Podcasts about Swiss

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  • 4,169PODCASTS
  • 6,853EPISODES
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Best podcasts about Swiss

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Latest podcast episodes about Swiss

The Cantankerous Catholic
Practical Resistance

The Cantankerous Catholic

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 63:46


Episode 152Church Militant has established a formal arm of its apostolate called Resistance. This week we're going to meet the young man who Michael Voris has put in charge of that. ResourcesIn an effort to provide you with the best, most helpful experience we can, any resource mentioned in The Cantankerous Catholic podcast will always be listed in this section. As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases on links that are for purchases made from Amazon. This costs you nothing, but Amazon pays me a small commission on purchases made through those links. This helps to support this apostolate. https://wwb.gr8.com/ (Sixpack System Bulletin Inserts) Church Militant Resistancehttp://www.CMResistance.com (Resistance general info) https://www.cmresistance.com/recruit (Become a Member of Resistance) https://www.cmresistance.com/resistance-archived-episodes (Resistance Podcast) Contact Joe Gallagher Simon Rafe's https://www.churchmilitant.shop/?product=7 (Case Files) on DVD. Makes a great Christmas gift! https://www.churchmilitant.com/video/allshows (Church Militant Premium)—only $10 per month! The Wanderer Catholic Newspaper. Get one month for one dollar by texting the word “news” to 830-331-5729. https://www.paypal.com/cgi-bin/webscr?cmd=_s-xclick&hosted_button_id=85YEDSUJHVN42&source=url (Help Keep the Joe Sixpack—The Every Catholic Guy Apostolate Alive) FOR CHECKS: make checks payable to Cassock Media, P.O. Box 41, Villa Ridge, Missouri 63089 https://app.getresponse.com/site2/joe_sixpack_answers/?u=BhGUM&webforms_id=YZQe (I Want To Learn More About The Catholic Church!) https://mariancatechist.com/product/basic-catholic-catechism-course/ (Marian Catechist Apostolate Basic Course) https://www.avoicelikebutter.com/ (Rick Stender)—Official Voice of The Cantankerous Catholic SubscribeMake sure you never miss an episode of The Cantankerous Catholic by subscribing through one of these links, or wherever else you get your podcasts. https://thecantankerouscatholic.captivate.fm/listen (Subscribe to The Cantankerous Catholic here) Catholic News Notes#5 https://www.washingtonexaminer.com/news/fauci-hit-by-cruz-missile-in-war-of-words-over-science (Fauci hit by Cruz missile in war of words over 'science') #4 https://www.newsmax.com/us/hochul-newyork-electivesurgeries-omicron/2021/11/27/id/1046375/ (NY Gov. Hochul Blocks Elective Surgeries Over Surge, Omicron Fears) #3 https://www.washingtonexaminer.com/news/seven-children-remain-hospitalized-one-week-after-waukesha-parade-massacre (Seven children remain hospitalized one week after Waukesha parade massacre) #2 http://www.apple.com (Chuck Todd Says Vaccine Mandates Are ‘Pro-Life,' Abortion Access Is ‘Freedom To Choose'; Tate Reeves Crushes Him) #1 https://www.washingtonexaminer.com/restoring-america/fairness-justice/retired-police-officer-dies-after-being-shot-while-protecting-news-crew-reporting-on-oakland-theft (Retired Police Officer Dies After Being Shot Wile Protecting News Crew Reporting on Oakland Theft) Catholic BootcampThis week Joe Sixpack—The Every Catholic Guy's Catholic Bootcamp is titled Agents of Darkness. Catholic QuotesThis week's quote is from St. Anthony of Padua. Catholic StoriesThis episode features a story about a saintly Swiss archbishop. Joe Sixpack's Stuffhttps://www.joesixpackanswers.com/ (JoeSixpackAnswers.com) https://cantankerouscatholic.com/product/secrets-of-the-catholic-faith/ (Secrets of the Catholic Faith) by Joe Sixpack—The Every Catholic Guy https://cantankerouscatholic.com/product/the-lay-evangelists-handbook-how-any-catholic-can-evangelize-anyone/ (The Lay Evangelist's Handbook) by Joe Sixpack—The Every Catholic Guy https://cantankerouscatholic.com/product/the-best-of-what-we-believe-why-we-believe-it-volume-one/ (The Best of What We Believe... Why We Believe It—Volume One) by Joe Sixpack—The Every Catholic Guy... Support this podcast

Fish Out of Water: The SwimSwam Podcast
Olympic Medalist Noe Ponti on Training in Switzerland for Foreseeable Future

Fish Out of Water: The SwimSwam Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 46:39


We sat down with Olympic bronze medalist in the 100 fly, Noe Ponti. The butterfly specialist is fresh off of breaking 4 new Swiss records at the Swiss SC championships. Ponti was public on his Instagram that winning his bronze medal was fairly life-changing and prompted him to depart from NC State after having been in the US for just a few weeks this fall. Ponti speaks on how being at home in Switzerland brings him happiness and will therefore be staying there for the foreseeable future. SWIMSWAM PODCAST LINKS Click here to listen and subscribe on Spotify Click here to listen and subscribe on Apple Podcasts Click here to listen and subscribe on Podbean Click here to listen and subscribe on Google Click here to listen and subscribe on YouTube Click here to listen and subscribe on Listen Notes Click here to listen and subscribe on Stitcher Click here to listen and subscribe on iHeartRadio Click here to listen and subscribe on Amazon Click here to listen and subscribe on Pandora Music: Otis McDonald www.otismacmusic.com

Punk Till I Die
Episode 141: Beat Man Zeller (The Monsters, Voodoo Rhythm)

Punk Till I Die

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 75:25


In Episode 141 we talk to Swiss madman Beat Man Zeller, boss at Voodoo Rhythm Records and main guy in The Monsters. He tells us tons of great stories about his 30 years running the label and touring. Music by The Monsters and Hasil Adkins.

The Rebel Capitalist Show
News: Swiss Citizens Vote For Health Passports (Here's What They're Missing)

The Rebel Capitalist Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 41:27


Check out the Rebel Capitalist Live event Jan 7th - 9th!! https://rebelcapitalistlive.com

Women of HERstory: A podcast
Iris von Roten: Swiss Author/Lawyer/Feminist

Women of HERstory: A podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 44:37


Iris von Roten wrote "Women in the Playpen", a scathing analytical assessment of the Swiss woman's experience in the 1950s. That was just the problem, the Swiss were not used to the biting, witty delivery- especially from a woman. She faced intense backlash and ridicule for the rest of her life for the work, which is now a staple in the feminist literary canon! ofherstory.com Insatgram: @womenofherstorypodcast Twitter: @theherstorypod Facebook: Women of HERstory TikTok: @womenofherstory

Uncensored Advice For Men
Are Vaccines Fraud w/ Robert Alan Yoho

Uncensored Advice For Men

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 50:29


Dr. Yoho is 68 years old and calls himself a healthcare whistleblower. He practiced medicine in the United States and retired two years ago. He was a board-certified emergency physician and cosmetic surgeon. He has recently published two books, Butchered by “Healthcare” and Hormone Secrets. Dr. Yoho, welcome to the show. Here is a free gift of the complete versions of my ebooks: https://dl.bookfunnel.com/4kliod8a9z and https://dl.bookfunnel.com/p7dvqow83g. See Robertyohoauthor.com for more including amazon links, free audio and ebook download of half of each book, and sample podcasts I have done. https://www.robertyohoauthor.com/ COVID AND VAX REFERENCES THAT CAN SAVE YOUR LIFE:  OVERVIEW. Covid is little to worry about if you have the proper medications and treatment. The physician lecturing at the first link, Peter McCullough, is a famed academic. He reports that 85 percent of fatalities would be prevented by ivermectin, hydroxychloroquine, vitamin D, and other treatments used early and in combination.  https://thelibertydaily.com/here-is-the-video-by-dr-peter-mccullough-that-is-changing-minds-about-the-vaccines/ The following two videos are more about the dangers of the “vaccine.” https://rumble.com/vndgg6-oct-2-2021-peter-mccullough-md-the-vxs-are-not-safe.html https://rumble.com/vomwi7-cv19-injections-will-cause-massive-death-dr.-elizabeth-eads.html ONLINE TREATMENT resources and legal help: https://aapsonline.org/CovidPatientTreatmentGuide.pdf https://www.truthforhealth.org https://americasfrontlinedoctors.org/  https://doctors4covidethics.org Ivermectin is safe and effective for Covid. It is being slammed by a wall of lies. See this LINK.  FOR COVID GEEKS: this LINK is a Swiss website. THE BEST PODCASTS are Peter Breggin's and Robert Kennedy, Jr's. His lecture about the erosion of the Constitution's Bill of Rights is at this LINK. Subscribe to his newsletter at childrenshealthdefense.org.   The best books about the whole situation are: 1)    Peter Breggin's Covid 19 and the Global Predators (see this LINK for a summary). 2)   RFK, Jr.'s The Real Anthony Fauci   WHY 25 PERCENT OF WORLD FATALITIES OCCURRED IN THE USA, SEE HERE. TO GET INVOLVED, a practical path is at this LINK. AUSTRALIA is a nightmare and must be studied to understand what could happen to us. See this LINK and THIS ONE and HERE. PLEASE PASS THIS ALONG. IT IS THE MOST IMPORTANT MESSAGE OF MY CAREER. Physicians are mostly sheep, but a few are stepping up. Over 10,000 signed a petition about this in Europe, and we have a few in the USA who are treating covid properly. We have to fight—we are being cannibalized.   --Robert Yoho, October 2021.    "LEGAL” DISCLAIMER: Use any information here at your own risk. It is not medical advice. Make your healthcare decisions with the help of your physician.    SEE ROBERTYOHOAUTHOR.COM to learn about my books, Butchered by “Healthcare” andHormone Secrets, which are available on Amazon. You can also access half of the audio version free and much more. 

Even the Rich
Murder in the House of Gucci | Not Guilty, Not Innocent | 3

Even the Rich

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 44:35


Who killed Maurizio Gucci? As the police begin their investigation, they have no leads and too many suspects. Is it Patrizia, the wife Maurizio abandoned? Paolo, the cousin he betrayed? Or the Swiss mob, to whom Maurizio owed millions? The authorities go in circles – until a mysterious late-night phone call pushes the case in an entirely new direction.Indeed- Get started with a $75 credit indeed.com/Rich to upgrade your job posting!CV Sciences(Plus CBD)- Sleep better tonight at pluscbdoil.com; enter Promo Code: RICH for 40% OFFyour order!See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Top Flight Time Machine

Dog dirt disposal, dealing with HMRC, Bumping Bobby, and the cheap Swiss euthanasia option.Join the Iron Filings Society: https://www.patreon.com/topflighttimemachine See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

I Am A Champion
Nikita Ducarroz - Pro Freestyle BMX Biker

I Am A Champion

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 29:54


Nikita Ducarroz is Swiss & American freestyle BMX rider. Listen to her amazing story on how she overcame severe anxiety. From not being able to leave her house to now traveling the world as a Redbull Athlete living her life by design. She is a powerhosue in mental skills and recently won the Bronze medal at the Tokyo Olympics in BMX Freestyle. Nikita is someone you will want to follow for life. Keep up with her on IG@Nikita.duccarozhttps://instagram.com/m1ndtricks?utm_medium=copy_linkand her Instagam sharing stories & conversations about #MentalHealth shared by the action sports community and beyond

The Economist Morning Briefing
The Economist Morning Briefing, November 29th, 2021

The Economist Morning Briefing

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 4:43


Catch up: Omicron restrictions multiply and Swiss back covid certificatesHave your say about “The Economist Morning Briefing” in our survey here www.economist.com/briefingsurvey.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Give Bats A Podcast
On the Energetic Edge - Ep. 6 Dina Dechmann

Give Bats A Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 61:51


Greetings, batfolk!! My guest this episode is Dr. Dina Dechmann, a Swiss ecologist that lives in Switzerland and then crosses the border to work in Germany every day at the Max Planck Institute of Animal Behavior. Dina's career and research has taken her all over the world, as you'll soon learn, and the questions she's asking have to do with bat behavior and the energetic realities that underlie them. I found myself just completely fascinated by the processes and strategies bats employ to save energy that Dina explained to me. We also talk about Kasanka National Park and the straw-colored fruit bats, how you have to know a lot about a lot in order to study bats (or at least know and collaborate with others who know a lot about which you know little), the enormous complexities of conservation, a bat that excavates and lives in termite nests with the termites still in there, and so much more. Follow Dina on Twitter at https://twitter.com/dechmannlab. Visit the Give Bats A Break Linktree https://linktr.ee/GiveBatsABreak to find ALL of the GBAB and GBAP links, including to Apple Podcasts and Podchaser where you can leave a rating and a review! Let me know what you like, what you'd like to hear, and what you think of the show, or shoot me an email at givebatsabreak@gmail.com. If you dig the song at the intro and outro, it is appropriately named "Bats" and it is by my friend and music producer MNPHST who you can find on Soundcloud https://soundcloud.com/maniphest-1. Thanks for putting the podcast in your bat caves! I'm looking forward to the next time we get to Give Bats A Podcast together

ESG Insider: A podcast from S&P Global
Direct Air Capture: A high-tech fix for climate change?

ESG Insider: A podcast from S&P Global

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 20:59


Can a global array of CO2-sucking machines save us from the worst ravages of climate change? This episode is the first in an ESG Insider miniseries about new carbon-removal technology. This week we examine a method called Direct Air Capture, or DAC Right now, DAC is expensive and only at the nascent stages of development. But there's growing support from entrepreneurs and some large companies to deploy the approach on an industrial scale. In this episode, we interview Steve Oldham, CEO of a Canadian company called Carbon Engineering, which is building a giant carbon-sucking plant in America's oil-rich Permian Basin. Oldham explains how the technology works; why his company almost shut its doors; and why it now has the backing of Bill Gates and a host of fossil fuel companies, including Occidental, BHP and Chevron. We also talk to Daniel Egger, Chief Commercial Officer of Swiss firm Climeworks. The clean tech company recently switched on the world's largest DAC plant in Iceland. A smaller DAC plant run by Climeworks in Switzerland already sells the CO2 it extracts to greenhouses and to Coca-Cola, which uses the gas to put the fizz in its namesake drink. Our third guest is Stuart Haszeldine of the University of Edinburgh, which describes him as the world's first official professor of carbon capture and storage. Haszeldine explains how DAC technology can help remove the large volumes of CO2 that humans have pumped into the air since the Industrial Revolution. He also points out that, despite recent progress on DAC technology, most politicians and policymakers have yet to back the idea because it “seems to promise magic out of thin air.” Photo credit: Getty Images

Science Friday
Futuristic Freezing, Koji, Cheese Microbiome, Wine-Bottle Resonators. November 26, 2021, Part 1

Science Friday

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 46:59


New Cold Storage Method Solves Freezer Burn—And Saves Energy Have you ever pulled a long-anticipated pint of ice cream out of the freezer, only to find the strawberries crunchy and the normally creamy substance chalky and caked with ice? Freezer burn, a phenomenon caused by water in food crystallizing into ice inside the ice cream or fruit or meat during freezing, is a menace to taste buds, a driver of food waste, and even damages some of the nutritional benefits of food. And it's always a risk as long as food preservation relies on very cold temperatures. Even flash-freezing, which works much faster, can still create small ice crystals. But United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) food scientists, working with a team at the University of California-Berkeley, have a method that could help solve this problem. Normal food freezing, called isobaric, keeps food at whatever pressure the surrounding air is. But what if you change that? Isochoric freezing, the new method, adds pressure to the food while lowering temperature, so the food becomes cold enough to preserve without its moisture turning into ice. No ice means no freezer burn. And, potentially, a much lower energy footprint for the commercial food industry: up to billions fewer kilowatt-hours, according to recent research. Ira talks to USDA food technologist Cristina Bilbao-Sainz and mechanical engineer Matthew Powell-Palm about how pressure and temperature can be manipulated to make food last longer, and hopefully taste better. Plus, the challenges of turning a good idea into a widespread technology. Koji: The Mold You Want In Your Kitchen When chef Jeremy Umansky grows a batch of Aspergillus oryzae, a cultured mold also known as koji, in a tray of rice, he says he's “bewitched” by its fluffy white texture and tantalizing floral smells. When professional mechanical engineer and koji explorer Rich Shih thinks about the versatility of koji, from traditional Japanese sake to cured meats, he says, “It blows my mind.” Koji-inoculated starches are crucial in centuries-old Asian foods like soy sauce and miso—and, now, inspiring new and creative twists from modern culinary minds. And Shih and Umansky, the two food fanatics, have written a new book describing the near-magical workings of the fungus, which, like other molds, uses enzymes to break starches, fats, and proteins down into food for itself. It just so happens that, in the process, it's making our food tastier.  You can grow koji on grains, vegetables, and other starchy foods, and make sauces, pastes, alcohols, and vinegars. Even cure meats. Umansky and Shih say the possibilities are endless—and they have the koji pastrami and umami popcorn to prove it.   The Bacteria Behind Your Favorite Blues, Bries, and More Cheese lovers, you can thank microbes for the flavorful funk of Camembert cheese and the perforated pattern of Swiss. According to microbiologist Rachel Dutton, one gram of cheese rind is home to 10 billion bacterial and fungal cells. Dutton describes our favorite cheese-microbe pairings and explains why the cheese rind is ripe for teaching us about the basic interactions of bacteria.   The World According To Sound: When Your Wine Bottle Sings A few years ago, Chris Hoff was making himself some plum wine. He had a nice big plum tree in the apartment he was renting in San Francisco, and it had been a plentiful year. During the process he came across a beautiful, simple sound that made him get out his recording gear. It came from his little metal funnel. Each time Hoff poured liquid through his funnel to fill a bottle, it made this pleasant rising arpeggio of bubbles. When the pitch reached its height, the bottle was filled, and Hoff moved on to the next one. He liked it so much that he grabbed his small handheld recorder and captured the sound. This simple, everyday sound is the result of a complex interaction of the liquid, bottle, air, and funnel. While water pours down through the funnel, air is being forced out of the bottle and up through the liquid, where it makes a bubble on the surface and then pops. As the level of liquid decreases in the funnel, the pitch of the popping bubbles rises. Read more at sciencefriday.com.    

Ideas of India
Neha Gupta on Creating Affordable Housing

Ideas of India

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 28:35


This episode is the seventh in a miniseries of weekly short episodes featuring young scholars entering the academic job market who discuss their latest research. In this episode, Shruti speaks with Neha Gupta about her job market paper, “Homeownership, Renting and Market Failures: Evidence from Indian Slums.” They discuss government policies to increase affordable housing, how nonstate actors affect slum and nonslum housing, the Swiss housing market and much more. Gupta has a Ph.D. in economics and finance from the University of St. Gallen, Switzerland. Her research interests include applied economics, causal econometrics, empirical macroeconomics, and urban and development economics. Follow Neha on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Dr_NehaG  Follow Shruti on Twitter: https://twitter.com/srajagopalan For a full transcript of this conversation with helpful links, visit DiscourseMagazine.com. 

