Kaffeetassen und können mitdiskutieren und mitgestalten, wenn wir unser nächstes Podcast-Projekt anpacken. Gesprächspartner:innen: Prof. Dr. Dr. h.c. Stanisław Biernat, Jagiellonian University in Kraków Prof. Dr. Tanja A. Börzel, Freie Universität Berlin Prof. Dr. Ireneusz Paweł Karolewski, Universität Leipzig Prof. R. Daniel Kelemen, Rutgers University Prof. em. Dr. Ulrike Liebert, Universität Bremen Prof. Dr. Anna Katharina Mangold, Europa-Universität Flensburg Prof. Dr. Franz C. Mayer, Universität Bielefeld Dariusz Mazur, Richter am Regionalgericht Krakau Prof. Dr. Florian Meinel, Georg-August-Universität Göttingen Prof. Dr. Jan-Werner Müller, Princeton University Prof. Dr. Martin Nettesheim, Universität Tübingen Dr. Thu Nguyen, Jacques Delors Centre Prof. Dr. Laurent Pech, Middlesex University London Prof. Dr. Morten Rasmussen, University of Copenhagen Dr. Roya Sangi, Kanzlei Redeker Sellner Dahs Dr. Malte Symann, Kanzlei Freshfields Bruckhaus Deringer Prof. Dr. Alexander Thiele, BSP Business & Law School Berlin Prof. Dr. Antoine Vauchez, Université Paris 1-Sorbonne Anna Wójcik, Polnische Akademie der Wissenschaften Quellen: Auf dem Verfassungsblog sind seit 2015 mehr als 300 Artikel zur Rechtsstaatskrise in Polen erschienen. Eine unschätzbare Informationsquelle ist außerdem die fortlaufende Berichterstattung auf der Website RuleofLaw.pl. Weitere Informationsquellen: Amelie Albrecht: Sanktionen gegenüber „democratic backsliding“ in Ungarn und Polen - Das Interventionsparadox der EU. Münchner Beiträge zur Politikwissenschaft 2020. DOI: 10.5282/ubm/epub.72109. Petra Bárd, Adam Bodnar: The End of an Era. The Polish Constitutional Court's judgment on the primacy of EU law and its effects on mutual trust, CEPS Policy Insights 2021 / 15. Stanisław Biernat, Paweł Filipek: The Assessment of Judicial Independence Following the CJEU Ruling in C-216/18 LM. In: Armin von Bogdandy et al. (Hrsg.): Defending Checks and Balances in EU Member States. Beiträge zum ausländischen öffentlichen Recht und Völkerrecht 298, https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-662-62317-6_16 Anne Boerger, Morten Rasmussen: Transforming European Law: The Establishment of the Constitutional Discourse from 1950 to 1993. European Constitutional Law Review 2014, S. 199 ff. Rebecca Byberg: The History of the Integration Through Law Project: Creating the Academic Expression of a Constitutional Legal Vision for Europe, German Law Journal 2020, S. 1431 ff. Paweł Filipek: The New National Council of the Judiciary and its impact on the Supreme Court in the light of the principle of judicial independence. Problemy Współczesnego Prawa Międzynarodowego, Europejskiego i Porównawczego 2018, S. 177ff. Lukas Hartmann: Fehlerfolgen: Ist die verfassungsgerichtliche Ultra-Vires- und Identitätskontrolle aus verfassungsrechtlichen Gründen rechtlich wirkungslos? Der Staat 2021, S. 387 ff. R. Daniel Kelemen: The European Union's Authoritarian Equilibrium. Forthcoming in Journal of European Public Policy, Rutgers Law School Research Paper, http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.3450716 Dimitry V. Kochenov, Petra Bárd: The Last Soldier Standing? Courts vs. Politicians and the Rule of Law Crisis in the New Member States of the EU (February 22, 2019). 1 Eur Ybk Cont'l L 2019, University of Groningen Faculty of Law Research Paper 5/2019, https://ssrn.com/abstract=3339631. Dimitry V. Kochenov, Barbara Grabowska-Moroz: Constitutional Populism versus EU Law: A Much More Complex Story than You Imagined. RECONNECT Working Paper 16, Juli 2021, https://ssrn.com/abstract=3880717 Helle Krunke, Sune Klinge: The Danish Ajos Case. The Missing Case from Maastricht and Lisbon. European Papers 2018, S. 157 ff. Katarzyna Krzyżanowska: Legal impossibilism versus the rule of law, Review of Democracy 29.6.2021, https://revdem.ceu.edu/2021/06/29/legal-impossibilism-versus-the-rule-of-law. Claus Leggewie, Ireneusz Pawel Karolewski: Die Visegrád-Connection. Eine Herausforderung für Europa, Berlin 2021. Wilfried Loth: Europas Einigung. Eine unvollendete Geschichte. 2. Aufl., Frankfurt 2020. Florian Meinel: Das Bundesverfassungsgericht in der Ära der Großen Koalition - zur Rechtsprechung seit dem Lissabon-Urteil. Der Staat 2021, S. 43 ff. Christoph Möllers, Linda Schneider: Demokratiesicherung in der Europäischen Union. Studie zu einer europäischen Aufgabe. Heinrich-Böll-Stiftung, Schriften zu Europa Bd. 9, Berlin 2018. Christian Neumeier: Kompetenzen. Zur Entstehung des deutschen öffentlichen Rechts, Tübingen 2021 (i.E.). Laurent Pech, Dimitry Kochenov: ‪Respect for the Rule of Law in the Case Law of the European Court of Justice‬. ‪A Casebook Overview of Key Judgments since the Portuguese Judges Case‬, SIEPS 2021/3, https://www.sieps.se/globalassets/publikationer/2021/sieps-2021_3-eng-web.pdf?. Laurent Pech: The Rule of Law in the EU: The Evolution of the Treaty Framework and Rule of Law Toolbox, Pech,  RECONNECT Working Paper 7, März 2020, http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.3608661 Laurent Pech, Sébastien Platon: Judicial Independence Under Threat: The Court of Justice to the Rescue. Common Market Law Review 2018, S. 1827 ff., https://ssrn.com/abstract=3607788 Laurent Pech, Kim Lane Scheppele: Illiberalism Within: Rule of Law Backsliding in the EU. Cambridge Yearbook of European Legal Studies 2017, S. 3 ff., http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.3009280 Morten Rasmussen: Towards a Legal History of the EU, European Papers 2021, S. 923 ff. Wojciech Sadurski: Poland's Constitutional Breakdown, Oxford 2019. Wojciech Sadurski: What makes Kaczyński tick? ICONnect 14.1.2016, http://www.iconnectblog.com/2016/01/what-makes-kaczynski-tick/. Marek Safjan: Transitional Justice: The Polish Example, the Case of Lustration. European Journal of Legal Studies 2007, S. 1, http://hdl.handle.net/1814/7711. Eric Stein: Lawyers, Judges, and the Making of a Transnational Constitution, American Journal of International Law 1981, S. 1 ff., https://doi.org/10.2307/2201413 Hanna Suchocka: Lustration: Experience of Poland. Venedig-Kommission des Europarats, ‪CDL-PI(2015)029‬. Venedig-Kommission des Europarats: Joint Urgent Opinion of the Venice Commission and the Directorate General of Human Rights and the Rule of Law (DGI) of the Council of Europe on Amendments to the Law on the Common Courts, the Law on the Supreme Court and some Other Laws, 16.1.2020, ‪CDL-PI(2020)002. Urteile: Europäischer Gerichtshof für Menschenrechte: 12.9.2019: Guðmundur Andri Ástráðsson v. Iceland, 26374/18, http://hudoc.echr.coe.int/eng?i=001-191701 7.5.2021: Xero Flor w Polsce v. Polen, 4907/18, http://hudoc.echr.coe.int/eng?i=001-210065 29.6.2021: Broda und Bojara v. Polen, 26691/18, 27367/18, http://hudoc.echr.coe.int/eng?i=001-210693 22.7.2021: Reczkowicz v. Polen, 43447/19, http://hudoc.echr.coe.int/fre?i=001-211127 8.11.2021: Dolińska-Ficek und Ozimek v. Polen, 49868/19 57511/19, http://hudoc.echr.coe.int/eng?i=001-213200 Europäischer Gerichtshof: 27.2.2018: Associação Sindical dos Juízes Portugueses gegen Tribunal de Contas, C-64-16 17.4.2018: Europäische Kommission gegen Polen (Wald von Białowieża), C-441/17 25.6.2018: LM (Celmer) , C-216/18 PPU 24.6.2019: Europäische Kommission gegen Polen (Unabhängigkeit des Obersten Gerichtshofs), C-619/18 24.6.2019: Daniel Adam Popławski, C-573/17 5.11.2019: Europäische Kommission gegen Polen (Zwangsverrentung), C‑192/18 19.11.2019: A. K. gegen Krajow a Rada Sądow nictwa und CP und DO gegen Sąd Najwyższy, C‑585/18, C-624/18, C-625/18 29.1.2020: DŚ gegen Zakład Ubezpieczeń Społecznych Oddział w Jaśle, C‑522/18 (erledigt) 26.3.2020: Miasto Łowicz gegen Skarb Państwa – Wojewoda Łódzki und Prokurator Generalny gegen VX, WW, XV, C‑558/18, C‑563/18 2.3.2021: A.B. u.a., C-824/18 20.4.2021: Repubblika gegen Il-Prim Ministru, C-896/19 18.5.2021: Asociația „Forumul Judecătorilor din România“, C‑83/19, C‑127/19, C‑195/19, C‑291/19, C‑355/19 und C‑397/19 15.7.2021: Europäische Kommission gegen Polen (Disziplinarkammer), C-791/19 20.9.2021: Tschechische Republik/ Polen (Turów), C-121/19 (Beschluss) 6.10.2021: W.Z., C-487/19 27.10.2021: Europäische Kommission gegen Polen („Maulkorb“-Gesetz), einstweilige Anordnung, C-204/21 R 16.11.2021: W.B. u.a. C‑748/19 bis C‑754/19

iceland europe law university berlin interview lm er geschichte rescue poland human rights europa council ju regierung berichterstattung grund beitr gesetz reaktion zerst entstehung universit gro werk democracy legal zak jagiellonian university portuguese journal plan rom politicians stanis era sie weg widerstand ww courts xv gu position dialog interesse richter zweck tat mitteln oxford european union punkt euro kr korruption aufl macht dabei stra sicht schl schutz verlauf mitglied grenzen union doi prof supreme court maastricht mayer frankfurt cp lisbon polsce bia projekt monat polen hrsg vx versuch judiciary judges verteidigung aufgabe international law european court european legal studies legal history tribunal verfahren christoph m recht menschenrechte europ universit paris identit hilfe studie gerichte ausgleich heinrich b jurist vorrang amendments sindical rechts trumpf historiker gebrauch schriften koalition justiz mitgliedstaaten verfassung konflikt ungarn beschluss wahrung rechtsstaat american journal european journal luxemburg stiftung schwert andri hase europa universit kette institutionen diesen fragen pech freie universit associa unterwerfung asocia legal studies balances contas europarats eu kommission kaczy forthcoming kommission gehorsam der kampf rechtsprechung eugh anordnung eine herausforderung der staat ihre unterst grundpfeiler der konflikt eu member states urteilen informationsquelle gerichtshof kaffeetassen miasto broda riesenproblem najwy podcast projekt verfasstheit jan werner m georg august universit konflikts grundwerte der mechanismus petra b oddzia iconnect caselaw eu recht misswirtschaft directorate general gesetzespaket sieps rechtsbruch rechtsstaats
Shaping Opinion
Christopher Browning’s “Ordinary Men:” The Making of a Kill Squad

