Podcasts about Swiss

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Best podcasts about Swiss

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Latest podcast episodes about Swiss

10vor10
10 vor 10 vom 01.07.2022

10vor10

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2022 25:48


Chaos an europäischen Flughäfen, stressiger Alltag der Crew von Swiss, Nestlé lobbyiert in Mexico und das Seco hilf mit, erstes lesbisches Ehepaar gibt sich das Ja-Wort in der Schweiz, Serie «Cold Cases» – Teil 5: Der Tote in der Badewanne 1987

The Scoop
The Solana phone is the leap that Google and Apple won't take, says Anatoly Yakovenko

The Scoop

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2022 40:54


Many Web3 platforms require users to connect their crypto wallets before engaging with the platform in any meaningful way. Consequently, the Web3 experience on mobile devices is tedious at best, given current devices are not designed with such functionalities in mind. Solana Mobile — a subsidiary of the development team behind Solana — hopes to address the difficulties that surround the Web3 mobile user experience with its new Android phone called ‘Saga,' which is slated for release in early 2023.  Last week, Solana Labs co-founder and CEO Anatoly Yakovenko announced the new mobile device, which will run a ‘Solana Mobile Stack' (SMS) operating system and will feature a marketplace for decentralized Web3 applications. In this episode of The Scoop, Anatoly Yakovenko said he believes Saga's early success will be linked to its ability to significantly enhance the mobile crypto user experience: “The theory is that crypto users might be crazy enough to switch from iOS to Android because of crypto. It might be so important to have that experience, that they're willing to change their habits.” If Solana Mobile is successfully able to prove there is consumer demand for crypto-forward mobile products, Yakovenko believes it will inspire major tech companies to integrate crypto infrastructure into their own mobile devices moving forward: “You need Google and Apple to do it, but they're not going to do it until there is proven demand that people need it — and so somebody has to kind of make that leap…” Episode 60 of Season 4 of The Scoop was recorded live at The Block headquarters in New York with The Block's Frank Chaparro and Anatoly Yakovenko, co-founder and CEO of Solana Labs. Listen below, and subscribe to The Scoop on Apple, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Stitcher or wherever you listen to podcasts. Email feedback and revision requests to podcast@theblockcrypto.com. This episode is brought to you by our sponsors Chainalysis & IWC Schauffhausen About Chainalysis Chainalysis is the leading blockchain data platform. We provide data, software, services, and research to government agencies, exchanges, financial institutions, and insurance and cybersecurity companies in over 60 countries. Backed by Accel, Addition, Benchmark, Coatue, Paradigm, Ribbit, and other leading firms in venture capital, Chainalysis builds trust in blockchains to promote more financial freedom with less risk. For more information, visit www.chainalysis.com. About IWC Schaffhausen IWC Schaffhausen is a Swiss luxury watch manufacturer based in Schaffhausen, Switzerland. Known for its unique engineering approach to watchmaking, IWC combines the best of human craftsmanship and creativity with cutting-edge technology and processes. With collections like the Portugieser and the Pilot's Watches, the brand covers the whole spectrum from elegant timepieces to sports watches. For more information, visit IWC.com

EV News Daily - Electric Car Podcast

➤ Mercedes-Benz Outlines Next Gen Electric-Car Production Plans ➤ Production of the BMW i3 comes to a close with HomeRun Edition ➤ EV Batteries Plant in Doubt Over US Inflation, Says LGES ➤ Citroën launches ë-C4 X crossover in the ë-C4 series ➤ Genesis Electrified G80 Launched as the Korean Company's Mercedes EQE Rival ➤ North Dakota to use $26 million to build electric vehicle charging stations across the state ➤ Why Is Toyota Benchmarking Two Rivian R1T Electric Trucks? ➤ Electric vehicle curbside charging is coming to Seattle neighborhoods ➤ VW: EV battery output bigger challenge than EU combustion engine ban ➤ Stellantis' French diesel engine plant to get EV motor boost ➤ Swiss plan tax on EVs to help finance roads | Automotive News Europe ➤ NC State computer model plots best locations for EV chargers

STAB!
STAB! 305 – If Pervert, Take

STAB!

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 83:45


In this leering episode of the STAB! show, trench coat enthusiast and host Jesse Jones welcomes a panel of creeps, Kim Martel, Benton Harshaw & Joe-Joe Louis to share their three takes on LBIST, nine things found on the break room bulletin board of Social Media, celebrations of paper money, Swiss cheese, & Mark Twain, … Continue reading »

13 O'Clock Podcast
Flickers Of Fear – Jenny's Horror Movie Reviews: A Cure for Wellness (2016)

13 O'Clock Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022


Jenny discusses Gore Verbinski’s gothic, psychological horror about an arrogant executive sent to a weird Swiss health spa in order to retrieve an errant colleague. Find this movie and more at the 13 O’Clock Amazon Storefront! Audio version: Video version: Please support us on Patreon! Don't forget to subscribe to our YouTube channel, like us on Facebook, and … Continue reading Flickers Of Fear – Jenny’s Horror Movie Reviews: A Cure for Wellness (2016)

BX Swiss
Gold als Inflationsschutz? | BX Swiss TV

BX Swiss

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 4:09


Die Inflation ist in aller Munde, das macht auch das Metall Gold wieder interessant. Auch aufgrund des Krieges und der Rezessionsängste steigt die Nachfrage nach sicheren Häfen enorm. Wie können Investoren optimal in Gold investieren? Sollte man direkt investieren oder auf ETFs bzw. ETPs zurückgreifen? Diese Fragen beantwortet Nima Pouyan, Head of Switzerland & Liechtenstein ETF von der Invesco Asset Management (Schweiz) AG im heutigen Experteninterview mit David Kund, COO der BX Swiss AG.

Kerby’s Disc Golf World
Episode 74 - Kerby's Disc Golf World

Kerby’s Disc Golf World

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 58:36


Swiss starts with a surprise for JK with the news that we attained the infamous Glory Hole. Jesus covers his thought on 9 - hole course layout design after a sad experience. JK throws a round with a newby and reflects on the round. They then recap the Preserve Championship and the excitement it provided. From there they showcase the USWDGC and cover day one Prize Picks for each player.

Fitter & Faster by Triathlete
Triathlete Hour: Nicola Spirig looks back on 30 years at the top of the tri game

Fitter & Faster by Triathlete

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 51:33


This week, we've got a quick preview of the race in Roth this Sunday: world champion v. world champion. And then we're talking to another world champ, the legend Nicola Spirig. Nicola talks to us from her home in Switzerland, as she nears the end of her final season and retirement. She tells us about what her goals have been in this final year, which of her five Olympics was her favorite, and how she actually never intended to be a pro triathlete for this long. The Swiss star and Olympic gold medalist started triathlon when she was just a kid; her dad coached her for 15 years and she ultimately won 6 European championships. What will she do now? And what does training look like when she's all done with triathlon? Check out the video from On Running looking back on her three decades: Nicola's Spirit This week's episode is brought to you by the AIRWAAV Endurance Performance Mouthpiece, which can open your airway by up to 25% for improved breathing. As a partner of USA Triathlon, AIRWAAV is offering Triathlete Hour listeners 15% off with code TH15. 

The Triathlete Hour
Triathlete Hour: Nicola Spirig looks back on 30 years at the top of the tri game

The Triathlete Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 51:33


This week, we've got a quick preview of the race in Roth this Sunday: world champion v. world champion. And then we're talking to another world champ, the legend Nicola Spirig. Nicola talks to us from her home in Switzerland, as she nears the end of her final season and retirement. She tells us about what her goals have been in this final year, which of her five Olympics was her favorite, and how she actually never intended to be a pro triathlete for this long. The Swiss star and Olympic gold medalist started triathlon when she was just a kid; her dad coached her for 15 years and she ultimately won 6 European championships. What will she do now? And what does training look like when she's all done with triathlon? Check out the video from On Running looking back on her three decades: Nicola's Spirit This week's episode is brought to you by the AIRWAAV Endurance Performance Mouthpiece, which can open your airway by up to 25% for improved breathing. As a partner of USA Triathlon, AIRWAAV is offering Triathlete Hour listeners 15% off with code TH15. 

The Sustainability Agenda
Episode 155: Art curator and critic Hans Ulrich Obrist discusses the role of art in climate communications and activism

The Sustainability Agenda

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 57:40


A wide-ranging discussion with Hans Ulrich Obrist on ecology and contemporary art. Hans discusses his work as at the Serpentine Gallery in London which has made an important commitment to ecology. He highlights the  Gallery's ongoing exploration of an idea of communion with the environment through is exhibitions and activities—and how he has been inspired by the work of artist and political activist Gustav Metzger. Hans also explores the potential fo climate and environmental art --and the role of the avante garde-- within an increasingly financialised global art market. Hans Ulrich Obrist is a Swiss art curator, critic and historian of art. He is artistic director at the Serpentine Galleries, London, which has embedded environmental and ecological concerns across its programmes and activities-- and research around ecology and climate change. He is the author of The Interview Project, an extensive ongoing project of interviews: so far, some 2000 hours of interviews have been recorded. He is also co-editor of the Cahiers d'Art review. He recently edited the book 140 Artists' Ideas for Planet Earth.  

When it Mattered
Patrick Struebi

When it Mattered

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 43:14


Ep. 65 — An epiphany in Peru results in a kidnapping in Mexico that galvanizes the evolution of a fair trade social entrepreneur / Patrick Struebi, Founder & Executive Chairman, Fairtrasa Patrick Struebi was eager to fly home to Switzerland on one of his periodic visits after spending eight years in Mexico establishing Fairtrasa, one of the world's largest fair trade organizations for avocados and other fruits from Latin America. It was the morning of January 28, 2011. Struebi's then-girlfriend had come to pick him up at his home, to drive him to the bus station, from where he planned to go Mexico City to take the plane back home. As he put the bags in the trunk, two cars suddenly blocked the driveway and two masked men with guns threw him into one of the cars and whisked him away in a highly orchestrated kidnapping for ransom plot. Thrown on the floor of a cold cellar, masked and handcuffed, and in the clutches of ruthless Mexican gangsters who made him watch videos of violent killings, Struebi somehow kept his cool and tried to figure a way out. He was released after five days of coordinated activity between the Mexican and Swiss governments. The kidnapping gave Struebi a lens into the economic conditions of his hostage takers and renewed his commitment to building Fairtasa as a means to lift Latin American farmers out of poverty. For International Fruit Day this July 1st, I'm honored to welcome a pioneer in the field of fair trade, Patrick Struebi, serial social entrepreneur, thought leader, humanitarian, and founder and Executive Chairman of the Fairtrasa Group. Struebi has never publicly shared the story of his kidnapping publicly. He's doing it here for the first time so I'm grateful for his trust. If you liked this episode, check out these other episodes: 63. Held hostage by a drug lord reveals the best and worst of humanity / Francisco Cantos Calderón / Former Vice President of Colombia 61. Heroism, activism, reconciliation with nature / Jerry White, Nobel laureate, landmine survivor 14. Terrifying robbery and kidnapping reveals executive leadership lessons

West Coast Cookbook & Speakeasy
West Coast Cookbook and Speakeasy - Tarrytown Chowder Tuesdays 28 June 22

West Coast Cookbook & Speakeasy

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 63:24


West Coast Cookbook & Speakeasy is Now Open! 8am-9am PT/ 11am-Noon ET for our especially special Daily Special; Tarrytown Chowder Tuesdays!Starting off in the Bistro Cafe, voters are swinging back to the Democrats ahead of the midterms.Then, on the rest of the menu, Trump's special purpose acquisition company faces a grand jury investigation; Planned Parenthood sued Idaho over its ‘trigger' abortion ban; and, Facebook has begun removing posts offering birth control and the morning after pill.After the break, we move to the Chef's Table where a Swiss court fined Credit Suisse for facilitating a cocaine cash laundering scheme; and, a Paris court found the French government guilty of wrongful negligence in the use of a banned pesticide in the French Caribbean islands.All that and more, on West Coast Cookbook & Speakeasy with Chef de Cuisine Justice Putnam.Bon Appétit!~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~“As I ate the oysters with their strong taste of the sea and their faint metallic taste that the cold white wine washed away, leaving only the sea taste and the succulent texture, and as I drank their cold liquid from each shell and washed it down with the crisp taste of the wine, I lost the empty feeling and began to be happy and to make plans.” - Ernest Hemingway "A Moveable Feast"~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~Show Notes & Links:https://www.dailykos.com/stories/2022/6/28/2106998/-West-Coast-Cookbook-amp-Speakeasy-Daily-Special-Tarrytown-Chowder-Tuesdays

Holidays to Switzerland Travel Podcast
Trip Report: Exploring Switzerland by car

Holidays to Switzerland Travel Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 49:49


My special guest in this episode is Nansi Martin from New Jersey in the United States, who, along with her husband Rob, rented a car and did a road trip around Switzerland in September 2021.  They loved the freedom that having a car gave them as they were able to travel at their own pace and not have to adhere to timetables.In fact, they loved Switzerland - and driving around the country - so much, they've booked another trip for September 2022!In this episode we discuss:Nansi and Rob's itineraryWhy they loved renting a car and driving in SwitzerlandThe things that surprised Nansi about SwitzerlandThe plans for Nansi and Rob's return trip to SwitzerlandNansi's tips for first-time travellers to SwitzerlandListen now for practical tips and advice to help you plan your own Swiss vacation.For more information about the places mentioned in this episode, and the full show notes, visit https://holidaystoswitzerland.com/episode49.>> Visit our shop for helpful Switzerland travel guides and resources.Connect with us:Website | Newsletter | Facebook group | InstagramThis podcast is sponsored by Switzerland Tourism. #ineedswitzerland

Info 3
Novartis streicht jede zehnte Stelle in der Schweiz

Info 3

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 14:08


Der Pharmakonzern Novartis streicht in der Schweiz rund 1400 Stellen. Novartis bestätigt entsprechende Meldungen der TA-Media-Zeitungen gegenüber der Nachrichtenagentur AWP. In der Schweiz verlieren damit mehr als 10 Prozent der Angestellten in den nächsten drei Jahren ihren Arbeitsplatz. Weitere Themen: Die Fluggesellschaft Swiss reagiert auf den anhaltenden Personalmangel: Der Service an Bord wurde reduziert und Flüge sollen gestrichen werden. Zudem sollen 70 Flugbegleiter:innen vom Mutterkonzern Lufthansa bei der Swiss aushelfen. Doch: Der Plan der Swiss scheint nicht wirklich aufzugehen. Am Dienstag ging auf Schloss Elmau der G7-Gipfel zu Ende. Das Spitzentreffen stand im Zeichen des Ukrainekriegs und verlief durchaus erfolgreich. Scheitern war von Beginn an verboten. Doch es wurde deutlich: Was immer die G7 entscheiden - es hat nicht mehr dasselbe Gewicht wie noch vor ein paar Jahren.

Squawk Box Europe Express
SQUAWK BOX, TUESDAY 28TH JUNE, 2022

Squawk Box Europe Express

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 26:11


G-7 leaders mull the feasibility of a price cap on Russian oil as French President Macron admits he faces reluctance from major international producers to boost supply. NATO announces it will increase the number of troops on high alert from 40,000 to 300,000. We are live in Madrid ahead of the bloc's summit. A Swiss court finds Credit Suisse guilty in a high-profile Bulgarian money-laundering case. CEO Thomas Gottstein is due to face investors at the lender's Investor Deep Dive today. Central bank governors arrive in Sintra, Portugal at the ECB Forum where ECB board member Isabel Schnabel warns that fragilities are beginning to show between nations over inflation. And in crypto news, Robinhood shares are in the red in extended trade after cryptocurrency exchange FTX denies rumours it is looking to buy the trading app.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

The Theatre Podcast with Alan Seales
Ep212 - Charlie Rosen: A Strange Loop... of orchestrating

The Theatre Podcast with Alan Seales

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 58:10


Tony and Grammy award-winning Charlie Rosen takes us through his journey as a musician and now an orchestrator. Born in a family of talented musicians, it's no surprise that Charlie grew up to be a good multi-instrumentalist and has already worked for renowned Broadway shows like "Be More Chill", "Moulin Rouge", etc., and won prestigious awards for his work. He talks about what it's like to work and prepare for the recently rescheduled revival of "Some Like It Hot". Charlie explains what exactly an orchestrator is, how he works with other departments, and how he uses Spotify and YouTube to get the overall feel of the show. He talks about his fascination with big sounds, why theatre is a great place for a "Swiss army knife" kind of musician like him, and the communal aspect of making music that motivates him to do and create more. Charlie Rosen is a musician, composer, arranger, orchestrator, musical director, and music producer who is best known for his work on Broadway. Some of his credits include "Be More Chill", "Prince of Broadway", "Moulin Rouge!", "A Strange Loop", "Some Like It Hot", and "American Psycho". He has also worked for TV shows such as "The President Show" and "The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel". He has won numerous awards, including an Obie Award for "A Strange Loop", Tony Award for Best Orchestrations for "Moulin Rouge!", and a Grammy Award for Best Arrangement, Instrumental or A Cappella for "Meta Knight's Revenge (From Kirby Superstar)".  In this episode, we talk about: What makes a great orchestrator composer and a musical successful How Charlie got involved with the musical, “A Strange Loop” Charlie's 35-piece jazz orchestra called The 8-Bit Big Band Composing for video games Connect with Charlie: Twitter: @crosenmusic Instagram: @crosenmusic Website: charlierosen.com and the8bitbigband.com Connect with The Theatre Podcast: Support us on Patreon: Patreon.com/TheTheatrePodcast Twitter & Instagram: @theatre_podcast TikTok: @thetheatrepodcast Facebook.com/OfficialTheatrePodcast TheTheatrePodcast.com Alan's personal Instagram: @alanseales Email me at feedback@thetheatrepodcast.com. I want to know what you think. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Podcasts Rhône FM
Portrait du mois: Raphaël Crettol, le "Monsieur durabilité" de Swiss Cycling

Podcasts Rhône FM

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022


Life on the Wrist
Ep. 96 - Bloomberg News Article About Watches and Swiss Watch Exports for May 2022

Life on the Wrist

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 16:19


If you are into watches, I am sure you were sent a link to Bloomberg News' article about investing in watches and how the returns outpaced gold, bitcoin and other financial assets over the last 12 months. The article can be found here and the Subdial50 Index can be found here.Swiss watch exports for May 2022 can be found here.You can find us on our Website, YouTube, Instagram, Twitter, and Facebook Want to be part of the Launch of our clothing line? Check out Life on the Wrist Merch!

La Matinale - La 1ere
La relocalisation en marche (2/5): Flawa, le pari des masques Swiss Made

La Matinale - La 1ere

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 4:27


InfoSec Overnights - Daily Security News
Auto Supplier Attacked, Iranian Factory Lucky Break, CODESYS ICS Flaws, and more.

InfoSec Overnights - Daily Security News

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 2:53


A daily look at the relevant information security news from overnight - 27 June, 2022Episode 253 - 27 June 2022Auto Supplier Attacked- https://www.bleepingcomputer.com/news/security/automotive-fabric-supplier-tb-kawashima-announces-cyberattack/ Iranian Factory Lucky Break - https://www.securityweek.com/cyberattack-forces-iran-steel-company-halt-productionOracle Miracle Fix- https://portswigger.net/daily-swig/oracle-patches-miracle-exploit-impacting-middleware-fusion-cloud-servicesMega Vuln - https://www.securityweek.com/top-cryptographers-flag-devastating-flaws-mega-cloud-storageCODESYS ICS Flaws - https://thehackernews.com/2022/06/critical-security-flaws-identified-in.htmlHi, I'm Paul Torgersen. It's Monday June 27th, 2022, and this is a look at the information security news from overnight. From BleepingComputer.comTB Kawashima, part of the Toyota Group of companies, announced that one of its subsidiaries has been hit by a cyberattack. The company responded by turning off all systems and devices in the network and says that production has not been impacted, but their website was down. No confirmation from the company, but the LockBit ransomware group has claimed responsibility and started leaking data supposedly acquired in the attack. From SecurityWeek.com:Iranian state owned Khuzestan Steel Company, one of three in the country, had to stop work until further notice following a cyberattack. The company's CEO claimed they were able to thwart the attack and prevent structural damage to production lines. In a bit of a lucky break, it appears the attack at least partially failed because the factory happened to be non-operational at the time due to an electricity outage. From PortSwigger.net:Oracle has finally patched a remote code execution vulnerability impacting Oracle Fusion Middleware and other Oracle systems. The vulnerability, dubbed Miracle Exploit, carries a 9.8 severity and is said to be easily exploitable. The bug was found on accident while researchers were building a proof of concept for a different zero-day. Oracle was first notified of the flaw back in October of last year and has now issued a fix. Get your patch on kids. From SecurityWeek.com:Cryptographers at a Swiss university have found at least five exploitable security flaws in the privacy-themed MEGA cloud storage service that could lead to devastating attacks on the confidentiality and integrity of user data in the MEGA cloud. The company released an advisory and patches, but said the vulnerabilities would be exceedingly difficult to exploit, basically requiring Mega to become a bad actor against itself. And last today, from TheHackerNews.comCODESYS has released patches to address 11 security flaws in its ICS automation software, two of which were rated critical, that could result in information disclosure and denial-of-service. These vulnerabilities are considered simple to exploit, and impacted at least seven of their Programmable Logic Controller applications. More details in the article. That's all for me today. Have a great rest of your day. Like and subscribe, and until tomorrow, be safe out there.

Sell Without Selling
198: Attract Clients Effortlessly Through Video Marketing With Nina Froriep

Sell Without Selling

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 52:58


Today's Guest: Nina Froriep Nina Froriep has been in TV, film, and video production her entire life. She's seen it all from the early days on independent features, to big national TV commercials, corporate mega-shows, and Emmy award-winning documentary films, including one she produced and directed, called Abraham's Children. Nina has negotiated with teamsters, clients, actors, crew, children, police officers, a few dogs, and one snake. All of them worth great stories. Today, Nina is excited to enable business coaches and service-based entrepreneurs to create easy and impactful video marketing, so they can attract their ideal clients and be disruptors in their industry. Nina loves spending time outside, especially in the Swiss alps where she's from. Her owner is a Dachshund-Yorkie-mix, called Tigger. On this episode: Stacey is joined by entrepreneur Nina Froriep for a conversation on falling into starting a entrepreneurship, the stark differences between a job and a business, and the importance of providing great service. Key Takeaways -The service your provide represents your brand. -Highlight you natural strengths. -Do you have a business or have you created a job? Tweetable Quotes: "Having control of my own destiny has always been very important to me. Entrepreneurship gave me that." -Nina Froriep "A coach doesn't necessarily have to be an expert in your specific field." -Stacey O'Byrne "The moment you offer a service, you become the product." -Nina Froriep "Many entrepreneurs leave a job and simply create another job. A business begins outside of the transactional interactions where we trade time for money." -Stacey O'Byrne Nina Froriep: https://www. clockwiseproductions.com (https://www. clockwiseproductions.com) LinkedIn: @nina-froriep Resources: Instagram: @thestaceyobyrne Schedule a 15 minute call with Stacey:http://pivotpointadvantage.com/talktostacey ( http://pivotpointadvantage.com/talktostacey) If you're ready to take yourself and your business to the next level and are interested in a coaching program that will get you there check out:http://pivotpointadvantage.com/iwantsuccess ( http://pivotpointadvantage.com/iwantsuccess)  Join an interactive environment to help you build the success you've always wanted with other like-minded, success-driven entrepreneurs, business owners, and sales professionals:https://facebook.com/groups/sellwithoutselling ( https://facebook.com/groups/sellwithoutselling) 

Irish Tech News Audio Articles
The need for Governance in the Defi space, Insights with Dr. Eelco Fiole, interviewed by Dr. Efi Pylarinou

Irish Tech News Audio Articles

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 2:29


The meltdown of Terra`s algorithmic stablecoin, Celsius, and the systemic risk that has emerged, is evidence of the lack of Governance in the Defi space. We discuss with Dr. Eelco Fiole, the kind of Governance that is lacking and that has been ignored at the expense of the entire ecosystem. We are witnessing a monumental value destruction as a result. Governance in the Defi space, Dr. Eelco Fiole Dr. Eelco Fiole is the founder and managing partner at/ Alpha Governance Partners –/ . He is a seasoned banking professional. Over the past 10 years he has been in fiduciary COO and CFOroles in blockchain and investments. He also teaches Ethics at two Swiss universities and recently got award the CFA inspirational Leader award for Ethics. Dr. Efi Pylarinou is the No.1 Global Woman Influencer in Finance & the Data conversation by Refinitiv, a Top Thought Leader by Onalytica, and a Top Digital Futurist, Linkedin and Twitter Voice, by Engatica. A seasoned Wall Street professional & a recognized technology thought leader on innovation topics. Founder of Efi Pylarinou Advisory servicing Big Tech, Financial Services and Fintech clients. She strongly believes in building bridges between the old and the new economy. She shares her passion of content creation with her 190,000+ followers on Linkedin and 18,000+ on Twitter. Join her on the social platforms Listen to more podcasts here. More about Irish Tech News Irish Tech News are Ireland's No. 1 Online Tech Publication and often Ireland's No.1 Tech Podcast too. You can find hundreds of fantastic previous episodes and subscribe using whatever platform you like via our Anchor.fm page here: If you'd like to be featured in an upcoming Podcast email us at Simon@IrishTechNews.ie now to discuss. Irish Tech News have a range of services available to help promote your business. Why not drop us a line at Info@IrishTechNews.ie now to find out more about how we can help you reach our audience. You can also find and follow us on Twitter, LinkedIn, Facebook, Instagram, TikTok and Snapchat.

Terragrams
Dispatch 28: Stefan Rotzler

Terragrams

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 71:31


This episode was originally broadcast in May 2009. Stefan Rotzler studied History of Art at the Zurich University before becoming a gardener. Following this hands-on experience, Rotzler opted to study landscape architecture at the ITR Technical School in Rapperswil, Switzerland where he graduated in one of the first classes of the newly-created professional program. After graduation, he worked with the town planning office of Zurich for a few years and then opened his own office. In 1989 he began his collaboration with Matthias Krebs. Together, they have made projects for gardens, public spaces, sports facilities, infrastructure primarily in Europe. In 2007, the Swiss publishing firm Niggli released the first monograph of the Rotzler Krebs collaboration. Rotzler has taught in the landscape program at Rapperswil and has participated widely in international competitions, juries and workshops. Special thanks to Merete Vindum for dispatch research and preparation. This show employs visual chapters that update the show art to provide illustrations relevant to the ongoing onversation. If your podcast client does not support this, you can view the chapter art and their sources at this episode's webpage.

Lunch with Jer
The 1890s Ironman

Lunch with Jer

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 34:55


We are back at Fire on the Mountain in the Highlands, and boy do we have an episode for you. Deric has been required to wear old-timey race gear at his next Ironman. We discuss the best place to sit at a baseball game, and the Swiss scientist makes his usual appearance. The post The 1890s Ironman appeared first on Lunch with Jer.

World Business Report
Ryanair staff strike in Europe

World Business Report

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 26:26


Ryanair staff have gone on strike today in protest against pay and conditions. Strikes will last for three days. Ernesto Iglesias from the USO trade union joins us from Madrid airport. President Zelensky has found a new way to connect remotely, using technology donated to Ukraine that beams him into venues around the world as a hologram. Last week he spoke at a technology event in the UK. The BBC's Lara Lewington was there and we get the details from her. M&G Wealth' Chief Investment Officer, Shanti Kelemen gives us a snapshot of how the markets are doing. The European Union is allocating €1 million in humanitarian aid to Afghanistan, in response to a deadly earthquake that hit the country on Wednesday. Dr Nilab Mobarez is the acting President of the Afghan Red Crescent in Kabul. She explains the difficulties of getting aid into Afghanistan. Bangladesh's prime minister will cut the ribbon on a new road and rail bridge across the mighty Padma river tomorrow. The $3.6 billion dollar bridge will connect the north with nearly 20 poorer districts in the south. The BBC's South Asia Correspondent Anbarasan Ethirajan tells us more. Swiss company Inores has developed a bar tending robot. Helmut Wede is the CEO explains exactly how the automaton serves drinks. (Picture: Ryanair Boeing 737 close up - stock photo. Picture Credit: Getty Images).

The Irish Tech News Podcast
The need for Governance in the Defi space, Insights with Dr. Eelco Fiole, interviewed by Dr. Efi Pylarinou

The Irish Tech News Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 28:22


The meltdown of Terra`s algorithmic stablecoin, Celsius, and the systemic risk that has emerged, is evidence of the lack of Governance in the Defi space. We discuss with Dr. Eelco Fiole, the kind of Governance that is lacking and that has been ignored at the expense of the entire ecosystem. We are witnessing a monumental value destruction as a result. Dr. Eelco Fiole is the founder and managing partner at https://www.linkedin.com/in/fiole/ Alpha Governance Partners - https://www.alpha-gp.com/ . He is a seasoned banking professional. Over the past 10 years he has been in fiduciary COO and CFOroles in blockchain and investments. He also teaches Ethics at two Swiss universities and recently got award the CFA inspirational Leader award for Ethics. https://www.linkedin.com/posts/fiole_cfa-institute-inspirational-leader-award-activity-6940688810359848961-9cSz?utm_source=linkedin_share&utm_medium=member_desktop_web Dr. Efi Pylarinou is the No.1 Global Woman Influencer in Finance & the Data conversation by Refinitiv, a Top Thought Leader by Onalytica, and a Top Digital Futurist, Linkedin and Twitter Voice, by Engatica. A seasoned Wall Street professional & a recognized technology thought leader on innovation topics. Founder of Efi Pylarinou Advisory servicing Big Tech, Financial Services and Fintech clients. She strongly believes in building bridges between the old and the new economy. She shares her passion of content creation with her 190,000+ followers on Linkedin and 18,000+ on Twitter. Join her on the social platforms https://linktr.ee/Efiglobal

Scatterbrain Podcast
Episode 117 - Scatterbrain Podcast: Edgar Cayce

Scatterbrain Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 69:40


Welcome one and all to Scatterbrain Podcast Episode 117: Edgar Cayce "The Sleeping Prophet". We recorded this episode two days late, so this is coming to you late. Better late than never, right? We talk about going viral, a newer Swiss death metal band, a famous old-school German thrash band, and their new album releases ( it's a two review episode and I'm out of time, so listen to find out who ) Then we discuss a man that Dan thinks is a charlatan: Edgar Cayce, AKA "The Sleeping Prophet". Or is it Ian who thinks this guy was a phony and fraud? Dan is a secret Scientologist, and Ian is an alien, so no one actually knows anything. Except Joe Nickle. He has all the answers. Thanks for listening everyone! Bonus episode next week, then we'll be back with a new episode in two weeks. "Scatterbrain Podcast with Ian and Dan" (c) 2022 Scatterbrain Productions. Always. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/scatterbrain-podcast/message

Bergos Now
Swiss Equities (EN) #102

Bergos Now

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 16:05


Martina Oettiker takes a closer look at Swiss stocks and their performance - now and in the past two decades. DISCLAIMER This publication is for information- and marketing purposes only. The provided information is not legally binding and neither constitutes a financial analysis, nor an offer for investment-transactions or an investment advice and does not substitute any legal, tax or financial advice. Bergos AG does not accept any liability for the accuracy, correctness or completeness of the information. Bergos AG excludes any liability for the realisation of forecasts or other statements contained in the publication. The reproduction in part or in full without prior written permission of Bergos is not permitted.

House of Mystery True Crime History
Kim Hays - Pesticide

House of Mystery True Crime History

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 53:00


Bern, Switzerland—known for its narrow cobblestone streets, decorative fountains, and striking towers. Yet dark currents run through this charming medieval city and beyond, to the idyllic farmlands that surround it.When a rave on a hot summer night erupts into violent riots, a young man is found the next morning bludgeoned to death with a policeman's club. Seasoned detective Giuliana Linder is assigned to the case. That same day, an elderly organic farmer turns up dead and drenched with pesticide. Enter Giuliana's younger—and distractingly attractive—colleague Renzo Donatelli to investigate the second murder. Giuliana's disappointment that they're on two different cases is tinged with relief—her home life is complicated enough without the risk of a fling.But when an unexpected discovery ties the two victims into a single case, Giuliana and Renzo are thrown closer together than ever before. Dangerously close. Will Giuliana be able to handle the threats to her marriage and to her assumptions about the police? If she wants to prevent another murder, she'll have to put her life on the line—and her principles.Combining suspense and romance, this debut mystery in the Polizei Bern series offers a distinctive picture of the Swiss. An inventive tale, packed with surprises, it will keep readers guessing until the endSupport this show http://supporter.acast.com/houseofmysteryradio. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Sons of Slam Podcast
#142 - The Swiss Missile?

Sons of Slam Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 99:08


On this week's episode, we talk about why Bray Wyatt was released, Rhea Ripley's brain injury, Jeff Hardy's DUI, full preview of AEW x NJPW Forbidden Door PPV, and the Vince McMahon investigation. Cheers and thanks for letting us penetrate your ears.

Swarfcast
Best Of Swarfcast: Starting a Swiss Shop with Dulio Arellano—EP 68

Swarfcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 33:48


Today's podcast is an American Dream story. Our guest is Dulio Arellano, owner of Premier Swiss, a Tornos shop in Addison, Illinois, which he founded in 2017. Dulio came to the United States from Mexico when he was 18 years old. After working in various machine shops, Dulio got a job as a technician at [...] The post Best Of Swarfcast: Starting a Swiss Shop with Dulio Arellano—EP 68 first appeared on Today's Machining World.

The Matty Johns Podcast
"It's So Weird...But It's So Funny"

The Matty Johns Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 62:12


This week brings us dating apps and catfishing, Swiss army dildos and sauna etiquette, plus get your rotten potatoes ready, the stand up challenge begins.  To read about everything that's talked about in this episode of The Matty Johns Podcast, and for everything Matty.....go to dailytelegraph.com.au and get yourself a subscription, or download the Daily Telegraph app at your app store.   See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Lords of Soccer
2. The Raid

Lords of Soccer

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 32:20


The five-star Baur-Au-Lac Hotel in Zurich, Switzerland caters to the world's elite. Among its regular patrons, members of FIFA, which has its headquarters nearby. In May of 2015, just as the sun rose over bucolic Lake Zurich, authorities raided the hotel. The corrupt empire the Lords of Soccer had built was crashing down around them. Many FIFA's biggest names would find themselves in handcuffs, led out by Swiss police as part of a raid that took down more than a dozen soccer officials, indicted on a range of charges, from money laundering to racketeering. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

United Basketball and Leadership Podcast
Ep 126 | Ali Farokhmanesh | The Value of Building Relationships

United Basketball and Leadership Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 56:23


Ali Farokhmanesh is in his fifth year as an assistant coach with the Colorado State men's basketball program in 2022-23. He helped ead the turnaround in the CSU program from 11 wins in 2017-18 before he arrived to three consecutive postseason invitations, the most conference wins in back-to-back seasons and the highest win percentage in program history in 2021-22. He was named one of the top 40 coaches (head and assistant) under 40 by ESPN in 2020. He spent the 2017-18 year on Medved's staff at Drake University, helping the Bulldogs to a 10-game turnaround from the previous year and most wins in Missouri Valley Conference action in 10 years. Prior to his year on the Bulldogs' staff, Farokhmanesh spent the previous three seasons at the University of Nebraska, serving most recently as the Director of Player Relations and Development. At Nebraska, he managed and oversaw the off-the court responsibilities of the student-athletes including the implementation of mentoring programs and community outreach. On campus, he directed recruiting operations, including on-campus hosting duties. Following his storied career at UNI, Farokhmanesh spent four seasons playing professionally overseas in the Netherlands, Austria and Switzerland. In 2013-14, he was the Sixth Man of the Year in the Dutch Basketball League, averaging 10.4 points, 2.0 assists and 1.0 steal per game. His best season was with SAM Massagno Basket in the Swiss league in 2010-11, where he averaged 19.5 points, 3.1 assists and 2.3 steals per game while shooting 48 percent from 3-point range. Visit www.unitedbasketballplus.com and use Coupon Code - UBPlus for 20% off an annual membership. This episode is sponsored by the Dr. Dish Basketball. Mention "United Basketball & Leadership Podcast" and receive $300 off on the Dr. Dish Rebel, All-Star, and CT models. Connect with Dr. Dish on Twitter or Instagram @drdishbball Connect with our host, Matt on Twitter - @coachmwsmith and @unitedbballplus

Your Woo Woo Best Friend
The Philosophy of Beauty with Ada Polla, CEO of Alchimie Forever

Your Woo Woo Best Friend

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 58:59


When reflecting on beauty the enlightenment philosopher David Hume said:  It exists merely in the mind which contemplates them, and each mind perceives a different beauty. The nature of beauty is one of the most enduring and controversial themes in Western philosophy - beauty has been counted among the ultimate values, with goodness, truth, and justice. But what is beauty exactly? In today's episode, my guest Ada Polla, the CEO of Alchimie Forever, and a long-time beauty industry friend gets into this very topic. Ada grew up in a very close-knit family with three sisters, the daughter of world-renowned Swiss dermatologist Dr. Luigi Polla — the first medical doctor to introduce laser technology to Europe. She started working with her father when she was a child. Saying Ada was raised in the world of beauty is an understatement. Skincare, beauty, and the importance of looking your best in order to feel good were a part of her upbringing. As Ada launched Alchimie Forever, she and her family had a goal of bringing the magical and the mystical to skincare while using science to transform skin into something that's like gold. I met Ada back in my corporate beauty days - we've spent many days exploring the industry, meeting prominent and prestigious experts, and hearing their stories at conferences, workshops, boardroom meetings, and beyond. Knowing Ada I thought, there's no better person to discuss the philosophy of beauty with than her. As spiritual people - sometimes we may ask ourselves - is it vain to think about beauty and our skincare rituals? Can we be mystical people and care about our outward appearance too? What about body modification, and beauty-enhancing procedures like botox, fillers, etc? These are all questions that Ada and I dive into in this episode.   Read more about the episode on the podcast blog and enter our collaborative giveaway over on Instagram.  Resources mentioned in this episode: 4 Steps to Design & Master Your Manifestation Plan Masterclass is now open for registration! Have questions, or want to say hi, text me

Thinking Crypto Interviews & News
Citibank's HUGE Crypto Move - Ripple Canada - Bitcoin ATM Coming to Supermarkets

Thinking Crypto Interviews & News

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 20:27


Citibank has selected Swiss cryptocurrency custody firm Metaco to develop the bank's digital assets safekeeping capabilities. Nexo is working with banking giant Citigroup as it pursues a consolidation of other crypto lenders hit by the recent market downturn. KuCoin exchange has been permanently banned from participating in the Ontario market by OSC regulators. Ripple has opened an office in Toronto. Industry leading Bitcoin ATM and Digital Currency Machine (DCM) Operator Coin Cloud today announced a partnership with Cardenas MarketsSponsor

Risk Parity Radio
Episode 183: The Cost Matters Hypothesis, I-bonds, Emerson And Swiss Pop Music

Risk Parity Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 32:29


In this episode we answer emails from MyContactInfo, Jeff, Liah and Andrin.  We discuss asset pricing models, the history of economics and Bogle's Cost Matter Hypothesis, Emerson and Foolish Consistencies and the FTSE All World GDP Weighted Index.Links:Self-Reliance:  Self-Reliance: Change Your Life For The Better - Ralph Waldo Emerson (emersoncentral.com)Self-Reliance Audio:  Self-Reliance Ralph Waldo Emerson Audio Book - YouTubeFTSE All-World Index:   GDP-Weighted-Paper.pdf (ftserussell.com)ACWI Fund Page:   iShares MSCI ACWI ETF | ACWISupport the show

The Music Authority LIVE STREAM Show
June 22, 2022 Wednesday Hour 3

The Music Authority LIVE STREAM Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 59:50


My show producer cat, Lily, she was older when she chose to adopt us.  She's been in our lives for just over ten years now.  Slowing down a bit.  Chews around her toes and ankles.  Getting her checked next week for arthritis and another nail trim.  Just found out she truly LOVES sliced turkey, Swiss cheese…AND Chaz's (Studio Guard Dog) dry food!  Cat family friends…what do you do for your pets' arthritis?  The Music Authority LIVE STREAM Show & Podcast...listen, like, comment, download, share, repeat…heard daily on Podchaser, Deezer, Amazon Music, Audible, Listen Notes, Google Podcast Manager, Mixcloud, Player FM, Stitcher, Tune In, Podcast Addict, Cast Box, Radio Public, and Pocket Cast, and APPLE iTunes!  Follow the show on TWITTER JimPrell@TMusicAuthority!  Please, are you sharing the show? Please, are you listening? How does and can one listen in? Let me list the ways...*Listen LIVE here - https://fastcast4u.com/player/jamprell/ *Podcast - https://themusicauthority.transistor.fm/   The Music Authority LIVE STREAM Show & Podcast!  Special Recorded Network Shows, too!  Different than my daily show! *Radio Candy Radio Monday Wednesday, & Friday 7PM ET, 4PM PT*Rockin' The KOR Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday at 7PM UK time, 2PM ET, 11AM PT  www.koradio.rocks*Pop Radio UK Friday, Saturday, & Sunday 6PM UK, 1PM ET, 10AM PT!  June 22, 2022, Wednesday, the third…Kevin Robertson - 05 Rather Hide [Teaspoon of Time] (Futureman Records) (Subjangle)Abbie Barrett - 06 The Light [I Will Let You Know] (Rum Bar Records)John Kirby Jr. and The New Seniors - Enemy Is Me [Sleepers]Goodbye Victory Road - The Songs Of Davies And Weller [Act 2] (GVR Records)@Vanilla - Rue du Jour [66] (Charlatan Record Cartel) (Jayson Jarmon)Roger C. Reale & Rue Morgue - 20 I'm In Distress [The Collection]Nick Piunti & The Complicated Men - Nothing New [Heart Inside Your Head] (Jem Records)Jeremy Morris - Where Is Love [Brighter Day] (www.jamrecordings.com)The Kite Collectors - Save Me From Myself [Switch The World Back On (Paisley Records)@Whimsical - Take All Of Me [Melt]Jason Berk - Will You Come Home With Me [Strangers]@Gyasi - 08 Walk On [Pronounced Jah-See]Extra Arms - 07 In Control [What Is Even Happening Right Now]Chuck Yoakum - 01 - Can't Stop The Rain [Paisley Garden Project] (koolkatmusik.com)@The William Loveday Intention - A Framed T-Shirt Remnant [The Baptizer] (Damaged Goods Records)@Lawsuit - 09 Entropy [Emergency Third Rail Power Trip - 1993]FAZ WALTZ - 10 Lotta Lovin' [On The Ball]@Tony Jay - Deep In Squalor [Hey There Flower]Walker Brigade - 01 Fallout [If Only] (Big Stir Records)Hemmit - Thank You [Straight Outta Nowhere]

Moment of Um
Why are there holes in Swiss cheese?

Moment of Um

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 3:35


Have you noticed that there's a kind of cheese that's holier than all the rest? Swiss! Why does it have all those holes anyway? We asked Jenny Eastwood of Small Goods to help us answer this delicious question.Hungry for some answers? Send your questions to BrainsOn.org/contact, and we'll briepare an answer justfor you.

Coffee Break with Game-Changers, presented by SAP
The Future of Sustainability and Technology: Is It Enough? Part 2

Coffee Break with Game-Changers, presented by SAP

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 55:03


The Buzz 1: Sustainability is no longer just a buzzword, but an environmental, economic and social driver that's changing our day-to-day lives… committing to sustainable practices is no longer a “nice to have” but a “must do”…. [forbes.com] The Buzz 2: Technologies shaping the sustainability agenda: Public electric transport. Electric trucks. Cheap energy storage. Plastic recycling. LED light efficiency. Accessible solar power. Carbon capture and storage. Hydrogen in the energy transition. [mckinsey.com] The Buzz 3: “I came up with idea of a solar airplane flying around the world with no fuel – that would be a beautiful message in terms of technology, the energy of the future and the environment.” (Bertrand Piccard FRSGS, Swiss explorer, psychiatrist, environmentalist] The Buzz 4: “Unfortunately, in the environment, I don't see as much willingness to invest heavily in R&D as I do in consumer technology. And that's a pity.” (Ramez Naam, American technologist, sci-fiction author: Nexus Trilogy] BIG QUESTION: Can we achieve Sustainability through data-driven processes, technology, collective mindset, government mandates, individual action or a combination of the above? We'll ask Don DeLoach, Debra Lam, Geoffrey Kasselman, Rob Tiffany and Chris Rezendes for their take on The Future of Sustainability and Technology: Enough for Tomorrow? – Part 2.

Coffee Break with Game-Changers, presented by SAP
The Future of Sustainability and Technology: Is It Enough? Part 2

Coffee Break with Game-Changers, presented by SAP

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 60:00


The Buzz 1: Sustainability is no longer just a buzzword, but an environmental, economic and social driver that's changing our day-to-day lives… committing to sustainable practices is no longer a “nice to have” but a “must do”…. [forbes.com] The Buzz 2: Technologies shaping the sustainability agenda: Public electric transport. Electric trucks. Cheap energy storage. Plastic recycling. LED light efficiency. Accessible solar power. Carbon capture and storage. Hydrogen in the energy transition. [mckinsey.com] The Buzz 3: “I came up with idea of a solar airplane flying around the world with no fuel – that would be a beautiful message in terms of technology, the energy of the future and the environment.” (Bertrand Piccard FRSGS, Swiss explorer, psychiatrist, environmentalist] The Buzz 4: “Unfortunately, in the environment, I don't see as much willingness to invest heavily in R&D as I do in consumer technology. And that's a pity.” (Ramez Naam, American technologist, sci-fiction author: Nexus Trilogy] BIG QUESTION: Can we achieve Sustainability through data-driven processes, technology, collective mindset, government mandates, individual action or a combination of the above? We'll ask Don DeLoach, Debra Lam, Geoffrey Kasselman, Rob Tiffany and Chris Rezendes for their take on The Future of Sustainability and Technology: Enough for Tomorrow? – Part 2.

Myths and Legends
276-Swiss Horror: Along Came a Spider

Myths and Legends

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 58:00


An adaptation of a Swiss horror novella "The Black Spider" by author Jeremias Gotthelf (AKA Albert Bitzius), about a town with a knight problem, so they make a deal with a very suspicious man to help them in their time of need. The creature is the Kanbari nyūdō, that creepy hairy guy watching you go to the bathroom on New Year's Eve. -- The disclaimer: https://myths.link/276 -- Music: All music by Blue Dot Sessions -- Sponsors: BOMBAS: Suuuuper comfortable everything. Check it out and get 20% off your first purchase. http://bombas.com/legends Best Fiends: Go to the App Store or Google Play to download Best Fiends for FREE. Grove: Go to http://grove.com/legends and get a free gift set worth up to $50 with your first order! Head to http://FahertyBrand.com and use code “MYTHS” at checkout to snag 20% off ALL your new spring staples! June's Journey: Download June's Journey FREE today on the Apple App Store or Google Play See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

ASCO eLearning Weekly Podcasts
Cancer Topics - Career Paths in Oncology (Part 1)

ASCO eLearning Weekly Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 26:24


In part one, of this two-part ASCO Education podcast episode, host Dr. Jeremy Cetnar (Oregon Health & Science University) interviews two very accomplished physicians and researchers, Dr. Lauren Abrey and Dr. Jason Faris. We'll hear about their motivations for pursuing medicine and how they arrived at the different positions they've held in academia and industry.  If you liked this episode, please subscribe. Learn more at https://education.asco.org, or email us at education@asco.org.   TRANSCRIPT   Dr. Jeremy Cetnar: Hello, and welcome to the ASCO Education podcast episode on career paths and oncology. My name is Jeremy Cetnar. I'm a Medical Oncologist and Associate Professor of Medicine at Oregon Health and Science University in Portland. I'm delighted to introduce today's two guests, whose careers in oncology have crisscrossed academia and industry. Dr. Lauren Abrey and Dr. Jason Faris, I'm excited to chat with you about the inspiration and motivations that drive you, people you've leaned on, how you've made your career decisions, challenges you've faced, and more.  So let's start by asking each of you, could you share a little bit about your early life and background, what attracted you to medicine, and who are some of your early mentors and role models? Let's start with you, Dr. Faris.  Dr. Jason Faris: Yeah, I'd be happy to. Thank you. So, I grew up in a small town in South Jersey in Greater Philadelphia. My mom was a registered nurse in pediatrics in the maternal infant unit for many years at Cooper Hospital. I was always interested in science and medicine and my mom's dedication to her patients. Her altruism and compassion served as a real inspiration for me, for my eventual decision to go to medical school. But I took a long time to get there. I had a bit of a circuitous route to arrive to my career in medicine though it started off conventionally enough. I was initially geared towards a premedical track in college, majoring in biology, but an exciting summer research project, working on the biochemical mechanisms underlying osmoregulation in a marine crustacean with mentoring from my first true mentor, Dr. Don Lovett, led me to apply to and attend graduate school in molecular biology at Princeton.  This was followed by a position at Merck as a molecular biologist in the genetic and cellular toxicology group. I went to veterinary school at the University of Pennsylvania where I met my future wife. And then finally, back to the original plan of attending medical school, but I have to say with a much better sense of why I wanted to attend medical school in the first place, now in my late 20s, which was a bit unconventional at the time. I really did my fair share of exploration of Allied Health careers. That's for sure. I attended Johns Hopkins for medical school, where I quickly discovered a passion for internal medicine. And that was far and away my favorite clerkship and sub-internship. That's the background to how I got to medical school.  Dr. Jeremy Cetnar: Dr. Abrey?  Dr. Lauren Abrey: Interesting. I love your story. We share... I grew up in a small town, not so far away, but I was in upstate New York. And I think there were two influences that kind of got me to my ultimate passion for brain tumors. And this sounds a little quirky to start with. But I had a pretty serious head injury as a tween. So I guess I was about 12. I had a skull fracture, epidural hematoma. And while I would never have said I woke up at that moment and thought I have to be a doctor, I think I became fascinated about things to do with the brain.  In parallel, something that I think tinged a lot of my childhood was a number of family members who had cancer. So both of my grandmothers had breast cancer, while I was well aware of the fact that they were sick and battling this. And two of my aunts also had cancer. And I would say it's an interesting split in my family. So about half of them are survivors and about half ultimately died of their disease.  So both of these things really motivated me or focused me on the need to do something important, but also to do something that really motivated me to get out of bed in the morning. I think I was much more to the point. I went straight to college, straight to medical school. I remember calling my parents and telling them I was applying to medical school and having them say, “Wait. You? Really?” So it wasn't necessarily the family expectation that I would do this, but I was very driven and motivated to make some of these choices and then discover my particular interests as I progressed through medical school. So I went to Georgetown for medical school and then have trained at a number of places in the US. I think that's a little bit how I took my first step on this career journey, let's say.  Dr. Jeremy Cetnar: So take us through what the decisions were like in your head at the end of fellowship in terms of first jobs. Dr. Faris?  Dr. Jason Faris: In terms of my choice to pursue a career in medical oncology, this goes back to medical school during an internal medicine clerkship. I had an assistant chief of service, ACS, at the time, Phil Nivatpumin. He'd go on to become a medical oncologist. He really inspired me with his optimism and bedside manner, including with multiple oncology patients on that clerkship. His enthusiasm for science and medicine, his teaching skills, and an absolutely legendary fund of knowledge. For Phil, he was just an incredible ambassador for both internal medicine and for oncology.  After medical school, I went to internship and residency at Mass General Hospital. And in one of my first rotations, I was on the oncology service, which was not so creatively called Team Three. I think they can up the ante there, but oncology services on Team Three. I was caring for many extremely ill patients battling disease progression from their metastatic cancers, or sadly, in many cases complications of their treatments. During that rotation, I was intrigued by clinical trials offering novel treatment options based on cutting edge science, but also struck by the number of patients who just didn't have any clinical trial options. I became aware of the limitations of the conventional treatments that were offered.  I was really inspired by the patience and dedication of the nurses and doctors caring for them. And I vividly recall a roughly 50-year-old woman I helped care for with AML, watching as the 7+3 chemotherapy caused lots of side effects for her and being amazed by her strength and grace, her resilience as she faced her illness, her potential mortality, and the intense chemotherapy she was undergoing. And I knew during those moments with that leukemia patient while caring for other patients on that oncology service that this was the field I would pursue. Oncology was really the perfect blend of humanism, problem solving, longitudinal follow-up and rapidly accelerating scientific progress leading to new avenues for clinical trial treatments.  Like Lauren, I was motivated and inspired by cancer diagnoses in my own family. My maternal grandmother died of pancreatic cancer during my junior year of college. My dad was diagnosed with colon cancer during my first year of fellowship. So those are all really strong motivators, I would say. And after completing my fellowship at the combined Dana-Farber MGH program, my first position out of fellowship was in the gastrointestinal cancer group at MGH. I actually had been training in genitourinary oncology after my main clinically focused year of fellowship, but I did a chief resident year in the middle of fellowship, and that was the tradition at MGH. And as I was about to return to fellowship for my senior year of fellowship, the head of the GI Group and head of the Cancer Center at the time, Dave Ryan, offered to serve as a clinical research mentor for me in GI cancers. As a senior fellow, I wrote an investigator-initiated trial of cabozantinib for patients with neuroendocrine tumors under his mentorship that went on to demonstrate encouraging results, led to a Phase III study in that cancer population, and I ultimately accepted a position at the MGH Cancer Center in the GI cancer group about 11 years ago. And that was the start of my post-training career.  Dr. Jeremy Cetnar: And how about you, Dr. Abrey?  Dr. Lauren Abrey: So for people who don't know, I'm actually a neurologist. I finished my training in neurology and then pursued a fellowship in neuro oncology. I would say it was really patients and observations of things that were happening with patients during my residency. I did my residency at the University of Southern California at Los Angeles. I was at the LA County Hospital, which for people who don't know, is one of the largest hospitals in the country. I had the chance to see several patients who had paraneoplastic syndromes, and got the support from different faculty members to write those cases up, and really resulting in my first independent publications. That was what kind of got me bitten by the bug to understand this link between neurology and oncology.  I very intentionally went to Memorial Sloan Kettering to have the opportunity to work with Jerry Posner. And I think I no sooner got there than I got totally bitten by the brain tumor bug, which seems a little counterintuitive. But the paraneoplastic work was kind of deep laboratory work. And I realized that I really enjoyed seeing the patients having the partnership with neurosurgeons and digging into what is still a pretty intense unmet medical need.  So it was an interesting pivot because I really thought I was going to Sloane to focus on paraneoplasia. I still think I learned so much with that interest that I think we can reflect on when we consider how immunology has finally entered into the treatment landscape today for different tumor types and understanding is there a background in paraneoplastic disorders that could help us. But I have to say it was really the brain tumor work that got me focused and the chance to work with people like Lisa DeAngelis, Phil Gutin, and others that was kind of fundamental to my choices. I stayed there for two years of fellowship and then continued as faculty for about another 15 years at Sloan Kettering. So that's really the start of my academic career and the pivot to industry came much later.  Dr. Jeremy Cetnar: So both of you have impressive career CVs, have been trained at very prestigious institutions. So at some point in time, take me through, what was that transition like between, 'Hmm, what I'm doing is enjoyable, but maybe there's something else out there that I want to explore.' And what I mean by that is mostly industry at this point. So that's an important question that I think a lot of junior faculty face, a lot of mid-career faculty, maybe even later-stage faculty. But I think that's a tension point for a lot of people because I think there's a lot of fear. I think there's a lot of anxiety about moving outside of the academic realm. So, tell us a little bit about what was the pull in terms of going to industry and what were some of the thought processes that were going on. Dr. Faris?    Dr. Jason Faris: I've experienced two transitions, actually, between academia and industry. I like to do things in pairs, I guess. But the first was, after multiple years at the MGH as a resident fellow and as a clinical investigator at the MGH Cancer Center. As a new attending and clinical investigator, I was attempting to balance my work priorities, providing patients with GI cancers, which is a rewarding but complex and I'd say emotionally intense experience, given the phenomenally aggressive and devastating cancers these patients grapple with such as pancreatic cancer, alongside the other responsibilities of my clinical investigator position.  Those other responsibilities included writing grants and papers and protocols, evaluating patients who were interested in open clinical trials, and serving as the principal investigator for multiple studies. I was serving on committees, mentoring and teaching. Patient care was always my top priority as it should and really must be. And I feel incredibly lucky to have had truly amazing colleagues at MGH across several disciplines, from medical oncology, nurse practitioners, practice nurses, radiation oncologists, and surgeons. It was and continues to be a dynamic place full of extremely talented and dedicated clinicians. I think we really all benefited from the coordinated teamwork in both patient care and research in a really tight-knit GI Group.  But nonetheless, for me as someone who delighted in spending large amounts of time with my patients in the clinic rooms, and I think my colleagues would agree frequently agonizing over decisions impacting their care, achieving sufficient balance to really focus on writing and overseeing clinical trials was becoming increasingly challenging for me. And it was in that context, after spending roughly a decade and the combination of residency fellowship training and as an attending in the GI cancer group all at MGH that I made a truly difficult decision to move from my beloved outpatient clinical and clinical investigator role to industry to focus more exclusively on clinical research.  And after interviewing for several industry-based roles, I accepted a position in the early-phase group at the Novartis Institutes for Biomedical Research or NIBR as we kind of pronounced those words in Cambridge. I absolutely loved my time at NIBR. It's an incredible place with a strong history of and commitment to innovation as well as passionate, talented colleagues, many of whom I've worked with in the past. When I first started at Novartis, I was amazed at the array of experts on the teams I was helping to lead as a clinical program leader. Our teams are the definition of multidisciplinary. They're composed of what we call line function experts in multiple disciplines. This includes preclinical safety experts who design and analyze data from studies that precede the filing of an IND, research scientists, chemists, preclinical, and clinical pharmacologists, statisticians, program managers, drug and regulatory affair colleagues, who focus on the interactions with health authorities, including the FDA, operational colleagues called clinical trial leaders, and many others.  In my role as a senior clinical program leader, I also have the opportunity to collaborate frequently with research colleagues on preclinical programs, designing and writing first in human trials, followed by conducting the actual studies and in close collaboration with our academic colleagues, analyzing the clinical and translational results.  Dr. Jeremy Cetnar: Dr. Abrey, how about you? Was there a moment or what were the moments that led to you deciding to make this transition?  Dr. Lauren Abrey: I guess I have the other sort of story. I got pushed, I would say, in the sense that like many of us, I'm married, and my husband was the one who took a job with Novartis and said, “This would be an adventure. Let's go live in Switzerland.” So similar to Jason, he took a position at NIBR, and I think for many of the same reasons, he really wanted to delve deeply into early mechanism of action and allow himself to dedicate really a chunk of his career to developing key drugs. But moving to Switzerland changes your options suddenly. I think I had spent most of my career at Sloan Kettering doing clinical trials. That was really my comfort zone, my sweet spot. And when we moved over here, I explored briefly, could I set up an academic career here?  And very kindly, I was invited by a number of Swiss colleagues to look for opportunities to do that. But I realized what I loved was talking to patients, and that that was going to be difficult with the language barrier. And I equally loved running clinical trials. So I had a great opportunity to join Roche shortly after their merge or full acquisition of Genentech. This allowed me to continue the work I had been doing on Avastin for brain tumors.  But I think the other thing that allowed me to do, that was something I was really looking for was to broaden my scope and to no longer be niched as just a brain tumor expert. And if you're in academia and you're a neurologist, obviously, you're going to be fairly constrained in that space. But moving into a role in industry really allows you to look much more broadly and work across multiple tumor types. And I spent the next seven years at Roche running not just the Avastin teams that were developing drugs for a number of indications, but really overseeing the clinical development group based in the European sites. And they had about 14 different drugs in different stages of development as well as partnerships with their early research group that was European based.  So it was a fascinating time for me, and I feel kind of like I got thrown into the pond. I knew a lot about clinical trials. I had no idea about so many other aspects of what I needed to consider. And I think Jason started to allude to some of this with the different line function expertise and things I think we take for granted or maybe we simply have blind spots around them when we are sitting in our academic organizations. So it's been a really delightful plunge into the pool. I've continued to swim mostly. Occasionally, a little bit of drowning, but a lot of fun.  Dr. Jeremy Cetnar: What would you say are the major differences between an academic career and industry?  Dr. Lauren Abrey: I think, as you said, the things that are similar is that the purpose or the mission for both is in many ways the same. We would like to develop better treatments for patients with cancer. And so there's a huge focus on clinical trials. There needs to be a huge focus on patients, and that can get diluted in industry. I think the things that you don't appreciate sometimes when you're sitting on the academic side is just really the overarching business structure and the complexity of some of the very large organizations. So you suddenly are in this huge space with people focused on regulatory approvals focused on pricing, focused on manufacturing, focused on the clinical trial execution, and why you are doing it in different spots.  And so I think some of the different factors that you have to consider are things that again, we either take for granted or are super focused when you're in one organization. And I think the tradeoffs and how decisions are made, particularly in large pharma, can be frustrating. I think we are all used to applying for grants or getting the funding we need to do whatever our project or trial is. And then you just start very laser focused on getting to the end. If you're in a large organization and they have a portfolio where they're developing 14, 15, 20 different things, you might suddenly find that the project you think is most important gets de-prioritized against something that the company thinks is more critical to move forward. And that could be because there's better data, but it could also be because there's increasing competition in the space or there's a different pull for a large company. I haven't seen the early development side as much. I've seen the development. I've now seen Medical Affairs for how some of those decisions are made, but I'd be curious to hear what Jason has seen in some of his experiences as well.  Dr. Jason Faris: Comparing and contrasting a little bit between the two, because I've run early phase studies on the academic side, I'll talk more about that in a little bit in terms of another academic position that I held. So I've run early-phase studies there. I've run early-phase studies in industry as well. And they share a lot of similarities, certainly following compelling science, the excitement about new therapies that are going to be offered to patients. But I think the execution is a bit different, and I would say, when you're running clinical trials in the academic setting, you're meeting every patient that you're going to put on study or at least one of your colleagues is, if you have sub-eyes on the study, that's a major, major difference, right? You're directly taking care of a patient going on to an experimental therapy, consenting that patient, following them over time, getting the firsthand experience and data from that patient interaction, but not necessarily, unless you're running an investigator-initiated study, not necessarily having access to the data across the whole study.  You're hearing about the data across the whole study at certain time points on investigator calls, PI meetings, dose escalation meetings, those kinds of things. But you're not necessarily having access to the real-time emergence of data across the whole study from other people's patients. So you're a bit dependent on the sponsor to provide those glimpses of the data, synthesize that and present overview. So those are some operational differences, I would say, because you're not taking direct care of the patients and having your time split among different commitments in that way I have felt a greater ability to focus on the clinical research that I'm doing in my industry-based role, which I like, of course, but I also miss taking care of patients. I love taking care of patients.   So I think it's always a double-edged sword with that if we can use a sword analogy here. But I think they both offer really exciting options to pursue new therapies for patients, which for me, was one of the fundamental reasons that I pursued medical oncology in the first place. It was really this idea that the field is rapidly advancing. I wanted to be a part of that. I saw firsthand what cancer could do to my family or family members, and I took care of patients in the hospital as an intern resident and fellow where I think there's just a tremendous unmet medical need. And so having an opportunity to contribute to the development of new therapies was always a real inspiration for me.  Dr. Jeremy Cetnar: With that being said, what led you to go back into academia?  Dr. Jason Faris: This is an ongoing saga, I guess. So after several years of professional growth at Novartis, gaining experience with designing and conducting clinical trials on the industry side, I was actually at ASCO and I learned of an open role for the director of the early phase trials program at Dartmouth's Cancer Center. After extensive consideration, which I think you can see as my trademark at this point, I made another difficult decision to interview for the position, which was focused on helping to grow the early phase trials program at an NCI comprehensive designated cancer center that's unique in a way because it's in a rural area. And it had a new director of the Cancer Center, Steve Leach, who's a renowned laboratory scientist with a focus on pancreatic cancer and a surgeon by training.  I ultimately decided to accept the early phase director position, moving my family away from Greater Boston, where we had lived for about 15 years, to the upper valley of New Hampshire. And while at Dartmouth, I was part of exciting projects, including writing and overseeing an NCI grant called Catch Up, which was geared towards improving access to early phase clinical trials for rural patients. I opened numerous sponsor-initiated immunotherapy and targeted therapy, early phase trials. Just to say a little bit about Dartmouth's Cancer Center - I think they also benefit from tremendous collaboration, this time across Dartmouth College, the Geisel School of Medicine, the School of Public Health. I think they provide really excellent care to their cancer patients. And I was extremely proud to be part of that culture in the GI Group, which was much smaller than the one at MGH, but also an incredibly dedicated group of multidisciplinary colleagues who work tirelessly to care for their patients.  But nonetheless, less than six months into that new position, the COVID pandemic started, and that introduced some significant and new challenges on the clinical trials side in terms of staffing, infrastructure, those kinds of things. In that context, I made a decision to return to NIBR, refocus on clinical research, and hope to harness my background in running clinical trials in both settings, both academic and industry, as well as the resources and pipeline of Novartis to really maximize my impact on drug development. So for me, it was a question of where can I have the maximum impact at this crazy time, difficult time. I saw that my best option was to return to industry to work on studies to try to develop new therapies. Broadly speaking, my role as a senior clinical program leader in the translational and clinical oncology group at NIBR is to design, write, conduct, and analyze innovative clinical trials of early phase therapeutics.  Dr. Jeremy Cetnar: Wow, that's fascinating, very, very interesting. A lot of stress. You should definitely be buying lots of presents for your family for moving them all over the place.  This concludes part one of our interview with Drs. Abrey and Faris. Thank you so much for sharing your inspiring career stories. And thank you to all our listeners for tuning into this episode of the ASCO Education Cancer Topics podcast.  Thank you for listening to the ASCO Education podcast. To stay up to date with the latest episodes, please click subscribe. Let us know what you think by leaving a review. For more information, visit the Comprehensive Education Center at education.asco.org.    The purpose of this podcast is to educate and to inform. This is not a substitute for professional medical care and is not intended for use in the diagnosis or treatment of individual conditions.  Guests on this podcast express their own opinions, experience, and conclusions. Guest statements on the podcast do not express the opinions of ASCO. The mention of any product, service, organization, activity, or therapy should not be construed as an ASCO endorsement. 

Switzerland - Meeting New Friends - Podcast

Grüezi and Welcome! A podcast to bring people from all over the world together My Name is Sandra and I am 100 % Swiss cheese - living in Switzerland You learn 5 Words in Swiss German. Events: https://www.meetup.com/de-DE/Meeting-new-friends-in-Zug/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/meetingnewfriendsinzugmeetup/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/meetingnewfriendsinzug/ Website: https://www.meetingnewfriendsinzug.com/

Overcoming Proximal Hamstring Tendinopathy
How to rehab your PHT without a gym membership

Overcoming Proximal Hamstring Tendinopathy

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 28:52


While a gym membership is highly encouraged, sometimes it isn't readily available. Whether it is financially, accessibility or you are travelling in the short-term. For this reason, this episode covers rehabilitation tips if a gym membership is not an option. Brodie covers helpful exercises and progressions with 5 levels of equipment. Level 1: No equipment Level 2: Resistance bands Level 3: Swiss ball Level 4: Weighted backpacks Level 5: Adjustable dumbbells Tune in to gain insight into your proximal hamstring tendinopathy rehabilitation.  Book a free 20-min physio chat here Click here to learn more about the PHT video course & to receive your 50% discount If you would like to learn more about having Brodie on your rehab team go to www.runsmarter.online

Postcards from Italy | Learn Italian | Beginner and Intermediate
Lungotevere & Italian Food Festivals | Speak Italian | S1 Ep14

Postcards from Italy | Learn Italian | Beginner and Intermediate

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 17:10


Dani and Luca go to a popular Roman summer festival along the Tiber River, where their date is interrupted, first by friends and then by a slap! In our roundtable, we learn about “the misery of the pork” and how it's used by Italians to express surprise or frustration, or both! Elisa also demystifies “proprio,” which is a veritable Swiss army knife of Italian words. [In fact, in our subscriber bonus notes, we offer 15 examples of how to use it!]To get the most out of Postcards from Italy, subscribe to our premium online course for full episodes, transcripts, roundtable notes and Italian-only audio to test your listening and comprehension skills.www.PostcardsFromItalyPodcast.com

Drone Radio Show
Mapping Volcanos to Protect Lives: David Adjiashvili, Co-Founder Drone Harmony

Drone Radio Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 38:46


Can a drone prevent the loss of life from volcanos? David Adjiashvili is Co-Founder and Vice President of Products at Drone Harmony.  Drone Harmony is a software as a service company that automates mission planning in the most challenging vertical inspection scenarios.  Their software enables cost-effective deployment of drone technology in industries where existing technologies are unable to deliver. And it enables pilots with minimal training to collect high quality, reproducible data. As a Swiss company, Drone Harmony understands that the safety of your data is essential and even deploys their system on your premises. The company was founded in 2016 by a team of problem solvers with a passion for drones, software and automation. In addition to being one of those founders and Chief Scientist, he is also senior scientist at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology. His field of expertise is Algorithm Design and Mathematical Optimization, and he has been responsible for algorithmic development of the Drone Harmony Mission Planner. David received his Bachelors degree in computer science from the Tel Aviv University and his Master's in applied mathematics from the Weizmann Institute of Science. He completed his Ph.D. in mathematics at the ETH Zurich in 2012 specializing on algorithm design for planning and optimization problems. He has since been employed in the Mathematics Department at ETH and worked on various research and industrial projects in the field of optimization. In 2021 Drone Harmony assisted DERYL Group KK and the Kyoto University in generating an up-to-date high-resolution 3D model of Japan's Sakurajima volcano.  Sakurajima is one of the world's most active volcanoes.  It is located in the south of Japan, with approximately 600,000 people living within 4 kilometers. Scientists are predicting a major eruption within the next 30 years.  The project team used Drone Harmony to develop the 3-D model and run various simulations for disaster prevention and response, with the goal of developing evacuation and mitigation plans for all potential disaster scenarios. Mapping a terrain is typically a straightforward process, but the Project Team quickly learned that a large geographic area, much of which is inaccessible, hostile and changing poses several challenges. In this episode of the Drone Radio Show, David talks about Drone Harmony, the company's 3-D mapping services and how that technology can be used to accurately map  and model large vertical geographic areas.

The Remote Real Estate Investor
Does having a real estate license help investors get an edge?

The Remote Real Estate Investor

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 18, 2022 35:28


Omni Casey, along with his wife and kids, owns and operates New Leaf Redevelopers, which is their family real estate investing company. Although they tackle many different types of investment projects, their primary focus has been to purchase vacant and barely habitable properties, fix them up to be the nicest property on the block, then rent them out at affordable rates. Omni has been a real estate investor, broker, and coach for nearly 20 years. His real estate career started in Hawaii where he grew up. Over the last 10+ years, he and his family have lived in Northern Virginia and have been very active in both growing their real estate investment portfolio and growing a top-performing real estate team and office in Loudoun County Virginia. With a passion for building wealth and helping others achieve financial freedom, Omni has coached hundreds of real estate investors, real estate agents, and clients alike to create and execute a plan to grow their real estate business, grow their investment portfolio, or both. Today, we talk about whether it is worth it as an investor to get your real estate license or not. Episode Link: https://www.omnitheinvestorguy.com/ https://www.instagram.com/omnitheinvestorguy/?hl=en https://www.facebook.com/omnitheinvestorguy --- Transcript Before we jump into the episode, here's a quick disclaimer about our content. The Remote Real Estate Investor podcast is for informational purposes only, and is not intended as investment advice. The views, opinions and strategies of both the hosts and the guests are their own and should not be considered as guidance from Roofstock. Make sure to always run your own numbers, make your own independent decisions and seek investment advice from licensed professionals.   Michael: Hey, everyone, before we get started, I want to encourage everyone to actually go share this podcast with one person, you know, we are trying to get the word out there to help all investors all across the country and throughout the world. So if you know someone that is looking to get in investing, please go share this podcast with them and encourage them to the same. It's also really helpful for us if you could leave us a rating or review wherever it is get your podcast. Thanks so much, happy investing.   Hey, everyone, welcome to another episode of the Remote Real Estate Investor. I'm Michael Albaum and today with me I have a returning guest Omni Casey, agent, broker investor entrepreneur, he's gonna be talking to us today about is it worth it as an investor to get your real estate license and vice versa, so let's get into it.   Hey, everyone just wanted to give a quick shout out and encourage everyone before we get started here to go check out the Roofstock Academy at roofstockacademy.com, it is an education program that we talk about all the time on the podcast, we've got different price offering tiers depending on what it is you're looking for. We've got one on one coaching, 50 hours of on demand lectures, Slack channels, private forums and a whole lot more, as well as money back on your marketplace fees if you're transacting in the marketplace. So come check us out rootstockacademy.com. I look forward to seeing you in there, I'm not a cash flow guy. Welcome back to the show, man, thanks for coming on hanging out with me today.   Omni: Like that, thanks for inviting me back, Michael.   Michael: No, of course. So last time, your book hadn't yet come out but you were just sharing with us that now it is available. So before we get to the episode, what is it and where can people find it?   Omni: Excited, so cashflow Breakfast Club, sign up on the back there as well. So it's on Amazon, finally, you know, both eBook and print is available. Actually, we sold out the first week. So if you go on Amazon right now, it might be like a delayed a couple of weeks but you'll get it and we're working through some voice talent right now to do the audiobook. I'm not comfortable doing it myself, so we're hiring somebody out to do that, so hopefully in the next month or so we'll have the audio version as well.   Michael: You should go get Obama to do it. He did and he did that naturally.   Omni: I saw that I think he's a little out of my budget but you know what, maybe on the next book   Michael: On the next book, all right. All right, cool, well, today, I mean, last time we had you on, we were talking about your book and kind of your story and your journey. Today, we're talking about something a little bit different and that's really should people who want to be investors go get the real estate agents license and so would love if you could shed a little bit of light around how you did it and then I got a lot of questions for it because as I've shared with you, my wife's going through the same question, so we're going to talk through it.   Omni: Yeah, absolutely and it's a great question and it's not a simple yes, or a simple no, no, some people go on, absolutely get your license and some people say no, don't do it. You know, back to my original story, I started investing before I was an agent and I got my license fairly soon after, because one, I think I'm a control freak and so it helped me to control the information and the data and the access to speed. You know, and I would say, when I started, there weren't many real estate agents that understood how to help real estate investors rallies, I didn't, I didn't know where to find them and so it allowed me to one, understand that if I wanted a good agent, I need to become a good agent myself. So I went down that path. Now there's a lot more information, so it's not a necessity, because there's a lot of great agents out there that know how to help investors just got to find the right agent to do that and then there's a lot of good information, you know, outside of just from real estate agents as well.   So it's not a necessity, but the when someone comes to me, after they hear my story, and they say, Okay, you're an agent, and you're an investor, that must be it and, and really, you know, my kind of go through processes just kind of tell me like what drives you? What's your motivation because the reality is most people are not built to be real estate agents and so the reality is, it's actually much harder than people think it's a very detailed process of owning a business and if you're not built to own a business and be your own boss, and be a successful boss, right, some people are good employees, but they're terrible bosses and so, if you are not driven to be a really good boss to hold yourself accountable, you're gonna probably not be a successful real estate agent and I usually tell people, get an agent if you become an agent if you plan to use that as your active income if you plan to, whether it's full time or part time, make them money from it, then go for it. But you have to commit the time to becoming successful at that and then if you earning cashflow as an agent helps you become a better investor and have more capital to invest in, it's a win win but if you're only getting your license as one option to, you know, because you're an investor, you think I should have my license, well, why won't why don't you become a contractor? Why don't you become a property manager? Why don't you become so many other things along the way, real estate agent is a very integral part of the process of becoming successful, successful real estate investor, it doesn't necessarily mean that you need to be that. So that's kind of where I start and then it kind of takes us on a very few various tangents from there.   Michael: That makes total sense and I mean, it really gets I love that question. I've never thought to ask someone that because I get asked all the time, like, should I go get my agents license, and I don't have mine and for kind of a specific reason, really, to your point that you mentioned, but it kind of gets to the problem. I think of so many people starting out small businesses like, oh, I don't need that person, I could do it better myself and that sounds like the struggle that you went through of like, I can't find a good agent, I gotta go become the expert. I gotta go do it myself, knowing what you know. Now, are you glad you did that?   Omni: Oh, absolutely. So it turns out I love being an agent. Starting out, I almost had no knowledge of it. Right. So I've been doing this about 20 years now and I had no real knowledge of what a real estate agent does. I had some friends and family that were but it wasn't like on my plan, right? So I was an entrepreneur, and I didn't really look at being an agent as running your own business. It wasn't until I got my license, that I realized it was a really cool business and of itself. So real estate investing, I look at that as a standalone business and then the real estate agent side is as a standalone business as well and so it's no different than if you were to go open up a Subway franchise or some other business, you are the owner and probably the only employee to start, right and so both as the owner and as an employee, do you have the skill sets to run both of those until your business is profitable enough that you can step back and be just an owner? If not, you're always going to be an employee. If we go back to Robert Kiyosaki, it's a Cashflow Quadrant book, right, you have the various quadrants you have the employee, the self-employed, the business and investor quadrants, the self-employed means you own your job, but it's still a job, and you make no money at a job that you don't work at. So I loved it and I became a very successful real estate agent and eventually transitioned into becoming a coach and a broker, have an office about 100 agents right now that I kind of coach and train and so I lucked out, because it became a passion for me. But starting out It by no means I had no goal of becoming a top agent or actually being a successful agent. What I realized now is to be a to really scale your investments at a high level or at a level that were to my ambitions, I needed scalable income and any job out there most jobs are not scalable, meaning I'm going to work and I'm going to make about the same amount no matter what, and maybe there's some performance bonuses in there.   But you're always kind of capped at what you can do, real estate as an agent truly is one of the most scalable incomes you can have and I've leveraged that because I've put deals under contract early on in my investing career that I could not afford, like it was too good to pass up and I just put it under contract and I'm like, I'm gonna buy this no matter what I don't have the money to buy it. I don't know how. So I've got to go find a partner or I've got to go earn income and my highest producing agent, income wise months, were tied to me putting myself in a position that I needed to earn money, and I needed that extra income. So you go out, you can make 5060 $80,000 in a short period of time, because you need it because it turns out, I don't really care about money, and I don't need it and I earn exactly what I need to be at my comfort level and so finding ways to push yourself outside of that comfort level. To need more income was the trick for me to kind of have really high production productions as a real estate agent.   Michael: I love that. There's a I don't know, forget who told the story or of what King or conquer but they talked about, like getting to a beach coming on boats and then burning all the ship because going home is not an option. So you better win the freaking battle because there's no other choice. So I love that putting that I mean really turning the pressure up on yourself intentionally to perform.   Omni: That's great that definitely burned the ships behind you is really what it comes down to and although prior to becoming an agent, I was a you know, business owner, entrepreneur and in sales. So I've always been used to that. But the complete scalable income where you can make zero or you can make $100,000 in a month really depends on how hard you work and the results of your effort, right. It's not just clocking in and feeling like hey, I put in a hard day's work is like no, I need to do things that were actually leading to productivity leading to contracts and sales and so you can, you can be as successful as you're motivated to be.   Michael: I think that's, that's such a good point that I kind of want to spotlight on as an employee, you show up and get paid, kind of independent of what you do. I'm not saying you can't get fired, right? There's performance stuff, but like, all you have to do is kind of show up and do the bare minimum and you'll get by, versus as an entrepreneur, as a business owner. If you don't do the things that are getting results that are actually moving the needle, you probably aren't getting paid.   Omni: Yeah, absolutely, absolutely and so, so back to the original question, right of should I get my license? If I'm a real estate investor or want to be a real estate investor? It's yes, if you're going to use it as active income, and it's maybe if you're going to do if you're going to use it as so. So most people think I'm going to get my license to save commissions on my deal, right? Like, I'm licensed in five states. I don't earn commissions on my deals, because I make sure everyone else my I hire agents still because one, I don't have the time to do that anymore myself starting out. Sure, I was involved in some deals but actually getting your license to just save on commissions could backfire on your success because starting out, I said, oh, that's cool. I'm going to make money on every deal that I do and other agents knew that I was an investor. Other agents saw me as alright, well, if I send someone to this guy or tell them about a lead, they don't have an opportunity to make Commission's because I was going to be making the commission. So it wasn't until I figured out I tell everyone, I want to pay you well, I even though I'm an agent, I want you as an agent to get paid on this and I started telling everyone agents and wholesalers that I will pay you extremely well, if you bring me an off market deal. That made it easy for them to bring me off market deals, because now I wasn't they weren't worried about me cutting them out of some sort of potential listing fee or biography down the road.   Michael: That's such a great point. I'm going to two statements that I'm going to make and I want you to evaluate which one you think is more true. Investors make great agents, or real estate agents make great investors.   Omni: Oh, man, both are false 100%. I love the way you frame both of that. So I will say investors make great agents. Some investors, it takes a certain mindset, right. So from a real estate agent standpoint, or I guess you can pull out from a business owner standpoint, you really need a visionary and an integrator and kind of goes back to that book. I was at rocket fuel. No, there's, there's another one.   Michael: Is it a traction?   Omni: Traction? Yes, traction. Thank you.   Michael: I haven't read it. But someone just mentioned that in the course…   Omni: Traction and rocket fuel, both by Gino Wickman talks about the visionary and integrator and most people starting out, you're just one person, and you got to figure out how to be both. But really, there are different, you know, mindsets altogether and so from an investor's standpoint, you will reach your limit as either an integrator or visionary unless you start to build the team or hire beyond that and as a real estate agent, as well, a visionary, usually those are the ones that like had the big vision, they're usually you know, out and social and they're kind of building, you know, ideas and kind of getting people excited. But then the details fall through the cracks and they don't have the ability to actually execute on their plan. They get people to say, yeah, help me buy help me sell, but they don't have the details in place to do them. So it's actually easier to be a visionary and hire out from for administrative purposes, from the integrator standpoint, than being an integrator and hiring out on the visionary standpoint. But once again, those are just roles and we all play both roles until we get big enough to go beyond that. So from the investor standpoint, most are visionaries, most are absolutely visionaries, but you get to the point where you don't have the details in place or maybe you don't even value the details of what the real estate agent does and the investors that have been investing for a very long time, especially at a high level, getting into real estate, they're saying I don't understand the purpose, I don't understand why we're talking about, like this $5,000 commission or this one little transaction. So it's hard for them to bring them into the moment as a successful investor. From a from a real estate agent standpoint, unfortunately, most real estate agents actually get into the business and unless they connect with an investor or investor broker like myself, they actually look at real estate investors as like, like, I don't want to deal with you like the worst clients in the world, right? So there's almost as friction between the two was spoken or unspoken and really, it's only the agents that get in with the mindset of I think I want to do both, or the investors that get in the mindset that I think I want to do both you're almost ruining yourself from jumping over to the other side. Once you're established as an agent, or as an investor, it's very tough to cross over from what I've seen.   Michael: Interesting. Okay and why do you think some agents don't like working with investors because objectively A, I would want to work with me humblebrag. But like, it seems like we're so much more fact driven and numbers driven, as opposed to an owner occupant. You know, I don't like the paint color. I don't want this house. Like, I don't care about the paint. If the numbers make sense, great. It's a go for me. So why do you think that is?   Omni: So I think, just like any industry, the inexperienced investors and the, the, the investors that I've never invested before, give everyone else a bad name, right because they're all about one, they don't have the money to actually hire somebody and pay for the services. So they're trying to use and abuse as many people as possible, because that's what they were taught to do, and pay nothing for it and make no commitments, right. No, I'm not going to sign an agreement with you and so, so they are one, the least committal group out there. They are the cheapest group, they're always trying to, you know, Beat Agents down for their commissions and their fees and things like that and so I'm not saying that's everyone I'm saying, if I'm a terrible investor, and don't know how to find or put under contract deals with good margins, that I might be pressured to make sure I'm paying nobody along the way, right, because I'm making only make a little bit of money, you can't make money, I can't have my agent make more money than I'm making on the deal, right. So that's the, the beginner or the novice investor mindset, where I think Robert Kiyosaki is the one that kind of ingrained in me and many people that you pay, your vendors will pay your broker as well and the more I decide to pay, like, if the going rate for a commission is 3%, I'm paying 4%, I pay above market rate, because I want everyone to see me as a more profitable venture for them to actually take them down the path of getting a deal sold and so, you know, the margins need to make sense, but I just don't buy the deal. If I can't pay my brokers, pay my agents pay my contract as well, and get a good deal because that relationship is far more valuable than that one deal. I need to make sure that that agent, or that wholesaler, or that contract, or whatever it wants to do business with me over and over and over again and they put me at the top of the line, when there's all these other newer investors out there are newer agents that want to work with them. Hopefully, they're thinking about me first.   Michael: That is a great point, that's a great point. I'm not I feel like everybody and their brother and sister are real estate agents. We all know someone, we may even have some in our family, how can you get in the business and separate yourself and what seems like already a pretty saturated market, if you decide that's the route for you, getting your license, make sure.   Omni: So my wife is not licensed and she helps me on the investment side and like every other year, she's like, maybe I should get my license, maybe I should get my license. I'm like, you would be a terrible agent, right. So and I love my wife. She's amazing at what she does. But I know what she would not be willing to do, right and so to set yourself apart, you need to establish that you're different or you need to establish some sort of differentiator, right and if not, then to be a successful agent, it's okay, well, can I be the cheapest and the reality is there's so many cheap agents out there that are willing to reduce what their cost of services are. But it also reduces the quality of service and just like that gives investors a bad name to agents, right. I only deal with investors that never buy properties, or that do want me to make 1000 offers before they actually put in a reasonable offer, right. Same thing on the, in the real estate industry. There are many real estate agents that got their license, because one, it's easy to get your license, and there's such a low barrier of entry and they really didn't, they just they just said, Alright, I'm going to do this as a hobby, maybe not as a business and so because of that, for them to be competitive, they got to be make themselves at a lower rate, but they can't afford to offer the same level of service and so from an investor standpoint, you're like, I hired the worst agent in the world, that agent wouldn't return my calls, didn't know what he was doing wasn't educated. Well, that's what you want it right. You wanted the cheapest agent out there, and you get what you pay for. So it is a self-fulfilling prophecy in terms of who you end up with but someone just getting in and getting their license, it comes to education. So I think I bounced around from a few different brokerages throughout my career and it wasn't until I found like a mentor and someone that was willing to kind of take me under my wing and say, okay, you got potential, but you're all over the place. Do you need to kind of stay organized and put a plan in place. I don't think I would have made it right, I needed that direction. So having the coaches the mentors and the masterminds that I relied on the investing side, same thing on the real estate agent side, also the essential and I'm although I'm a visionary to start, I do get very analytic Call and so I try to calculate the ROI of everything right, the ROI of my dollars is easy to track. But the ROI of my time now, you're telling me I need to go sit at an open house on the weekend. And you know, I'm talking to people, but what's my ROI on that, right.   That's three hours or four hours or five hours, I'm sending out postcards, what's my ROI on building a business and so you know, I got really good at tracking everything I did from the beginning, and actually writing down the results over a period of time off, alright, if I did an open house, and I made on average $10,000, let's just say every time I sold a home, and it took me five open houses to sell one home, I got to figure out what my ROI was, right. So every time I did an open house, I made $2,000, or you know, something along those lines. Turns out, I was really good at drinking coffee. So that became like, my number one business generator was meeting people drinking coffee with them connecting with them on a one on one basis at our favorite coffee shop in Hawaii and then it's not, Hi, I'm an agent, I want to sell you real estate, it really is sitting down with them and you know them somehow they might be a relative, they might be a friend, you might barely know them from social media, wherever your relationship is here. You're just trying to take your relationship to there and it's not whether or not that person in front of you, buys or sells with you, which is the end goal for most real estate agents, it really comes down to, is that person in front of you? Do they like you? Do they trust you and would they actually refer their family and friends to you, because there's no guarantee they'll actually ever buy in the next 10 years, right? You're building this relationship for something that might not turn into a transaction but if they are saying, hey, I like this guy and at some point, I'm going to hear about someone that needs a good agent. I'm gonna feel good referring Omni as my agent, that became it. So I realized that I can build those relationships, one on one, at my favorite coffee shop back to back, you know, sometimes I would sit down and have two or three meetings back to back of just having coffee, sometimes breakfast with people and just building the relationship that eventually turned into referrals.   Michael: That's great. Sounds like you're very caffeinated for quite some time and you're very caffeinated…   Omni: Very caffeinated. I switched to decaf, decaf, usually around the third person but the ROI at some point got to like $6,000 per coffee meeting, right. So I figured out what my average commission was and how many coffee meetings I needed to get to enough referrals to get the clothes that I was making about $6,000 for a 45 minute coffee meeting, I was motivated to have a lot of coffee meetings. Yeah and from a broker coach standpoint, I go to the same organization with every one of my agents, I say, okay, how do you figure out your ROI and what you're good at everyone's good at something different but once you know, what you're making per activity, how do you motivate yourself to continue to do that activity and that's really the key, like, keep yourself motivated?   Michael: Yeah, no, that's so good. That's so good. I think we could do the exact same thing from the investor side is like, okay, what how, you know, how are you networking? What is the activity you're doing and what is the ROI. That's great man, absolutely curious to get your thoughts, because you've been on both sides of the coin, like, what should investors be doing to a, like, be good to work with to be a good investment be a good client for their agents but also, how do they go find a good investor friendly agent and how can you kind of, you know, how do you break up with a bad one?   Omni: Yeah, that's a really good question. I think there's a lot of online forums now, with investor friendly agents or agents that are at least advertising as investor friendly. No, I think it'd be hard for me to work with an agent that is investor friendly, but doesn't invest themselves, right. So, so it's a simple conversation, like, what are they doing? Are they actually investing in not to say it's required, but at the level that I need right now, of the amount of transactions I do in the advisor, I'd love if my agent could actually be an advisor, right, so I think I understand the investment standpoint, but they should know that the market specifics, they should know how that ties into that specific geographic region that I might not be familiar with and I want them to walk me through and have this kind of mastermind kind of effect of us both thinking through and, and if they have not, kind of done their own investments, it makes it harder now, we'll say for our brand new investor, and investor friendly agent that has not invested I think it's okay, because they're learning the knowledge there.   But yeah, I think I when I asked him, how, what kind of investments do they do, and if I'm focusing on doing a burr in a particular area, that usually means that they need to know you know, how to be a landlord how to fix and flip you know, how to get contractor quotes and things like that, to give me some guidance of what the cost structure for that type of project in that area would be and where do you where do we find them? It's through referrals. So from an investor's standpoint, you know, various meetups, there's a lot of online meetups now but if you can connect with online meetups, various podcasts like this, you know, people make recommendations per area and what's interesting people go to an area and they, they are usually gonna go through one of one of two, they're like, I want to find the best agent in the area, the top agent, guess what the top agent doesn't want to work with us, they don't have time to work with an investor looking to buy a $200,000 property, right, because they've gotten to a level. So they're not to say they couldn't help you, they just don't want to help you right now, unless they have a team of people, they're gonna hand up the truth, they're gonna go the right, the other route of I'm gonna go with a brand new agent that has nothing else to do. So they're going to do everything that I want, and they're going to do it at a, at a very affordable rate. Once again, now you are just coaching, and you don't get the benefit of someone with expertise. So usually, it's somewhere in between someone that's a successful agent, not a top agent, but also an investor as well and if you get stuck with somebody that is not meeting your criteria, one, it usually comes down to one or two things, one, they don't know how to help you, maybe they don't even want to help you because they didn't know what they're gonna get into, or the communication, expectations or not and so I think getting really good at setting your communications upfront, before you agree to work with them. If you're really good at setting your communications, people will, some people will not actually want to work with you, not because of you, but they're gonna say, okay, I need to be at a certain level of understanding and expertise to meet his expectations. I don't think I can meet that. But guess what this agent I think might be the right fit for you and maybe you might get a recommendation from there, but lay down exactly what you, you know, what you would like to see from the relationship and they have to see that it's mutually beneficial. So whenever I go into a new market, I rarely go in with the intent of buying one property, I usually go into the intent of establishing a market and if I can build the right team, I'm gonna buy a lot of properties in that area and whether I'm talking to a in real estate agent or a property manager, I tell them that I want to become your number one client, that's my goal, there's no guarantee I will, it will be based on whether or not this relationship continues at work and I find deals that are profitable, and you help me find those deals. But if so, I will continue to invest around you and so I invest around good agents and good property managers, more so than specific locations. There's great locations out there that I own one or two properties in, I just have not continued to buy there. Because I don't love the team that I have yet, you know. So it's, it's I just have not found the right team to give me the confidence to scale up to 30, 40, 50 properties in one area around someone that maybe I'm not fully happy with in terms of communication or results.   Michael: Yeah, that makes a ton of sense and I talked about with folks on the podcast and in the Roofstock Academy all the time about just that, like, do you go deep into a market or do you go wide across multiple, and I think when you go wide, you get exposure to a lot of different markets, you can you can decide, hey, market A was great market beat, maybe not so much. See, we're gonna pass entirely, but you wouldn't have seen market A;B;C if you're only in market a so and that makes a ton of sense and then so from on the investor side, like what should we be doing. Other than setting very clear expectations around communication to be to make agents want to work with us. I mean, we want to, of course, be the number one client for those agents but what can we be doing skill wise or communication wise or pitch wise to make ourselves as attractive as possible for agents to fight over us so to speak?   Omni: Yeah, I love that and I think, even today, when I go into a new market, I still, like come in with when I'm interviewing agents, but I really want them to be interviewing me as well and I really want to show up as a as a good and desirable client and, and so I do want to make it as easy as possible for them. So I will do a little bit more backend research on my end. If I know I have access to the data, rather than making my agent go do some, you know, meaningless task or some task that they might not fully understand yet. I'll do that until we kind of are on the same page and reach almost partnership level, right. So I do try to make it easy. If I just go in and say okay, here's a list of everything that I need right now and guess what we're going to make 30 offers and none of them might get will probably not get accepted, but that's my average or whatever the case may be. They're probably not going to like working with me or want to work with me. So I set the expectations up front of here's what we're going to get to, but I also if there's something that I can do, or some like my virtual assistants, someone on my team can take care of, I'll take that off of the agents play and really only use them for the essential things that I don't have access to or I don't like they're my boots on the ground. They are my local knowledge and those are the two things and sources to sources to other contractors, sources to wholesalers. But those are the things that my agents really bring to the table and I want to make sure that anything outside of that if I can take care of it myself, I'm going to take care of it myself or have someone on my team take care of it.   Michael: So even though they might be a Jack or Jill, of all trades we shouldn't be using and abusing them as a Swiss army knife.   Omni: Yeah, until they volunteer to be abused, or until they say, you are my number one client, and we bought 10 properties together, what can I do to help you buy 10 more. Sure, but if you're still trying to buy your first or second property, I mean, how many of those type of investors has every real estate agent worked with a lot. The reality is, there's always a little bit of skepticism until they get to that first one or two transactions, then it's like, okay, this is real. He's one of the good investors and not one of the investors that don't know what they're doing. So I think it's prove yourself both sides are proving yourself through till you get to your first few transactions.   Michael: That makes total sense. I met a question that I have for you, and you're gonna have to kind of wear both hats, if you could. So as an investor, I'm sure I would actually ask you, have you ever made an offer, like a ridiculous offer. You're like, there's no way this gets accepted and it does?   Omni: Yes, all the time, all the time, so…   Michael: I have to, and I've had agents tell me, that's probably not going to get accepted and I push them I say, do it anyway. Now, you mentioned that as an agent, working with clients, like throwing out ridiculous offers, and you feel like it's a waste of time for the agent. So how do you square those two. I mean, how can you know what I mean?   Omni: Yeah, and I can see absolutely both sides and I do take off and put on hats all the time, as you mentioned, right. So whenever I do training, I gotta explain like, okay, I have my broker head on right now and then sometimes I'm like, no, I'm not a broker right now, I'm putting my investor hat on. So it is a different perspective. I think understanding the perspective on the other side is definitely helpful. Me personally, when I put in offers, I usually, for a very long time, I've usually done in three offers strategy. So I usually put in three offers at the same time to the same client, and it is varying strengths of offers and it usually has some sort of component. So there might be an all cash offer, there might be a traditional lending offer, that's a little bit all cash is going to be the lowest price the seller needs to sell today, it's going to be the lowest price and traditional lending offer is going to be at 95% of value, or whatever it is and I might go 100% or 105% of market value if they're willing to do seller financing, right and so you're kind of laying out these, you're educating your agent at the same time, if they're not familiar with that. And you give I give my agent, my agent, the exact wording the exact template, so they're not having to figure out, what do I do here, I say, here's the wording, here's what you sent to them, here's the attendance for the offers and we're gonna give them three options to choose from and so although it is more explanation on their part, it really is some coaching that I take on if it's a new agent of here's what I want you to say, here's what I want you to do and they usually see that as really good education of how they can better serve other investors moving forward.   But rarely do I just put in an offer of alright, they want $500,000, let's say 200,000, you know, so it's just that just not me, I usually give multiple options there and they're comfortable doing that not to say, you can't do that, I think you just need to set the right expectations with that agent of alright, we are going to be putting in 50 offers at ridiculous prices and then if they're okay with that, great, they build a template and hopefully it takes them two minutes to get the paperwork ready for you because it's already pre built but if they're having to like struggle through and spend, sometimes upwards of a few hours prepping offer paperwork, people don't understand, like it could take several hours prepping that paperwork and reviewing it. That's probably not worth it to submit 30 offers for the chance of one going through, you know, if they, if they figured out their ROI on that activity, it'd be like less than minimum wage. So I think it's setting the right expectations, making sure they're okay with that but my strategy is that three offers strategy that gives them at least a better chance of having a conversation with that listing agent or seller that might turn into something.   Michael: Yeah, it's funny, I actually do the same thing that three offers strategy, and I just made a YouTube video talking all about it. So I think it's great. It gives folks the choice of which of your offers am I going to choose as opposed to yes, no accept or reject.   Omni: Absolutely, I don't want to sell everything in between yes and no, I want them to be thinking between option one, two and three and it works at a much higher rate than people think.   Michael: I love it, I love it, Omni this was so much fun, man really insightful for people that want to continue the conversation and learn more about you reach out to you directly where's the best place to do so?   Omni: Yeah, I'm on social media Omni the investor guy Facebook, Instagram and actually on Tik Tok now no dancing yet but I'm getting there soon and then I'm on https://www.omnitheinvestorguy.com/ is my website you can get information on the booking see my story you can send me messages there as well.   Michael: Awesome. Well, hey, thanks again man and I'm sure we'll be chatting soon.   Omni: Always a pleasure, thanks.   Michael: Take care. All right, everyone. That was our episode a big thank you to all my for coming back on the show, super, super interesting stuff. Definitely have a lot to think about and hopefully you do too as an investor or as an agent, kind of walking on the other side of the coin. So as always, if you'd like the episode, please feel free to leave us a rating or review and we look forward to seeing on the next one. Happy investing…

FT Everything Else
What Warhol's Marilyn tells us about the art market

FT Everything Else

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 18, 2022 33:01


Last month, Andy Warhol's "Shot Sage Blue Marilyn" sold for $195mn, making it the second most expensive piece of art to sell at auction, ever. And as prices keep going up, the art market — auction houses, gallerists, dealers, collectors — want to keep it that way. On the heels of a ‘stonking' art season, we invite two heavy hitters into the studio to walk us through it: arts editor Jan Dalley and art market columnist Melanie Gerlis. Then, Christie's head of 20th- and 21st-century art, Alex Rotter, pulls back the curtain on these record-breaking sales. --------------Want to say hi? We love hearing from you. Email us at ftweekendpodcast@ft.com. We're on Twitter @ftweekendpod, and Lilah is on Instagram and Twitter @lilahrap. --------------Links and mentions from the episode: – Melanie's article ‘Art Basel's Swiss fair defies gloomy economy with soaring sales': https://on.ft.com/3QtSagn – Melanie's auction season roundup: https://on.ft.com/38jn363 – Columnist John Gapper on how ‘The art market cannot get enough Andy Warhol Marilyns': https://on.ft.com/3O3GeAm – Jan's most recent art column, on whether we should send art back to Russia: https://on.ft.com/3OeLzF2 – Robert Armstrong's profile of Larry Gagosian: https://on.ft.com/3IfT0sD – Melanie's books are called The Art Fair Story and Art as an Investment? – Melanie is on Twitter @mgerlis, and Alex is on Instagram @rottweilernyc.—-------------Special offers for Weekend listeners, from 50% off a digital subscription to a $1/£1/€1 trial are here: http://ft.com/weekendpodcast. --------------Original music by Metaphor Music. Mixing and sound design by Breen Turner and Sam Giovinco. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

FT News Briefing
FT Weekend: What Warhol's Marilyn tells us about the art market

FT News Briefing

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 18, 2022 34:02


Last month, Andy Warhol's "Shot Sage Blue Marilyn" sold for $195mn, making it the second most expensive piece of art to sell at auction, ever. And as prices keep going up, the art market — auction houses, gallerists, dealers, collectors — want to keep it that way. On the heels of a ‘stonking' art season, we invite two heavy hitters into the studio to walk us through it: arts editor Jan Dalley and art market columnist Melanie Gerlis. Then, Christie's head of 20th- and 21st-century art, Alex Rotter, pulls back the curtain on these record-breaking sales. --------------Want to say hi? We love hearing from you. Email us at ftweekendpodcast@ft.com. We're on Twitter @ftweekendpod, and Lilah is on Instagram and Twitter @lilahrap. --------------Links and mentions from the episode: – Melanie's article ‘Art Basel's Swiss fair defies gloomy economy with soaring sales': https://on.ft.com/3QtSagn – Melanie's auction season roundup: https://on.ft.com/38jn363 – Columnist John Gapper on how ‘The art market cannot get enough Andy Warhol Marilyns': https://on.ft.com/3O3GeAm – Jan's most recent art column, on whether we should send art back to Russia: https://on.ft.com/3OeLzF2 – Robert Armstrong's profile of Larry Gagosian: https://on.ft.com/3IfT0sD – Melanie's books are called The Art Fair Story and Art as an Investment? – Melanie is on Twitter @mgerlis, and Alex is on Instagram @rottweilernyc.—-------------Special offers for Weekend listeners, from 50% off a digital subscription to a $1/£1/€1 trial are here: http://ft.com/weekendpodcast. --------------Original music by Metaphor Music. Mixing and sound design by Breen Turner and Sam Giovinco. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.