The Pedalshift Project: Bicycle Touring Podcast
264: Holiday Bike Draft 2021

The Pedalshift Project: Bicycle Touring Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 64:04


It's the most wonderful time of the year, or so the song goes... so let's gather 'round the Zoom and warm up with our friends from the Land of Sunshine and Bunnies at the Sprocket Podcast, and compete in our semi-regular bike draft! Armando, Joan, Aaron and I pick seven rounds of bike touring gear to see who has the best setup... just in time for the holidays! Holiday Bike Draft 2021 Don't look at this chart unless you want to be spoiled, but come back and check it out to decide who should win (cough cough me cough).     Armondo Joan Tim Aaron 1 Spare tubes Rear rack Ortlieb O bag Frame pump 2 Water filter Ortlieb panniers Camping hammock Front rack 3 Masterlink fenders Schwalbe marathon plus tires Tubeless tires 4 Backpack Warm Showers account Showers Pass rain gear Caradice double flap 5 front headlight Rain cape Self heating MREs 3 person tent 6 Puffy jacket Water bottle Bike multitool Swiss army knife 7 iPhone Bike map of UK Camelback Compass BIKE Salsa Fargo Disc Trucker Brompton Pugsly Pedalshift LIVE Friday, December 10, 9pm ET - check it out on YouTube or pedalshift.net/live! Pedalshift Society As always we like to close out the show with a special shoutout to the Pedalshift Society! Because of support from listeners like you, Pedalshift is a weekly bicycle touring podcast with a global community, expanding into live shows and covering new tours like 2022's winter bike tour! If you like what you hear, you can support the show for 5 bucks, 2 bucks or even a buck a month. And there's one-shot and annual options if you're not into the small monthly thing. Check it all out at pedalshift.net/society. Kimberly Wilson Caleb Jenkinson Cameron Lien Andrew MacGregor Michael Hart Keith Nagel Brock Dittus Thomas Skadow Marco Lo Terrance Manson Harry Telgadas Chris Barron Mark Van Raam Brad Hipwell Mr. T Nathan Poulton Stephen Dickerson Vince LoGreco Cody Floerchinger Tom Benenati Greg Braithwaite Sandy Pizzio Jeff Muster Seth Pollack Joseph Quinn Drue Porter Byron Paterson Joachim Raber Ray Jackson Jeff Frey Kenny Mikey Lisa Hart John Denkler Steve Hankel Miguel Quinones Alejandro Avilés-Reyes Keith Spangler Greg Towner Dan Gebhart, RIP Jody Dzuranin Lucas Barwick Michael Baker Brian Bechtol Reinhart Bigl Greg Middlemis Connie Moore William Gothmann Brian Benton Joan Churchill Mike Bender Rick Weinberg Billy Crafton Gary Matushak Greg L'Etoile-Lopes James Sloan Jonathan Dillard John Funk Tom Bilcze Ronald Piroli Dave Roll Brian Hafner Misha LeBlanc Ari Messinger David Gratke Todd Groesbeck Wally Estrella Sue Reinert John Leko Stephen Granata Phillip Mueller Robert Lackey Dominic Carol Jacqi McCulloch John Hickman Carl Presseault David Neves Patty Louise Terry Fitzgerald Peter Steinmetz Timothy Fitzpatrick Michael Liszewski Hank O'Donnell David Zanoni David Weil Matthew Sponseller Chad Reno Spartan Dale Carolyn Ferguson Peggy Littlefield Lauren Allansmith Eric Burns Thomas Pearl Darrin McKibben Richard Stewart Dave Fletcher Jack Smith Music Music You've been hearing about Jason Kent and his music for many fine episodes. Sunfields has a new album available NOW,AND Jason has a new solo album coming this year, AND his first solo album is now streaming on Spotify, including America, the Pedalshift theme. Go listen! And Jason is doing live events in and around Montreal, so go listen LIVE too! https://soundcloud.com/sunfields  

Seven Million Bikes; A Saigon Podcast
Niall Mackay Interviewed on NowOrNhi - Podcasts And Comedy (in Saigon) | Bonus Episode

Seven Million Bikes; A Saigon Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 22:16


Join The Community!In Season 5 we spoke to Nhi Mai a Swiss born and raised Viet Kieu who decided to live in Saigon to discover more about her roots and gave her another perspective of her motherland.She decided to create a YouTube channel about it, called Now Or Nhi to give insight into her life as a Viet Kieu / Expat in Saigon.I was lucky enough to be a guest on her show and this was the first YouTube interview I had done before. Nhi wanted to talk to me about how I ended up in Vietnam after living in different countries, the journey of his podcast and how Seven Million Bikes started hosting comedy shows.Thanks Nhi, come back soon, and enjoy hearing me be the interviewee!----------------------------------Watch Herehttps://www.youtube.com/c/NowOrNhiSeven Million Bikes is one of the top English-speaking podcasts in Vietnam. And I was so lucky to be the first YouTuber who got Niall Mackay, the founder of Seven Million Bikes, in front of the camera for an interview! We talked about how he ended up in Vietnam after living in different countries, the journey of his podcast and how Seven Million Bikes now also hosts comedy shows. If you are not really convinced by podcasts (or comedy shows) yet, give this one a try! Niall gave me an insight into the world of podcasts and comedy, one that I didn't know about before. And even more of a surprise: All this is happening in Saigon / Vietnam!NhiFollow & Support Seven Million Bikes:https://www.facebook.com/SevenMillion...https://www.instagram.com/seven_milli...youtube.com/channel/UCcLcj_HUDZ0sswA7...If you order before the end of November Masqd are giving A Vietnam Podcast listeners 20% off orders over 330k. Click the link in the notes to their Instagram or Facebook and message them directly with the code 7MB to get your discount!In 2020, 2,900 disposable masks were thrown away every minute! Protect the environment, yourself and others. Have you thought about starting your own podcast, but don't know where to begin or have the time. Seven Million Bikes can help you with this. Read our Free Blog Post here - 10 Tips To Start Your podcast​Book A Free Consultation.Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/SevenMillionBikes)

Stand Up! with Pete Dominick
Joe Madison and Kenneth C Davis Episode 483

Stand Up! with Pete Dominick

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 35:13


Stand Up is a daily podcast. I book,host,edit, post and promote new episodes with brilliant guests every day. Please subscribe now for as little as 5$ and gain access to a community of over 800 awesome, curious, kind, funny, brilliant, generous souls Check out StandUpwithPete.com to learn more 27 Minutes  Kenneth C. Davis is the bestselling author of Don't Know Much About® History and other books in the Don't Know Much About® series. He also wrote the acclaimed In the Shadow of Liberty. For 30 years, Kenneth C. Davis has proven that Americans don't hate history — just the dull version they slept through in class. Davis's approach is to refresh us on the subjects we should have learned in school. He does it by busting myths, setting the record straight, and making history human. If your school, library or learning community would like to speak with Kenneth C. Davis about American history, click on   Classroom Skypes or Custom Virtual Visits to learn more. 1:01 Washington University Arts & Sciences alumnus Joe Madison is a groundbreaking radio personality and human and civil rights activist. He has built a legacy of using his voice for those without one. His radio program, “The Joe Madison Show,” airs nationally weekday mornings on SiriusXM's Urban View channel 126. During his four-hour program, Mr. Madison, also known as “The Black Eagle,” talks about political and social issues, brings attention to social injustices around the world, and challenges himself and his listeners daily to “do something about it.” Named one of Talkers magazine's 100 Most Important Talk Radio Hosts nine times, often in the top 10, Mr. Madison has interviewed world leaders, including President Barack Obama in the Oval Office, among other notable guests. A native of Dayton, Ohio, Mr. Madison was raised by his grandparents. In the mid-1960s, he attended Wisconsin State, where he was captain of his undefeated freshman football team. As a student leader, he became involved in the civil rights movement. His coach, resenting Mr. Madison's campus activism, removed him from the team. Eventually, Mr. Madison received a welcoming call from the athletic director at Washington University, who offered him a spot on the Bears football team. A sociology major, he was an all-conference running back on the football team, a baritone soloist in the university choir and a disc jockey at the campus radio station. He earned a bachelor's degree in 1971, the first in his family to do so. After becoming active in the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP), Mr. Madison, at age 24, was named executive director — the youngest — of the NAACP's 10,000-member Detroit chapter in 1974. He was promoted in 1986 by the NAACP's president, Benjamin Hooks, to serve as the organization's national political director. Among the highlights of his eight-year tenure, he organized a successful boycott of Dearborn, Michigan, businesses over a racist city law, and he led hundreds of volunteers on a series of successful voter registration marches, including a cross-country “march for dignity” from Los Angeles to Baltimore that also garnered thousands of signatures for an anti-apartheid bill in Congress. In 1986, he was elected to the NAACP s Board of Directors, a position he held for 14 years. In the midst of his civil rights work, he started another career in 1980 as a socially conscious radio talk show personality on Detroit's WXYZ-AM. He went on to host talk shows in Philadelphia and Washington, D.C. The popularity of his WOL-AM show led to syndication on the Radio One Talk Network and eventually to SiriusXM. A tenacious leader in the cause for social justice, he uses his show as a platform for inspiring action on critical issues. He brought international attention to human rights abuses in southern Sudan from his three trips to the country in the middle of its second civil war. Working with the Swiss-based Christian Solidarity International, he helped free 7,000 Sudanese being held as slaves. In February 2015, he broke the Guinness World Record for “longest marathon hosting a radio talk show” (52 hours live), raising over $250,000 for the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture. In June 2015, Mr. Madison made history again by broadcasting live from Cuba, becoming the first American radio host to do so in more than 50 years. In 2019, Madison received an honorary Doctor of Laws degree from Washington University for his work as a groundbreaking radio personality and human rights activist. In November 2019, Madison was inducted into the Radio Hall of Fame. He has not forgotten the opportunities he received as a Washington University student and continues to give back to his alma mater. A member of the William Greenleaf Eliot Society, he has generously supported scholarships, athletics and the university's Gephardt Institute for Civic and Community Engagement. For the past two decades, he has interviewed potential students for the admissions office. In 2017, he received Arts & Sciences' Distinguished Alumni Award. A board member of the American Red Cross, his other awards include the Southern Christian Leadership Conference Journalism Award in 2000, the Washington Association of Black Journalists Community Service Award in 1997 and the NAACP Image Award in 1996. Mr. Madison and his wife of 42 years, Sharon, live in Washington, D.C. They have four children and five grandchildren Check out all things Jon Carroll Follow and Support Pete Coe   Pete on YouTube Pete on Twitter Pete On Instagram Pete Personal FB page