Shaping Opinion

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 24, 2022 67:21


Historian and author Christopher R. Browning joins Tim to talk about his study of the Holocaust and the “Final Solution” in Poland. In this episode, Christopher discusses his book, “Ordinary Men: Reserve Police Battalion 101 and the Final Solution in Poland” and how a group of otherwise average, everyday men turned into one of Hitler's most prolific killing squads in World War II. https://traffic.libsyn.com/secure/shapingopinion/Ordinary_Men_auphonic.mp3 Long before the world heard the term “Holocaust” in connection with the Second World War, and even before the mass killing started, it all began with an atmosphere in Germany that supported the expelling of Jewish people from territories controlled by Hitler's Germany. At some point, instead of expulsion, the movement would turn into the mass executions of millions of Jews in places like Poland. Historian and author Christopher Browning wrote the landmark book on how such horrific events could take place. It's called “Ordinary Men: Reserve Police Battalion 101 and the Final Solution in Poland.” To set the stage for the larger story of the book, Browning tells us how it began. This passage is part of the opening chapter that book: “Pale and nervous, with choking voice and tears in his eyes, (Major) Trapp visibly fought to control himself as he spoke. The battalion, he said plaintively, had to perform a frightfully unpleasant task. This assignment was not to his liking, indeed it was highly regrettable, but the orders came from the highest authorities. If it would make their task any easier, the men should remember that in Germany the bombs were falling on women and children. He then turned to the matter at hand. The Jews had instigated the American boycott that had damaged Germany, one policeman remembered Trapp saying. There were Jews in the village of Jozefow who were involved with the partisans, he explained according to two others. The battalion had now been ordered to round up these Jews. The male Jews of working age were to be separated and taken to a work camp. The remaining Jews – the women, children, and elderly – were to be shot on the spot by the battalion. Having explained what awaited his men, Trapp then made an extraordinary offer: if any of the older men among them did not feel up to the task that lay before him, he could step out.” These were the major's comments to the battalion of mostly middle-aged men on the morning of July 13, 1942. They weren't Nazis. They weren't even members of the German army. They made up a police battalion of working-class men too old to serve in the army. Those men would round up and shoot 1,500 Jews in that Polish village on that one day. That battalion would eventually kill upwards of 83,000 captives during the war, making it one of the most efficient German killing squads in the war. But as the title of Christopher Browning's book suggests, before the war, he says these were considered Ordinary Men. Please Thank Our Sponsors Please remember to thank our sponsors, without whom the Shaping Opinion podcast would not exist.  If you have the need, please support these organizations that have the same taste in podcasts that you do: BlueHost Premium Web Hosting Dell Outlet Overstock Computer Center Philips Hue Smart Home Lighting Links Ordinary Men: Reserve Police Battalion 101 and the Final Solution in Poland, by Christopher R. Browning (Barnes & Noble) Christopher R. Browning, University of North Carolina (website) The Stanford Prison Experiment (website) About this Episode's Guest Christopher Browning Christopher R. Browning was the Frank Porter Graham Professor of History at the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill until his retirement in May 2014.  Before taking up this position in the fall of 1999, he taught for 25 years at Pacific Lutheran University in Tacoma, Washington. Browning received his B.A. degree from Oberlin College in 1967 and his M.A.

The Atlas Obscura Podcast
Chopin's Heart

The Atlas Obscura Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 24, 2022 15:38


The Church of the Holy Cross in Warsaw, Poland is the final resting place of famed composer Frédéric Chopin's heart - smuggled there by Chopin's sister after his death. READ MORE IN THE ATLAS: https://www.atlasobscura.com/places/chopin-s-heart

Geobreeze Travel
Episode 66 - How to Travel to Poland on Points with Kristie Gonzalez

Geobreeze Travel

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 24, 2022 37:46


Kristie Gonzalez of @2travelingengineers is a native Texan living in Poland. When her husband took a two-year work assignment, Kristie decided to take a break from her full-time engineering job and make the move with her husband and dog. She now manages 2TravelingEngineers.com a site about her and her husband's travels, points/miles recommendations and expat life tips. In this episode, Kristie and I discuss their life as expats in Poland, and how to visit Poland using points and miles. Whenever you're traveling abroad, make sure you use a card that has no foreign transaction fees. Personally, my husband and I like to use the Chase Sapphire Reserve for this very reason. The Chase Sapphire Reserve also comes with a $300 travel credit each year and earns 10 points per dollar when you spend on hotels, car rentals, or Chase Dining through the Chase travel portal! Remember, never ever apply for a credit card through Google, always be sure to ask your favorite friends and travel creators if they have a referral link that you can use to help them earn more points and commissions! Chase Sapphire Reserve: https://milevalue.com/creditcards/chase-sapphire-reserve/?aff=gbt Download Fluz at: https://joinfluz.app.link/GEOBREEZETRAVELPODCAST You can find Kristie at: Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/2travelingengineers You can find Julia at: Website: https://www.geobreezetravel.com Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/geobreezetravel Credit card links: https://www.geobreezetravel.com/cards Masterclasses: https://www.geobreezetravel.com/hangouts Patreon to access recordings of masterclasses: https://www.patreon.com/geobreezetravel Award travel coaching call: https://www.geobreezetravel.com/calendly Sign up for the newsletter and get exclusive access to sign up for free coaching calls: https://www.geobreezetravel.com/free-coaching Geobreeze Travel is part of an affiliate sales network and receives compensation for sending traffic to partner sites, such as milevalue .com. This compensation may impact how and where links appear on this site. This site does not include all financial companies or all available financial offers. Terms apply to American Express benefits and offers. Enrollment may be required for select American Express benefits and offers. Visit americanexpress .com to learn more.

Seforimchatter
With Prof. Glenn Dynner discussing Jewish Tavernkeepers & the Liquor trade in the Kingdom of Poland

Seforimchatter

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 23, 2022 62:40


#121.** Corporate sponsor of the series Gluck Plumbing: For all your service needs big or small in NJ with a full service division, from boiler change outs, main sewer line snake outs, camera-ing main lines, to a simple faucet leak, Gluck Plumbing Service Division has you covered. Give them a call -   732-523-1836 x 1. **With Prof. Glenn Dynner (Prof. & chair of Religion at Sarah Lawrence College) discussing Jewish Tavernkeepers & Liquor in the Kingdom of Poland, and his book about it: "Yankel's Tavern: Jews, Liquor, & Life in the Kingdom of Poland."We discussed the history of Jews running taverns in Poland, anti-semitic attitudes towards Jews, new laws of Poland, Jewish underground, Blumrozen affair, Rav Eliyahu Guttmacher & the Kvitlach sent to him, and moreTo purchase the book: https://www.amazon.com/Yankels-Tavern-Liquor-Kingdom-Poland-dp-0190204141/dp/0190204141/ref=mt_other?_encoding=UTF8&me=&qid=

The Mindset Athlete Podcast
#256 Your destiny is in your own hands with Darek Symonowicz

The Mindset Athlete Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 22, 2022 67:19


After a motorcycle accident in 2007, Darek chose to take control of his life. In 2015, he chose to have his leg amputated and has never looked back. He has represented Canada in sitting volleyball at the Para Pan Am games in Peru in 2019 where the team brought home the bronze medal. After that, he then went overseas to Play wheelchair basketball. Later, went back to Europe to pursue sitting volleyball as well. In 2021, his club team in Katowice, Poland, Silesia, became Polish Champions. Also in 2021 his club team in Leverkusen, Germany became German Champions. You can learn more about Darek by connecting with him on Instagram.   For more information about James Roberts (the host of the podcast), visit jamesowenroberts.com and connect with him on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram

IGN.com - Daily Fix (Video)
Take-Two CEO Calls GTA Trilogy Launch Problems a 'Glitch' That's Been 'Resolved' - IGN Daily Fix

IGN.com - Daily Fix (Video)

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 22, 2022


Today on IGN The Fix: Games, Take-Two CEO Strauss Zelnick has described the launch issues that plagued last year's release of Grand Theft Auto: The Trilogy as a 'glitch' that has since been 'resolved'. During a CNBC interview, Zelnick spoke about the release of Grand Theft Auto: The Trilogy, where he appeared to draw a line under the issues that the collection of classic games suffered from across a number of consoles. "With regards to the GTA trilogy, that was actually not a new title," Zelnick stated when speaking about the game. "That was a remaster of preexisting titles. We did have a glitch in the beginning, that glitch was resolved." Students from Warsaw University in Poland have created a fully detailed, to-scale map of The Witcher universe's continent, and it's a doozy that shows off the scale of Geralt's adventures from Kaer Morhen to Skellige and beyond. The map reads a lot like any other professionally designed map, just you know, with fantasy cities and countries. It even comes with a helpful set of symbols that divides cities by population scale, country borders, and even elevation. And it's all brought to you by Tom Clancy's Rainbow Six Extraction

A History of Europe, Key Battles
64.5 French Revolutionary Wars - Napoleon's Conquest of Italy

A History of Europe, Key Battles

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 21, 2022 27:35


The French invade Belgium in 1794 and the Netherlands in 1795. The coalition against them starts to fall apart as individual members came to terms. Russia, Prussia and Austria are distracted by their partitioning of Poland, which is wiped off the map.Next the French invade Austria and Italy, the Italian campaign led by a promising young commander Napoleon Bonaparte.www.patreon.com/historyeuropewww.historyeurope.netMusic from Mozart (Symphony no. 40 'Prague'), courtesy of www.musopen.orgPicture - Louis-François, Baron Lejeune - The Battle of Lodi 1796 See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Ideas from CBC Radio (Highlights)
Landscape of Disgrace

Ideas from CBC Radio (Highlights)

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 21, 2022 54:08


Ultranationalism requires an enemy. In Poland, that means sexual minorities. Municipalities across the country are passing anti-LGBT measures. But activists are fighting back, despite the legal odds and the physical violence.

Inside Europe | Deutsche Welle
Inside Europe 20.01.2022

Inside Europe | Deutsche Welle

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2022 55:00


Tensions over the EU's sustainability taxonomy, a defence pact causes concern in Slovakia, taxing times for Poland's middle classes and Italian police refuse to wear pink. Also: protection for journalists at demonstrations in Germany, Turkish-Armenian relations begin to thaw, France's liaison dangereuse with public intellectuals and life at the circus resumes in Hungary.

The Hayseed Scholar Podcast
Xymena Kurowska

The Hayseed Scholar Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2022 100:43


Xymena Kurowska of Central European University joins the Hayseed Scholar podcast. Professor Kurowska grew up in the northern part of Poland, at a time of world and local transition. She discusses what it was like to move around to 'closed' cities in a military family, having a father who served in the Polish military and also in a UN peacekeeping operation in Southern Lebanon. Xymena recalls how a karate injury almost kept her out of going to a university, and how she came to study International Relations. She reflects on what Warsaw was like in the late 1990s, getting her MA in Warsaw when Poland was part of the 2003 'Coalition of the Willing' for the US-led Iraq War. She recalls being on the waitlist, and then attending, European University Institute in Florence for her Phd, and the challenges and opportunities that entailed, eventually working with Prof Fritz Kratochwil. She discusses the experiences she had with Dvora Yanow who 'changed her life' through introducing her to interpretive methods and a network of interpretive 'American Political Scientists' like Friend of the Hayseed Scholar Podcast, Professor Peri Schwartz'Shea. Xymena recalls how she got a job at CEU right after her PhD, getting a Marie Curie fellowship at Aber,  how she decompresses via hiking and watching Mixed Martial Arts, and how she approaches editing a journal. 

Mac OS Ken
Mac OS Ken: 01.20.2022

Mac OS Ken

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2022 18:47


- Capitol Hill Takes Aim at Big Tech - Apple Drops Max Trade-In Values on Older Apple and Android Devices - Apple Has Officially Dropped Security-Only Updates for iOS 14 - Poland's Conotoxia Adds Apple Pay Support - Apple Outs Trailer for “WeCrashed” Ahead of Mid-March Premier - “Fraggle Rock: Back to the Rock” Gets a First Look Ahead of 21 January Premier - Jon Stewart to Receive Mark Twain Prize for American Humor - How to Clean Apple's Polishing Cloth - Upstart - Fair & fast personal loans. Learn more and check your rate at Upstart.com/macosken. - New Relic - Monitor, debug, and improve your entire stack. Learn more and get started at newrelic.com/macosken - Power what we do next for as little as $1 a month. Join the Mac OS Ken Test Kitchen at Patreon at Patreon.com/macosken - Send me an email: info@macosken.com or call (716)780-4080!

The 'Yiddish Voice' Podcast
Efraim Kessler, 105-year-old born and raised in Bilgoray

The 'Yiddish Voice' Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2022 64:13


This show features an interview with Efraim (Froyim) Kessler, who, at age 105, is the oldest person ever interviewed on The Yiddish Voice. In the interview Kessler, who was born in Bilgoray, Poland, in 1916, recalls various aspects of his youth, including encounters with the Nobel Prize-winning author Isaac Bashevis Singer and Rabbi Aharon Rokeach, the Belzer Rebbe. He also recalls surviving the Spanish flu. (We learned after the interview that he also survived Covid-19.) Efraim Kieslowicz was born and raised in Bilgoray (Polish spelling: Biłgoraj) on July 27, 1916, one of nine siblings. His father was a rabbi and also ran a grain mill and grocery store. He became an electrician in prewar Poland. He spent the war years in various places in the Soviet Union, including Chukotka in the Russian Far East and Samarkand and Tashkent in Uzbekistan. After the war, he spent several years in a DP camp in Ebensee, Austria. He arrived in the USA in 1952, spending several years in New York and elsewhere before arriving in Los Angeles, where he has lived until now. Along the way, he anglicized his name to be Fred Kessler. In 1960, he started his own electrical contracting business, Fred Kessler Electric, later called Robert Kessler Electric when his son took over the business. He was for decades a member of the shtibl known as "Rabbi Moskovitz's shul" on Fairfax St. in Los Angeles, and has been a member of Young Israel of Los Angeles for over 40 years. He now resides with his son Michael in Los Angeles. The interview took place in September 2021. Also on tonight's show, Kolya Borodulin, director of Yiddish Programming at Workers Circle in New York, talks about the upcoming virtual program, Vinter in Yidishland. We'll also hear the Yiddish Voice debut of a new Yiddish version of the Dolly Parton song Jolene, performed by the Israeli singer and actress Ronit Asheri. Finally, to observe Tu Bishvat, which fell two days ago, from our archives: Miriam Libenson Z"L: a talk in honor of the holiday Tu Bishvat, the holiday of the trees, originally broadcast in 1994, followed by music related to Tu Bishvat and/or to trees, generally. Music: Ronit Asheri: Jolene (Music and original English lyrics by Dolly Parton, Yiddish lyrics by Leyzer Burko) Victor Berezinsky: Tu Bishvat Ruth Levin: A Hoykher Boym (Lyrics Shike Driz, Music by Leibu Levin) Hilda Bronstein: Afn Veg Shteyt A Boym (Lyrics by Itzik Manger) Dudu Fisher: Unter Beymer (Lyrics by Alexander Olshanetsky, Music by Moishe Oysher) Intro instrumental music: DEM HELFANDS TANTS, an instrumental track from the CD Jeff Warschauer: The Singing Waltz Air date: January 19, 2022

Microsoft Business Applications Podcast
Dawid Ziolkowski on The MVP Show

Microsoft Business Applications Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 17:56


FULL SHOW NOTES https://podcast.nz365guy.com/351 A Short introduction about Dawid Ziolkowski's life background, hobbies and interests Find out more about Poland – the things you can do and the best place to visit Hear David's story about his technology journey and what led him to where he is right now? David's educational background and his involvement with the school projects/contests A conversation about David's career background and the different tools and projects he worked on Talks about David's involvement in SharePoint Workflows, Power Apps and Power Automate Check out David's story and his journey into becoming a Microsoft MVP What made David decide to start blogging  David shares his experience - Speaking at an Event  Music Credit The Happiness of Larry by radiotimes (c) copyright 2012 Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution Noncommercial  (3.0) license AgileXRM AgileXRm - The integrated BPM for Microsoft Power PlatformSupport the show (https://www.buymeacoffee.com/nz365guy)

ESC Insight: The Eurovision Song Contest Podcast
Eurovision Coffee Podcast: Lyrics And Language

ESC Insight: The Eurovision Song Contest Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 28:41


Samantha and Ewan sit down to talk about the history of the language rule at Eurovision, its impact on the Song Contest, and the tantalising prospect of a new language at the Contest from Poland's 2022 National Final. The post Eurovision Coffee Podcast: Lyrics And Language appeared first on ESC Insight - Home of the Unofficial Eurovision Song Contest Podcast.

When Diplomacy Fails Podcast
30YearsWar #49: The Peace in the East

When Diplomacy Fails Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 34:46


With Denmark exiting the war in Germany, everything seemed to be looking up Ferdinand in spring 1629, but there was a problem. While on the military front, the Emperor still held the edge, on the diplomatic front, forces were conspiring to turn the war on its head. Cardinal Richelieu recognised that if Sweden and Poland could be brought to the peace table, Gustavus Adolphus would be free at long last to intervene in Germany. Both the Swedes and the French went deeper than this, though. Each recognised that Russia, far to Poland's east, could play a pivotal role in occupying the attentions of the Commonwealth just long enough for Sweden to make history. But could it be done? Could these tangled diplomatic branches actually bear fruit? In fact, they proved central to ushering in the next phase of the Thirty Years' War...**DON'T FORGET TO FOLLOW THESE LINKS!**1) To support the podcast financially in return for some extra audio content, check out Patreon!2) To find a community of history friends, look at our Facebook page and group!3) To keep up to date with us, follow us on Twitter!4) Matchlock and the Embassy, our new historical fiction novel, is out NOW! Get it here Get bonus content on Patreon See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Mayo Clinic Q&A
Why getting infected with COVID-19 is still a bad idea

Mayo Clinic Q&A

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 33:44


With the highly transmissible omicron variant spread across the U.S., it may seem inevitable that most people will get infected with COVID-19. But Mayo Clinic experts explain why it is important to continue to be vigilant and take measures to avoid COVID-19 infection. "One of the many negatives about saying, 'Well, I'll just go ahead and get infected and get it over with' is you can spread the virus to highly vulnerable people," says Dr. Gregory Poland, head of Mayo Clinic's Vaccine Research Group. "Parents, grandparents, people too young to be immunized, and people whose immune systems might not be working well are all at risk of more severe disease. While your case may be mild, theirs may not." Dr. Poland cautions that the sheer number of infections is stressing the health care system, and treatments for omicronare more limited than they were for the delta variant."The role of testing and of getting boosted is critical to our response to this, and remember, even though you might have mild disease, every time this virus infects somebody, it is the opportunity for further mutation." says Dr. Poland. Vaccination, boosting and masking are all necessary to prevent the spread of omicron."Your best chance of protecting yourself is to be fully vaccinated, wear a proper mask properly when in public, and to avoid crowded indoor settings," says Dr. Poland. On the Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Dr. Poland discusses the omicron surge and answers listener questions.

Places I Remember with Lea Lane
A Survivor's Holocaust Story, And World Sites That Help Us 'Never Forget'

Places I Remember with Lea Lane

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 31:58


 In a truly special 50th episode of Places I Remember, Holocaust survivor Allan Hall tells his frightening, harrowing story as a child caught up in horror. We follow Allan and his parents from their comfortable life in Krakow, Poland, out-manuevering the Nazis in Lvov and Warsaw, and hiding in plain sight throughout the war.  Lea  prefaces his story with a few sites, memorials, and museums around the world where you can travel, to bear witness. Allan's tale includes uprooting from Krakow to Lvov, to the ghetto in Warsaw ; near death experience in a children's pogram; changing appearances and identities; avoiding a last-minute train to Treblinka extermination camp; hiding in a closet with his mother for 10 hours a day in a Nazi-headquarters building in Warsaw for two years; the birth of a brother in the middle of the horror; and carrying- - as an 11-year-old -- that two-year-old brother  across Europe, to get to freedom, and reunite with his parents.With a combination of brilliant moves, risky endeavors, bravery, hope, resilience and luck, the family survived the Holocaust. Allan Hall tells his story with grace and detail, holding back nothing. And he ends with a memory of irony and hope._____Holocaust survivor Allan Hall is a retired attorney. He is a docent at the Miami Beach Holocaust Memorial, and is available as a speaker, in-person or on Zoom. If you are interested in contacting Allan, please notify Lea at one of her links below.As a gift to you to celebrate our 50th episode, and because Allan Hall wants you to never forget, you can click on this link to read Allan's memoir, "Hidden In Plain Sight."_____Podcast host Lea Lane blogs at forbes.com, has traveled to over 100 countries, written nine books, including Places I Remember, and contributed to many travel guidebooks. She's @lealane on Twitter; PlacesIRememberLeaLane on Insta; on  Facebook, it's Places I Remember with Lea Lane. Website: placesirememberlealane.com.  Please follow, rate and review this award-winning travel podcast!

The Worthy House
Ordinary Men: Reserve Police Battalion 101 and the Final Solution in Poland (Christopher R. Browning)

The Worthy House

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 22:25


In these strange days of violent medical apartheid and state-organized hatred directed at those who will not comply with criminally insane dictates, Christopher Browning's classic work on how ordinary men end up participating in mass killing has taken on fresh relevance. Forewarned is forearmed; make ready. (This article was first published November 2, 2018.) The written, original version of this article can be found here, or at https://theworthyhouse.com/2018/11/02/ordinary-men-reserve-police-battalion-101-and-the-final-solution-in-poland-christopher-r-browning/ We strongly encourage, in these days of censorship and deplatforming, all readers to bookmark our main site (https://www.theworthyhouse.com). You can also subscribe for email notifications. The Worthy House does not solicit donations or other support, or have ads. 

Dilemma Podcast
S03E05: What Kind of Truth? - Spencer Greenberg

Dilemma Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 93:04


Does 2+2 really equal 4? What realm of truth am I in when I speak about my pain? What kind of truth claim is it to speak about the existence of "Poland"? How about the existence of ghosts and gods? Spencer Greenberg breaks down his taxonomy of truth claims to help us better understand what we and others might be saying when we declare something to be true. He also lays out his personal philosophy of Valuism, a deceptively simple yet illuminating framework that can guide your behavior and focus your mind on what really matters to you. Spencer's work and his intrinsic values test can all be found here: https://www.clearerthinking.org/ Spencer's essay on the "Seven Realms of Truth" can be found here: https://www.spencergreenberg.com/2019/03/the-7-realms-of-truth-framework/

Rockin' the Suburbs
1285: 2021 Favorites - The Coral, Oscar Lang, The Weather Station

Rockin' the Suburbs

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 20:47


2021 listener favorites continue. Gerald Chyzenski likes Oscar Lang's "Chew the Scenery" album, plus a favorite Canadian album by the Weather Station. And Greg from Poland talks up "Coral Island" by the Coral. Episode editor: Jason Pae Become a Rockin' the Suburbs patron - support the show and get bonus content - at Patreon.com/suburbspod Subscribe to Rockin' the Suburbs on Apple Podcasts/iTunes or other podcast platforms, including audioBoom, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Amazon, iHeart, Stitcher and TuneIn. Or listen at SuburbsPod.com. Please rate/review the show on Apple Podcasts and share it with your friends. Visit our website at SuburbsPod.com Email Jim & Patrick at rock@suburbspod.com Follow us on the Twitter, Facebook or Instagram @suburbspod If you're glad or sad or high, call the Suburban Party Line — 612-440-1984. Theme music: "Ascension," originally by Quartjar, covered by Frank Muffin. Visit quartjar.bandcamp.com and frankmuffin.bandcamp.com (c) Artie S. Industries LLC

TRUNEWS with Rick Wiles
War Drums: Could Proud, Arrogant USA Get Sucker-Punched by Russia, Iran, and North Korea?

TRUNEWS with Rick Wiles

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 71:27


The Biden Administration said the threat of war between Russia and Ukraine remains high as military experts prepare combat options in case tension between the two countries erupt into open warfare. US Ambassador Michael Carpenter said that the drumbeat of war is sounding loud and the rhetoric has become shrill.  White House national security advisor Jake Sullivan said the threat of a Russian military invasion of Ukraine is high. And Poland's foreign minister Zbigniew Rau said that the European continent could be plunged into war with Russia.Rick Wiles and Doc Burkhart have the full report to keep you informed.  Airdate 1/14/22

Ridiculous Romance
Laura & Dick Hillman

Ridiculous Romance

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 82:49


When Laura learned her family was being deported to concentration camps in Poland, she wrote to the Gestapo asking permission to go with them to protect them. This began a terrible journey that would place her in seven camps over three years. But amidst the horrors, she also found the love of her life. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

Revenge of the Average Joe
I'm Poland for You

Revenge of the Average Joe

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 76:14


ROTAJ is 50% professional. That's it. That's the description. Just kidding, we're way too wordy for that. Wild card weekend is upon us, and we bring you the goods. We also discuss the NBA, NHL, and the state of the Broncos coaching search. Join in, and give us your thoughts!

World of Basketball with Fran Fraschilla
Jeremy Sochan - Baylor Bears

World of Basketball with Fran Fraschilla

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 36:52


Fran Fraschilla is joined by Baylor Bears freshman Jeremy Sochan. The two talk about what his freshman year has been like so far, why he chose to play at Baylor, how playing rugby and soccer helped his basketball development, why playing for the Polish National Team means so much to him, and more.

Daily Halacha Podcast - Daily Halacha By Rabbi Eli J. Mansour
Which Transgressions Render a Person Disqualified From Serving as a Witness?

Daily Halacha Podcast - Daily Halacha By Rabbi Eli J. Mansour

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 3:57


A person who is, God forbid, involved in certain kinds of sinful behavior is disqualified from serving as a witness. These Halachot are especially important in the context of a wedding, when valid witnesses are required both for the signing of the Ketuba contract, and to witness the act of Kiddushin (when the groom gives the bride an object of value for betrothal). Care must be taken when choosing the witnesses, as appointing invalid witnesses could invalidate the Kiddushin.We list here several examples of people who are disqualified from serving as a witness:1) A person who is suspected of having an illicit relationship. The man is disqualified from serving as a witness even though there are no witnesses to the offense, but rumors have spread about his involvement in a forbidden relationship.2) The Bet Shemuel (Rav Shemuel Feivush, Poland, 17th century), in Siman 42, rules that a man who hugs and kisses women who are forbidden to him is also disqualified from serving as a witness, on the level of Torah law. 3) One who is "married" to a non-Jewish woman. Even though a Jew cannot be Halachically considered married to a gentile, a man who lives with a non-Jewish woman as husband and wife is disqualified from serving as a witness, on the level of Torah law. According to the Kenesset Hagedola (Rav Haim Banbenishti, Turkey, 1603-1673), one is disqualified if he has relations with a non-Jewish woman even if they do not live together as a married couple.4) One who eats the cheese of non-Jews or drinks the wine of non-Jews is disqualified from serving as a witness. 5) One who lends or borrows money on interest may not serve as a witness. Since it is forbidden by Torah law to accept interest or to pay interest, both the lender and borrower are disqualified.6) A person who raises his hand to strike his fellow is disqualified from serving as a witness by force of Rabbinic enactment, whereas somebody who actually strikes a fellow Jew is disqualified on the level of Torah law.7) It goes without saying that a "Moser" (somebody who cooperates with non-Jewish authorities in their persecution of Jews) is disqualified from serving as a witness on the level of Torah law. 8) A heretic who does not accept the authority of the oral tradition – the Mishna, Talmud, etc. – is disqualified from serving as a witness on the level of Torah law. In light of these guidelines, it is imperative to choose people of the highest caliber to serve as witnesses at a wedding. Witnesses should not be chosen simply because of their close relationship to the bride or groom, or to their families; they should be chosen based upon their level of Torah observance, to ensure that they are valid. Discretion is far more critical when it comes to the witnesses than with regard to the Berachot recited under the Hupa. A wedding ceremony is perfectly valid even if the Berachot are not recited at all, and the personal religious stature of the people who recite the Berachot will have no effect upon the legal validity of the marriage. But if the witnesses are unsuitable, they undermine the validity of the Kiddushin. It therefore cannot be emphasized enough how important it is to ensure to choose men of a high religious caliber to serve as witnesses.

Screaming in the Cloud
“Cloudash”ing onto Mac with Maciej Winnicki

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 34:41


About MaciejMaciej Winnicki is a serverless enthusiast with over 6 years of experience in writing software with no servers whatsoever. Serverless Engineer at Stedi, Cloudash Founder, ex-Engineering Manager, and one of the early employees at Serverless Inc.Links: Cloudash: https://cloudash.dev Maciej Winnicki Twitter: https://twitter.com/mthenw Tomasz Łakomy Twitter: https://twitter.com/tlakomy Cloudash email: hello@cloudash.dev TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part byLaunchDarkly. Take a look at what it takes to get your code into production. I'm going to just guess that it's awful because it's always awful. No one loves their deployment process. What if launching new features didn't require you to do a full-on code and possibly infrastructure deploy? What if you could test on a small subset of users and then roll it back immediately if results aren't what you expect? LaunchDarkly does exactly this. To learn more, visitlaunchdarkly.com and tell them Corey sent you, and watch for the wince.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by our friends at Rising Cloud, which I hadn't heard of before, but they're doing something vaguely interesting here. They are using AI, which is usually where my eyes glaze over and I lose attention, but they're using it to help developers be more efficient by reducing repetitive tasks. So, the idea being that you can run stateless things without having to worry about scaling, placement, et cetera, and the rest. They claim significant cost savings, and they're able to wind up taking what you're running as it is in AWS with no changes, and run it inside of their data centers that span multiple regions. I'm somewhat skeptical, but their customers seem to really like them, so that's one of those areas where I really have a hard time being too snarky about it because when you solve a customer's problem and they get out there in public and say, “We're solving a problem,” it's very hard to snark about that. Multus Medical, Construx.ai and Stax have seen significant results by using them. And it's worth exploring. So, if you're looking for a smarter, faster, cheaper alternative to EC2, Lambda, or batch, consider checking them out. Visit risingcloud.com/benefits. That's risingcloud.com/benefits, and be sure to tell them that I said you because watching people wince when you mention my name is one of the guilty pleasures of listening to this podcast.Corey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn. And my guest today is Maciej Winnicki, who is the founder of Cloudash. Now, before I dive into the intricacies of what that is, I'm going to just stake out a position that one of the biggest painful parts of working with AWS in any meaningful sense, particularly in a serverless microservices way, is figuring out what the hell's going on in the environment. There's a bunch of tools offered to do this and they're all—yeee, they aspire to mediocrity. Maciej, thank you for joining me today.Corey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn. And my guest today is Maciej Winnicki, who is the founder of Cloudash. Now, before I dive into the intricacies of what that is, I'm going to just stake out a position that one of the biggest painful parts of working with AWS in any meaningful sense, particularly in a serverless microservices way, is figuring out what the hell's going on in the environment. There's a bunch of tools offered to do this and they're all—yeee, they aspire to mediocrity. Maciej, thank you for joining me today.Maciej: Thank you for having me.Corey: So, I turned out to have accidentally blown up Cloudash, sort of before you were really ready for the attention. You, I think, tweeted about it or put it on Hacker News or something; I stumbled over it because it turns out that anything that vaguely touches cloud winds up in my filters because of awesome technology, and personality defects on my part. And I tweeted about it as I set it up and got the thing running, and apparently this led to a surge of attention on this thing that you've built. So, let me start off with an apology. Oops, I didn't realize it was supposed to be a quiet launch.Maciej: I actually thank you for that. Like, that was great. And we get a lot of attention from your tweet thread, actually because at the end, that was the most critical part. At the end of the twitter, you wrote that you're staying as a customer, so we have it on our website and this is perfect. But actually, as you said, that's correct.Our marketing strategy for releasing Cloudash was to post it on LinkedIn. I know this is not, kind of, the best strategy, but that was our plan. Like, it was like, hey, like, me and my friend, Tomasz, who's also working on Cloudash, we thought like, let's just post it on LinkedIn and we'll see how it goes. And accidentally, I'm receiving a notification from Twitter, “Hey, Corey started tweeting about it.” And I was like, “Oh, my God, I'm having a heart attack.” But then I read the, you know—Corey: Oops.Maciej: [laugh]. Yeah. I read the, kind of, conclusion, and I was super happy. And again, thank you for that because this is actually when Cloudash kind of started rolling as a product and as a, kind of, business. So yeah, that was great.Corey: To give a little backstory and context here is, I write a whole bunch of serverless nonsense. I build API's Gateway, I hook them up to Lambda's Function, and then it sort of kind of works. Ish. From there, okay, I would try and track down what was going on because in a microservices land, everything becomes a murder mystery; you're trying to figure out what's broken, and things have exploded. And I became a paying customer of IOpipe. And then New Relic bought them. Well, crap.Then I became a paying customer of Epsagon. And they got acquired by Cisco, at which point I immediately congratulated the founders, who I know on a social basis, and then closed my account because I wanted to get out before Cisco ruins it because, Cisco. Then it was, what am I going to use next? And right around that time is when I stumbled across Cloudash. And it takes a different approach than any other entity in the space that I've seen because you are a native Mac desktop app. I believe your Mac only, but you seem to be Electron, so I could be way off base on that.Maciej: So, we're Linux as well right now and soon we'll be Windows as well. But yeah, so, right now is Mac OS and Linux. Yeah, that's correct. So, our approach is a little bit different.So, let me start by saying what's Cloudash? Like, Cloudash is a desktop app for, kind of, monitoring and troubleshooting serverless architectures services, like, serverless stuff in general. And the approach that we took is a little bit different because we are not web-based, we're desktop-based. And there's a couple of advantages of that approach. The first one is that, like, you don't need to share your data with us because we're not, kind of, downloading your metrics and logs to our back end and to process them, et cetera, et cetera. We are just using the credentials, the AWS profiles that you have defined on your computer, so nothing goes out of your AWS account.And I think this is, like, considering, like, from the security perspective, this is very crucial. You don't need to create a role that you give us access to or anything like that. You just use the stuff that you have on your desktop, and everything stays on your AWS account. So, nothing—we don't download it, we don't process it, we don't do anything from that. And that's one approach—well, that's the one advantage. The other advantage is, like, kind of, onboarding, as I kind of mentioned because we're using the AWS profiles that you have defined in your computer.Corey: Well, you're doing significantly more than that because I have a lot of different accounts configured different ways, and when I go to one of them that uses SSO, it automatically fires me off to the SSO login page if I haven't logged in that day for a 12 hour session—Maciej: Yes.Corey: —for things that have credentials stored locally, it uses those; and for things that are using role-chaining to use assuming roles from the things I have credentials for, and the things that I just do role assumption in, and it works flawlessly. It just works the way that most of my command-line tools do. I've never seen a desktop app that does this.Maciej: Yeah. So, we put a lot of effort into making sure that this works great because we know that, like, no one will use Cloudash if there's—like, not no one, but like, we're targeting, like, serverless teams, maybe, in enterprise companies, or serverless teams working on some startups. And in most cases, those teams or those engineers, they use SSO, or at least MFA, right? So, we have it covered. And as you said, like, it should be the onboarding part is really easy because you just pick your AWS profile, you just pick region, and just pick, right now, a CloudFormation stack because we get the information about your service based on CloudFormation stack. So yeah, we put a lot of effort in making sure that this works without any issues.Corey: There are some challenges to it that I saw while setting it up, and that's also sort of the nature of the fact you are, in fact, integrating with CloudWatch. For example, it's region specific. Well, what if I want to have an app that's multi-region? Well, you're going to have a bad time because doing [laugh] anything multi-region in AWS means you're going to have a bad time that gets particularly obnoxious and EC2 get to when you're doing something like Lambda@Edge, where, oh, where are the logs live; that's going to be in a CloudFront distribution in whatever region it winds up being accessed from. So, it comes down to what distribution endpoint or point of presence did that particular request go through, and it becomes this giant game of whack-a-mole. It's frustrating, and it's obnoxious, and it's also in no way your fault.Maciej: Yeah, I mean, we are at the beginning. Right now, it's the most straightforward, kind of pe—how people think about stacks of serverless. They're think in terms of regions because I think for us, regions, or replicated stacks, or things like that are not really popular yet. Maybe they will become—like, this is how AWS works as a whole, so it's not surprising that we're kind of following this path. I think my point is that our main goal, the ultimate goal, is to make monitoring, as I said, the troubleshooting serverless app as simple as possible.So, once we will hear from our customers, from our users that, “Hey, we would like to get a little bit better experience around regions,” we will definitely implement that because why not, right? And I think the whole point of Cloudash—and maybe we can go more deep into that later—is that we want to bring context into your metrics and logs. If you're seeing a, for example, X-Ray trace ID in your logs, you should be able with one click just see that the trace. It's not yet implemented in Cloudash, but we are having it in the backlog. But my point is that, like, there should be some journey when you're debugging stuff, and you shouldn't be just, like, left alone having, like, 20 tabs, Cloudash tabs open and trying to figure out where I was—like, where's the Lambda? Where's the API Gateway logs? Where are the CloudFront logs? And how I can kind of connect all of that? Because that's—it's an issue right now.Corey: Even what you've done so far is incredibly helpful compared to the baseline experience that folks will often have, where I can define a service that is comprised of a number of different functions—I have one set up right now that has seven functions in it—I grab any one of those things, and I can set how far the lookback is, when I look at that function, ranging from 5 minutes to 30 days. And it shows me at the top the metrics of invocations, the duration that the function runs for, and the number of errors. And then, in the same pane down below it, it shows the CloudWatch logs. So, “Oh, okay, great. I can drag and zoom into a specific timeframe, and I see just the things inside of that.”And I know this sounds like well, what's the hard part here? Yeah, except nothing else does it in an easy-to-use, discoverable way that just sort of hangs out here. Honestly, the biggest win for me is that I don't have to log in to the browser, navigate through some ridiculous other thing to track down what I'm talking about. It hangs out on my desktop all the time, and whether it's open or not, whenever I fire it up, it just works, basically, and I don't have to think about it. It reduces the friction from, “This thing is broken,” to, “Let me see what the logs say.”Very often I can go from not having it open at all to staring at the logs and having to wait a minute because there's some latency before the event happens and it hits CloudWatch logs itself. I'm pretty impressed with it, and I've been keeping an eye on what this thing is costing me. It is effectively nothing in terms of CloudWatch retrieval charges. Because it's not sitting there sucking all this data up all the time, for everything that's running. Like, we've all seen the monitoring system that winds up costing you more than it costs more than they charge you ancillary fees. This doesn't do that.I also—while we're talking about money, I want to make very clear—because disclaiming the direction the money flows in is always important—you haven't paid me a dime, ever, to my understanding. I am a paying customer at full price for this service, and I have been since I discovered it. And that is very much an intentional choice. You did not sponsor this podcast, you are not paying me to say nice things. We're talking because I legitimately adore this thing that you've built, and I want it to exist.Maciej: That's correct. And again, thank you for that. [laugh].Corey: It's true. You can buy my attention, but not my opinion. Now, to be clear, when I did that tweet thread, I did get the sense that this was something that you had built as sort of a side project, as a labor of love. It does not have VC behind it, of which I'm aware, and that's always going to, on some level, shade how I approach a service and how critical I'm going to be on it. Just because it's, yeah, if you've raised a couple 100 million dollars and your user experience is trash, I'm going to call that out.But if this is something where you just soft launched, yeah, I'm not going to be a jerk about weird usability bugs here. I might call it out as “Ooh, this is an area for improvement,” but not, “What jackwagon thought of this?” I am trying to be a kinder, gentler Corey in the new year. But at the same time, I also want to be very clear that there's room for improvement on everything. What surprised me the most about this is how well you nailed the user experience despite not having a full team of people doing UX research.Maciej: That was definitely a priority. So, maybe a little bit of history. So, I started working on Cloudash, I think it was April… 2019. I think? Yeah. It's 2021 right now. Or we're 2022. [unintelligible 00:11:33].Corey: Yeah. 2022, now. I—Maciej: I'm sorry. [laugh].Corey: —I've been screwing that up every time I write the dates myself, I'm with you.Maciej: [laugh]. Okay, so I started working on Cloudash, in 2020, April 2020.Corey: There we go.Maciej: So, after eight months, I released some beta, like, free; you could download it from GitHub. Like, you can still download on GitHub, but at that time, there was no license, you didn't have to buy a license to run it. So, it was, like, very early, like, 0.3 version that was working, but sort of, like, [unintelligible 00:12:00] working. There were some bugs.And that was the first time that I tweeted about it on Twitter. It gets some attention, but, like, some people started using it. I get some feedback, very initial feedback. And I was like, every time I open Cloudash, I get the sense that, like, this is useful. I'm talking about my own tool, but like, [laugh] that's the thing.So, further in the history. So, I'm kind of service engineer by my own. I am a software engineer, I started focusing on serverless, in, like, 2015, 2016. I was working for Serverless Inc. as an early employee.I was then working as an engineering manager for a couple of companies. I work as an engineering manager right now at Stedi; we're also, like, fully serverless. So I, kind of, trying to fix my own issues with serverless, or trying to improve the whole experience around serverless in AWS. So, that's the main purpose why we're building Cloudash: Because we want to improve the experience. And one use case I'm often mentioning is that, let's say that you're kind of on duty. Like, so in the middle of night PagerDuty is calling you, so you need to figure out what's going on with your Lambda or API Gateway.Corey: Yes. PagerDuty, the original [Call of Duty: Nagios 00:13:04]. “It's two in the morning; who is it?” “It's PagerDuty. Wake up, jackass.” Yeah. We all had those moments.Maciej: Exactly. So, the PagerDuty is calling you and you're, kind of, in the middle of night, you're not sure what's going on. So, the kind of thing that we want to optimize is from waking up into understanding what's going on with your serverless stuff should be minimized. And that's the purpose of Cloudash as well. So, you should just run one tool, and you should immediately see what's going on. And that's the purpose.And probably with one or two clicks, you should see the logs responsible, for example, in your Lambda. Again, like that's exactly what we want to cover, that was the initial thing that we want to cover, to kind of minimize the time you spent on troubleshooting serverless apps. Because as we all know, kind of, the longer it's down, the less money you make, et cetera, et cetera, et cetera.Corey: This episode is sponsored by our friends at Oracle Cloud. Counting the pennies, but still dreaming of deploying apps instead of "Hello, World" demos? Allow me to introduce you to Oracle's Always Free tier. It provides over 20 free services and infrastructure, networking, databases, observability, management, and security. And—let me be clear here—it's actually free. There's no surprise billing until you intentionally and proactively upgrade your account. This means you can provision a virtual machine instance or spin up an autonomous database that manages itself all while gaining the networking load, balancing and storage resources that somehow never quite make it into most free tiers needed to support the application that you want to build. With Always Free, you can do things like run small scale applications or do proof-of-concept testing without spending a dime. You know that I always like to put asterisks next to the word free. This is actually free, no asterisk. Start now. Visit snark.cloud/oci-free that's snark.cloud/oci-free.Corey: One of the things that I appreciate about this is that I have something like five different microservices now that power my newsletter production pipeline every week. And periodically, I'll make a change and something breaks because testing is something that I should really get around to one of these days, but when I'm the only customer, cool. Doesn't really matter until suddenly I'm trying to write something and it doesn't work. Great. Time to go diving in, and always I'm never in my best frame of mind for that because I'm thinking about writing for humans not writing for computers. And that becomes a challenge.And okay, how do I get to the figuring out exactly what is broken this time? Regression testing: It really should be a thing more than it has been for me.Maciej: You should write those tests. [laugh].Corey: Yeah. And then I fire this up, and okay, great. Which sub-service is it? Great. Okay, what happened in the last five minutes on that service? Oh, okay, it says it failed successfully in the logs. Okay, that's on me. I can't really blame you for that. But all right.And then it's a matter of adding more [print or 00:14:54] debug statements, and understanding what the hell is going on, mostly that I'm bad at programming. And then it just sort of works from there. It's a lot easier to, I guess, to reason about this from my perspective than it is to go through the CloudWatch dashboards, where it's okay, here's a whole bunch of metrics on different graphs, most of which you don't actually care about—as opposed to unified view that you offer—and then “Oh, you want to look at logs, that's a whole separate sub-service. That's a different service team, obviously, so go open that up in another browser.” And I'm sitting here going, “I don't know who designed this, but are there any windows in their house? My God.”It's just the saddest thing I can possibly experience when I'm in the middle of trying to troubleshoot. Let's be clear, when I'm troubleshooting, I am in no mood to be charitable to anyone or anything, so that's probably unfair to those teams. But by the same token, it's intensely frustrating when I keep smacking into limitations that get in my way while I'm just trying to get the thing up and running again.Maciej: As you mentioned about UX that, like, we've spent a lot of time thinking about the UX, trying different approaches, trying to understand which metrics are the most important. And as we all know, kind of, serverless simplifies a lot of stuff, and there's, like, way less metrics that you need to look into when something is happening, but we want to make sure that the stuff that we show—which is duration errors, and p95—are probably the most important in most cases, so like, covering most of this stuff. So sorry, I didn't mention that before; it was very important from the very beginning. And also, like, literally, I spent a lot of time, like, working on the colors, which sounds funny, [laugh] but I wanted to get them right. We're not yet working on dark mode, but maybe soon.Anyways, the visual part, it's always close to my heart, so we spent a lot of time going back to what just said. So, definitely the experience around using CloudWatch right now, and CloudWatch logs, CloudWatch metrics, is not really tailored for any specific use case because they have to be generic, right? Because AWS has, like, I don't know, like, 300, or whatever number of services, probably half of them producing logs—maybe not half, maybe—Corey: We shouldn't name a number because they'll release five more between now and when this publishes in 20 minutes.Maciej: [laugh]. So, CloudWatch has to be generic. What we want to do with Cloudash is to take those generic tools—because we use, of course, CloudWatch logs, CloudWatch metrics, we fetch data from them—but make the visual part more tailored for specific use case—in our case, it's the serverless use case—and make sure that it's really, kind of—it shows only the stuff that you need to see, not everything else. So again, like that's the main purpose. And then one more thing, we—like this is also some kind of measurement of success, we want to reduce number of tabs that you need to have open in your browser when you're dealing with CloudWatch. So, we tried to put most important stuff in one view so you don't need to flip between tabs, as you usually do when try to under some kind of broader scope, or broader context of your, you know, error in Lambda.Corey: What inspired you to do this as a desktop application? Because a lot of companies are doing similar things, as SaaS, as webapps. And I have to—as someone who yourself—you're a self-described serverless engineer—it seems to me that building a webapp is sort of like the common description use case of a lot of serverless stuff. And you're sitting here saying, “Nope, it's desktop app time.” Which again, I'm super glad you did. It's exactly what I was looking for. How do you get here?Maciej: I'd been thinking about both kinds of types of apps. So like, definitely webapp was the initial idea how to build something, it was the webapp. Because as you said, like, that's the default mode. Like, we are thinking webapp; like, let's build a webapp because I'm an engineer, right? There is some inspiration coming from Dynobase, which was made by a friend [unintelligible 00:18:55] who also lives in Poland—I didn't mention that; we're based in [Poznań 00:18:58], Poland.And when I started thinking about it, there's a lot of benefits of using this approach. The biggest benefit, as I mentioned, is security; and the second benefit is just most, like, cost-effective because we don't need to run in the backend, right? We don't need to download all your metrics, all your logs. We I think, like, let's think about it, like, from the perspective. Listen, so everyone in the company to start working, they have to download all of your stuff from your AWS account. Like, that sounds insane because you don't need all of that stuff elsewhere.Corey: Store multiple copies of it. Yeah I, generally when I'm looking at this, I care about the last five to ten minutes.Maciej: Exactly.Corey: I don't—Maciej: Exactly.Corey: —really care what happened three-and-a-half years ago on this function. Almost always. But occasionally I want to look back at, “Oh, this has been breaking. How long has it been that way?” But I already have that in the AWS environment unless I've done the right thing and turned on, you know, log expiry.Maciej: Exactly. So, this is a lot of, like, I don't want to be, like, you know, mean to anyone but like, that's a lot of waste. Like, that's a lot of waste of compute power because you need to download it; of cost because you need to get this data out of AWS, which you need to pay for, you know, get metric data and stuff like this. So, you need to—Corey: And almost all of its—what is it? Write once, read never. Because it's, you don't generally look at these things.Maciej: Yeah, yeah. Exactly.Corey: And so much of this, too, for every invocation I have, even though it's low traffic stuff, it's the start with a request ID and what version is running, it tells me ‘latest.' Helpful. A single line of comment in this case says ‘200.' Why it says that, I couldn't tell you. And then it says ‘End request ID.' The end.Now, there's no way to turn that off unless you disabled the ability to write to CloudWatch logs in the function, but ingest on that cost 50 cents a gigabyte, so okay, I guess that's AWS's money-making scam of the year. Good for them. But there's so much of that, it's like looking at—like, when things are working, it's like looking at a low traffic site that's behind a load balancer, where there's a whole—you have gigabytes, in some cases, of load balancer—of web server logs on the thing that's sitting in your auto-scaling group. And those logs are just load balancer health checks. 98% of it is just that.Same type of problem here, I don't care about that, I don't want to pay to store it, I certainly don't want to pay to store it twice. I get it, that makes an awful lot of sense. It also makes your security job a hell of a lot easier because you're not sitting on a whole bunch of confidential data from other people. Because, “Well, it's just logs. What could possibly be confidential in there?” “Oh, my sweet summer child, have you seen some of the crap people put in logs?”Maciej: I've seen many things in logs. I don't want to mention them. But anyways—and also, you know, like, usually when you gave access to your AWS account, it can ruin you. You know, like, there might be a lot of—like, you need to really trust the company to give access to your AWS account. Of course, in most cases, the roles are scoped to, you know, only CloudWatch stuff, actions, et cetera, et cetera, but you know, like, there are some situations in which something may not be properly provisioned. And then you give access to everything.Corey: And you can get an awful lot of data you wouldn't necessarily want out of that stuff. Give me just the PDF printout of last month's bill for a lot of environments, and I can tell you disturbing levels of detail about what your architecture is, just because when you—you can infer an awful lot.Maciej: Yeah.Corey: Yeah, I hear you. It makes your security story super straightforward.Maciej: Yeah, exactly. So, I think just repeat my, like, the some inspiration. And then when I started thinking about Cloudash, like, definitely one of the inspiration was Dynobase, from the, kind of, GUI for, like, more powerful UI for DynamoDB. So, if you're interested in that stuff, you can also check this out.Corey: Oh, yeah, I've been a big fan of that, too. That'll be a separate discussion on a different episode, for sure.Maciej: [laugh]. Yeah.Corey: But looking at all of this, looking at the approach of, the only real concern—well, not even a concern. The only real challenge I have with it for my use case is that when I'm on the road, the only thing that I bring with me for a computer is my iPad Pro. I'm not suggesting by any means that you should build this as a new an iPad app; that strikes me as, like, 15 levels of obnoxious. But it does mean that sometimes I still have to go diving into the CloudWatch console when I'm not home. Which, you know, without this, without Cloudash, that's what I was doing originally anyway.Maciej: You're the only person that requested that. And we will put that into backlog, and we will get to that at some point. [laugh].Corey: No, no, no. Smart question is to offer me a specific enterprise tier pricing—.Maciej: Oh, okay. [laugh].Corey: —that is eye-poppingly high. It's like, “Hey, if you want a subsidize feature development, we're thrilled to empower that.” But—Maciej: [laugh]. Yeah, yeah. To be honest, I like that would be hard to write [unintelligible 00:23:33] implement as iPad app, or iPhone app, or whatever because then, like, what's the story behind? Like, how can I get the credentials, right? It's not possible.Corey: Yeah, you'd have to have some fun with that. There are a couple of ways I can think of offhand, but then that turns into a sandboxing issue, and it becomes something where you have to store credentials locally, regardless, even if they're ephemeral. And that's not great. Maybe turn it into a webapp someday or something. Who knows.What I also appreciate is that we had a conversation when you first launched, and I wound up basically going on a Zoom call with you and more or less tearing apart everything you've built—and ideally constructive way—but looking at a lot of the things you've changed in your website, you listened to an awful lot of feedback. You doubled your pricing, for example. Used to be ten bucks a month; now you're twenty. Great. I'm a big believer in charging more.You absolutely add that kind of value because it's, “Well, twenty bucks a month for a desktop app. That sounds crappy.” It's, “Yeah, jackwagon, what's your time worth?” I was spending seven bucks a month in serverless charges, and 120 or 130 a month for Epsagon, and I was thrilled to pieces to be doing it because the value I got from being able to quickly diagnose what the hell was going on far outstripped what the actual cost of doing these things. Don't fall into the trap of assuming that well, I shouldn't pay for software. I can just do it myself. Your time is never free. People think it is, but it's not.Maciej: That's true. The original price of $9.99, I think that was the price was the launch promo. After some time, we've decided—and after adding more features: API Gateway support—we've decided that this is, like, solving way more problems, so like, you should probably pay a little bit more for that. But you're kind of lucky because you subscribed to it when it was 9.99, and this will be your kind of prize for the end of, you know—Corey: Well, I'm going to argue with you after the show to raise the price on mine, just because it's true. It's the—you want to support the things that you want to exist in the world. I also like the fact that you offered an annual plan because I will go weeks without ever opening the app. And that doesn't mean it isn't adding value. It's that oh, yeah, I will need that now that I'm hitting these issues again.And if I'm paying on a monthly basis, and it shows up with a, “Oh, you got charged again.” “Well, I didn't use it this month; I should cancel.” And [unintelligible 00:25:44] to an awful lot of subscriber churn. But in the course of a year, if I don't have at least one instance in which case, wow, that ten minute span justified the entire $200 annual price tag, then, yeah, you built the wrong thing or it's not for me, but I can think of three incidents so far since I started using it in the past four months that have led to that being worth everything you will charge me a year, and then some, just because it made it so clear what was breaking.Maciej: So, in that regard, we are also thinking about the team licenses, that's definitely on the roadmap. There will be some changes to that. And we definitely working on more and more features. And if we're—like, the roadmap is mostly about supporting more and more AWS services, so right now it's Lambda, API Gateway, we're definitely thinking about SQS, SNS, to get some sense how your messages are going through, probably something, like, DynamoDB metrics. And this is all kind of serverless, but why not going wider? Like, why not going to Fargate? Like, Fargate is theoretically serverless, but you know, like, it's serverless on—Corey: It's serverless with a giant asterisk next to it.Maciej: Yeah, [laugh] exactly. So, but why not? Like, it's exactly the same thing in terms of, there is some user flow, there is some user journey, when you want to debug something. You want to go from API Gateway, maybe to the container to see, I don't know, like, DynamoDB metric or something like that, so it should be all easy. And this is definitely something.Later, why not EC2 metrics? Like, it would be a little bit harder. But I'm just saying, like, first thing here is that you are not, like, at this point, we are serverless, but once we cover serverless, why not going wider? Why not supporting more and more services and just making sure that all those use cases are correctly modeled with the UI and UX, et cetera?Corey: That's going to be an interesting challenge, just because that feels like what a lot of the SaaS monitoring and observability tooling is done. And then you fire this thing up, and it looks an awful lot like the AWS console. And it's, “Yeah, I just want to look at this one application that doesn't use any of the rest of those things.” Again, I have full faith and confidence in your ability to pull this off. You clearly have done that well based upon what we've seen so far. I just wonder how you're going to wind up tackling that challenge when you get there.Maciej: And maybe not EC2. Maybe I went too far. [laugh].Corey: Yeah, honestly, even EC2-land, it feels like that is more or less a solved problem. If you want to treat it as a bunch of EC2, you can use Nagios. It's fine.Maciej: Yeah, totally.Corey: There are tools that have solved that problem. But not much that I've seen has solved the serverless piece the way that I want it solved. You have.Maciej: So, it's definitely a long road to make sure that the serverless—and by serverless, I mean serverless how AWS understands serverless, so including Fargate, for example. So, there's a lot of stuff that we can improve. It's a lot of stuff that can make easier with Cloudash than it is with CloudWatch, just staying inside serverless, it will take us a lot of time to make sure that is all correct. And correctly modeled, correctly designed, et cetera. So yeah, I went too far with EC2 sorry.Corey: Exactly. That's okay. We all go too far with EC2, I assure you.Maciej: Sorry everyone using EC2 instances. [laugh].Corey: If people want to kick the tires on it, where can they find it?Maciej: They can find it on cloudash.dev.Corey: One D in the middle. That one throws me sometimes.Maciej: One D. Actually, after talking to you, we have a double-D domain as well, so we can also try ‘Clouddash' with double-D. [laugh].Corey: Excellent, excellent. Okay, that is fantastic. Because I keep trying to put the double-D in when I'm typing it in my search tool on my desktop, and it doesn't show up. And it's like, “What the—oh, right.” But yeah, we'll get there one of these days.Maciej: Only the domain. It's only the domain. You will be redirected to single-D.Corey: Exactly.Maciej: [laugh].Corey: We'll have to expand later; I'll finance the feature request there. It'll go well. If people want to learn more about what you have to think about these things, where else can they find you?Maciej: On Twitter, and my Twitter handle is @mthenw. M-then-W, which is M-T-H—mthenw. And my co-founder @tlakomy. You can probably add that to [show notes 00:29:35]. [laugh].Corey: Oh, I certainly will. It's fine, yeah. Here's a whole bunch of letters. I hear you. My Twitter handle used to be my amateur radio callsign. It turns out most people don't think like that. And yeah, it's become an iterative learning process. Thank you so much for taking the time to speak with me today and for building this thing. I really appreciate both of them.Maciej: Thank you for having me here. I encourage everyone to visit cloudash.dev, if you have any feature requests, any questions just send us an email at hello@cloudash.dev, or just go to GitHub repository in the issues; just create an issue, describe what you want and we can talk about it.We are always happy to help. The main purpose, the ultimate goal of Cloudash is to make the serverless engineer's life easier, on very high level. And on a little bit lower level, just to make, you know, troubleshooting and debugging serverless apps easier.Corey: Well, from my perspective, you've succeeded.Maciej: Thank you.Corey: Thank you. Maciej Winnicki, founder of Cloudash. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn, and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, whereas if you've hated this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice along with an angry comment telling me exactly why I'm wrong for using an iPad do these things, but not being able to send it because you didn't find a good way to store the credentials.Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

Locales Unknown
Exploring Poland with Gosia Kiszniewska

Locales Unknown

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022 66:42


In this episode Gosia takes us all over Poland to its myriad landscape of historic cities, picturesque mountain ranges and stunning seaside escapes. We start in Krakow with its UNESCO world heritage historic center and highlight Wawel Royal Castle along with other notable sights. Our next stop is the town of Weilicksa with its huge salt mine and charming old town. Further east are two mountain ranges, Tatra and Bieszczady, that have different options for hiking, nature watching and relaxation. For sailors and aquatic enthusiasts the Masurian lake district and the Hel peninsula offer a range of activities for every age group and budget. Gdańsk is also an important stop for history lovers as well as a seaside getaway with ferry connections to other Baltic countries northward. Our conversation rounds out with a discussion of Polish food (keilbasa and pierogi to name just a few), vodka and wine. Be sure to add Poland to any upcoming European adventures or onward destinations as it truly has something for everyone.Polish LakesHiking in PolandCity OverviewFun fact: Poland actually invented the bagel. 

Podside Picnic
Episode 151: Two Mermaids Walk Into a Bar (Ft. Mattie Lewis)

Podside Picnic

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2022 57:10


Mattie Lewis of The Podhand returns to talk about The Lure (2015). Join us as we discuss this dark and violent retelling of The Little Mermaid set in the club scene of 80s Poland. Listen to Mattie and her co-hosts on The Podhand: https://player.fm/series/the-podhand Read Mattie's writing: https://devilsdoorbell.gumroad.com/

Learn Polish Podcast
#203 Ferie zimowe - Winter Holiday

Learn Polish Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2022 8:27


Learn Polish in a fun way with short Episodes. On this episode we talk about Ferie zimowe - Winter Holiday.   Sponsor www.coolabulla.com for Websites and Animation. Use code LearnPolish for 10% Discount.   All Social Media https://linktr.ee/learnpolish   Donations https://linktr.ee/roycoughlan   Spotify https://open.spotify.com/show/0ZOzgwHvZzEfQ8iRBfbIAp   Apple https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/learn-polish-podcast/id1462326275   To listen to all Episodes + The Speaking Podcast + The Meditation Podcast + Business Opportunities please visit http://roycoughlan.com/   Now also on   Bitchute https://www.bitchute.com/channel/pxb8OvSYf4w9/   Youtube https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC9SeBSyrxEMtEUlQNjG3vTA   To get Skype lessons from Kamila or her team please visits http://polonuslodz.com/   In this Episode we discuss:   Ferie zimowe- Winter Holiday   Możemy jechać w góry- We can go to the mountains   To są piękne góry- These are beautiful mountains   Jadę w góry- I'm going to the mountains   Jestem w górach- I'm in the mountains   Piesze wędrówki- Hiking   Dziesięć kilometrów pieszo- Ten kilometers on foot   Buty górskie- Mountain boots   Plecak- Rucksack   W plecaku mamy termos z gorącą herbatą- In the rucksack we have a thermos with hot tea   Wspinać się- Climb   Wędrować, spacerować po górach- To hike, walk in the mountains   Jeździć na nartach- Skiing   Jeździć na snowboardzie- Snowboarding   Podziwiać piękne widoki- Admire the beautiful views   Zdobywać szczyty górskie- To climb mountain peaks   Najwyższy szczyt górski w Polsce to Rysy- The highest mountain peak in Poland is Rysy   If you would like Skype lessons from kamila or her team please visit http://polonuslodz.com/   All Polish Episodes / Speaking Podcast / Meditation Podcast / Awakening Podcast/ Polish Property & business Offers - http://roycoughlan.com/   All Social Media + Donations https://linktr.ee/learnpolish   Please Share with your friends / Subscribe and give a 5* Review  - Thank You (Dziekuje Bardzo :) )   #learnpolish #speakpolish #polishpodcast

Macroaggressions
#193: The Leadup To World War 3 | Alex Krainer

Macroaggressions

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 9, 2022 66:53


When people take an honest look at the series of events that predicated the second world war, it becomes clear that there was collusion and media manipulation that played with how the public viewed the reasons for getting involved. As the media starts to bang the war drums once again, this time in Ukraine, we are starting to see similarities to how things kicked off in Poland and Czechoslovakia back in the late 1930s. Alex Krainer is writing about these similarities for his investment analytics clients from his time as a hedge fund manager in Monaco. His own personal experience as a Yugoslavian escaping the war in the 1990s also brings seriousness to the conversation, as well as the knowledge that these things can and do happen. Sponsors: Emergency Preparedness Food: www.preparewithmacroaggressions.com Chemical Free Body: https://www.chemicalfreebody.com and use promo code: MACRO C60 Purple Power: https://c60purplepower.com/ Promo Code: MACRO Wise Wolf Gold & Silver: www.Macroaggressions.gold True Hemp Science: https://truehempscience.com/ Haelan: https://haelan951.com/pages/macro Coin Bit App: https://coinbitsapp.com/?ref=0SPP0gjuI68PjGU89wUv Macroaggressions Merch Store: https://www.teepublic.com/stores/macroaggressions?ref_id=22530 LinkTree: linktr.ee/macroaggressions Books: HYPOCRAZY: https://amzn.to/3AFhfg2 Controlled Demolition on Amazon: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B08M21XKJ5 Purchase "The Octopus Of Global Control" Amazon: https://amzn.to/3aEFFcr Barnes & Noble: https://bit.ly/39vdKeQ Online Connection: Link Tree: https://linktr.ee/Macroaggressions Discord Link:  https://discord.gg/4mGzmcFexg Website: www.theoctopusofglobalcontrol.com Facebook: www.facebook.com/theoctopusofglobalcontrol Twitter: www.twitter.com/macroaggressio3 Twitter Handle: @macroaggressio3 YouTube: www.youtube.com/channel/UCn3GlVLKZtTkhLJkiuG7a-Q Apple Podcasts: https://apple.co/2LjTwu5 Email For Helium Miner: Email: theoctopusofglobalcontrol@protonmail.com Alex Krainer: https://thenakedhedgie.com/

Razib Khan's Unsupervised Learning
Eric Kaufmann: shall the religious still inherit the earth?

Razib Khan's Unsupervised Learning

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 8, 2022 85:43


Subscribe now Give a gift subscription Share This week on Unsupervised Learning Razib talks with Eric Kaufmann, political scientist and demographer, and the author of The Rise and Fall of Anglo-America, Shall the Religious Inherit the Earth? and Whiteshift: Populism, Immigration, and the Future of White Majorities. During the course of their conversation, Razib and Eric focus on the thesis at the center of Shall the Religious Inherit the Earth?, the prediction that due to the higher reproductive rates of religious groups compared to the secular population, the future is going to be more religious than the present. Eric's thesis is that aspects of religious belief, for example, the divine commandment in the Hebrew Bible to be “fruitful and multiply,” result in differential fertility on the individual level. On the group level, he notes that poorer societies are more religious, and these societies also are driving migration and demographic change in secular developed countries (for example, London is more church-going than the rest of England, due to large immigrant congregations). Before digging into the possibilities for future demographics, Razib gets Eric's opinions and views on the secularization evident across much of the world over the last few centuries. How does this align with the idea that the future will be religious, especially when worries about differential fertility have been mooted as far back as early 19th-century France? At the time, secular French intellectuals worried about the immigration and reproductive rates of highly religious Catholics from Poland and elsewhere. And yet today France is even more secular than it was 200 years ago. Much of the subsequent discussion revolves around the idea that social and cultural change is impacted by alternative forces acting in balance. Transcript Eric emphasizes that the core of his argument does not rely upon the idea of large prominent religious groups expanding through mass conversion. Rather, Shall the Religious Inherit the Earth? argues that fertility differences in the liberal secular societies are going to be impacted in the long-term by small strict endogamous groups, like ultra-Orthodox Jews in England and Israel, or Laestadian Lutherans in Finland. Eric makes the case that these fundamentalist groups benefit from the spread of secular liberalism, as they are more inoculated from the anti-natal currents in the broader populace, driving large differential fertility differences. Finally, they also touch on what is driving secularism in America, the demographic problems facing Mormons in America, and how secularism might play out differently in South and East Asian societies dominated by non-Abrahamic religions.  Subscribe now Give a gift subscription Share

RECO12
Andrew and Sara - Sexaholic Nuts and Bolts of a Healthy Relationship - Meeting 83

RECO12

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 7, 2022 61:52


Andrew:  is a 47 year old recovering sexoholic,  sober for 6 years. He joined the SA fellowship 11 years ago. He does his step work and has a sponsor and a few sponsees in SA.  He has also worked the steps in CODA.  He is clean from drugs for 23 years but has never joined a drug fellowship. Recently he started to do part-time work as an addiction therapist  in a small clinic that specializes in sex addiction.  In recovery he found God and God's guidance.  Thanks to His grace he has been married for 2 years to his lovely wife Sara who he first met in SA. This last year in July, their baby girl was born and right now he is living the life he had never expected to be possible.Sara: is a 30 year old recovering sex addict, sober from lust thanks to God's grace for 4.5 years. She has worked the 12 step program with a sponsor and served as a sponsor to other female sex addicts in her fellowship. Since she is married to another recovering sex addict is a part of the S-Anon fellowship which helps her to address the patterns of codependency and heal from them as well. When she first joined the SA fellowship she was a broken woman. She felt like her life was over. She reached my lowest low and didn't expect there was any decent life possible after that. But God in His goodness made her recover rapidly and soon after, gave her a wonderful husband and best friend- Andrew. They have their highs and lows but mutual faith and the 12 steps principles keep them close and make their marriage flourish. The Reco12 project which is an organization whose addictions include alcohol, drugs, lust and sex, food and gambling, just to name a few.  We come together from all places, faiths and backgrounds to learn the similarities of addiction and to gain tools and hope from others who are walking a similar path.  We invite recovering addicts with at least 1 year sobriety and who are actively working their recovery in their respective fellowships to share their experience, strength and hope on a live Zoom webinar, each Friday at 12:00 pm central time, for 20-25 minutes.  Then, we, the live audience, get the opportunity to ask questions of the speaker for another 20-25 minutes.  If you are hearing this meeting in recorded podcast form and would like to participate as a live audience member in the future, please go to www.reco12.com to learn more and submit your email address there to receive weekly invitations.  Reco12 is a self-supporting service and we appreciate your help in keeping it that way.  We gratefully accept contributions to help cover the costs of the Zoom platform, podcast platform, web hosting, and administrative costs.  To contribute, you can go to https://www.reco12.com/support  or you can click the link to PayPal (https://www.paypal.me/reco12)  in the chat of the live meeting.  When you contribute, please specify the meeting number.  This is meeting number 83.  Resources:  Sexaholics AnonymousOutro music is “Standing Still” by Cory Ellsworth and Randy Kartchner, performed by Mike Eldred and Elizabeth Wolfe.  This song, and/or the entire soundtrack for the future Broadway musical, “Crosses:  A Musical of Hope”, can be purchased here:  https://music.apple.com/us/album/crosses-musical-hope-by-cory/528476262  This song is used with the  permission of Cory Ellsworth.Support the show (https://www.reco12.com/support)

Hammer + Nigel Show Podcast

A fugitive in Poland who's been wanted for MURDER for 20 years finally got caught on Tuesday after cops detained him for not wearing a face mask inside a store. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Sarah and Vinnie Full Show
January 6th, 2022 8am Alice News Network

Sarah and Vinnie Full Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2022 14:24


Cops in Poland stop a man in public for not wearing a mask in public turns out he was a murder, some women have declared their body shape as airpod shape, and there is a website where you can invest in rare wine! 

Inside Europe | Deutsche Welle
Inside Europe 06.01.2022

Inside Europe | Deutsche Welle

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2022 55:00


Cheers and jeers over EU plans to label gas and nuclear energy, climate friendly - Poland's Watergate scandal over spyware attacks heats up - Bikes revolutionize the school run in Barcelona - Brexit one year after Britain left the EU - Why schools are key to preserving local life on Italy's Aeolian islands - All aboard the night train! Why more and more people are sleeping their way across Europe

Book Vs Movie Podcast
Book Vs Movie: "Apocalypse Now" (1979) Francis Ford Coppola

Book Vs Movie Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2022 65:37


Book Vs. Movie: Heart of Darkness & Apocalypse Now The Joseph Conrad Classic Novel Vs the Francis Ford Coppola Classic Film The Margos are going to talk about the multiple “horrors” of the 1899 Joseph Conrad novel Heart of Darkness and the 1979 Apocalypse Now film directed by Francis Ford Coppola which are both considered classics of their genre. They both follow the story of men who enter into dangerous situations which could either be a sly attack of European colonialism or more pandering to the white man as true leader mythos. Either way--we are a podcast that talks about the author, novel and then compares the filmed adaptation to decide which we like better. We are NOT experts on film, books, or colonialism. So if you are writing a paper about any of this, do not consider us a huge source. This is for entertainment!  Joseph Conrad is considered one of the greatest novelists of all time and was born in Poland to revolutionaries and political activists. He had a chaotic upbringing being raised by his mother's brother and being educated on and off until his 20s.  Conrad was fluent in Polish, English, and French and was conversational in Greek and German. He spent several years as a merchant marine for France and England.  He began his writing career in 1895 with Almayer's Folly and wrote in a style of literary impressionism. His Heart of Darkness was adapted to screen several times over the 20th Century with the most famous being the Francis Ford Coppola film that almost killed him and some of his actors (wait until you hear about it!)  The story is about ferry boat sailor Charles Marlow who is on a mission to find Mr. Kurtz who has disappeared somewhere along the Congo (though the site is not mentioned in the book) and has become enmeshed in the world of the “natives.” In the end, Kurtz returns to the “civilized” world telling the late Kurtz's finance he was thinking of her when he died. In reality, he said “the horror.”  The movie is set in Viet Nam late 1960s during the war with Martin Sheen as Captain Benjamin Willard who is set to look for the missing Colonel Kurtz (Marlon Brando) who has hidden in Cambodia and is considered insane and dangerous. The film was famous for being over budget, stressful, and almost killed several people attached to the project.  So, between the original story and the 1979 adaptation--which did we prefer?  In this ep the Margos discuss: Our first impressions of the novel The life of Joseph Conrad  The main differences between the book and movie The Animaniacs 1993 satire Hearts of Twilight  Starring: Marlon Brando (Colonel Kurtz,) Robert Duvall (Lt. Colonel William “Bill” Kilgore,) Martin Sheen (Capt. Ben Williard,) Frederic Forrest (Jay “Chef” Hicks,) Sam Bottoms (Lance B. Johnson,) Laurence Fishburne (Tyrone “Mr. Clean” Miller,) Dennis Hopper, Harrison Ford (Colonel Lucas,) Scott Glenn (Capt. Richard Colby,) and Ronald Lee Emery.  Clips used: Francis Ford Coppola in Hearts of Darkness: A Filmmaker's Apocalypse Apocalypse Now  the 1979 trailer Martin Sheen gets his assignment Duvall loves the smell of Napalm Martin Sheen comes for Marlon Brando Martin Sheen kills Marlon Brando (spoiler!) Music by Carmine Coppola  Book Vs. Movie is part of the Frolic Podcast Network. Find more podcasts you will love Frolic.Media/podcasts .  Join our Patreon page to help support the show! https://www.patreon.com/bookversusmovie    Book Vs. Movie podcast https://www.facebook.com/bookversusmovie/ Twitter @bookversusmovie www.bookversusmovie.com Email us at bookversusmoviepodcast@gmail.com     Margo D. @BrooklynFitChik www.brooklynfitchick.com brooklynfitchick@gmail.com Margo P. @ShesNachoMama https://coloniabook.weebly.com/    Our logo was designed by Madeleine Gainey/Studio 39 Marketing Follow on Instagram @Studio39Marketing & @musicalmadeleine 

The Patrick Madrid Show
The Patrick Madrid Show: January 05, 2022 – Hour 1

The Patrick Madrid Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 48:05


Poland has just adopted new pro-family policies meant to increase birth rates. Nirvana lawsuit over ‘Nevermind' baby cover tossed by judge Keanu Reeves donated 70% of his ‘Matrix’ salary Mark – During Mass people tend to bow to the table instead of genuflecting at the tabernacle. What do you think about this? Diana – I […]

The Patrick Madrid Show
The Patrick Madrid Show: January 05, 2022 – Hour 1

The Patrick Madrid Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022


Poland has just adopted new pro-family policies meant to increase birth rates. Nirvana lawsuit over ‘Nevermind' baby cover tossed by judge Keanu Reeves donated 70% of his ‘Matrix' salary Mark – During Mass people tend to bow to the table instead of genuflecting at the tabernacle. What do you think about this? Diana – I […]

Tick Boot Camp
Episode 232: Healing Channel - an interview with Bianca Crino

Tick Boot Camp

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022


Bianca Crino is a 27-year-old Health Coach, Reiki Practitioner, author, and course builder/creator. She was born and raised in Sydney, Australia and currently resides in Poland. Ms. Crino began to feel “unwell” shortly after her 22nd birthday. She experienced brain fog, severe fatigue, neck pain and headaches. Her debilitating symptoms caused her to seek diagnostic and treatment assistance from more than 6 medical doctors resulting in misdiagnosis including Multiple Sclerosis, Fibromyalgia, CFS, and depression. Her healing journey began when a Lyme Literate Medical Doctor utilized a blood test from the German BCA Lab to diagnose her with Lyme disease. Shortly after the diagnosis, the disease progressed and stole her capacity “to function at all.” The next page in her healing journey was written when she traveled to Malaysia for treatment. During her time there, Ms. Crino started an Instagram page to seek advice and counsel from members of the Lyme community. Ms. Crino discovered that as she leaned into vulnerably sharing her story on Instagram, the community would provide her with advice which she would in turn share on her page to pass on the healing models to others. The cycle of giving and receiving guided Ms. Crino to her purpose: channeling healing tools and tips to people suffering from Lyme disease. If you would like to learn more about how Lyme disease taught a healing channel and health coach to accept the responsibility to help others by healing herself first, then tune in now!

DJcity Podcast
Paragraph51

DJcity Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 30:23


DJ Paragraph51 is from Toruń, Poland. He is the co-owner of the Laba Przystań Towarzyska music festival and is the official DJ for the Twarde Pierniki basketball team and for the Polish HipHop Music Festival. Follow DJ Paragraph51 on Instagram: @djparagraph51 See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Let's Know Things
Pegasus Spyware

Let's Know Things

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 29:15


This week we talk about NSO Group, Mattel, and Poland. We also discuss vulnerabilities, human rights activists, and Citizen Lab. Support the show: patreon.com/letsknowthings & letsknowthings.com/support Show notes/transcript: letsknowthings.com Check out my other shows & publications: understandary.com

History Unplugged Podcast
Europe's Babylon: 16th-Century Antwerp was a City of Wealth, Vice, Heresy, and Freedom

History Unplugged Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 52:39


Before Amsterdam, there was a dazzling North Sea port at the hub of the known world: the city of Antwerp. For half the sixteenth century, it was the place for breaking rules – religious, sexual, intellectual. Known as Europe's Babylon, the once-humble Belgian city had an outsized role in making the modern world.In the Age of Exploration, Antwerp was sensational like nineteenth-century Paris or twentieth-century New York. It was somewhere anything could happen or at least be believed: killer bankers, a market in secrets and every kind of heresy.And it was a place of change—a single man cornered all the money in the city and reinvented ideas of what money meant. Jews fleeing the Portuguese Inquisition needed Antwerp for their escape, thanks to the remarkable woman at the head of the grandest banking family in Europe. She set up an underground railroad for Jews so that they could flee persecution and find safe passage to friendlier lands like Poland or the Ottoman Empire.Thomas More opened Utopia there, Erasmus puzzled over money and exchanges, William Tyndale sheltered there and smuggled out his Bible in English until he was killed. Pieter Bruegel painted the town as The Tower of Babel.But when Antwerp rebelled with the Dutch against the Spanish and lost, all that glory was buried. The city that unsettled so many now became conformist. Mutinous troops burned the city records, trying to erase its true history.To discuss the growth and decline of this city is today's guest is Michael Pye, author of Europe's Babylon: The Rise and Fall of Antwerp's Golden Age.

Dark Poutine - True Crime and Dark History
The Tragic Death of Robert Dziekanski

Dark Poutine - True Crime and Dark History

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 78:39


Episode 201: On October 14, 2007, after a gruelling 20-hour journey from Poland, Robert Dziekanski, arrived at the YVR airport's international terminal in Richmond, B.C. Dziekanski, who spoke nor read any English, was unable to read the signs directing him to what he should do next or where he should go. The confused man spent ten hours in the airport wandering around the secure customs area. His mother was waiting for him with a friend only a few meters away in the public waiting area. Had the two been able to connect this story would have had a very different conclusion, but they did not. She left the airport, frustrated, hours before her son's final moments. Sources: Commissioner's Statement - Incident at Vancouver Airport - Canada.ca Report Following a Public Interest Investigation into a Chair-Initiated Complaint Respecting the Death in RCMP Custody of Mr. Robert Dziekanski | Civilian Review and Complaints Commission for the RCMP Braidwood Inquiry Braidwood Commission Report Vancouver Sun — YVR Robert Dziekanski 2007 Taser incident — YouTube Vancouver Airport Tragedy - Canada — YouTube (song) Rundel v. British Columbia – Braidwood Commission, 2009 BCSC 814 (CanLII), < https://canlii.ca/t/2465p > Taser International, Inc. v. British Columbia, 2010 BCSC 1120 (CanLII), < https://canlii.ca/t/2c0pd > R. v. Bentley, 2013 BCSC 1125 (CanLII), < https://canlii.ca/t/g0349 > R. v. Bentley, 2013 BCSC 1364 (CanLII), < https://canlii.ca/t/fzvpn > R. v. Millington, 2014 BCSC 756 (CanLII), < https://canlii.ca/t/g6pxd > R. v. Millington, 2015 BCSC 143 (CanLII), < https://canlii.ca/t/gg44h > R. v. Bentley, 2015 BCCA 251 (CanLII), < https://canlii.ca/t/gjdgc > R. v. Robinson, 2015 BCSC 433 (CanLII), < https://canlii.ca/t/ggsh4 > R. v. Millington, 2015 BCSC 515 (CanLII), < https://canlii.ca/t/gh26c > R. v. Rundel, 2015 BCSC 1090 (CanLII), < https://canlii.ca/t/gjr5s > R. v. Millington, 2015 BCSC 1380 (CanLII), < https://canlii.ca/t/gkh89 > R. v. Millington, 2015 BCSC 1426 (CanLII), < https://canlii.ca/t/gkmrj > R. v. Robinson, 2015 BCSC 1535 (CanLII), < https://canlii.ca/t/gkwtz > R. v. Millington, 2016 BCCA 293 (CanLII), < https://canlii.ca/t/gshg5 > R. v. Robinson, 2017 BCCA 6 (CanLII), < https://canlii.ca/t/gwss2 > Criminal Law: Perjury | CanLII Connects Final report from Braidwood Commission finds Taser use unjustified Osoyoos First Nation Mountie still trying to clear his name 12 years after the Robert Dziekanski died - APTN News Mother of Robert Dziekanski dies during visit to Poland | Watch News Videos Online Blamed and Broken: The Mounties and the Death of Robert Dziekanski eBook : Petrovich, Curt: Amazon.ca: Kindle Store CBA British Columbia - In Memoriam: Thomas Braidwood Coroner's Report Support the show: https://www.patreon.com/darkpoutine See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.