Podcasts about United Nations

Share on
Share on Facebook
Share on Twitter
Share on Reddit
Share on LinkedIn
Copy link to clipboard

Intergovernmental organization

  • 7,734PODCASTS
  • 16,000EPISODES
  • 41mAVG DURATION
  • 7DAILY NEW EPISODES
  • Aug 13, 2022LATEST
United Nations

POPULARITY

20122013201420152016201720182019202020212022



    Best podcasts about United Nations

    Show all podcasts related to united nations

    Latest podcast episodes about United Nations

    Rebel News +
    DAVID MENZIES | Petitioning the United Nations; Radicalized trans parade in Montreal

    Rebel News +

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 13, 2022 49:39


    Welcome to Rebel Roundup, ladies, and gentlemen — and the rest of you — in which we look back at some of the very best commentaries of the week by your favourite Rebels. I'm your host, David Menzies. Our chief reporter, Sheila Gunn Reid and our uber legal eagle, Sarah Miller, recently went all the way to Geneva's Palace of Nations to deliver our petition decrying the human rights abuses taking place in Justin Trudeau's Canada these days. The question is: will the human rights head honchos take this petition seriously — or will they bury it? Sheila Gunn Reid has all the nitty-gritty details. And last week in Montreal, the circus — er, I mean, the radicalized transgender parade came to town. And guess what? The various spirit unicorns have absolutely no problem with children changing their gender. Alexa Lavoie has all the shocking details… And letters; we get your letters; we get your letters every minute of every day. And I'll share some of your letters about the shocking incident that occurred to Linda Todd of Port Coquitlam, British Columbia. You see, Linda went to a Walmart store in nearby Maple Ridge and was shocked to discover that the store was using a security camera to film up her skirt. AND, was displaying that image on a monitor for all to see. Even worse, Walmart doesn't seem to care about this outrageous breach of her personal privacy. Those are your Rebels, now let's round them up…

    The Documentary Podcast
    OS Conversations: Drought

    The Documentary Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 13, 2022 24:44


    We're seeing drought all around the world. Without significant rainfall, lakes and rivers have been drying-up, pastures are becoming dusty deserts and crops are failing to grow. As well as the devastating effect on nature, drought has an economic and human cost - particularly in the poorest parts of the world. The United Nations warns that millions are at risk of severe hunger, in particular in Somalia, Kenya and Ethiopia. We hear from two families in Kenya who are struggling with rising food prices as their own crops fail. Michael tells us about the impact on his mother, who has a small farm, and Odongo worries about the health effects of the drought on the people living in Nairobi. France is experiencing its worst drought since records began. We bring together two French wine growers who are desperate for rain as their crops are suffering. They warn it could be a “huge problem”. Meanwhile, in Iraq, drought continues to be a concern, as temperatures increase. Two Iraqis tell us how they are trying to cope.

    Earth Wise
    Building Resilient Food Systems | Earth Wise

    Earth Wise

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2022 2:00


    According to the United Nations and The World Bank, global hunger levels in 2021 surpassed the previous record set in 2020.  The organizations also found that acute food insecurity – defined as when a person’s inability to consume adequate food puts their lives or livelihoods in immediate danger – could continue to worsen this year […]

    Monocle 24: The Briefing
    Friday 12 August

    Monocle 24: The Briefing

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2022 30:00


    The United Nations calls for a demilitarised zone around Europe's largest power plant; we're live in Freetown as violent protests continue in Sierra Leone over the high cost of living; this week's What We Learned; and film news with Karen Krizanovich.

    QAnon Anonymous
    Premium Episode 180: The Venus Project

    QAnon Anonymous

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2022 9:00


    A self-taught futurist imagines a utopian world with no money, war, scarcity or property. Jacque Fresco considered himself beyond capitalism and communism, relying on technology, science, and resource management to create a perfect, cybernetically enhanced world. He was also pretty horny and claimed to have changed the minds of several Ku Klux Klan members about race. His ideas ended up being showcased at the United Nations. Subscribe for $5 a month to get an extra episode of QAA every week + access to ongoing series like 'Trickle Down': http://www.patreon.com/QAnonAnonymous Tickets to our Eugene, Oregon show on September 10th: http://tour.qanonanonymous.com Music by Pontus Berghe. Editing by Corey Klotz. Merch / Join the Discord Community / Find the Lost Episodes / Etc: http://qanonanonymous.com

    (don't) Waste Water!
    S6E11 - Did we Hold our 1977 Promise?

    (don't) Waste Water!

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2022 1:02


    It's time to hold a 1977 promise! In 2021, 2 billion people lacked access to safely managed drinking water. But how can it be when you know that, in march 1977, the United Nations held a conference in Mar del Plata, Argentina, and they pledged to bring water to all? And that wasn't a one-off. The entire eighties were named the water decade. And then again, the millennium development goals set the target to bring water to all by 2015, and here we are in 2021, with 26% of humanity still left aside. To be fair, over that period, 2.8 billion people gained access to drinking water. But the World's population also grew by - guess how much - 2.8 billion people. The new horizon now is 2030. And promised, swore, spat, this time we'll make it!  And still, we're running at a quarter of the speed we should... Does it mean, it's impossible? Well, providing every human with safe drinking water requires a 43.1 billion dollars investment every year between now and 2030.  That's about one-tenth of the subsidies the World provides to the fossil fuel industry.  So honestly, I think it's time to hold a 1977 promise! Wanna dive deeper into the topic, check out my conversation with David Lloyd Owen, the author of Global Water Funding.  You'll also find everything you'd like to know about SDG6  right here.

    Breaking the Sound Barrier by Amy Goodman
    An Imperfect Climate Bill Confronts a Perfect Storm

    Breaking the Sound Barrier by Amy Goodman

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2022


    As governments prepare for the upcoming United Nations global climate summit to be held in Egypt in mid-November, developments in the fight against catastrophic climate change suggest that, against all odds, hope is not lost.

    Talking to Cool People w/ Jason Frazell
    Brittany Hodak — Author & Speaker

    Talking to Cool People w/ Jason Frazell

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2022 51:09


    Brittany talks about why the customer experience across every single person in the organization, Jason labels Brittany the "Larry David of customer experience" and they decide that Brittany's four year old son is going to be the next great guest."Be nice and listen." Kato Hodak (Brittany's son)Brittany Hodak is an award-winning entrepreneur, author, and customer experience speaker who has delivered keynotes across the globe to organizations including American Express and the United Nations. She has worked with some of the world's biggest brands and entertainers, including Walmart, Disney, Katy Perry, and Dolly Parton. She founded and scaled an entertainment startup to eight figures before exiting and is the former Chief Experience Officer of Experience.com. Her debut book, Creating Superfans, will be in stores on January 10, 2023.BrittanyHodak.comhttps://www.instagram.com/brittanyhodak/?hl=enhttps://www.facebook.com/brittanyhodakhttps://www.linkedin.com/in/brittanyhodak/Enjoying the podcast? Please tell your friends, give us a shoutout and a follow on social media, and take a moment to leave us a review at https://lovethepodcast.com/talkingtocoolpeople.Find the show at all of the cool spots below.WebsiteFacebookInstagramIf something from this or any episode has sparked your interest and you'd like to connect about it, please email us at podcast@jasonfrazell.com. We love hearing from our listeners!If you are interested in being a guest on the show, please visit jasonfrazell.com/podcasts.

    Global Dispatches -- World News That Matters
    Lab Leak? Bioweapons Attack? Natural Pathogen? A New Proposal Would Give the UN the Ability to Investigate | Angela Kane

    Global Dispatches -- World News That Matters

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2022 29:47


    Rapidly identifying an emerging infectious pathogen is critical to  prevent a disease outbreak from becoming an epidemic -- or even a deadly pandemic. But right now, there is no agreed international mechanism to do so. Veteran UN diplomat Angela Kane is trying to change that. She is working to create a new UN body to strengthen UN capabilities to investigate high-consequence biological events of unknown origin. Angela Kane, is the Sam Nunn Distinguished Fellow at the Nuclear Threat Initiative. She is a veteran diplomat who has held several senior positions at the United Nations, including Assistant Secretary-General for Political Affairs, Under-Secretary-General for Management, and High Representative for Disarmament.     

    THE SITH LIST
    EPISODE 314 | Andor | Ahsoka | Prey | The Rehearsal | HBOMAX

    THE SITH LIST

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2022 96:51


    Welcome...Welcome...Welcome to Episode 314 of THE SITH LIST! Iraj, Boo, Les, Eric, Randy and King Tom have all your "Week in Geek" right here in one place! The Sith List is composed of a group of people with different cultural backgrounds and experiences, you might call us the United Nations of Fandom. We all come together once a week to bring you the latest in Fandom and of course to…..“SHOOT the SITH.” Introductions The Shenanigans Box Office/Streaming Get on the Love Train Things we watched last week. Star Wars Chit Chat Ahsoka News Andor doesn't use the volume and all of the sudden “The Volume” isn't cool? What? Ok which one of our friends is not in the Star Wars universe? New excerpt from the Princess and the scoundrel Star Wars Summer Vacation Pop Culture Breakdown/Reboots and Remakes Boo Bits Comicbook TV/Movie News Batgirl canned She Hulk Sandman Emails & Voicemails Support THE SITH LIST through Patreon and become an official SithLister Click here to visit THE SITH LIST website SUBSCRIBE TO OUR YOUTUBE PAGE Find THE SITH LIST on Twitter: @THESITHLSIT @TheSithlistBoo @Lesismore78 @ericstrothers  @tomchansky Check out ERIC STROTHERS on his other podcast......THE BAD MOTIVATORS by clicking RIGHT HERE!!! Check out ERIC'S MUSIC ON BANDCAMP RIGHT HERE! Instagram: thesithlist Facebook: The Sith List Podcast Email: thesithlist@gmail.com Catch you next week on Episode 315 of  The Sith List!  

    FBI Retired Case File Review
    268: Jalaine Ward and Joan Cronier – Nuwaubian Nation Cult Leader Dwight York

    FBI Retired Case File Review

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 61:52


    Retired agents Jalaine Ward and Joan Cronier review their investigation of cult leader Dwight D. York, of the United Nation of Nuwaubian Moors. York used his charisma to recruit thousands of followers. Several hundred cult members lived with their children on his 475-acre compound in Putnam County, Georgia where, for years, he sexually molested boys and girls, 3-18 years old. In 2004, York was convicted and sentenced to 135 years without parole. Jalaine Ward served in the FBI for nearly 27 years. Joan Cronier served in the FBI for 20 years.  Check out episode show notes, photos, and related articles. https://jerriwilliams.com/268-jalaine-ward-and-joan-cronier-nuwaubian-nation-cult-leader-dwight-york/ Buy me a coffee - https://www.buymeacoffee.com/JerriWilliams   Join FBI the Retired Reader Team to get the FBI Reading Resource - Books about the FBI, written by FBI agents, the 20 clichés about the FBI Reality Checklist, and keep up to date on the FBI in books, TV, and movies via my monthly email. Join here. http://eepurl.com/dzCCmL  Visit Jerri's website to check out her books, available as audiobooks, ebooks and paperbacks wherever books are sold. https://jerriwilliams.com/books/

    Conspiracy Unlimited: Following The Truth Wherever It Leads

    Episode #771 The Great Reset and End Times Richard speaks with a documentary filmmaker and Bible prophecy expert about whether the machinations of the World Economic Forum and the United Nations align with End Times prophecy. ​ Guest: Ali Siadatan is the founder of Think Again Productions in Canada—a multimedia teaching ministry shedding light on mysteries and treasures of scriptural knowledge which is making the bible more real than ever. Siadatan has found evidence keeps agreeing with the bible's tale, from biblical cities peering through the sand to "alien" abductions and prophetic events. ​ VIDEOS: UFOs Angels & Gods Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    Back2BasicsMode
    Dr. Mandeep Rai (And Why You Should Read her Book 'The Values Compass!) | SE2/EP120 | Back2Basics

    Back2BasicsMode

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 15:24


    Mandeep Rai is a global authority on values, working with companies, institutions, and individuals around the world. She has travelled to more than 150 countries and reported as a journalist for the BBC World Service and Reuters, amongst others.She began her career in private banking at JPMorgan, and later worked for the United Nations, the European Commission, and grassroots NGOs before setting up the UAE's first media venture capital fund.Mandeep studied philosophy, politics, and economics (PPE), has an MSc in International Development from the London School of Economics, and completed an MBA at London Business School, with a year at Harvard Business School and MIT. She also holds a PhD in global values.Support the show

    Entrepreneur Mindset-Reset with Tracy Cherpeski
    EP 65: Innovation as A Business Model with Costa Michailidis

    Entrepreneur Mindset-Reset with Tracy Cherpeski

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 48:16


    In today's episode, I am really excited to be speaking with Costa Michailidis of Innovation Bound.  Costa shares that his journey to becoming an entrepreneur seems to have been in his blood, since he comes from a long line of entrepreneurs who got their start as builders in Greece before moving to New York, and then becoming well-recognized for their high-end renovations in some of Manhattan's finest apartments.   Costa helps people use creativity to solve problems, and reminds us that we need to learn how to cope with the rapidly changing environment thorough resilience and innovation. He defines innovation something uniquely new and valuable, or a process that results in something new and valuable. He says that entrepreneurs play a valuable role in bringing new technology to the masses, through innovative methods.  Costa teaches us that we need to test early and often, rather than, say, investing 4 years and $400K only to learn that the market is lukewarm to our brilliant idea or invention. We discussed how iterative development in our business and services not only creates more refined offerings in our business, but also builds resilience within the business in the form of adaptability, AND personal resilience and adaptability.  Costa focuses on 5 Innovation Habits: Test early and often Be ready to improvise and adapt Come up with lots of ideas to go beyond your regular thinking and problem solving Give and receive feedback as a way to improve your ideas Ask the right questions You won't want to miss when he takes the time to teach us about #3: come up with lots of ideas to go beyond your regular thinking and problem solving. He's sharing a reduced-priced resource in his Innovation 101 course, and for the time being, it's priced at $35, so if you're wanting to dive deeper into your own innovation, I strongly recommend you take advantage of this opportunity. Innovation 101 Course I know you'll enjoy learning from Costa today, and I suspect you'll want to scroll down and follow the links in the show notes so you can go down the rabbit hole of innovation. So, you know what to do: grab a beverage or a snack and settle-in to listen to Costa and his amazing journey. Find Costa: Website LinkedIn Twitter Instagram  Resources: Reimagining The Search For Life Beyond Earth With Professor Lee Cronin Lee Cronin: Origin of Life, Aliens, Complexity, and Consciousness | Lex Fridman Podcast Costa's Bio: Costa began life as a creative misfit, using his imagination to spur havoc, laughter, and the occasional unintended success. Come to think of it, he hasn't changed much over the years. Some of his recent adventures include working with NASA scientists to reimagine the search for life beyond Earth, designing innovation tournaments inside of Fortune 500 companies to seed innovation projects, speaking at the United Nations in New York as part of the first TEDx event there, working with a group of cyber security experts (including one of the original creators of the internet—not Al Gore) to make recommendations to the Obama Administration, and that's just the compulsory who's who. Some of the most impactful and beautiful work he's done has been with college students, young entrepreneurs, and nonprofit organizations. Costa's passion, and by some cosmic coincidence his job, is to help people be more creative, so they can solve new and meaningful problems in the world. He takes great joy and pride in skillfully priming the human brain, and the human heart, for creative breakthrough. He cofounded Innovation Bound, and has joined a team of academics, entrepreneurs, consultants, and other creativity & innovation experts just like him to help accelerate innovation efforts in science, business, and beyond. Costa grew up in the world of competitive gymnastics. To this day, he still chalks up to swing high bar on Wednesday nights. If you spend enough time with him, you're sure to catch a glimpse of him flying through the air or standing on his hands. Connect With Us: Instagram  Schedule Strategy Session with Tracy Tracy's LinkedIn Business Page LinkedIn

    Lowy Institute: Live Events
    EVENT: Migration nation: Australia's foreign policy from a multicultural perspective

    Lowy Institute: Live Events

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 64:27


    Half of all Australians were born overseas or have a parent who was born overseas, and Australia is home to more than 250 ancestries and 350 languages. The new Labor government has invoked Australia's multiculturalism as a part of our national identity in its recent engagement with the region. But what is the role of Australia's multiculturalism in foreign policy? Are diversity and diasporas a source of soft power and engagement? Our panel examined how Australia's multiculturalism can inform foreign policymaking chaired by Dr Jennifer Hsu, Research Fellow in the Lowy Institute's Public Opinion and Foreign Policy Program. Panel guests include: Dr Melissa Phillips is a Lecturer in Humanitarian and Development Studies in the School of Social Sciences at Western Sydney University. She has previously worked for the United Nations and international NGOs in South Sudan, North Africa, and the Middle East, and recently co-edited Understanding Diaspora Development: Lessons from Australia and the Pacific. Jason Chai is the Director of Market Access and Government Affairs for Cochlear Asia-Pacific. He is a former Australian diplomat and has worked for the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade, as well as at senior government levels, including as a Chief of Staff to a Victorian Minister of Trade and Investment. Alfred Deakin Professor Fethi Mansouri holds a research chair in Migration and Intercultural Studies and the UNESCO Chair for comparative research on cultural diversity and social justice. He is the founding Director of the Alfred Deakin Institute for Citizenship and Globalisation at Deakin University. He is the editor of the Journal of Intercultural Studies and since 2010 has served as an expert adviser to the United Nations on cultural diversity and intercultural relations. Recorded on 10 Aug 2022

    KVMR News
    Evening News - Tue August 9th, 2022

    KVMR News

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 24:04


    The United Nations estimates that over 1 million refugees have fled Ukraine since Russia invaded in February of this year. Almost 23 thousand have come to California. Many are now in the Sacramento area, which has a large Slavic community. The California Report talks to some of them. After regional weather, retired Federal Reserve economist, Gary Zimmerman, talks to Paul Emery about the latest unemployment numbers. We close with a commentary by Marc Cuniberti. 

    The Takeaway
    Can Dimming the Sun Prevent Climate Catastrophe?

    The Takeaway

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 16:07


    The United Nations' Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change says that the earth's temperature will rise by almost 35 degrees Fahrenheit by 2040 if we don't curb our greenhouse gas emissions. But what if there was another way — what if we could simply shade the planet from the sun's hot rays? It sounds like something right out of a science fiction movie, but research into making it a reality has recently won some powerful financial backers. Solar geo-engineering, as the idea is called, doesn't just pose environmental and technological challenges, but also questions of international cooperation and governance.  Dr. Alan Robock, Distinguished Professor of climate science in the Department of Environmental Sciences at Rutgers University, joined us to explain the research, the technology, and the unintended consequences.

    Write About Now
    An Inside Look at One of the Most Interesting and Stressful Professions

    Write About Now

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 54:21


    Ewandro Magalhães is the former chief interpreter for the United Nations. He has interpreted for world leaders, pop singers, and the Dalai Lama. On this episode, he shares a collection of stories from the field and talks about this book The Language Game, which offers insights on the power of communication. Ewandro recalls the chance encounter with a certain member of the royal family that brought him to this high-pressure profession, and the work involved in interpreting for high-profile dignitaries. He also talks about what interpreters do in tricky situations, and the underrated traits that help someone succeed in the field.

    Stand Up For The Truth Podcast
    John Loeffler: How Did We Get Here and Where Will This All End?

    Stand Up For The Truth Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 53:41


    After nearly 32 years on the air, John is ending his radio broadcast of the Steel on Steel program. Today, we'll ask John what he sees coming down the road globally and nationally. We'll also benefit from what John has learned in over three decades about how the world works, how we got to where we are today, and where we can expect to head in the future. Daily podcast, relevant articles on issues pertaining to Christians and more can be found on Stand Up For The Truth.

    Success to Significance: Life After Breaking Through Glass Ceilings
    Making Your 'Why' Bigger Than Your 'Why Not' with Dan Clark

    Success to Significance: Life After Breaking Through Glass Ceilings

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 69:36


    The way to find Success and turn it into significance in life is not easy. But once we answer 'Why', figuring out the how becomes clear and simple. Everything else falls into place. Join Jen and her special guest Dan Clark, founder and CEO of a multi-million dollar international communications company. Listen along as Dan shares why finding your 'Why' is so important for your journey to success! Are you a successful professional, ready to share your story? Email admin@jenduplessis.com to get scheduled! _____________________________________________________ Learn more about Dan BIO: DAN CLARK is founder and CEO of a multi-million dollar international communications company; University Professor; High Performance Business Coach; Podcast Host; Gold Record Songwriter; Film Maker; New York Times Best Selling Author of 37 books; a Primary Contributing Author to the Chicken Soup For The Soul series; and an Award Winning Athlete who fought his way back from a paralyzing injury that cut short his football career. Dan has been inducted into the Professional Speakers Hall of Fame; was Named on e of the Top Ten Motivational Speakers In The World ; and has spoken to more than 6000 audiences, to over 6 million people, in 73 countries, to most of the Fortune 500, Super Bowl Champions, the United Nations, and to our military combat troops in Iraq, Afghanistan, Europe, Asia and Africa. Dan has appeared on over 500 television and radio shows including Oprah and Glenn Beck; and has been featured in Success Magazine, Forbes, Entrepreneur, Inc, Sports Illustrated, Millionaire and the Mayo Clinic Journal. Clark's inspiring life includes soaring to the edge of space in a U2 Spy Plane; flying fighter jets with the Air Force Thunderbirds; racing automobiles at Nur-burg-ring; serving on the Olympic Committee and carrying the Olympic Torch in the Winter Games; receiving the United States Distinguished Service Medal-America's Highest Civilian Award presented by the Secretary of the Air Force; and most importantly - being named Utah Father of the year. Get in touch with Dan Clark: LN IG FB WEBSITE NEW BOOK - The Art of Significance: Achieving the Level Beyond Success Love the show? Subscribe, rate, review, and share! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    Optimal Business Daily
    678: What is Data Quality and How Do You Measure It for Best Results by Sherice Jacob with Neil Patel

    Optimal Business Daily

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 11:57


    Sherice Jacob with Neil Patel talks about how to measure data quality Episode 678: What is Data Quality and How Do You Measure It for Best Results by Sherice Jacob with Neil Patel Neil Patel is a New York Times Bestselling author. The Wall Street Journal calls him a top influencer on the web, Forbes says he is one of the top 10 marketers, and Entrepreneur Magazine says he created one of the 100 most brilliant companies. He was recognized as a top 100 entrepreneur under the age of 30 by President Obama and a top 100 entrepreneur under the age of 35 by the United Nations. The original post can be found here: https://neilpatel.com/blog/data-quality/  Indeed is the #1 source of hires in the U.S., according to TalentNest. Go to Indeed.com/STARTUP to get started Visit Me Online at OLDPodcast.com  Interested in advertising on the show? Visit https://www.advertisecast.com/OptimalStartUpDaily Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    Springfield's Talk 104.1 On-Demand
    Nick Reed PODCAST 08.09.22 - Why Isn't The FBI Raiding Hunter Biden And The Clintons?

    Springfield's Talk 104.1 On-Demand

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 42:03


    Hour 2 -  Good Tuesday morning! Here's what Nick Reed covers this hour: Nikki Haley, former President Trump's ambassador to the United Nations, called on President Joe Biden to “answer for his agencies” after the FBI raided Trump's Mar-a-Lago residence. Following the FBI raid on former President Donald Trump's Mar-a-Lago home in Florida, Republican officials in the House and Senate slammed the move, calling it a “weaponization” of federal agencies while warning of the ramifications for average citizens nationwide.

    The Forgotten Exodus
    Yemen

    The Forgotten Exodus

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 28:35 Very Popular


    Once home to one of the world's oldest Jewish communities, some 50,000 Yemeni Jews, or Teimanim, left their homes between 1949-50 as part of Operation Magic Carpet. They walked for months to reach Alaskan Airlines planes “filled like sardines” that chartered them to safety in the then-young Jewish nation. How did this incredible story unfold and what were the political, social, and economic forces that drove them to leave? In the #1 Jewish podcast in the U.S, the history and personal stories of Yemenite Jews are uncovered and told. Hear from windsurfer Shahar Tzubari, who won a bronze medal in the 2008 Beijing Olympics, about how his grandparents left behind their life as dairy farmers in Ta'iz, Yemen, to come to Israel, and Ari Ariel, a Middle East historian at the University of Iowa, who delves into what the 2,600-year-old community was like and the dramatic transitions that led to the mass exodus. ___ Show notes: Sign up to receive podcast updates here. Learn more about the series here. Video credits: Sailing - Men's RS:X Windsurfing - Beijing 2008 Summer Olympic Games Shahar Tzuberi Wins Israel's First Olympic Medal Of 2008 Beijing Olympics  Song credits:  "Emet El Shmeha", by Shoshana Demari "Hatikvah"  “Muhabet” by Turku, Nomads of the Silk Road Pond5:  “Desert Caravans”: Publisher: Pond5 Publishing Beta (BMI), Composer: Tiemur Zarobov (BMI), IPI#1098108837 “Sentimental Oud Middle Eastern”: Publisher: Pond5 Publishing Beta (BMI), Composer: Sotirios Bakas (BMI), IPI#797324989. “Adventures in the East”: Publisher: Pond5 Publishing Beta (BMI) Composer: Petar Milinkovic (BMI), IPI#00738313833. “Modern Middle Eastern Underscore”: Publisher: All Pro Audio LLC (611803484); Composer: Alan T Fagan (347654928) “Middle Eastern Arabic Oud”: Publisher: Pond5 Publishing Beta (BMI); Composer: Sotirios Bakas (BMI), IPI#797324989 Photo credit: GPO/Zoltan Kluger ____ Episode Transcript: BENNY GAMLIELI/ZE'EV TZUBARI: During thousands of years, the Jewish people used to dream, that the Messiah would come, to go to Israel, to go to the Holy Land, to see the city of Jerusalem. It was a dream during thousands of years.  MANYA BRACHEAR PASHMAN: The world has overlooked an important episode in modern history: the 800,000 Jews who left, or were driven from their homes in Arab nations and Iran in the mid-20th century. This series, brought to you by American Jewish Committee, explores that pivotal moment in Jewish history and the rich Jewish heritage of Iran and Arab nations, as some begin to build relations with Israel.  I'm your host, Manya Brachear Pashman.  Join us as we explore family histories and personal stories of courage, perseverance, and resilience. This is The Forgotten Exodus.  Today's episode: Leaving Yemen. [Video clip of Beijing 2008 Summer Olympics Windsurfing RS:X event] MANYA: That is the sound of Israeli Windsurfer Shahar Tzubari in the 2008 Beijing Olympics, coming up from behind to earn the bronze medal. At the same time, he was electrifying his country by winning Israel's only medal in those Olympic Games, he was also fulfilling his mandatory military service to help defend the Jewish state. Two generations before him also served in the Israeli military, including his grandfather who fought to defend Israel against attacks from its Arab neighbors just days after shepherding his family on foot across Yemen to board a plane and make the new Jewish state their new home.   SHAHAR TZUBARI: I just know about the past, of my parents and my grandparents. And I know, they fought for this country. And they fought for independence. And for me, I'm here, and I represent basically what they fought for.  MANYA: Shahar, who now coaches Israel's women's windsurfing team, is a second-generation Israeli whose grandparents and generations before them lived in Yemen. Their journey to the Jewish state resembles that of tens of thousands of Yemeni Jews, who came to Israel from Yemen between 1948 and 1949 as part of a mass exodus commonly called Operation Magic Carpet.  In fact, Yemeni Jews, or Teimanim, are believed to be one of the oldest Jewish communities in the world outside of Israel, existing there even before the destruction of the First Temple. Yemeni Jews spoke a particular dialect of Hebrew and maintained many original religious traditions and others shaped over the centuries by the influence of Maimonides and Kabbalah. Hundreds of Jewish settlements were scattered across Yemen, where Jews primarily served as silversmiths, blacksmiths, carpenters, masons, shoemakers, and tailors.  But that population started to shift in the 19th Century, what historians call the “age of migration,” driven largely by economic shifts. When the Suez Canal opened in 1869, movement between the Red Sea and the Mediterranean suddenly became much easier. That was true not only for imported and exported goods, but transportation of people too. ARI ARIEL: Most of the time, the story is told starting with Magic Carpet, because that's the big migration. But it's really a much older story. MANYA: That's Ari Ariel, a Middle East historian at the University of Iowa who focuses on Jewish communities in the Arab world and Mizrahi communities, those who immigrated from Arab countries to Israel and elsewhere in the Diaspora.  His own family left Yemen for Israel in the 1920s. Professor Ariel has spent the last decade trying to piece together that lineage and the history of Yemeni Jews. He notes that between 1872 and 1881, Ottomans retook parts of Yemen where they had previously ruled centuries before. They also ruled over Palestine.  But that wasn't the only significant transition. In fact, just in the span of five decades leading up to 1922, monumental transitions unfolded. The Ottoman Empire fell apart. Yemen became independent, both Jewish and Arab national movements arose, and the British, who obtained a mandate over Palestine in 1922, expressed support for a Jewish national home – Israel.  ARI: So, there are big economic changes. More and more imported goods start to enter Yemen, and Yemeni Jews, who are craftsmen, largely, and small-scale merchants, really can't compete. So, you have documents complaining about the price of imported shoes and other kinds of imported things.  So, in 1911, the Zionist movement, for the first time sends an emissary to Yemen, because they want Yemeni Jews to move to Palestine. And here, there's also an economic factor. For the Jewish nation to redeem itself, Jews have to fulfill all economic roles.  What that means is they really want Jewish farmers. So, they send a guy named Shmuel Yavnieli. He goes and he walks, he goes around to different villages. It's kind of an intrigue story. He goes from village to village trying to get Yemeni Jews to move.  When he writes back to Jerusalem, he makes it pretty clear, the only Jews who he thinks he's going to be able to get to move to Palestine are the ones who aren't doing so well economically. And that if the Zionist movement agrees to pay for, say, their transportation or housing, or things of that nature, that they may move, and he is successful at doing that.  From my perspective, as a historian, that's important, too, because from that point, pretty much most Yemeni Jews who leave Yemen are going to Palestine. That's not true initially. So in the earlier periods, you have lots of Yemeni Jews going to East Africa, to India, to Egypt, a small number to the U.S., actually. So you get these movements. But once it's directed by a state, or I guess, a state like structure, in the case of the Zionist movement, at this point, the flow becomes much clearer to Palestine.  MANYA: The Tzubari family's initial departure from Yemen – aunts, uncles, cousins – is part of that larger story of migration. But Shahar's grandparents came amid the events of the mid-20th Century that sparked the most significant exodus. Within a three-month period, nearly 50,000 Yemeni Jews, including Shahar's grandparents and great grandparents, poured out of Yemen and made Israel their new home. This is their story as told to me by Shahar and his father Ze'ev Tzubari. Ze'ev Tzubari's parents were born in southwestern Yemen. For generations they had been dairy farmers. Before they left in 1949 through Operation Magic Carpet, they lived in Ta'iz, once known as the nation's cultural capital.  ZE'EV AND BENNY, TRANSLATOR: [speaking Hebrew]:  ZE'EV: In Yemen?  BENNY: Yes, you remember what they did? ZE'EV: They had, what I remember, goats, cattle, they had cattle. BENNY: In Ta'iz?  ZE'EV: In Ta'iz, there, we had cattle.] MANYA: Ze'ev spoke to me in Hebrew, and a family friend, Benny Gamlieli, translated. Here's Benny. BENNY: By the way, my parents as well came through this project by Alaska [Airlines] and brought, as I said, over 50,000-55,000 Jewish people from Yemen came through this project. You know this Aliyah, that we call the Magic Carpet. MANYA: Operation Magic Carpet was the nickname for a joint venture of the Israeli government, the American Jewish Joint Distribution Committee and the Jewish Agency, to transport Jews from Yemen to Israel. Its official name was Operation Kanfei Nesharim, which, translated from Hebrew means “On the Wings of Eagles”, referring to the passage in Exodus: “how I carried you on eagles' wings and brought you to me…” BENNY: So during thousands of years, the Jewish people used to dream, that the Messiah will come, to go to Israel, to go to the Holy Land, to see the city of Jerusalem. It was a dream during thousands of years. MANYA: There are a number of theories about why the exodus from Yemen took place at this moment in time and the circumstances surrounding it. Ze'ev's translator, Benny, said Jews and Muslims lived side by side. But being Jewish wasn't easy. Since the seventh century, Jews in Yemen were considered second class, which varied in meaning from ruler to ruler. Since 1910, the imam of Yemen had an agreement with the Ottomans to take care of the Jews.  But that did not prevent the Yemeni government from imposing heavy taxes or applying an even more troubling interpretation. Known as the Orphan's Decree, Yemen required any Jewish children under the age of 12 who lost a parent to be handed over to a Muslim family and convert to Islam – ostensibly for their protection. In 1924, the King of Yemen restricted Jewish immigration to Palestine. Then, in November 1947, after the Holocaust sent a wave of European Jewish immigrants seeking refuge in their biblical homeland, the United Nations voted for the partition of Palestine and the creation of an independent Jewish state.  Days later, rioters targeted Jewish homes and businesses in Aden. That pogrom killed an estimated 82 Jews. In 1948, the King of Yemen, the imam, opened the window for three months for Jews to leave under two conditions: leave everything behind, and teach the Yemeni Muslims your trades in order to maintain the economy.  With only three months, Jews seized the opportunity. ARI: It's not entirely clear why he gives permission at that point. But there are different stories. One is that maybe a Yemeni Rabbi tells him a story about a dream, that this is kind of fate and that Yemeni Jews are supposed to . . . because the Imami its legitimacy is religious, and it understands these kinds of movements. So, the idea of a Messianic movement is kind of appealing to the Muslim side of this as well, in a sense.  There's another story that he's paid. There's some sort of element of bribe because people are given money for the number of Jews that leave Yemen. MANYA: But that moment was also a time of political strife in Yemen that – as most times of political strife do – threatened the welfare of the Jewish community. After the riots in Aden, Jews already had good reason to worry.  Then in 1948, the imam of Yemen, who had agreed to take care of the Jews, was assassinated. If Jews saw their fortunes aligned with the imam, now they had even more reason for concern. ARI: It's about a moment of political instability and about the changing nature of government and society in Yemen, which pushes some Jews to leave because they've been so aligned with the imam.  MANYA: Jews came from hundreds of towns and villages throughout Yemen, some walking for weeks and months to reach Aden, where between June 1949 and September 1950 more than 380 flights took off for Tel Aviv. Those Kanfei Nesharim, eagles' wings, were provided by Alaska Airlines. BENNY: Alaska Airlines was the only company who agreed to do the journey. And you know what they did to absorb as much as they can in one plane? They took off all the seats and they filled them like sardines.  MANYA: For the harrowing mission, the airline stationed flight and maintenance crews throughout the Middle East and outfitted newly acquired war-surplus twin-engine planes, with extra fuel tanks to guarantee a non-stop 3,000-mile flight.  British officials warned pilots that if they had to stop along the way, those angry about the establishment of Israel, would surely kill the passengers and crew. To reassure the Yemeni passengers boarding the one-way flights from Aden to Tel Aviv, the airline painted the outstretched wings of an eagle above each airplane hatch. Planes were shot at, the airport in Tel Aviv was bombed. But miraculously, no lives were lost. BENNY: For three months it was a crazy situation. And the government cannot say, ‘Oh, we have no room for you.' That's why they built tents.” MANYA: Tents. A temporary tent city, or a ma'abara in Hebrew, was where Ze'ev's parents and grandparents lived when they first arrived in Israel. ZE'EV: [in Hebrew: Five meters by five meters, that in each corner of the tent was a family. Here's a family, here's a family, here's a family . . .]  BENNY: Five meters by five meters one square. And in each tent, four different families, each corner of the tent was settled by a family.  MANYA: Ze'ev's family shared a tent with other families from Yemen. That wasn't always the case. Sometimes each corner would be occupied by families from four different countries. Another tent could have Olim Chadashim, the Hebrew term for new immigrants, from Romania, Iraq, Yemen, and Egypt.  BENNY: Impossible to describe that terrible situation, that years, the beginning of the State of Israel, of course, until the government, you know, start to build, to establish cities and to try to absorb as much as they can, Olim Chadashim, you know, Jewish from all over the world. MANYA: In 1952, Ze'ev was born in one of those 5-meter-by-5-meter tents. But his father Natan did not know right away that Ze'ev had been born. He was already fighting for the Israeli army's Golani Brigade, the troops that defended the Jewish state from the Arab nations that attacked Israel as soon as it declared independence. ZE'EV: My father was in the army. Yeah. He didn't know that I was born.  BENNY: He knew it later because he was busy in the army in one of the missions, one of his job, whatever, as a young fighter, so it took it took a few weeks, (ZE'EV: a few weeks) to find his father to let him know that ‘You're lucky because the boy was born . . . now you have a son.'  That was the beginning of the war. It's funny to say the beginning and the end – no beginning and no end. War, all the time.  The minute when the Prime Minister David Ben Gurion declared about this young state of Israel, declared our independent country, at the same time – booming and shooting from the four different countries, Lebanon, Syria, Jordan, and Egypt, attacked Israel. So we have 10 months of fighting, 24 hours a day.  So his father Natan, he went to the army and by the way, in the army, he didn't get money, let me tell you, but you know what, he got? Uniform and food. That's enough, I can survive. You know, you know what I mean? As long as they feed him, and bring him some uniform, clothes, thank God, everything is okay. Every second, day was, you know, problems, shooting, whatever along the border. So, we have to protect the young country that starts to build itself. MANYA: Natan returned after the birth of his son. The government moved the families to cabins where Ze'ev's sister was born, and eventually to an apartment where his younger brother was born and raised.  Natan connected with an older brother who had come a decade earlier and found work building roads and planting trees – literally laying the foundation for and cultivating the nation of Israel.  ZE'EV:  Ok, so after that we [in Hebrew: . . . good, let's speak in Hebrew. We studied at the schools, and my mother would always say ‘I work like a donkey for you, only so you should learn and exceed your parents.' She used to work for an Ashkenazi family, they owned a pharmacy . . . Yes.] MANYA: His mother found a job working as a nanny for the family of an Ashkenazi pharmacist. BENNY: She found, his mother, the way they treat the children, how much they spend, because they have money. And it's mainly for education, mainly for studies. Because of the study. She said, ‘I'll do my best for my children as well.' MANYA: While progress has been made in closing the education and income gap between Ashkenazim and Mizrahim in Israel, it was difficult from the start. At that time, many Ashkenazim, Jews from Europe, had more financial resources and they were well-educated. Meanwhile, Mizrahim, including Jews from Yemen, left everything behind and did not have the same level of education. But Ze'ev's mother saw no reason why her family could not follow the same path as the Ashkenazi family for whom she worked. She and Natan set out to forge a bright future for their children. BENNY: And she said, she talked to her children. And she said ‘Listen guys, we are poor people. But I work 24 hours a day just because of one reason. I want you to study. I want you to be well-educated. I'll do my best. I sacrificed my life for you, for the three of you, and your father as well.' So, their parents work, as I said, so hard to earn money to promise them a good education.  And she found, because she learned from the Ashkenazi family, she said, why not to do the same for my children and that's why he describes the very hard difficult situation at that time, that how many hours a day they miss their mother because she was out working trying to get more money to promise them a good education in Tel Aviv at that time. MANYA: Ze'ev understood and appreciated what his mother and father provided and did what they asked of him. He studied and took care of his brother and sister while his parents worked.  At the age of 16, he entered a special military academy in Haifa, then, like his father Natan, served his time in the Israeli Defense Forces.  When he got out, he found a job working for a utility company on the Sinai Peninsula, which at that time, prior to the Israeli Egyptian peace treaty, was under Israeli control. BENNY: The peninsula of Sinai, it's a huge area, it's a desert, but with a beautiful golden seashore from Eilat to Sharm El Sheikh. 250 kilometers, which is like, 150-60 miles length to the south, and the southern city of that peninsula, called Sharm El Sheikh.  And a lot of young people went there, mixed with the Bedouins, to find a job and he earned a lot of money because as long as you work far away from the center, from the country, you have a chance to earn much more. So let's say, a double salary a month. Gave him a chance to help his family in southern Tel Aviv and the old place that he used to live, his parents.  MANYA: But in addition to earning money to send back to his family, Ze'ev also took advantage of that beautiful golden seashore and took up a hobby – windsurfing. He married an Ashkenazi woman, the daughter of a German businessman who left Germany before the Holocaust. Instead of returning to the HaTikva neighborhood, what was then a high crime area in Tel Aviv, Ze'ev and his wife moved to Eilat and when he became a father, Ze'ev took Shahar and his sister Tal to the shore of the Red Sea every day in hopes they too would fall in love with the ocean. And they did.  SHAHAR: I started windsurfing as well at the age of 6-7. Basically, she was windsurfing for fun as I was windsurfing for fun. And when I got to the age where I had to decide, I decided to go for a special athlete program in the army, because I was good. And I wanted to go to the Olympics, and I wanted to continue with the sport.  MANYA: Because Shahar grew up in Eilat, away from where his father's family remained, his exposure to Yemeni customs and culture was limited.  SHAHAR: So I kind of knew the roots of my father. And every time we went there, we went to the market, and I saw my cousins, and they were going to the synagogue with my grandparents. And we did the kiddush, and eating Yemeni food and connecting more to the roots of the Yemen side of my family, and hearing the stories and sharing the stories. But in a way, I was a bit disconnected, because I was living in Eilat.    So, like, less connected to the Yemen side, but my family name Tzubari and the roots. Also my appearance, it's more Yemeni. So when I became more known, the connection with the Yemen side became stronger and stronger.  MANYA: Shahar lost his grandparents this past year. But before they passed away, he made a point to listen to their stories.  SHAHAR: We tried to observe many of the history and their story about coming to Israel. And it's fascinating that when they were young, at the age of 10, or 12, they walked so many miles to come here, because they had hope. They didn't know what to expect, but they had hope. That they come here, and everything will be better. MANYA: He appreciates how far the family has come since his grandparents and great-grandparents arrived in Israel and lived in that 5-meter by 5-meter tent.  SHAHAR: Basically, it's a funny story. Because where my father was born and raised, or where my grandparents first lived when they came to Israel, now it's the most expensive place in Tel Aviv. And the parents of my wife are living in this neighborhood, in the penthouse. MANYA: Shahar also recognizes the role he plays in his family's and nation's progress, and how intertwined the history of his family is with the future of the Jewish nation. He realizes now that protecting Israel, defending the Jewish state, is part of growing up Israeli. It's not the diversion he once resented.  SHAHAR: So when I was young, I felt like it's kind of stalking me. But now I'm older, and I have athletes, which are also soldiers, because now I'm a coach, and I see all the positive things, because sometimes athletes think that they are the center of the world. And it's not so true because they are living in a system, doesn't matter which system it is– it's the Federation, it's the Olympic committee. You always have a boss, and you're always in a system.  And I think that the journey that I pass in the IDF, it's a good journey to build yourself and realizing and taking everything out there . . . and realizing that, okay, I might be the best athlete in the world, but I still have responsibilities. So it gave me a lot of tools and abilities for life. MANYA: In March 2021, Iranian-backed Houthi rebels deported the last three Jewish families living in Yemen, marking the end of that country's 2,600-year-old Jewish community within its borders. I asked Shahar if he would ever want to go to Yemen to trace his family's footsteps, once it's safe for Jews and Israelis.  SHAHAR: For me, it's a pity that, of course, this is life and politics, but I can't go there because I'm an Israeli, and I have an Israeli passport. And if I had another passport, I could go … Yeah, it's a shame. I have this thing that I really want to visit all the Arab countries, not only Yemen, because as an Israeli, learning about the conflict . . . in the end, I think that all the Arab nations, we are very similar. And we are neighbors, and you know, as neighbors, we have the same temperament. And we share many of the values of the family, and being together. For me, I think being able to visit those places, it's a dream come true. MANYA: Just as military service and family history have shaped Shahar, windsurfing has given him perspective too. The waters of Eilat can be soothing, serene, utterly breathtaking. But storms churn up fierce waves for which the strongest surfer is no match. And that's when Shahar really likes to be on the water. A fearless determination that goes back generations.   [Video clip from after the Beijing 2008 Summer Olympics Windsurfing RS:X event] Moments after he sailed across the finish line in Beijing and claimed that bronze medal, Shahar plunged into the water. A reporter shoved a cell phone into his hand to film Shahar sharing the victory with his family back in Israel.  Nearly 60 years later, another leg of the journey from Ta'iz was complete, another dream fulfilled.   SHAHAR: If you think about it … just to, one day, to wake up, take all your belongings and move. It's a brave act. In hard times, or not even in hard times, just sometimes when I do represent my country as an athlete, so I think about those moments, and it makes me feel pride that my grandparents or my family look at me and say ‘OK, it was worth it.' MANYA: Yemeni Jews are just one of the many Jewish communities who in the last century left Arab countries to forge new lives for themselves and future generations. Join us next week as we share another untold story of The Forgotten Exodus. Does your family have roots in North Africa or the Middle East? One of the goals of this series is to make sure we gather these stories before they are lost. Too many times during my reporting, I encountered children and grandchildren who didn't have the answers to my questions because they had never asked. That's why one of the goals of this project is to encourage you to find more of these stories.  Call The Forgotten Exodus hotline. Tell us where your family is from and something you'd like for our listeners to know such as how you've tried to keep the traditions and memories alive. Call 212.891-1336 and leave a message of 2 minutes or less. Be sure to leave your name and where you live now. You can also send an email to theforgottenexodus@ajc.org and we'll be in touch. Many thanks to Shahar and his father Ze'ev for sharing their family's story. And thank you to Benny Gamlieli for translating Ze'ev from Hebrew. Atara Lakritz is our producer, CucHuong Do is our production manager. T.K. Broderick is our sound engineer. Special thanks to Jon Schweitzer, Sean Savage, Ian Kaplan, and so many of our colleagues, too many to name really, for making this series possible. And extra special thanks to David Harris, who has been a constant champion for making sure these stories do not remain untold. You can subscribe to The Forgotten Exodus on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, or wherever you listen to podcasts, and you can learn more at AJC.org/theforgottenexodus.  The views and opinions of our guests don't necessarily reflect the positions of AJC.  You can reach us at theforgottenexodus@ajc.org. If you've enjoyed this episode, please be sure to spread the word, and hop onto Apple Podcasts to rate us and write a review to help more listeners find us.

    Rebel News +
    DAILY | 'Misleading' Liberal gun ban; UN complaint against Trudeau; Dutch Farmers still rebelling

    Rebel News +

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 67:32


    Adam Soos and Dakota Christensen kick the week off with a look at the "misleading" Liberal gun ban, Sheila Gunn Reid's trip to the United Nations to file a human rights complaint against Justin Trudeau and Lewis Brackpool returns to the Netherlands, where Dutch farmers are continuing to protest against their government's restrictive climate policies.

    Daily Dose
    Daily Dose Ep 1119: Stampede at Rajasthan temple, Sanjay Raut sent to judicial custody

    Daily Dose

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 8:11


    Anwiti Singh brings you the news from the Supreme Court, Noida, Maharashtra, Rajasthan and the United Nations. Our GDPR privacy policy was updated on August 8, 2022. Visit acast.com/privacy for more information.

    The Conversation
    Women crossing borders and seeking refuge

    The Conversation

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 28:00


    According to the United Nations, at the end of 2021, 89.4 million people around the world had been forced to flee their homes as a result of persecution, conflict, human rights violations or other events. Among them are nearly 27.1 million refugees. Kim Chakanetsa talks to two women from Afghanistan and Zimbabwe about having to leave their country. Hajira Zaman is 29 years old and left Afghanistan in November 2021. She'd been working in a dentist's clinic when the Taliban entered the clinic and told her she couldn't work with a male doctor – unless she took her husband, brother or father with her. After threats from the Taliban she, her husband and young son fled the country. Hajira was nine months pregnant and had her baby shortly after arriving in Pakistan. Nyasha Masi is a refugee from Zimbabwe living in Cape Town. She was abused by her family for being gay and forced into marriage. She made the devastating decision to leave without her three year old daughter and escaped to South Africa. She now works with the charity Safe Place International and has set up her own group for LGBTI+ refugees called Pachedu. Her daughter (now a teenager) has joined her. Produced by Jane Thurlow (Image: (L) Nyasha Masi, courtesy Nyasha Masi. (R) Hajira Zaman, courtesy Hajira Zaman.)

    Learn Irish & other languages with daily podcasts
    20220808_IRISH_long_lan_arbhair_on_ucrain_le_bualadh_chun_poirt_in_eirinn

    Learn Irish & other languages with daily podcasts

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 12:14


    jQuery(document).ready(function(){ cab.clickify(); }); Original Podcast with clickable words https://tinyurl.com/2h3bpmn9 Contact: irishlingos@gmail.com A ship full of grain from Ukraine to dock in Ireland. Long lán arbhair ón Úcráin le bualadh chun poirt in Éirinn. The Turkish Government has indicated that three ships with grain cargo have left ports in Ukraine under the custody of the United Nations and that one of them is due to dock in Ireland. Tá sé tugtha le fios ag Rialtas na Tuirce go bhfuil trí long a bhfuil lucht arbhair orthu tar éis calafoirt san Úcráin a fhágáil faoi choimirice na Náisiún Aontaithe agus go bhfuil ceann acu le bualadh chun poirt in Éirinn. Turkey is an occasional peacemaker between Russia and Ukraine since it is a neighboring country that has a voice in the conflict between them. Tá an Tuirc ina ceann réitigh ócáideach idir an Rúis agus an Úcráin ós tír chomharsanachta leo í a bhfuil guthaíocht aici ar an gcoimhlint eatarthu. Last week, diplomats from Turkey and the United Nations managed to persuade the Governments of both Russia and Ukraine to reach an agreement on sending grain across the lake. An tseachtain seo caite, d'éirigh le taidhleoirí na Tuirce agus na Náisiún Aontaithe áitiú ar Rialtais na Rúise agus na hÚcráine araon teacht ar chomhaontú faoi ghrán a sheoladh thar loch amach. There was a point, of course, since Russia and Ukraine produce a third of the world's wheat. Bhí téirim leis, ar ndóigh, ós iad an Rúis agus an Úcráin a tháirgeann an tríú cuid de chruithneacht an domhain. There was concern - and there is still concern - that there would be a famine in poor countries, which are already in dire straits, due to cargoes of grain being locked up in a dock in the south of Ukraine. Bhíothas imníoch - agus táthar imníoch i gcónaí - go mbeadh gorta i dtíortha bochta, atá i ngéarchall cheana féin, de bharr lastaí arbhair a bheith faoi iamh duga i ndeisceart na hÚcráine. When the iron is red it should be struck and apparently the Ukrainians were not the most negligent. Nuair atá an t-iarann dearg is cóir a bhualadh agus níor leis na hÚcránaigh ab fhaillí, de réir cosúlachta. In light of what was decided about corn matters, permission to export other raw materials - such as iron ore - is now being demanded. I bhfianaise ar socraíodh faoi chúrsaí arbhair, cead bunábhar eile a onnmhairiú - leithéidí amhiarainn - atá siad a éileamh anois. It is not known, however, when their petition will come in, if it does. Ní fios, áfach, cén uair a thiocfas a n- achainí isteach, má thagann. As with the war in Ukraine, the Russian Army is reportedly pushing the town of Avdiivka north of the city of Donetsk in the east of the country, as well as other important settlements in the region. Mar leis an gcogaíocht san Úcráin de, tuairiscítear go bhfuil Arm na Rúise ag brú ar bhaile Avdiivka ó thuaidh ó chathair Donetsk in oirthear na tíre, chomh maith le lonnaíochtaí tábhachtacha eile sa réigiún. It seems that the Ukrainians' quatrains in the places where they are not in a position to fight the enemy's encroachment. Dealraítear gur geall le ceithearnaigh na hÚcránaigh sna háiteanna nach bhfuil siad in araíocht dul i ngleic le hanfhorlann an namhad. This approach of the Ukrainian Army in some areas has been criticized, however, by the human rights organization Amnesty International. Tá cur chuige seo Arm na Úcráine i ndúichí áirithe cáinte, áfach, ag an eagraíocht chearta daonnna Amnesty International. Amnesty claims that civilians are being put at risk by soldiers settling among the population in a residential area. Maíonn Amnesty go bhfuil sibhialtaigh á gcur i nguais de bharr saighdiúirí a bheith ag cur fúthu i measc an phobail i gceantar chónaithe. That claim made the President of Ukraine Volodymyr Zelensky blush and he accused Amnesty that the organization was trying to take the bait from the house of the evildoers and send it to the door of the victim.

    The Conspiracy Show with Richard Syrett
    Weird Things & Secrets Found on Google Maps

    The Conspiracy Show with Richard Syrett

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 95:25


    Weird Things & Secrets Found on Google Maps Guest: Mary A. Joyce has worked for two major metropolitan newspapers - The Orlando Sentinel in Florida as an artist and columnist, and The Oakland Press in Michigan as a Sunday magazine editor and then feature editor. On the side, she

    Love’s Last Call
    “Last Minute Warning” - Part 8

    Love’s Last Call

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 15:19


    At the “10th World Assembly of Religions for Peace” about a thousand representatives of world religions and other organizations gathered in Germany, in late August, to advance globalism and a planetary uniting of all religions to promote the United Nation's masterplan for humanity known as UN Agenda 2030. Critics expressed alarm that self-proclaimed religious leaders were embracing dangerous world “order” ideas which are totally at odds with liberty and Christianity. The implications are massive.The controversial 10th World Assembly of Religions for Peace, backed by George Soros and the globalist-controlled German government, as well as other powerful forces, aimed to unify the world's religious organizations behind the key elements of the establishment's agenda – including the UN-guided “modern order.”Operating in almost 100 nations, the alliance claims to be “the world's largest and most representative coalition of religious and indigenous communities.”It is funded by Soros, the Rockefellers, the Ford Foundation, the UN Foundation, various UN agencies, U.S. taxpayers via the State Department, and more.Among other decisions, the coalition vowed to increase cooperation among their religious sects under the guise of caring for “the earth – the entire web of life,” and what participants descried as the “common good.”Behind this global sham lies the very fulfillment of God's Prophetic Word of Truth with confirmation that the Rapture is very near – Are You Ready?Support the show

    Unconventional Life with Jules Schroeder
    Ep322: Pushing the Limits of AI With StoryFile's Co-founder and Chief Visionary Officer Heather Smith Smith

    Unconventional Life with Jules Schroeder

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 26:03


    As the Chief Visionary Officer and co-founder of StoryFile, Heather Smith is paving the way for a new generation of storytelling. Heather Smith's love for storytelling was born when she found herself creating Holocaust remembrance exhibits that traveled to Jewish Community Centers across the country and even to the United Nations. She believed the stories of Holocaust survivors were so important to capture for generations to come that she began to reimagine the storytelling experience with Artificial Intelligence (AI). She saw video as the new medium for human interaction long before we even had FaceTime. She knew the next wave of communication was going to be through video. With a passion for the project, Heather set out to create Conversa, the AI engine that drives the StoryFile platform where people can talk to a pre-recorded video as if the individual is there in front of them. More from Heather and StoryFile: Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/storyfile/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/StoryFileApp Twitter: https://twitter.com/storyfile LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/storyfile/ Website: https://storyfile.com/ Click here to enter the giveaway!

    Ukrainecast
    Nuclear Power Struggle

    Ukrainecast

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 25:12


    Part of Europe's largest nuclear power plant has been damaged by Russian rockets. Vitaly brings us up to date on his home city of Zaporizhzhia, where part of its nuclear plant has been damaged by Russian rockets, in an attack the United Nations called “suicidal”. We hear from Yeva (not her real name), who worries for the safety of her family members working on the site.   And the BBC's security correspondent, Frank Gardner, talks us through new evidence that Russia is using technology from Western companies in its military equipment. This episode of Ukrainecast was made by Daniel Wittenberg with Ivana Davidovic and Arsenii Sokolov. The planning producer was Louise Hidalgo and the technical producer was Gareth Jones. The series editor is Estelle Doyle. Email Ukrainecast@bbc.co.uk with your questions and comments. You can also send us a message or voice note via WhatsApp, Signal or Telegram to +44 330 1239480.

    Science and the Sea podcast
    Saffir-Simpson Scale

    Science and the Sea podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 7, 2022 2:15


    As a hurricane roars toward the American coastline, residents pay close attention to a single number: the hurricane's category. Category 1 is dangerous but usually survivable, while category 5 is monstrous -- an Armageddon with effects that can last for months.The categories come from the Saffir-Simpson hurricane wind scale. It was conceived in 1969 by Herbert Saffir. He was an engineer who was evaluating the impacts of tropical storms for the United Nations. He showed it to Robert Homer Simpson, Director of the National Hurricane Center, who'd survived a major hurricane in Corpus Christi, Texas, as a child.Saffir based the scale on wind speeds. Simpson added storm surges and other effects, then began using the scale in 1973. Decades later, the other effects were dropped, so today the scale once again is based on wind speeds alone.Category 1 begins with winds of 74 miles per hour. They can cause a lot of damage, but the extent and clean-up are fairly minor. Beginning with category 3, at 111 miles per hour, hurricanes are classified as “major.” And the strongest hurricanes, category 5, start at 157 miles per hour. They're described as “catastrophic,” with near-total destruction.Not many hurricanes hit the coast at category 5. And most of the ones that do quickly drop to lower levels -- still-deadly storms high on the Saffir-Simpson scale.

    Headline News
    UN chief renews nuclear warning

    Headline News

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 7, 2022 4:45


    The United Nations chief has reiterated his warning against nuclear weapons.

    1984 Or 1776 PATRIOTS RISING
    KNOW YOUR CONSTITUTIONAL RIGHTS. POLICING BY INTIMIDATION

    1984 Or 1776 PATRIOTS RISING

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 6, 2022 16:17


    Tyranny from the United Nations to a local sheriff's department you have a duty and responsibility to stand for the Constitution and your the Constitution and your rights while you can. The war is way waiting either you're gonna be on one side or the other I will stand for good. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/kalishnikitty/message

    The Children's Book Podcast
    It's a Heat Wave

    The Children's Book Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 6, 2022 12:14


    Over the past few weeks, you may have noticed how very hot it is! Across the northern hemisphere, countries like the United States, Portugal, the United Kingdom, and many others are experiencing hotter temperatures than ever before. This global heat wave is Worth Noting. Sources consulted:US Heat Wave: NBCUniversal News Group. (2022, July 24). Record temperatures forecast as heat wave blasts across U.S. NBCNews.com. Retrieved July 28, 2022, from https://www.nbcnews.com/news/weather/record-breaking-temperatures-forecast-heat-wave-blasts-us-rcna39728Thompson, A., & Huynh, A. (2022, July 25). Boston hits 100 degrees, setting record for the date as heat wave scorches the state - The Boston Globe. BostonGlobe.com. Retrieved July 28, 2022, from https://www.bostonglobe.com/2022/07/24/metro/boston-queues-up-another-scorcher-heat-wave-rolls/#:~:text=Boston%20hits%20100%20degrees%2C%20setting,the%20state%20%2D%20The%20Boston%20Globe  Europe's Heat Wave: Cutts, E. (2022, July 25). Why are heat waves becoming so common in Europe? VOA. Retrieved July 28, 2022, from https://www.voanews.com/a/why-are-heat-waves-becoming-so-common-in-europe/6673184.htmlFountain, H. (2022, July 18). Why Europe is becoming a heat wave hot spot. The New York Times. Retrieved July 28, 2022, from https://www.nytimes.com/2022/07/19/climate/europe-heat-wave-science.html Guardian News and Media. (n.d.). Europe's record summer of heat and fires – visualised. The Guardian. Retrieved July 28, 2022, from https://www.theguardian.com/environment/ng-interactive/2022/jul/26/how-europe-has-been-hit-by-record-fire-damage-and-temperaturesTaylor, A. (2022, July 21). Why European Homes (usually) don't have Air Conditioning. The Washington Post. Retrieved July 28, 2022, from https://www.washingtonpost.com/world/2022/07/20/europe-uk-air-conditioning-ac/ Climate Change: A Kids Book About Climate Change -  https://akidsco.com/products/a-kids-book-about-climate-changeDahlman, R. L. A. N. D. L. A. (n.d.). Climate change: Global temperature. NOAA Climate.gov. Retrieved July 28, 2022, from https://www.climate.gov/news-features/understanding-climate/climate-change-global-temperatureUnited Nations. (n.d.). What is climate change? United Nations. Retrieved July 28, 2022, from https://www.un.org/en/climatechange/what-is-climate-change#:~:text=Climate%20change%20refers%20to%20long,like%20coal%2C%20oil%20and%20gasYoung People Fighting Climate Change: Fortson, A., & Johnson, L. A. (2022, April 22). How young people are taking action against climate change. NPR. Retrieved July 28, 2022, from https://www.npr.org/2022/04/22/1092847883/how-young-people-are-taking-action-against-climate-changeFridays for future is an international climate movement active in most countries and our website offers information on who we are and what you can do. Fridays For Future. (2022, July 22). Retrieved July 28, 2022, from https://fridaysforfuture.org/Young climate activists demand action and Inspire Hope. UNICEF. (n.d.). Retrieved July 28, 2022, from https://www.unicef.org/stories/young-climate-activists-demand-action-inspire-hope

    Bar Crawl Radio
    Nuclear War--Keeps on Rockin'

    Bar Crawl Radio

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 6, 2022 25:47


    August 2, 2022. Outside the United States Consulate to the United Nations. Second day of the 10th Conference of the Parties to the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons. Several dozen people--mostly in their 70s or more--marched and chanted and practiced civil disobedience in a call to end the build-up of nuclear arms. Here is a reflection of what some of them believed -- See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    First Coast Connect With Melissa Ross
    Ben Frazier travels to the United Nations; Compost Jax; Jacksonville NAACP; The Move

    First Coast Connect With Melissa Ross

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 53:05


    Ben Frazier travels to the United Nations; Compost Jax; Jacksonville NAACP; The Move

    Arroe Collins
    James Rollins Releases The Book Kingdom Of Bones

    Arroe Collins

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 8:04


    James Rollins is the author of international thrillers that have been translated into more than forty languages. His Sigma Force series has been lauded as one of the "top crowd pleasers" (New York Times) and one of the "hottest summer reads" (People). In each novel, acclaimed for its originality, Rollins unveils unseen worlds, scientific breakthroughs, and historical secrets—and he does it all at breakneck speed and with stunning insight. In his new book, KINGDOM OF BONES, the story begins in Africa. A United Nations relief team in a small village in the Congo makes an alarming discovery. An unknown force is leveling the evolutionary playing field. Men, women, and children have been reduced to a dull, catatonic state. The environment surrounding them—plants and animals—has grown more cunning and predatory, evolving at an exponential pace. The insidious phenomenon is spreading from a cursed site in the jungle — known to locals as the Kingdom of Bones —and sweeping across Africa, threatening the rest of the world.

    Africa Daily
    How does President Museveni see relations with the West and Russia?

    Africa Daily

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 16:43


    Last week Russia's foreign minister, Sergei Lavrov, visited Uganda's capital. He met with President Museveni as part of a tour to bolster support among African countries. Uganda is one of many counties on the continent that have refused to condemn the war in Ukraine. But on Thursday, Linda Thomas-Greenfield – the US ambassador to the United Nations – is visiting the country. She is likely to deliver a very different message to Mr Museveni. Amid all the high profile visits, Alan is also in town. He sat down with President Museveni to ask how Uganda is navigating the turbulent relations between two of it's allies. #AfricaDaily

    SBS World News Radio
    UN warning issued over Ukraine nuclear plant

    SBS World News Radio

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 4:51


    The United Nations' nuclear chief has warned Europe's largest nuclear plant, located in Ukraine, is 'completely out of control'.

    The Current
    UN peacekeepers under fire over violent protests in Congo

    The Current

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 23:27


    Violent protests erupted in the Democratic Republic of Congo last week — people there feel the United Nations has failed in its peacekeeping mission, as its decades-long instability drags on. We discuss the country's humanitarian crisis with Nelleke van de Walle from the International Crisis Group; Amavi Akpamagbo, the director of Save the Children in Congo; and Dominique Hyde, UNHCR's director for external relations.

    THE SITH LIST
    EPISODE 313 | THE 2022 SITH LIST TELETHON

    THE SITH LIST

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 50:29


    Welcome...Welcome...Welcome to Episode 313 of THE SITH LIST! Iraj, Boo, King Tom & Iraj bring you the 2022 STIH LIST TELETHON featuring: Eric Strothers, Les Gonzalez, Randy Lo Gudice, Tom Chansky, Iraj Dowlatshahi , Carlos "Boo" Arguello and the wonderful Downtown Brittani Brown.  It's a popurrii of our exclusive patreon episodes, hope you enjoy.  The Sith List is composed of a group of people with different cultural backgrounds and experiences, you might call us the United Nations of Fandom. We all come together once a week to bring you the latest in Fandom and of course to…..“SHOOT the SITH.” Part 1 The King & I Part 2 Ask Eric Part 3 If you're Wondering if I like Weezer....I love Weezer. Part 4 Brittani & Boo "Millennials" at the Movies Part 5  The Way We Was - The Mall  Support THE SITH LIST through Patreon and become an official SithLister Click here to visit THE SITH LIST website SUBSCRIBE TO OUR YOUTUBE PAGE Find THE SITH LIST on Twitter: @THESITHLSIT @TheSithlistBoo @Lesismore78 @ericstrothers  @tomchansky Check out ERIC STROTHERS on his other podcast......THE BAD MOTIVATORS by clicking RIGHT HERE!!! Check out ERIC'S MUSIC ON BANDCAMP RIGHT HERE! Instagram: thesithlist Facebook: The Sith List Podcast Email: thesithlist@gmail.com Catch you next week on Episode 314 of  The Sith List!  

    The Ricochet Audio Network Superfeed
    Reagan Foundation: Words To Live By – Grain, Soviets, and the American Farmer (#181)

    The Ricochet Audio Network Superfeed

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022


    So let's take a look at some current news on grain and the Ukraine. It's been reported that Russia, Ukraine, Turkey and the United Nations are due to sign a deal aimed at resuming Black Sea grain exports from Ukraine, which have been severely hampered by the war there. Russia’s Feb. 24 invasion has stalled exports […]