Greater Than Code
260: Fixing Broken Tech Interviews with Ian Douglas

Greater Than Code

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 64:32


01:01 - Ian's Superpower: Curiosity & Life-Long Learning * Discovering Computers * Sharing Knowledge 06:27 - Streaming and Mentorship: Becoming “The Career Development Guy” * The Turing School of Software and Design (https://turing.edu/) * techinterview.guide (https://techinterview.guide/) * twitch.tv/iandouglas736 (https://www.twitch.tv/iandouglas736) 12:01 - Tech Interviews (Are Broken) * techinterview.guide (https://techinterview.guide/) * Daily Email Series (https://techinterview.guide/daily-email-series/) * Tech vs Behavior Questions 16:43 - How do I even get a first job in the tech industry? * Tech Careers = Like Choose Your Own Adventure Book * Highlight What You Have: YOU ARE * Apply Anyway 24:25 - Interview Processes Don't Align with Skills Needed * FAANG Company (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Big_Tech) Influence * LeetCode-Style Interviews (https://leetcode.com/explore/interview/card/top-interview-questions-medium/) * Dynamic Programing Problems (https://medium.com/techie-delight/top-10-dynamic-programming-problems-5da486eeb360) * People Can Learn 35:06 - Fixing Tech Interviews: Overhauling the Process * Idea: “Open Source Hiring Manifesto” Initiative * Analyzing Interviewing Experiences; Collect Antipatterns * Community/Candidate Input * Company Feedback (Stop Ghosting! Build Trust!) * Language Mapping Reflections: Mandy: Peoples' tech journeys are like a Choose Your Own Adventure book. Keep acquiring skills over life-long learning. Arty: The importance of 1-on-1 genuine connections. Real change happens in the context of a relationship. Ian: Having these discussions, collaborating, and saying, “what if?” This episode was brought to you by @therubyrep (https://twitter.com/therubyrep) of DevReps, LLC (http://www.devreps.com/). To pledge your support and to join our awesome Slack community, visit patreon.com/greaterthancode (https://www.patreon.com/greaterthancode) To make a one-time donation so that we can continue to bring you more content and transcripts like this, please do so at paypal.me/devreps (https://www.paypal.me/devreps). You will also get an invitation to our Slack community this way as well. Transcript: ARTY: Hi, everyone. Welcome to Episode 260 of Greater Than Code. I am Arty Starr and I'm here with my fabulous co-host, Mandy Moore. MANDY: Thank you, Arty. And I'm here with our guest today, Ian Douglas. Ian has been in the tech industry for over 25 years and suggested we cue the Jurassic Park theme song for his introduction. Much of his career has been spent in early startups planning out architecture and helping everywhere and anywhere like a “Swiss army knife” engineer. He's currently livestreaming twice a week around the topic of tech industry interview preparation, and loves being involved in developer education. Welcome to the show, Ian. IAN: Thanks for having me. It's great to be here. MANDY: Awesome. So we like to start the show with our famous question: what is your superpower and how did you acquire it? IAN: Probably curiosity. I've always been kind of a very curious mindset of wanting to know how things work. Even as a little kid, I would tear things apart just to see how something worked. My parents would be like, “Okay, great. Put it back together.” I'm like, “I don't know how to put it back together.” So [chuckles] they would come home and I would just have stuff disassembled all over the house and yeah, we threw a lot of stuff out that way. But it was just a curiosity of how things work around me and that led into computer programming, learning how computers worked and that just made the light bulb go off in my mind as a little kid of, I get to tell this computer how to do something, it's always going to do it. And that just led of course, into the tech industry where you sign up for a career in the tech industry, you're signing up for lifelong learning and there's no shortage of trying to satiate that curiosity. I think it's just a never-ending journey, which is fantastic. ARTY: When did you first discover computers? What was that experience like for you? IAN: I was 8 years old. I think it was summer, or fall of 1982. I believe my dad came home with a Commodore 64. My dad was always kind of a gadget nut. Anything new and interesting on the market, he would find an excuse to buy and so he, brought home this Commodore 64 thinking family computer, but once he plunked it down in front of me, it sort of became mine. I didn't want to share. I grew up in Northern Canada way, way up in the Northwest territories and in the wintertime, we had two things to do. We could go play hockey, or we'd stay indoors and not freeze. So I spent a lot of time indoors when I wasn't playing hockey—played a lot of hockey as a kid. But when I was home, I was basically on this Commodore 64 all the time, playing games and learning how the computer itself worked and learning how the programming language of it worked. Thankfully, the computer was something I had never took apart. Otherwise, it would have been a pile of junk, but just spending a lot of time just learning all the ins and outs. Back then, the idea was you could load the software and then you type a run command and it would actually execute the program. But if you type a list, it would actually show you all the source code of the program as well and that raised my curiosity, like what is all this symbols and what all these words mean? In the back of the Commodore 64 book, it had several chapters about the basic programming language. So I started picking apart all these games and trying to learn how they worked and then well, what would happen if I change this instruction to that and started learning how to sort of hack my games, usually break the game completely. But trying to hack it a little bit; what if I got like an extra ship, an extra level, or what if I change the health of my character, or something along those lines? And it kind of snowballed from there, honestly. It was just this fascination of, oh, cool, I get to look at this thing. I get to change it. I get to apply it. And then of course, back in the day, you would go to a bookstore and you'd have these magazines with just pages and pages and pages of source code and you'd go home and you type it all in expecting something really cool. At the end of it, you run it and it's something bland like, oh, you just made a spreadsheet application. It's like, “Oh, I wanted a game.” Like, “Shucks.” [laughter] But as a little kid, that kind of thing wasn't very enticing, but I'm sure as an adult, it's like, oh cool, now I have a spreadsheet to track budgeting, or whatever at home. It was this whole notion of open source and just sharing knowledge and that really stuck with me, too and so, as I would try to satiate this innate curiosity in myself and learn something, I would go teach it to a friend and it's like, “Hey, hey, let me show you what I just did. I learned how to play this thing on the piano,” or “I learned how to sing this song,” or “I learned how to use a magnifying glass to cook an ant on the sidewalk.” [chuckles] Whatever I learned, I always wanted to turn around and teach it to somebody else. I would get sometimes more excitement and joy out of watching somebody else do it because I taught them than the fact that I was able to learn that and do it myself. And so, after a while it was working on the computer became kind of a, oh yeah, okay, I can work on the computer, I can do the thing. But if I could turn around and show somebody else how to do that and then watch them explore and you watch that light bulb go off over their head, then it's like, oh, they're going to go do something cool with that. Just the anticipation of how are they going to go use that knowledge, that really stuck with me my whole life. In high school doing little bits of tutoring here and there. I was a paid tutor in college. Once I got out of college and got into the workplace, again, just learning on my own and then turning around and teaching others led into running my own web development business where I was teaching some friends how to do web development because I was taking on so much work that I had to subcontract it the somebody where I wasn't going to meet deadlines and so, I subcontracted them. That meant that I got to pay my friends to help me work this business. And so, that kind of kicked off and then I started learning well, how to servers work and how does the internet work and how do I run an email server on all this stuff? So just never-ending stream of knowledge going on in the internet and then just turning around and sharing that knowledge and keeping that community side of things building up over time. MANDY: Very cool. So in your bio, it said you're streaming now so I'm guessing that's a big part of what you do today with the streaming. So what are you streaming? IAN: So let's see, back in 2014, I started getting involved in mentorship with a local code school here in Denver called The Turing School of Software and Design. It's the 7-month code program and they were looking for someone that could help just mentor students. They were teaching Ruby on Rails at the time. So I got involved with them. I was working in Ruby at SendGrid at the time where I was working, who was later acquired by Twilio. And I'm like, “Yeah, I got some extra time. I can help some people out.” I like giving back and I like the idea of tutoring and teaching. I started that mentorship and it quickly turned into hey, do any of our mentors know anything about resumes and the hiring and interviewing and things like that. And by that point, I had been the lead engineer. I had done hiring. I hired several dozen engineers at SendGrid, or helped hire several dozen people at SendGrid. And I'm like, “Yeah, I've looked at hundreds and thousands of resumes.” Like, “What can I help with?” So I quickly became the career development guy to help them out and over time, the school started developing their career development curriculum and I like to think I had a hand in developing some of that. 3 years later, they're like, “You just want a job here? Like you're helping so many students, you just want to come on staff?” And so, I joined them as an instructor, taught the backend program, had a blast, did that for almost 4 full years. And then when I left Turing in June of 2021, I thought, “Well, I still want to be able to share this knowledge,” and so, I took all these notes that I had been writing and I basically put it all onto a website called techinterview.guide. When I finished teaching, I'm like, “Well, I still miss sharing that knowledge with people,” and I thought, “How else can I get that knowledge out there in a way that is scalable and manageable by one human being?” And I thought, “Well, I'll just kind of see what other people are doing.” Fumbled around on YouTube, watched some YouTube videos, watched people doing livestreaming on LinkedIn, livestreaming on Facebook, livestreaming on YouTube and trying to think could I do that? Nah, I don't know if I could do that. A friend of mine named Jonan Scheffler, he currently works at New Relic, he does a live stream. So I was hanging out on his stream one night and it was just so much fun seeing people interact and chat and how they engage the people in the chat and answering questions for them. I'm like, “I wonder if I could do that.” The curiosity took over from there and you can imagine where that went; went way down some rabbit holes on how to set up a streaming computer. Started streaming and found out that I wasn't very good at audio routing, [chuckles] recording things, and marketing, all that kind of stuff. But I kind of fumbled my way through it and Jonan was very generous with his time to help me straighten some things out and it kind of took off from there. So I thought, “Well, now I've got a platform where I can share this career development advice having been in the industry now for 25 years. Now, I've been director of engineering. I'm currently the director of engineering learning at a company. I've got an education background now as an instructor for several years. I've been doing tons of mentoring.” I love to give back and I love to help other people learn a thing that's going to help improve their life. I think of it like a ripple effect, like I'm not going to go out and change the world, but I can change your world and that ripple effect is going to change somebody else's world and that's going to change somebody else's world. So that's how I see my part in all of this play out. I'm not looking to be the biggest name in anything. I'm just one person with a voice and I'm happy to share my ideas and my perspectives, but I'm also happy to have people on my stream that can share their ideas and perspectives as well. I think it's important to hear a lot of perspectives, especially when it comes to things like job hunt, interview prep, and how to build a resume. You're going to see so much conflicting advice out there like, “This is the way you should do it,” and someone else will be like, “No, this is the way you should do it.” Meanwhile, I'm on the sidelines going, “You can do it all of that way.” Just listen to everybody's advice and figure out how you want to build your resume and then that's your resume. It doesn't have to look like the way I want it, or the way that someone else wants it; it can look how you want it to look. This is just our advice kind of collectively. So the livestream took off from there and I've got only a couple of hundred followers, or so on Twitch, but it's been a lot of fun just engaging with chat and people are submitting questions to me all the time. So I do a lot of Q&A sessions, like ask me anything sessions and it's just been a ton of fun. ARTY: That's awesome. I love the idea of focusing on one person and how you can make a difference in that one person's life and how those differences can ripple outward. That one-on-one connection, I feel like if we try and just broadcast and forget about the individuals, it's easy for the message and stuff to just get lost in ether waves and not actually make that connection with one person. Ultimately, it's all those ones that add up to the many. IAN: Definitely. Yeah. ARTY: So can you tell us a little bit more about the Tech Interview Guide and what your philosophy is regarding tech interviews? IAN: The tech interview process in – well, I mean, just the interview process in general in the tech industry is pretty broken. It lends itself very well to people who come from position and privilege that they can afford expensive universities and have oodles and oodles of free time to go study algorithms for months and months and months to go jump through a whole bunch of hoops for companies that want four, or five, six rounds of interviews to try to determine whether you're the right fit for the company and it's super broken. There are a lot of companies out there that are trying to change things a little bit and I applaud them. It's going to be a tough journey, for sure. Trying to convince companies like hey, this is not working out well for us as candidates trying to apply for jobs. As a company, though I understand because I've been a hiring manager that you need to be able to trust the people that you're hiring. You need to trust that they can actually do the job. Unfortunately, a lot of the tech interview process does not adequately mimic what the day-to-day responsibility of that job is going to be. So the whole philosophy of me doing the Tech Interview Guide is just an education of, “Hey, here's my perspective on what you're likely to face as a technical interview. These are the different stages that you'll typically see.” I have a lot of notes on there about how to build a resume, how to build a cover letter, thoughts on building a really big resume and then how to trim it down to one page to go apply for a particular job. How to write a cover letter that's customized to the business to really position yourself as the best candidate for that role. And then some chapters that I have yet to write are going to be things like how do you negotiate once you get an offer, like what are some negotiation tips. I've shared some of them live on the stream and I've shared a growing amount of information as I learn from other people as well, then I'll turn around and I'll share that on the stream. The content that's actually on the website right now is probably 3, 4 years old, some of it at least and so, I'm constantly going back in and I'm trying to revamp that material a little bit to kind of be as modern as possible. I used to want to go a self-publish route where I actually made a book. Several of my friends have actually gone through the process of actually making a book and getting it published. I'm like, “Oh, I want to do that, too. My friends are doing that. I could do that, too,” and I got looking into it. It's like, okay, it's an expensive, really time-consuming process and by the time I get that book on a shelf somewhere, a lot of the information is going to be out of date because a lot of things in the tech industry change all the time. So I decided I would just self-publish an online book where I can just go in and I can just constantly refresh the information and people can go find whatever my current perspective is by going to the website. And then as part of the website, I also have a daily email series that people can sign up for. I'm about to split it into four mailing lists. But right now, it's a single mailing list where I'm presenting technical questions and behavioral questions that you're likely to get asked as a web developer getting into the business. But I don't spend time in the email telling you how to answer the question; what I do instead is I share from the interviewer's perspective. This is why I'm asking you this question. This is what I hope to hear. This is what's important for me to hear in your answer. Because there's so many resources out there already that are trying to tell you how to craft the perfect answer, where I'm trying to explain this is why this question is important to us in the first place. So I'm taking a little bit different perspective on how I present that information and to date I've sent out, I don't know, something like 80,000 emails over a couple of years to folks that have signed up for that, which has been really tremendous to see. I get a lot of good feedback from that. But again, that information it doesn't always age well and interview processes change. I'm actually going through the process right now in the month of November to rewrite a lot of that information, but then also break out into multiple lists and so, where right now it's kind of a combination of a little bit of technical questions, a little bit of behavioral questions, a little bit of procedural, like what is an interview and so on. Now I'm actually going to break them out into separate lists of this list is all just technical questions and this list is all just behavioral questions and this list is going to be general process and then the process of going through the interview and how to do research and so on. And then the last one is just general questions and answers and a lot of that is stemmed from the questions that people have submitted to me that I answered on the live stream. So it all kind of packages up together. MANDY: That's really cool. I'd like to get into some of the meat of the material that you're putting out here. IAN: Yeah. MANDY: So as far as what are some of the biggest questions that you get on your street? IAN: Probably the most popular question I get—because a lot of the people that come by the stream and find the daily email list are new in the industry and they're trying to find that first job. And so by far, the number one question is, how do I even get a job in the industry right now? I have no experience. I've got some amount of education, whether it's an actual CS degree, or something similar to a CS degree, or they've gone through a bootcamp of some kind. How do I even get that first job? How do I position myself? How do I differentiate myself? How do I even get a phone call from a company? That's a lot of what's broken in the industry. Everybody in the industry right now wants people with experience, or they're saying like, “Oh, this is a “entry-level role,” but you must have 3 to 4 years' experience.” It's like, well, it's not entry level if you're asking for experience; it can't be both. All they're really doing is they're calling it an entry-level role so they don't have to pay you as much. But if they want 3-, or 4-years' experience, then you should be paying somebody who has 3-, or 4-years' experience. So the people writing these job posts are off their rocker a little bit, but that's by far, the number one question I get is how do I even get that first job. Once you get that first job and you get a year, year and a half, 2 years' experience, it's much easier to get that second job, or third job. It's not like oh, I'm going to quit my job today and have a new job tomorrow. But the time to get that next job is usually much, much shorter than getting this first job. I know people that have gone months and months, or nearly a year just constantly trying to apply, getting ghosted, like not getting any contact whatsoever from companies where they're sending in resumes and trying to apply for these jobs. Again, it's just a big indication of what's really broken in our industry that I think could be improved. I think that there's a lot of room for improvement there. MANDY: So what do you tell them? What's your answer for that? How do they get their first job? How do you get your first job? IAN: That's a [chuckles] good question. And I hate to fall back on the it depends answer. It really does depend on the kind of career that you want to have. I tell people often in my coaching that the tech industry is really a choose your own adventure kind of book. Like, once you get that job a little bit better, what you want your next job to be and so, you get to choose. If you get your first job as a QA developer, or you get that first job as a technical writer, or you get that first job doing software development, or you get that first job in dev ops and then decide, you don't want to do that anymore, that's fine. You can position yourself to go get a job doing some other kind of technical job that doesn't have to be what your previous job was. Now, once you have that experience, though recruiters are going to be calling you and saying, “Hey, you had a QA role. I've also got a QA role,” and you just have to stand firm and say, “No, that's not the direction I'm taking my career anymore. I want to head in this direction. So I'm going to apply for a company where they're looking for people with that kind of direction.” It really comes down to how do you show the company what you bring to the company and how you're going to make the company better, how are you going to make the team better, what skill, experience, and background are you bringing to that job. A lot of people, when they apply for the job, they talk about what they don't have. Like, “Oh, I'm an entry level developer,” or “I only went to a bootcamp,” or “I don't know very much about some aspect of development like I don't know, test driven development,” or “I don't really understand object-oriented programming,” or “I don't know anything about Docker, but I want to apply for this job.” Well, now you're highlighting what you don't have and to get that first job, you have to highlight what you do have. So I often tell people on your resume, on your LinkedIn, don't call yourself a junior developer. Don't call yourself an entry level. Don't say you're aspiring to be. You are. You are a developer. If you have studied software development, you can write software, you're a software developer. Make that your own title and let the company figure out what level you are. So just call yourself a developer and start applying for those jobs. The other advice that I tend to give people is you don't have to feel like you meet a 100% of the requirements in any job posts. As a hiring manager, when I read those job posts often, it's like, this is my birthday wish list. I hope I can find this mythical unicorn that has all of these traits [laughter] and skills and characteristics and that person doesn't exist. In fact, if I ever got a resume where they claim to have all that stuff, I would immediately probably throw the resume in the bin because they're probably lying, because either they have all those skills and they're about to hit me up for double the salary, or they're just straight up lying that they really don't have all those skills. As a hiring manager, those are things that we have to discern over time as we're evaluating people and talking with them and so on. But I would say if you meet like 30 to 40% of those skills, you could probably still apply. The challenge then is when you get that phone call, how do you convince them that you're worth taking a shot, that you're worth them taking the risk of hiring you, helping train you up in the skills that you don't have. But on those calls, you still need to present this is what I do bring to the company. I'm bringing energy, I'm bringing passion, and I'm bringing other experience and background and perspectives on things, hopefully from – just increasing the diversity in tech, just as an example. You're coming from a background, or a walk of life that maybe we don't currently have on the team and that's great for us and great for our team because you're going to open our eyes to things that we might not have thought of. So I think apply anyway. If they're asking for a couple of years' experience and you don't have it, apply anyway. If they're asking for programming languages you don't know, apply anyway. The languages you do know, a lot of that skill is going to transfer into a new language anyway. And I think a lot of companies are really missing out on the malleability and how they can shape an entry-level developer into the kind of developer and kind of engineer that they want to have on the team. Now you use that person as an example and say, “Now we've trained them with the process that we want, with the language and the tools that we want. They know the company goals.” We've trained them. We've built them up. We've invested in them and now everybody else we hire, we're going to hold to that standard and say, “If we're going to hire from outside, this is what we want,” and if we hire someone who doesn't have that level of skill, we're going to bring them up to that skill. I think a lot of companies are missing out on that whole aspect of hiring, that is they can take a chance on somebody who's got the people skills and the collaboration skills and that background and the experiences of life and not necessarily the technical skills and just train them on the technical skills. I went on a rant on this on LinkedIn the other day, where I was saying the return on investment. If a company is spending months and months and months trying to hire somebody, that's expensive. You're paying a recruiter, you're paying engineers, you're paying managers to screen all these people, interview all these people, and you're not quite finding that 100% skill match. Well, what if you just hired somebody months ago, spend $5,000 training them on the skills they didn't have, and now you're months ahead of the game. You could have saved yourself so much money so much time. You would have had an engineer on the team now. And I think a lot of companies are kind of missing that point. Sorry, I know I get very soapbox-y on some of the stuff. ARTY: I think it's important just highlighting these dynamics and stuff that are broken in our industry and all of the hoops and challenges that come with trying to get a job. You mentioned a couple of things on the other side of one, is that the interview processes themselves don't align to what it is we actually need skill-wise day-to-day. What are the things that you think are driving the creation of interviews that don't align with the day-to-day stuff? Like what factors are bringing those things so far out of alignment? IAN: That's a great question. I would say I have my suspicions. So don't take this as gospel truth, but from my own perspective, this is what I think. The big, big tech companies out there, like the big FAANG companies, they have a very specific target in mind of the kind of engineers that they want on their team. They have studied very deep data structures and algorithms, the systems thinking and the system design, and all this stuff. Like, they've got that knowledge, they've got that background because those big companies need that level of knowledge for things like scaling to billions of users, highly performant, and resilient systems. Where the typical startup and typical small and mid-sized company, they don't typically need that. But those kinds of companies look at FAANG companies and go, “We want to be like them. Therefore, we must interview like them and we must ask the same questions that they ask.” I think this has this cascading effect where when FAANG companies do interviews in a particular way, we see that again, with this ripple effect idea and we see that ripple down in the industry. Back in the early 2000s, mid 2000s—well, I guess right around the time when Google was getting started—they were asking a lot of really oddball kinds of questions. Like how many golf balls fit in a school bus and those were their interview challenges. It's like, how do you actually go through the calculation of how many golf balls would fit in a school bus and after a while, I think by 2009, they published an article saying, “Yeah, we're going to stop asking those questions. We weren't getting good signals. Everybody's breaking down those problems the same way and it wasn't really helpful.” Well, leading up to that point, everyone else was like, “Oh, those are cool questions. We're going to ask those questions, too,” and then when Google published that paper, everyone else was like, “Yeah, those questions are dumb. We're not going to ask those questions either.” And then they started getting into what we now see as like the LeetCode, HackerRank type of technical challenges being asked within interviews. I think that there's a time and place for some of that, but I think that the types of challenges that they're asking candidates to do should still be aligned with what the company does. One criticism that I've got. For example, I was looking at a technical challenge from one particular company that they asked this one particular problem and it was using a data structure called Heap. It was, find a quantity of location points closest to a target. So you're given a list of latitude, longitude values, and you have to find the five latitude and longitude points that are closest to a target. It's like, okay and so, I'm thinking through the challenge, how would I solve that if I had to solve it? But then I got thinking that company has nothing to do with latitude and longitude. That company has nothing to do with geospatial work of any kind. Why are they even asking that problem? Like, it's so completely misaligned that anybody they interview, that's the first thing that's going to go through their mind as a candidate is like, “Why are they asking me this kind of question?” Like, “This has nothing to do with the job. It had nothing to do with the role. I don't study global positioning and things like that. I know what latitude and longitude are, but I've never done any kind of math to try to figure out what those things would be and how you would detect differences between them.” Like, I could kind of guess with simple math, but unless you've studied that stuff, it's not going to be this, “Oh yeah, sure, no problem. It's this formula, whatever.” We shouldn't have to expect that candidates coming to a business are going to have that a, formula memorized, especially when that's not what your company does. And a lot of companies are like, “Oh, we're got to interview somebody. Quick, go to LeetCode and find a problem to ask them.” All you're going to do is you're going to bias your interview process towards people that have studied those problems on LeetCode and you're not actually going to find people that can actually solve your day-to-day challenges that your company is actually facing. ARTY: And instead, you're selecting for people that are really good at things that you don't even need. [chuckles] It's like, all right! It totally skews who you end up hiring toward people that aren't even necessarily competent in the skills that they actually need day-to-day. Like you mentioned FAANG companies need these particular skills. I don't even think that for resilience, to be able to build these sort of systems, and even on super hardcore systems, it's very seldom that you end up writing algorithmic type code. Usually, most of the things that you deal with in scaling and working with other humans and stuff, it's a function of design and being able to organize things in conceptual ways that make sense so that you can deconstruct a complex, fuzzy problem into little pieces that make sense and can fit together like a jigsaw puzzle. I have a very visual geometric way of thinking, which I find actually is a core ability that makes me good at code because I can imagine it visually laid out and think about the dependencies between things as like tensors between geographically located little code bubbles, if you will. IAN: Sure. ARTY: Being able to think that way, it's fundamentally different than solving algorithm stuff. But that deconstruction capability of just problem breakdown, being able to break down problems, being able to organize things in ways that make sense, being able to communicate those concepts and come up with abstractions that are easy enough for other people on your team to understand, ideally, those are the kinds of engineers we want on the teams. Our interview processes ought to select for those day-to-day skills of things that are the common bread and butter. [chuckles] IAN: I agree. ARTY: What we need to succeed on a day-to-day basis. IAN: Yeah. We need the people skills more than we need the hard technical skills sometimes. I think if our interview process could somehow tap into that and focus more on how do you collaborate, how do you do code reviews, how do you evaluate someone else's code for quality, how do you make the tradeoff between readability and optimization—because those are typically very polarized, opposite ends of the scale—how do you function on a team, or do you prefer to go heads down and just kind of be by yourself and just tackle tasks on your own? I believe that there's a time and place for that, too and there are personality types where you prefer to go heads down and just have peace and quiet and just get your work done and there's nothing wrong with that. But I think if we can somehow tap into the collaborative process as part of the interview, I think it's going to open a lot of companies up to like, “Oh, this person's actually going to be a really great team member. They don't quite have this level of knowledge in database systems that we hope they'd have, but that's fine. We'll just send them on this one-week database training class that happens in a week, or two and now they'll be trained.” [overtalk] MANDY: Do they want to learn? IAN: Right. Do they want to learn? Are they eager to learn? Because if they don't want to learn, then that's a whole other thing, too. But again, that's something that you can screen for. Like, “Tell me what you're learning on the side, or “What kinds of concepts do you want to learn?” Or “In this role, we need you to learn this thing. Is that even of interest to you?” Of course, everyone's going to lie and say, “Yeah,” because they want the paycheck. But I think you can still narrow it down a little bit more what area of training does this person need. So we can just hire good people on the team and now our team is full of good people and collaborative, team-based folks that are willing to work together to solve problems together and then worry about the technical skills as a secondary thing. MANDY: Yeah. I firmly believe anybody can learn anything, if they want to. I mean, that's how I've gotten here. IAN: Yeah, for sure. Same with me. I'm mostly self-taught. I studied computer engineering in college, so I can tell you how all the little microchips in your computer work. I did that for the first 4 years of my career and then I threw all that out the window and I taught myself web development and taught myself how the internet works. And then every job I had, that innate curiosity in me is like, “Oh, I wonder how e-commerce works.” Well, I went and got an e-commerce job, it's like, okay, well now I wonder how education works and I got into the education sector. Now, I wonder how you know this, or that works and so, I got into financial systems and I got into whatever and it just kind of blew my mind. I was like, “Wow, this is how all these things kind of talk to each other,” and that for me was just fascinating, and then turning around and sharing that knowledge with other people. But some people are just very fixed mindset and they want to learn one thing, they want to do that thing, and that's all they know. But I think, like we kind of talked about early in the podcast, you sign up for a career in this industry and you're signing up for lifelong learning. There's no shortage to things that you can go learn, but you have to be willing to do it. MID-ROLL: Rarely does a day pass where a ransomware attack, data breach, or state sponsored espionage hits the news. It's hard to keep up with all this and also to know if you're protected. Don't worry, Kaspersky's got you covered. Each week their team looks at the latest news, stories, and topics you might have missed during the week on the Transatlantic Cable Podcast. Mixing in-depth discussion, expert guests from around the world, a pinch of humor, and all with an easy to consume style - be sure you check them out today. ARTY: What kind of things could we do to potentially influence the way hiring is done and these practices with unicorn skilled searches and just the dysfunctional aspects on the hiring side? Because you're teaching all these tech interview skills for what to expect in the system and how to navigate that and succeed, even though it's broken. But what can we do to influence the broken itself and help improve these things? IAN: That's a great question. Breaking it from the inside out is a good start. I think if we can collectively get enough people together within these, especially the bigger companies and say like, “Hey, collectively, as an industry, we need to do interviewing differently.” And then again, see that ripple effect of oh, well, the FAANG companies are doing it that way so we're going to do it that way, too. But I don't think that's going to be a fast change by any stretch. I think there are always going to be some types of roles where you do have to have a very dedicated, very deep knowledge of system internals and how to optimize things, and pure algorithmic types of thinking. I think those kinds of jobs are always going to be out there and so, there's no fully getting away from something like a LeetCode challenge style interview. But I think that for a lot of small, mid-sized, even some large-sized companies, they don't have to do interviewing that way. But I think we can all stand on our soapbox and yell and scream, “Do it differently, do it differently,” and it's not going to make any impact at all because those companies are watching other companies for how they're doing it. So I think gradually, over time, we can just start to do things differently within our own company. And I think for example, if the company that I was working at, if we completely overhauled our interview process that even if we don't hire somebody, if someone can walk away from that going, “Wow, that was a cool interview experience. I've got to tell my friends about this.” That's the experience that we want when you walk away from the company if we don't end up hiring. If we hire you, it's great. But even if we don't hire you, I want to make sure that you've still got a really cool interview experience that you enjoyed the process, that it didn't just feel like another, “Okay, well, I could have just grind on LeetCode for three months to get through that interview.” I don't ever want my interviews to feel like that. So I think as more of us come to this understanding of it's okay to do it differently and then collectively start talking about how could we do it differently—and there are companies out there that are doing it differently, by the way. I'm not saying everyone in the industry is doing all these LeetCode style interviews. There are definitely companies out there that are doing things differently and I applaud them for doing that. And I think as awful as it was to have the pandemic shut everything down to early 2020, where no hiring happened, or not a lot of hiring happened over the summer, it did give a lot of companies pause and go, “Well, hey, since we're not hiring, since we got nobody in the backlog, let's examine this whole interview process and let's see if this is really what we want as a company.” And some companies did. They took the time, they took several months and they were like, “You know what, let's burn this whole thing down and start over” as far as their interview process goes. Some of them completely reinvented what their interview process was and turned it into a really great process for candidates to go through. So even if they don't get the job, they still walk away going, “Wow, that was neat.” I think if enough of us start doing that to where candidates then can say, “You know what, I would really prefer not to go through five, or six rounds of interviews” because that's tiring and knowing that what you're kind of what you're in for, with all the LeetCode problems and panel after panel after panel. Like, nobody wants to sit through that. I think if enough candidates stand up for themselves and say, “You know what, I'm looking for a company that has an easier process. So I'm not even going to bother applying.” I think there are enough companies out there that are desperately trying to hire that if they start getting the feedback of like you know what, people don't want to interview with us because our process is lousy. They're going to change the process, but it's going to take time. Unfortunately, it's going to drag out because companies can be stubborn and candidates are also going to be stubborn and it's not going to change quickly. But I think as companies take the step to change their process and enough candidates also step up to say, “Nah, you know what, I was going to apply there,” or “Maybe I got through the first couple of rounds, but you're telling me there's like three more rounds to go through? Nah, I'm not going to bother.” Companies are now starting to see candidates ghost them and walk away from the interview process because they just don't want to be bothered. I think that's a good signal for a company to take a step back and go, “Okay, we need to change our process to make it better so the people do want to apply and enjoy that interview process as they come through.” But it's going to take a while to get there. ARTY: Makes me think about we were talking early on about open source and the power of open source. I wonder with this particular challenge, if you set up a open source hiring manifesto, perhaps of we're going to collaborate on figuring out how to make hiring better. Well, what does that mean? What is it we're aiming for? We took some time to actually clarify these are the things we ought to be aiming for with our hiring process and those are hard problems to figure out. How do we create this alignment between what it is we need to be able to do to be successful day-to-day versus what it is we're selecting for with our interview process? Those things are totally out of whack. I think we're at a point, at least in our industry, where it's generally accepted that how we do interviewing and hiring in these broken things—I think it's generally accepted that it's broken—so that perhaps it's actually a good opportunity right now to start an initiative like that, where we can start collaborating and putting our knowledge together on how we ought to go about doing things better. Even just by starting something, building a community around it, getting some companies together that are working on trying to improve their own hiring processes and learning together and willing to share their knowledge about things that are working better, such that everybody in the industry ultimately benefits from us getting better at these kinds of things. As you said, being able to have an interview process that even if you don't get the job, it's not a miserable experience for everyone involved. [chuckles] Like there's no reason for that. IAN: Yeah. MANDY: That's how we – I mean, what you just explained, Arty isn't that how we got code of conducts? Everybody's sitting down and being like, “Okay, this is broken. Conferences are broken. What are we going to all do together?” So now why don't we just do the same thing? I really like that idea of starting an open source initiative on interviewing. Like have these big FAANG companies be like, “I had a really great interview with such and such company.” Well, then it all spirals from there. I think that's super, super exciting. ARTY: Yeah. And what is it that made this experience great? You could just have people analyze their interview experiences that they did have, describe well, what are the things that made this great, that made this work and likewise, you could collect anti-patterns. Some of the things that you talked about of like, are we interviewing for geolocation skills when that actually has absolutely nothing to do with our business? We could collect these things as these funky anti-patterns of things so that people could recognize those things easier in there because it's always hard to see yourself. It's hard to see yourself swinging. IAN: An interesting idea along those lines is what if companies said like, “Hey, we want the community to help us fix our interview process. This is who we are, this is what our business does. What kinds of questions do you think we should be asking?” And I think that the community would definitely rally behind that and go, “Oh, well, you're an e-commerce platform so you should be asking people about shopping cart implementations and data security around credit cards and have the interview process be about what the company actually does.” I think that that would be an interesting thing to ask the community like, “What do you think we should be asking in these interviews?” Not that you're going to turn around and go, “Okay, that's exactly what we're going to do,” but I think it'll give a lot of companies ideas on yeah, okay, maybe we could do a take-home assignment where you build a little shopping cart and you submit that to us. We'll evaluate how you did, or what you changed, or we're going to give you some code to start with and we're going to ask you to fix a bug in it, or something like, I think that there's a bigger movement now, especially here in Canada, in the US of doing take-home assignments. But I think at the same time, there are pros and cons of doing take-home assignments versus the on-site technical challenges. But what if we gave the candidate a choice as part of that interview process, too and say, “Hey, cool. We want to interview you. Let's get through the phone screen and now that you've done the phone screen, we want to give you the option of, do you want to do a small take-home assignment and then do a couple of on-site technical challenges? Do you want to do a larger take-home and maybe fewer on-site technical challenges?” I think there's always going to be some level of “Okay, we need to see you code in front of us to really make sure that you're the one that wrote that code.” I got burned on that back in 2012 where I thought somebody wrote some code and they didn't. They had a friend write it as their take-home assignment and so, I brought them in for the interview and I'm like, “Cool, I want you to fix this bug,” and they had no idea what to do. They hadn't even looked at the code that their friend wrote for them it's like, why would you do that? So I think that there's always going to be some amount of risk and trust that needs to take place between the candidates and the companies. But then on the flip side of that, if it doesn't work out, I really wish companies would be better about giving feedback to people instead of just ghosting them, or like, “Oh, you didn't and pass that round. So we're just not even going to call you back and tell you no. We're just not ever just going to call.” The whole ghosting thing is, by far, the number one complaint in the tech industry right now is like, “I applied and I didn't even get a thanks for your resume. I got nothing,” or maybe you get some automated reply going, “We'll keep you in mind if you're a match for something.” But again, those apple looking at tracking systems are biased because the developers building them and the people reading the resumes are going to have their own inherent bias in the search terms and the things that they're looking for and so on. So there's bias all over the place that's going to be really hard to get rid of. But I think if companies were to take a first step and say like, “Okay, we're going to talk to the community about what they would like to see the interview process be,” and start having more of those conversations. And then I think as we see companies step up and make those changes, those are going to be the kinds of companies where people are going to rally behind them and go, “I really want to work there because that interview process is pretty cool.” And that means the company is – well, it doesn't guarantee the company's going to be cool, but it shows that they care about the people that are going to work there. If people know that the company is going to care about you as an employee, you're far more likely to want to work there. You're far more likely to be loyal and stay there for a long term as opposed to like oh, I just need to collect a paycheck for a year to get a little bit of experience and then job hop and go get a better title, better pay. So I think it can come down to company loyalty and stuff, too. MANDY: Yeah. Word of mouth travels fast in this industry. IAN: Absolutely. MANDY: And to bring up the code of conduct thing and now people are saying, “If straight up this conference doesn't have a code of conduct, I'm not going.” IAN: Yeah. I agree. It'll be interesting to see how something like this tech interview overhaul open source idea could pick up momentum and what kinds of companies would get behind it and go, “Hey, we think our interview process is pretty good already, but we're still going to be a part of this and watch other companies step up to.” When I talked earlier about that ripple effect where Google, for example, stopped asking how many golf balls fit in a school bus kind of thing and everyone else is like, “Yeah, those questions are dumb.” We actually saw this summer, Facebook and Amazon publicly say, “We're no longer going to ask dynamic programming problems in our interviews.” It's going to be interesting to see how long that takes to ripple out into the industry and go, “Yeah, we're not going to ask DP problems either,” because again, people want to be those big companies. They want to be billion- and trillion-dollar companies, too and so, they think they have to do everything the same way and that's not always the case. But there's also something broken in the system, too with hiring. It's not just the interview process itself, but it's also just the lack of training. I've been guilty of this myself, where I've got an interview with somebody and I've got back-to-back meetings. So I just pull someone on my team and be like, “Hey, Arty, can you come interview this person?” And you're like, “I've never interviewed before. I guess, I'll go to LeetCode and find a problem to give them.” You're walking in there just as nervous as the candidate is and you're just throwing some technical challenge at them, or you're giving them the technical challenge that you've done most recently, because you know the answer to it and you're like, “Okay, well, I guess they did all right on it. They passed,” or “I think they didn't do well.” But then companies aren't giving that feedback to people either. There's this thinking in the industry of oh, if we give them feedback, they're going to sue us and they're going to say it's discriminatory and they're going to sue us. Aline Lerner from interviewing.io did some research with her team and literally nobody in recent memory has been sued for giving feedback to candidates. If anything, I think that it would build trust between companies and the candidates to say, “Hey, this is what you did. Well, this is what we thought you did okay on. We weren't happy with the performance of the code that you wrote so we're not moving forward,” and now you know exactly what to go improve. I was talking to somebody who was interviewing at Amazon lately and they said, “Yeah, the recruiter at Amazon said that I would go through all these steps,” and they had like five, or six interviews, or something to go through. And they're like, “Yeah, and they told me at the end of it, we're not going to give you any feedback, but we will give you a yes, or no.” It's like so if I get a no, I don't even find out what I didn't do well. I don't know anything about how to improve to want to go apply there in the future. You're just going to tell me no and not tell me why? Why would I want to reapply there in the future if you're not going to tell me how I'm going to get better? I'm just going to do the same thing again and again. I'm going to be that little toy that just bangs into the wall and doesn't learn to steer away from the wall and go in a different direction. If you're not going to give me any feedback, I'm just going to keep banging my head against this wall of trying to apply for a job and you're not telling me why I'm not getting it. It's not helpful to the candidate and that's not helpful to the industry either. It starts affecting mental health and it starts affecting other things and I think it erodes a lot of trust between companies and candidates as well. ARTY: Yeah. The experience of just going through trying to get a job and going through the rejection, it's an emotional experience, an emotionally challenging experience. Of all things that affect our feels a lot, it's like that feeling of social rejection. So being able to have just healthier relationships and figuring out how to see another person as a human, help figure out how you can help guide and support them continuing on their journey so that the experience of the interview doesn't hurt so much even when the relationship doesn't work out, if we could get better at those kinds of things. There's all these things that if we got better at, it would help everybody. IAN: I agree. ARTY: And I think that's why a open source initiative kind of thing maybe make sense because this is one of those areas that if we got better at this as an industry, it would help everybody. It's worth putting time in to learn and figure out how we can do better and if we all get better at it and stuff, there's just so many benefits and stuff from getting better at doing this. Another thing I was thinking about. You were mentioning the language thing of how easy it is to map skills that we learned from one language over to another language, such that even if you don't know the language that they're coding in at a particular job, you should apply anyway. [chuckles] I wonder if we had some data around how long it takes somebody to ramp up on a new language when they already know similar-ish languages. If we had data points on those sort of things that we're like, “Okay, well, how long did it actually take you?” Because of the absence of that information, people just assume well, the only way we can move forward is if we have the unicorn skills. Maybe if it became common knowledge, that it really only takes say, a couple months to become relatively proficient so that you can be productive on the team in another language that you've never worked in before. Maybe if that was a common knowledge thing, that people wouldn't worry about it so much, that you wouldn't see these unicorn recruiting efforts and stuff. People would be more inclined to look for more multipurpose general software engineering kinds of skills that map to whatever language that you're are doing. That people will feel more comfortable applying to jobs and going, “Oh, cool. I get the opportunity to learn a new language! So I know that I may be struggling a bit for a couple months with this, but I know I'll get it and then I can feel confident knowing that it's okay to learn my way through those things.” I feel if maybe we just started collecting some data points around ramp up time on those kind of things, put a database together to collect people's experiences around certain kind of things, that maybe those kinds of things would help everyone to just make better decisions that weren't so goofy and out of alignment with reality. IAN: Yeah, and there are lots of cheat sheets out there like, I'm trying to remember the name of it. I used to have it bookmarked. But you could literally pull up two programming languages side by side in the same browser window and see oh, if this is how you do it in JavaScript, this is how you do it on Python, or if this is how you write this code in C++, here's how you do it in Java. It gives you a one-to-one correlation for dozens, or hundreds of different kinds of blocks of code. That's really all you need to get started and like you said, it will take time to come proficient to where you don't have to have that thing up on your screen all the time. But at the same time, I think the company could invest and say, “You know what, take a week and just pour everything you've got into learning C Sharp because that's the skill we want you to have for this job.” It's like, okay, if you are telling me you trust me and you're making me the job offer and you're going to pay me this salary and I get to work in tech, but I don't happen to have that skill, but you're willing to me in that skill, why would I not take that job? You're going to help me learn and grow. You're offering me that job with a salary. Those are all great signals to send. Again, I think that a lot of companies are missing out and they're like, “No, we're not going to hire that person. We're just going to hold out until we find the next person that's a little bit better.” I think that that's where some things really drop off in the process, for sure is companies hold out too long and next thing they know, months have gone by and they've wasted tons of money when they could have just hired somebody a long time ago and just trained them. I think the idea of an open source collective on something like this is pretty interesting. At the same time, it would be a little subjective on “how quickly could someone ramp up on a, or onboard on a particular technology.” Because everybody has different learning styles and unless you're finding somebody to curate – like if you're a Ruby programmer and you're trying to learn Python, this is the de facto resource that you need to look at. I think it could be a little bit subjective, but I think that there's still some opportunity there to get community input on what should the interview process be? How long should it really be? How many rounds of interviews should there be from, both the candidates experience as well as the company experience and say, as a business, this is why we have you doing these kinds of things. That's really what I've been to teach as part of the Tech Interview Guide and the daily email series is from my perspective in the business, this is why. This is why I have you do a certain number of rounds, or this is why I give you this kind of technical challenge, or this is why I'm asking you this kind of question. Because I'm trying to find these signals about you that tell me that you're someone that I can trust to bring on my team. It's a tough system when not many people are willing to talk about it because I think a lot of people are worried that others are going to try to game the system and go, “Oh, well, now that I know everything about your interview process, I know how to cheat my way through it and now you're going to give me that job and I really don't know what I'm doing.” But I think that at the same time, companies can also have the higher, slow fire, fast mentality of like, “All right, you're not cutting it.” Like you're out right away and just rehire for that position. Again, if you're willing to trust and willing to extend that offer to begin with. If it doesn't work out, it doesn't work out. It's a business decision; it's not a personal thing. But it's still devastating to the person when they don't get the job, or if they get fired right away because they're not pulling their weight, but if they're cheating their way through it, then they get what they deserve to. MANDY: Awesome. Well, I think that's a great place to put a pin in this discussion. It is definitely not a great place to end it. I think we should head over to our reflection segment. For me, there were so many things I wrote down. I loved that you said that people's tech journey is like a choose your own adventure. You can learn one thing and then find yourself over here and then the next thing you know, you find yourself over here. But you've picked up all these skills along the way and that's the most important thing is that as you go along this journey, you keep acquiring these skills that ultimately will make you the best programmer that you can be. Also, I really like that you also said something about it being a lifelong learning. Tech is lifelong learning and not just the technical skills. It's the people skills. It's the behavioral skills. Those are the important skills. Those skills are what ultimately it comes down to being in this industry is, do you have the desire to learn? Do you have the desire to grow? I think that should be one of the most important things that companies are aware of when they are talking to candidates that it's not about can this person do a Fibonacci sequence. It's can they learn, are they a capable person? Are they going to show up? Are they going to be a good person to have in the office? Are they going to be a light? Are they going to be supportive? Are they going to be caring? That's the ultimate. That right there for me is the ultimate and thank you for all that insight. ARTY: Well, I really, really loved your story, Ian at the very beginning of just curiosity and how you started your journey, getting into programming and then ended up finding ways to give back and getting really excited about seeing people's light bulbs go off and how much joy you got from those experiences, connecting with another individual and making that happen. I know we've gotten on this long tangent of pretty abstract, big topics of just like, here's the brokenness in the industry and what are some strategies that we can solve these large-scale problems. But I think you said some really important things back of just the importance of these one-on-one connections and the real change happens in the context of a relationship. Although, we're thinking about these big things. To actually make those changes, to actually make that difference, it happens in our local context. It happens in our companies. It happens with the people that we interact with on a one-on-one basis and have a genuine relationship with. If we want to create change, it happens with those little ripples. It happens with affecting that one relationship and that person going and having their own ripple effects. We all have the power to influence these things through the relationships with the individuals around us. IAN: I think my big takeaway here is we have been chatting for an hour and just how easy it is to have conversation about hey, what if we did this? How quickly it can just turn into hey, as a community, what if? And just the willingness of people being in the community, wanting to make the community better,

The Gravel Ride.  A cycling podcast
EverAthlete - Dr. Matt Smith

The Gravel Ride. A cycling podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 39:36


This week we are joined by Dr. Matt Smith, Founder EverAthlete. Matt walks us through the importance of strength training for gravel cyclists. Presented by: Competitive Cyclist Join The Ridership Episode Transcription (please excuse the typos): EverAthlete - Dr. Matt [00:00:00] Craig Dalton: Hello and welcome to the gravel rod podcast. I'm your host Craig Dalton. This week on the show, we've got Dr. Matt Smith from ever athlete coming to talk to us. About the importance. Once of strength training for cyclists.  [00:00:14] Before we jump in, we need to thank this week. Sponsor competitor. cyclist.  [00:00:18] Competitive cyclist is the specialty online retailer of road, gravel and mountain bikes, components, apparel, and accessories.  [00:00:26] Featuring some of your favorite brands like pock, Castelli, Pearl Izumi on the gravel bike side. They feature frames from evil Niner. Ibis. Really creating a big selection of gravel bikes for your perusal [00:00:41] But the real difference that competitive cyclists are the gearheads equal parts customer service cycling fanatic gear heads are former pro athletes, Olympians and seasoned cyclists. With years of experience. All available by phone, email, or chat for personal. Product recommendations and hard won advice.  [00:01:00] Last week you heard me talk about my personal experience. With Maggie. I brought her through an exercise to help me find the. Perfect gravel bike for 2022 and perfect for me not. Perfect for what they had in inventory, or really put her to the fire and asked her a lot of tough questions. About designing a bike that was going to fit the type of writing that I do as an individual. So it's not like I was building, a bike for someone.  [00:01:25] In a different part of the country or a different part of the world. She really listened to me. And as I tried to point her to bikes that I thought were flat. Flashy or good-looking. She reminded me that those bikes were all good, but based on what she told me about the riding I was looking to do. She would recommend that I  [00:01:42] key in on a couple specific bikes. And to be honest, she was spot on all the bikes that she recommended. I think it was the IBUs haka. To a lesser degree and the pivot we're spot on for the types of. Bikes that i would want to ride here in marin county. [00:01:58] One of the things that might be a concern for any product you're buying online would be returns. Competitive. Cyclists has a. A hundred percent guaranteed returns. So you can shop in confidence, whether it's a component or bike, anything you need competitive. Cyclists, this has your back. So go to competitive cyclists.com.  [00:02:16] Slash the gravel ride. And enter promo code the gravel ride to get 15% off your first full price order. And free shipping on orders of over $50. Some. Some exclusions apply to go right now and get 15% off. Plus free shipping. shipping@competitivecyclists.com slash the gravel ride. And remember that.  [00:02:37] Promo code is the gravel ride. We very much appreciate their sponsorship and appreciate that they're sending a discount your way.  [00:02:45] Would that business out of the way, let's jump right into my interview with Matt from ever athlete.  [00:02:51] Matt. Welcome to the show.  [00:02:53] Dr. Matt Smith: Thanks so much for having me. [00:02:55] Craig Dalton: I'm super excited to learn a little bit about, more about your background and about other ever athlete. As I'm about seven weeks into my first program and I'm eager to talk about my experiences, but also look forward to some of the other ride strong programs. So why don't we start off by just setting the stage for the listener a little bit about yourself and then about the. [00:03:17] Dr. Matt Smith: Yeah. So ever athlete is now an online platform. That's dedicated to helping athletes to perform outdoors on trails in the water on bikes. W our goal is essentially to create longevity to that journey and help people improve their performance. I started out I'm a sports chiropractor and a strength coach and started ever athlete as a sports injury care clinic, actually back in 2015. [00:03:46] And since then, through the pandemic and a few other things we have transitioned into doing some in-person one-on-one work, we work with a lot of different athletes and. Different people, but, we've transitioned a lot of our efforts to the online atmosphere. [00:04:03] And I've taken a lot of the lessons that we've learned from working with high level athletes and also amateur athletes and have started creating training programs, recovery tools, and injury rehab programs online. To rewind a little bit, to give you a little bit more background about, how we started, again, we started as an injury care clinics, primarily focused on athletes and quickly. [00:04:27] Transitioned into strength training as well. We work with a variety of people, but our goal is really to meet any athlete, wherever they are on the healthcare spectrum or the health and performance spectrum, whether they're dealing with an injury or looking to make it to the Olympics. [00:04:44] That's been the premise of ever athlete since we began. And that's just been amplified in the last few years. So that's a little bit about us.  [00:04:52] Craig Dalton: That's interesting. When you started, obviously what you went through chiropractic college, did you act as a traditional sports focused chiropractic professional originally, and then see that these were all different pieces of the same puzzle you were trying to solve for your clients? [00:05:08] Dr. Matt Smith: Yeah. So before I ever went to, I went to a school called Palmer west for grads. And before I went to Palmer and throughout my time going to Palmer I was working as a strength coach. And so I've worked in strength conditioning for about 15 years. And so when I graduated, I went to work at a pretty cool sports therapy clinic out in Austin, Texas where we were not traditional chiropractic. [00:05:34] So it was. A lot of people think about chiropractic as, if you're going into a chiropractic clinic you're coming in to get adjusted and it's a mill, I've never practiced in that way. I've always been more focused on soft tissue therapy corrective exercise, rehab work in a lot of other modalities. [00:05:53] And so from the beginning of ever athlete, we've always. W we've always worked in a non-traditional sense with people, going through soft tissue work, teaching exercises and then leveraging for the more functional training and exercise now as a preventative and wellness model. And so it's always been a little non-traditional, it's always been athlete focused. [00:06:17] Especially from the beginning phases, but initially it was a little bit more like I think of our company as a company that just solves problems for athletes. And initially we were very focused on solving solving the problems that athletes would have when they're dealing with injuries. [00:06:33] And now we're diving far more into the performance space and also preventing injuries.  [00:06:40] Craig Dalton: That's super interesting and resonates with me personally. I know the relationships I've had with the chiropractic community, the ones that have been the strongest have always been the ones that looked at my problem or my challenge holistically and never, just simply as a chiropractor, because honestly, as a athlete, I could care less about whether you call it chiropractic work, what you're doing on me, or it's stretching or strengthening or advice. [00:07:07] I just want to have that session. Get through whatever hurdle I'm going through and learn tools and techniques to prevent me from, arriving at whatever acute injury probably led me through the door in the first  [00:07:20] Dr. Matt Smith: place a hundred percent. And I think, to, to your point, I've never cared if anyone called via chiropractor, I've never really, I don't know if I fully identify as any one. [00:07:32] I don't fully identify as a chiropractor. It's certainly a part of what I do and has taught me a lot, but it's like a piece of it. And for me, the chiropractic profession, there are a ton of really great practitioners who do a phenomenal job and focus on educating people and creating self-reliance in patient groups. [00:07:52] And that was really the big thing for me, especially early on when. Transitioning out of this role of having people rely on me constantly. And, especially with our online stuff, creating more affordable avenues for people to get good high performance, health care and performance training has been a huge form of wellness. [00:08:15] Whereas a lot of times, if you're thinking about wellness from a chiropractic sense, it's, going to see your chiropractor once a week for, your entire life. And for me, just from a professional mindset, I've never wanted a hundred percent resonated with, having that be my life's work, I've always, really wanted to educate people more and provide. [00:08:36] More self-reliance through practical resources and that's really what we've evolved into has been fast-tracked due to the pandemic, but but it's been a really interesting, this project, this online platform has been this like second evolution I've ever athlete that have been very stoked. [00:08:54] Yeah,  [00:08:54] Craig Dalton: a hundred percent. It's never one single thing. And I think if for the listener, if you've got a relationship with a chiropractor that just feels like they just have to keep coming back in and they're not advising you on how to change your life or how to avoid the situation you're in. And it just becomes this weekly crutch that becomes one expensive and two, in my opinion, just not in your best in. [00:09:16] Dr. Matt Smith: A hundred percent, and a lot of those models are based off of what insurance companies will pay out for, in terms of getting reimbursed as a professional. And I've always worked outside of those lines, from the beginning, we've never been a part of the insurance game. [00:09:32] And so it's been, for me, that's forced me to provide value in a way that is. Far different than trying to fit into that type of model. And that's pushed me forward into saying how do we provide maximum value and self-reliance, and, empowerment for people not on a one-on-one basis. [00:09:53] And yeah, it's been, it's not to downplay Cairo. There's a ton of really great chiropractors out there. There's phenomenal. Hands-on practitioners. And a lot of times, people go through injuries or situations where they need some guidance. But I think the bottom line for me in terms of, what I pride myself on is teaching it's helping people become more resilient on their own. [00:10:17] And that's really been our focus with every athlete from the.  [00:10:21] Craig Dalton: Yeah, I think I became aware of ever athlete probably first through Kate Courtney on Instagram, going through her exercise routine. And I'm pretty sure it predated any of the kind of ride strong and run strong and try strong programs that you've put out there. [00:10:38] So I know when I started to see those things arrive in this online platform that you guys had been working on throughout the pandemic, I guess it really spoke to me in a different way. To see these programs being very specific to me as a cyclist was just one of those pushes that helped me get off the dime and start. [00:10:58] Can you talk about why strength training is important for cyclists and why it might be important for us to back off a little bit in our riding routine, particularly in the off season, quote unquote and what we should look forward to throughout a strength training? Yeah.  [00:11:15] Dr. Matt Smith: I think, the conversation about how strength training can fit in for cyclists can go in a lot of different directions. [00:11:23] I think the, one thing to constantly come back to is the fact that sitting for long hours, Is not like it's pretty new for the human body. This is in terms of our evolution and what we're really designed for. That's not exactly in line, even though it's very fun. It's not exactly attuned to what is most healthy for us movement wise. [00:11:48] And so it's not to say that riding a bike is bad. It's just to say that there's an expense. And one of the ways that you can combat that expanse. And ensure that you can do it for longer and potentially with more effectiveness, more power is to implement some strength training. And the identification that, Hey, riding a bike, being in a flection posture pedaling for long hours, the posture that you have to be in while you're on a bike is not super beneficial for the overall. [00:12:22] Human body. And again, one of the ways that we can bring the body back into balance, bring it back to a healthier state is to implement some strength training techniques. And one of the biggest misconceptions when people start thinking about, Hey, I'm an endurance athlete. I, I don't want to train like a powerlifter and I don't want to train like a bodybuilder. [00:12:44] You know that's, those are barriers that, you certainly don't need to start becoming a powerlifter. If you're going to implement some basic strength principles as a part of your training plan. And you can have a tremendous effect. By just implementing some basic movements, getting some good hip extension, thinking about turning your glutes on and driving your hips all the way forward. [00:13:05] We sit in hip flection constantly on the bike, and that can be pretty detrimental for the low back long-term and the hips long-term. And strength training is a really great way to start. Counteracting some of the repetitive stress that you'll find on the bike and it doesn't take that much, it doesn't take a huge commitment. [00:13:22] It's the simple things that you implement over time that can have a pretty tremendous impact on your overall health, but also your performance on the bike. Yeah,  [00:13:32] Craig Dalton: that makes sense. I think most listeners have probably had one of those days where they've just spent so long on the bike. [00:13:38] By the time they got up, it was difficult to stand fully around. Yes. And that's a very acute sign that, that's the way your body feels on every ride, probably to some small degree. And I know for one I need to work at a standing desk because I just don't want to add any more sitting position in my life for the amount of time I'm actually riding. [00:14:01] Dr. Matt Smith: Yeah. I think that's a super smart move and, . Your comment about, seeing some Kate Courtney's exercises and some of the stuff that she'll put up on, on Instagram, and I've worked with Kate for years now. And I think even with the stuff that she puts out, it's super cool to see what an elite world-class athlete can do. [00:14:24] But I think when it comes to, the audience, who's listening to this podcast and also just like the endurance community over. There's a lot of really high level endurance athletes that are novice strength athletes. They just don't have, they haven't developed the same skill set that they have aerobically when they're in the gym. [00:14:44] And, the bang for your buck that you can get out of like really simple things that don't look cool on Instagram. Bodyweight rose and simple deadlifts or even bridges. I think that, the more exposure that we can give to like how simple it can be for people to implement, very effective tools in their training program. [00:15:03] That's a critical thing because a lot of people think, when they see Kate's stuff or they'll see some of the things that Ali. It's making a little bit more flamboyant than it needs to be. And so a lot of the programs that we put out get to the bare bones of, simple patterns that bring the body back into balance and build a more resilient system overall. [00:15:24] Craig Dalton: Yeah. For the listener, I can attest that in the beginner program, I have not. Balanced on a balance board and brought a dumbbell around my head, like Kate has done in our recent Instagram post. She was just  [00:15:36] Dr. Matt Smith: doing that 15 minutes ago in the other room.  [00:15:39] Craig Dalton: That it's awesome. And funny because I do have a balanced board, so I like dream of getting there, but time will allow that  [00:15:46] Dr. Matt Smith: to happen. [00:15:47] Yeah. And that's a great, I think that's a pretty good segue in terms of. How you parse out your time? Like how can you, everything costs when it comes to training, right? Like it costs time. It costs energy and how to be most effective for a lot of people doing some like simple stuff, not getting too overwhelmed with balance board stuff or anything like that. [00:16:10] Stuff is very effective and can be very fun. But starting with the foundational principles of just good healthy positions and movement can be. Equally, if not more beneficial and as much more accessible. So  [00:16:23] Craig Dalton: for sure. And I know when I reached out to your team originally, and I came in the front door as any other customer would, and it just said, here's the deal. [00:16:31] I, I'm a lifelong cyclist and may have done some strength training. Many years ago, but essentially I'm a beginner in this, where should I start? And the recommendation was this eight week beginner strength program, which I'm seven weeks into at this point of the recording. And it's been good. [00:16:48] We started at a very basic level, half an hour long workouts, maybe at this point, they're about 45 minutes long, but they add up and you're not asking. You've never asked me to do any massive weightlifting or anything like that. It's just been about getting these basic motions down and introducing these concepts to my body, which it's been paced out in a great way. [00:17:13] For me. I've never felt overly sore from an exercise or anything like that. It felt very appropriate and I feel a lot more confident reaching the end of this program about what's next than I did when I first start.  [00:17:25] Dr. Matt Smith: Yeah. And that's the whole premise. It's one of the most challenging things. And I really commend you for being such an inexperienced athlete and also saying, Hey, this is a new skill set or one that I haven't visited for a long time. [00:17:42] Let me start with victories. Let's build up some victories in the bank and give myself some things that are fairly simple to do. And I'm just going to continue to hammer them out and take bite. A bite sized approach to the whole thing is really the premise behind the beginners program. It's that the program is designed to be very simple and progress over time. [00:18:06] And. And what that allows you to do is to reintegrate some of the software programs in your body and your brain that it takes to squat well, or to activate your glutes or to hold a side bridge position or whatever else. The things that you lose from not doing. And especially if you've been riding a lot for many years and have not done any strength work, that's where you get the most bang for your buck. [00:18:34] It's like integrating these simple patterns in bite ways, and then you can make it more complex and add volume and add more load over time. But that's really the premise behind the beginners programs like to be ultimately accessing. And then lead in to some of the other ride strong programs that we have that give a little bit more specific to positions that you'll find on the bike and get you a little bit more, we'll we add in little, different tempos to exercises, more load increase the stability demands and, we add difficulty in a variety of ways, but starting out with foundational movement where you're just learning good patterns. [00:19:12] And practicing those things so that you can load them more effectively later without getting injured is really what our goal was when developing that, that  [00:19:21] Craig Dalton: program. Yeah. That's certainly been one of my focuses is to really look at the instruction and make sure my body to the best of my ability. Is it a hearing to the correct shape and. [00:19:33] 'cause I know, like anytime we're adding dumbbells in that if I have poor form, if I'm curling my back, if I'm not getting the squat in the right position, that's not going to serve me well, as real weight starts to be added into the equation. Yep.  [00:19:48] Dr. Matt Smith: And one of the biggest misconceptions, I think that's out there right now is like, there's this like global agreement that strength training is good for endurance health. [00:20:01] But poor staff, poorly executed strain training could be the absolute worst thing for an endurance athlete. And, you get a lot more out of performing a good unloaded squat or lunge or hinge without heavy loads. If you just do the pattern well, you get just as much, if not more out of that than using really heavy load. [00:20:26] And having poor form or potentially hitting, faltering in your movement pattern in a way that could injure you. And coming back to Hey, what's the point of all this, the point of all this is to reintegrate healthy patterns for the body and bring it back to balance and then start to add some load to build strength and power is really where we come from. [00:20:47] Craig Dalton: So as a cyclist, one of the things I noted in this beginner strength program, which I think of your programs, that this is obviously more generic to just get me started, but there is a fair amount of upper body work that goes on. And as a weak upper body cyclist, that was, that's probably one of the bigger transitions. [00:21:06] Can you talk about why we're working kind of the upper body and arms as well as the legs and these moves.  [00:21:11] Dr. Matt Smith: Yeah, in that specific program. So in the beginner strength program, the goal of the program is really just to develop not only strength, but just overall athletics. And a robust system. And so in that program specifically, it's really teaching you different patterns with the upper body so that you get a little bit more balanced. [00:21:32] And I think when it comes to, our ride strong programs and some of the upper body work that we do more specific to the bike, that stuff is critical. For a couple of different reasons, it's critical in the same way that like building up foot strength is very important for running. In the sense that that's your, it's like one of your primary contact points on the bike. [00:21:53] And if you don't control well with your provider, if you don't have strength, endurance, grip, strength and solid control of your upper body, especially in gravel riding with the. Amount of time that you're on the bike, you can start running into not only acute situations where you crash or, you just lose control of your bike. [00:22:14] But also longterm, you can just start running into poor posture on the bike, which leads to all kinds of issues, not only in the upper body, but also sometimes in the lower back in the neck. And building up a certain degree not again, not we're not doing like bicep curls and heavy bench press with our programs. [00:22:33] It's more like integrating pushups, grip strength from hanging. Pull-ups all these different things that can be very beneficial just in terms of like control, just in terms of like confidence and control on the bike and maintaining healthy posture with your.  [00:22:50] Craig Dalton: Yeah, that resonates with me. It might be a good time to take a moment and just talk about the type of equipment that is necessary to follow these programs. [00:22:59] Dr. Matt Smith: Yeah. So we have a variety of programs up on the site, including no equipment programs. So we have we have a body weight strength program that's eight weeks long, and if you're looking for kind of a generic program to follow that will build up, lower body, upper body core strength. [00:23:17] That's a great one. If you've got nothing available, we also have kettlebell programs that just require one kettlebell that are also generic, very similar to the beginner strength program. But build up overall athleticism when it comes to our ride strong program. There's a pretty good amount of equipment that you need. [00:23:35] But any, Jim will have these things and then if you wanna, if you want to get pretty robust at home, you can a few of the things that we have in our programs, I'm actually looking up our equipment list right now, but we have everything. Many bands. So there's a little bands that you see people wrap around their legs and do like sidesteps or squats with long bands with handles are one piece of equipment that we use quite often that can wrap around a door handle, or a pole or a pull up bar. [00:24:06] We use barbells in our new restaurant. So we're currently putting out a 20 week ride strong program. It's like a slow release right now. But we do have a strength cycle in there with barbells. So barbells bumper plates, all that we use dumbbells, we use benches for box jumps and then for a few other exercises. [00:24:30] And I'm trying to think here,  [00:24:32] Craig Dalton: what else do we use? Yeah, I've I was lucky in that I already owned a TRX that was gathering dust and TRX that's right. Yeah. And the TRX was useful in that there were some modifications. So if you didn't have a pull-up bar, which I don't currently have a plan on getting you could do a TRX derivative of that. [00:24:52] And I, the, just FYI for the listener those stretch bands, I think for $29, I got a set of the long ones and the short ones that pretty much cover all my needs. And then I ended up just recently finding a deal on a barbell set. So ended up getting barbells thinking, I'm going to want it for this next stage, but you can take these things in incrementally and that's what I've been doing. [00:25:15] Just acquiring them when I have the finances to do.  [00:25:18] Dr. Matt Smith: Yeah. And just to be clear. So last year we put out six months of rod strong program. Actually more than six months, we put out a full off season of red, strong programming that required no barbell. So it was all dumbbell work, all bands, a suspension trainer, and we have all of our. [00:25:39] The one thing that I didn't mention so far was a Swiss ball. We do Swiss balls, particularly in the registrar program. Good. Because I  [00:25:46] Craig Dalton: Got one of those and didn't see it in the beginner strength program. So I was hoping I would see it in the future.  [00:25:51] Dr. Matt Smith: Yeah, you will see it. If you follow the 20, which I do recommend falling that the 20 week ride strong program that we have coming out. [00:25:58] Now, if you follow that, you'll see that in core routine. Like we like to play around particularly in like kneeling positions on the ball, using it for hamstring curls and a lot of different drills. Yeah,  [00:26:12] Craig Dalton: right on. That's actually a good segue into my question. So I've, I've, I'm fortunate that I got the bug early and I'm finishing my eight weeks sort of the beginning of December. [00:26:22] What would you recommend? I move on to it. It sounds like it's that 20 week program. And if so, could describe the journey that you've created?  [00:26:31] Dr. Matt Smith: Yeah. And so to be clear, like what I recommend to you now, And really like the conversation should revolve around a goal. So everything that we every th the premise behind everything that we're putting out is to help people set goals and create a path from a to B and so create, do you have any races coming up in the. [00:26:54] Craig Dalton: I'm sure I will. And here's my challenge in my coachability is it's difficult for me as a family guy to plan out my race calendar. And it's often driven by balancing my desire with family obligations and, ability to travel. But so I typically end up at. Two to four gravel events, big gravel events a year, and then a smattering of local ones that I can drive to. [00:27:19] Typically they're not going to start until, March or April, I would say.  [00:27:25] Dr. Matt Smith: Okay. Yeah. Yeah. And that's that's pretty common. So if you're finishing up this beginner's program, I was looking at a calendar here and you're in the first week of December, you've got a bow. 12 to 16 weeks until you're actually racing. [00:27:43] And, you can jump into our 20 week program. I'll send you a note about this offline, but. I do recommend like our 20 week program that we're currently putting out is based on a lot of the work that we've done with pro riders and essentially have taken those concepts and made them more available to amateur and lower level competitive writers. [00:28:05] And. We start out with a six week stability phase. That's broken up into three parts. So three, two week phases, and then we go into an eight week strength cycle. That's broken up into two different four week strength blocks. And then we finished with a six week power and power endurance cycle. [00:28:27] And so the way that we've created the program, Is to allow for flexibility. So say you have 20 weeks from an event or versus having 12 weeks from an event, we can clip things out and give you a custom program to have you peaking for your event. Just based on the programs that we currently have out, and we have a few other programs outside of the 20 week program that we're currently releasing. [00:28:54] We have a five week strength and power blend. We have a six week strength and power blend and we have a 12 week progressive strength program. So there's a lot of different things that we can pull from. To basically figure out what's right for you. And this is a lot of what we're doing with people right now. [00:29:08] It's we're doing calls with people pretty often. And we include this in our membership where you can set up, you can shoot us an email and say, Hey, here's what I have going on here. My goals, do you have any suggestions for my path? And this is a lot of what we're doing day to day is trying to answer these questions for people. [00:29:24] So for you, I would recommend, jumping right in, hop right into. Our stability phase one, for this new ride strong program it'll pick up in a similar way with where you left off from the beginner strengths. And, it's in the front half of this thing it's pretty low volume. [00:29:43] It's the same concept of working on patterns. Some of the patterns in the stability phase are a little bit more specific to the bikes. You'll get that feeling a little bit more. And then the volume starts to pick up as we start getting into the later phases of the stability program and then furthermore, into the strength phase. [00:30:01] Craig Dalton: For those who are unaccustomed to strength training in their winter of their cycling season is the conflict that if you're if I'm in a power lifting phase of this program, come March and I want to go out and race. I'm just going to be too fatigued and played out to pre.  [00:30:18] Dr. Matt Smith: Yeah. So the way that our program works is it peaks in volume during the strength phase, because usually during that phase, like we're really timing it with a like a seasonal schedule for say, cross country, mountain biking. [00:30:34] There's a time when the writing volume is low enough to where we have an opportunity to build up in the gym and we can do a little bit more volume and can boost that there becomes a secondary time in the spring, or like the early, like late winter. We'll say where that's not the case. [00:30:53] The writing volume kicks up at. We're in full preparation mode for race season to start. And that's when the gym starts to take a back seat a little bit more and our volume needs to go down. And that's really what we do in our power, endurance phase. And we do recommend being conscious of volume. [00:31:10] Particularly if you are doing, if you're a cyclist who's competitive and you're doing a lot of time on the bike, many hours per week. Then you need to be careful with, overwhelming your system through just too much strength work. That's a huge piece of all this. And pretty much all of the, this 20 week program that we're putting out currently is very careful about volume. [00:31:33] In reference to Hey, what should I do leading up to a race. If I'm not following the direct timeline that we've written out, you can parse different things. I would take out part of the strength cycle and Mo I would like skip strength B, which is the second four weeks, and then move into the power. [00:31:49] And during. Psych part of things leading up to your race.  [00:31:52] Craig Dalton: Gotcha. And one of the fears maybe from the listener and certainly in my mind is, okay. I commit to this program. And I think in these, in the strength phase, a it might even be three workouts a week, trying to figure out how to squeeze that in with riding and riding for pleasure. [00:32:10] I think for a lot of my listeners writing as an outlet, that is, is not. Necessarily about the competitive nature of it. It's like what we crave every week to get out there and get in the wilderness. Can you just talk about, R D would you advocate lifting and riding in the same day? Is there a certain number of rides per week that you think about that athletes would typically have in their program? [00:32:35] In addition to these, the strength training routine?  [00:32:39] Dr. Matt Smith: It really depends. This is a pretty subjective. Topic, because different writers who are doing, there'll be writers who are doing high volume on the bike, but really this is like the first time that they've done any strength training. [00:32:55] Versus there are writers who are not doing as much volume on the bike who are very familiar with strength training and have that cash in the bank. And so their response to strength volumes can be. And the way that I typically like the way that we've structured this whole program is to be two days of strength. [00:33:13] And then you have, and these days are like 30 to 45 minutes in the starting phases. And then they kick up to about 45 minutes. And then we have a third session each week, which is a 20 minute core routine. And you can repeat that throughout the week whenever you'd like, so you can do it once a week. [00:33:30] You can do it twice a week. And so you can stack things to whatever makes sense for you. And part of the reason that we did that is we want to have a fairly flexible plan for people because it is, there's just such a variety of. Have, not only people's schedules, but also how they respond to training what their life off the bike looks like. [00:33:50] Nothing is going to be perfect. And so in terms of, what would be ideal, usually we'll stack strength days on very light low intensity riding day. Is historically what I've done and, I've had other writers that try and do strength and an intense ride on the same day. [00:34:11] But if you're just a recreational rider, who's doing it for the enjoyment which, everyone should be doing it for the enjoyment, but I would recommend maximize your enjoyment on the bike. Don't let any part of your training program steal that from you. Consider your strength work as like you're contributing to the longevity of you enjoying your time on the bike and don't have your strength work, be so intense that it starts pulling away from that. [00:34:39] So think of it as a long-term plan, we don't hit home runs with this program is all singles and doubles. And you really if you're starting strength work as a masters cyclist this year, consider it like a 20 year. And don't try and change everything in your first year of doing that. Dip your toes in the water. [00:34:57] Just add maybe one to two days of strength, per week. And just see, I would say two days is probably the. The like optimal range, particularly for someone who's riding quite a bit add that in and do it in a way that doesn't completely disrupt your writing schedule. Particularly if you're like very comfortable with, a fairly strict writing schedule and you know exactly how you're going to respond to that. [00:35:21] Just add a little dose of strength. Don't try and go ham on the. Yeah, that  [00:35:27] Craig Dalton: makes a ton of sense. It's been interesting for me personally, as this eight week period, it just happens to be a period where for whatever reason, I just haven't had a lot of opportunity to ride. So it's been, I don't feel like I've got that. [00:35:41] Balance yet. So as I enter this next phase and feel a little bit more compelled to get in quote, unquote, riding shape, I want to get out there more. So I'll have to circle back with the listener and inform them how I'm doing on finding that balance between the strength training and the riding I love to do for pleasure. [00:35:58] Dr. Matt Smith: Yeah. And I think that you're certainly not alone in that it's a. It can be fairly tricky, especially if you haven't done strength work for a long time, or you've never done it. It's this new habit that you it's no one can address it the same way. No one can implement it the same way. [00:36:20] And so figuring out. What works best for you and playing around with, scheduling and, allowing yourself a little bit of flexibility on the front end to see how you respond to strength, work and see how you feel on big rads after that, taking the time to really observe and see what works for you. [00:36:38] Not necessarily everyone else is a critical piece to making sure that, strength and recovery work stays a part of your game plan for a long.  [00:36:47] Craig Dalton: Yeah, right on. That makes a ton of sense. And I think for the listener, check out the ever athlete website, I'll link to it in the show notes. [00:36:54] There's, as Matt's described, there's a lot of programs there that the subscription is quite affordable. From what I've seen out there, I was really pleased and I didn't get hit by some massive dollar number. So kudos to you and hope you get the volume you need. Cause I know the production values high and the effort you guys have put into designing these programs is quite substantial. [00:37:14] Dr. Matt Smith: Yeah, no, we. Our whole goal with it is to make the lessons that we've learned with different athletes and also working from an injury care perspective. Making those lessons accessible to people is that's the. That is the thing. That's the legacy that I would want to leave behind, for my career. [00:37:37] And so in terms of the dollar, the pricing of our platform will not go up from what it is. It'll probably go down at some point, but. Our goal is to make stuff accessible, particularly for people that we love hanging out with, which includes gravel cyclist, mountain bikers, road, cyclists, like we love supporting people's active lifestyle. [00:37:56] And in terms of covering our costs and all that, like w we're doing great and more than anything, it's been a really interesting project. And, we're excited to keep. Yeah.  [00:38:08] Craig Dalton: Thanks so much for all the time and insight matter, really enjoyed the conversation, hopefully for the listener, it wasn't too much of a Greg's journey to strength training. [00:38:16] I feel like I got a lot out of it, but hopefully it's translated to everybody listening and you can find your own journey.  [00:38:23] Dr. Matt Smith: Oh yeah. Hey, thanks so much for having me on Craig. This is spot cheers  [00:38:27] Craig Dalton: Huge. Thanks for Matt for joining us this week, I learned a ton on my personal journey to strength training. I actually just knocked out another exercise before recording this outro. So I'm finishing week eight and feeling good about my journey and continuing on through the winter and hopefully hitting 20, 22 much stronger as a person and as a gravel cyclist.  [00:38:50] Another huge, thanks to competitive cyclist or appreciate their support of the podcast. Remember, visit competitive cyclists.com/the gravel ride and enter the promo code, the gravel ride for 15% off your order.  [00:39:05] Finally, if you've got any feedback for the show or would like to connect with other gravel cyclists around the world. I invite you to join the ridership. Simply visit www.theridership.com to join our free community and communicate with thousands of other cyclists around the world. Until next time.  [00:39:25] Here's to finding some dirt under your wheels.  [00:39:29]   

Space Café Podcast
EPISODE 041: Stewart Bain, NorthStar Earth & Space and why our planet needs an image upgrade.

Space Café Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 59:56


Cop26 in Glasgow did not manage to deliver the big hit that many would have expected. Perhaps we humans simply lack the ability to think in such large dimensions. Can a series of new satellites save us? Hyperspectral images of the Earth's surface promise a new image of our world. NorthStar Earth and Space sent their CEO Stewart Bain to join us in the podcast studio.Host: Markus Mooslechner: Markus Mooslechner Guest: Stewart Bain Stewart Bain Publisher: Torsten Kriening: https://www.linkedin.com/in/torsten-kriening-68456/ Who we are?SpaceWatch.Global is a digital magazine and portal for those interested in space, and the far-reaching impact that space developments have. While showcasing the technology that enables the industry to edge closer to the next frontier, SpaceWatch.Global also provides analysis, forecasts, and insight into the geopolitical implications of space developments. From space policy, exploration, and missions, to space weapons and technology, we provide a complete perspective on the emerging space sector as it expands into a global marketplace. The team behind SpaceWatch.Global is a dynamic mix of space geeks, tech junkies, space policy experts, regional specialists, and passionate writers. We fully believe that space should be used for humanity, that it enables knowledge, and enriches societies.SpaceWatch.Global is published by ThorGroup GmbH, headquartered in Bern, Switzerland. In the true Swiss spirit, neutrality, ethics and integrity are at our core. SpaceWatch.Global abides by the Society of Professional Journalists' code of ethics; we seek the truth and report on it. ThorGroup GmbHWaaghausgasse 183011 BernSwitzerlandWebsite: www.spacewatch.global Email: info@thorgroup.ch Exclusive distribution Partner: Bookwire - www.bookwire.de See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Most memorable journeys
Roswitha Gassmann - How I crossed all borders

Most memorable journeys

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 36:30


Roswitha Gassmann is a Swiss author and tour guide and even though she is retired, she still accompanies an occasional tour group because she loves spending time with people and she loves culture. We worked for the same tour operator years ago. In this episode she talks to me about how she reluctantly became a tour guide and then did the job for over 40 years. Things were very different before the internet, we had to deal with stuff that is unimaginable today. She is the author of the book "Wie ich alle Grenzen ueberschritt" or in English, "How I crossed all borders" She is an amazing lady with lots of fascinating stories and a great sense of humor. Tune in. https://www.orellfuessli.ch/shop/home/artikeldetails/A1061028183 Support this podcast

The ION Pod
Ep. 66: The Swiss Solo

The ION Pod

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 91:36


Our trip to Geneva for the Biennale de l'Image en Mouvement at the Centre d'Art Contemporain Geneve. WAY MORE EPISODES WHERE THIS CAME FROM AT WWW.PATREON.COM/THEIONPACK

PM Point of View
Project Management Forward from the 2021 UMD Symposium

PM Point of View

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 60:46


We know change is constant. So as business practices evolve and new systems & tools are developed, the role of Project Managers and the skills they rely on must change to meet the new demands. PMs who don't move forward risk being left behind. In the third episode from our 2021 UMD PM Symposium series, we discuss the role of "Innovation PMs," and how they can effectively manage open-ended, amorphous innovation projects. And Data: how to collect and leverage meaningful data to make better, faster, informed decisions. Check out more presentations from the UMD Symposium at https://pmsymposium.umd.edu/pm2021/ Listen, learn, and get a free PDU! PDU Information Use the following information in PMI's CCRS system to register the PDUs for this podcast: PDU Category: Online or Digital Media Provider Number: 4634 Talent Triangle: Leadership Activity Number: PMPOV0092 PDUs for this episode: 1 About the Speakers Marcus Glowasz is a Co-Founder and Product Lead at Fortean, a Swiss technology startup that leverages data analytics and artificial intelligence technology to innovate and redefine the project management practice, addressing the growing challenges of project professionals to effectively and successfully deliver projects. Dr. Michael O'Connor is the Director of Strategy & Project Management with Medtronic. He has over 29 years of professional experience in the Medical Device Industry. He is currently a Director at Large for the Product Development and Management Association (PDMA).

Skeleton Songs
The Glittering Lights of Wolfstack Docks

Skeleton Songs

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 42:47


Hiraeth? Sensucht? Saudade? Listen to Alexis and Lottie cry as we talk nostalgia, sequels and games, from 17th-century Swiss cowbells to sailing away from your loved ones into danger. We talk transmission of experience from one generation to the next, the future of games as gamers get old, and the impossible loss of childhood - and why that's not such a bad thing after all.Games / books mentioned in this episode, for your gaming / reading pleasure:- Sunless Sea, by Alexis Kennedy and Failbetter Games- The Nature of Order, by Christopher Alexander - Toy Story 3, by Pixar - No Country for Old Men, by the Cohen brothersFollow us on Twitter and sign up to the mailing list to make sure you don't miss the next episode! ♥Support the show (http://bit.ly/2JCKVEH)

Daily Crypto Report
"Gemini raises $400M. ConstitutionDAO misses out at Sotheby's auction." November 19, 2021

Daily Crypto Report

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 3:13


Today's blockchain and cryptocurrency news Brought to you by ungrocery.com Bitcoin is down 3% at $57,198 Ethereum is down slightly at $4,165 and Binance Coin up 1% at $568 Ethos up 130% Loopring up 16% ConstitutionDAO misses out at auction. Gemini raises $400M at a valuation of $7B. Macy's New York Thanksgiving day parade will release collection of NFTs. The SEC is charging a California man over allegedly fraudulent bitcoin schemes. a16z led the $13M funding round for the Swiss based Nym

ActionPacked
The Rebirth Of Andermatt

ActionPacked

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 21:28


The Swiss village of Andermatt is undergoing a major transformation into a world-class year-round destination.

Swarfcast
Tornos DECO Swiss Meister, Achim Bauer

Swarfcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 22:25


On today's podcast I spoke to Achim Bauer, one of the most knowledgeable people I know about Tornos DECO CNC Swiss machines. His company, Bauer & Licht Industrietechnik OHG, in Pforzheim, Germany, is one of the only companies in the world that specializes specifically in rebuilding Tornos DECOs. Recently, I had the privilege to pick […] The post Tornos DECO Swiss Meister, Achim Bauer first appeared on Today's Machining World.

Swiss and Lali Hijack HOLLYWOOD!
11. Big City Nights: Part III

Swiss and Lali Hijack HOLLYWOOD!

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 25:55


And now, the harrowing conclusion to Swiss and Lali season 01! But wait... Who is that who just showed up? Why does his voice sound familiar? It couldn't be... El Daddy! Introducing to the Swiss-and-Lali-Verse, Mr. Patton Oswalt. See you next season, kids! Very Special Guest Star: Patton Oswalt End Credits Song "Gold Mine": by thanks. ****************************************** Follow our social media below for weekly comic strips and cartoons IG: @swissandlali Twitter: @swissandlali Visit swissandlali.com for a complete list of episodes, credits, and cartoons. See you in Hollywood, Kids!

9INE POINT Started With A Dream Podcast w/ Jacolby Gilliam
The Power of Choice with Swiss Pro Volleyball Player Thays Deprati

9INE POINT Started With A Dream Podcast w/ Jacolby Gilliam

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 47:51


In Episode 98, we chat with Thays Deprati about her journey and the power of choice. Thays is a professional volleyball player in Switzerland and currently on the national team. Instagram: @thaysdeparti

This Day in History Class
William Tell allegedly shoots an apple off his son's head - November 18th, 1307

This Day in History Class

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 11:21


On this day in 1307, a legend was born when a Swiss farmer and skilled hunter named William Tell shot an apple off his son's head with a crossbow. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

Swiss and Chips - Your British guide to Switzerland
Becoming Swiss, part six: 'the interview'

Swiss and Chips - Your British guide to Switzerland

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 5:56


It's the big moment in the Swiss citizenship process: finally you will meet someone face-to-face who will decide whether all the paperwork you have collected, all the forms you have filled out and all the studying you have done is enough to make you a viable candidate for becoming Swiss. My moment finally came when I was invited to the office that handles citizenship applications in Bern. I've read so many reports in the media about the difficult questions posed at these interviews and heard numerous horror stories about people being grilled on matters of Swiss society and history, or being asked highly personal questions. What actually happened was something quite different.

The Retrospectors
On This Day: William Tell's Apple Adventures

The Retrospectors

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 9:49


Switzerland's most famous archer shot fruit off his own son's head on 18th November, 1307. Or did he? ‘Chronicon Helveticum' by Aegidius Tschudi, from which the date comes, claims to be a serious historical account, but was written roughly 200 years later - and not published until nearly 200 years after that. And the myth bears remarkable similarities with the Danish folklore of Palnatoki, recorded in print centuries earlier.In this episode, Arion, Rebecca and Olly recount the improbable beats of Tschudi's tale; consider the small casting pool for 1950s swashbucklers; and marvel at how the story has come to represent the (genuine) Swiss resistance of the Habsburg army…Further Reading:• ‘A Brief History of the Legend of William Tell' (The Culture Trip, 2017): https://theculturetrip.com/europe/switzerland/articles/a-brief-history-of-the-legend-of-william-tell/• ‘Shooting an apple off one's child's head' (Wikipedia): https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shooting_an_apple_off_one%27s_child%27s_head#Palnatoki• ‘The Adventures of William Tell: Opening Theme' (ITC, 1958): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HcfykK8Iw7wFor bonus material and to support the show, visit Patreon.com/RetrospectorsWe'll be back tomorrow! Follow us wherever you get your podcasts: podfollow.com/RetrospectorsThe Retrospectors are Olly Mann, Rebecca Messina & Arion McNicoll, with Matt Hill.Theme Music: Pass The Peas. Announcer: Bob Ravelli. Graphic Design: Terry Saunders. Edit Producer: Emma Corsham.Copyright: Rethink Audio / Olly Mann 2021. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Me Clicking RECord with Dane Curley
Episode 40 - Psychedelic Ideas

Me Clicking RECord with Dane Curley

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 30:16


Three related moments in time sharing a date: November 16th. They are, the discovery of L.S.D. by Swiss chemist Albert Hoffman, the birth of Terence McKenna, and the death of Alan Watts. We discuss a variety of "psychedelic" ideas on this funny and good-spirited 40th episode!Brought to you by people like you!Please donate via PATREON.(Cover Image is from the High Times magazine 1992 interview with Terence McKenna)Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/danecurley)

Privacy Please
S2, E92 - Lydia Knab, Global Data Privacy Officer

Privacy Please

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 69:39


This week on Privacy Please, the gang has the honor of interviewing, Lydia Knab, Global Data Privacy Officer!  We discuss a wide array of topics around Privacy and learn from her very interesting story that found her way into the big world of Pharma. Mini CV on Lydia:Swiss, Hungarian, and German national – moved to the US less than a year ago (yes, I speak German, Hungarian and French)Went to law school, specialized in(bio-) ethics and pharmaceutical law and data privacy governance (risk, data governance, legal, compliance, and operations)Spent a few years as an operations officer in a Swiss bank, became the first woman named chief privacy officer in a Swiss bank, and helped build their privacy programStarted my new role as a global privacy officer in a big pharma company a few months ago – love the return to pharma after my banking experienceDISCLAIMER: Lydia is not speaking on the company's behalf and that her views are her own

Future of Sex
How To Talk About Sexual Fantasies Feat. Dr. Justin Lehmiller and Sara Tang

Future of Sex

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 29:14


This week's episode features two leading experts on human sexuality, Dr. Justin Lehmiller, Kinsey Institute fellow and author and Sara Tang, sex coach and podcast host. They talk us through some fascinating insights into how we can talk about our sexual fantasies and explain that fantasies are a normal thing and how to explore them. We'll also be looking at how technology might help us live out our wildest sex dreams. To learn more about this show, visit FutureOfSex.org. To keep up with all things Future of Sex, follow us on Instagram @futureofsex and Twitter @futureofsexshow. Guests: Dr Justin Lehmiller, Kinsey Institute fellow, founder of Sex and Psychology website author of Tell Me What You Want, The Science of Sexual Desire and How It Can Help Improve Your Sex Life and Sara Sense, Sex coach and Sexologist, you can listen to her podcast Better in Bed here Sponsors We-Vibe: We-Vibe are creator's of the world's best couples vibes and our favourites when it comes to innovation in sex toys. Check out We-Vibe's Touch X which is not only a Swiss army knife for your pleasure (7 vibration modes) - visit at www.wevibe.com for more info! From November 24th check out We-Vibe's Black Friday sale with up to 50% discounts on selected products! Pure: As mentioned in today's episode by Sara the Pure app is the ultimate dating app to explore all your fantasies and desires. Pure is all about honest dating without shame. Pure works as online board with classified ads where people write what kind of experiences they are looking for, which can be specific kinks, a date for a wine/coffee or maybe invitation to museum/cinema. You decide. To download Pure, follow the link here Frenchie: Frenchie has been created for a new generation of lovers. They believe sex should be fun, natural, simple and safe for everyone - just like your sexual wellness products should be! Frenchie have a range of lubes and condoms all made with vegan and natural ingredients. Check out their latest Lovers Kit for a passionate weekend or night in ;) Credits Host: Bryony Cole on IG @bryonycole Twitter @bryonycole, www.bryonycole.co Producers: Bryony Cole and David Lamb on IG: @davylamb Editor: Chad Michael Snavely on Twitter @chad_michael, www.chadmichael.com

The Remote Real Estate Investor
How Rachel Richards made enough passive income to retire at 27

The Remote Real Estate Investor

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 31:01


Rachel Richards is an author and real estate investor that came from humble beginnings and 'retired' at the age of 27. Rachael demistyfies the overwhelming, intimidating and complex world of personal finances to making simple, fun and accessible.   In this episode, Rachel shares her story of how she got started as a financial advisor, lauched into real estate, scaled up to 40 doors and built a diversivied portfolio. Rachel's Site: https://www.moneyhoneyrachel.com/ Rachel's free passive income starter kit: https://www.moneyhoneyrachel.com/bonus Rachel's Book: https://amzn.to/3kFzKej  --- Transcript   Before we jump into the episode, here's a quick disclaimer about our content. The Remote Real Estate Investor Podcast is for informational purposes only, and is not intended as investment advice. The views, opinions and strategies of both the hosts and the guests are their own and should not be considered as guidance from Roofstock. Make sure to always run your own numbers, make your own independent decisions and seek investment advice from licensed professionals.   Rachel: What's up everybody, Michael Albaum here with the remote real estate investor. Today with me I have an amazing guest, Rachel Richards, she is a best selling author, finance guru, real estate investor, former financial advisor, professional speaker just did amazing all around person. And she's gonna talk to us today about all of those topics and more. So let's just jump right into it.   Rachel Richards, thank you so much for taking the time to hang out with me today. I really appreciate you coming on.   Rachel: Yeah, thank you for having me. I'm excited.   Michael: Oh, me too. So I mean, for those of our listeners who don't know you, I know you as a best selling author, finance guru, real estate investor, former financial advisor, professional speaker. I mean, is there anything that you haven't done?   Rachel: Well, I appreciate that you make me sound really good. So I don't know.   Michael: You have seemingly accomplished so much in the financial and real estate space. I would love if you could give our listeners a little bit of background on who you are, what you've done, and then what you're currently doing in real estate.   Rachel: Yeah, for sure. I started as a finance nerd at a pretty young age. I still am a nerd to this day and proud of it. But I grew up in a household where money was always a stressor. And so at a pretty young age, I was motivated to turn things around for myself and become financially independent, and went to college, I became a financial adviser. I'm kind of giving you the high level story. But I read Rich Dad Poor Dad in high school. And that was the first thing that yeah, that turned me on to real estate investing. So I always knew that was going to be my path.   I didn't know about all these other passive income streams yet. And my eyes opened on passive income a little bit later. But I knew real estate investing was one of the key pathways for myself. So I did start investing in real estate with my husband in 2017. I also self published my first book money, honey that year. And we had these two passive income streams, rental income and royalty income. And we focused on growing those as much as we possibly could over the next few years. So fast forward to 2019. So within the span of two years, we had accumulated almost 40 rental doors, six buildings, almost 40 doors, and we've grown our passive income streams, yeah, to over $10,000 per month. So by then I was able to quit my job. We were financially independent. And that is where we are today.   Michael: Oh, my gosh, well, there is a lot to unpack there. That's incredible. So taking a few steps back, do you think that you became a financial advisor because of that angst you were feeling at home. And that's never something you never want to worry about money. So you said if I can get as educated as I can about it, it'll be easier for me.   Rachel: I think there were a few reasons I became a financial advisor. That's definitely one of them. One of them is because my parents were really struggling with money. And I wanted to help them. And for some reason, I felt like I needed to have the credibility of calling myself a financial advisor to finally be like, okay, look, I'm taking over your finances. We're going to get you out of debt. We're going to turn this around, and I'm going to finally manage your money for you.   So I did that. And we did help them and they're doing way better now than they were this was like a decade ago. So that was one of the reasons was to help them. And another reason is because I had the passion for helping people manage their money, I was obsessed with learning about how to invest in the stock market. And the third reason is because I sold Cutco cutlery in college. Have you heard of Cutco knives? By any chance?   Michael: Yeah, I've heard of it. Is that the door to door selling?   Rachel: Yeah, it's like a direct sales company. So it's high quality knives. And of course, when I when I took this job, I had graduated from high school. I was terrified at the idea of taking out student loans because I had read enough books. I knew enough to be hesitant at the thought of that. And I'd seen what student loan debt had done to other people and how crippling it could be. So I was really scared of student loans. I didn't want to take on debt. And my parents were not able to help me pay for college whatsoever. It felt like all my friends I grew up in this really wealthy bubble and I felt like all my friend's parents were paying for their school and good for them, but I was kind of having to pay for it on my own.   So I took this job selling knives. And it was the first time I've been exposed to something where the harder you work, the more money you make. And I knew I could outwork anybody. So I sold knives my mom was less than thrilled about The idea of me selling sharp objects to family and friends, but that's what I did. I sold Cutco. I set sales records, and I paid my way through school and I graduated completely debt free, which is one of my proudest accomplishments. And because of the sales experience, and my passion for helping people with money, I figured becoming a financial adviser was my dream job. And that would be the perfect fit for me. I was wrong about that. But that was my thought at the time.   Michael: Good for you, Rachel. That's incredible. That's really, really incredible. So now you became,   Rachel: Thank you.   Michael: Yeah, you're most welcome. So now you've become a financial advisor, you are looking to help people with money, and their finances. And so I'm curious, where do you see real estate fit into that picture, because I know a lot of financial advisors and a lot of them push products that they make Commission's on or push more passive investments in the stock market. So curious to know how you blended the two for professional level as well as in the personal level, you investing in real estate and seeing how impactful it can be.   Rachel: Yeah, and honestly, that was one of the things that I found disenchanting about the financial advising industry is how financial advisors are incentivized. And they you know, they want you to sell certain products to people that maybe are not in their best fit. So I didn't last very long in that industry, I think I was only a advisor for almost a year, actually. But I always had the dream of becoming financially independent. And so I knew that working in a job where I was trading, my time for money was not the way to become financially independent. So that's where real estate investing made a lot of sense to me, I knew this was something that could be a passive income stream, if I did it the right way. You know, I always tell people, you don't want to have this huge rental portfolio and quit your job to become a full time landlord, right? That's not the goal.   So you have to do this, and you need to have a property manager, that's one thing that will help it become passive. And even with a property manager, there's always going to be an aspect of manage the manager. So it's not going to be perfectly passive. But it is a lot more passive than a nine to five job, or working a sales job or working as a financial advisor.   Michael: Yeah, nice.   Rachel: So it was always my goal to start investing in real estate. And doing that on the side. And my husband, I hadn't met Andrew yet my husband as a financial advisor, but I did meet him later. And together, we wanted to get to this $10,000 A month mark, because I think at the time, our expenses were like $6,000 a month. So it felt like we could cover our expenses and still have a lot of money to save. And just to back up, let me just define what passive income is or the way that I define it. I define passive income as money that is earned with little to no ongoing effort. There are not many things that are truly 100% passive, except for portfolio income.   Most passive income streams will require you to work a few hours a month or a couple hours a week to maintain them. But again, it's a lot more passive than working 40 hours a week as a full time salaried employee.   Michael: Yeah.   Rachel: And the epiphany that we had several years ago, is that once your passive income exceeds your living expenses, you're retired, you're financially independent. So once we realize that it was just this, this constant urge to have enough passive income to cover our living expenses. And even more because we wanted buffer room, we wanted to keep saving money. So that's why we came up with that $10,000 A month goal.   Michael: Love it. Love it. And so you started investing in rental properties in 2017, you said, and two years later, you've got 40 doors under your belt, which is unbelievable. So I'm curious to know, how did you get your start? And what led you or what allowed you to kind of take that first step? Because I think so many of our listeners, and so many beginning investors get plagued by analysis paralysis. So how did you do it?   Rachel: Yeah, that's a great question. And I'm glad you asked when people hear that I went from zero to almost 40 doors and under two years, the first thing they asked me is like, Are you a trust fund, baby. So I always like to clarify right off the bat. I'm not a trust fund baby. I never made six figures actually, from a job or a career. I started off as a financial advisor making $36,000 And my next job I was making $32,000. In my next job I was making $42,000. So by no means was I was making some huge salary to achieve this. We were kind of making average salaries, but working really hard and being frugal and being thrifty in order to accomplish what we accomplish. So always put that out there first. There was a lot of fear, for sure, in that first rental property, and there was a lot of discouraged discouragement along the way. So the first duplex we had been searching for months and months and months to find this first duplex that we invested in. We started looking in early 2016 I think, and I'll back up with a quick story of who was working for at the time.   I was working for this woman who was a very emotionally abusive boss. And I was overqualified for this job, I was underpaid. This is one of the most condescending people I've ever worked with. Like, I just I've never seen an adult person, treat another adult person this way in my life. She regularly made her employees cry. She just made people feel stupid. So it was an awful work experience. Yeah. And there was just this one time where she made me cry. And I was I went to the bathroom to clean up and I just looked at myself in the mirror, I was 23. At the time, I looked at myself in the mirror, and I just decided, I am so sick of this. And I am never going to let another employer treat me this way again. And I'm never going to be financially constrained, again, where I feel trapped in a job, and I can't leave because of finances.   And I remember feeling like I'm so sick of myself, I'm sick of talking about investing in real estate. I'm sick of complaining about this job and not doing anything about it. So it I had this enough is enough moment, where yes, it was a low point for me. But also the silver lining of that is that I finally started to take action. And I finally realized, I'm done with this, I'm going to start taking action, I'm going to get serious, and I'm going to buy my first rental property. And I share that because I think you have to almost have that moment and have that mental jump, where you just decide, okay, I'm going to do this because I'm sick of hearing myself talking about it. Or I'm sick of like living in fear or living in the what ifs or you know, what if I lose money, what if this bad thing happens? What if it doesn't go right? It's like, you just have to take the first step.   So I had that moment, I started to take action, we started to look for rental properties. It took a long time, way longer than I thought. And I think most first time investors experienced this. We put offers on properties. We had a an accepted contract on a property and it fell through. And so there were so many times we're like, this just isn't going to work. And we taught we told ourselves, Well, you know, this works for some people. Clearly, this just isn't meant to be.   Luckily, we got through that. And we kept looking and we didn't let it completely discourage us. And we finally found this duplex. And by then the great news was we'd analyze so many properties that we recognized, this is such a good deal. And we were able to take really quick action, make an offer on the property and close on it. And we were really confident in it because we you know, we made other offers on properties. We'd had accepted contracts, and it was to this day, the best deal we've ever done.   Michael: No way   Rachel: Saw it. We we recognized it. And we we took quick action. Yeah, I mean, the I think we have like a 25% cash on cash ROI or something something. It's at least 25%. So   Michael: That's incredible.   Rachael: That's how we got our first duplex. Yeah, it's crazy. Yeah.   Michael: And so you said that you were facing a lot of headwinds and discouragement and mental hurdles and physical obstacles. How did you and I imagine you're working with your husband at this point, right?   Rachel: Yes.   Michael: How did you know and how, I mean, how did you go about analyzing properties? Was it hey, we've just seen this enough times to kind of know what we're looking for. Did you have a mentor or coach kind of walk you through or somebody more experienced that was able to guide you or were you kind of figuring it out on your own?   So by then, I had taken a couple different jobs in the real estate industry. I partnered with somebody who flipped houses and I learned a lot from him. This job that I'd worked at with this abusive boss, she was a realtor and I was her admin assistant. So I did learn a lot from her as well. I read a lot of books. So one of the best books I read to help me with analyzing rental properties is the book hold by Steve Shader and then the McKissicks, Jim Melinda McKissick. Okay, that was a great book for me to learn how to analyze properties. So I was just kind of going off of what I learned myself to that point and using my own spreadsheets.   Michael: Love it. So you got a kick butt deal. That was your first one down. And then the next just started falling down like bowling pins, and it was a pretty sequential, it sounds like it happened fairly quickly over the span of two years.   Rachel: Yes, it did happen quickly. I'm happy to get into the numbers too, because a lot of people were like, how did you come up with all these down payments if you weren't doing house hacking, because we came up with 20% and down payments, one after the other, which was quick and it was a lot of money. So the first duplex was $100,000. That was the list price. We we had a few advantages going for us that allowed us to save money, first of all, so we both graduated without debt, I sold knives. My husband's a veteran and he used his military benefits for his college.   So we graduate without debt. That was a big advantage because even though we started out not making six figures and I never made six figures my husband did eventually even though We started off not making six figures, we could save a lot a large portion of our salary. Back when I was making 36 grand, I was saving 50% of my income. I was living off something like $1,500 a month.   Michael: Holy smokes.   Rachel: Yeah, in Louisville, Kentucky. I mean, it was very bare bones, I was very, very frugal. So because of that it only took me a few years to save up a decent chunk of money that I could invest into real estate. And then obviously, Louisville, Kentucky is where we invested, it's a great place to invest low cost of living. It's an affordable city. So the duplex we found was 100 grand. So those were some of the advantages that we had. And that's how we came up with the downpayment for that first duplex by 2017, we both had $10,000, we saved and we pulled together to get to the $20,000 downpayment. That's how it started.   Now how we scaled, we did a couple things. First of all, we did not give into lifestyle creep. So those few years leading up to that we were very frugal, we made a lot of sacrifices, we weren't going out to eat with friends, we weren't partying on the weekends. I mean, we were working full time jobs, we were acquiring rental properties. On the weekends, I was starting to write my book in the evenings, we were just working and hustling. It's not like we had these really cool lives or anything. So we made a lot of sacrifices. And after we bought that first property, and we were cash flowing $500 a month in profit, it would have been really easy for us to turn to each other and high five and just decide, wow, now we can really live it up, we have $500 a month, we can increase our quality of life, we could get a new car, we could do whatever.   But we didn't, we decided we're gonna save 100% of this cash flow. And we're gonna reinvest this into the down payment for the next property. So that was one thing we did, we didn't get into lifestyle creep. And the second thing, this is really the key for us. We I had my real estate license, I did not have it for the purpose of having clients. But it was just for my own purposes and representing us as the buyer's agent on the deals. So we would deplete our savings completely to buy the for the downpayment and to buy the property. But then I would be the buyer's agent on the deal, we would represent ourselves. And I would immediately get a commission check back for 1000s of dollars, sometimes it would be 10 grand depending on how much the property was.   So that would be an immediate boost that would help us save for the down payment for the next property. And by then to by 2017, my husband was making six figures. So you think about a 50% savings rate on our combined income. And those other three things that cashflow we kept generating from every successes, successive rental property, the Commission's from the real estate license, we were able to have some very, very fast momentum where we could come up with down payments, one after the other and scale very, very quickly. So that's how we did it.   Michael: That is so cool. That's so cool. Rachel, a question for you kind of about mindset. And how do you square saving so much of your income and being so frugal when it sounds like a lot of your friends and circle may not have been? I mean, it was that hard, like just emotionally to get through?   Rachel: It was definitely challenging. It was definitely challenging. I think from a young age, though I've always had this mindset of, or I always recognize that doing the opposite of what most people do tends to be more successful, I guess I don't know if that's the best way of putting it. But I always was like, I'm going to do the opposite of what most people are doing.   Michael: Yeah.   Rachel: And I was always able to, I guess delay gratification or just keep that motivation in front of me and stay very, very disciplined. So it was difficult. I remember there were times working when I did work in corporate finance eventually. And I remember my coworkers would invite me to lunch. And I always packed my lunch. And so the first few times they invited me out to lunch, I would eat my lunch first and I would join them because I didn't want to miss out, I would want to network and I would want to go to lunch with them because I liked them. And so I would say yeah, I'll go to lunch. And then I would go and just drink water. And so I would explain to them, you know, sometimes I would say I'm just trying to be healthy, or I'm on a diet or sometimes I'd be like, I'm just trying to save money. I would always tell the truth, whichever it was, but…   At first I think they probably thought it was weird. Not that they ever said that. Right? But then they got used to it. And they knew that if they invited me to lunch, I was gonna come and not eat and they were always supportive. And luckily, I've always had very supportive people in my life that helped me along the way. But yeah, I mean, you just have to get used to kind of being the oddball out because it is kind of weird. You're not getting the new car and you're not getting the new house but you know that in the end, you're going to have a lifestyle that's going to be freedom and travel and way different than than what anybody else can experience. until you know that it's going to be worth it. And if you can focus on that, it'll make all those sacrifices in between a lot easier.   Michael: Totally. I forget who said the quote, but it's something to the effect of live like no one now. So you can live like no one else later.   Rachel: Yes. That's a great one.   Michael: Oh, that's awesome. And I totally hear you. Because I mean, coming from a guy who lives in a van with his dog and wife, I totally get the doing the opposite of what everyone else does.   Rachel: Yes, I try to still live by that, especially with investing in the stock market, too.   Michael: Oh, okay. So that's actually a really great segue for something I wanted to chat with you about. So what is your take on the stock market? I mean, is that is that an asset class that you believe in that you invest in to get diversified? Talk to me about that?   Rachel: Yeah, for sure we invest in a stock market. I think the more diversification, the better. So we invest in the stock market, we invest in real estate. And within real estate, we do all kinds of things multifamily self storage, you know, we own direct rental property. And then we have syndications. And then we have REITs, and other types of real estate investments. So I always think the more you can diversify yourself, the safer your portfolio is, stock market investing, I think is an absolute must for everybody. My husband still works a W2 job, even though we're financially independent, he loves his job, he loves what he does. So he has a 401k that we max out every year. And we still have old IRAs that are invested in the stock market.   I am a big believer that what is boring, ends up being sexy in the long term. So we invest mostly in index funds and ETFs. And long term investing, most of the time, I'm not caught up in how the Dow has performed today, or how the S&P is performing or what's going on in the stock market, because I don't look at it. The way I approach the stock market is that it's none of my business. I know that in the long term, it's going to take care of me and that in the long term, the stock market has always gone up, it's going to be volatile, day to day, week to week, month to month, year to year, but over the decades, my money will go up as long as I keep it invested. So I don't think I've ever sold anything I've invested in. And I've started investing at the age of 18. So I'm like 11 years in now.   But that's how I've approached it. I don't invest in crypto, it's not because I don't believe in it. It's just that I haven't had the time to fully educate myself on crypto, and to fully understand it. And if I don't 1,000% understand something, I don't invest in it. It's as simple as that. And I would tell anybody that if you don't understand something completely don't invest in it.   Michael: That's a great tip. That's a great tip. So Rachel, I'm curious to know, because you used to work as a financial advisor, what did you see your really successful clients doing? And where were they investing?   Rachel: Yeah, the I would say the successful clients. I mean, I was a fee only advisor, first of all, so I was advising my clients differently than what other people were doing. I would say that my most successful clients were doing what I told them to do.   Michael: For someone who might not be familiar with the financial advisement world, what is a fee only advisor? And how is that different than some of the other fee structures out there?   Rachel: Yeah, it's really important that clients understand how their financial advisors are being paid. So if you're looking to work with a financial advisor, you definitely need to advocate for yourself and ask, Hey, how are you being paid, what's your pay structure, there's three ways financial advisors are paid. Number one is commission based, that means they're being paid a commission based on the products that they sell to you. That's not a good thing normally, because that means they might be incentivized to push products on you that might not be in your best interest. Number two would be a fee based advisor, which means they could be paid still commission some of the times and fees other times.   And then number three is a fee only advisor. And this is the best way. This would be somebody that is paid, for example, 1% of the assets under management. So they're paid based off of like a fee of your portfolio, or it could be an hourly fee. And this is the one that's the most in alignment with with your values, because the more money you make, the more money they'll make. So that's something you want to ask them, you also want to make sure that they're a fiduciary, that means that they are obligated to act in your best interest and look out for your best interests as your advisor.   Michael: So what you're saying is that there can be licensed and registered financial advisors that are not fiduciaries.   Rachel: Correct.   Michael: That's mind blowing.   Rachel: It is, isn't it and people don't know that. I didn't even know that until I was a financial advisor.   Michael: Wow.   Rachel: And so yeah, there you can have all these certifications and licenses and still not be upheld as somebody that is legally obligated to act in your clients best interests.   Michael: Wow. Okay, well, you have just armed all of our listeners with a Fantastic question. If they're chatting with financial advisors, and it's as simple as argue a fiduciary   Rachel: Mm hmm, that's right.   Michael: That's great. That's great. Okay. And then so getting back to to what you were saying previously about that the most successful clients you had were the ones that listened to your advice, what advice were you giving them?   Rachel: It was, it came down to the same things that I do with my own portfolio, investing in the long term, investing in the, you know, the boring things that I say in quotes, index funds, ETFs. But the thing is, when you invest a lot of your money in the stock market, it can be very scary and emotional. The most successful clients were the ones who did not panic and sell at the wrong time. Because when the stock market's going down, your instinct is to sell and you want to get out and you want to make sure you're not going to lose any more money.   The thing is, though, when the stock market's going down, you don't actually have a loss, right? It's a theoretical loss, you don't actually have a loss until you sell and then you've actually realized that loss, you make that loss real. If you don't sell, the loss isn't real yet. And if you look at the stock market over time, you see that it's always gone up. So if you can just hold out, you just if you can suppress the panic and the fear. And if you can hold out and keep your money in the stock market, even invest more in the stock market, because the stocks are on sale if the stock market has gone down. And if you can just wait that out, it will go back up, it always has in the long run. So the clients that were able to manage their emotions Well, during those times of panic and fear. Those are the ones who did the best in the long run.   Michael: Yeah, that makes total sense. So Rachel, would you say that it's a fair expectation of someone to have have their financial advisor to have the advisor help them manage their emotions and kind of coach them through the highs and the lows of those emotional roller coasters?   Rachel: I think so. Yeah, I think a good financial adviser would do that. And when you're looking for somebody, that's another question to ask. I've seen good financial advisors who set expectations helped manage their clients emotions through the when the markets very volatile. So I think absolutely, and again, this all comes back to the concept of doing the opposite of what everyone else is doing. So when you successfully invest in the stock market, if everyone's hopping on the latest trend and buying the latest crypto, then it could be a signal not to do that. Or if everyone's panicked and selling in the stock market is going down. That could be a signal not to sell. If you do the opposite of what everyone else is doing that can end up being very successful for you.   Michael: Okay, I want to shift gears entirely here and talk about the book that you wrote. Because again, just another notch in your belt, another accolade you have, it's called Money Honey, why did you write it? Who did you write it for? And what can people expect to get out of it if they end up purchasing in a reading it?   Rachel: Well, thank you for asking money, honey was a complete surprise for me because it was it was something I was just doing as a passion project. And when it took off the way it did, I was shocked. But I started writing it in 2017, because I was a former financial advisor and all my family and friends came to me for financial advice, which I loved. And I also began to wonder, well, why aren't they reading books like I did? You know, why aren't they learning on their own? And then I had this aha moment where I realized, oh, yeah, personal finance is boring. It's overwhelming. It's intimidating. It's complex. No wonder, no wonder people don't like to learn about it.   So I thought to myself, How can I make this topic sassy, and simple and fun. And that's where the idea for money honey came from. And the words kind of poured out of me at first, it was something I was really excited to do, just something I felt compelled to do. So I self published the book in September of 2017. And like I said, to my surprise, it just took off immediately. It really resonated with female millennials. And it teaches the basic topics of personal finance, budgeting, savings, stock market, investing, debt, it touches on insurance and taxes as well.   So that is what somebody would get out of it. And it's yeah, like I said, it's done well has over 1100 Amazon reviews now and it just sells more and more every year. So it just blows my mind.   Michael: Right on. And where's the best place for someone to pick up a copy of the book?   Rachel: It's on Amazon, and it's in ebook paperback and audiobook formats.   Michael: Right on, Rachael, this has been so amazing. I really, really appreciate you coming on here. And you're just like a Swiss army knife. Like you just got so many facets to you and so much experience that I love and I know our listeners will love. If people want to learn more about you find out more about your story. Where can they get ahold of that type of stuff?   Rachel: Thank you. I appreciate it. My website is Money Honey, Rachel calm, and my Instagram is money. Honey Rachel and what I would love to do for your listeners is, if anyone wants to download my passive income starter kit, I will give that for free so you can go to moneyhoneyrachel.com/bonus to download that.   Michael: Amazing. Thank you so much. We will definitely link to all of that in the show notes here. Who Rachel, thank you again. This has been so much fun and I wish you the best of luck and hope to stay in touch.   Rachel: Thank you so much for having me.   Michael: Already, everybody that was our episode a big big, big thank you to Rachel. It was so much fun as super insightful. We covered a ton of topics. I am definitely gonna be getting a copy of her book here shortly. If you enjoyed the episode, feel free to leave us a rating or review wherever you listen to your episodes. And as always, we look forward to seeing the next one. Happy investing

Brain Burrow: Digging Deep into Psychology and Horror
Janet Wang: Going, Going, Going (Ep 50, Season 2)

Brain Burrow: Digging Deep into Psychology and Horror

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 26:06


Is it ok to constantly move forward?In this lighthearted but insightful Brain Burrow Digging Deep interview, actor, producer, and stunt woman Janet Wang talks about her extremely busy lifestyle and her strategy to incorporate balance.She talks about the rush she gets from "going, going, going" but also the need to incorporate down time.At the young age of 5 Janet's vibrant personality landed her a major role in her school play. After that she continued her love for the stage until she graduated college. After college life took her in another direction for a few years. During that time she earned her black belt in Tae Kwon Do, practiced Muay Tai kickboxing, trained as a performing aerialist, and did several modeling jobs as a print model. She was picked up as a stunt woman, and soon rediscovered her love for acting which took her to the big screen instead of the stage. Janet is now an acting stunt woman, and Producer. You might also find her doing other jobs as a Makeup Artist, First AD, or production manager earning her the title of "Swiss army knife" of film. [IMDB]She is known for Arena Wars, Z-Dead End, and Hell Fire.Connect with Janet Wanginstagram.com/janetwangsta/facebook.com/janet.lt.wangimdb.com/name/nm11721146/Connect with Mark D Valenti:instagram.com/valentihorror/brainburrow.com​​IMDB: Mark D ValentiBrain Burrow YouTubetwitter.com/brainburrowtiktok.com/@brainburrowinstagram.com/brainburrowshow/Brain Burrow Sponsors:Delirium MagazineCreepy Crate (use code Burrow5 to save $5 off your first order)Hunt a KillerHorror Pack: Movie Subscription Box#brainburrow 

Serie A Chronicles
Italy Taking the Scenic Route to the World Cup

Serie A Chronicles

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 49:21


The Euro 2020 honeymoon... and Italy's sensational summer of sport... is well and truly over as Roberto Mancini's men failed to qualify directly for the 2022 World Cup. Draws with Switzerland and Northern Ireland saw the Swiss qualify as group winners, leaving Gli Azzurri needing the dreaded play-off pathway in March to get to Qatar.Nicky and Mina break it down for us. What are the problems? What about Jorginho's penalty woes? What are Mancini's options? Where will the goals come from in the play-offs? What has happened to the element of surprise that they had at the Euros?Plus... Poetry chaos, and the Christmas run-in report card. Which managers will get to eat their panettone?And stick in to the end as we end with a good World Cup Qualification play-off memory featuring one Pierluigi Casiraghi (can he make a comeback???), coincidentally also from November 15th, all the way back in 1997.00:00 Italy's road to Qatar29:40 Mina's limerick33:20 The Serie A Christmas run-inDon't forget our ChroniclesQ&A mailbag show on Friday.Tweet us your questions to @serieAchronpod with the hashtag #ChroniclesQandAFor sponsorship opportunities with Serie A Chronicles podcast email marketing@mediachronicles.com.au.Find Serie A Chronicles on social media (all the links here) and at our website serieachronicles.com.Please give us a rating and review on Apple Podcasts.You can also become a Chronicles Tifoso by supporting the podcast to help keep us running, at serieachronicles.com/supporter.Serie A Chronicles is a Media Chronicles production.Digital content and social media by Calido Media.Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/serie-a-chronicles. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Cerebral Faith Podcast
Episode 128: Soteriology Is A Bed Of R.O.S.E.S - With Kenneth Keathley

The Cerebral Faith Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 13, 2021 83:04


Are you aware that deterministic T.U.L.I.P Calvinism has more holes than a block of Swiss cheese and yet you find yourself not completely satisfied with typical Arminian soteriology either? Then you're in good company. Evan Minton and Kenneth Keathley felt exactly the same way, but then they discovered Molinism. While Molinism is not a soteriological view per se, it can be applied to one's understanding of soteriology. With a Molinistic flavor of Arminianism, no longer do you have to explain away any of The Bible's teachings on God's love, the extent of the atonement, predestination, or eternal security. You can embrace the whole counsel of God. If you want to dive deeper into this subject, pick up a copy of Kenneth Keathley's book “Salvation and Sovereignty: A Molinist Approach”. It's available in paperback and Kindle on Amazon.com --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/evan-minton/support

Swiss and Lali Hijack HOLLYWOOD!
10. Big City Nights: Part II

Swiss and Lali Hijack HOLLYWOOD!

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 25:37


They made a list and checked it once... Time to party! Big City Nights is officially open for business! Swiss and Lali party it up like rock stars in their Malibu Beach Dream House... that is until a person from their past shows up. Will this giant rager be a success or will they become the laughing stock of The Bu? Bum, Bum, BUM!!!   Starring: Kristin Couture and Aparna Brielle Guest Starring: Rock Samson, Johnny Baca, Aliy Small, Miranda O'Hare, Brooke Markham, Eddie Leavy, Jacob Houston and Aaron Cavette Featuring music by: Thanks. ****************************************** Follow our social media below for weekly comic strips and cartoons IG: @swissandlali Twitter: @swissandlali Visit swissandlali.com for a complete list of episodes, credits, and cartoons. See you in Hollywood, Kids!

Introvert Biz Growth Podcast
Free 'Selling Like We're Human' workshop

Introvert Biz Growth Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 4:05


Composers Datebook
Bloch's Quintet

Composers Datebook

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 2:00


Synopsis On today's date in 1923, the League of Composers presented its first chamber concert in New York City. Their stated mission was to present music by living composers whose works represented new trends in music. Their opening concert included a world premiere: a piano quintet by the Swiss composer Ernest Bloch, who was then living in America. While not a radical work, Bloch's quintet was strong stuff for 1923, and even included some quartertone elements. The New York Times critic was impressed, but not won over, writing: “To the inevitable question, ‘Do you like it?' it seems almost impossible to answer, but if pressed I should say, no, not for any fault in the work but simply because of its too apparent determination to be emotionally stirring.” The British critic Ernest Newmann, on the other hand, singled out Bloch's First Quintet for special praise: “No other piece of chamber music produced in any country during that period can be placed in the same class with it.” For his part, Bloch said simply: “I write without any regard to please either the so-called ‘ultra-moderns' or the so-called ‘old-fashioned.'” Music Played in Today's Program Ernest Bloch (1880 – 1959) — Piano Quintet No. 1 (Portland String Quartet; Paul Posnak, piano) Arabesque 6618

Democracy in Question?
The Role of Radio in Transitions to Democracy

Democracy in Question?

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 31:10


Episode NotesDemocracy in Question? is brought to you by:• Central European University: CEU• The Albert Hirschman Centre on Democracy in Geneva: AHCD• The Podcast Company: NovelFollow us on social media!• Central European University: @CEU• Albert Hirschman Centre on Democracy in Geneva: @AHDCentreSubscribe to the show. If you enjoyed what you listened to, you can support us by leaving a review and sharing our podcast in your networks!   GLOSSARYGlossary for episode 5 Caroline & SaidWhat is Fondation Hirondelle?(00:1:03 or p.1 in the transcript) Fondation Hirondelle is a Swiss non-profit organization which provides information to populationsfaced with crisis, empowering them in their daily lives and as citizens. Founded in 1995 and based inLausanne, Fondation Hirondelle currently implements media programmes in 8 countries in Africaand Asia.Through our work, millions of people in war-affected countries, post-conflict areas,humanitarian crises, and societies in democratic transition have access to media that speak to themand give them a voice.Fondation Hirondelle practices and defends responsible, independent,accurate journalism in conflict and post-conflict situations, in humanitarian crises and countries indemocratic transition. Our information covers the news in the countries and regions where we work,as well as key issues that connect societies.Our debate programs bring together all political andsocial components of society. They facilitate the participation of ordinary people in public debate,and create a platform where everyone has a voice and people can seek common solutions toproblems. Source What is TNN?(00:1:22 or p.1 in the transcript) Founded by broadcast journalists, TNN provides balanced and accurate news coverage of eventsparticularly in KP and tribal districts providing local people with local news and information thataffect their social and political lives.TNN has just become digital-first where it reports first for onlineaudience and then reversions those stories for 10 partner FM radio stations in the region.TNN was established to serve radio audiences through partner FM radio stations in 2014, but withthe passage of time it has evolved itself as an online multimedia news organization catering to theneeds of online audience in the Pakhtun areas. TNN also produces and broadcasts telephonicbulletins in Pashto since September 2016 that provide latest stories to unique audience of 100,000that are registered with TNN. The news can be heard by dialing a local number from mobile phone.TNN also produces daily five-minute long radio bulletins in Pashto on the most important newsevents for broadcast by a network of 10 partner radio stations across KP and tribal districts. Newsstories, features and interviews are also published on the TNN website in Pashto, Urdu and Englishto tell national and international audiences about events in our region. TNN also accommodatesnews and views of interest to Pakhtun audience in other parts of Pakistan and also in Afghanistan.Source:

The Pet Photographers Club
S10E11 | Sarah Stangl Raised Her Swiss Dog Photography Prices by 75% - and Business Boomed!

The Pet Photographers Club

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 20:58


When Sarah Stangl was faced with the unnerving realisation that her pet photography side hustle was not profitable enough to become her full-time job, she knew she'd have to either raise her prices, or quit altogether. She took the leap, bumped her prices by significant 75% and focused on creating incredible hiking dog photo experiences in the Swiss Alps. Tune into our in depth interview with Sarah Stangl of Abenteuerhunde to find out all about her European adventure dog photography business.IN THE EXTENDED EPISODE:* Marketing her adventure dog photography experiences* Using expos and fairs to gain commercial clientsClick here to listen to the full extended version of this episode in the MemberzoneLINKS:Website: www.abenteuerhunde.ch Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/abenteuerhunde.fotografie.ch P.S. Ready to Raise Your Prices?Download our Required Average Sale Calculator here: https://www.thepetphotographersclub.com/freebie-required-average-sale

Thank You, Mama
The Art of Landing on Your Feet

Thank You, Mama

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 49:46


After 21 years in banking, Dr. Mara Harvey became a founder and CEO of “Smart Way to Start”, as well as a public speaker and advocate for financial literacy in girls. She is the author of five beautiful books aiming to educate girls about money and finances. In this interview, she beautifully connects her Swiss mom Vera's story of being abandoned by her husband with Vera's teachings about financial independence, and her own passion for financial education for girls and women. You will learn not only about women and money, about the significance of financial independence, but also about why nature is important, why we need to let go of grudges, and how to recognize our parents' unique ways of showing love. You can learn more about Mara and order her financial literacy books for children here.  To contact Ana, please send your mail to: info@thankyoumama.net For more about “Thank You, Mama" and to subscribe to the newsletter, please visit: http://www.thankyoumama.net    

PRI's The World
EU climate chief calls for reaching headline Paris agreement goal

PRI's The World

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 47:11


The European Union's climate chief said during the ongoing COP 26 conference in Glasgow that talks must focus on meeting the headline goal of the Paris agreement. Former US President Barack Obama spoke on the sidelines of the conference on Monday, saying President Joe Biden's climate package will be “historic,” while welcoming the efforts of bipartisan US support in working toward slowing down global warming. Also, pressure is building for more Haitians to migrate by sea, as The World's Monica Campbell shares first-hand accounts of the latest. And, an app at a Swiss university tries to use augmented reality to help people overcome arachnophobia. Every day, the reporters and producers at The World are hard at work providing you with relevant, fact-based and human-centered news from across the globe. From the initial pitch, to the chase, to interviews, to writing, to production, to broadcast, every story from The World requires careful input and touches from many different members of our nonprofit newsroom. The story you just read is available to read for free because thousands of listeners and readers like you generously support our nonprofit newsroom.  Become one of 515 donors to make your gift of $130, or pledge $11 monthly before Nov. 30, and you'll help us unlock a matching gift of $67,000. We need your help now more than ever — give today!

Action and Ambition
First Momentum Ventures shares insights on the German, Austrian and Swiss start up scene

Action and Ambition

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 32:24


Andreas Fischer is a Founding Partner at First Momentum Ventures, a fund that is pioneering pre-seed investments in frontier technology companies in Germany, Austria and Switzerland, collectively known as the DACH region. There are no fewer than 160 Nobel Prize winners in the region (second only to the US) and ranks fourth in the world on the number of patent applications its innovators file each year. All the ingredients are in place for founders to build game-changing companies and as a "first money in" investor, they provide the first momentum by backing them with the first cheque as well as a broad industry network, world-class mentoring, a strong community and access to further financing.

Ho Ho Hong Kong
From bean to bar with Conspiracy Chocolate founders Celine Herren and Amit Oz

Ho Ho Hong Kong

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2021 54:44


Conspiracy Chocolate makes high quality small batch craft chocolate from bean to bar. We use cacao beans from a single farm in Vietnam and process slowly and manually over 5 days to retain the natural health benefits and flavor of the cacao. We chat with its founders Celine Herren and Amit Oz. They are a Swiss and Israeli couple who met in Hong Kong with a passion for creating food and discovering new combinations of flavors. After a few months of learning and refining the process in their kitchen in Sai Ying Pun, Conspiracy Chocolate, a small-batch bean-to-bar craft chocolate company was born. They now craft their chocolate in their own licensed chocolate lab in Wong Chuk Hang.  Check out Conspiracy Chocolate website here: https://www.conspiracychocolate.com/ Join us on Patreon for weekly bonus eps every Thursday: https://www.patreon.com/hohopod Follow Mohammed on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/theothermohammed/ Follow Vivek on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/funnyvivek/ Follow Conspiracy Chocolate on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/conspiracychocolate/

History of Philosophy Without Any Gaps
HoP 383 - Slowly But Surely - Huldrych Zwingli

History of Philosophy Without Any Gaps

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2021 23:58


The Swiss theologian Zwingli launches the Reformation in Switzerland, but clashes with Luther and more radical Protestants.

The History of Literature
355 Jean-Jacques Rousseau

The History of Literature

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 62:42


Brilliant and contentious, the Swiss-born political philosopher Jean-Jacques Rousseau (`1712-1768) is one of the key figures of the Enlightenment, with a fame and influence that continues to this day. But although we know him best for his Social Contract, which influenced both the American Constitution writers and the French revolutionaries, in his own time he was as well known for his novels Julie; or, The New Héloïse, and Emile, or On Education, both of which were runaway bestsellers. In this episode, Jacke takes a look at the eventful life, many enemies, and major works of this wide-ranging thinker. Help support the show at patreon.com/literature or historyofliterature.com/shop. (We appreciate it!) Find out more at historyofliterature.com, jackewilson.com, or by following Jacke and Mike on Twitter at @thejackewilson and @literatureSC. The History of Literature Podcast is a member of Lit Hub Radio and the Podglomerate Network. Learn more at www.thepodglomerate.com/historyofliterature. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices