Podcasts about Mumbai

Share on
Share on Facebook
Share on Twitter
Share on Reddit
Copy link to clipboard
  • 2,483PODCASTS
  • 6,101EPISODES
  • 35mAVG DURATION
  • 2DAILY NEW EPISODES
  • Oct 20, 2021LATEST
Mumbai

POPULARITY

20112012201320142015201620172018201920202021


Best podcasts about Mumbai

Show all podcasts related to mumbai

Latest podcast episodes about Mumbai

Let's Go To Court!
192: A Wild Robbery and the Honeymoon from Hell

Let's Go To Court!

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 153:30


Marjorie Jackson was a multi-millionaire who didn't trust banks. So, when she discovered that a high ranking bank employee had stolen from her, she took action. Over the course of four months, she showed up at the bank with a suitcase or a couple of grocery bags and made massive cash withdrawals. She took out millions of dollars and hid the money in her modest Indianapolis home. People worried about Marjorie. It didn't seem safe for a 66-year-old woman to live alone, surrounded by millions of dollars in cash. It wasn't. Then Brandi tells us about a pair of newlyweds whose honeymoon ended in murder. Anni Hindocha and Shrien Dewani were a beautiful couple. They married at Lake Powai near Mumbai, India, and afterward, went on a whirlwind honeymoon to South Africa. They started their trip with a few nights at Kruger National Park, followed by a trip to Cape Town. Once they got there, they met a driver named Zola Tongo. He told the couple he'd be their tour guide. On the ride back from dinner one night, two men hijacked the car. And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases. In this episode, Kristin pulled from: “Notorious 92: Indiana's Most Heinous Murders in all 92 counties,” by Andrew E Stoner “Banker testifies in heiress' murder,” by Kristie Hill for the Associated Press “Alleged bandit gang activities taken up,” The Indianapolis News, November 30, 1931 “F. Lee Bailey told Willard, to bury cash, witnesses say,” by R. Joseph Gelarden for the Indianapolis Star, December 3, 1977 “Robinson innocent of Jackson slaying; guilty on other counts,” by Carolyn Pickering for the Indianapolis Star, April 25, 1978 “Robinson's defense brief in murder trial,” The Indianapolis Star, April 23, 1978 “Missing millions and the murder of grocery heiress Marjorie Jackson,” by Dawn Mitchell for the Indianapolis Star “Murdered heiress, missing millions an enduring Indiana mystery,” by Tim Evans for the Indianapolis Star “Marjorie Jackson Murder Case,” Encyclopedia of Indianapolis “Was FBI agent involved in missing fortune of murdered heiress?” by Mia De Graaf for the Daily Mail In this episode, Brandi pulled from: “The Honeymoon Murder” by Joshua Hammer, The Atavist Magazine “Anni Dewani” chillingcrimes.com “Honeymoon Murder: Timeline of events for Shrien Dewani” BBC.com “Dewani murder case: How grieving husband became suspect” by Steven Morris, David Smith, and Alex Duval Smith, The Guardian “Dewani trial: what really happened and how did police get it so wrong?” by Dan Newling, The Guardian “Murder of Anni Dewani” wikipedia.org YOU'RE STILL READING? My, my, my, you skeezy scunch! You must be hungry for more! We'd offer you some sausage brunch, but that gets messy. So how about you head over to our Patreon instead? (patreon.com/lgtcpodcast). At the $5 level, you'll get 25+ full length bonus episodes, plus access to our 90's style chat room!  

In The Game Podcast
123: Caring for girls one toilet at a time by Mark Balla

In The Game Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 41:39


Today, we continue the conversation with a man who is full of SHIT!  Don't get mad at me Mom for swearing, Mark Balla is actually the “Toilet Warrior” and has been advocating and changing the story about sanitation worldwide.In 2013, he founded the not-for-profit “We can't wait”.  He then joined forces with Rotary and began using his business connections to Mumbai to change the reality for girls in that region and then the country as a whole.  Did you know that of the 1.4M schools in India, 400,000 of them do NOT have toilets?  And the schools that do have toilets, do not have separate ones for girls. So, why does this matter so much? 25% of girls in India drop out and skip school when they reach puberty.  When their menstruation begins, its just too much to go to school and be humiliated.Many of these girls homes also do NOT have toilets so after holding their bodily functions in all day, their desperate attempts to go to the bathroom results in 50% of sexual assaults occurring while these innocent girls are seeking a quiet place to do so.If you want to dive deeper into this reality that's happening right now before our eyes, read Mark's book the Toilet Warrior or google his TedX talk to be enthralled.As sanitation goals worldwide continued to not be met; this linguist and global supply-chain expert from Melbourne took it on.  Thanks to Mark, he is proving the truth of his own TedX quote, that “Children are the most spectacular agents for LASTING change”! The Goods on Mark:* Accomplished public speaker on humanitarian issues both in Australia and internationally, ready to change your perception of the world we live in* Founder of a charity with an international focus on improving life opportunity for girls and women in developing countries* A deep passion for opportunities in corporate social responsibility* Board level experience in both for profit and not for profit environments in both Australia, India and Globally* Committed advocate for global causes that matter* Fluent in German, Spanish and Portuguese, conversant in French* Inter-cultural business specialist* Extensive experience outsourcing to China, India and SE Asia* 15 years experienced in manufacturing, and supply chain management in China.* Five years experience with manufacturing supply chains in India.* Five years experienced with IT supply chain and IT project management in India and Sri Lanka* Knowledge of supply chain processes in Brazil. * Five years of general business experience in Germany.  Contact Mark:         LinkedIn: linkedin.com/in/markballa1         TedX talk: youtube.com/watch?v=r3xr13xFfto   Get Mark's Sister Trace's book “Cycling Together” at www.TraceBalla.com (based on these incredible Indian girls) Go to http://www.bit.ly/InTheGamePodcast to become part of this growing community of DREAMERS!

Cyrus Says
feat. Aaman Trikha

Cyrus Says

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 81:10


On this episode, Cyrus is joined by playback singer Aaman Trikha, to talk about his song 'Achhe Din Aane Waale Hain', how that came about and the process of writing and recording it within 24 hours. They also talk about how Aaman found out he could sing well only in engineering college, always being studious in school and college, and tons more. They also talk about how Aaman got into singing Bollywood songs, performing and being popular in a lot of college fests and college circuits even before he made it big, how he started making his scratches in engineering college itself, being a part of a rock band in college, getting the 'Best Vocalist' prize at Mood Indigo in Mumbai with Shankar-Ehsaan-Loy as judges, and more. Aaman also talks about his thoughts on the term 'making it', going for auditions for reality shows, getting onto 'Sur Kshetra' with Himesh Reshamiya and Atif Aslam as team leaders and a star studded list of guest jurors like Asha Bhonsle and other top notch singers judging, winning the 'Man of the Series' on the show, Atif Aslam seemingly not being a fan of Aaman's, and more. Tune in for a very fun episode.Follow Aaman on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/aamantrikhaSubscribe to our new YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCmY4iMGgEa49b7-NH94p1BQAlso, subscribe to Cyrus' YouTube channel: https://youtube.com/channel/UCHAb9jLYk0TwkWsCxom4q8AYou can follow Antariksh on Instagram @antariksht: https://instagram.com/antarikshtDo send in AMA questions for Cyrus by tweeting them to @cyrussaysin or e-mailing them at whatcyrussays@gmail.comDon't forget to follow Cyrus Broacha on Instagram @BoredBroacha (https://www.instagram.com/boredbroacha)In case you're late to the party and want to catch up on previous episodes of Cyrus Says you can do so at: www.ivmpodcasts.com/cyrussaysYou can listen to this show and other awesome shows on the new and improved IVM Podcasts App on Android: https://ivm.today/androidor iOS: https://ivm.today/ios

Becoming Unf*@kwithable
Episode 42: Sean Stone Humanity VS The NWO

Becoming Unf*@kwithable

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2021 60:50


Take your awakening to the next level and get ready for a mind blowing journey of red pills as we sit down with Filmmaker, Media Host, Author, Actor, Poet, Speaker, and above all, truth-seeker and spiritual activist Sean Stone. Sean Christopher Ali Stone began his spiritual quest at 10 years old, when his father took him to Tibet, Nepal and India, to illuminate the stark contrast between those worlds, and Hollywood, where he had been a child-actor in Oliver Stone films like JFK, The Doors and Natural Born Killers.  Sean took summer jobs for Jim Brown's Amer-I-Can program and Save the Children while still in high school, then studied American History at Princeton University, and Oxford, before writing his Senior Thesis on the modern history of the New World Order, now available from TrineDay and Amazon.  Sean began his own filmmaking career by apprenticing under his father on Alexander, shooting the behind-the-scenes documentary Fight Against Time.  On the film W., Sean worked as an Editorial Consultant, and on the TV series The Untold History of the United States, as an Associate Editor.  Sean Stone starred in and directed his first feature film Greystone Park in 2012, based on his real-life paranormal experiences in a haunted mental hospital.  In 2020, he published the cosmic fairy tale, Desiderata by Ali, now available from Blackstone and Audible.  His most recent release is the poetry book The Ephemeral Shades of Time.  Sean is a graduate of the Baron Brown Studio and has starred in multiple features including Night Walk, Union Bound, and Fury of the Fist and the Golden Fleece, which he also wrote.  He has directed the documentaries A Century of War, Hollywood, D.C. and MetaHuman with Deepak Chopra.  His short films include Singularity, a dystopian warning about a plague that leads to a totalitarian surveillance state, as well as the short film Anaarkali with Bollywood star Javed Jaffrey, adapted from the fairy tale of a ‘kept woman' seeking her independence in modern Mumbai.  Sean has hosted the reality show Conspiracy Theory with Jesse Ventura, the interview program Buzzsaw, formerly on Gaia TV, and the RT news show Watching the Hawks.Sean's unique perspective from his life's work and journey, helps to connect the dots for all truth-seekers in his mind-blowing new series "Best Kept Secret". In this episode, we go back to #Homaha, home of the Oracle; Mr. Buffett himself and talk about the Franklin Scandal, the NWO, Deep State, The WEF and the IoT, (basically all your favorite 3 letter organizations) the medical system and sterilization, the Rockefellers, Freemasons and so much more. There was so much more we could have talked about, but it's better off that you watch his series for yourself. DO take note of the extra info Sean includes in the series "Best Kept Secret" to further research for yourself. Tune in and unfuckyourself Best Kept SecretHuman trafficking, pedophilia, 'Satanic' politics... The Jeffrey Epstein scandal was the tip of the iceberg as Sean Stone, the former host of Buzzsaw, lays out the hidden agenda of the dark elite in this six-part documentary series. In this 'red pill' journey, Stone explores famous cases like the Franklin Scandal, MK-Ultra and Monarch programming, the Jon Benet Ramsey murder and even the Son of Sam case, to connect the dots of a dangerous ideology, now driving the philosophy of a 'transhumanist' idea - to remake the human being. As more and more people awaken to this hidden agenda, the more rapidly we can take our power back. The full series is now on Ickonic.com , 107daily.com and Vimeo on Demand

Awakin Call
Rupa Marya & Raj Patel -- How Our Systems Prime Us for Chronic Illness

Awakin Call

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2021


When academic, best-selling author, and filmmaker Raj Patel and physician, musician, and activist Rupa Marya joined to write a book together, the result was a deep dive into how our economic, political, and social structures fan disease, often invisibly. “Inflammation is the body’s appropriate response to damage, or the threat of damage,” says Marya. “We’re learning that the social, environmental, and political structures around us are tuning the immune system to sound out the full range of inflammation.” Patel adds, “Capitalism primes our bodies for sickness.” In Inflamed: Deep Medicine and the Anatomy of Injustice, released in August 2021, Marya and Patel arrive at a new systems level of diagnosis that incorporates history and the pathologies of power, offering treatment options to heal people and the planet. Rupa Marya, MD, is an associate professor of medicine at the University of California, San Francisco, where she practices and teaches internal medicine. She’s co-founder of the Do No Harm Coalition, a collective of healthcare workers committed to changing social structures that impede health and wellbeing for different groups of people; and the founder and executive director of Deep Medicine Circle, a worker-directed nonprofit committed to “healing the wounds of colonialism through food, medicine, story, learning and restoration.” Working with her husband, the agroecological farmer Benjamin Fahrer, and the Association of Ramaytush Ohlone in their ancestral territory, she is a part of the Farming Is Medicine project, where farmers are recast as ecological stewards of rematriated land and food is liberated from the market economy. Her work in social advocacy has earned her trust from indigenous communities where she lives, in Ohlone territory and in places where she has served, such as Lakota territory. In 2016, she was invited to Standing Rock to assist with medical response to increasing state violence toward indigenous people protecting their sovereign land in the face of the Dakota Access Pipeline. Outside of her medical work, Marya is a gifted guitarist, singer, and composer. Her band, Rupa and the April Fishes, mixes styles -- from jazz to punk to reggae -- and spans multiple languages. Her music explores themes of climate justice, ecology, politics, culture, and the impact of violence and racism on people of color. She lives with her husband and two sons in the Bay Area where, at the invitation of Lakota elders, she is helping to develop a clinic to “decolonize food and medicine” at the Mni Wiconi Health Clinic and Farm. Raj Patel, PhD, is an author six times over, a filmmaker, and an academic. He is a research professor at the University of Texas at Austin’s Lyndon B. Johnson School of Public Affairs, a professor in the university’s department of nutrition, and a research associate at Rhodes University, South Africa. Patel credits an upsetting encounter witnessing an adolescent girl carrying a crying infant while begging on the roadside during a family trip to Mumbai in his early childhood as a formative experience that led to the big questions that shaped his life. Those questions never left him, and prior to his writing and academic work, he worked for the UN, the World Bank, and the WTO to explore possible solutions to poverty, hunger, and inequity. Later, he would become a fierce critic of those very same multilateral institutions, and has been tear-gassed on four continents protesting against them. Yet today, he serves on the International Panel of Experts on Sustainable Food Systems and has advised governments worldwide on the causes of and solutions to crises of sustainability. Among Patel’s books are Stuffed and Starved, which examines the inequities of the world food system wherein a billion are obese even as another billion starve; the New York Times bestselling The Value of Nothing, which critiques the free market’s notions of value, especially with regard to fundamental needs like clean water, housing, and health care; A History of the World in Seven Cheap Things, which details how capitalistic distortion of environmental, social, and health costs of goods has devastated society and the planet. As a filmmaker, Patel recently co-directed a documentary on climate change and the global food system called The Ants and the Grasshopper, which follows Malawian women impacted by climate change as they travel the United States and attempt to convince Americans of the reality of the global threat. Please join Rahul Brown and Andrew Kim for this illuminating conversation with two trailblazers dedicated to deep consciousness and deep medicine for healing the earth and all her people.

Orbital
Realme's Madhav Sheth — Orbital exclusive

Orbital

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 41:59


Realme isn't just a leading smartphone brand anymore — it's also number one in tablets, laptops, smart TVs, and ANC earphones (on Flipkart). How did this happen? We hear it from the horse's mouth. Madhav Sheth, Realme VP and CEO for Realme India, Europe and Latin America joins Gadgets 360 reviews editor Jamshed Avari and Orbital host Akhil Arora for a wide-reaching conversation. Sheth talks about why Realme is making so many products, some that are not even connected to its Internet of Things ecosystem, why Realme and other brands are so big on 5G chipsets, and their plans for the new Realme GT series that expanded this week with the GT Neo 2. Along the way, Sheth touches upon Realme's Make in India push that he hopes will move beyond “Assemble in India”, and why Realme doesn't have different local and global strategies. It's about understanding the consumer — someone in Mumbai and Madrid might be more similar than next-door neighbours. Sheth also dicusses deceiving marketing tactics from companies, and advocates for more transparency within offline traders and promoters, who have developed a reputation for recommending brands that provide financial incentives. Follow Gadgets 360 on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and YouTube. Write to us at podcast@gadgets360.com Chapters Intro (00:00) New GT Neo series (00:20) Make in India (07:49) Local is global (12:23) Online revolution (14:26) Small (town) is big (19:36) A Realme every week (21:52) Realme laptop (27:33) Misleading buyers (30:02) Why the overlap (34:44) The 5G push (36:33) Outro (40:54) Photo credits: Realme

Healthcare Entrepreneur Academy Podcast
#213: Ankit Gupta: Overcoming the Stigma of Opioid Addiction Using Telemedicine

Healthcare Entrepreneur Academy Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 38:42


OVERVIEW: Jason A. Duprat, Entrepreneur, Healthcare Practitioner, and Host of the Healthcare Entrepreneur Academy podcast talks with Ankit Gupta, founder, and CEO of Bicycle Health. Ankit looks back on his experiences with Pulse News and LinkedIn, sharing advice for people thinking about starting their own business. He talks about launching Bicycle Health and his passion for treating opioid use disorder.  EPISODE HIGHLIGHTS: Ankit grew up in Mumbai, India. He always enjoyed writing code and programming. He discovered his passion for user-centric design while working on his master's at Stanford.  Ankit noticed when people read news online, they had to open and toggle between different tabs across various publications. To solve this problem, he created the mobile app Pulse News.  Pulse News started as a standalone app and later became the foundation for LinkedIn's news feed, which creates a personalized newspaper for users.  When it comes to solving a problem, Ankit advises entrepreneurs to take user feedback to heart.  He also believes a small team of dedicated people can create more value than a company with hundreds of employees. Ankit worked at LinkedIn for 3 years, integrating the news app and also working on startup projects on the B2B side of the company. He left LinkedIn and traveled for two years, pursuing educational opportunities and spending time with his family. During these two years, he learned about the problems in healthcare and technology while working on a project with a nonprofit in India. He launched Bicycle Health to treat opioid use disorder utilizing telemedicine. Ankit learned about the problems surrounding this disorder while shadowing an anesthesiologist. A special license is needed to prescribe suboxone. Clinics offering this treatment can only treat 30 to 100 patients in the first year—275 patients max after that. Ankit was the initial developer of Bicycle Health, but more than writing code, he enjoyed growing the business. COVID accelerated the demand for telemedicine. Regulations have changed as well so Bicycle Health works with a law firm to be able to meet this demand. Ankit created a nonprofit, Docs and Hackers, to improve the practice of medicine with technology.  3 KEY POINTS: The Pulse News app, which aggregates news articles, started out as a school project, became a full-blown business, and was later acquired by LinkedIn. The stigma on addiction gets in the way of accessing treatment so Bicycle Health became an online provider of medication-assisted treatment for opioid dependence. Building a solution and going into entrepreneurship is easy once you identify the population you want to help and understand what their needs and desires are. TWEETABLE QUOTES: “It's more about really understanding who your users are as a human being.” - Ankit Gupta “The issues around convenience, affordability, privacy, and access are something that telemedicine can really help overcome.” - Ankit Gupta “Entrepreneurship is a really satisfying job.” - Ankit Gupta RESOURCES: Ankit Gupta's LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/ankitgupta00/ Bicycle Health: https://www.bicyclehealth.com/ Foley & Lardner LLP: https://www.foley.com/en Do you enjoy our podcast? Leave a rating and review: https://lovethepodcast.com/hea Don't want to miss an episode? Subscribe to the podcast: https://followthepodcast.com/hea #HealthcareEntrepreneurAcademy #healthcare #entrepreneur #entrepreneurship #podcast  #LinkedIn #appdevelopment #opioidaddiction #telemedicine

Your Brain on Facts
Twins Remix (ep. 169)

Your Brain on Facts

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 43:04


Twins, synchronicity, science, anomalies, and dark mysteries. Support the show Merch, book Music by Kevin MacLeod  Read the full script. Reach out and touch Moxie on FB, Twit, the 'Gram or email.     In 1940, a pair of twin boys, only three weeks old, were put up for adoption in Ohio.  Separate families adopted each boy and coincidentally named both James, calling them Jim for short.  They grew up never knowing anything about one another, but their lives were bizarrely similar.  They each had a dog named Toy and in elementary school, each both was good at math, showed talent in woodshop, but struggled with spelling.  But it was as they moved into adulthood that coincidences really started to pile up.  My name... If one is good, two must be better, so today we were talking about twin on the first of a pair of twin episodes.  Let's start with a quick review.  Fraternal twins occur when two eggs are separately fertilized.  They are genetically distinct, basically regular siblings that happened to be conceived at the same time.  Or not.  There's a rare circumstance called superfetation, where a woman ovulates while already pregnant and the second egg also gets fertilized.  Multiple eggs being released during ovulation can sometimes result in heteropaternal superfecundation, meaning the eggs were fertilized by different men's sperm, creating fraternal twins with different fathers.  Identical twins occur when a fertilized egg splits, creating two zygotes with the same cells.  The splitting ovum usually produces identical twins, but if the split comes after about a week of development, it can result in mirror-image twins.  Conjoined twins, what we used to call Siamese twins, can result from eggs that split most of the way, but not complete.  Twins account for 1.5% of all pregnancies or 3% of the population.  The rate of twinning has risen 50% in the last 20 years.  Several factors can make having twins more likely, such as fertility therapy, advanced age, heredity, number of previous pregnancies, and race, with African women have the highest incidence of twins, while Asian women have the lowest.    Twins have always been of great interest to scientists.  There's simply no better way to test variable vs control than to have two people with identical DNA.  Identical twins share all of their genes, while fraternal twins only share 50%.  If a trait is more common among identical twins than fraternal twins, it suggests genetic factors are at work.  "Twins studies are the only real way of doing natural experiments in humans," says Tim Spector, a professor of genetic epidemiology at Kings College, London. "By studying twins, you can learn a great deal about what makes us tick, what makes us different, and particularly the roles of nature versus nature that you just can't get any other way.”   NASA was presented with a unique opportunity in the Kelly brothers, identical twins Scott, a current astronaut, and Mark, a retired astronaut.  As part of the "Year in Space" project, which would see Scott spend 340 on the ISS, the brothers provided blood, saliva, and urine samples, as well as undergoing a battery of physical and psychological tests designed to study the effects of long-duration spaceflight on the human body.  According to Dr Spector, twin studies are currently underway in over 100 countries.  Working with data and biological samples in the TwinsUK Registry, Spector's team has found more than 600 published papers showing a clear genetic basis for common diseases like osteoarthritis, cataracts and even back pain.  "When I started in this field, it was thought that only 'sexy' diseases [such as cancer] were genetic," Spector says. "Our findings changed that perception."   Back on our side of the pond, the Michigan State University Twin Registry was founded in 2001 to study genetic and environmental influences on a wide range of psychiatric and medical disorders.  One of their more surprising findings is that many eating disorders such as anorexia may not be wholly to blame on societal pressured by may actually have a genetic component to them.  "Because of twins studies,” says co-director Kelly Klump, “we now know that genes account for the same amount of variability in eating disorders as they do in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. We would have never known that without twins studies."  On the topic of body-fat, a LSU study by Claude Bouchard in 1990 overfed a dozen young male twins by 1,000 calories a day for three months.  Although every participant gained weight, the amount of weight, and more importantly for the study, fat varied considerably, from 9-29lbs/4-13kg.  Twins tended to gain a similar amount of weight and in the same places as each other, but each pair differed from the other pairs in the test.   While some twin studies, like Year In Space, are famous, others are infamous.   If you're worried where this topic is going, don't be.  We're not talking about Joseph Mengele or the Russian conjoined twins, Masha and Dasha, though they may show up next week.  Twin studies helped create the thinking and even the word “eugenics.”  Francis Galton, a half-cousin of Charles Darwin, was one of the first people to recognize the value of twins to study inherited traits.  In his 1875 paper, "The History of Twins," Galton used twins to estimate the relative effects of nature versus nature, a term he is credited with coining.  Unfortunately, his firm belief that intelligence is a matter of nature led him to become a vocal proponent of the idea that "a highly gifted race of men" could be produced through selective breeding and that unsuitable people should be prevented from reproducing.  The word “eugenics” came up a lot during the Nuremberg trials, if it wasn't already clear with adherents to the idea had in mind.  More recently, in 2003, a psychology professor at the University of Virginia reviewed the research on the heritability of I.Q.  He noticed that most of the studies that declared that I.Q. is genetic involved twins from middle-class backgrounds.  When he looked at twins from poorer families, he found that the I.Q.s of identical twins varied just as much as the I.Q.s of fraternal twins.  In other words, the impact of growing up poor can overwhelm a child's natural intelligence.   Bonus fact: The trope of the evil twin can be traced back as far as 300 BCE, to the Zurvanite branch of Zoroastrianism, the world's oldest continuously-observed religion.    Of all the things inherent to and special about twins, one of the most fascinating is twin language.  You might have seen the adorable viral video of a pair of toddlers having an animated conversation in their twin language.  If you want to bust out your Latin, it's cryptophasia, a form of idioglossia, an idiosyncratic language invented and spoken by only one person or very few people.  It was a struggle not to throw myself head-first down the idioglossia rabbit hole; maybe for a later episode.  Twin speak, or even sibling speak has existed, for as long as human language, but has only been seriously studied for the last few decades, not only to determine how the languages develop but to see if speaking a twin language could hamper the children learning their parents' language.  The reason twins are more likely than other sibling pairs to create their own language is less interesting than psychic phenomena - twins spend a lot of time together, being built-in companions, and are at the same developmental stage.  They unconsciously work together to build their language by imitating and pretending to understand one another, reinforcing their use of the language.  This can weaken their incentive to learn to speak to everyone else--they already have someone to talk to.  Some researchers advocate treating cryptophasia as early as possible.  According to Oxford neuropsychologist Dorothy Bishop, twins often get less intervention from speech therapists than nontwins. “People often assume that it's normal for twins to have funny language, and so they don't get a proper assessment and diagnosis. And then, when they are identified, they are often treated together as a unit, and so each gets half the attention of the professionals working with them.”   When doctors first began examining cryptophasic children, they discovered that the language isn't created out of nothing, but is made up of mispronounced words they've heard or references that only work inside their family.  It's usually not a language at all.  According to Karen Thorpe, a psychologist with Queensland University of Technology, you can think of it like “conversations between married couples where words are invented and abbreviated or restricted codes are used because full explanations are redundant.”  That absolutely happens here.  My husband and I talk like kids in a tree fort clubhouse.  But sometimes, just sometimes, a full-blown language does develop, complete with syntax and totally independent of the language spoken at home.  The syntax of a true twin language doesn't arise from mistakes made while learning the family's language.  It's similar to the syntax seen in deaf children who create their own sign language when not taught to sign.  This syntax could “gives us a potential insight into the nature of language” and mankind's “first language,” says linguist Peter Bakker.  Twin languages play fast and loose with word order, putting subjects, verbs, and objects wherever, but always putting the most important item first, which makes sense.  Negation, making something negative, is used as the first or last word of the statement, regardless of how the parental language handles negation.  It's almost like a Spanish question mark, letting you know where the sentence is going.  Verbs aren't conjugated--go is go, regardless of it's attached to I, he/she, us, or them.  There are also no pronouns, like he, she, or they, only the proper nouns.  There is also no way to locate things in time and space; everything just is.  If you're a fan of Tom Scott's language series on YouTube, he's started making them again.  If not, start with “Fantastic Features We Don't Have In The English Language.”  I'll put a link to it in the show notes.  If I forget, or you want to tell me what you thought, Soc Med.  Breakroom  Most children stop using private languages on their own or with minimal intervention, which is good, according to psychologists, because the longer they practice cryptophasia, the worse they do in tests later.  If you remember nothing else I say ever, remember that correlation does not equal causation.  Cryptophasia could be a symptom of an underlying handicap and that's the cause of the low test scores.     This simple-structured language is fine for two or a few people, but once there are more people to talk to or more things to talk about, you're going to need some more features, “unambiguous ways to distinguish between subject and object,” Bakker says.  “In the twin situation these can be dispensed with, but not in languages in which it is necessary to refer to events outside the direct situation.”  So do twin languages really offer insight into mankind's first language?  Could a primitive society have functioned as a cohesive unit with a language that can only refer to what can be seen at that moment?  That's what linguists are studying, but UC-Santa Barbara's Bernard Comrie adds the asterisk that this research into the infancy of spoken language is still a baby itself.  “First we were told that creole languages [that is, a distinct language that develops from the meeting a two or more languages] would provide us with insight into ‘first language,' then when that didn't pan out interest shifted to deaf sign language (also with mixed results)—I guess twin language will be the next thing.”     It's not an easy scientific row to hoe.  Twin languages come and go quickly as the children develop hearing their parents' language much more than their twin language.  They might keep speaking their twin language if they were very isolated, like two people in a Nell situation or that Russian family who lived alone for 40 years, but we'll file that idea under “grossly unethically and probably illegal.”  Not that it hasn't been tried.  Herodotus tells us of what is considered the first every psychological experiment, when Pharaoh Psammetichus I in the sixth century BCE wanted to know if the capacity for speech was innate to humans and beyond that, what language would that be.  He ordered two infants to be raised by a shepherd hermit who was forbidden to speak in their presence.  After two years the children began to speak; the word that they used most often was the Phrygian word for bread.  Thus, Psammetichus concluded that the capacity for speech is innate, and that the natural language of human beings is Phrygian.  Similar experiments were conducted by Holy Roman Emperor Frederick II in the 12th century CE who ordered children to be raised by caretakers forbidden to speak to them and 15th century James I of Scotland who ordered children raised exclusively by a deaf-mute woman, which was repeated by 16th century Mughal Indian Emperor Akbar, among others.  I shouldn't have to tell you that they were all based on dubious methodology and soaking in confirmation bias.  A less-terrible test was done in the 20th century by British ethologist, or animal behavior scientist, William H. Thorpe, who raised birds in isolation to determine which songs are innate.   One of the best-known cases a negative impact from cryptophasia is the Kennedy sisters of San Diego, Grace and Virginia, of Poto and Cabengo, as they called each other.  They created a media whirlwind in 1970s when it was reported that they only spoke their twin language, to the complete exclusion of English, at the rather advanced age of 6.  “Twin Girls Invent Own Language,” “Gibberish-Talking Twins,” “Like a Martian” the headlines read.  Here is a clip of the girls speaking and sadly this is the best audio quality I could find.  Grace and Virginia had suffered apparent seizures as infants, leading their parents to conclude that the girls had been left mentally handicapped.  Their parents opted to keep them inside and away from other children, leaving them mostly in the care of a laconic grandmother who often left them to their own devices.  They seemed like the next big thing in language-creation studies, but on closer examination, it was discovered that, like most cryptophasics, the girls were just very badly, and very quickly, mispronouncing English and German, the languages spoken at home.  Adding to their disappointment, when scientists tried to use the girls' words to converse with them, the girls couldn't stop laughing.  Grace and Virginia were also cleared of their parents mis-labeling them as intellectually handicapped.  Both were found to have relatively normal IQs, for as much good as IQ tests are, which is very little, but that's another show.  The girls eventually underwent speech therapy and learned regular English, though their language skills were a bit stunted, even into adulthood.  identical twins come from a fertilized egg that splits.  If the zygote splits most of the way, but not all, it results in conjoined twins.  Or if the zygotes collide and fuse, science isn't really sure.  Thus conjoined twins are always identical, meaning the same gender.  Why am I pointing that out?  I met two moms of twins at the She PodcastsLive conference who regularly have people ask them if their identical twins are the same gender.  This is why we need sex ed in school.  You'll also notice I'm not using the term Siamese twins.  That term comes from Chang & Eng Bunker, who were born in Siam, modern day Thailand, in 1811, connected by a band of tissue at the chest.  It's not offensive per e, but just doesn't apply to anyone not born in Siam, so people have stopped using it.   Conjoined twins occur once every 2-500,000 live births, according to the University of Minnesota. About 70% of conjoined twins are female, though I couldn't find a reason or theory why.  40 to 60% of these births are delivered stillborn, with 35% surviving only one day.  The overall survival rate is less than 1 in 4.  Often, one twin will have birth defects that are not conducive to life and can endanger the stronger twin.   Conjoined twins are physically connected to one another at some point on their bodies, and are referred to by that place of joining.  Brace yourself while I wallow in my medical Latin.  The most common conjoinments are thoracopagus (heart, liver, intestine), omphalopagus (liver, biliary tree, intestine), pygopagus (spine, rectum, genitourinary tract), ischiopagus (pelvis, liver, intestine, genitourinary tract), and craniopagus (brain, meninges).  75% are joined at the chest or upper abdomen, 23% are joined at the hips, legs or genitalia, 2% are joined at the head.     If the twins have separate organs, chances for separation surgery are markedly better than if they share the organs.  As a rule, conjoined twins that share a heart cannot be separated. Worldwide, only about 250 separation surgeries have been successful, meaning at least one twin survived over the long term, according to the American Pediatric Surgical Association. The surgical separation success rate has improved over the years, and about 75 percent of surgical separations result in at least one twin surviving.  The process begins long before the procedure, with tests and scans, as well as tissue expanders, balloons inserted under the skin and slowly filled with saline or air to stretch the skin, so there will be enough skin to cover the area where the other twin's body used to be. It requires a whole hospital full of specialties to separate conjoined twins, from general surgeons, plastic and reconstructive surgeons, neurosurgeons, neonatologists, cardiologists, advanced practice nurses, and maternal-fetal medicine specialists, among others.  In fact, the longest surgery of all time was a conjoined twin separation.  Separation surgeries often last an entire day; this one required 103 hours.  If they started at 8am Monday, the team finished the surgery at 3pm Thursday.  In 2001, a team of 20 doctors at Singapore General Hospital worked in shifts to separate Ganga and Jamuna Shrestha, 11-month-old twins conjoined at the head.  Not only did the girls share a cranial cavity, their brains were partially fused.  Each tiny brain had hundreds of bitty blood vessels, each of which had to be traced and identified as belonging to one or the other of the girls.  Their brains were not only connected, they were wrapped around each other like a helix.  Plus, each twin's skull needed to be reshaped and added to, using a blend of bone material and Gore-Tex fibers.  Both babies survived the surgery.  Sadly, Ganga died of meningitis at age 7, but Jamuna has gone on to live a healthy life and attend school.   We interrupt this podcast script for an exciting article.  Meaning I was almost done writing it, then I found something I had to go back and include.  There was another pair of conjoined twins named Ganga and Jamuna, this pair born in 1970 in West Bengal.  The pairing of the names makes sense when you learn that the Ganga and Jamuna are sacred rivers.  The sisters are ischio-omphalopagus tripus, meaning joined at the abdomen and pelvis.  They have two hearts and four arms, but share a set of kidneys, a liver and a single reproductive tract.  Between then they have three legs, the third being a nine-toed fusion of two legs, which was non-functional and they kept that one under their clothing.  They can stand, but they cannot walk and crawl on their hands and feet, earning them the show name "The Spider Girls".  Managed by their uncle while on the road with the Dreamland Circus, they exhibit themselves by lying on a charpoy bed, talking to the spectators who come to look at them.  They earned a good living, making about $6/hr, compared to the average wage in India of $.40.   Ganga and Jamuna have two ration cards for subsidized grain, though they eat from the same plate.  They cast two votes, but were refused a joint bank account.  They also share a husband, Gadadhar, a carnival worker who is twenty years their senior.  When asked which he loves more, Gadadhar replies, "I love both equally."  In 1993, the twins had a daughter via Caesarean section, but the baby only lived a few hours.  Though the sister would like to have children, doctors fear that pregnancy would endanger their lives.  Doctors have offered them separation surgery, but they're not interested.  They feel it would be against God's will, be too great of a risk, and put them out of a job.  "We are happy as we are. The family will starve if we are separated."   Not all parasitic twins are as obvious as a torso with arms and legs.  The condition is called fetus in fetu, a parasitic twin developing or having been absorbed by the autosite twin.  It's extremely rare, occurring only once in every 500,000 births and twice as likely to happen in a male.  The question of how a parasitic twin might develop is one that currently has no answer.  To say the fetuses in question are only partially developed is still overstating thing.  They are usually little more than a ball of tissues with perhaps one or two recognizable body parts.  One school of thought holds that fetus in fetu is a complete misnomer.  Adherents contend that the alien tissue is not in fact a fetus at all, but a form of tumor, a teratoma, specifically.  A teratoma, also known as a dermoid cyst, is a sort of highly advanced tumor that can develop human skin, sweat glands, hair, and even teeth.  Some believe that, left long enough, a teratoma could become advanced enough to develop primitive organs.   There have only been about 90 verified cases in the medical record.  One reason fetus in fetu is rare is that the condition is antithetical to full-term development.  Usually, both twins die in utero from the strain of sharing a placenta.  Take 7 year old Alamjan Nematilaev of Kazakstan, who reported to his family abdominal pain and a feeling that something was moving inside him.  His doctors thought he had a large cyst that needed to be removed.  Once they got in there, though, doctors discovered one of the most developed cases of fetus in fetu ever seen.  Alamjan's fetus had a head, four limbs, hands, fingernails, hair and a human if badly misshapen face.    Fetus in fetu, when it is discovered, is usually found in children, but one man lived 36 years, carrying his fetal twin in his abdomen.  Sanju Bhagat lived his whole life with a bulging stomach, constantly ridiculed by people in his village for looking nine months pregnant.  Little did they know, eh?  Fetus in fetu is usually discovered after the parasitic twin grows so large that it causes discomfort to the host.  In Bhagat's case, he began having trouble breathing because the mass was pushing against his diaphragm.  In June of 1999, Bhagat was rushed to Tata Memorial Hospital in Mumbai, India for emergency surgery.  According to Dr. Ajay Mehta, "Basically, the tumor was so big that it was pressing on his diaphragm and that's why he was very breathless.  Because of the sheer size of the tumor, it makes it difficult [to operate]. We anticipated a lot of problems."   While operating on Bhagat, Mehta saw something he had never encountered.  The squeamish may wish to jump30 and think about kittens, though if you've made it this far, you're cut from strong cloth.  As the doctor cut deeper into Bhagat's stomach, gallons of fluid spilled out.  "To my surprise and horror, I could shake hands with somebody inside," he said. "It was a bit shocking for me."   One unnamed doctor interviewed in the ABC News story described what she saw that day in the operating room:  “[The surgeon] just put his hand inside and he said there are a lot of bones inside,” she said. “First, one limb came out, then another limb came out. Then some part of genitalia, then some part of hair, some limbs, jaws, limbs, hair.”  There was no placenta inside Bhagat -- the enveloped parasitic twin had connected directly to Bhagat's blood supply. Right after the surgery, Bhagat's pain and inability to breathe disappeared and he recovered immediately.  Upon recovery from the surgery, in which his twin was removed, Bhagat immediately felt better. But he says that villagers still tease him about it. The story I was referring to was made into a plot point on AHS:FS, the tale of Edward Mordrake, the man with two faces.  In 1895, The Boston Post published an article titled “The Wonders of Modern Science” that presented astonished readers with reports from the Royal Scientific Society documenting the existence of “marvels and monsters” hitherto believed imaginary.   Edward Mordrake was a handsome, intelligent English nobleman with a talent for music and a peerage to inherit.  But there was a catch.  With all his blessings came a terrible curse.  Opposite his handsome was, was a grotesque face on the back of his head.  Edward Mordrake was constantly plagued by his “devil twin,” which kept him up all night whispering “such things as they only speak of in hell.”  He begged his doctors to remove the face, but they didn't dare try.  He asked them to simply bash the evil face in, anything to silence it.  It was never heard by anyone else, but it whispered to Edward all night, a dark passenger that could never be satisfied.  At age 23, after living in seclusion for years, Edward Mordrake committed suicide, leaving behind a note ordering the evil face be destroyed after his death, “lest it continues its dreadful whispering in my grave.”   This macabre story ...is just that, a story, a regular old work of fiction.  “But, but, I've seen a photograph of him.”  Sadly, no.  You've seen a photo of a wax model of the legendary head, Madame Toussad style.  Don't feel bad that you were convinced.  The description of the cursed nobleman was so widely accepted that his condition appeared in an 1896 medical encyclopedia, co-authored by two respected physicians.  Since they recounted the original newspaper story in full without any additional details, gave an added air of authority to Mordrake's tale.   “No, there's a picture of his mummified head on a stand.”  I hate to puncture your dreams, but that's papier mache.  It looks great, but the artist who made it has gone on record stating it was created entirely for entertainment purposes.  If you were to look at that newspaper account of Mordrake, it would fall apart immediately.  “One of the weirdest as well as most melancholy stories of human deformity is that of Edward Mordake, said to have been heir to one of the noblest peerages in England. He never claimed the title, however, and committed suicide in his twenty-third year. He lived in complete seclusion, refusing the visits even of the members of his own family. He was a young man of fine attainments, a profound scholar, and a musician of rare ability. His figure was remarkable for its grace, and his face – that is to say, his natural face – was that of Antinous. But upon the back of his head was another face, that of a beautiful girl, ‘lovely as a dream, hideous as a devil.'”  What did we say at the top?  Conjoined twins are identical, meaning among other things, the same gender.   And that… though we'll finish up out story of the twin Jims.  Their lives were so unbelievably similar, if you saw it in a movie, you'd throw your popcorn at the screen.  Both Jims had married women named Linda, divorced them and married women named Betty.   They each had sons that they named James Alan, though one was Alan and the other Allan.  Both smoked, drove a Chevrolet, held security-based jobs, and even vacationed at the exact same Florida beach, though one assumes not at the same time.  After being reunited at age 37, they took part in a study at University of Minnesota, which showed that their medical histories, personality tests, and even brain-wave tests were almost identical.  Remember, you can always find… Thanks…  

Sadhguru's Podcast
Who Is Shiva?

Sadhguru's Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 4:11


Is Shiva territorial or universal? In this conversation excerpt, Sadhguru explains that “Shiva” means that which is not physical. Something which is not physical can be everywhere – whether America or India, Earth or anywhere in the cosmos. He speaks about this dimensionless existence and modern science's increasing recognition of it. In Conversation with the Mystic, Subhash Ghai with Sadhguru, Mumbai, Dec 2016

Commonwealth Club of California Podcast
Kai-Fu Lee: Our AI Future

Commonwealth Club of California Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 68:01


Within the next two decades, Kai-Fu Lee says, artificial intelligence will become the defining development of the 21st century, making aspects of daily human life today virtually unrecognizable. AI will revolutionize medicine and education through human-machine symbioses. It will challenge the social and economic order by creating brand-new forms of communication and generating unprecedented wealth. AI is at its tipping point, and if our society doesn't prepare for both the exciting and possibly perilous pathways ahead, we will lose the ability to control our collective future. In their new book AI 2041, Kai-Fu Lee, bestselling author and former president of Google China, teams up with Chen Qiufan to create an image of what a world with artificial intelligence will look like in 20 years. In 10 gripping short stories, the authors introduce readers to an array of eye-opening concepts, such as the rogue scientist in Munich who uses AI technologies in a revenge plot that endangers the world. Or the teenage girl in Mumbai who rebels when AI's crunching of big data gets in the way of romance. Through these stories, Lee and Qiufan draw on the ominous possibilities of autonomous weapons and human bias in smart technology as well as the incredible liberating power of artificial intelligence and its unprecedented ability to strengthen societal connections. Kai-Fu Lee is the CEO of Beijing-based Sinovation Ventures and the co-chair of the Artificial Intelligence Council at the World Economic Forum. Formerly the president of Google China, Lee was also a senior executive at Microsoft, SGI and Apple. Join us as Kai-Fu Lee delves into the intriguing future of artificial intelligence. SPEAKERS Kai-Fu Lee Ph.D., CEO, Sinovation Ventures; Co-author, AI 2041: Ten Visions for Our Future In Conversation with Rumman Chowdhury Ph.D., CEO and Founder, Parity AI n response to the COVID-19 pandemic, we are currently hosting all of our live programming via YouTube live stream. This program was recorded via video conference on September 28th, 2021 by the Commonwealth Club of California. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Finding Founders
Using Her Last $3000 to Buy Turmeric: Founder Wisdom #054 - Sana Javeri Kadri

Finding Founders

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 15:49


After Sana Javeri Kadri earned their IB diploma from UWC Adriatic, she worked as a Documentary Filmmaker for P.R.I.D.E India in Maharashtra, India and was a freelance photographer for Kadri Consultants Pvt. Ltd in Mumbai, India before attending Pomona College. While pursuing a Bachelor of Arts in Visual and Performing Arts, she accumulated an array of experiences during college. At 23 years old in 2017, Sana Javeri Kadri used $3,000 from her tax refund to start sourcing and selling ethically farmed turmeric. Today Diaspora Co. works with nearly a dozen small family farms across India, paying an average of six times more than the commodity price, and sells seven spices including coriander and cardamom. Kadri has bootstrapped the entire operation while going beyond the norm, like paying for healthcare to farm laborers on some of its farms, with the goal of growing enough to be able to provide it to all workers on its partner farms. Subscribe to our Newsletter! https://findingfounders.co/subscribe Website: findingfounders.co Follow Sam: https://www.instagram.com/samueldonner/ Follow Finding Founders IG: https://www.instagram.com/findingfounderspodcast/ --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/finding-founders/support

Tests and the Rest: College Admissions Industry Podcast
251. Success In Computer-Based Testing

Tests and the Rest: College Admissions Industry Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 26:59


Like it or not, most major assessment and admissions tests will eventually migrate to a digital platform, some sooner than you'd think. This need not be a cause for despair. Amy and Mike invited educator Sonya Muthalia to describe the path to success in computer-based testing. What are five things you will learn in this episode? How do computerized tests differ from the paper-pencil version? What are the advantages and disadvantages of taking computer-based tests? How is the prep for computerized tests different from the paper-pencil version? What digital tools are often provided to improve the computer-based testing experience? Why should educators feel excited about an inevitable expansion of computer-based testing? MEET OUR GUEST Sonya Muthalia is the Founder and CEO of Informed Decisions, a leading Mumbai based test prep company that trains students for the SAT, ACT, GMAT and GRE. Over the last two decades Sonya, along with her faculty located in India and North America, has trained over 10,000 students across 33 countries. Sonya also contributes to articles in newspapers and is a speaker at various online and offline forums. Sonya is always looking for newer and better ways to help her students and enhance their experience.  Informed Decisions is one of the strongest proponents of the Mindprint Learning Assessment and holds marketing exclusivity for India. Sonya uses MindPrint to design bespoke tutoring plans for her students which has helped significantly improve teaching outcomes and ultimately translated to optimal scores.  Sonya is also a passionate cook and particularly loves baking. Her newfound love for sourdough bread making is what helps her destress the eve of test day or results day! Find Sonya at sonya@informeddecisions.in. LINKS Taking A Computer-Based ACT Looming Questions About a Digital SAT or ACT Is Online a Better Baseline? Comparing the Predictive Validity of Computer- and Paper-Based Tests RELATED EPISODES COMPARING PAPER- AND COMPUTER-BASED TESTING HOW DOES REMOTE PROCTORING ACTUALLY WORK? HOW COLLEGE BOARD AND ACT ARE CHANGING ABOUT THIS PODCAST Tests and the Rest is THE college admissions industry podcast. Explore all of our episodes on the show page.

Cyrus Says
feat. Neena Gupta

Cyrus Says

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 51:46


On this episode, Cyrus is joined by the amazimg Neena Gupta, Actor and Television Director, to talk about her new book 'Sach Kahun Toh: An Autobiography' and her long and storied career as an actress in the industry, working in films, television, theatre and web series, and lots more. Cyrus also asks Neena about her early days in Raigarpura, her professor who used to also be a professional matchmaker named 'Prof. Arora', studying in Janki Devi Mahavidyalaya in New Delhi for her college, going to National School of Drama, how she got into acting finally, and tons more. Neena also talks about seeing herself on the big screen for the first time, Neena and her NSD-theatre friends getting roles in Gandhi, what it was like working on Gandhi and how she became great friends with Sir Ben Kingsley, when she finally moved to Mumbai, how and when she knew that she had become a household name, the show Neena wroet and directed titled 'Saans (1998)' that helped her gain even more popularity, her play with Anupam Kher and Rakesh Bedi called 'Mera Woh Matlab Nahin Tha' which had one of the biggest runs in Indian theatre, and more. Tune in for a truly fascinating conversation.Follow Neena Gupta on Instagram: https://instagram.com/neena_guptaSubscribe to our new YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCmY4iMGgEa49b7-NH94p1BQAlso, subscribe to Cyrus' YouTube channel: https://youtube.com/channel/UCHAb9jLYk0TwkWsCxom4q8AYou can follow Antariksh on Instagram @antariksht: https://instagram.com/antarikshtDo send in AMA questions for Cyrus by tweeting them to @cyrussaysin or e-mailing them at whatcyrussays@gmail.comDon't forget to follow Cyrus Broacha on Instagram @BoredBroacha (https://www.instagram.com/boredbroacha)In case you're late to the party and want to catch up on previous episodes of Cyrus Says you can do so at: www.ivmpodcasts.com/cyrussaysYou can listen to this show and other awesome shows on the new and improved IVM Podcasts App on Android: https://ivm.today/androidor iOS: https://ivm.today/ios

Founders Unfiltered
Ep41: Food: the Internet's Last Frontier ft. Rebel Foods

Founders Unfiltered

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2021 44:08


Jaydeep grew up in a Bengali household that loved food. While working in Pune, he missed the Kathi rolls he loved growing up and decided to start a restaurant as a side project. The two launched Faasos, a restaurant serving rolls, and outsourced its operations. Jaydeep then went to pursue his MBA at INSEAD and landed a job at McKinsey London. After 5 years, he returned to India and had to choose between joining the firm's rapidly growing India office or growing Faasos. Faasos started from a single restaurant in Pune and eventually expanded to 10 across Mumbai and Bangalore. It offered doorstep delivery, a novel concept back in the day! In spite of the customer love, Faasos struggled to make unit economics work due to the high cost of real estate - a common problem for Indian restaurants. A shift in strategy was driven by a customer survey insight - 74% of customers had never visited a Faasos restaurant! This epiphany led them to adopt a 'delivery only' model and cut down costs. Rebel Foods eventually pioneered the concept of 'cloud kitchens' - a single physical kitchen serving as multiple brands. Today, Rebel Foods is the leading internet restaurant company globally with 15+ brands and 3500+ restaurants across 10 countries. For more details visit: ajuniorvc.com/podcast

The Human Risk Podcast
Michael Walford-Williams on Ethical Hacking of Human Controls

The Human Risk Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2021 60:32


How can we assess the level of human risk we're running in a control framework? Unlike technology, humans aren't always reliable and how they behave under pressure may well be different to how they behave in normal situations.My guest on this episode, Michael Walford-Willaims is a risk professional who specialises in how to plan for when things go wrong, covering areas like business continuity, operational resilience and crisis management. Michael helps companies by testing out the human components of control frameworks to see where there might be weaknesses. He goes into organisations and tries to ethically hack them by trying to circumvent controls with human elements — that might be trying to get a fraudulent invoice paid or simply tailgating employees to see if he can get physical access to buildings.His work serves two purposes:Firstly it identifies potential weaknesses in controls. If he can get a fake invoice paid, then so can a fraudster. If he can get access to buildings, then so can thieves. By seeing how easy it is to bypass controls, organisations can get a better handle on their risk profile. Until you've actually tested the human controls, it's impossible to know how weak or strong they actually are.Secondly, it serves as a training exercise. Just like a fire evacuation drill, it's better to have employees learn what to do or not do, by experiencing a simulation, than letting them learn from real-life situations.This is human risk management in action. Of course there are ethical components to the work that Michael does — how far is it appropriate to test out your employees and what do you if you discover they are the weakest link in your security chain? As Michael explains, we have to also think about what impact the exercise will have on those involved in it. If you think you've been tricked by your employer, that you're somehow not trusted, or that your employer is prepared to deceive you and therefore the organisation is unethical, the exercise could actually make things worse. So the expertise Michael brings isn't just about testing the proverbial fences. It's planning exercises that don't cross ethical lines and then using the information gleaned from them, sensitively and intelligently.About MichaelMichael has worked for over 15 years in various aspects of risk management and compliance with a specialism in Business Continuity and Crisis Management and more recently third party risk management. He has worked in a number of countries globally having been based in London, Singapore and New York. Working in house and for the last 7 years as a consultant, Michael has worked across many industries for some of the largest organisations in the world including some of the worlds largest banks. and through his work in the field of crisis management has worked on a number of major incidents including the Japanese Tsunami and Fukushima incident, terror attacks in Mumbai, Boston and Moscow and numerous natural disasters, and technology & infrastructure failure related incidents. In 2014 Michael worked to set up one of the UK's first CrowdFunding platforms and as head of Operations and Compliance oversaw the first successful direct FCA authorisation of a platform for both Debt and Equity-based crowdfunding. Michael continues to work as a consultant as has just set up a new brand "Westbourne" to pull together a number of offerings in the risk management space. 
You can contact him via LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/michael-walford-williams-2302a78a/

Keys To The Shop : Equipping the Coffee Retail Professional
ROR #8 How Post-Harvest Processing Impacts Flavor w/ Siva Subramanian and Byron Holcomb of Olam Food Ingredients

Keys To The Shop : Equipping the Coffee Retail Professional

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 72:51


How coffee is processed after harvest has an incredible impact on the final quality in the cup. Today we have the luxury of choosing form  a wide variety of processing techniques. Whether you are a roaster or a farmer, understanding what these methods contribute to the coffee as well as their impact on the environment, and the industry is critical.  On this episode of RoR from Roast Magazine, we will be discussing post-harvest processing methods from a scientific, philosophical, and practical perspective with guests, Siva Subramanian and Byron Holcomb of Olam Food Ingredients.  Siva Subramanian is Vice President & Head of coffee Innovation, Olam Food Ingredients (OFI).  He has 27 years of extensive experience in the food industry working in multiple countries including India, Singapore, and the United States.  Prior to joining OFI, Siva worked with Hindustan Unilever at the Global R&D center in Bangalore, India Siva holds degrees in Chemistry, Chemical Technology & Food Technology from the University of Mumbai, India.  Currently, Siva is leading a team engaged in creating new processing techniques to enhance the aroma, flavor, and taste of coffee & creating novel food ingredients. Byron Holcomb is the Specialty Coffee Manager, Olam Food Ingredients (OFI. Byron likes to say he is a strong generalist in coffee but not an expert at any one part of coffee. In 2009 he competed as a barista with coffee from his own farm in the Dominican Republic.  He was a coffee buyer for Dallis Bros Coffee in NYC for a few years before moving to Brazil to manage a couple farms in Sul de Minas. There he tried to bring better post-harvest management to the operation. At least one of the farms made it into CoE the 5 years he was there. Recently he received the QP3 certification. For the last few years he is based in Guatemala City supporting the Specialty business in Olam/ofi.  We cover: How processing has evolved What happens in the washed, natural, and honey process The illusion of sweetness Role of stress, microorganisms, acids, metabolites, and sugars Mechanical harvesting impact on flavor Why honey process is not ideal How much does processing contribute to the bean's true terroir?  What methods are most scalable and sustainable? How roasters can make mindful selections to support farmers and serve customers well  Experimental processing, quality, and marketing Pendulum of experimentation Links: www.olamspecialtycoffee.com www.asic-cafe.org   Subscribe to Roast Magazine! www.roastmagazine.com   Related Episodes: RoR #1: A Conversation w/ Anne Cooper of Equilibrium Master Roasters RoR #2: Exploring Quality Control w/ Spencer Turer of Coffee Enterprises RoR #3: Making Contingency Planning a Reality w/ Andi Trindle Mersch of Philz Coffee RoR #4: Practical Thermal Dynamics w/ Candice Madison of Royal Coffee / The Crown Oak RoR #5: Time and Color in Roasting w/ Morten Munchow of Coffee Mind” RoR #6: Buying Less and Doing More w/ Ever Meister RoR #7 Illustrative Sample Roasting w/ Mike Ebert of Firedancer Coffee Consultants

Departures with Robert Amsterdam
That feeling when we are between world orders

Departures with Robert Amsterdam

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 28:27


We are no longer living in a unipolar world of US dominance, argues India's brilliant former Foreign Secretary Shivshankar Menon in the latest episode of Departures with Robert Amsterdam, but neither have we transitioned to multipolarity or whatever is coming next. Former Ambassador Menon's new book, "India and Asian Geopolitics: The Past, Present," is slightly misleading in its title, in that it implies a regional study, when in fact his insights, analysis, and proscriptions are truly global in their validity. In this discussion with Robert Amsterdam, Menon addresses the sweeping changes which have undergone Asia in the past few decades, including the rebalancing between India and China, and makes a strong argument for the enhancement and expansion of Mumbai's integration and engagement with the international system. Menon expresses his concern over the spread of rising nationalism and nativism in many countries, which he argues often restricts their ability to negotiate and successfully engage with other nations to make progress on the world's most pressing issues. A truly fascinating discussion with one of the world's most experienced diplomats.

Music Life
The beauty of sampling with Anchorsong, Loraine James, Gold Panda and Sandunes

Music Life

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 28:59


Anchorsong, Loraine James, Gold Panda and Sandunes discuss what song they'd make it they knew billions of people were going to listen to it, being guided by samples, the importance of keeping in the mistakes, and the art of making organic sounds. Masaaki Yoshida is better known as Anchorsong, an electronic musician and producer originally from Tokyo. He describes his music as being “borderless”, fusing dance music and samples with elements of rock, hip-hop and electronica. Sanaya Aredeshir, also known as Sandunes, is a composer, producer, and pianist from Mumbai, India who incorporates elements of dance and jazz to create something wholly unique. Derwin Schlecker, aka Gold Panda, is an electronic music producer and performer who creates “swirling electronic textures out of samples from pop, soul, hip-hop, or whatever happens to be lying around”. And finally, Loraine James is an experimental electronic adventurer and producer who's breaking new ground with her sound, and is one of the most exciting talents coming out of London right now. Her latest album, Reflections, is her most critically acclaimed work to date.

3 Things
How the NCB raided Cordelia, Lakhimpur Kheri, and tourist visas

3 Things

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 21:53


In this episode, Mohammed Thaver joins host Snigdha Sharma to discuss how the NCB raid on a Mumbai cruise ship unfolded and why the NCB is facing heat for its choice of witnesses. Next, Asad Rehman joins the show from Lakhimpur Kheri to give us the latest updates including what came out of Rahul and Priyanka Gandhi's visit to the victims' families. (11:21)And finally, we go over details of the government's decision to open the country to tourists after one and a half years. (19:05)

The Sewers of Paris
Always Pushing Boundaries (Ep 356 - Madonna/Farhad Dadyburjor)

The Sewers of Paris

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 48:08


My guest on the Sewers of Paris podcast this week is the author of The Other Man, a forthcoming novel set in Mumbai about two men from very different cultures falling in love. Farhad Dadyburjor knows a thing or two about bridging cultures — growing up in India, he developed a deep obsession with western pop stars like Madonna and even came out to a friend via a carefully phrased comparison to George Michael. These days he's gained a much richer understanding of himself and his community — thanks to a combination of queer literature and dance parties.We'll have that conversation in a minute. First a big thanks to everyone who supports the Sewers of Paris at Patreon.com/mattbaume. And to everyone who's left a review on Apple podcasts or wherever you listen.Also don't forget to check out my YouTube where I post videos about queer pop culture history — and you can also head over to my Patreon to watch hours of bonus videos featuring stories of queer TV, film, and Broadway history.And check out my cute little newsletter where I share sneak peeks at what I'm working on at mattbaume.com.

The Cricket Podcast
IPL Match Reaction - Mumbai Thump the Royals and RCB do the Unthinkable

The Cricket Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 47:27


Jack and Max are joined by TMS's Daniel Norcorss to review the latest two games in the IPL: Mumbai Indians v Rajasthan Royals and Royal Challengers Bangalore vs Sunrisers Hyderabad. As we approach the final stages, Mumbai are in need of a huge NRR swing, and theywere given the perfect opportunity against a hapless Royals side on a pudding of a wicket. RCB then had the chance to sneak into the top two, but somehow managed to blow it by losing to bottom side Sunrisers Hyderabad. Where does that leave things as we head into the final four fixtures? Who do we think will make it? And what are the white things on Jack's headphones?

Victim 2 Victor - Surviving Abuse and Overcoming Trauma
"The Wounded Healer" By Mumbai Based Author Dr Priya Saklani Who Suffered Two Decades of Childhood Complex Trauma & Sexual Abuse

Victim 2 Victor - Surviving Abuse and Overcoming Trauma

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 62:57


Anu Verma interviews Mumbai-based author Dr Priya Saklani. As a survivor of two decades of childhood complex trauma and sexual abuse, and after healing herself from the effects of childhood abuse, Priya is committed to helping anyone suffering from childhood trauma and to help them overcome the core beliefs that are blocking their road to recovery. A firm believer that the only way forward is by addressing the past and to attempt to heal oneself, Dr Priya feels that otherwise the trauma subconsciously begins to affect the person, making it difficult to lead a “normal” life. “I had only one friend – fear.” Abandoned by her mother, she suffered from abuse by those closest to her. She now wishes to dispel the stigma associated with discussions about sexual abuse, which still remains a taboo topic in many cultures. Born an empath and a clairsentient, Dr Priya holds a doctorate degree in holistic and spiritual healing and is also a pioneer of ‘Animal Reiki' in India. She has dedicated her life to assisting the wounded adult children of dysfunctional families and victims of abuse, by helping them to overcome flawed childhood programming and co-dependency and breaking the negative patterns of the past and reclaiming their life. Her speciality is ‘Inner child healing' and she is passionate about ‘Conscious Parenting'.It is her mission to inspire and empower others to reveal their authentic self and live a life of their highest potential. She bridges the gap between trauma and purpose.You can find out more about Dr Priya by visiting her website: https://www.priyasaklani.com/Thanks For Watching!========================================================Follow us on:- Website:   https://victim2victor.net/- FACEBOOK:   https://www.facebook.com/victim2victor- TWITTER:    https://twitter.com/V2V_healing- Victim 2 Victor Audio Book Audible: https://adbl.co/3akVNCu - Victim 2 Victor Book on Amazon: https://amzn.to/34MQQyu- Apple Podcast: https://apple.co/3wHvUof- Spotify: https://spoti.fi/36D6ZYE=========================================================

The Big Story
798: Aryan Khan Case: How Legally Sound Are the Charges Invoked by the NCB?

The Big Story

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 18:17


A high-profile drug bust case from Mumbai has been grabbing headlines since the weekend and raking up the hotly pursued pitch of "bollywood drug nexus". Part of the reason for this enormous attention is because it involves Bollywood superstar Shah Rukh Khan's 23-year-old son Aryan Khan, who was arrested with seven others by the Narcotics Control Bureau after they allegedly uncovered cocaine, charas, MDMA, and ecstasy from the accused from a Goa-bound cruise ship. Though no drugs were found on Aryan Khan, he has not been granted bail since the NCB claimed that it has recovered “shocking and incrementing evidence” on his phone. The NCB sought for custody for Khan and others till 11 October but it was only granted till 7 October by a magistrate's court in Mumbai. While many TV news channels have given it “Bollywood drug nexus” or the “international drug racket” spin, an angle that amply discussed during the Sushant Sing Rajput case in 2020, what do we know so far about the case? How legally sound are the charges against the accused in this case, and why is this case making all headlines across the country? To discuss the developments in the case, for this episode we spoke with former DGP of Kerala and author Dr NC Asthana and Vakasha Sachdev, The Quint's Legal Editor. Tune in! Host and Producer: Himmat Shaligram Guest: Dr NC Asthana, former DGP of Kerala and Vakasha Sachdev, The Quint's Legal Editor. Editor: Shelly Walia Music: Big Bang Fuzz Listen to The Big Story podcast on: Apple: https://apple.co/2AYdLIl Saavn: http://bit.ly/2oix78C Google Podcasts: http://bit.ly/2ntMV7S Spotify: https://spoti.fi/2IyLAUQ Deezer: http://bit.ly/2Vrf5Ng Castbox: http://bit.ly/2VqZ9ur

The Allan McKay Podcast
319 -- F9 VFX Supervisor - Peter Chiang

The Allan McKay Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 53:42


Peter Chiang is co-founder of DNEG and a prolific and critically acclaimed Visual Effects Supervisor. He is one of the leaders in his field with over 30 years experience in the industry. Starting out as a graphic artist, animator and later visual effects art director, he moved quickly into visual effects supervision on films including Pitch Black (DNEG's first project), Chronicles of Riddick, Flyboys, The Bourne Ultimatum, Green Zone, John Carter, Total Recall, Pacific Rim: Uprising, as well as Ridley Scott's Exodus: Gods and Kings and Justin Lin's Star Trek: Beyond. DNEG (www.dneg.com) is one of the world's leading visual effects (VFX) and animation studios for the creation of feature film, television and multiplatform content. DNEG employs nearly 7,000 people with worldwide offices and studios across North America (Los Angeles, Montréal, Toronto, Vancouver), Europe (London) and Asia (Bangalore, Chandigarh, Chennai, Mumbai). DNEG's critically acclaimed work has earned the company six Academy Awards® for Best Visual Effects and numerous BAFTA and Primetime EMMY® Awards for its high-quality VFX work. Upcoming DNEG projects on behalf of its Hollywood and global studio and production company partners include Dune (October 2021), No Time To Die (October 2021), Ron's Gone Wrong (October 2021), Last Night In Soho (October 2021), Ghostbusters: Afterlife (November 2021), The Matrix 4 (December 2021), Uncharted (2022), Borderlands (2022), Aquaman and the Lost Kingdom (2022), The Flash (2022), and Shazam! Fury of the Gods (2023). In this Podcast, Allan and Peter talk about the beginning of DNEG, the projects the studio has worked on, the rate of technological innovation, adapting to the challenges of COVID-19 and their most recent work on F9: The Fast Saga. For more show notes, visit www.allanmckay.com/319/.

3 Things
Lakhimpur Kheri violence, Siddique Kappan, and NCB raid

3 Things

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 26:24


In this episode, Asad Rehman joins host Snigdha Sharma to discuss the violent clashes in Uttar Pradesh's Lakhimpur Kheri that left 8 dead, including four farmers.Next, Amil Bhatnagar joins the show to discuss the 5000 pages-long chargesheet filed by the UP STF in the Siddique Kappan case. (9:48)And finally, we go over the latest updates on the NCB raid in Mumbai. (23:14)

Cyrus Says
Cock & Bull feat. Amit and Antariksh

Cyrus Says

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 73:01


On this episode, Cyrus is joined by Amit and Silverie (Antariksh) to talk about the new words Cyrus has learnt - 'pimping' and 'hollus bollus', and lots more. They talk about Trump suing Twitter because they banned him but still continue to let the Taliban post on the platform, former Maharashtra Police Commissioner Param Bir Singh being on the run from the law, Shahrukh Khan's son Aryan Khan getting caught in an NCB drug bust on a cruise ship to Goa, the panelists' favourite Martin Scorsese movies, and tons more. Tune in for a hilarious episode.Subscribe to our new YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCmY4iMGgEa49b7-NH94p1BQAlso, subscribe to Cyrus' YouTube channel: https://youtube.com/channel/UCHAb9jLYk0TwkWsCxom4q8AYou can follow Amit on Instagram & Twitter @DoshiAmit: https://twitter.com/doshiamit and https://instagram.com/doshiamitYou can follow Antariksh on Instagram @antariksht: https://instagram.com/antarikshtDo send in AMA questions for Cyrus by tweeting them to @cyrussaysin or e-mailing them at whatcyrussays@gmail.comDon't forget to follow Cyrus Broacha on Instagram @BoredBroacha (https://www.instagram.com/boredbroacha)In case you're late to the party and want to catch up on previous episodes of Cyrus Says you can do so at: www.ivmpodcasts.com/cyrussaysYou can listen to this show and other awesome shows on the new and improved IVM Podcasts App on Android: https://ivm.today/androidor iOS: https://ivm.today/ios

The Cricket Podcast
MI v DC & CSK v RR - IPL 2021 - Reaction - Are Mumbai OUT? Jaiswal And Gaikwad Light It Up!

The Cricket Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 2, 2021 50:44


The IPL continues, and The Cricket Podcast's reaction shows continue too. Today we talk about Mumbai Indians v Delhi Capitals and Chennai Super Kings v Rajasthan Royals. In game one Mumbai lost to Delhi. Does this mean they are out? Are Delhi still the team to beat, or were they vulnerable today? In the later game, both teams teed off. Gaikwad and Jaiswal battle it out to be crowned top Indian prospect at the top of the order. Our Twitter and Instagram: @thecricketpod Our Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/thecricketpod Our sponsor: https://woodstockcricket.co.uk/ Our channel membership: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC1nj... Our website: www.thecricketpod.com #IPL2021

The Big Story
796: Ambani Bomb Scare: What Explains Param Bir Singh's Sudden Disappearance?

The Big Story

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 15:42


Once the top cop in the Mumbai Police, Param Bir Singh now has a lookout notice issued against him for allegedly being on the run and reportedly even leaving the country. The recent development in the extortion case connected with the Antilia bomb scare incident comes after Maharashtra Home Minister Dilip Walse Patil on 30 September said that the state government is on the lookout for Singh and that they are working with the Centre to find him. Singh, who has multiple corruption allegations, has been summoned on several occasions by the National Investigation Agency, the Central Bureau of Investigations and several Mumbai police stations for warrants against him. However, he has not turned up for a single one. But the big question is- how is it possible that a serving Mumbai Police senior official can just disappear without anyone's notice? And what does it speak about the governmental agencies handling the investigation? Host and Producer: Himmat Shaligram Guest: Sujata Anandan, senior journalist and Vakasha Sachdev, The Quint's Legal Editor. Editor: Shelly Walia Music: Big Bang Fuzz Listen to The Big Story podcast on: Apple: https://apple.co/2AYdLIl Saavn: http://bit.ly/2oix78C Google Podcasts: http://bit.ly/2ntMV7S Spotify: https://spoti.fi/2IyLAUQ Deezer: http://bit.ly/2Vrf5Ng Castbox: http://bit.ly/2VqZ9ur

The Musafir Stories - India Travel Podcast
Coromandel Coast with Lakshmi Sharath

The Musafir Stories - India Travel Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 56:00


This week, The Musafir Stories speaks with Lakshmi Sharath, one of the top travel writers and bloggers in India, who blogs under Travel with Lakshmi or lakshmisharath.com ! Today's destination: Coromandel Coast! Nearest Airport: Chennai International Airport, MAANearest Railway Station: Chennai Central, MASPrerequisites - NAPacking - Pack light, carry sunscreen and shades. Time of the year - June-Feb, avoid the cyclone seasonLength of the itinerary: 4-7 daysItinerary Highlights: Lakshmi takes us on a fascinating journey covering the east coast of India, exploring the colonial connections of the region, being at the forefront of trade and commerce, and how some towns and villages blossomed while others have stood still in time. The coromandel coast covers the states of Tamil Nadu and parts of Andhra Pradesh and runs along the Bay of Bengal. It is popular not just for its scenic beauty but also attracted travelers and traders from far and wide. The first stop on the itinerary is Madras or Madrasapattinam as it was formerly known. Madras' rise to prominence dates back to the time of the Portuguese and Britishers, both having ruled here. The area around Santhome was a Portuguese settlement whereas the Britishers made it their first base as Fort St. George. The city still has a lot of remnants of its British connection with the secretariat building, the High court as well as some popular churches. Lakshmi carries on her journey passing Mahabalipuram,famous for its Shore Temple and moving on to Sadras or Sadrangapattinam - which boasts of a 17th century Dutch fort, and is also the scene of the Battle of Sadras fought in 1782.The next pit stop is at Alamparai which has the ruins of a fort, believed to be built by the Nawab of Arcot, but was gifted to the French for their help and collaboration. The village was known to have a mint where coins were minted as well as a hostel for travelers. The region was also popular for trading of ghee, textiles and zari. Lakshmi moves on to Pondicherry from here for the night halt. Enroute Pondi, Lakshmi makes a stop at Marapakkam, popular for its huge salt fields. Pondicherry exploration includes a walk with INTACH - Indian National Trust for Art and Cultural Heritage, around the city that was the headquarters of the French in India. Also on the itinerary is a visit to the popular cafes, architecture, streets and Auroville. After Pondicherry, Lakshmi travels to Cuddalore, one of the early settlements of the British at Fort St. David. Fort David is a shadow of itself and has completely been reduced to ruins. Lakshmi continues to drive from here and the next stop on the itinerary is Porto Novo, the other Portuguese settlement besides Santhome in Madras. It was formerly known as Parangi pete or land of the parangis/foriegners. It was also known to be a trade center for the Arabs and Yemenis. Porto Novo pagoda was known to be minted from the Porto Novo mint in this village. The next stop along the journey is Tranquebar or Tharangambadi - land of the singing waves, the most prominent Danish settlement in India. The town's popular attraction includes Fort Dansborg, built in its unique Danish style, rustic streets like King's street, Queen's street, churches and temples. Karaikal, a part of the Puducherry/Pondicherry UT is the next stop on the road trip and includes a fascinating legend of Kraikal. The last stop on the road tip is Nagapattinam - believed to be a popular Dutch settlement and also has a strong Buddhist connection. The town is also very close to other popular religious sites like Nagoor Dargah and Vellankani Cathedral. The final call out is for Poompuhar, the point where the final estuary of the river Cauvery meets the Bay of Bengal!Links:Blog: https://lakshmisharath.comLinks to the blog post: Part 1 : https://lakshmisharath.com/driving-down-the-coromandel-coast-part-1/Part 2 : https://lakshmisharath.com/driving-down-the-coromandel-coast-2/Part 3 : https://lakshmisharath.com/driving-down-the-coromandel-coast-part-3/YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC57mn7ypVKFBb3UrMU7TiXQFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/TravelwithLakshmi Twitter: https://twitter.com/lakshmisharath Marine Life of Mumbai: https://www.instagram.com/marinelifeofmumbai/ Photo by Namrata Poddar on Unsplash Follow the Musafir stories on:Twitter : https://twitter.com/musafirstories?lang=enFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/themusafirstories/Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/musafirstoriespodcast/?hl=enwebsite: www.themusafirstories.comemail: themusafirstories@gmail.comYou can listen to this show and other awesome shows on the IVM Podcasts app on Android: https://ivm.today/android or iOS: https://ivm.today/ios, or any other podcast app.You can check out our website at http://www.ivmpodcasts.com/

Gladiatrix! Hear me Roar!
How to use the power of words for change With Ritika of Practicalbloggers

Gladiatrix! Hear me Roar!

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 43:21


In today's episode we are speaking with Ritika of PracticalBloggers.Ritika says:I'm not an extrovert. I went from recovering people pleaser, former shy kid to being known as someone who can "make a dead man talk."With over 7+ years of Relationship Building experience in Sales working for Technology companies in the Silicon Valley, she has helped businesses earn millions and have served major clients like Eventbrite, Google etc."Don't tell anyone your secrets!" they'd say. "Lord forbid, what if they do it better than you?!"Immigrant communities at large are pretty hush-hush about sharing #hacks. Growing up in Mumbai and Los Angeles, she used to share freely. Apparently, this was a problem, because the competition was REAL. Her response to such advice led to the creation of my travel + wellness blog in March 2021, Practical Bloggers. Her coaching program, The P.O.I.S.E.D 360 Method, followed suit. Her mission is to enhance your holistic confidence with healthy people skills. Because she believes that restoring the relationship we have with ourselves is central to restoring your interpersonal + community relationships. Our words give us the power to change ourselves.She also says: "I've embarrassed myself enough in social settings to be honored to provide for you the tools to start your journey into confidence and reclaim the incredible human being you already are! I've been an international student in India, London, and the United States pivoted my career by obtaining 2 coaching certifications to help you through your transformation.  "Ritika can be reached viaInstagram:@Practicalbloggers

Cyrus Says
Cock & Bull feat. Amit and Antariksh

Cyrus Says

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 70:41


On this episode, Cyrus is joined by Amit and Silverie (Antariksh) to talk about the two new words Cyrus has learnt, Android vs Apple, IFS Sneha Dubey's speech at the UN against Pakistan, the Aaj Tak reporter who got trolled for trying to barge in and speak to Sneha Dubey, and more. They also talk about the decline of print media, whether it actually is declining at the level it is being reported, Rs. 50,000/- being announced as compensation for losing a family member due to the coronavirus, the situation in Punjab politics right now, and more.Subscribe to our new YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCmY4iMGgEa49b7-NH94p1BQAlso, subscribe to Cyrus' YouTube channel: https://youtube.com/channel/UCHAb9jLYk0TwkWsCxom4q8AYou can follow Amit on Instagram & Twitter @DoshiAmit: https://twitter.com/doshiamit and https://instagram.com/doshiamitYou can follow Antariksh on Instagram @antariksht: https://instagram.com/antarikshtDo send in AMA questions for Cyrus by tweeting them to @cyrussaysin or e-mailing them at whatcyrussays@gmail.comDon't forget to follow Cyrus Broacha on Instagram @BoredBroacha (https://www.instagram.com/boredbroacha)In case you're late to the party and want to catch up on previous episodes of Cyrus Says you can do so at: www.ivmpodcasts.com/cyrussaysYou can listen to this show and other awesome shows on the new and improved IVM Podcasts App on Android: https://ivm.today/androidor iOS: https://ivm.today/ios

Adventure Calls
Global Relocation Conference Day 8: How To Avoid Tax Issues Abroad with Cloud Expat Tax

Adventure Calls

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 32:56


Welcome to Day 8 of the  Adventure Calls 2021 Global Relocation Conference.This interview aired live on Instagram on September 22, 2021. Watch the interview on IGTV here:  https://www.instagram.com/tv/CUIIH0uo0dTGet the 2022 Global Relocation Guide: https://jessicadrucker.com/guideFull conference line-up: https://jessicadrucker.com/live-relocation-conferenceAbout Saurabh Bandagale, Founder of Cloud Expat Tax Saurabh is an enrolled IRS agent who is licensed to practice US taxes, and has gained over ten years' experience in global mobility tax at three of the 'Big 4' accounting companies (Ernst & Young, PwC, KPMG, Deloitte). He then created Cloud Expat Tax Asia, LLP, a virtual tax firm based out of Mumbai, India that focusesspecifically on the US tax requirements of American expats abroad, green card holders, andinternational students. Unlike global tax firms, Cloud Expat Tax does not believe in achievingscale through outsourcing, which means that you are working with in-house licensedaccountants at affordable rates while staying compliant, not wasting money, and making thebest of your time abroad. Find Cloud Expat Tax OnlineOn Instagram: www.instagram.com/cloudexpattaxWebsite: https://cloudexpattax.comFind Jess DruckerOn Instagram: www.instagram.com/jessicavdruckerOn Twitter: https://twitter.com/jessicavdruckerOn Facebook: www.facebook.com/jessicavdruckerExpat Life Coaching: https://jessicadrucker.com/coachingHow To Move Abroad Book: https://jessicadrucker.com/bookGlobal Relocation Guide: https://jessicadrucker.com/guide About Adventure CallsAdventure Calls is the podcast that helps you live your biggest dreams by listening to your inner voice, finding your dream team, and following  your call to adventure. Adventure Calls is produced, edited and written by me, Jess Drucker, a four-time expat, world-traveler and author of How To Move Abroad And Why It's The Best Thing You'll Do: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B08FXSYQSL.

Simblified
Solving Genetic Diseases Ft. Berty Ashley

Simblified

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 74:18


One of the smartest people we know joins us on the show! Berty Ashley is a good friend and a quizzer, music nerd and... Molecular biologist who by day works with a private organization called DART, helping to solve rare diseases, putting all us PPT-makers in our place! Jokes apart, the work Berty and his team does is fascinating and this is a conversation we've been thinking of having for months now. He is also inspirational and hilarious, leading to a fun conversation. Also touching upon the meaningfulness of the work that he does and lots more.You can say hello to Berty at

The Cricket Podcast
IPL Weekend Review! RCB vs MI, CSK vs KKR, PKBS vs SRH & DC vs RR

The Cricket Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2021 95:08


It's a 4 game special on this episode! Delhi Capitals smash Rajasthan Royals, Sunrisers and the Punjab Kings of Comedy play-off for the wooden spoon, Chennai Super Kings and Kolkata Knight Riders fight out a thriller and Mumbai Indians are in trouble after Royal Challengers Bangalore beat them. Delhi teach Rajasthan a lesson, Punjab Kings beat a miserable Sunrisers, CSK sneak past a resurgent KKR and RCB pile the pressure on Mumbai! Our Twitter and Instagram: @thecricketpod Our Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/thecricketpod Our sponsor: https://woodstockcricket.co.uk/ Our channel membership: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC1njF-8tUuQVbTZVyUaoBcQ/join Our website: www.thecricketpod.com #IPL2021

Cyrus Says
feat. Nikhita Gandhi

Cyrus Says

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 64:58


On this episode, Cyrus is joined by the extremely talented playback singer Nikhita Gandhi. They talk about Nikhita's new song with Badshah titled 'Bad Boy x Bad Girl', how Badshah contacted her and she thought she was being pranked, and also sings a bit of the song on this episode. They also talk about Nikhita's mother being a fan of the podcast, being a dentist by qualification, both her parents being dentists as well, how she got to work with AR Rahman, and tons more.Follow Nikhita on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/nikhitagandhiofficialSubscribe to our new YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCmY4iMGgEa49b7-NH94p1BQAlso, subscribe to Cyrus' YouTube channel: https://youtube.com/channel/UCHAb9jLYk0TwkWsCxom4q8AYou can follow Antariksh on Instagram @antariksht: https://instagram.com/antarikshtDo send in AMA questions for Cyrus by tweeting them to @cyrussaysin or e-mailing them at whatcyrussays@gmail.comDon't forget to follow Cyrus Broacha on Instagram @BoredBroacha (https://www.instagram.com/boredbroacha)In case you're late to the party and want to catch up on previous episodes of Cyrus Says you can do so at: www.ivmpodcasts.com/cyrussaysYou can listen to this show and other awesome shows on the new and improved IVM Podcasts App on Android: https://ivm.today/androidor iOS: https://ivm.today/ios

Cyrus Says
Cock & Bull feat. Amit and Antariksh

Cyrus Says

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 67:39


On this episode, Cyrus is joined by Amit and Silverie (Antariksh) to talk about the Taliban's oppression of fellow Afghans, the Taliban in Afghanistan's appeal for Afghanistan's UN seat, PM Modi's current trip to the US, Erdogan and Modi's similarities, and lots more. They also talk about Sachin Gupta becoming the first Indian-origin person to become the head of operations of a basketball team - Minnesota Timberwolves, Mumbai being the most stressful city to drive in, and more.Subscribe to our new YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCmY4iMGgEa49b7-NH94p1BQAlso, subscribe to Cyrus' YouTube channel: https://youtube.com/channel/UCHAb9jLYk0TwkWsCxom4q8AYou can follow Amit on Instagram & Twitter @DoshiAmit: https://twitter.com/doshiamit and https://instagram.com/doshiamitYou can follow Antariksh on Instagram @antariksht: https://instagram.com/antarikshtDo send in AMA questions for Cyrus by tweeting them to @cyrussaysin or e-mailing them at whatcyrussays@gmail.comDon't forget to follow Cyrus Broacha on Instagram @BoredBroacha (https://www.instagram.com/boredbroacha)In case you're late to the party and want to catch up on previous episodes of Cyrus Says you can do so at: www.ivmpodcasts.com/cyrussaysYou can listen to this show and other awesome shows on the new and improved IVM Podcasts App on Android: https://ivm.today/androidor iOS: https://ivm.today/ios

Here's What I Don't Get
Episode 252 - More Beer!

Here's What I Don't Get

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 127:06


It's Fall now. I don't care what you say. We had the sneak preview, and now it's here, so chug a bunch of Claritin and get your carving kit out because some horny teens just moved in next door and you've got to stop them. While you're carefully hanging up the dead bodies in order to scare the virgin last girl, think about what went wrong in your life that got you here. Was it being drowned in a lake for being ugly? Was it dying in a fiery blaze because you like to touch kids? Or maybe because you're a magical midget that likes mayhem? Perhaps it was even one of these:- True Crime Internet Detectives- Not Enough Beer- The Man Behind The Wizard- Third Party Support SitesEvery now and then a 'girl next door' young blonde woman from Ohio pisses her boyfriend off enough or catches the attention of a crazed lunatic and for weeks all the news can talk about is the search for her. And with the rise of the internet, some people have started to take on the case themselves! Searching through social media and making a timeline of her movements in the lamest form of vigilante justice possible. Do they ever find the guy and go beat his ass? No. They find the wrong guy and get him arrested at work. But you know who could actually find all these missing white women? Batman. Not himself of course, I'm sure if Batman was real, he'd just have the Batcomputer solving all these cases in a minimized tab while he trolls through the local orphanage for his next Robin.Outdoor festivals, what are they? They're cordoned off public areas that it's okay to get drunk in! Do you think its okay to run out of beer at one of these 2/3rd of the way through the day? What if you went to Six Flags and they stopped half the rides at 2 PM? You'd be pissed! Are there a dozen other things to do or see there? Yeah, but we all know what you're there for. What if all the rides were at the very back of the park and not spread throughout? That's just more poor planning. And it's not like this is the first time! You'd think they could fix this and make it better and more efficient year after year, but what do I know.When you create a character or persona, it's important not to break the illusion. It's why when you go see a play and Hamlet stabs someone he doesn't stop, turn to the audience and say "Don't worry folks, I didn't really stab him, we're actors and this sword is a fake!" It's why kids cry when the guy in the Mickey Mouse costume pulls off his giant head. They don't care about the park employee, they want pure, unadulterated Mouse. Similarly, I don't need to know that you're depressed, or you want me to donate to a GoFundMe for your sick cousin, or even that you're on vacation so you won't be active for the next 2 weeks. You post dumb fake movie quotes, you're not a public servant.You know that feeling you get when you go to a restaurant and the service is above and beyond your expectations? Or when the guy at the store you're at actually cares about what he sells and can give you great advice? That's great customer service. Unfortunately it's the 0.01% of all customer service experiences. More and more companies are moving support to third party services that handle 150 other companies already with a phone farm in Mumbai. "Josh" from SupportCo doesn't know and doesn't care about your very specific use case of a very expensive piece of equipment, he just wants his $1.25 an hour.All this and more on this week's episode! Don't forget to join us on DISCORD, support us on PATREON or by BUYING A SHIRT.

New Books in Sociology
Gayatri Nair, "Set Adrift: Capitalist Transformations and Community Politics Along Mumbai's Shores" (Oxford UP, 2021)

New Books in Sociology

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 49:30


The Koli community in Mumbai-which has been practicing fishing for centuries-has experienced rapid changes over the last few decades, in the forms of increased mechanization, export of fish to global markets, and the pressure of urbanization on their living and workspaces. The capitalist transformation in fishing has altered what was once a caste-based practice to one that brought to it investors from outside the community, migrant workers, and ecological degradation. The resultant loss of revenue, jobs, and catch for artisanal fishers has led to movements demanding fishing rights to be granted to traditional fisher communities alone and for a return to older fishing practices. This call found resonance with populist politics in the city: Koli women organized themselves to stridently resist the entry of migrant men into the sector and Koli men-particularly the young-became inclined to move out of the practice of fishing. Through an examination of the lives and struggles of fishers in one of India's wealthiest cities, Set Adrift: Capitalist Transformations and Community Politics along Mumbai's Shores (Oxford UP, 2021) looks at how contestations around livelihoods map out in the shadow of significant encounters between capitalism and ecology. Gayatri Nair is Assistant Professor of Sociology, Department of Social Sciences and Humanities, Indraprastha Institute of Information Technology, New Delhi, India. Alize Arıcan is a Postdoctoral Associate at Rutgers University's Center for Cultural Analysis. She is an anthropologist whose research focuses on urban renewal, futurity, care, and migration in Istanbul, Turkey. Her work has been featured in Current Anthropology, City & Society, Radical Housing Journal, and entanglements: experiments in multimodal ethnography. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/sociology

New Books Network
Gayatri Nair, "Set Adrift: Capitalist Transformations and Community Politics Along Mumbai's Shores" (Oxford UP, 2021)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 49:30


The Koli community in Mumbai-which has been practicing fishing for centuries-has experienced rapid changes over the last few decades, in the forms of increased mechanization, export of fish to global markets, and the pressure of urbanization on their living and workspaces. The capitalist transformation in fishing has altered what was once a caste-based practice to one that brought to it investors from outside the community, migrant workers, and ecological degradation. The resultant loss of revenue, jobs, and catch for artisanal fishers has led to movements demanding fishing rights to be granted to traditional fisher communities alone and for a return to older fishing practices. This call found resonance with populist politics in the city: Koli women organized themselves to stridently resist the entry of migrant men into the sector and Koli men-particularly the young-became inclined to move out of the practice of fishing. Through an examination of the lives and struggles of fishers in one of India's wealthiest cities, Set Adrift: Capitalist Transformations and Community Politics along Mumbai's Shores (Oxford UP, 2021) looks at how contestations around livelihoods map out in the shadow of significant encounters between capitalism and ecology. Gayatri Nair is Assistant Professor of Sociology, Department of Social Sciences and Humanities, Indraprastha Institute of Information Technology, New Delhi, India. Alize Arıcan is a Postdoctoral Associate at Rutgers University's Center for Cultural Analysis. She is an anthropologist whose research focuses on urban renewal, futurity, care, and migration in Istanbul, Turkey. Her work has been featured in Current Anthropology, City & Society, Radical Housing Journal, and entanglements: experiments in multimodal ethnography. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

TMS at the Cricket World Cup
No Balls: The Cricket Podcast - The most disgusting sandwich you've ever heard of

TMS at the Cricket World Cup

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 60:31


As the season heads towards a close, Kate and Alex talk through their weeks and receive some wild emails. And with the IPL back underway, Graeme Swann checks in from Mumbai.

Docs in Orbit
A Night of Knowing Nothing with Payal Kapadia

Docs in Orbit

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 35:57


Featuring a conversation with Payal Kapadia about her remarkably brave and powerful film A NIGHT OF KNOWING NOTHING which took home awards at Cannes, TIFF, and CIFF. Here, she discusses with us her artistic approach, sources of inspiration, and the freedom she finds in documentary filmmaking.Kapadia is a filmmaker and artist based in Mumbai, and she studied at the Film and Television Institute of India.  A NIGHT OF KNOWING NOTHING is her debut feature film.The film is structured around a series of love letters, written by a university student in India to her estranged lover and separated because of caste differences. Read in voiceover from an unseen protagonist, the letters provide an intimate glimpse into a young woman's life and the drastic changes taking place around her, while shining light on a contemporary convoluted India. Composed mostly of grainy black in white analog film, and mixed with newspaper clippings, family archives, and viral videos found off the internet,  A NIGHT OF KNOWING NOTHING takes on an amorphous form, merging reality with fiction, dreams with memories, fantasies with anxieties. It unfolds like a long, unpredictable night, where we are all in the dark of what to expect next. It's a remarkably powerful and brave film that I still find myself circling back to days after watching. And it is with great admiration that we reached out to Payal Kapadia to invite her to speak about her artistic practice, sources of inspiration, and the freedom she finds in non-fiction cinema. Facilitating the conversation is Aylin Gökmen. Aylin is a Turkish-Swiss filmmaker. Her short film SPIRITS AND ROCKS: AN AZOREAN MYTH premiered at Locarno, and has screened at a number of festivals including Sundance, and Telluride. Aylin also takes on a formally inventive approach, blending carefully composed black and white documentary images with archive and an evocative soundscape. For a list of sources and references from this episode, visit https://www.docsinorbit.com/a-night-of-knowing-nothing

Sixteen:Nine
David Labuskes, AVIXA

Sixteen:Nine

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 36:32


The 16:9 PODCAST IS SPONSORED BY SCREENFEED – DIGITAL SIGNAGE CONTENT There is a whole pile of back seat driving happening lately in the pro AV and digital signage communities about how to run a trade show in the COVID-19 era, and much of the focus has squarely been on Dave Labuskes, the CEO of AVIXA, which runs InfoComm and co-owns the even larger trade show ISE. The show is happening in about a month in Orlando, and with other big trade shows saying never mind for 2021, there are endless questions and suggestions about the prospects of the show even happening. It will, says Labuskes, unless there are measures like government-mandated closures. Given that the show is in Florida, that's probably not going to happen. Labuskes has done some frank interviews lately that went into deep detail about InfoComm and COVID, and the business. I spoke with Labuskes late last week and did not see the value in rehashing and revisiting a lot of what he said, so in our chat we talk a little about how things will come off and why. But we spend a lot more time on bigger picture stuff about how trade shows fit, and whether a niche industry like digital signage can find a well-defined home and community at big, omni AV shows like Infocomm and ISE. Subscribe to this podcast: iTunes * Google Play * RSS TRANSCRIPT Mr Labuskes, thank you for joining me. I wanted to get into a number of things, but I also didn't want to just rehash some recent conversations you had in an hour long interview last week with Tim Albright from AVnation that went into a lot of frank discussion about where InfoComm is at and everything associated with that, but I can't cCompletely ignore that, and I just wanted to ask, where are things now , has anything changed in the last week since I watched that interview?  Dave Labuskes: Mr. Haynes, it's good to be here. There have been a couple of other events that have announced cancellations, but there's been nothing that's changed in AVIXA's policy with regards to InfoComm. We still see a runway to a fantastic event with fantastic people conducting fantastic business. It's been described as being the last trade show standing this fall, but that's not really true. There's all kinds of events going on here, there, and everywhere.  Dave Labuskes: Yeah. There's a lot that's described that isn't necessarily really true, David. But yeah there's events and trade shows happening every day, all around the world, and I'm actually a little confused. For an industry that is really based on overcoming challenges and doing the impossible and making things happen that nobody believed could actually happen, there is that sort of a sentiment that trade shows can't take place right now and that just simply is not true. They're taking place every day.  So I have mixed opinions personally. I was supposed to be doing a mixer down at InfoComm and decided not to do that, and that wasn't really so much about I don't think InfoComm should even happen or anything else, it was just as simply a fact of, I didn't quite see how a cocktail party, where everybody was wearing a mask and being asked to stand six feet apart would work terribly well and the optics were weird.  It's one of those things where I could see a trade show happening, but I didn't see that happening well, and we don't need to get into all of that. I'm curious more about whether or not you're enjoying all the armchair opinions from people who say what you should be doing, but have never actually run a tradeshow?  Dave Labuskes: Before I had this job, I was a partner at a large architectural engineering firm, and one of the gentlemen that was on the search committee that was interviewing me for this job, James Ford, owner of Ford AV and I'll never forget where he was sitting in the boardroom, he leaned forward and said, “Dave, you've got a really good gig, like why would you want this job?” And I'm like that's a great question, and I try to answer it, and he's like, “But Dave, here's the thing: You're running one of the largest consulting practices in the world and if you have a management meeting and you decide to go liveleft, then everybody's going to leave that meeting and they're going to go left, and the jobs that you're interviewing for you and your team are going to decide to go left, and then 50,000 people are going to tell you, you should go right!” I actually celebrate varied opinions. I do think a lot of people express an expertise that is perhaps inflated in their own perception. Trade shows, they're a complicated industry. I've been doing this now for eight years and I have people on my team that have forgotten twice what I'll ever know. The interplay between the various different constraints, the challenges that people throw out there as though they're simple challenges. Yeah, they're a little frustrating, but I signed up for it. Nobody made me do this job. I was forewarned, so maybe I'm the one that has an exaggerated impression of my expertise. Is part of the problem just simply that it's Florida and Florida is this eternally weird place at the best of times, but it's got a particular problem and people all the way up to the governor of the state who don't seem to recognize that, “Hey, maybe there's a bit of a problem happening here.”? Dave Labuskes: Yeah. I think I'll be a little more politically correct than that, and it was nice for you to try it, but it isn't my first rodeo here.  (Laughter) I wasn't trying to bait you. I just think that's a big part of it and the people, the armchair opinion makers who say why don't you just move it or why didn't you just do it in another city? There's a little bit of baggage associated with doing that but just simply speaking, it's a part of the country that has a particular exacerbated problem, but doesn't seem to want to recognize that it has an exacerbated problem. Dave Labuskes: It all comes from the jurisdictions and it all comes down to point of reference, right? You can also just say, is it the problem that the event is in the United States, right? Because if you look at the United States and compare the United States to other countries, we're not necessarily getting a straight-A report card. What I have said, and I know we don't want to have the same conversation I've had already with others, is that I don't think the brush that should be used in making that decision is Florida. I think the brush that we should use in painting that picture is Orange County. There's parts of California that may or may not be behaving in the same fashion you or I would do. So I think you have to look at where are you going to fly into, where you're going to be, where are you going to have dinner, where are you going to sleep? Those types of things, and when you get to that stage orange county this morning had 79.4% of their population over the age 18 having had one shot of the vaccine. They've got a mask order that was issued by the mayor strongly recommending that masks be worn inside any public space. They've got plummeting hospitalization rates, death rates, positivity rates at 12.4%, I believe.  So, I think, unfortunately the world and this country and all of the states have this polarization thing going on, and yeah, would it be more comfortable for people to attend an event somewhere else that are looking from afar and don't take time to do all that research? Probably. The headline, the abbreviated picture, is challenging, but I do think that there are people that are going to make a decision that attending a trade show weighed against other factors just isn't for them this year, and I think they'd make that decision regardless of where it is.  Yeah. I guess that's the other thing that you didn't know you were signing up for was having an extensive ability to talk in genealogical terms. Dave Labuskes: This is a true story, David. Last year, I came home from the office, and at dinner I said to my wife and son I spent an hour today reading a scientific study about the efficacy of washing your hands with cold water versus hot water, and that is not something I ever anticipated taking place in my career, I will admit that. (Laughter) By the way, it is just as good. You just don't tend to wash them as long because it's less comfortable, but...  I'm just impressed I was able to say epidemiology.  Dave Labuskes: Happy with that. These are words that were not part of our vocabulary two years ago, right?  Just drafting off of some of that: CEDIA which AVIXA has a relationship with because you co-own ISC had their event last week or the week before in Indianapolis and I won't go into how that went business-wise or anything else, but I'm curious if you had AVIXA folks there and did they see how things were done? I know they had signage and kind of cues on whether you are comfortable with people coming close and all that sort of stuff. Did those things work?  Were there things that you learned from that you can take away and apply to InfoComm?  Dave Labuskes: First part of the question: No, we didn't have anybody from AVIXA at that event that I'm aware of. Not that I know of, but I'm sure there were people there that were AVIXA members. We do have a close relationship with CEDIA. Obviously we have a partnership over a very large joint venture that owns and operates ISC and ISR and DSS. The show itself is owned by Emerald Expositions, and we have our conversational talking relationship with Emerald as well. In fact I have a call next week with Emerald to talk through lessons learned.  I was in Louisville, Kentucky a couple of weeks ago at a SISO conference, which is the Society of Independent Show Operators. So it's Emerald, Informa, and mostly the for-profit trade show organizers and AVIXA was invited to attend. The industry of trade show organizers and meeting planners and event planners, we've joined arms and we recognize that this is a problem for all of us that we have to share best practices with, we have to share learnings with, we have to talk about what works and doesn't work. It's kinda like the AV industry and as I'm learning more about it, the digital signage industry where people compete, but they also have a comradery where a rising tide lifts all ships kind of a thing, and so I think all trade show operators are working through this, associations as well are famously collaborating with regards to sharing information and learning and helping each other. So that's a good part of the pandemic.  I would imagine one of the things that all these organizations collectively learned, if they didn't already know it, is that the whole virtual trade show thing just really doesn't work. Does it? Dave Labuskes: It certainly didn't work in v1.0 of 2020. I think v1.5, and we're starting to get closer to 2.0, I think there's hope for it. The best visual I saw over the last 18 months is talking about books versus movies, and you don't convert a book to a movie by putting it on a podium and filming somebody turning the pages. And I think that probably is a closely apt description of what we all did with our first version of the virtual events. But I think you can tell a story, very effectively in print or in film, leveraging and celebrating the differences of the media.  Where I am at now and where AVIXA is driving towards, and you'll see more developments about this in the next couple months is more about how AVIXA delivers on its mission, leveraging physical  events and digital platforms, and how do they interface and interact with each other? How do they mutually benefit each other? What's good in one, that's not good in the other? Not a lot of good, special effects when you're reading a book, but a lot of great imagination when you're reading a book. Not a lot of ability to be character development through introspection in a movie, but it's really easy to do that when you're reading. I think if you look at education, you look at delivery of information from provider to consumer, that can be done pretty effectively digitally. I think about human interaction and the break time during class is almost impossible to create digitally. That doesn't mean it is impossible. So I see a lot of assumptions that we made in order to achieve X, we needed to convene people face-to-face being challenged. But I also think that all of the pundits that got online in March and April of last year and said, this is the end of face-to-face, and we're going to be digital for the rest of our lives, have seen that they were probably not right with that either.  I think the one thing that I took away, or what I have enjoyed about these virtual events is the ability to attend round tables panels presentations on demand. So I don't need to be somewhere or sit at a certain place, set aside things then at 10:00 AM, I'm going to watch this. Just the simple fact that I got stuff going on. I can't do this today or right now, that I could click on it and see. Yeah, somebody from Brand X explaining this to me on my terms, and if I'm bored, I just click out, I don't have to stand up and walk out of the room and embarrass the presenter or anything like that. That part I like. Dave Labuskes: I do too, and that's the irony of it is. If one of the things that all of us like is the absence of time and geography constraints, right? So it doesn't matter if that panel discussions take place in London or Nova Scotia or Orlando, you can still receive the outcome of that panel.  Why are we saying that they should be organized and delivered between 9:00 AM and 4:00 PM Eastern time on Tuesday and Wednesday of next week? That's where I get to this. I think it's more about a digital presence and digital community, a place where people interact when it's appropriate for them to interact, where they can organize their interaction times. I'm old enough to have been in chat rooms on Prodigy and AOL and you remember you would organize with people like I'm going to be on at eight o'clock tonight for an hour, because you can only afford an hour. Because we were charged by the minute, and then I think that's what we have to recognize. So in that regard, I'm really excited about the fact that I'm not a trade show organizer, instead I'm an association that is committed to an industry and an industry community, and what I can do is build that community both digitally and physically.  What do you think of the suggestion that the days of the big macro show are cloudy and that regionalized events make more sense, so an InfoComm Southwest, an ISE UK, that sort of thing? And granted that was tried a little bit in the past year, but that was out of necessity as opposed to design.  Dave Labuskes: Yeah, I'm intrigued by it. But I think the loudest proponents of it are the attendees, not the exhibitors and the attendees don't pay. Doing ten small shows only costs a little less than doing one big show or less than doing then ten times doing one big show. The cost of doing a show has a fixed amount. Even in the smallest show, you're going to pay an X and then get to the big show, you may only be paying 2X where if you're doing a regional show, like 10 times, you are close to 10X, and your ROI on each of those events is smaller because your audience is small.  Now that's using all the old rules. So if we go back to the last question, if I can segment an audience for an exhibitor and say, I'm going to bring people that have spending authority over half a million dollars that have a project next three months, it's going to require a high-end audio system. That's going to change that algebra, and so I don't think you throw it out the window, but economics has a factor in these things and it's easy to say I would rather go to a small event in Nashville, but the problem is I have to find somebody to pay for it, and even if you say I'm happier to go to a small event in Nashville, I bet you don't want to spend $195 for a ticket to go to that event?  I get the hunger for it. I get the desire for it, but I don't see a business model around it right now. We've never been successful at small events being profitable. There have been good strategies like, before ISE launched. We did small roadshow events from country to country, it was before my time, but I hear stories from the old timers about the amazing sort of experience of going from hotel room or hotel conference to hotel conference across from Warsaw to Budapest to Rome type thing. And we've done them in advance of launching our Bangkok show. We did it in advance of launching our Mumbai show, but those become feeders to a larger event that has a more sustainable business model. We did a lot of what we used to call round tables, for example, we did the AVIXA round table in Baltimore where you'd have 15, 20, maybe 30 people come to them, and so you were spending a lot of money on an event that served 15, 20 or 30 people, and we just felt like there were better ways of spending the industry's money than that.  The demise of Digital Signage Expo certainly raised the eyebrows at AVIXA and got you guys thinking, although you've always had digital signage as a component, you've had pavilions for many years, but there was an opportunity and a sense that something needed to fill that void. Granted, it's been refilled to some degree since then, but the show hasn't happened yet so we'll see how that comes off.  How do you build up the digital signage affinity for InfoComm? Cause I've gone for many years, but I go to have a look at the gear. I'm not a gear head, but I write about it and everything else, but I don't really see it as an end-user show where a big retailer, those kinds of people are going to come to that they maybe they send their gearheads, but more likely it's the integrators that sell into big retail and so on are there are there, so how do you make all that kind of come together over the next couple of years? Dave Labuskes: Boy, there's so much in that question, David. We should talk more often, I enjoy this. Yes, it is an unfortunate demise and it didn't get folks in the AVIXA thinking. Yes, we've been looking at the digital signage industry for a long time. I do think it's a community within the larger industry that needs to be celebrated, and that's that other point with regards to small regional shows versus big shows. I think we see lots more shows within shows taking place, and I think that's probably the right solution, and I'm biased. I think AVIXA has the right place to build a home within a home for the digital signage community.  First of all: there was this interesting dynamic between the association and the show operator, right? From an association perspective AVIXA has been having conversations with DSF, with DS-LATAM, with digital signage of Asia, and the various different entities in Europe. When you move from our association to association, one of the ways I think I actually described it to Rich Ventura, he and I were talking probably years ago and it's like you and I, David, are best friends, but our dads owns the competing gas stations on the corner, and so we can go to school and everything and be friends there but when we came home there's limits.  That was kinda how I felt like it was and I felt like there's a window there to not have that dynamic. Now, some of that's changed and I respect Questex. I respect Paul and don't know him well, but I know him and I've had conversations with him and he's a smart guy and I believe he's committed to delivering a successful event. I think it's being honest, looking at what does an organization want, what is the community best one? And making honest agreements and commitments to each other, and then keeping them. There are advantages to working together, and I think the end goal is that “home within a home” and “a community within a community.”  I think the challenge and opportunity for digital signage and InfoComm is the scale of the InfoComm show and the specificity and the heart and relationship with the digital signage community, and I think if we work together, we can build that home within a home. I think it can be more than a guest room. It can be an in-law apartment. It can be a place where it's identified and that's, yeah, I'm disappointed that you're not going to be there, and I know the mixture is just one manifestation of that home within a home, and we look forward to being able to do it in the future.  Absolutely. One of the logistical problems or mechanical problems, so to speak, with a big show like an InfoComm is: yes, you've created these pavilions through the years of digital signage pavilion and some of the vendors have been in that, designated zone, so to speak, but the biggest players are the display manufacturers, and they've always had their spots, their Primo spots, and they're serving a whole bunch of audiences at InfoComm, not just the digital signage people. So how do you figure out a way to create a show within a show when you've got Sony in the front row, Samsung's got a giant booth in the middle of the hall and so on. You're never going to be able to herd them all into one hall, so to speak?  Dave Labuskes: Yeah, so what do you do then? I think what you have to do and we're down to the details of tactics, right? But I think you start to curate attendees' journeys. You use content as the honey to attract and people will come where content is and content can be delivered where people are, and that's the challenge of starting a trade show, but we've done that. We know how to form a trade show and it takes time and it takes continual feeding until it becomes a self-feeding cycle, and then you have to create a journey that is guided a bit so the attendees that are coming from retail or the attendees that are coming from the advertising agencies can get to where they will be able to extract value and some of that will require tour guides, not maps and serendipity, because it's too big to just let somebody lose, but we have that problem now with end users in general at the show, you described as gearheads, but about 40% of the attendees at a typical InfoComm are end user buyers. It's part of what makes that show so valuable to exhibitors.  A lot of them are brought there by channel members. The consultants are bringing their customers, the integrators are bringing their customers. But a lot of them are brought there by us too, with promoting them and developing conference content that would be of interest to them, creating a nucleus of community. It's all very explicit, but it doesn't happen by chance. There are hosted buyers that are brought in to shows around the world. There are groups that are sponsored. There are other associations that are partnered with. Richard runs our Asian subsidiary. He's a genius at identifying influential associations within the geographies and partnering with them to offer programs. Organizations like the Indian Architects Association are partnered with our InfoComm Mumbai event, and they are holding content conferences for architects in conjunction with our event. All of our channels want architects at it. Those types of strategies are part of the town and the team that works on these. Last question, looking ahead a few months to ISE and it's hard to do the crystal ball thing, but I gather things are calmer in Spain. I don't hear very many people at all saying, hell no, we're not going to Barcelona or anything else, maybe that'll bubble up, who knows? But is ISC in Barcelona going to be normal-ish? Dave Labuskes: Yes, I think so. Again, like you said, the crystal balls are not crystal clear and now, after the last series of conversations, I think I'm going to put the crystal ball into the same place where I put “pivot” and “agile” and “unprecedented” but yeah, the biggest indicator that you would have about and event like ISC at this stage five months out is sold show floor space, right?  I don't think we've even opened registration for attendees yet, and show floor sales are, I think they're probably about 8% off of 2020. I guess there's no such thing as quoting me because we're recording this, but it's within that ballpark of the size of the last event at the Rye, which is, really the last event to compare it to. So if it's 90% of that size, 80% of that size, I think that's, that absolutely fits into your technical definition of normal.  And there were lots of people who said, because you're going to Barcelona, as awesome a place as it is, it may mean you see a slight drop because people who might go to ISC in Amsterdam, because they can drive there, maybe would not go all the way to Barcelona?  Dave Labuskes: Yeah, but there's other people that are going to drive to Barcelona that wouldn't have driven to Amsterdam. And yeah not a hundred percent a repeat audience, but… Well, I'm not driving to Barcelona.  Dave Labuskes: Yeah, me neither. (Laughter) That's those armchair spectators that you talked about earlier, right? We did the homework to make a determination about that, and we love the Rye. We would love to have stayed at the Rye, but the Rye isn't big enough to hold the show as it was moving forward in the future and it was starting to have a negative impact on attendee experience and you start to have those different factors impact a show and reach the value of the show.  I'll just be happy if I can find my way around.  Dave Labuskes: Yeah, it's a beautiful city. I'll tell you what it's like. It's the opposite of the Rye. It was one of the things I joked with Mike about. Finally I figured out how to get through the Eye without getting lost, and now we've decided to move the show.  Yeah, me too.  All right. I appreciate you taking some time with me. I suspect you're a busy fellow these days. Dave Labuskes: Never too busy for you, sir. Congratulations on your recent deal. I'm really happy for you.  Thank you!

The Chet Buchanan Show
9/20/21 Good Feeling Stories of the Day!

The Chet Buchanan Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 2:35


Marines leap into action to help a sinking motorist, 23 year old from Mumbai is recycling pollution, AND a couple from Cincinnati adopts two sets of twins to "spread the love."  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Frosty, Heidi and Frank Podcast
Heidi and Frank - 09/20/21

Frosty, Heidi and Frank Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2021


Topics discussed on today's show: Frank's Emmy Voice, NFL Week 2, Pacquiao for Presidents, Notre Dame Rebuild, SpaceX Landing, Booster Shots 65+, Black Holes, The Stock Market, Boeing Criminal Charges, Sears Last Store, Beto O'Rouke for Gov, Birthdays, News of the Day, Florida Or Anywhere Else, Do you have adopted kids you hate?, Pollution Bricks in Mumbai, Zebras in Wisconsin, 20 in 21, Going above and beyond for job - then fired, Pringles Flavors, Studio Session: Nelly Furtado - I'm Like A Bird, Fears, Booze News, and Apologies.

The Documentary Podcast
Coronavirus: Vaccinations and hospitals

The Documentary Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 18, 2021 24:42


The United States continues to record some of the highest infection and death rates in the world due to Covid-19. Host Nuala McGovern brings together two hospital nurses in Florida. They share the heartbreak and exhaustion of treating severely ill and dying patients, often young, who they say could have avoided hospital completely by getting vaccinated. Two doctors working in Delhi and Mumbai, say vaccination numbers are soaring. But they worry that festivals and other celebrations may lead to another surge of the disease. They are also concerned the real legacy of coronavirus in India may be its impact on mental health and the education of children in poorer communities. We also hear from teachers in India and the Philippines.

Book Dreams
Ep. 71 - “We Were Outsiders. Now We're Not. What Do We Do With That?” with Sanjena Sathian

Book Dreams

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2021 34:21


What does it say about the American Dream if immigrants achieve financial success but their children, and their children's children, still experience a lack of belonging? What does it mean to be part of groups that are both privileged and treated as outsiders? What are the flaws in the stories we tell ourselves about our parents' generation, and what are their consequences? What are the forces, internal and external, that shape our ambition? And when might ambition become our downfall? This week on Book Dreams, Sanjena Sathian--using the particular stories of two Indian American families in her debut novel Gold Diggers to access a universal story--shares thoughts on these questions and more. Sanjena Sathian is a graduate of the Iowa Writers' Workshop, an alumna of the Clarion Writers' Workshop and a former Paul & Daisy Soros Fellow. She's worked as a journalist in San Francisco and in Mumbai, and she has written nonfiction for The New Yorker, The New York Times, The Washington Post, Vox, Time, Food & Wine, and more. Her award-winning short fiction appears in Conjunctions, Boulevard, Joyland, Salt Hill, and The Masters Review. Booksellers named Gold Diggers an “Indie Next” pick, and Mindy Kaling's production company is adapting it for a TV series, with Sanjena co-writing the adaptation and Mindy Kaling herself set to executive produce. Find us on Twitter (@bookdreamspod) and Instagram (@bookdreamspodcast), or email us at contact@bookdreamspodcast.com. We encourage you to visit our website and sign up for our newsletter for information about our episodes, guests, and more. Book Dreams is a part of Lit Hub Radio and the Podglomerate network, a company that produces, distributes, and monetizes podcasts. For more information on how The Podglomerate treats data, please see our Privacy Policy. Since you're listening to Book Dreams, we'd like to suggest you also try other Podglomerate shows about literature, writing, and storytelling like Storybound and The History of Literature. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Newsy Jacuzzi
Kid News This Week: India's festive season, “fan-plastic” food wrap, tennis wonder, Ig Nobel prizes

Newsy Jacuzzi

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2021 21:06


Policy Punchline
Tiger's Last Interview - Prema Gauranga Das: Satsang on the Ganges and the Pursuit of Absolute Truth

Policy Punchline

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2021 156:44


This interview marks my last interview as the host of Policy Punchline. I will soon release another recording giving you an update about Policy Punchline's future, but for now I just want to present to you the following conversation with Prema Gauranga Das. Over the last three years with Policy Punchline, I've interviewed more than 150 guests, mostly public intellectuals, policy makers, journalists, investors… but this is my only interview with a monk – a Hindu monk. Premji has been a resident monk at Sri Sri Radha Gopinath Temple in Mumbai with the International Society for Krishna Consciousness (also known as ISKCON) for the last 20 years. Like many of his peers, Premji completed his Bachelors degree in engineering from the University of Pune, a top university in India, and subsequently had a 4-year stint at India's largest auto manufacturing company. But he quit his job to become a monk and to explore a more fulfilling and purposeful lifestyle, after being inspired by the teachings of His Divine Grace A.C. Bhaktivedanta Swami Prabhupada, and His Holiness Radhanath Swami. Currently he is one of the research and implementation leads for ISKCON's flagship project, the Temple of Vedic Planetarium, and is compiling his research on the Bhagavata Cosmology. I conducted the interview in the winter of 2019, right before Covid hit the world. I went on a yoga and meditation trip to India with Princeton University's Office of Religion Life, led by two fantastic mentors, Vineet and Angela, with a group of 15 students. We traveled for a month during Christmas vacation, visiting yoga institutes, temples, ashrams, and cultural sites. We were accompanied by Premji, who helped plan our trip and guide us through the country, and through many conversations he gradually became an important mentor. I was truly fortunate to have met Premji. He answered my questions on the Hindu faith, life, and my confusion about my own path forward. He was almost like a beacon of light, using simple principles to help me reason through some of the most difficult philosophical and religious questions that had puzzled me over the years: - Should we be pessimistic in light of the world's unending sufferings? - Have we made progress as a humanity? - How flexible can one be with their spiritual and religious faiths? - What does it mean to be guided by God? Does one have to be guided by God or some form of greater power? - How do we control our desires? What does it mean to be happy? - What is one's destiny and how do we discover our true calling? … Premji and I recorded this conversation towards the end of my trip. We were in Rishikesh, a city on the Ganges river and home to the famous Beatles Ashram. Overseeing sunset on the foothills of the Himalayas, we sat along the Ganges river and chatted for three hours. Hence we named the episode “Satsang on the Ganges,” where the word “Satsang” refers to the idea of group discussions or informal gatherings in hope to better understand the Vedic philosophy –– or, in essence, together pursuing the Absolute Truth. It's never my goal to try to change people's lives via this podcast –– that would be too condescending to think that I should do that –– but I would be honored if the following interview could open a small window for you to explore some of these ideas. You may reach out to Premji by emailing him at prem.gauranga.rns@gmail.com. You may learn more about ISKCON via https://www.iskcon.org/ and https://iskconchowpatty.com/.

People I (Mostly) Admire
44. Edward Glaeser Explains Why Some Cities Thrive While Others Fade Away

People I (Mostly) Admire

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 11, 2021 46:09


An expert on urban economics and co-author of the new book Survival of the City, Ed says cities have faced far worse than Covid. Steve talks with the Harvard professor about why the slums of Mumbai function so well, high-quality housing in China sits empty, and declining cities hang on for so long.

Bon Appétit Foodcast
What makes us Food People (not Foodies, never Foodies)?

Bon Appétit Foodcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2021 31:51


Tell us you're a food person without TELLING us you're a food person. We'll go first. On this week's show, BA staffers divulge the single moments, winding paths, and everyday habits that make us food people. Associate food editor Rachel Gurjar walks us through how she went from living with her parents in Mumbai to landing her dream job at BA. Contributor DeVonn Francis tells us why, for him, being a food person means caring about far more than what's on the plate. Tune in to hear their stories, and to find out who on the BA staff drinks milkshakes for breakfast, and who lies in bed counting cheeseburgers instead of sheep. Stuff we talk about in this episode: Rachel Gurjar's website: https://www.rachelgurjar.com/ Rachel's Grilled Chicken Breasts With Tadka-ish Sauce Recipe: https://www.bonappetit.com/recipe/grilled-chicken-breasts-with-tadka-sauce DeVonn's Jerk Chicken Recipe: https://www.bonappetit.com/video/watch/from-the-home-kitchen-devonn-makes-jerk-chicken DeVonn's Yardy World website: https://www.yardy.nyc/ Rachel's Peach Aperol Spritz Recipe: https://www.bonappetit.com/recipe/peach-aperol-spritz Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices