Podcasts about AstraZeneca

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British pharmaceutical company

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Best podcasts about AstraZeneca

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Latest podcast episodes about AstraZeneca

Global News Podcast
Scientists find trigger for rare AstraZeneca clots

Global News Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 23:06


Findings should help company make any necessary changes; Meghan Markle wins a major legal battle with a UK newspaper. How high school basketball players tried to message a friend, but ended up talking to Tom Brady.

El Universo Podcasts
El Universo Podcast: jueves 2 de diciembre de 2021

El Universo Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 7:22


Grupos de profesionales del área administrativa y de salud acudieron a recibir la tercera vacuna, el refuerzo anticovid que desde el miércoles se habilitó a todas las personas de 18 años en adelante que hayan cumplido seis meses de haber recibido la segunda dosis. Esta decisión del Ministerio de Salud Pública se da para reforzar la inmunización, reducir la mortalidad, la enfermedad grave y con base en evidencia científica se aplica una dosis de AstraZeneca como refuerzo. Más aún con la alerta por la variante ómicron.

El Universo Podcasts
El Universo Podcast: miércoles 1 de diciembre de 2021

El Universo Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 6:01


El Gobierno adelantó para este miércoles la colocación de la dosis de refuerzo a toda la población ya vacunada, ante la amenaza que supone la variante ómicron de covid, descubierta en Sudáfrica. Esta fase estaba prevista que comience masivamente en enero.  La dosis de refuerzo de AstraZeneca se aplicará a quienes tengan cumplidos seis meses desde su última vacuna, haya sido esta la de dos dosis o la monodosis. La misma se usará para quienes padecen de inmunosupresión y son mayores de 12 años.

Coronavirus 4 1 1  podcast
Coronavirus, COVID-19, Omicron and Delta variants, and vaccine updates for 11-30-2021

Coronavirus 4 1 1 podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 4:54


This is Coronavirus 411, the latest on Omicron and other COVID variants and new hotspots for November 30th, 2021. No matter how the new Omicron variant turns out, the World Health Organization would like to see more globalization when it comes to pandemics. Specifically, some sort of international accord to prevent, prepare, and respond to future outbreaks. A draft resolution stops short of calling for a treaty or legally binding instrument, but some are saying that's what's needed. Scientists are hard at work in South Africa trying to assess how well the vaccines work against Omicron. Right now, it's still unknown how well it can hide from immune defenses primed by vaccines. They'll not only test AstraZeneca, Pfizer, and Johnson & Johnson vaccines, they'll also use plasma from recovered patients to gauge the risk of reinfection with Omicron after recovering from previous versions of the virus. Officials in New York City reinstated their mask advisory while indoors, that means places like grocery stores, building lobbies and offices, regardless of vaccination status. Masks are still required for public transit, health care settings, schools, and congregate settings like churches. Omicron has not yet been detected in the city, but officials know it's only a matter of time. They're all mandated to get vaccinated, but which federal department do you think has the lowest vaccination rate so far? It's the US Department of Agriculture at 86.1% according the White House. Next comes the Department of Veterans Affairs at 87.8%, and the Department of the Interior at 88.3%. From the “it doesn't pay to think you're clever” department, a couple tried to escape the quarantine in the Netherlands after testing positive. But they got caught and are being held in forced isolation at a hospital. The pair fled the hotel where travelers who tested positive were staying after arriving in Amsterdam from South Africa and hopped a plane to Spain. Military police were there to greet them. With reporting affected by the Thanksgiving holiday, in the United States cases were up 3%, deaths are down 10%, and hospitalizations are up 11% over 14 days. The 7-day average of new cases has been trending up since November 3. The five states that had the most daily deaths per 100,000 are Montana, West Virginia, Oregon, Michigan, and Kentucky. There are 9,467,489 active cases in the United States. The five states with the greatest increase in hospitalizations per capita: New Hampshire 49%, Massachusetts 47%, Indiana 45%, Michigan 41%, and Illinois 34%. The top 10 counties with the highest number of recent cases per capita according to The New York Times: Scurry, TX. Mason, MI. Shiawassee, MI. Nodaway, MO. Houghton, MI. Sullivan, NH. Ionia, MI. Jackson, MI. DeKalb, IN. And Oceana, MI. There have been at least 776,639 deaths in the U.S. recorded as Covid-related. The top 3 vaccinating states by percentage of population that's been fully vaccinated: Vermont at 72.7%, Rhode Island at 72.2%, and Maine at 72.1%. The bottom 3 vaccinating states are West Virginia at 41.5%, Wyoming at 45.3%, and Alabama at 46%. The percentage of the U.S. that's been fully vaccinated is 59%. Globally, cases were up 14% and deaths were down 3% over 14 days, with the 7-day average trending up since October 15. There are 20,242,995 active cases around the world. The five countries with the most new cases: The United States 69,498. The U.K. 42,583. Germany 42,582. Russia 33,860. And Hungary 27,830. There have been at least 5,199,349 deaths reported as Covid-related worldwide. For the latest updates, subscribe for free to Coronavirus 411 on your podcast app or ask your smart speaker to play the Coronavirus 411 podcast. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Spectrum | Deutsche Welle
Omicron variant: What we (don't) know

Spectrum | Deutsche Welle

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 14:37


PVRoundup Podcast
No association found between COVID-19 vaccination and early pregnancy loss

PVRoundup Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 10:16


Does COVID-19 vaccination cause early pregnancy loss? Find out about this and more in today's PV Roundup podcast.

Wake Up to Money
Working 9 to 5 ... till 50

Wake Up to Money

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 47:24


Felicity Hannah takes a look at why older workers are having to change their job hunting tactics and how some people are getting their own back on scammers. Plus a look ahead to the latest NEETs figures (16-24 year olds not in education employment or training) and AstraZeneca unveils plans for a huge £1bn R&D centre.

The Global Politico
Why the African Union isn't waiting for COVAX

The Global Politico

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 25:02


The U.N.-backed COVAX vaccine facility was supposed to be a game changer. But with less than ten percent of Africans vaccinated — well short of the African Union's goal of 60% by the end of this year— Strive Masiyiwa, the head of the Union's vaccination effort, says the continent can no longer rely on donations and vaccines produced abroad to fight disease. Masiyiwa tells POLITICO's Ryan Heath about his negotiations with the Indian government after he realized they would no longer be exporting vaccines to Africa — and why that moment convinced him the only thing left to do was to build out a vaccine infrastructure back home.  POLITICO couldn't confirm a figure mentioned by our guest in this episode — that there has been $32b distributed in stimulus funds across Africa during the coronavirus pandemic. Strive Masiyiwa's team did not respond to request for comment in time for broadcast. Strive Masiyiwa is the head of the African Vaccine Acquisition Task Team and the founder and executive chairman of Econet.  Ryan Heath is the host of the "Global Insider" podcast and authors the newsletter.  Olivia Reingold produces “Global Insider.”  Irene Noguchi  edits “Global Insider” and is the executive producer of POLITICO Audio.

The Research Evangelist
Meet Rodney Gillespie, accomplished pharmaceutical industry executive. He is passionate about giving back to disadvantaged communities and kids.

The Research Evangelist

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 38:25


On today's episode, meet Rodney Gillespie. Rodney is a Global executive with broad leadership experience. He is currently the Vice President, Oncology Sales & Marketing, Solid Tumor at The Janssen Pharmaceutical Companies of Johnson & Johnson (JNJ). Before joining JNJ, Rodney had a thirteen-year tenure with AstraZeneca, including stints in the UK and in South Africa. Rodney has a Bachelor of Science Degree in Commerce & Engineering from Drexel University in Philadelphia and a Masters of Business Administration from University of Washington in Seattle. He has a passion for participating in activities and organizations that allow him to give back to disadvantaged communities and kids.

Coronacast
Will vaccination cause new variants?

Coronacast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 10:29


When the slew of variants popped into existence last year, scientists began worrying what it could mean for vaccine resistant variants down the line. So far, the Delta variant has remained top dog. While it is much more infectious than the original coronavirus, thankfully it doesn't evade our vaccines by much. But what about down the line? As more and more of the world is vaccinated, will the virus find a way to evolve to get around vaccines? That's on today's Coronacast. Also on today's show: * Lockdowns return to Europe * How is Japan doing such a good job? * What side effects can I expect from my Pfizer booster shot if I had AstraZeneca for my first and second shot?

Best of Today
AstraZeneca Boss: Jab limited UK Covid hospitalisations

Best of Today

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 10:20


The biggest science lab in the UK, which is also the biggest investment AstraZeneca has ever made, had its formal opening in Cambridge on Tuesday. Today's Justin Webb went to Cambridge to speak to Pascal Soriot, the boss of AstraZeneca, about his hopes for the £1bn research facility and the key role the AZ vaccine has had in reducing serious illness and death from Covid-19. (Image: Researcher working on AstraZeneca Vaccine, Credit: John Cairns/University of Oxford/PA Wire)

Raise the Line
The Why and How of Joining the ‘Best Profession in the World' - Dr. Katie Bean and Dr. Beth Macintire, Co-founders of Pre-PA Clinic

Raise the Line

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 32:12


Mentioned in this episode:https://www.prepaclinic.comhttps://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/where-the-white-coats-come-off/id1568900250https://prepaclinic.com/?product=book-secrets-tips-tactics-everything-you-need-to-know-to-get-accepted-into-pa-school 

C dans l'air
COVID : ALERTE GÉNÉRALE ! SAUF EN FRANCE ? - 19/11/21

C dans l'air

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 65:43


COVID : ALERTE GÉNÉRALE ! SAUF EN FRANCE ? - 19/11/21 Invités Pr ODILE LAUNAY Infectiologue – Hôpital Cochin SOPHIE AURENCHE Journaliste - « RTL » NICOLAS BERROD Journaliste - « Le Parisien – Aujourd'hui en France » Dr RICHARD HANDSCHUH Médecin généraliste à Paris Membre du syndicat MG France Pr ANTOINE FLAHAULT - En direct de Genève Épidémiologiste Directeur de l'Institut de santé globale de l'Université de Genève C'est une première en Europe depuis le printemps dernier. Pour tenter d'endiguer le nombre considérable de nouveaux cas de Covid-19 en Autriche, le chancelier Alexander Schallenberg a annoncé, ce vendredi 19 novembre, un reconfinement général de tout le pays dès lundi « pour vingt jours ». Il a également fait savoir qu'une obligation vaccinale serait instaurée à compter du 1er février 2022. Ces décisions interviennent seulement cinq jours après l'entrée en vigueur du confinement des non-vaccinés dans le pays. Il faut « regarder la réalité en face. Malgré des mois de persuasion, nous n'avons pas réussi à convaincre suffisamment de gens de se faire vacciner », a expliqué le chancelier conservateur, déplorant la surcharge actuelle des unités de soins intensifs et le taux « d'« honteusement bas » de la couverture vaccinale (65,6 %). « La dynamique des contaminations n'est pas tenable », alertait la veille Wilfried Haslauer, gouverneur du Land de Salzbourg, où le taux d'incidence sur sept jours a dépassé 1 700 cas pour 100 000 habitants. Dès lundi, les commerces non essentiels, à commencer par les restaurants et les hôtels, seront donc fermés en Autriche. Les habitants seront appelés à rester chez eux, excepté pour se rendre à leur travail ou faire des achats essentiels. Ils conserveront aussi le droit de prendre l'air et sont incités à aller se faire vacciner. En Allemagne où seulement 67,9 % de la population est complètement vaccinée, les contaminations flambent également. Plus de 65 000 nouveaux cas de Covid-19 ont été déclarés au cours des dernières vingt-quatre heures et la situation sanitaire est si grave qu'un confinement ne peut pas être exclu, y compris pour les personnes vaccinées, a affirmé ce vendredi le ministre de la Santé. La veille, Angela Merkel avait déjà annoncé des nouvelles restrictions drastiques pour les personnes qui ne sont pas vaccinées contre le Covid-19 et ouvert la voie à une obligation vaccinale pour les personnels soignants. Mais ces mesures arrivent trop tard pour éviter la saturation de nombreux hôpitaux. En Bavière, où pour la première fois un patient a dû être transféré vers l'Italie, le chef du gouvernement Marku Söder vient de décider l'annulation de tous les marchés de Noël dans la région. En France, si la situation n'est pas si alarmante, « les chiffres confirment qu'on est dans la 5e vague », a affirmé Olivier Véran. Jeudi, Santé publique France a fait savoir que le taux d'incidence dépasse le seuil d'alerte dans tous les départements de France métropolitaine. 20 366 nouveaux cas de Covid-19 ont été détectés dans le pays en vingt-quatre heures. Un chiffre de nouveau en nette hausse par rapport à la semaine dernière, notamment chez les enfants. Le ministère de l' Education a indiqué ce vendredi que plus de 4000 classes sont fermées à cause d'un cas de coronavirus, un record depuis la rentrée. Pour autant, dans un entretien à La Voix du Nord, le président de la République a écarté l'hypothèse d'un confinement réservé aux non-vaccinés. Un retour généralisé au télétravail « n'est pas envisagé aujourd'hui » a également assuré la ministre du Travail Elisabeth Borne sur RMC. « 90 % des adultes sont vaccinés, nous avons d'autres armes (…) Il y a un protocole sanitaire très strict en entreprise qui impose notamment le port du masque dans les espaces de travail partagé. Il y a eu un certain relâchement, j'appelle tout le monde à se remobiliser. Nous allons augmenter les contrôles de l'inspection du travail » a souligné la ministre. Parmi les autres armes, l'exécutif met en avant l'importance de la troisième dose de vaccin contre le Covid-19 pour les personnes éligibles et n'exclut pas une généralisation de l'obligation du rappel vaccinal après six mois, si l'avis des autorités sanitaires va dans ce sens. Enfin, l'espoir viendra aussi peut-être des traitements anti-Covid. Le laboratoire AstraZeneca a déclaré avoir réussi des essais cliniques avancés pour un médicament à base d'anticorps contre le Covid-19. Il emboîte ainsi le pas aux laboratoires américains Merck et Pfizer. Alors quelle est la situation sanitaire en Autriche, en Allemagne et chez nous ? Pourquoi les cas de Covid flambent-ils à nouveau ? La France fait-elle vraiment mieux que ses voisins ? Et où en est la course aux traitements contre le Covid-19 ? DIFFUSION : du lundi au samedi à 17h45 FORMAT : 65 minutes PRÉSENTATION : Caroline Roux - Axel de Tarlé REDIFFUSION : du lundi au vendredi vers 23h40 RÉALISATION : Nicolas Ferraro, Bruno Piney, Franck Broqua, Alexandre Langeard PRODUCTION : France Télévisions / Maximal Productions Retrouvez C DANS L'AIR sur internet & les réseaux : INTERNET : francetv.fr FACEBOOK : https://www.facebook.com/Cdanslairf5 TWITTER : https://twitter.com/cdanslair INSTAGRAM : https://www.instagram.com/cdanslair/

Raise the Line
Fixing the Black Hole of American Medicine – Dr. Rahul Rajkumar, COO Optum Care Solutions

Raise the Line

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 23:04


Early in Dr. Rahul Rajkumar's career, he wondered how he could help improve health outcomes at a population level. An interest in public policy led him to the realization that, at least in the U.S., the financing mechanisms of the health care industry are “the main lever” that we have to this end. The question of how these mechanisms should (or could) be reengineered has guided Dr. Rajkumar through a career that has taken him from the clinic to the health insurance industry to government, where as deputy director at the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Innovation, he experimented with different approaches to organizing and paying for health care systems. The problem is “really, really hard,” he tells host Dr. Rishi Desai. Every single case “is a puzzle with a human being at the center of it.” Rajkumar believes more attention should be paid to what he calls ‘the black hole of American Medicine' – the period after a patient is discharged from the hospital when coordinating care becomes more difficult. “Is there an accountable provider, or a quarterback outside of the hospital? Someone who, beyond their professional ethic, actually cares about what happens to this patient? That's the nut of the issue.” Tune in to hear about novel payment systems emerging in the wake of the Affordable Care Act, the true social meaning of health insurance, and what other nations try to emulate about the famously dysfunctional U.S. health care system.

ASCO Daily News
Dr. Oliver Sartor on the VISION Trial and Improving Care for Patients With mCRPC

ASCO Daily News

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 12:52


Guest host Dr. Neeraj Agarwal, editor-in-chief of ASCO Daily News and director of the Genitourinary Cancers Program at the University of Utah Huntsman Cancer Institute, interviews Dr. Oliver Sartor, medical director of the Tulane Cancer Center in New Orleans, on the practice-changing VISION trial and its impact on the current treatment paradigm for mCRPC. Transcript ASCO Daily News: Welcome to the ASCO Daily News Podcast. Our topic today is the practice-changing VISION trial, a phase III trial of radioligand therapy in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer. Our guest host, Dr. Neeraj Agarwal, the editor-in-chief of the ASCO Daily News and director of the Genitourinary Cancers Program at the University of Utah's Huntsman Cancer Institute, will speak with one of the trial's investigators, Dr. Oliver Sartor, the medical director of the Tulane Cancer Center and Laborde Professor for Cancer Research. Their full disclosures are available on the transcript of this episode, and disclosures relating to all episodes of the Daily News Podcast are available on our transcripts at asco.org/podcasts.   Dr. Neeraj Agarwal: Hi, my name is Dr. Neeraj Agarwal. I am with Dr. Oliver Sartor. Today, we are going to discuss one of the practice-changing trials in the context of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer. Welcome to the ASCO Daily News Podcast, Dr. Sartor. Thanks for taking the time to be with us today.   Dr. Oliver Sartor: Thank you, Neeraj. A pleasure to be here.   Dr. Neeraj Agarwal: You recently published the primary results of the phase III VISION trial, which tested the efficacy of a novel radioligand therapy, Lutetium-177-PSMA-617, in men with metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer. Could you please tell us more about this compound and why you did this study?   Dr. Oliver Sartor:  So I'll start off with the compound itself. Radioligand therapy is a therapy that has a little warhead, and that warhead in this case is Lutetium-177. But it's guided by binding to PSMA. Now, PSMA is prostate-specific membrane antigen, and many of us are familiar with it, but some may not be. So PSMA is a protein expressed on the surface of most prostate cancer cells. Not all patients have it, but most do. And the ability of the PSMA Lutetium-177 to target the cancer was indicated in some preliminary studies, but they have not been to phase III. So the purpose of the phase III VISION trial was really to design a definitive study to look at overall survival, in particular, to determine whether or not this agent was truly active. And the good news is, it is truly active. And in the VISION trial, we were able to not only extend life with an overall survival benefit, haz ratio 0.62, but there was also a time-to-progression image-based radiographic progression-free survival. It was also much in favor of the PSMA Lutetium with a haz ratio of 0.4. So whether or not you look at time to cancer progression or whether or not you look at overall survival, this is an effective therapy. It, of course, does have some adverse side effects. We can talk more about that, but it's reasonably well tolerated. And I do anticipate that there'll be an FDA approval as a consequence of these pivotal findings.   Dr. Neeraj Agarwal: These are wonderful results and news for our patients. Please tell me how it will affect the current treatment paradigm of our patients with mCRPC. As we know, you selected patients who had disease progression on chemotherapy with taxanes and novel hormonal therapy. But real-world studies, many of which were published by you, have shown that docetaxel is received by a minority of patients with metastatic prostate cancer. So how do you envision treating your patients who do not want to be treated with chemotherapy as many of my patients do? How will you apply Lutetium-177 in their treatment?   Dr. Oliver Sartor:  Well, Neeraj, I think that we're going to be restricted in accordance with the label that the FDA provides. And I fully expect that the label will include a progression after treatment with docetaxel or at least one taxane-based therapy because that's the way the VISION trial was constructed. Now, you're raising a very critical point, and that is, what about the individuals that do not want to receive or are ineligible to receive a chemotherapy such as docetaxel? And for those individuals, we now have a new trial called PSMA4, and that trial is going to be testing the Lutetium-177-PSMA-617 in the context of chemotherapy-naive patients. So I think we're going to have to wait until we have more results, more clinical trials completed, prior to the application of PSMA-617 into the more general population of chemotherapy-naive patients. But those clinical trials are now underway.   Dr. Neeraj Agarwal: That's great. So, Oliver, in the VISION trial, you did mandate a diagnostic PSMA PET scan, and patients who were positive on the diagnostic PSMA PET scan were deemed to be eligible for enrollment on the VISION trial. Do you expect FDA to include diagnostic PSMA scan for eligibility for treatment with the Lutetium-177 in the real-world setting? If it doesn't or if it does, how it is going to affect the treatment of our patients, that availability of treatment for our patients?   Dr. Oliver Sartor:  That's really a great question. And I do expect that PSMA PET imaging will be a criteria given that it was used for patient selection. Now, as it turned out, about 87% of the patients actually did qualify after getting a PSMA PET scan. And given that that was part of the inclusion criteria, I anticipate that the FDA will also incorporate such imaging. Now, it does get to be a bit of an issue because it turns out that PSMA PET is just now coming into more widespread use. We did have, in May of this year, the approval by the FDA for the PSMA PET imaging agent and-- I shouldn't say "the"-- a PSMA PET imaging agent. Prior to that, in December of last year, there was both UCLA and UCSF approval by the FDA for yet another PSMA PET imaging agent. As we move forward, I anticipate that PET imaging is going to be more widely available. And of course, we don't have the approval as of yet today for the PSMA-617-Lutetium-177. And when we do get the anticipated approval, which likely will be in 2022, then I also anticipate that PSMA PET will be more widely available. Now, there are still issues with reimbursement for PSMA PET, and we've encountered those in our own practice. But that's a rapidly changing area, and we're working with the insurance companies in an effort to ensure that patients will get the imaging that they need.   Dr. Neeraj Agarwal:  Got it. And obviously, I asked this question because many of my community friends and colleagues have asked me this question.  Before we talk about the side effects of Lutetium-177, would you have any message for our friends and colleagues in the community who are bracing themselves for treating their patients with the Lutetium-177, whether they should be proactive in establishing contacts and relationships with the nuclear medicine facilities and so on?   Dr. Oliver Sartor:  That's a great question, Neeraj, because I think you're raising a very important point. This is going to be the type of therapy that involves multidisciplinary care. We can see that there'll be diagnostic PET imaging as being a component of the study. There'll be the necessity of licensed physicians, typically either nuclear medicine or radiation oncology, to actually administer the drug. And then, quite frankly, the medical oncologists or those urologists who are trained in advanced prostate cancer are going to need to manage the patient. This is a lot more than just getting an injection. Many of these patients are ill. They need to have symptom management. They need to manage their bone health. They need to manage their hormonal manipulations. They need management with regard to pain. So this is not just about giving an injection. And I encourage those people who are interested to involve multidisciplinary teams starting now. And I realize that the therapy is not available now, but you have to anticipate that it will be. And I think it will be a game changer of a therapy, and many patients are going to want it. So that means it's incumbent upon the physicians to be prepared, and that means multidisciplinary care.   Dr. Neearj Agarwal:  Excellent point. So basically, we should be ready. We should start establishing relationships with nuclear medicine facilities or radiation oncologists who are going to deliver Lutetium-177. Overall, when I was reading the New England Journal paper, the side effect profile seemed very reasonable. I did not see any red flags. To me, it sounded like a pretty well-tolerated drug. So what is your take on the side effects of Lutetium-177?   Dr. Oliver Sartor: I think the side effects are quite manageable. One of the unique side effects is that of dry mouth and that's because the PSMA can actually be expressed in the salivary glands and that there is some potential for salivary gland binding in the PSMA-617-Lutetium. And that means that you can have damage to the salivary glands, and that means dry mouth. It turns out that a little over 40% of the patients actually did complain of a dry mouth, and that needs to be managed typically with fluid intake or various ways of mouth moisturizers. Fatigue is a potential issue. It was raised, as well as some bone marrow suppression. And if you look at the grade 3/4 toxicities, anemia was present a little more than 10% of the time. And that, of course, needs to be monitored. There is some potential collateral damage to the bone marrow. So these patients need to have their counts monitored. They need to have their symptoms assessed. And they need to be managed as they go through the process. It's not just about giving an injection, but clearly, the licensed individuals, including nuclear medicine and radiation oncology, need to be engaged, because without them, there is no injection. So this is a complex multidisciplinary care paradigm. And emphasizing the point, symptom management, yes; adverse event management, yes. But you have to deliver the drug, and that means multidisciplinary care.   Dr. Neeraj Agarwal:  Those are fantastic points. Thank you very much, Dr. Sartor, for taking time to be with us. And I'm really hoping that this podcast will be very enriching to our listeners. Thank you very much.   Dr. Oliver Sartor: Thank you, Neeraj. Glad to be here.   ASCO Daily News:  You've been listening to Dr. Neeraj Agarwal of the Huntsman Cancer Institute and Dr. Oliver Sartor of the Tulane Cancer Center. Our listeners will find a link to the VISION study in the transcript of this episode. Thank you to our listeners for joining us today. If you enjoyed this episode, please take a moment to rate, review, and subscribe wherever you get your podcasts.   Disclosures: Dr. Neeraj Agarwal Consulting or Advisory Role: Pfizer, Medivation/Astellas, Bristol-Myers Squibb, AstraZeneca, Nektar, Lilly, Bayer, Pharmacyclics, Foundation Medicine, Astellas Pharma, Exelixis, Merck, Novartis, Eisai,    Seattle Genetics, EMD Serono, Janssen Oncology, AVEO, Calithera Biosciences, MEI Pharma, Genentech, Astellas Pharma, Foundation Medicine, and Gilead Sciences   Research Funding (Inst.): Bayer Your Institution, Bristol-Myers Squibb, Takeda, Pfizer, Exelixis, Amgen,    AstraZeneca, Calithera Biosciences, Celldex, Eisai, Genentech, Immunomedics, Janssen, Merck, Lilly, Nektar, ORIC Pharmaceuticals, crispr therapeutics, and Arvinas     Disclosures: Dr. Oliver Sartor Stocks & Other Ownership Interests: Lilly, GlaxoSmithKline, Abbvie, Cardinal Health, United Health Group, PSMA Therapeutics, Clarity Pharmaceuticals, Noria Therapeutics, Inc., Clovis Consulting or Advisory Role: Bayer, Sanofi, AstraZeneca, Dendreon, Constellation Pharmaceuticals, Advanced Accelerator Applications, Pfizer, Bristol-Myers Squibb, Bavarian Nordic, EMD Serono, Astellas Pharma, Progenics, Blue Earth Diagnostics, Myovant, Myriad Genetics, Novartis, Clarify Pharmaceuticals, Fusion, Istopen Technologien Meunchen, Janssen, Noxopharm, Clovis, Noria Therapeutics, Point Biopharma, TeneoBio, Telix, Theragnostics Research Funding (Inst): Sotio, Janssen, Progenics, Bayer, Sanofi, Endocyte, Merck, Invitae, Constellation Pharmaceuticals, Advanced Accelerator Applications, Dendreon, AstraZeneca Expert Testimony: Sanofi Travel, Accommodations, Expenses: Bayer, Johnson & Johnson, Sanofi, AstraZeneca, Progenics   Disclaimer: The purpose of this podcast is to educate and to inform. This is not a substitute for professional medical care and is not intended for use in the diagnosis or treatment of individual conditions. Guests on this podcast express their own opinions, experience, and conclusions. The mention of any product, service, organization, activity, or therapy should not be construed as an ASCO endorsement.   Dr. Oliver Sartor on the VISION Trial and Improving Care for Patients With mCRPC       ASCO Daily News: Welcome to the ASCO Daily News Podcast. Our topic today is the practice-changing VISION trial, a phase III trial of radioligand therapy in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer. Our guest host, Dr. Neeraj Agarwal, the editor-in-chief of the ASCO Daily News and director of the Genitourinary Cancers Program at the University of Utah's Huntsman Cancer Institute, will speak with one of the trial's investigators, Dr. Oliver Sartor, the medical director of the Tulane Cancer Center and Laborde Professor for Cancer Research. Their full disclosures are available on the transcript of this episode, and disclosures relating to all episodes of the Daily News Podcast are available on our transcripts at asco.org/podcasts.   Dr. Neeraj Agarwal: Hi, my name is Dr. Neeraj Agarwal. I am with Dr. Oliver Sartor. Today, we are going to discuss one of the practice-changing trials in the context of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer. Welcome to the ASCO Daily News Podcast, Dr. Sartor. Thanks for taking the time to be with us today.   Dr. Oliver Sartor: Thank you, Neeraj. A pleasure to be here.   Dr. Neeraj Agarwal: You recently published the primary results of the phase III VISION trial, which tested the efficacy of a novel radioligand therapy, Lutetium-177-PSMA-617, in men with metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer. Could you please tell us more about this compound and why you did this study?   Dr. Oliver Sartor:  So I'll start off with the compound itself. Radioligand therapy is a therapy that has a little warhead, and that warhead in this case is Lutetium-177. But it's guided by binding to PSMA. Now, PSMA is prostate-specific membrane antigen, and many of us are familiar with it, but some may not be. So PSMA is a protein expressed on the surface of most prostate cancer cells. Not all patients have it, but most do. And the ability of the PSMA Lutetium-177 to target the cancer was indicated in some preliminary studies, but they have not been to phase III. So the purpose of the phase III VISION trial was really to design a definitive study to look at overall survival, in particular, to determine whether or not this agent was truly active. And the good news is, it is truly active. And in the VISION trial, we were able to not only extend life with an overall survival benefit, haz ratio 0.62, but there was also a time-to-progression image-based radiographic progression-free survival. It was also much in favor of the PSMA Lutetium with a haz ratio of 0.4. So whether or not you look at time to cancer progression or whether or not you look at overall survival, this is an effective therapy. It, of course, does have some adverse side effects. We can talk more about that, but it's reasonably well tolerated. And I do anticipate that there'll be an FDA approval as a consequence of these pivotal findings.   Dr. Neeraj Agarwal: These are wonderful results and news for our patients. Please tell me how it will affect the current treatment paradigm of our patients with mCRPC. As we know, you selected patients who had disease progression on chemotherapy with taxanes and novel hormonal therapy. But real-world studies, many of which were published by you, have shown that docetaxel is received by a minority of patients with metastatic prostate cancer. So how do you envision treating your patients who do not want to be treated with chemotherapy as many of my patients do? How will you apply Lutetium-177 in their treatment?   Dr. Oliver Sartor:  Well, Neeraj, I think that we're going to be restricted in accordance with the label that the FDA provides. And I fully expect that the label will include a progression after treatment with docetaxel or at least one taxane-based therapy because that's the way the VISION trial was constructed. Now, you're raising a very critical point, and that is, what about the individuals that do not want to receive or are ineligible to receive a chemotherapy such as docetaxel? And for those individuals, we now have a new trial called PSMA4, and that trial is going to be testing the Lutetium-177-PSMA-617 in the context of chemotherapy-naive patients. So I think we're going to have to wait until we have more results, more clinical trials completed, prior to the application of PSMA-617 into the more general population of chemotherapy-naive patients. But those clinical trials are now underway.   Dr. Neeraj Agarwal: That's great. So, Oliver, in the VISION trial, you did mandate a diagnostic PSMA PET scan, and patients who were positive on the diagnostic PSMA PET scan were deemed to be eligible for enrollment on the VISION trial. Do you expect FDA to include diagnostic PSMA scan for eligibility for treatment with the Lutetium-177 in the real-world setting? If it doesn't or if it does, how it is going to affect the treatment of our patients, that availability of treatment for our patients?   Dr. Oliver Sartor:  That's really a great question. And I do expect that PSMA PET imaging will be a criteria given that it was used for patient selection. Now, as it turned out, about 87% of the patients actually did qualify after getting a PSMA PET scan. And given that that was part of the inclusion criteria, I anticipate that the FDA will also incorporate such imaging. Now, it does get to be a bit of an issue because it turns out that PSMA PET is just now coming into more widespread use. We did have, in May of this year, the approval by the FDA for the PSMA PET imaging agent and-- I shouldn't say "the"-- a PSMA PET imaging agent. Prior to that, in December of last year, there was both UCLA and UCSF approval by the FDA for yet another PSMA PET imaging agent. As we move forward, I anticipate that PET imaging is going to be more widely available. And of course, we don't have the approval as of yet today for the PSMA-617-Lutetium-177. And when we do get the anticipated approval, which likely will be in 2022, then I also anticipate that PSMA PET will be more widely available. Now, there are still issues with reimbursement for PSMA PET, and we've encountered those in our own practice. But that's a rapidly changing area, and we're working with the insurance companies in an effort to ensure that patients will get the imaging that they need.   Dr. Neeraj Agarwal:  Got it. And obviously, I asked this question because many of my community friends and colleagues have asked me this question.  Before we talk about the side effects of Lutetium-177, would you have any message for our friends and colleagues in the community who are bracing themselves for treating their patients with the Lutetium-177, whether they should be proactive in establishing contacts and relationships with the nuclear medicine facilities and so on?   Dr. Oliver Sartor:  That's a great question, Neeraj, because I think you're raising a very important point. This is going to be the type of therapy that involves multidisciplinary care. We can see that there'll be diagnostic PET imaging as being a component of the study. There'll be the necessity of licensed physicians, typically either nuclear medicine or radiation oncology, to actually administer the drug. And then, quite frankly, the medical oncologists or those urologists who are trained in advanced prostate cancer are going to need to manage the patient. This is a lot more than just getting an injection. Many of these patients are ill. They need to have symptom management. They need to manage their bone health. They need to manage their hormonal manipulations. They need management with regard to pain. So this is not just about giving an injection. And I encourage those people who are interested to involve multidisciplinary teams starting now. And I realize that the therapy is not available now, but you have to anticipate that it will be. And I think it will be a game changer of a therapy, and many patients are going to want it. So that means it's incumbent upon the physicians to be prepared, and that means multidisciplinary care.   Dr. Neearj Agarwal:  Excellent point. So basically, we should be ready. We should start establishing relationships with nuclear medicine facilities or radiation oncologists who are going to deliver Lutetium-177. Overall, when I was reading the New England Journal paper, the side effect profile seemed very reasonable. I did not see any red flags. To me, it sounded like a pretty well-tolerated drug. So what is your take on the side effects of Lutetium-177?   Dr. Oliver Sartor: I think the side effects are quite manageable. One of the unique side effects is that of dry mouth and that's because the PSMA can actually be expressed in the salivary glands and that there is some potential for salivary gland binding in the PSMA-617-Lutetium. And that means that you can have damage to the salivary glands, and that means dry mouth. It turns out that a little over 40% of the patients actually did complain of a dry mouth, and that needs to be managed typically with fluid intake or various ways of mouth moisturizers. Fatigue is a potential issue. It was raised, as well as some bone marrow suppression. And if you look at the grade 3/4 toxicities, anemia was present a little more than 10% of the time. And that, of course, needs to be monitored. There is some potential collateral damage to the bone marrow. So these patients need to have their counts monitored. They need to have their symptoms assessed. And they need to be managed as they go through the process. It's not just about giving an injection, but clearly, the licensed individuals, including nuclear medicine and radiation oncology, need to be engaged, because without them, there is no injection. So this is a complex multidisciplinary care paradigm. And emphasizing the point, symptom management, yes; adverse event management, yes. But you have to deliver the drug, and that means multidisciplinary care.   Dr. Neeraj Agarwal:  Those are fantastic points. Thank you very much, Dr. Sartor, for taking time to be with us. And I'm really hoping that this podcast will be very enriching to our listeners. Thank you very much.   Dr. Oliver Sartor: Thank you, Neeraj. Glad to be here.   ASCO Daily News:  You've been listening to Dr. Neeraj Agarwal of the Huntsman Cancer Institute and Dr. Oliver Sartor of the Tulane Cancer Center. Our listeners will find a link to the VISION study in the transcript of this episode. Thank you to our listeners for joining us today. If you enjoyed this episode, please take a moment to rate, review, and subscribe wherever you get your podcasts.   Disclosures: Dr. Neeraj Agarwal Consulting or Advisory Role: Pfizer, Medivation/Astellas, Bristol-Myers Squibb, AstraZeneca, Nektar, Lilly, Bayer, Pharmacyclics, Foundation Medicine, Astellas Pharma, Exelixis, Merck, Novartis, Eisai,    Seattle Genetics, EMD Serono, Janssen Oncology, AVEO, Calithera Biosciences, MEI Pharma, Genentech, Astellas Pharma, Foundation Medicine, and Gilead Sciences   Research Funding (Inst.): Bayer Your Institution, Bristol-Myers Squibb, Takeda, Pfizer, Exelixis, Amgen,    AstraZeneca, Calithera Biosciences, Celldex, Eisai, Genentech, Immunomedics, Janssen, Merck, Lilly, Nektar, ORIC Pharmaceuticals, crispr therapeutics, and Arvinas     Disclosures: Dr. Oliver Sartor Stocks & Other Ownership Interests: Lilly, GlaxoSmithKline, Abbvie, Cardinal Health, United Health Group, PSMA Therapeutics, Clarity Pharmaceuticals, Noria Therapeutics, Inc., Clovis Consulting or Advisory Role: Bayer, Sanofi, AstraZeneca, Dendreon, Constellation Pharmaceuticals, Advanced Accelerator Applications, Pfizer, Bristol-Myers Squibb, Bavarian Nordic, EMD Serono, Astellas Pharma, Progenics, Blue Earth Diagnostics, Myovant, Myriad Genetics, Novartis, Clarify Pharmaceuticals, Fusion, Istopen Technologien Meunchen, Janssen, Noxopharm, Clovis, Noria Therapeutics, Point Biopharma, TeneoBio, Telix, Theragnostics Research Funding (Inst): Sotio, Janssen, Progenics, Bayer, Sanofi, Endocyte, Merck, Invitae, Constellation Pharmaceuticals, Advanced Accelerator Applications, Dendreon, AstraZeneca Expert Testimony: Sanofi Travel, Accommodations, Expenses: Bayer, Johnson & Johnson, Sanofi, AstraZeneca, Progenics   Disclaimer: The purpose of this podcast is to educate and to inform. This is not a substitute for professional medical care and is not intended for use in the diagnosis or treatment of individual conditions. Guests on this podcast express their own opinions, experience, and conclusions. The mention of any product, service, organization, activity, or therapy should not be construed as an ASCO endorsement.   Dr. Oliver Sartor on the VISION Trial and Improving Care for Patients With mCRPC       ASCO Daily News: Welcome to the ASCO Daily News Podcast. Our topic today is the practice-changing VISION trial, a phase III trial of radioligand therapy in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer. Our guest host, Dr. Neeraj Agarwal, the editor-in-chief of the ASCO Daily News and director of the Genitourinary Cancers Program at the University of Utah's Huntsman Cancer Institute, will speak with one of the trial's investigators, Dr. Oliver Sartor, the medical director of the Tulane Cancer Center and Laborde Professor for Cancer Research. Their full disclosures are available on the transcript of this episode, and disclosures relating to all episodes of the Daily News Podcast are available on our transcripts at asco.org/podcasts.   Dr. Neeraj Agarwal: Hi, my name is Dr. Neeraj Agarwal. I am with Dr. Oliver Sartor. Today, we are going to discuss one of the practice-changing trials in the context of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer. Welcome to the ASCO Daily News Podcast, Dr. Sartor. Thanks for taking the time to be with us today.   Dr. Oliver Sartor: Thank you, Neeraj. A pleasure to be here.   Dr. Neeraj Agarwal: You recently published the primary results of the phase III VISION trial, which tested the efficacy of a novel radioligand therapy, Lutetium-177-PSMA-617, in men with metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer. Could you please tell us more about this compound and why you did this study?   Dr. Oliver Sartor:  So I'll start off with the compound itself. Radioligand therapy is a therapy that has a little warhead, and that warhead in this case is Lutetium-177. But it's guided by binding to PSMA. Now, PSMA is prostate-specific membrane antigen, and many of us are familiar with it, but some may not be. So PSMA is a protein expressed on the surface of most prostate cancer cells. Not all patients have it, but most do. And the ability of the PSMA Lutetium-177 to target the cancer was indicated in some preliminary studies, but they have not been to phase III. So the purpose of the phase III VISION trial was really to design a definitive study to look at overall survival, in particular, to determine whether or not this agent was truly active. And the good news is, it is truly active. And in the VISION trial, we were able to not only extend life with an overall survival benefit, haz ratio 0.62, but there was also a time-to-progression image-based radiographic progression-free survival. It was also much in favor of the PSMA Lutetium with a haz ratio of 0.4. So whether or not you look at time to cancer progression or whether or not you look at overall survival, this is an effective therapy. It, of course, does have some adverse side effects. We can talk more about that, but it's reasonably well tolerated. And I do anticipate that there'll be an FDA approval as a consequence of these pivotal findings.   Dr. Neeraj Agarwal: These are wonderful results and news for our patients. Please tell me how it will affect the current treatment paradigm of our patients with mCRPC. As we know, you selected patients who had disease progression on chemotherapy with taxanes and novel hormonal therapy. But real-world studies, many of which were published by you, have shown that docetaxel is received by a minority of patients with metastatic prostate cancer. So how do you envision treating your patients who do not want to be treated with chemotherapy as many of my patients do? How will you apply Lutetium-177 in their treatment?   Dr. Oliver Sartor:  Well, Neeraj, I think that we're going to be restricted in accordance with the label that the FDA provides. And I fully expect that the label will include a progression after treatment with docetaxel or at least one taxane-based therapy because that's the way the VISION trial was constructed. Now, you're raising a very critical point, and that is, what about the individuals that do not want to receive or are ineligible to receive a chemotherapy such as docetaxel? And for those individuals, we now have a new trial called PSMA4, and that trial is going to be testing the Lutetium-177-PSMA-617 in the context of chemotherapy-naive patients. So I think we're going to have to wait until we have more results, more clinical trials completed, prior to the application of PSMA-617 into the more general population of chemotherapy-naive patients. But those clinical trials are now underway.   Dr. Neeraj Agarwal: That's great. So, Oliver, in the VISION trial, you did mandate a diagnostic PSMA PET scan, and patients who were positive on the diagnostic PSMA PET scan were deemed to be eligible for enrollment on the VISION trial. Do you expect FDA to include diagnostic PSMA scan for eligibility for treatment with the Lutetium-177 in the real-world setting? If it doesn't or if it does, how it is going to affect the treatment of our patients, that availability of treatment for our patients?   Dr. Oliver Sartor:  That's really a great question. And I do expect that PSMA PET imaging will be a criteria given that it was used for patient selection. Now, as it turned out, about 87% of the patients actually did qualify after getting a PSMA PET scan. And given that that was part of the inclusion criteria, I anticipate that the FDA will also incorporate such imaging. Now, it does get to be a bit of an issue because it turns out that PSMA PET is just now coming into more widespread use. We did have, in May of this year, the approval by the FDA for the PSMA PET imaging agent and-- I shouldn't say "the"-- a PSMA PET imaging agent. Prior to that, in December of last year, there was both UCLA and UCSF approval by the FDA for yet another PSMA PET imaging agent. As we move forward, I anticipate that PET imaging is going to be more widely available. And of course, we don't have the approval as of yet today for the PSMA-617-Lutetium-177. And when we do get the anticipated approval, which likely will be in 2022, then I also anticipate that PSMA PET will be more widely available. Now, there are still issues with reimbursement for PSMA PET, and we've encountered those in our own practice. But that's a rapidly changing area, and we're working with the insurance companies in an effort to ensure that patients will get the imaging that they need.   Dr. Neeraj Agarwal:  Got it. And obviously, I asked this question because many of my community friends and colleagues have asked me this question.  Before we talk about the side effects of Lutetium-177, would you have any message for our friends and colleagues in the community who are bracing themselves for treating their patients with the Lutetium-177, whether they should be proactive in establishing contacts and relationships with the nuclear medicine facilities and so on?   Dr. Oliver Sartor:  That's a great question, Neeraj, because I think you're raising a very important point. This is going to be the type of therapy that involves multidisciplinary care. We can see that there'll be diagnostic PET imaging as being a component of the study. There'll be the necessity of licensed physicians, typically either nuclear medicine or radiation oncology, to actually administer the drug. And then, quite frankly, the medical oncologists or those urologists who are trained in advanced prostate cancer are going to need to manage the patient. This is a lot more than just getting an injection. Many of these patients are ill. They need to have symptom management. They need to manage their bone health. They need to manage their hormonal manipulations. They need management with regard to pain. So this is not just about giving an injection. And I encourage those people who are interested to involve multidisciplinary teams starting now. And I realize that the therapy is not available now, but you have to anticipate that it will be. And I think it will be a game changer of a therapy, and many patients are going to want it. So that means it's incumbent upon the physicians to be prepared, and that means multidisciplinary care.   Dr. Neearj Agarwal:  Excellent point. So basically, we should be ready. We should start establishing relationships with nuclear medicine facilities or radiation oncologists who are going to deliver Lutetium-177. Overall, when I was reading the New England Journal paper, the side effect profile seemed very reasonable. I did not see any red flags. To me, it sounded like a pretty well-tolerated drug. So what is your take on the side effects of Lutetium-177?   Dr. Oliver Sartor: I think the side effects are quite manageable. One of the unique side effects is that of dry mouth and that's because the PSMA can actually be expressed in the salivary glands and that there is some potential for salivary gland binding in the PSMA-617-Lutetium. And that means that you can have damage to the salivary glands, and that means dry mouth. It turns out that a little over 40% of the patients actually did complain of a dry mouth, and that needs to be managed typically with fluid intake or various ways of mouth moisturizers. Fatigue is a potential issue. It was raised, as well as some bone marrow suppression. And if you look at the grade 3/4 toxicities, anemia was present a little more than 10% of the time. And that, of course, needs to be monitored. There is some potential collateral damage to the bone marrow. So these patients need to have their counts monitored. They need to have their symptoms assessed. And they need to be managed as they go through the process. It's not just about giving an injection, but clearly, the licensed individuals, including nuclear medicine and radiation oncology, need to be engaged, because without them, there is no injection. So this is a complex multidisciplinary care paradigm. And emphasizing the point, symptom management, yes; adverse event management, yes. But you have to deliver the drug, and that means multidisciplinary care.   Dr. Neeraj Agarwal:  Those are fantastic points. Thank you very much, Dr. Sartor, for taking time to be with us. And I'm really hoping that this podcast will be very enriching to our listeners. Thank you very much.   Dr. Oliver Sartor: Thank you, Neeraj. Glad to be here.   ASCO Daily News:  You've been listening to Dr. Neeraj Agarwal of the Huntsman Cancer Institute and Dr. Oliver Sartor of the Tulane Cancer Center. Our listeners will find a link to the VISION study in the transcript of this episode. Thank you to our listeners for joining us today. If you enjoyed this episode, please take a moment to rate, review, and subscribe wherever you get your podcasts.   Disclosures: Dr. Neeraj Agarwal Consulting or Advisory Role: Pfizer, Medivation/Astellas, Bristol-Myers Squibb, AstraZeneca, Nektar, Lilly, Bayer, Pharmacyclics, Foundation Medicine, Astellas Pharma, Exelixis, Merck, Novartis, Eisai,    Seattle Genetics, EMD Serono, Janssen Oncology, AVEO, Calithera Biosciences, MEI Pharma, Genentech, Astellas Pharma, Foundation Medicine, and Gilead Sciences   Research Funding (Inst.): Bayer Your Institution, Bristol-Myers Squibb, Takeda, Pfizer, Exelixis, Amgen,    AstraZeneca, Calithera Biosciences, Celldex, Eisai, Genentech, Immunomedics, Janssen, Merck, Lilly, Nektar, ORIC Pharmaceuticals, crispr therapeutics, and Arvinas     Disclosures: Dr. Oliver Sartor Stocks & Other Ownership Interests: Lilly, GlaxoSmithKline, Abbvie, Cardinal Health, United Health Group, PSMA Therapeutics, Clarity Pharmaceuticals, Noria Therapeutics, Inc., Clovis Consulting or Advisory Role: Bayer, Sanofi, AstraZeneca, Dendreon, Constellation Pharmaceuticals, Advanced Accelerator Applications, Pfizer, Bristol-Myers Squibb, Bavarian Nordic, EMD Serono, Astellas Pharma, Progenics, Blue Earth Diagnostics, Myovant, Myriad Genetics, Novartis, Clarify Pharmaceuticals, Fusion, Istopen Technologien Meunchen, Janssen, Noxopharm, Clovis, Noria Therapeutics, Point Biopharma, TeneoBio, Telix, Theragnostics Research Funding (Inst): Sotio, Janssen, Progenics, Bayer, Sanofi, Endocyte, Merck, Invitae, Constellation Pharmaceuticals, Advanced Accelerator Applications, Dendreon, AstraZeneca Expert Testimony: Sanofi Travel, Accommodations, Expenses: Bayer, Johnson & Johnson, Sanofi, AstraZeneca, Progenics   Disclaimer: The purpose of this podcast is to educate and to inform. This is not a substitute for professional medical care and is not intended for use in the diagnosis or treatment of individual conditions. Guests on this podcast express their own opinions, experience, and conclusions. The mention of any product, service, organization, activity, or therapy should not be construed as an ASCO endorsement.    

Café Con Nata
Analizando el debate junto a nuestra editora Sol Abarca

Café Con Nata

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 81:14


Chile reporta 2.377 casos nuevos de COVID-19, la cifra total de muertos sobrepasó los 38 mil este lunes, y el 1 de diciembre se eliminarán las restricciones de salida de Chile. Por otro lado, AstraZeneca obtuvo su primer beneficio de las ventas de su vacuna contra el COVID-19: 2.200 millones de dólares. Hoy, además, comentamos extendidamente el último debate presidencial de cara a las elecciones del domingo, junto a nuestra editora Sol Abarca.

Earnings Season
AstraZeneca PLC, Q3 2021 Earnings Call, Nov 12, 2021

Earnings Season

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 101:54


AstraZeneca PLC, Q3 2021 Earnings Call, Nov 12, 2021

Bom Dia USA
Balanço dos resultados até aqui e números da AstraZeneca e Warby Parker

Bom Dia USA

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 12:49


O seu podcast sobre o mercado americano

SoFi Daily Podcast
SoFi Daily Podcast - 11/15/2021

SoFi Daily Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 5:04


US stocks climbed Friday. Plus, Foxconn warns that semiconductor shortages will persist, AstraZeneca will make profits from vaccines, and Toshiba breaks up.

Alles auf Aktien
Kimmichs Hoffnung und eine fehlende Mietpreisbremse

Alles auf Aktien

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 12:22


In der heutigen Folge „Alles auf Aktien“ berichten die Finanzjournalisten Anja Ettel und Philipp Vetter über eine alte Technologie als Hoffnungsträger und einen Markt ohne Mietpreisbremse. Außerdem geht es um Tesla, Moderna, Disney, Astrazeneca, Biontech, Siemens, Delivery Hero, Westwing, Rivian, Sixt, Hertz und Valneva. Zum Newsletter geht es hier: https://www.welt.de/newsletter/plus232797673/Alles-auf-Aktien-Der-taegliche-Boersennewsletter-fuer-WELTplus-Abonnenten.html "Alles auf Aktien" ist der tägliche Börsen-Shot aus der WELT-Wirtschaftsredaktion. Die Wirtschafts- und Finanzjournalisten Holger Zschäpitz, Anja Ettel, Philipp Vetter, Daniel Eckert und Nando Sommerfeld diskutieren im Wechsel über die wichtigsten News an den Märkten und das Finanzthema des Tages. Außerdem gibt es jeden Tag eine Inspiration, die das Leben leichter machen soll. In nur zehn Minuten geht es um alles, was man aktuell über Aktien, ETFs, Fonds und erfolgreiche Geldanlage wissen sollte. Für erfahrene Anleger und Neueinsteiger. Montag bis Freitag, ab 6 Uhr morgens. Wir freuen uns an Feedback über aaa@welt.de. Disclaimer: Die im Podcast besprochenen Aktien und Fonds stellen keine spezifischen Kauf- oder Anlage-Empfehlungen dar. Die Moderatoren und der Verlag haften nicht für etwaige Verluste, die aufgrund der Umsetzung der Gedanken oder Ideen entstehen. Für alle, die noch mehr wissen wollen: Holger Zschäpitz können Sie jede Woche im Finanz- und Wirtschaftspodcast "Deffner&Zschäpitz" hören.

Raise the Line
The Unacknowledged Value of Unpaid Caregivers – Alexandra Drane, CEO of ARCHANGELS

Raise the Line

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 29:20


Nearly half of U.S. adults work as unpaid caregivers, but the essential contribution they make is undervalued, and even often unacknowledged, by employers and healthcare professionals. Alexandra Drane could not abide this, so she co-founded ARCHANGELS, an organization dedicated to supporting and honoring the unpaid caregivers among us. As she tells host Dr. Rishi Desai in this episode of Raise the Line: “I myself have been a caregiver, am a caregiver, have needed a caregiver, and will most certainly be a caregiver multiple times over again.” Against the backdrop of a pandemic that has injected unprecedented stress and instability into the lives of millions of people in the U.S., Drane wants the swelling ranks of unpaid caregivers to understand they are not alone, and that help is available. Tune in to learn why society sees childcare in a different light than elder care, what some states are doing to help unpaid caregivers, and what Drane tells the pregnant strangers she approaches on the street.

RNZ: Morning Report
Covid-19: Vaccinologist on AstraZeneca becoming available

RNZ: Morning Report

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 4:52


AstraZeneca jabs will soon be available, in what is being seen as another lever in the government's push to boost vaccination rates. The double dose vaccine will provide an alternative for those who won't have the Pfizer shot for medical reasons, or who are opposed to taking the MRNA-based Pfizer option and are required to get vaccinated for their work. Vaccinologist Helen Petousis-Harris believes introducing an option is a good move. She spoke to Corin Dann.

Raise the Line
Helping People to Become Better Versions of Themselves – Saeju Jeong, CEO of Noom

Raise the Line

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 27:06


Before he died, Saeju Jeong's father, an esteemed doctor in South Korea, passed down a question for his son to consider: "Why is healthcare overly-optimized for sick care management?" “My father encouraged me to think about how I can do something great for the community,” explains Jeong. Tune in to this episode of Raise the Line to hear how Jeong's company, Noom, uses science to help end-users unlock their potential and become better versions of themselves through improved diet, nutrition, exercise, sleep, and stress management. Of prime importance, says Jeong, is actually believing in Noom's end-users, and encouraging them to leave any previous “stigmatized experience” with weight loss behind. Listen in as Jeong and host Shiv Gaglani discuss the increasing emphasis on “direct-to-consumer” healthcare as technological innovation decreases the gap between patients and service providers, and hear why Noom chose a consumer-first approach in building their company. Plus, learn the backstory on their new product, Noom Mood, and discover what Jeong believes to be the silver lining of the COVID-19 pandemic.

The Oncology Nursing Podcast
Episode 180: Learn How Nurse Practitioners Use Biomarker Testing in Cancer Care

The Oncology Nursing Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 38:04


ONS members Kristin Daly, MSN, ANP-BC, AOCN®, medical oncology nurse practitioner at the Siteman Cancer Center at the Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, MO, and Jessica Pforr, RN, AOCNP®, nurse practitioner at Mon Medical Center in Morgantown, WV, join Stephanie Jardine, BSN, RN, oncology clinical specialist at ONS, to discuss biomarker testing, interpreting test results, and how nurse practitioners working in academic and community settings can communicate testing results to their patients. AstraZeneca sponsored this podcast episode, which is brought to you by ONS.  Music Credit: "Fireflies and Stardust" by Kevin MacLeod Licensed under Creative Commons by Attribution 3.0 Episode Notes Check out these resources from today's episode: NCPD contact hours are not available for this episode. ONS Voice article: An Oncology Nurse's Primer on Genomics and Biomarker Terminology ONS Voice article: Harnessing the Power of Genes Oncology Nursing Podcast Episode 134: Nurse Innovators Increase Access to Biomarker Testing During ONS Hackathon Oncology Nursing Podcast Episode 157: Biomarker Testing Improves Outcomes for Patients With Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Oncology Nursing Podcast Episode 169: How Biomarker Testing Drives the Use of Targeted Therapies Clinical Journal of Oncology Nursing article: Predictive Biomarkers: Understanding Their Use in Treatment Decision Making ONS biomarker taxonomy ONS certification courses ONS Genomics and Precision Oncology Learning Library American Cancer Society news on biomarkers American Society of Clinical Oncology journal publications on biomarkers National Cancer Institute information on biomarker testing To discuss the information in this episode with other oncology nurses, visit the ONS Communities.  To provide feedback or otherwise reach ONS about the podcast, email pubONSVoice@ons.org. 

ASCO Guidelines Podcast Series
Lung Toxicities: Management of irAEs Guideline (Part 5)

ASCO Guidelines Podcast Series

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 10:47


An interview with Dr. Jarushka Naidoo from Johns Hopkins University, author on “Management of Immune-Related Adverse Events in Patients Treated With Immune Checkpoint Inhibitor Therapy: ASCO Guideline Update.” She discusses the identification, evaluation, and management of lung toxicities in patients receiving ICPis, focusing on pneumonitis in Part 5 of this 13-part series. For more information visit www.asco.org/supportive-care-guidelines   TRANSCRIPT [MUSIC PLAYING]   SPEAKER: The purpose of this podcast is to educate and to inform. This is not a substitute for professional medical care and is not intended for use in the diagnosis or treatment of individual conditions. Guests on this podcast express their own opinions, experience, and conclusions. The mention of any product, service, organization, activity, or therapy should not be construed as an ASCO endorsement. [MUSIC PLAYING]   BRITTANY HARVEY: Hello, and welcome to the ASCO Guidelines podcast series brought to you by the ASCO Podcast Network-- a collection of nine programs covering a range of educational and scientific content and offering enriching insight into the world of cancer care. You can find all the shows, including this one, at asco.org/podcast. My name is Brittany Harvey, and today we're continuing our series on the management of immune-related adverse events. I am joined by Dr. Jarushka Naidoo from Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, Maryland. Author on management of immune related adverse events in patients treated with immune checkpoint inhibitor therapy, ASCO Guideline update, and management of immune-related adverse events in patients treated with chimeric antigen receptor T-cell therapy ASCO guideline. And, today, we're focusing on lung toxicities in patients treated with immune checkpoint inhibitor therapy. Thank you for being here, Dr. Naidoo. JARUSHKA NAIDOO: Thank you. It's my pleasure to share updates on this guideline. BRITTANY HARVEY: First, I'd like to note that ASCO takes great care in the development of its guidelines and ensuring that the ASCO Conflict of Interest policy is followed for each guideline. The full Conflict of Interest information for this guideline panel is available online with a publication of the guidelines in the Journal of Clinical Oncology. Dr. Naidoo, do you have any relevant disclosures that are directly related to these guidelines? JARUSHKA NAIDOO: Yes. So I have research funding in the last two years from Merck, AstraZeneca, and Bristol Myers Squibb. And I also have served in a consulting role-- or an advisory board capacity-- for Merck, AstraZeneca, Bristol Myers. And not specifically related to this work, but also Pfizer, Takeda, Daiichi Sankyo, and Kaleido Biosciences. BRITTANY HARVEY: OK. Thank you for those disclosures. Then-- getting into the content of this guideline-- what are the immune-related lung toxicities addressed in this guideline? JARUSHKA NAIDOO: Thanks, Brittany. So the main lung toxicity that is addressed in this guideline is immune checkpoint inhibitor pneumonitis, which-- as this audience knows-- is an uncommon, but potentially fatal toxicity particularly associated with anti-PD-1 or PD-L1 monotherapy, but can also occur with combination immunotherapy approaches. In the guideline, we go through what is known about the natural history, risk factors, and then, of course, our comprehensive approach to identifying, evaluating, and managing this toxicity, which is defined as a focal or diffuse inflammation of the lung parenchyma. We also identify that, while pneumonitis is the quintessential lung toxicity that can occur with immune checkpoint inhibitors, we also note that there are some other lung toxicities that have been reported on, but for which we relatively little. And this includes sarcoid-like granulomatous reactions, including subpleural micronodular opacities and hilar lymphadenopathy, as well as pleural effusions. And these have been associated with both CTLA-4 and the PD-1, PD-L1 immune checkpoint inhibitor therapies. BRITTANY HARVEY: I appreciate that overview. So then, you mentioned the main toxicity here is pneumonitis. What are the key recommendations for identification, evaluation, and management of pneumonitis? JARUSHKA NAIDOO: Thanks, Brittany. So yeah, this is a key focus of the guideline. So, as we're aware, pneumonitis is defined as a focal or diffused inflammation of the lung parenchyma and is a toxicity that was identified as one of the early toxicities in the early clinical trials of the PD-1 inhibitors. The incidence of this toxicity is estimated at anywhere between 0% and 10%, and in large meta analysis, looks to be around 2% to 3% in terms of incidents. In terms of how to evaluate patients with suspected immune-related pneumonitis, the common symptoms would be cough, shortness of breath, fever, and chest pain. And in a patient who has suspected pneumonitis, some of the first tests to be done would be to take a pulse oximetry and to do some chest imaging. Chest imaging is preferable with a CT scan with contrast in order to rule out alternative etiology, such as pulmonary embolus For patients who are symptomatic-- which means CTCAE grade 2 or greater-- we also recommend a standard infectious workup, which is guided by institutional guidelines. But based on our ASCO guideline, we outline that this should include, at a minimum, a nasal swab, sputum culture and sensitivity, blood culture and sensitivity, and urine culture and sensitivity, as well as a standard COVID-19 evaluation. When we come to the diagnosis of pneumonitis, we then evaluate that in terms of CTCAE grade. Where the grade of pneumonitis refers, firstly, to whether a patient has symptoms, and the proportion of the lung parenchyma that may be involved with pneumonitis on chest imaging. Broadly speaking, patients with grade 1 pneumonitis are asymptomatic and usually identified on radiographic imaging almost incidentally. For these patients, we would recommend either holding immunotherapy or proceeding with close monitoring. And we recommend that patients should have weekly physical exams and pulse oximetry offered, and consideration of further chest imaging if the diagnosis is uncertain, or to follow progress-- usually around every three to four weeks-- or, if a patient becomes symptomatic, it may be more often than this. We also recommend that we may consider doing spirometry or DLCO evaluation as a repeat in these patients. Broadly, again, in terms of the evaluation of patients-- if patients are symptomatic from pneumonitis, which means they have a symptom related to radiographic features, then this would be called grade 2. And usually, radiographically, patients have more of the lung parenchyma involved-- greater than 25%-- and require a medical intervention. And the management would be prednisone, 1 to 2 milligrams per kilogram per day, that is then tapered over 4 to six weeks, and immunotherapy is held during that time. Importantly, in order to knuckle down the diagnosis of pneumonitis, we recommend consideration of doing a bronchoscopy with bronchoalveolar lavage sampling in order to truly rule out alternative infectious diagnoses or lymphangitis carcinomatosis. And for this reason, a transbronchial biopsy can also be considered. In some cases, we also consider treating with empiric antibiotics to cover infection if we feel that this remains in the differential diagnosis. If patients do not clinically improve after 48 to 72 hours on prednisone, then we recommend treating at a higher grade, meaning grade 3, where patients have severe symptoms, hospitalization is required, and a larger proportion of the lung parenchyma is involved. For these patients who have grade 3 or greater pneumonitis, we recommend permanently discontinuing immunotherapy, administering a higher dose of steroids at methylprednisolone, 1 to 2 milligrams per kilogram per day. And, once again-- if there is no improvement after 48 hours, we recommend a range of potential additional immunosuppressive approaches, which include either infliximab, mycophenolate mofetil, intravenous immunoglobulin, or cyclophosphamide. And there are currently no recommendations as to which may be the optimum immunosuppressive approach, but there are a number of clinical trials aiming to elucidate the answer to this. Importantly, overall in patients who are symptomatic, it may also be appropriate to consult pulmonary medicine and infectious diseases teams to weigh in on the diagnosis and management going forward. BRITTANY HARVEY: Great. Thank you for that clear, step-wise approach to the evaluation and management of pneumonitis. So then, in your view, Dr. Naidoo-- how will these recommendations for the management of lung toxicities impact both clinicians and patients? JARUSHKA NAIDOO: I think it's very important for both clinicians and patients to be aware of the potential side effects of the treatment that patients are receiving with immune checkpoint inhibitors. We know that some toxicities from immunotherapy tend to be mild and can be managed quite well with corticosteroids or other approaches. What we understand about lung toxicities is that, thankfully-- in the majority of cases-- pneumonitis will be well-controlled with corticosteroids and holding of immunotherapy. However, in a proportion of patients, pneumonitis may become severe and may even lead to treatment-related deaths. And for that reason, both patients and clinicians need to be aware of what to look out for in terms of the symptoms of pneumonitis, and how to diagnose and manage this toxicity quickly and efficiently in order to avoid poor outcomes. BRITTANY HARVEY: Absolutely. Those are excellent points for both clinicians and patients to keep in mind. So I really want to thank you for all of your work on these guidelines and for taking the time to speak with me today, Dr. Naidoo. JARUSHKA NAIDOO: You're very welcome, Brittany. And thank you to the ASCO oncology community for the opportunity to share this important work. BRITTANY HARVEY: And thank you to all of our listeners for tuning into the ASCO Guidelines podcast series. Stay tuned for additional episodes on the management of immune-related adverse events. To read the full guideline, go to www.asco.org/supportive care guidelines. You can also find many of our guidelines and interactive resources in the free ASCO Guidelines app, available in iTunes or the Google Play store. If you have enjoyed what you've heard today, please rate and review the podcast, and be sure to subscribe so you never miss an episode. [MUSIC PLAYING]

Raise the Line
Embracing New Ways to Learn, Teach, and Connect – Nick Gomez and Sumer Avila, San Joaquin Valley College

Raise the Line

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 26:04


As it trains technicians and medical professionals, many of whom go into healthcare, California's San Joaquin Valley College focuses on the practical skills necessary to forge a successful career. But in the dramatically new context of the pandemic, the school's leadership -- including President Nick Gomez and Provost Sumer Avila -- had to reimagine how to deliver that education. Something surprising happened as a side effect of ensuring that students and faculty had what they needed to be able to learn and teach from afar: The school developed a new competency altogether. “Now,” Gomez tells host Dr. Rishi Desai, “we can better meet students where they are, which is the key thing that we love to do.” Tune in to hear how the school triangulates the visions of students, faculty, and employers, how medical education has been transformed by new technology, and the importance of understanding how your use of technology influences how you learn.

The Covexit.com Podcast
Vaccines Injuries & Mandates - Expert Testimonies & Remarks by US Senator Johnson

The Covexit.com Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 114:16


This is the second podcast episode devoted to the November 2nd Round Table convened by US Senator Ron Johnson about vaccines injuries and mandates. This episode presents the testimonies of prominent experts as well as of advocates for vaccines safety and truly informed consent.You will hear in this episode remarks by:- US Senator Ron Johnson (introductory remarks)- Brianne Dressen, Astra Zeneca clinical trial participant from Utah, co-founded react19.org, a patient advocacy organization dedicated to increasing awareness of adverse events- Dr. Linda Wastila, Professor and Parke-davis Chair in Geriatric Pharmacotherapy, University of Maryland School of Pharmacy- Dr. Theresa Long, MD, MD, MPH, FS, Army Flight Surgeon & Army Aerospace Medicine Specialist- Dr. Robert Kaplan, faculty member at the Stanford School of Medicine Clinical Excellence Research Center- Dr. Peter Doshi, Associate Professor of pharmaceutical health services research at the University of Maryland School of Pharmacy- Dr. David Healy, Professor in the Department of Family Medicine at McMaster University in Ontario- Dr. Linda Wastila, Professor and Parke-davis Chair in Geriatric Pharmacotherapy, University of Maryland School of Pharmacy (2nd set of remarks)- Dr. John Patrick Whelan, Associate Clinical Professor of Pediatrics in the Division of Rheumatology at University of California, Los Angeles- Dr. Aditi Bhargava, Professor in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology and the Center for Reproductive Sciences at University of California, San Francisco- Dr. Retsef Levi, J. Spencer Standish (1945) Professor of Operations Management at MIT- Dr. David Healy, Professor in the Department of Family Medicine at McMaster University in Ontario (2nd set of remarks)- Dr. Peter Doshi, Associate Professor of pharmaceutical health services research at the University of Maryland School of Pharmacy (2nd set of remarks)- Aaron Siri, Attorney, is the Managing Partner of Siri & Glimstad LLP- Kim Witczak, international drug safety advocate and speaker, serves as Consumer Representative on the FDA Psychopharmacologic Drug Advisory Committee, &- Dr. Iona Heath, retired general practitioner from Kentish Town in London and Past President, Royal College of general Practitioners

The Covexit.com Podcast
Vaccines Injuries - Victims' Testimonies - Senator Ron Johnson's media event in Washington, DC

The Covexit.com Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 66:19


This podcast episode features highlights of a media event held on November 2 2021 in Washington, DC, about vaccines safety and mandates. You will hear testimonies of real people, explaining their experience with vaccine injuries, either as a victim or as a parent of a victim. What you will hear is not easy to hear. It is dramatic, it is tragic, yet it is highly informative. And those people are not "rare" cases. There are thousands and thousands of such victims in the US and all over the world. You will hear:- Cody Flint, airline pilot from Cleveland, MS who accumulated 10,000 hours of flight time diagnosed with left and right perilymphatic fistula, Eustachian tube dysfunction, and elevated intracranial pressure following Pfizer vaccination.- Ernest Ramirez, father from Austin, TX whose only son collapsed playing basketball and passed away from myocarditis following Pfizer vaccination.- Kyle Werner, professional mountain bike racer from Boise, ID diagnosed with pericarditis following vaccination.- Doug Cameron, farm operations manager from Idaho, permanently paralyzed following vaccination.- Suzanna Newell, triathlete from Saint Paul, MN diagnosed with an autoimmune disease and reliant on a walker or cane to walk following vaccination - Kelly Ann Rodriguez, young mother from Tacoma, WA reliant on walker following vaccination.- Stephanie, the mother of Maddie de Garay, a 12-year old Pfizer clinical trial participant from Cincinnati, OH confined to wheelchair and feeding tube- Brianne Dressen, Astra Zeneca clinical trial participant from Utah, co-founded react19.org, a patient advocacy organization dedicated to increasing awareness of adverse events.- Dr. Joel Wallskog, orthopedic surgeon from Mequon, WI diagnosed with transverse myelitis following Moderna vaccination. - Shaun Barcavage, FNP-BC, a Research Nurse PractionnerOur next episode will feature other highlights from the same event, but this time focusing on expert testimonies.

The Oncology Nursing Podcast
Episode 179: Learn How to Educate Patients During Immunotherapy

The Oncology Nursing Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 43:23


ONS member Kristi Orbaugh, RN, MSN, RNP, AOCN®, nurse practitioner for Community Hospital Oncology Physicians in Indianapolis, IN, and member of the Central Indiana ONS Chapter, joins Stephanie Jardine, BSN, RN, oncology clinical specialist at ONS, to discuss patient education prior to and during immunotherapy. This is a continued conversation from a previous episode that discussed findings from an ONS focus group that Orbaugh facilitated in August 2021; we've linked that in the episode notes. This podcast episode is supported by an educational grant from AstraZeneca. ONS is solely responsible for the criteria, objectives, content, quality, and scientific integrity of its programs and publications.  Music Credit: "Fireflies and Stardust" by Kevin MacLeod  Licensed under Creative Commons by Attribution 3.0  Episode Notes  Check out these resources from today's episode:   NCPD contact hours are not available for this episode.  Oncology Nursing Podcast Episode 172: Address Knowledge Gaps in Evidence-Based Precision Medicine Care  Previous Oncology Nursing Podcast episodes on immunotherapy  ONS Voice article: New Patient Education Formats Help Nurses Connect Patients to Individualized Resources  ONS Voice article: Patient Education Is Critical to Managing irAEs for Immune Checkpoint Inhibitors  ONS Voice article: Tailored Education Improves Patient Satisfaction and Comprehension  ONS course bundle: Immuno-Oncology for the Oncology Nurse Case Studies  Immuno-Oncology Learning Library  American Cancer Society patient education resources   ASCO patient education materials  National Comprehensive Cancer Network guidelines on managing immunotherapy-related toxicities  To discuss the information in this episode with other oncology nurses, visit the ONS Communities.   To provide feedback or otherwise reach ONS about the podcast, email pubONSVoice@ons.org. 

Radio3 Scienza 2019
Campagna inglese

Radio3 Scienza 2019

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 30:00


Uno sguardo all'andamento della pandemia nel Regno Unito con Neil Ferguson

Reportage Afrique
Reportage Afrique - RDC: la campagne de vaccination contre le Covid-19 patine à Goma

Reportage Afrique

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 2:12


À Goma, le Covid-19 continue de progresser. La capitale du Nord-Kivu est la seconde ville la plus touchée par cette maladie en RDC après Kinshasa. La campagne de vaccination a commencé en mai avec le vaccin AstraZeneca et a été relancée en octobre avec l'arrivée des doses de vaccin Pfizer. Malgré la sensibilisation, l'affluence n'est pas au rendez-vous. Reportage à l'hôpital provincial de Goma.

CCO Oncology Podcast
PARP Inhibitors in Pancreatic Cancer: Experts Discuss Importance of Testing for Biomarkers Along With Current Treatment Landscape

CCO Oncology Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 19:52


In this episode, Philip Agop Philip, MD, PhD, FRCP, and Elena Gabriela Chiorean, MD, discuss the importance of testing for biomarkers along with thecurrent paradigm of PARP inhibitor therapy in the treatment of pancreatic cancer. Topics include:Importance of germline and somatic testingAdverse events associated with PARP inhibitorsMaintenance therapy in pancreatic cancerPresenters:Philip Agop Philip, MD, PhD, FRCPProfessorSchool of MedicineWayne State UniversityLeader, Gastrointestinal Multidisciplinary TeamDepartment of OncologyKarmanos Cancer InstituteDetroit, MichiganElena Gabriela Chiorean, MDProfessor of MedicineDivision of Medical OncologyDepartment of MedicineUniversity of WashingtonMemberFred Hutchinson Cancer ResearchSeattle, WashingtonContent based on an online CME program supported by an educational grant from AstraZeneca.Link to full program:https://bit.ly/3jEehCc

Raise the Line
Tackling Pervasive Health Inequity - Geoffrey Roche, Dignity Health Global Education

Raise the Line

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 26:28


“There's health equity concerns in everything,” observes Geoffrey Roche, from organ donation, to clinical care, to access of care, to quality of care. “I think everyone within healthcare needs to pay attention and be mindful of what they can do to fix that.” Join host Dr. Rishi Desai on this episode of Raise the Line as he speaks with Roche about what drew him to healthcare, his role at Dignity Health Global Education developing programs “for healthcare, by healthcare,” and his service on the National Health Equity Task Force. Hear Roche's thoughts on how COVID has caused healthcare to be further politicized, and why we need to return to the “core of service” -- the field's essential helping nature. Learn about Dignity Health's life-changing Equity Impact Scholarship, and how simulation can be an effective tool in communication training. Plus, find out why Roche believes middle schoolers should learn about the pathways of a healthcare career, and why he advises everyone to consider having a personal board of advisors.

Noticentro
Alto porcentaje de vacunación contra covid en la CDMX

Noticentro

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 1:24


•Marcelo Ebrard asistirá a la Cumbre del G20•Vacuna de Astra-Zeneca, podría ser autorizada en 2022•Más información en nuestro podcast

Noticentro
Del Mazo rinde homenaje a médicos que han fallecido por covid-19

Noticentro

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 1:19


•AstraZeneca anuncia dosis de refuerzo contra covid-19•Menores de 18 años podrán ingresar a Estados Unidos sin comprobante de vacuna•Más información en nuestro podcast

Noticentro
Detienen a presunto responsable de la balacera en restaurante de Tulum

Noticentro

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 1:20


Detienen a presunto responsable de la balacera en restaurante de Tulum Demanda la unión de alcaldías de la CDMX se les asigne un mayor presupuestoLlegó el décimo octavo embarque de vacunas contra la covid-19 de AstraZeneca

Coronacast
How do I protect the vulnerable people I love?

Coronacast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 8:45


As more states open their borders in coming months, more COVID than ever will be circulating through the community. Vaccines will help protect many of us, but for vulnerable people - like the elderly or immunocompromised - additional protections may be needed. So if you have someone close that is more vulnerable to severe disease from a COVID-19 infection, what are some of the things you can do to help reduce the risk? Also on today's show: * 2nd generation vaccines vs natural immunity * Will my pets need to be vaccinated too? * Are there/will there be any plant based COVID vaccines? * A study on fertility and the AstraZeneca vaccine (no problems found)

Scroll Down: True Stories from KYW Newsradio
The Long Haul: New COVID treatments and the 'endemic pandemic'

Scroll Down: True Stories from KYW Newsradio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 31:10


Independence Blue Cross presents The Long Haul: Learning to Live in a Lasting Pandemic, a special pandemic mini-series from KYW Newsradio In Depth. In the third and final part of our series we talk with Dr. Brian McDonough, KYW Newsradio's Medical Editor. We ask him to break down the new experimental treatments from Merck and AstraZeneca, and to explain what monoclonal antibodies are and how they work. Plus, we hear his thoughts on the safety of those treatments vs. the safety of the vaccine, and what he tells patients who are hesitant to get vaccinated. Finally, we end with his predictions for the future of this pandemic - both for the winter and long-term. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Raise the Line
Training Resilient Healthcare Workers – Dr. Lisa Urban, Southern New Hampshire University

Raise the Line

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 22:59


To train flexible nurses, Dr. Lisa Urban has found, you need to be a flexible educator. As Associate Chief Nursing Administrator at Southern New Hampshire University, Dr. Urban has helped reorient the curriculum and structure of the school's nursing programs to accommodate students and the forever-changed world of healthcare they will soon be entering. “People think of acute care for nurses, but nurses work in lots of different organizations, across lots of different types of health care,” she tells host Dr. Rishi Desai. That's why SNHU nursing programs focus on more generalized concepts and competencies that are transferable across multiple organizations. The idea is to cross train students in a broad array of disciplines so they can thrive in healthcare systems of the future and help hospitals to be better-prepared for the crises to come. Tune in to learn what it means to earn a patient's trust, why nursing is inextricably linked with teaching, and why, as you envision your goals, you should always write them down.

THE STANDARD Podcast
THE STANDARD NOW พร้อมไหม อีก 10 วันเปิดประเทศ? อัปเดตสถานการณ์โควิด-19 โค้งสุดท้าย

THE STANDARD Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 37:49


- จับตานายกฯ ลงนามเงื่อนไขเปิดประเทศพรุ่งนี้ ชี้ถ้าเปิดประเทศ 1 พ.ย. แล้วมีปัญหาก็ต้องปิด - สถานการณ์โควิด ผู้ติดเชื้อยังต่ำกว่าหมื่น เสียชีวิตยังต่ำร้อย ตัวเลขกำลังรักษาใกล้ต่ำแสน - หลายพื้นที่ระบาดหนัก 5 จังหวัดภาคใต้ยังรั้ง Top 6 เชียงใหม่ยอดพุ่ง หลังพบหลายคลัสเตอร์ - นายกฯ สั่งการวิษณุ พิจารณาวันหยุดภาคตะวันออก - เจาะ Valneva วัคซีนเชื้อตายที่อาจเทียบเท่า AstraZeneca แต่ผลข้างเคียงน้อยกว่า

Enfoque internacional
Enfoque Internacional - ¿Por qué la OMS tarda en reconocer las vacunas Sputnik y Cansino?

Enfoque internacional

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 2:38


Varios países de América Latina y Europa del Este han usado vacunas como la rusa Sputnik V y la china Cansino Bio, que no han sido aprobadas por la Organización Mundial de la Salud. El presidente mexicano López Obrador recordó este martes que lleva una semana urgiendo a la Organización Mundial de la Salud (OMS) a aprobar las vacunas Sputnik V y Cansino Bio. "Vacunarme de nuevo" Sin este aval los mexicanos que recibieron estos inmunizantes no podrán entrar a Estados Unidos, ya que este país sólo permite el ingreso a su territorio a personas que hayan recibido vacunas autorizadas por la OMS. Marcela Arceo, una maestra mexicana que desea visitar a su hermana residente en Estados Unidos, tomó la decisión de aplicarse la vacuna Astrazeneca, a pesar de ya haber sido vacunada con Cansino Bio. "Prefiero tener todos los requisitos listos desde ya para poder visitar a mi hermana. A los maestros de todo México nos vacunaron con una vacuna que no ha sido aprobada, por eso tomé la decisión de vacunarme de nuevo y espero que ésta sí sea la correcta porque duele mucho", indica. Razones geopolíticas Desde Argentina, otro país que recurrió masivamente a la vacuna rusa, el bioquímico e inmunólogo Guillermo Docena, investigador del Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas (CONICET), estima que Sputnik es efectiva y que las razones de la tardanza en su aprobación podrían ser geopolíticas. "Yo creo que las razones por las cuales la OMS no autoriza Sputnik son cuestiones geopolíticas, no tiene nada que ver con la eficacia o cuestiones sanitarias de la vacuna. De todas formas, ellos ya dijeron que están en la etapa final de aprobación, pero están desde noviembre del año pasado y eso es muy raro que tarden tanto tiempo. Con Sputnik las pruebas están a la vista, en Argentina se controlaron las curvas de contagio, las curvas de fallecimiento y las hospitalizaciones a pesar de que entró la variante Delta", explica. Falta de transparencia Por otro lado, Antoine Flahaut profesor de la Facultad de Medicina de la Universidad de Ginebra y director del Instituto de Salud Global asegura que la falta de aprobación de organizaciones como la OMS y la Agencia Europea de Medicamentos no se debe a la eficacia sino a la cultura de transparencia de datos. "Sputnik y Cansino Bio son vacunas bastante innovadoras. Hay un conocimiento, una habilidad y una calidad de producción totalmente clara de esta vacuna rusa, pero probablemente una falta de cultura de las agencias occidentales de parte de los fabricantes de este país. La OMS es una agencia totalmente multilateral, pero ella desea que los estándares de calidad sean los mismos para todos. Los expertos quieren tener expedientes que sean similares, así vengan de Rusia, de Estados Unidos o de Francia. Hay que tener expedientes que tengan la misma calidad y sobre todo que tengan el mismo rigor en la forma de poder verificar, acceder a los datos, comprobarlos y poder hacer preguntas a los fabricantes", detalla. La vacuna rusa que presume una eficacia del 70 % frente a la variante Delta ya ha sido aprobada en 70 países, y algunas naciones como Corea del Sur, Argentina e India ya la están fabricando.

E se ... podcast
É Por Isso! #81 - É por isso que devemos cuidar da asma infantil!

E se ... podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 13:17


Você sabe o que é a asma e quais os tipos de tratamento para crianças? O que aconteceria no mundo se problemas de respiração não fossem cuidados? No episódio de hoje, tio Samuel convidou Dr. Gustavo Wandalsen, que é pediatra e especialista em asma infantil, e também Bianca Sizzi e Camila Figueiredo, que são da AstraZeneca para tirar todas as suas dúvidas e também contar sobre o aplicativo Universo Respiração. Este episódio é um oferecimento AstraZeneca para você.

Health Check
New Covid vaccine

Health Check

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 28:33


New Covid vaccine from Valneva produces stronger immune response when compared to AstraZeneca, the French company reports, with no severe cases of Covid-19 seen in either group. And new positive research on lateral flow tests. Plus guest Graham Easton discusses the urgent need for teaching climate and environmental health in medical schools. Presenter: Claudia Hammond Producer: Erika Wright (Picture: Coronavirus vaccine vials on a laboratory shelf. Photo credit: Joao Paulo Burini/Getty Images.)

Raise the Line
Inspiring Health at the Community Level - Esther Dyson, Executive Founder of Wellville

Raise the Line

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 20:36


“My superpower is asking questions, and that's pretty good training for just about anything,” says Raise the Line guest Esther Dyson. She has decades of experience as an advisor to and investor in companies in a wide range of sectors -- from education, to healthcare, to information technology. Her current focus is Welville, an organization she founded that's running a 10 year project aimed at developing models to improve health in small communities. “We're basically a coaching organization. We're not giving them fish and we're not teaching them how to fish. We're helping them build their own fishing schools.” Tune in to this episode of Raise the Line to hear Dyson speak with Osmosis Co-Founder Shiv Gaglani about her fascinating career witnessing the birth of the high-tech era and her nonprofit's current proposal to improve the health literacy of underprivileged children in Muskegon, Michigan by getting them involved in measuring their own glucose. Their ultimate goal? To help communities become healthier and more equitable places, and inspire other communities to do the same. Listen in to find out why Dyson believes the inability to think long-term has caused so many of our problems, and why the “human infrastructure” investments being contemplated n Washington are so important.

CCO Infectious Disease Podcast
New COVID-19 Data: A Case for Optimism?

CCO Infectious Disease Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 42:19


In this podcast episode, Paul E. Sax, MD, and Renslow Sherer, MD, discuss the clinical significance of new data on the prevention and treatment of COVID-19, including:COVID-19 in immunocompromised hostsPrime-Boost Strategy for COVID-19 vaccinationCOVID-19 surge effectsMonoclonal antibody therapy for prevention and treatmentRemdesivir updateRepurposed drug, fluvoxamineWhat does the future of the pandemic look like?Presenters:Paul E. Sax, MDClinical DirectorHIV Program and Division of Infectious DiseasesBrigham and Women's HospitalProfessor of MedicineHarvard Medical SchoolBoston, MassachusettsRenslow Sherer, MDDirectorInternational HIV Training CenterProfessor of MedicineSection of Infectious Diseases and Global HealthDepartment of MedicineUniversity of ChicagoChicago, IllinoisLink to full program, including downloadable slidesets:https://bit.ly/3zVTwYW

Raise the Line
The New Acceptance of Online Learning - Ashwin Damera, CEO of Eruditus/Emeritus

Raise the Line

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 25:31


“What makes me successful? My simple answer is, 'I tried.'” Today's guest, first-generation entrepreneur Ashwin Damera, seems to embody the humility he advises to others. His personal motto? “Life is to give.” Damera's startup online education company Eruditus/Emeritus partners with top-tier universities such as MIT, Harvard, Cambridge, and Columbia, bringing accessible and affordable education to executives and schoolchildren alike, with the aim to impact one million students by 2025. Tune in to this engaging episode of Raise the Line with host Shiv Gaglani to learn about Damera's road to edtech entrepreneurship, and find out why he believes up-skilling and re-skilling may be the largest social problem of our generation. Hear about the COVID-accelerated “fundamental shift” in the way learning happens, and how the Eruditus/Emeritus SPOC model (small, private, online courses) serves the serious learner. Plus, uncover Damera's valuable tips for budding entrepreneurs on the best form of fundraising and what most influences the success of a startup.

Health Check
Henrietta Lacks Legacy

Health Check

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 26:41


Henrietta Lacks died in 1951 from a virulent cervical cancer. A sample of those cancer cells was taken at the time and the way they behave has changed medical science forever – contributing to everything from the polio vaccine to drugs for Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s disease. As the WHO give a posthumous award Claudia discusses how the Henrietta Lacks legacy raises issues of global health equity. Plus with a Malaria Vaccine given a historic green light by the WHO to protect children in Africa, what are the distribution difficulties in countries which carry the greatest burden of disease? And what’s behind the low rate of Covid-19 vaccinations in Taiwan? We hear from one resident about why she’s chosen to have a home-grown Medigen vaccine which hasn’t yet completed all its clinical trials – and another who wants to wait for an alternative. Scientists say that trials about to start in Paraguay should show whether it stimulates enough immunity to protect people in the way the AstraZeneca vaccine does. Presenter: Claudia Hammond Producer: Erika Wright (Picture: Henrietta Lacks, after whom HeLa cells are named, standing outside her home in Baltimore, USA. Photo credit: Getty Images.)

Small Things Make A Big Difference
Does The Audio Match The Video?: Domenick Fanelli, Ph.D (Head of Respiratory Marketing - AstraZeneca)

Small Things Make A Big Difference

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 30:40


Does The Audio Match The Video? This week Domenick Fanelli shares invaluable lessons on why great leadership involves constant learning, being humble, and serving others. Take time to learn from a student of leadership and reflect on what small thing you will do in your leadership habits that can make a big difference