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Largest country in South America

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The John Batchelor Show
1789: Mark Piesing, #UNBOUND,Arctic exploration, the complete, forty-minute interview; August 28, 2021

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2021 41:00


Photo:  THE AIRSHIP ITALIA: A MYSTERY AT THE END OF THE GOLDEN AGE OF POLAR EXPLORATION Mark Piesing, #UNBOUND,Arctic exploration, the complete, forty-minute interview; August 28, 2021 CBS Eye on the World with John Batchelor CBS Audio Network @Batchelorshow   N-4 Down: The Hunt for the Arctic Airship Italia, by Mark Piesing.  PorterSqBooks.  Hardcover – August 31, 2021    "GRIPPING. . . . One of the greatest polar rescue efforts ever mounted." —Wall Street Journal The riveting, true story of the largest polar rescue mission in history: the desperate race to find the survivors of the glamourous Arctic airship Italia, which crashed near the North Pole in 1928.              Triumphantly returning from the North Pole on May 24, 1928, the world-famous exploring airship Italia—code-named N-4—was struck by a terrible storm and crashed somewhere over the Arctic ice, triggering the largest polar rescue mission in history. Helping lead the search was the famed Norwegian explorer Roald Amundsen, the poles' greatest explorer, who himself soon went missing in the frozen wastes. Amundsen's body has never been found, the last victim of one of the Arctic's most enduring mysteries . . .              During the Roaring Twenties, zeppelin travel embodied the exuberant spirit of the age. Germany's luxurious Graf Zeppelin would run passenger service from Germany to Brazil; Britain's Imperial Airship was launched to connect an empire; in America, the iconic spire of the rising Empire State Building was designed as a docking tower for airships.              But the novel mode of transport offered something else, too: a new frontier of exploration. Whereas previous Arctic and Antarctic explorers had subjected themselves to horrific—often deadly—conditions in their attempts to reach uncharted lands, airships held out the possibility of speedily soaring over the hazards. In 1926, Roald Amundsen—the first man to reach the South Pole—partnered with the Italian airship designer General Umberto Nobile to pioneer flight over the North Pole. As Mark Piesing uncovers in this masterful account, while that mission was thought of as a great success, it was in fact riddled with near disasters and political pitfalls.              In May 1928, his relationship with Amundsen corroded beyond the point of collaboration. Nobile, his dog, and a crew of fourteen Italians, one Swede, and one Czech, set off on their own in the airship Italia to discover new lands in the Arctic Circle and to become the first airship to land men on the pole. But near the North Pole they hit a terrible storm and crashed onto the ice. Six crew members were never seen again; the injured (including Nobile) took refuge on ice floes, unprepared for the wretched conditions and with little hope for survival.              Coincidentally, in Oslo a gathering of famous Arctic explorers had assembled for a celebration of the first successful flight from Alaska to Norway. Hearing of the accident, Amundsen set off on his own desperate attempt to find Nobile and his men. As the weeks passed and the largest international polar rescue expedition mobilized, the survivors engaged in a last-ditch struggle against weather, polar bears, and despair. When they were spotted at last, the search plane landed—but the pilot announced that there was room for only one passenger. . . .              Braiding together the gripping accounts of the survivors and their heroic rescuers, N-4 Down tells the unforgettable true story of what happened when the glamour and restless daring of the zeppelin age collided with the harsh reality of Earth's extremes. https://www.amazon.com/N-4-Down-Arctic-Airship-Italia/dp/0062851527  

From Our Own Correspondent Podcast
Eric Zemmour: France's new right wing contender

From Our Own Correspondent Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 23, 2021 28:33


The French political scene has a new kid on the block, or one might say, a new veteran. Eric Zemmour is his name, not one familiar in the UK, but Zemmour has long been well known in his own country as a right-wing television presenter. His controversial pronouncements on race, religion and immigration have in the past got him into legal trouble, but now he appears to be flirting with the idea of standing to be president. Until now, the French far-right scene has been dominated by one political party – indeed you might say, by one family. The Front National was founded nearly fifty years ago by Jean-Marie Le Pen. His daughter Marine then took over its leadership, though she changed the party's name to “National Rally.” Ms Le Pen had been seen as a serious challenger for the French presidency, in elections to be held next year. Yet some think she's now being eclipsed by Mr Zemmour. Lucy Williamson went to see him in action: It looks like Joseph Biden will not be allowed to forget the way US troops departed from Afghanistan, leaving the country to fall quickly into Taliban hands again. Rightly or wrongly, it's likely to be a millstone round the president's neck, should Mr Biden seek re-election in three years' time. That is a very different state of affairs to the way Afghanistan is talked about in Russia these days, or rather not talked about. Military parades there tend to focus on the Soviet Union's victory in World War Two, while some politicians like to boast about more a more recent conflict, Russia's invasion and occupation of Crimea in 2014. Far less is said about how Soviet tanks rolled into Afghanistan in 1979, only for troops to pull out a decade later, defeated and demoralised. And this silence has proved hard for those Russians who served in Afghanistan, or who lost friends and family there. Now, a new exhibition is allowing veterans of the conflict to express through art the trauma they suffered. Francis Scarr went along to see it: As a health correspondent for the BBC, Tulip Mazumdar has reported on medical problems around the world, and one she has seen plenty of is women suffering miscarriages. It is a loss whose seriousness is often not recognised, with many women suffering a form of grief every bit as serious as when a living person dies. And it's a common problem too; in the UK, it has been estimated that a quarter of pregnancies are lost. However, knowing all this, and having reported on it for many years, could not have prepared Tulip for the many miscarriages she herself went on to suffer, and which she frankly admits, she is still struggling to come to terms with. People do sometimes hold funerals for babies who are miscarried or still-born. But whether for a child or an adult, funerals serve many purposes: they allow people to express publicly their grief, in the company of friends and families who are there to support them. They may be an opportunity to look back on the life of the person who died, and to recall what they meant to those who knew them. What you do not expect is for funerals to provide the chance for a quick buck to be made, and yet that's exactly what happens in parts of eastern Nigeria. And it's not just funerals, weddings too may be targeted by extortionists, unwilling to allow the proceedings to go ahead, unless they are paid off. It is something Olivia Ndubuisi has seen for herself: We all need a break now and then, and that might involve a holiday. But is that something you would grant to prisoners? That is exactly what happens in parts of Brazil, where occupants of the country's jails are given occasional home leave. You might think this sounds absurdly indulgent, the sign of a country that has gone soft on those who break the law. In fact, Brazil's prisons are notoriously harsh, with assault and murder common. The actual purpose of giving prisoners a break from their sentence is to encourage them not to end up back there, after they're released, as Andrew Downie discovered. For details of organisations which offer advice and support with pregnancy related issues, go online to bbc.co.uk/actionline.

The Shortwave Radio Audio Archive
Dimtsi Weyane (Tigrinya language, Clandestine): October 21, 2021

The Shortwave Radio Audio Archive

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 23, 2021


Many thanks to SRAA contributor, Carlos Latuff, who shares the following short recording and translation, along with his artwork above:Dimtsi Weyane, 17750 kHz, broadcasting in Tigrinya language to Tigray region in Ethiopia, from Issoudun, France.Region is facing a civil war since November 2020.Signal received at Catacumba Park, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, October 21, 2021, 16h57 (UTC). This recording was translated my Saba Tsen'at Mah'deromt via Twitter:

How To Love Lit Podcast
Shirley Jackson - The Haunting Of Hill House - Episode 1 - MeetThe Author And The Personal Issues That Created One Of The Best Horror Genre Books Of All Time!

How To Love Lit Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 23, 2021 48:20


Shirley Jackson - The Haunting Of Hill House - Episode 1 - MeetThe Author And The Personal Issues That Created One Of The Best Horror Genre Books Of All Time!   `Hi, I'm Christy Shriver and we're here to discuss books that have changed the world and have changed us.    And I'm Garry Shriver and this is the How to Love Lit Podcast.  If you are listening to this in real time, we are well into the month of October and in the United States, the month of October means Halloween.  Halloween, as we've discussed before, is not Christy's favorite holiday.  Christy, why is that?    Because it's horrifying.  It's about death.  It's about being scared.  It's about demons.  I don't understand why we're celebrating these things.      And yet, I have seen you dress up as Wilma Flintstone; answer a door bell to a slew of terrifyingly dressed children, hand out candy and enjoy every minute of it.  For those of you who live in other parts of the world- that is what we do here in the United States on October 31st.  My son, Ben, and his wife Rachel live in a part of Memphis which is particularly serious about Halloween, so we, if we can, love to go down there on Halloween and get in on the party.      That's true- and it is wild. They have a neighbor whose yard literally looks like the set of a horror movie with graves, and ghosts and witches and everything.  It spooks me, but on the other hand,  I do love dressing up, and I love seeing all the kids dress up.  That part I'm cool with.    And yet, here we are reading a classic work described as Female Gothic or horror fiction- the work of the celebrated Shirley Jackson, perhaps her most famous novel The Haunting of Hill House.      True.  But I will say that Literary Horror is slightly different than Nightmare on Elm street.  Here's a little story about myself, so I had never watched a horror movie growing up.  My mother didn't allow it in our home, and back then these movies were rated R and the people at movie theaters really policed that sort of thing- so if you were a young child, obviously you could watch a rated R movie, but they didn't make it easy for you.  Well, anyway, when I was a sophomore in high school, this little school that I attended at the time took an overnight trip out of town to hike up this mountain, Pico da Bandeira.   After the hike, somebody pulled out the VHS of this move and we were going to watch it (I'm pretty sure it was a bootleg).  Anyway, I was so excited- most everyone in Brazil loves horror movies and Nightmare on Elmstreet was one of the most populat at the time.       Well, how did that go for you?    Not well, I'm not sure I got through 15 minutes.  I spent the rest of the night under the covers and with my hands in my ears.  I didn't even want to hear it.      HA!!  Well, what I find fascinating about Literary fiction is that it's scary for all kinds of different reasons, not the idea of someone jumping out and stabbing an unsuspecting girl.      Exactly. It's not some obvious caricature of a gore covered mummy walking around with a hatchet that defines it.  It's metaphorical; it's about the cost of seduction; it's about psychological disorders and it's very much about anxiety.      Well, you know I love it when we get psychological.  One thing I found interesting, and this is coming from the perspective that we just did an entire series kind of around women's issue with A Doll's House, but I expected Shirley Jackson's work to be more feminist than it is.  Also, the book has all this mother/daughter stuff in it.  I wasn't expecting that.    Yes- it very much has everything to do with mother/daughter relationships.  That motif starts on the first page and never lets up.  I got tired of counting mother references, and I never found an article that did the math, but there are reference to mothers endlessly- and something that drew my immediate attention- especially the first time Eleanor wakes up terrified in the middle the night yelling for her mother.  But that is just one way of looking at the book- although that's a great place to start and where we will start our discussion today as we attempt to make it all the way through chapter 1 of the book.    But in a more general sense, what Jackson was looking at was this imbalance of power that can exist in relationships between any two people.  She wants to express the seduction and betrayal of the powerless by the powerful. She expresses how one person uses the power in the relationship basically to crush another person.  And unfortunately, she understood this problem so well because it was her entire life story.  She had that experience with her mother, and then she turned around and had it again with her husband, and really she had it within the community at large of the 1950s.      And, of course, being written in the 1950s, many women of her generation quickly related to it.  In fact, in some ways, it reminds me a little bit of that very famous work by Betty Friedan, The Feminine Mystique, that became so important in American history but wasn't even going to be written for another ten years.    Yeah, I've heard of that book, but honestly, I don't know much about it.  What is the premise and why does it connect, in your mind to Shirley Jackson.    Well, I'll be upfront and tell you I have never read the book, so I'm speaking from second hand knowledge.  But, what I know about it from teaching and studying history is the impact it had on American culture because of the power of the argument Friedan makes in the book.     First of all I would like to point out she's interviewing women that attended Smith College, which is a very well to do private school in Massachusetts.  survey sample was not very scientific     Friedan, at her 15th college reunion, took a survey from her fellow colleagues, about how they felt about their lives.  The basic premise of her book is that society had created a myth that women were most fulfilled if they were taking care of children, staying at home,  supporting their husbands, and staying away from politics and business.  In the book, she claims that entire worldview for women is a myth- at least for many women.  I will never assume to speak for women and I certainly won't speak for all women.  But Friedan will, and she went after the 1950s stereotypical Leave it To Beaver kind of mom that had been the socially accepted lifestyle.  She said many women were absolutely miserable.  She claimed that society's pressure on women for women to succumb to what amounted to in many cases mindnumbing non-stimulating existences was causing depression.  She famously said it was a “problem that has no name”.   And whether you want to challenge her or agree with her, you have to respect that her idea absolutely resonated across America and really the entire world.  Her book was a best seller, selling over 3 million in her lifetime and has been translated into at least a dozen major languages around the world.  Many textbooks credit Friedan for sparking the second wave of feminism that was a key feature of the 60s, the kind of thing we see portrayed in movies like Forrest Gump in the character of Jenny.  This women's rights movement was not interested in voting rights; it was moving forward to the next level.  It was pushing for workplace equality, birth control, abortion rights, breaking the glass ceiling in academia and business.  Where I see it aligning with Jackson, who came much earlier, is that this book, The Haunting of Hill House is a metaphorical expression of everything Friedan wanted to say about women in the 1960s- the house is haunted, so to speak.  The house was crushing women.  It was making women crazy.     Well, you're starting to steal a little bit of my thunder –next week we are going to spend almost the entire episode discussing the house itself, but you are dead on about what Jackson is doing in her work…pardon the pun.  But, I want to say before all the men moan and groan and say, I'm turning this off if this is going to be another one of those feminist books- the book really is much more than a political commentary- in fact that's just one way of relating to it.  The metaphor most definitely can be read exactly as you have connected to the femininist movement of the 1960s, and many many people have read it just that way, but I'm not sure Jackson herself really did, although there's no doubt she was an advocate for many of the things you just enumerated. She, like Ibsen, would say her work is art and not a piece of political propaganda.  She would also likely claim, and I know I'm being presumptuous to speak for her, but I do think she would claim, that would be a very small way to understand her body of work, if that's all you thought it was. She was writing the emotions and then the reader found themselves in them.     I was also interested to see that Jackson, very much like Elizabeth Barrett Browning struggled fighting critics over the years.  Stanley Hyman, her husband and literary critic during their lives, in the preface for a book he published of her yet unpublished work after her death famously wrote, “For all her popularity, Shirley Jackson won surprisingly little recognition.  She received no awards or prizes, grants or fellowships; her name was often omitted from lists on which it clearly belonged, or which it should have led.  She saw these honors go to inferior writers.”    True, and Hyman, although I have trouble giving him credit for anything because of his and Shirley's relationship which we'll talk about in a different episode, but he predicted that Jackson's “powerful visions of suffering and inhumanity” and would be found “increasingly significant and meaningful.”  He truly always understood that her long form or serious work was more than pop fiction, or gory horror, and yet that was not the majority view of that time.    And part of that is somewhat understandable.  One thing I didn't know about her until we started reading up on her for this podcast series was that her acclaim during her day really came from two places- one was for the short story, “The Lottery”, but the other and this is what I didn't know- was her best-selling essay collection on domestic life titled Life Among the Savages.  I haven't read much of that, to be honest, but what I did read is really truly funny stuff stuff.  She was Erma Bombeck before Erma Bombeck.    Yes- and she was funny, and she was writing about her kids, house cleaning, being a mom, a member of a local community and all the craziness of middle-class life.  It was the stuff that people were living in their world, and she made it funny.  People didn't take seriously the psychological insights into issues of emotional isolation, rage, paranoia, and the fragmentation of the human mind- from a person who was a regular contributor to magazines like Good Housekeeping, Mademoiselle, McCall's and Ladies Home Journal.    No, it was just too different, and of course, you can't discount the condescension from the serious art community- I mean here was a woman writing in a genre that nobody took seriously about female protagonists- which was often not taken seriously- and was famous for cute anecdotes about the comedy of errors which is life as a house-mom raising four children in a small town.We must remember also, as a general rule, the 1950s are not that far removed from the time period where women didn't read literature at all- there was a thing called “ladies reading material” That's what women read.  Men read literature, but women writing for women was not elevated enough to actually be called “literature”- it was simply reading material for women.       Oh- well – I guess we shall make that distinction- although I will say, as a woman writing “ladies reading material” for money she did fairly well for herself.  Shirley Jackson made serious cash off of these stories- in fact, she outearned her husband- and it was the essays that were funding their lifestyles, not her novels. Her biographer Ruth Franklin, commented in an interview that she could make  over $2000 per essay which at the time was enough to fun to fund her Morris Minor collection.    Nice- well British Sports cars are always a fun thing to keep around the house.     I'll say.  But back to her legacy for a second, Jackson is like Elizabeth Barrett Browning in that her work, well after her death, found it's way into the canon and today is very much taken seriously.  In fact, we're teaching her right now to all the 11th graders at Bartlett High School, and almost all American students will at some point read  her short story “The Lottery”, the  famous short story that triggered more public outrage  in 1948 than anything published before or since by the magazine the New Yorker.  Hundreds of people cancelled their subscriptions and even more wrote the magazine totally exasperated.      Well, it's political and psychological and really even religious as well.  But back to the 11th graders at Bartlett, do you think your kids will be able to appreciate or enjoy the depth of the psychological analysis in her novel that today is the central hallmark of her work?    Yeah, I think many of them will get it.  I look forward to how they understand what she's talking about.  You know, students today live in such a different world and the ghosts and houses that haunt them look so differently than the ghosts and houses that haunted our generation or much less Shirley Jackson's.     I look forward to discussing some of these issues with them and see what fascinates them the most.      One of the things that fascinates me the most and I'm expecting to come out is Jackson's multiple direct and indirect references to the relationship between mothers and daughters.  It's clear in this book that whatever is going wrong in Eleanor's mind has something to do with her dead mother.  I have two daughters, and I really pray, I am not the kind of mother Shirley Jackson had or that my daughters ever express any of the feelings she expresses about mother/daughter relationships- nothing that would haunt and torment my children after I'm dead.      No, I'm sure none of us want to have that kind of legacy with our children.      And yet, there are women like Geraldine Jackson, Shirley's mother.  Geraldine was truly relentless in her cruelty towards her daughter.  She was cruel to her as a child and her passive aggressive disapproval was something she perpetuated all throughout Shirley's life right to her untimely death at age 48.      Yes and I think understanding Geraldine' cruelty really helps me see some of the things in Jackson's writing that I may have overlooked before.  And I know that an author's life cannot be used uncritically to explain an artist's work; obviously art speaks for itself, but maybe more than any other writer we've read together, Jackson uses her writings to express pain in artistic ways that were personal to her, but universal to many of us.  Geraldine's ruthless subtle and sometimes not so subtle demoralizing was something Jackson could not get out of her mind.  .  Geraldine's own personality disorder took a heavy toll on Shirley.    And it was always expressed with all the best of intentions- she was always so concerned.    Let's tell a little about their story and then people will know what you're talking about.     Okay, well the story starts when  Jackson was born in 1916 (although she lied about her age and claimed to have been born in 1919- which I think is funny), but anyway, she was born into an affluent family and up until she was 16 they lived in Burlingame, California.     Let me interrupt, just for context, Burlingame, to this day is one of the most expensive cities in the United States.  The median house in Burlingame costs over 2 million dollars- and I'm not talking mansions- this is the price range for what would be an average home that would cost a tenth of that in other parts of the US.  Every review on bestplaces.com talks about how unaffordable it is for most people to live in this Burlingame.     Yep, and Geraldine, Shirley's mom and her father Leslie, cultivated that cliché'd vision of the upper class  country club lifestyle.  They were into the production of this very sophisticated appearance of success and wealth, what was important was the appearance of things.   They were into competitive living, and that,  of course, still includes having perfect children.  Shirley's brother, I might add, was beautiful and competitive and made them proud, but unfortunately for Shirley, she was not- and this was just a huge disappointment for Geraldine.  She could not nor did she want to fit the mold.  Shirley was heavier than the other girls.  She didn't enjoy the same kinds of things as the other girls.  She didn't have that “All-American” barbie doll look like the other girls.  She wasn't into the deputante thing, and if she had been wasn't cute enough.    Yes, I read a couple of articles that called Jackson morbidly obese, so I googled images of her, it was true that she was heavier , but, in my mind, she falls way short of the criteria for morbidly obese by today's definition, especially in her youth. And I want to say something else about this 1950's lifestyle we've been discussing. After WW 2 there was a huge economic boom that doubled family incomes in the decade. It was the first decade of widespread middle class wealth. And one sign of that new middle class wealth was the ability to live on one income. Wives staying at home were a sign of wealth and prestige.     Maybe not, but she certainly wasn't the daughter Geraldine wanted nor could be proud of at a deputant ball.  In fact, truth be told, Geraldine was actually disappointed when she found out she was pregnant because she didn't want a child at that time.  But Geraldine's largest problem and obsession was with Shirley's weight- and her obsession with Shirley's weight never ended.  She made comments about her weight- all of the time.  They were gratuitous, just dropped in to remind her that she was fat.   Here are some quotes from a couple of Geraldine's letters to her daughter just to show you what I'm talking about. “Glad you're dieting.” “Excess weight is hard on the heart.” “You should get down to normal weight. Try non-fat milk.”  Even after the publication of what would be Jackson's final novel, Geraldine could be relied on to bring up her weight, “Why oh why do you allow the magazines to print such awful pictures of you?...I have been so sad all morning about what you have allowed yourself to look like.”      Yes, let me read the full quote for context.     If you don't care what you look like or care about your appearance why don't you do something about it for your children's sake— and your husband's. . . . I have been so sad all morning about what you have allowed yourself to look like. . . . You were and I guess still are a very wilful child and one who insisted on her own way in everything— good or bad.    This is a straight up narcissistic rant.     There was always the subtext that was no matter what Shirley did with her life, she could never live up to her mother's expectations- even if she was famous- Jackson wanted acceptance of who she was- but she wanted it on her terms, and she and wanted to prove to her mom that the way she was was a good way, and she could be good at life just by being herself- but that was never going to happen.  In fact, at one low moment, Geraldine actually told her daughter that she was a failed abortion.      Wow.  That is just hateful.  Geraldine wanted a girl in the image of what she wanted, and she was never going to compromise.  This is classically what people call today a “toxic mother”,  And this plays a terrible toll on girls who have toxic mothers.  These behaviors can destroy women's images of themselves.   And this is what seems to have happened with Jackson and her mother.        Let me just back  up and say, it's absolutely natural and healthy for a girl to look up to her mother; a mom is the original ideal of what a woman should be.  That's how we all learn to navigate in this world, and likely a mom and a daughter will have a lot in common for obvious reasons.  There is a lot of joy in that.  There is a special bond in that.  Over the years, though, as a little girl develops into a teenager, although at first she wants to be exactly like her mom, that desire kind of separates out.  In a normal relationship, as a girl transitions into a woman, she individuates.   She becomes her own person.  Some things of her mother she will keep; others she'll discard.  And healthy moms respect and encourage their daughters individuality.  A normal mom will do whatever she can to equip her daughter, make her bolder and stronger.  But as painful as it may be from a mom's perspective, healthy mom's accept daughter's choices- even the ones they think are mistakes.  That's just what they do, and if they end up being mistakes, it's okay.  We all get to live our own lives.  But in Geraldine's life, what Shirley did was a reflection on her, so she couldn't let the fact that her daughter was overweight go.      Well, how do you think she took it when Shirley told her mom she was marrying a Jew in 1940- or I should say that she had already married a Jew, she didn't even tell them she got married until several months later because they were anti-Semitic people,  I can imagine that didn't go well?        No, I'd say it probably didn't, but I really don't know.   I do want to say one other thing, Christy, don't get me wrong, I think it's pretty well-established that motherhood is by definition a lose/lose proposition- moms just can't win.  It's impossible to raise a perfect child, just like it's impossible to be a perfect person, so of course we can't raise a person in the most perfect of emotional environments.      Mom's will unrealistically be blamed for things that may or may not be their fault- the reality is no one can be perfect, we will hurt each other and there will insecurities that spring up because of the way we are raised, and that's kind of normal too- it's normal for dads; it's normal for moms.  But, that is not the same as being a toxic mom.  Geraldine was toxic.  Nothing was ever going to be good enough for Geraldine.  She was perpetually disapproving, and Shirley was never going to meet her standards.  Geraldine was also always very controlling- I read somewhere she made Shirley wear garters and high heels as a little girl.  She was constantly guilt-tripping Shirley.  She constantly made negative comments; she manipulated her emotions, and most of the time she did it passive-aggressively.  She did it under the guise of love.      And that seems to be in one sense what Jackson expresses in her writing- it's at least what lots of people have identified with in Hill House.   There is this sense that Shirley could never get her mom out of her head, and of course, she's not the only one who struggles with these kinds of things.  In Hill House,  the main character is a 32 year old young woman named Eleanor Vance. I want to add that 32 is not a young age.  She's not telling the story of a child and the abuses of a mother on a small child.  Eleanor is a fully grown adult who should be living her own independent life for quite some time.  But she hasn't.  She hasn't even had an opportunity to do so.  Eleanor has no friends and is alone. That's what we're told at the beginning and we will see all the way through to the end of the book when she tells Theo she has never been wanted, it's been how she's felt always.  We're also told Eleanor's mother is dead right here at the beginning, and that Eleanor has been taking care of her relentlessly since she was twenty years old.   Eleanor's mom is a constant presence in Eleanor's psyche, even beyond the grave.  She even buys clothes that she knows her mother hates- pants- just because her mom is dead and can't do anything about it.   Eleanor is being haunted before she ever gets to Hill House.    True, and this lack of self-esteem and then loneliness is what has resonated with so many women and men who read Jackson's stories.  It also is what directly led to a lot of the suffering Jackson experienced in her marriage to Stanley.      Stanley Hyman, there's a character.  Before I smear him, I guess I will say right off that bat that he, in many ways, was very supportive of Shirley professionally and admired her intellectually.  My problem with him is that he degraded her sexually- and that is the cruelest and most intimate and demeaning forms of degradation that there is.    For one thing he absolutely did not respect the sexual boundaries Shirley wanted in their marriage.  Besides having so many affairs with students at the school he taught but also really just anyone—he seemed to enjoy telling Jackson all about these trysts.  I've read a few of the letters he wrote about women he was sleeping with on various business trips, and I got the feeling it's almost like he was bragging a little bit.  I'd read a few quotes, but they're vulgar.  He talked about groping girls- giving details about what he had done. It's gross never mind hurtful.  And Shirley would get upset.  Although she was a free spirit and Bohemian in some ways, this was not okay with her.  She didn't want a open marriage where everyone just slept with whoever they wanted.  There are letters where she writes him and expresses how this behavior made her feel, but she never mailed these letters.  I don't even know why.  Maybe she didn't have the nerve.  Maybe she knew it made no difference.  Maybe she wanted her family and that was a price she was willing to pay.  I'm speculating.  We only know that  she just took it.  She wouldn't confront him, at least that there isa record of.  She just forced herself to accept it and moved on with her life.      And that is an indication of low self-esteem, obviously.  Jackson wouldn't have put up with that sort of thing like she did, if she didn't think, at some level, it was her fault or that she didn't deserve to be treated any better than that.  This is the legacy of a toxic parent.  Allowing people to treat you in a way that is lesser and that is not how you treat them is a direct result of low self-esteem, but I want to add that future abusive relationships is not the only symptom of low self-esteem and it isn't the only symptom of low-esteem we see in Jackson's life.   Behaviors that provoke self-harm  like over-eating, over-drinking, and pill-popping- all things Jackson did- are also a result of low esteem and indicate high levels of anxiety.  Feelings of sadness, depression, anxiety, anger, shame and guilt- are also things we see in Jackson's life.  She seems to have truly struggled emotionally.     True, but before we get too dark, Shirley was all of that, but she wasn't ONLY that.  She had a happy side too- an apparently tremendously happy side.  I say that from interviews I read that people did with her children.  When her kids write or talk about their homelife, the reports are glowing.  Her home was a happy place.  It was chaotic and topsy turvey at times, the kind of crazy that people love.  They didn't even see any tension between their parents.  For one thing, Stanley didn't have a whole lot to do with the family- lots of men didn't in the 50s, that was the mother's domain, but from the perspective of her children, her marriage to Stanley was a happy one, as was their home.  So, we see all of that going on.  Back to her biographer, Ruth Franklin, Franklin titled her biography about Jackson, “A Rather Haunted Life” kind of to reflect that idea- that she was haunted, but not entirely, just rather haunted.      Yes, and it was that dichotomy that leads to all kinds of cognitive dissonance.  I read in another article by a different biographer that Shirley, as a mother was deeply involved but also emotionally erratic.  “Her moods and anxieties colored her children's days.  No one could be more loving; no one could be meaner.”      Which brings me back to her as a writer.  One critic observed that out of over 110 different stories that Jackson wrote in her lifetime, most of them are about imperiled, divided or anxious women- and that is including both her scary and her funny stories.  And when we get to her final three novels- they are gothic completely about anxiety, entrapment and in the case of Hill House, a deeply troubled female with an inability to differentiate well between illusion and reality.      Understanding that really makes the famous first paragraph of The Haunting of Hill House  meaningful in a deeper way, at least it does to me. And I do want to emphasize this first paragraph is one of the most famous paragraphs in all of Jackson's writings:    No live organism can continue for long to exist sanely under conditions of absolute reality; even larks and katydids are supposed, by some, to dream.  Hill House, not sane, stood by itself against its hills, holding darkness within; it had stood so for 80 years and might stand for eighty more.  Within, walls continued upright, bricks met neatly, floors were firm, and doors were sensibly shut; silence lay steadily against the wood and stone of Hill House, and whatever walked there, walked alone.”    And what do you always say, when we start these books, that great writers will give their story away in the first sentence or two.    They almost always do.  This one in particular invites us to think about so much.  First of all, it starts with a negation- “no” but there are a lot of negative words here.  It's hard to understand, but something is telling us no- and when we get to the end of the book, that prophecy is fulfilled, although I won't spoil that just yet and tell you how.  But there's so much more.      Listen to the ideas she introduces-  there is the idea of being alive- of being sane- or not sane- another negative word- of standing in the darkness-in the silence- of being alone.  Of being in a house, but yet…being alone.   The alliteration highlights and brings together her key ideas- within walls- drawing attention to the idea of claustrophobia- sensibly shut; silence lay steadily I might add brings the silence and the claustrophobia together.  Then of course- whatever walked- walked alone- the w sound kind of swoshes in her head and haunts the end of that sentence.      All of her personal demons in one sentence.    Yes- and all of her personal demons getting ready to flesh themselves out metaphorically for all of us to understand and experience with her.      This assertion that she makes about absolute reality, of course is a religious or philosophical statement.  This idea that we absolutely just cannot know what is real, and if we did know what is real we would go crazy.  She's going to say that even little bird or crickets (a katydid is a cricket if you haven't heard that word yet, it's not very common)- Not even the simpliest organisms can handle a world without illusions.  We need them to protect our own sanity.    Yes- and the subtext here suggests because reality is dark; and the reality is you are alone in this world.  You can live – but perhaps you must accept a dream, perhaps an illusion that people have your back, people love you and will support you, but in reality- you are alone.  Perhaps you have to even create an entire fairyland- something to give you an escape from what you know to be true- the betrayal which is coming.  I'm speculating, obviously because I'm fleshing out what is implied with the subtext, at least implied to me-  but there is a sense that that is the direction she's leading us, and it certainly seems to be something we find in her personal story.     It's also kind of a religious statement because it speaks to the nature of reality and that is the essence of faith and walking through life not-alone.  Christy, what was her religious background.      Well, that's a very interesting question.  She was raised by members of the the Christian Science church, but later on she developed a real fascination with the occult and was even accused of being a witch.  Garry, what makes Christian scientists different from main stream Christianity?    Christian scientists, for those who are not familiar with Christianity, adopt many tenents of traditional Christianity but they break from it in a couple of ways that are obvious.  For one,  they do not accept the diety of Jesus Christ in the way traditional versions of Christianity do.  But the second is What most people know and that is the tension is the between The teachings of the Christian science church and their complicated relationship with the medical community.  They  encourage their members to pray for divine healings often perhaps instead of going to doctors.  And this has been controversial in some cases especially for family members outside of the faith.     That was certainly true for Jackson.  One time she and her brother were horsing around and her brother broke his arm, instead of going to the doctor Geraldine and her mother stayed up all night and prayed for his broken arm.  Her grandmother was a faith healer in the church and Jackson did not approve of this. So, she had this side of her, that would seem more secular- but then Jackson had her own sense of the spiritual.  She carried around tarot cards, tried to communicate with spirits later in her life, and flirted with all kinds of spiritual practices, like I said before, many accusing her of actually practicing witchcraft, ahtough I never found anything that really verified how serious she was about that.      So I can see why she might say something about absolute reality being somewhat unknowable or even a dark and lonely thing.      True, and at least in this book what we see in the the relationships that populate the lives  of the characters is that they are contrived.  In chapter 1 of The Haunting of Hill House, Dr. Montague, a title that is somewhat meant to mislead since he's really a ghost hunter, assembles a very select group of people to live with him for three months in a house that he thinks is probably haunted.  There are only four people that will be in this house- Dr. Montague himself, Luke, who is a member of the family who will own the house, Theodora who is selected because she may have extra-sensesory perspection abilities and Eleanor who as a child appeared to bring down a shower of rocks.      We will follow what happens to them from the point of view of Eleanor.  This story is written in the third person omniscient style, but it's way more akin to the free indirect discourse we saw Jane Austen create in Emma.  Laura Miller in the introduction to the book put it this way, readers "experience the novel from within Eleanor's consciousness, and however unreliable we know her to be, we are wedded to her".  And of course the farther into the novel you get, the more you understand how true this statement really is.  Most of the first chapter is really kind of a way to introduce us to Eleanor, and what we find out about her first is that she is 32, she genuinely and for good reason hated her mother until she died and now genuinely hates her sister.  Let's read this part…    Page 3    She's clearly alone and exploited by people who are supposed to be protect her.  This is further developed through the anecdote about her sister and their car.  Apparently they bought a car together but her sister never lets her drive it.  So, when Dr. Montague invites her to come to Hill House, she just takes the car and goes.  And while she's driving to Hill House, she imagines all sorts of things.  She imagines things that could never be real, like the road being an intimate friend or living in a house with a pair of stone lions and people bowing to her on the street because of these lions.  It's gives you kind of this crazy feeling- like how you would feel if you finally had escaped.    Yes, and that crazy feeling is going to intensify as the book progresses.  She's escaped her mother only to land sleeping on a cot in the nursery of a terrible sister.  She's not escaped her sister, but to go where.  At one point on her drive to Hill House she stops to admire a quarter of a mile of Oleanders.  Oleanders are beautiful flowers but they are also poisonous flowers.  She fantasizes about them about a castle with oleanders …then she gets back in her car and drives to a diner where she's going to watch a mother try to coax her daughter into drinking a cup of milk- and let me tell you know- these very same images that she sees on her drive in come back towards the end of the book as we, as readers, feel we are losing our grasp of reality.      But here in chapter 1, when she finally gets to the mansion, the care taker, Mr. Dudley flat out tells her, “You won't like it.  You'll be sorry I ever opened that gate.”    She looks at him and asks him to get away from her car…then she proceeds forward.  At the end of the chapter, we see her looking at this house and this is what she says, “The house was vile.  She shivered and thought, the words coming freely into her mind, Hill House is vile, it is diseases, get away from here at once.”      But of course she doesn't.    No, she doesn't.  That's the thing about haunting houses- they are dangerously tantalizing.  She was invited here by Mr. Montague and for better or for worse, she wants to be here.   I don't know if the Haunting of Hill House is the best example of this, but Jackson was absolutely fascinated with this- Jackson was fascinated with man's obsession with what Poe called the “imp of the perverse.”    Oh yes,  the urge to do something awful to someone and have pleasure in it.  I've seen this in kids, a kid just trips a stranger in the hall just because he can.  Paul Salkovskis, a psychology professor, suggests that it's evolutionary to have these kinds of intrusive thoughts as part of our way of problem solving for future problems.  But this idea that people have impulses to do mean things  or at least things we know we shouldn't and get joy from them.  Jackson was very interested in this idea.  So, are you saying that Dr. Montague is deliberately doing something mean.  Or that Dudley is?  Or Eleanor is?    Not really, in other stories she really demonstrates this much more poignantly, but the reason it comes to mind, besides the fact that I've been told to look for it in her writings, is that we are setting up relationships where we really can't trust each other to be there for each other.  Hill House looks like a place where you are really going to feel alone and exposed and that's where the terror comes from, but we will also see that it's soft and motherly and the people here at the beginning seem kind of exciting- it's seductive.      And I guess it does and has for many readers.  Let me just add one thing I didn't know until we started studying this book.  Horrornovelreviews.com claims that The Haunting of Hill House is the 8th scariest novel of all time.  And Paste magazine puts it into the unsorted top 30.      And so we open the gates to this terrifying place- Hill House- next episode we will look at the house itself, we'll look at the places where biographers think she got her inspiration for the house, we'll meet the other residents, explore the history of the house and begin to experience the ghosts- if that's what they are- as they manifest themselves to us through the eyes of Eleanor.                        

That Real Blind Tech Show
Episode 56 - Apple, I Do Enjoy A Nice Dongle, But I Don't Want To Pay For It

That Real Blind Tech Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 69:53


The gang is fully back together after a busy weekend and start of the week to talk the latest Apple announcements and a little other tech news.   We start off discussing some changes you may or may not want to make to VoiceOver when getting a new device. And some basic maintenance you will want to do when starting with a new Apple device.   We then discuss the serious accessibility bug that has been affecting many Amazon VoiceOver users on iOS.     On a more positive Amazon note, Amazon music will now allow unlimited subscribers to play music with spatial audio on their headphones of choice.   NASA may not let a legally blind individual boldly go where no man has gone before, but Astro Access will!   In the dumbest news of the week, Facebook is rumored to be changing their corporate name. We speculate on what a few of their new names may be.   We then dive in to the latest Apple announcements. We start off discussing the newly announced Mac Book Pros. Here's a comparison of all Mac Book M1 Pros. Only Apple, after dropping two plus grand on one of these machines if you want to fast charge the 14 inch model you will need to still buy a $20 dongle. Seriously, only 11 hours of web browsing battery life on the new 14 inch model, is that enough?  Dogs and Cats everywhere rejoice, it's the return of MagSafe charging for the new Mac Book Pros! Oops, the notch comes to the Mac Book Pros, but Apple decided to not share this with everyone in house.   Apple's new GAM 140  Watt charger is supposedly a game changer, Ed explains to us why that is the case.   Here is a comparison of the newly announced Air Pod  3's to the Air Pod Pros. We would highly recommend you spend the extra moola to get the Pros.   Seriously Apple, a micro fiber cloth for $19?   Apple announced a new $5 music plan, but who is it for?   The most anticipated feature of Mac OS Monterrey will not be released on release day.   Don't go to Brazil to buy your Apple products. They're a little expensive there.   And in some non Apple news, Google announced the Pixel 6, the prices have some of us thinking.   And it's more of Watcha Streaming, Watcha Reading.         To contact That Real Blind Tech Show, you can email us at ThatRealBlindTechShow@gmail.com, join our Facebook Group That Real Blind Tech Show, join us on the Twitter @BlindTechShow , or leave us an old school phone message at 929-367-1005.

In The Thick
ITT Sound Off: Criminal Charges

In The Thick

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 20:19


Maria and Julio get into the Senate confirmation hearing for Chris Magnus, President Biden's pick to lead Customs and Border Protection. They also debrief the latest developments from the House committee investigating the January 6th insurrection at the U.S. Capitol. And, they talk about a Senate committee investigation in Brazil to hold President Jair Bolsonaro accountable for the failures in his response to the coronavirus pandemic. Staff PicksPresident Biden's pick for Customs and Border Protection commissioner, Chris Magnus, supports two Trump-era border tactics, reports Ryan Devereaux for The Intercept. The public already knows that Steve Bannon, an ally to former President Donald Trump, played a role in the insurrection at the Capitol on January 6, reports Dan Friedman for Mother Jones.In his latest column, Julio writes “Brazil's president has been all-in on what has become an apparently effective strategy for modern-day authoritarians,” for MSNBC.Photo credit: AP Photo/Eraldo Peres See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Simply Walk The Talk
Episode 165 - What is SANANGA and how is it used?

Simply Walk The Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 15:58


In this short video episode, Josh explains (and demonstrates) what is Sananga and how he uses it. He also adds in a bit of Zen Nasal Spray Hapé to take things up a notch! So, what IS Sananga? Sananga is commonly made from the roots and bark of Tabernaemontana undulata, a shrub which is found in Brazil and other South American countries. The bark and root is ground into a very fine powder and then extracted into a juice. This sacred and powerful medicine is used to treat and prevent ocular diseases such as glaucoma, cataracts, farsightedness, nearsightedness and even blindness. Sananga is mostly utilized by the tribes found in the Amazon region such as, Kaxinawás, Matsés and Yawanawá. Some tribes in the Amazon region use Sananga to sharpen their night vision while hunting, however, Sananga does more than that. This powerful eye drop has a healing power that is more spiritual than physical, and has the capacity to increase insight in the minds of those who use it. Sananga is commonly used in preparation for ayahuasca ceremonies due to its capacity to increase visual perception, enhance colors and remove unwanted energy. Sananga eye drops cause an intense burning sensation that typically lasts for a few minutes, but experienced practitioners claim that the pain is an important part of the healing process. They advise breathing deeply into the discomfort in order to reap all of sananga's benefits. Below are some of the benefits found in Sananga: * Antimicrobial: Studies show that Tabernaemontana pachysiphon and Tabernaemontana angulata, found in sananga, are effective in treating skin infections because of its antimicrobial properties. * Antifungal: Tabernaemontana stapfiana is effective in preventing fungal growth. Antioxidant: Tabernaemontana genus also has strong antioxidant properties which play a critical role in preventing age-related ocular problems. * Anti-inflammatory: Tabernaemontana pandacaqui has anti-inflammatory effects used for treating arthritis.  * Anti-cancer: Study shows that Tabernaemontana species, specifically the T. elegans is an effective cancer killer. The active principle of sananga is ibogaine which is a psychoactive alkaloid and mild stimulant in small doses, but can induce a profound psychedelic state if used in larger doses. Apart from ibogaine, several other alkaloids, such as coronaridine, quebrachidine, heyneanine, 3-hydroxycoronaridine, ibogamine and voacangine are believed to also be contained in sananga. All of these alkaloids have powerful psychoactive effects and can exert strong antibiotic effects. Like other psychedelics, Sananga can cause mental, visual and auditory changes, and an altered state of mind. But many find Sananga to be a unique type of psychedelic not only because of how it is administered but how it effects the body. The burning sensation one can feel after administration causes the release of endorphins, a chemical produced by the body to ease the pain, which stay in the body after the sananga is gone, leading to a feeling of utmost relaxation. And the ZEN Nasal Spray™ is Mitozen's strongest formula, and is made from different medicinal plants from the Amazon to calm and quiet the mind, as well as to reduce anxiety and stress.  ZEN EO Nasal Spray™ is made with Ultra Nano Liposomal terpenes & essential oils. ZEN CBD Nasal Spray™  contains essential oils, terpenes and full spectrum NeuroHEMP™.  The Zen formulas are powerful in the ability to calm the mind and allow for maximum vagal activation (stimulation of the vagal nerve). You will experience a powerful afterglow effect, following the initial temporary burning feeling after administration. ---- View full video on youtube: https://youtu.be/d7sW1O6mT-g ---- Referenced websites: https://psychedelicinvest.com/what-is-sananga/ https://shop.psychedelictimes.com/product/sananga/ — MitoZen/Zen Spray: https://www.mitozen.com/product/zen-nasal-spray/ref/wirkiuvxim/?v=35b5282113b8&campaign=ZenSpray

The Lance Wallnau Show
Just remembered something KIM CLEMENT told me…

The Lance Wallnau Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 33:46


Just flew in from Brazil. Met their President, Bolsonaro. He's the most significant anti-globalist world leader, cast in the same mold as Trump. He's called the “Trump of the tropics.” They have an election coming up that is as significant as our 2020 election. I came home and was distressed by news developments highlighting the lawlessness on the Left - BUT found God's strength enter into me as the Lord led me to a Word from God and a comment from Kim! I PROMISE that you'll be strengthened too as you hear this!

LEVELS – Metabolic Insights
Foods We Love: Brazil Nuts

LEVELS – Metabolic Insights

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 8:47


Brazil nuts aren't just another snack. They're the best source of selenium, which plays several crucial roles for your metabolic health. Author: Samantha Heller, MS, RD Link to article: https://www.levelshealth.com/blog/health-benefits-of-brazil-nuts Become a Levels Member – levelshealth.com Learn about Metabolic Health – levelshealth.com/blog Follow Levels on Social – @Levels on Instagram and Twitter

The Solarpreneur
How to be Ultra Consistent Without Working More Hours - Christian Moroni

The Solarpreneur

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 59:36


Visit Solciety.co now!Speaker 1 (00:03):Welcome to the Solarpreneur podcast, where we teach you to take your solar business to the next level. My name is Taylor Armstrong and I went from $50 in my bank account and struggling for groceries to closing 150 deals in a year and cracking the code on why sales reps fail. I teach you to avoid the mistakes I made and bringing the top solar dogs, the industry to let you in on the secrets of generating more leads, falling up like a pro and closing more deals. What is a Solarpreneur you might ask a Solarpreneur is a new breed of solar pro that is willing to do whatever it takes to achieve mastery and you are about to become one.Speaker 2 (00:41):What's happening. Solarpreneurs. We're back with another episode in this time we have the Brazilian master himself, my man Christian coming on the show. So we got Christian Maru and I thanks for coming on the show with us today, Christian.Speaker 3 (00:56):Oh man. Thanks for having me. I'm I'm super excited actually. It's my very first time speaking in public like this and, uh, I'm super stoked to be, to be here on the show.Speaker 2 (01:08):Yeah, well it's well-deserved because, um, if you haven't seen, if you haven't followed Christian yet, he's been just one of the most consistent like solar sales reps. I've seen, he's consistently hitting big numbers. Um, and we're going to talk about all that today. So he is the number one rep at affluent, right? Is it fluent? Yup. Okay, cool. Making sure I got the name right. And yeah, been doing awesome. And you're soon to start up an office there in Houston. You're telling me here in what 3, 3, 4 months, something like that. You're going to go down there. Yes.Speaker 3 (01:42):Yes. I started, I started with flowing on May 7th and I, after a month and a half, they say, Hey, I feel like you got a lot of potential. There wants to, to expand the company. And they showed me a few places and I chose Houston to be the place to go. Right.Speaker 2 (02:02):Well, my cousins down in Houston, so maybe I'll, uh, he just bought a house down there. So I'd love to get him sold. He's point, he's pulling this, you know, he's moving, he might move in a couple of years, crap. SoSpeaker 3 (02:15):I know how to handle that.Speaker 2 (02:20):I'm his cousin. So I can't like tell him to cut the crap as much, but if I send you to his door, I know you'll get him taken care of.Speaker 3 (02:27):Yeah. I can smell the blood man. I can smell blood from far away.Speaker 2 (02:32):I better watch out. Cause now all my Houston podcast listeners that I heard that are going to be like hitting me up. So put, put a target on his back, but no, that's a awesome man. And so yeah, I mean, again, you've been having a ton of results being super consistent and we're going to get into all that. But do you want to tell us a little bit of your background, Christian? I'm like, I don't know what, how you got started in knocking doors and um, just how you got in the store and everything.Speaker 3 (03:01):Sure. My brother. Um, so on September 1st it tells an 18. That's when I got that's exactly when I got here in this country. So actually tomorrow, I guess it's going to be three years. Hasn't even been three years and just like a lot of international people. And I can relate to a lot of people from my country and from different places and different backgrounds when they get here, they, they get the cleaning jobs. So that's what I was doing. I was cleaning cars, uh, in a dealership. And then we started cleaning offices and Jean, Jean places at night and stuff like that. And it just, you know, I wasn't super happy cause I was working during the day and I was working at night and working multiple jobs and, and I was like, I've done sales in Brazil. Let's put the way I felt like I was successful. My company was doing well. I was running my company for seven years in the security industry. And that's how I started knocking doors. Actually I was knocking doors in Brazil for my, for my own company. Uh,Speaker 2 (04:11):Yeah, like singularity system, like style.Speaker 3 (04:15):Yeah, something like that. And also like pepper spray, like everything that you can have to defend yourself in a situation of risk, just because in my country, actually we're not allowed to have guns and firearms or anything like that. So happen to says you better know some martial arts jujitsu, you know, you better, you better be ready because we just not allowed to have anything. So I realized that here in the U S people could have some stuff. So it just decided to, uh, to do that in Brazil. So instead of knocking doors to talk to homeowners, I was knocking on doors of the police departments. So I'll go to every single city drive to us, small town or anything like that and say, Hey, how do you guys like your equipment? How do you guys like the boots? The Cavilers, the helmets, everything, you know, the gun holsters, like all sort of equipment that law enforcement have. That's what I was doing. I was just the main distributor say. Okay. Okay. And then he was just knocking on doors, visiting police departments. And to be Frank, you gotta be ballsy to talk to this guy.Speaker 2 (05:32):Yeah, that's crazy. That's yeah. It's funny. I'm uh, I'm taking a Brazilian jujitsu class. Uh, right now I just took my third class the other day. I'm beat up, man. Probably can't see on the camera, but I'm, uh, got bruises all over the place. So guys,Speaker 3 (05:50):I can, I can see, I can see the bruises. I did it for a little bit, but I'm more of a couple era. I don't know if haven't heard of martial arts and it's pretty, pretty cool as well. So yeah, that's kind of how I started in dental. I had this cleaning jobs kind of hated. And then I got into sales. I started with T-Mobile and then I, uh, I got a manager position and I was like, okay, that's a little better. What? I realized that I was working in a store and there was no more room for growth because other than that, I was just, I don't know, maybe I should open my own store, but if I do want to do that, that's like 500,000. Uh, and I was like, yeah, I felt like there was no more room for growth and I would have to wait for people. So what I started to do, I started to approach people outside the stores say, Hey, who do you guys use for the phone? And I started like approaching people. And I got a notice saying, Hey, you can do that. You can do that. You got to wait for people to get inside the store. Uh, and that's when I realized that, you know what? I don't want to do diet because even though I was so out of 124 people, I was number one in sales for months and months and months in a row.Speaker 3 (07:18):And by doing that, it's still even being number one. I felt like I couldn't grow anymore anymore. Uh, I, I will have to be just passive and waiting for people. And I was like, no, I want to do something where I can run my own paycheck. So I recruited myself, nobody actually recruited him, recruiting me. I started, I got into the door to door tribe, Facebook group and say, Hey guys, I want to do sales, hit me up.Speaker 2 (07:47):Like, man, I wish I would've seen that post. It probably got, probably got 500 messages.Speaker 3 (07:54):Oh my, oh my. So I sat down with every single pass, controlling the book and I talked to Santiago and Sentire said, Hey, if you just want to learn the job past control is a good way to start. And then if your career, maybe you should look into solar. So I did, I talked to flow in and I talked to a pest control company, decided the past was for me because a lot of my friends that were doing past. So I did pass for a first summer, three months in the summer, broke my arm and yeah, I was arm wrestling. And actually I was I'm wrestling my manager for over 20 bucksSpeaker 2 (08:37):InSpeaker 3 (08:37):An arm wrestling. Yeah. I can send the video so you can post on your page later.Speaker 2 (08:42):Yeah. We'll have to put that. It's like a company in the podcast. That's crazy.Speaker 3 (08:47):Yeah. So I was having, I was having a really good summer, uh, number one, rookie for the company. Um, three months in the summer had like 400 counts. Uh, I was on a pace to just 600, but because it was, I broke my arm with three months and I went back. I had a recovery and then summer was over. So all of the guys, they just came back home and I talked to the owners and say, Hey, I have a goal to do 600 accounts. My very first summer, would you guys let me come back? And then everybody was gone and I flew back to Texas and I, I started working again doing passive control by myself. That was pretty much it. Oh yeah. All of the boys that were home, it was just the owners and myself. So I did go back sold for a little bit. And then the company say, Hey, you know what, you're the only one here. I don't feel like too good choice to have just you here. And then they just sent me home. Wow.Speaker 2 (09:55):Holy cow. Some extreme dries. That's awesome.Speaker 3 (09:59):Yeah. It's just because I had a goal. So something that I want to share, if you'll let me with the, with the people, with the audience, it's just that instead of goals, to be Frank, I had more of a commitment. So I, every time when you, when you see the results that you can get, I would say it's always good to reevaluate your goals because if I didn't reevaluate myself and didn't compare, I was just trying to compare myself to my very best version of myself. I feel like a lot of times we just compare ourselves to other people and that, that can be tricky, you know, for sure. Yeah. Yeah. That can be tricky. So if I, if I take to my original goal, I want it, man. I want it to do 150 pest control accounts. And I sold a hundred my first month. Like, uh, yeah. I was in the country before, like a year, a year, a little over a year. So my English was still, I still have a lot to learn, but where my English was super, super broken, but I just, you know what, sales it's, what's going to pay the most money. So I got, I got a better, I better figure it out.Speaker 2 (11:18):Yeah. That's incredible. So I got to ask, why did you, uh, what brought you out to like the U S in the first place? Why'd you come here? Is that for school or were you just thinking you're going to work or when did you come out?Speaker 3 (11:31):Awesome. That's a great question. So BYU has always been a dream for like all of the LDS families out there in Brazil. Like people just see like, oh my gosh. Like the us in general is just to like live in the dream, you know? And then my wife, she was doing manufacturing engineering in Brazil and she, Hey, what if we go to the U S and I could just go to BYU? And I was like, okay, I support you. And we got here together. And that was initially was for school, you know? And yeah, she was still going to school and work.Speaker 2 (12:08):Yeah. That's incredible. Yeah. No, I love hearing the drive ins. I dunno. Would you say like being in Brazil? I think, I don't know. You tell me I never been to Brazil, but I've been to Columbia. Maybe there's some similar stuff. That's where I did my church mission and it's like, I don't know. I'm sure it's similar in Columbia. People had nothing. Um, I imagine Brazil, there's probably a lot of poor parts and stuff like that. So I'm sure you gotta like, you know, scrap for everything and just like, you know, fighting call your way to success and everything. Um, probably more than out here in the U S we have, we have a ton out here compared to, I know a lot of countries down there. So do you think that contributes like your drive? Obviously you have like a ton of drive jelly, keep going where most other people to be bought in is industry. They're not, especially in solar, they're going to hit five, six deals in the month and be satisfied with that because they're making awesome money with that. So what is it? Yeah. What do you think, um, where do you get that drive from? If, if you have any, anything to say about that?Speaker 3 (13:09):Yeah. Um, every time when I think about drive, uh, I remember once I was talking to river rivers keener for like a while, I was just sharing like some personal stuff. And I remember it was just right when he made a post saying if you don't work hard, you're not grateful for the opportunity. That's how I always felt. It's not, I was one of the things that I learned from reading the book, grit from Angela Duckworth, gray, gray, gray book. It's just literally showing me the persistency and the grit and all of that. And when you're grateful for everything that happens. And especially when it come from a different background, I feel like sometimes here in the us, I see people actually complaining, like for not having space in the fridge. And, you know, like I came from a place where like, I will complain to not have stuff from the fridge, you know? Yeah. Sometimes we have the easiest sometimes I just feel like why fear is just so easier and never things just so, so, so cheaper that we take stuff for granted, you know, like we complain for the price of gas now, like three, $4, but in my country, 17, you know?Speaker 2 (14:35):Yeah. That's great. Yeah. That's awesome. And you reminded me, I don't know. Do you know a Leo salesman? He's like, yeah. Have you talked with him fellow Brazilian? He was on the podcast too, actually one of the earlier episodes of the show, but, uh, yeah, it's pretty crazy. He told me too how his dad first came here and same thing. I think he started out in cleaning and started his business and all that. And, um, went through like several bankruptcies, but it's just, uh, I think it's awesome hearing stories like that, of you guys that come from different countries and, um, you're just doing whatever it takes to have success. And, um, yeah, it shows an hours you're working. I asked, uh, I sent river a message because at first I was following you for a little bit, seeing you close all these deals and I'm like, wow, what is this guy doing?Speaker 2 (15:23):Is he on like sells steroids or something close in deal after deal? What is he doing? Um, and so I messaged river. I'm like, man, this guy works with you. What is he doing? And river's just like dared. He just works insane hours. He just goes out there all day, every day. And he's good at sales, but he's just putting in a ton hours. So, I mean, really, I think, do you want to give us idea how many hours are you typically working a week and give us some of your results. You've been getting to be number one rep there.Speaker 3 (15:54):Perfect. Perfect. I feel like, I don't know, uh, coming from passcode trope, I feel like sometimes the solar guys there, I don't want to say people are lazy, but it would just, we just don't work as hard as the farm guys or fast control guys. Exactly. I was eating up a friend say, Hey, what time you guys have meeting? And what time did you go to area? And my friend told me that, uh, his past patrol company, they have been at 9:00 AM and 10 30. They go to area and they work in art, in knife. I've been doing solar for almost almost 10 months now, and I'm never done to add myself. Uh, I work a lot, uh, some things that I might do differently. It's just that once I go to the doors, I just don't stop. And I really mean it. For example, my wife doesn't talk to me when I'm on the doors.Speaker 3 (16:53):And she knows that I just abide by some personal rules and some personal standards that I, I just don't do social media unless I'm posting the deals and talking about that. Like the only reason why I post and I shared that is just for personal accountability. Like it's not for visibility. It's not for the credits. Like I don't, I don't care. I have, I actually have 500 followers. Like I don't care about like how many people I have. Yeah. But you're like, the people I follow, it's just, they bring value. Like I don't follow any celebrity, like any famous people, brands and stuff. I don't have time for that. I just don't. So when I get to work, man, I have a P bottle in my carSpeaker 3 (17:46):And I just, yeah. Like I, or I, I, okay. I can't, I can say like, just being the trees and bushes and stuff, I've done it like so many times I just have a people auto. And then that said, like, I have go to gas stations, zero times I meal prep. I'm following a diet. I started a program a few months ago. I'm sticking to I, if I'm drinking anything, I take it with me. Like I just have everything to be ready for the doors in. And then I just don't stop and say, oh, I talked to 30Speaker 2 (18:21):Homeowners, 30 homers. Nice.Speaker 3 (18:24):That's my go-to. You don't have to be talented. You don't have to be super skilled if you just pull yourself from, in front of 30 people every day. I just feel like there's no way to get the results. And the only way to talk to that many people is just being efficient with the doors, you know, just cherry picking. One of the things that I do, I use my segway a lot. I love it. I wouldn't, I just, man, I don't even, yeah. I don't know. Have you ever used a segway Taylor?Speaker 2 (19:00):Yeah. Yeah. He's it. I, I forgot about it for a little bit, but then say you and river breaking them out. I'm like, man, I ain't gonna pull that thing back out because I forgot how like, you know, quicker and it makes it like more fun on the tours too, to get rejected. Just hop on the segway.Speaker 3 (19:16):Yes. Yes. Especially even if a super hard know what I do every single time. When I hop on my segway, I feel like it's a mental break. Like I don't even feel the no. Cause my brain at that moment is just trying to concentrate on getting on the segway, get it to the next house. See if their shutters are open, see the oils things as they arise, see people's homes, see like how many cars in drive and stuff like that. So it was just a lot of things that comes out automatically to the mind just cause you're used to the job. And that's my goal too. I, I remember being on an adventure with Sam Taggart and he said, and I was asking like, what should I do when I get a super-hard note? And he asked me back, what do you do? And I told him, I just fly to the next door. Like I don't let that get inside my head. I don't wait like half a second. Like whenever they're a jerk, you know? Or like super rude to me. I just two seconds later, I'm on the next door. Right.Speaker 2 (20:17):That's awesome. That's the way to do it. And like all these things, but like people expect, I don't know a lot for a long time. I thought people that were closing tons of deals had some like secret formula, my secret word track they're doing, but you heard it from Christian himself. He's not doing anything. He's just doing like simple things, super consistent. And it's like, I love how you just think of it. Not in like hours work, but no, it's just, I got to talk to 30 people. I got to get in front of 30 people because if I do, that's how I'm going to have success, so I'm going to get it right. And so for our listeners, Christian, um, how long would you say it typically takes you to get in front of 30 or 30 homeowners every day. Okay.Speaker 3 (20:59):That's a great question. So my rule of thumb is just to be driving to an area at three. And in a lot of days, I'm on the doors at three and I work until dark plus one, something that we have part of the culture, just like whenever it gets dark, you just knock one more door and really not more than one door to be just because, yeah, just because of personal standards, but as a company, like, will you just knock until dark plus one? And then yeah, whenever it gets dark, you just be careful the way approach the door. It's just being friendly. You show your badge, you know, you just, yeah. Just the way you carry yourself. Everybody knows the rules and stuff like that. ButSpeaker 2 (21:44):Yeah, that was good. Yeah. And so I did, so you're in a Dallas, right? Cause they're not going to Dallas area. That's where I started. That's where I, uh, uh, I guess got my start in pest control is, and in Dallas actually in, uh, it was pretty brutal. I didn't, I didn't throw it on as many pest accounts as you. I was pretty terrible pest, but um, I remember I got a gun pulled one time in Texas. Those, those Texans are no joke, man. You get guns pulled on you and stuff out there.Speaker 3 (22:15):Yeah. I had first month growing dollars. Same, same, same, same way brother.Speaker 2 (22:23):Yeah. And you got it. You guys got to get like permits and every city to knock out their deer. Right. And they're pretty strict about that.Speaker 3 (22:30):The city and knock sometimes. And again, it's more of a, your attitude. If you feel like you belong the place and you feel like you're all in the area, I feel like everybody's going to be receptive.Speaker 2 (22:43):Yeah. That's awesome. Well, no. So, um, another thing I see you doing a lot of Christian is, um, just getting a lot, a ton of same day appointments. It seemed like almost every deal I see you're posting up on Instagram. It's like same day, same kilowatt, same day 11 kilowatt, just big systems. And they're like majority, same days that looks like. So what do you do? Um, like tell me about that. Do you shoot for same days and what are you doing to get so many same day appointments? Cause that's actually a question I get asked a lot too from our listeners. Okay.Speaker 3 (23:16):Okay. Um, so yeah, average size. It's usually anywhere from nine to 11, that's kind of the average over there. So what we're doing, what I'm doing to get the same days, I don't even allow myself to work differently than that. Like if I'm not same day in you, I don't, I don't actually set the appointment. So it's much more of the way I perceive, uh, going to the events. And again, I think I kind of shared that with you, just listening to podcasts, like your show and many others and listening to people that have been on the job for so long. I just had to learn how to respect and love myself. When I started, I would just feel pity, you know, like, oh I, and that right now, I just feel like everybody's got a Ted story, you know, like who gives a crap? We all got [inaudible] uh, I'm the foreigner I have, I don't know where English and I don't know if I can do solar. So like, man, when I started, my goal was to close 40 deals in the year and then I've closed 60 over the last four months.Speaker 3 (24:37):Yeah. So I just, I just started to believe in myself a little bit more. For example, just the way just the self-talk every time, uh, before I even opened my eyes, that's first thing I do. I try to get myself into peak state. So I repeat a little, like a little mantra that I have for myself. Like I, I, I'm just going to share with you guys. I say today is a good day to make it a great day. Today is a good day to make it a great day. And then on the third time I put more emphasis and I jumped out of the bed and I just get ready. Today's a good day to have to make it a great day. You know? And that gets me to a different state. You know, Tony Robbins called calls it like pig state. And then I have some more stuff. So self-talk is kind of a big thing. I know Taylor McCarthy and a lot of the big players, they talk about that. So after I say that, I also share something else. I say, I'm a great salesman. I sell every day sales come easy to me because I work the hours focused. I'm enough. I weigh my mornings. I weigh my days. I'm winning my life.Speaker 2 (26:03):Boom. I love that. That's awesome. And I know you and river are big on those. I see river doing a lot of stuff like that too. Yeah, it works. I mean, and that NLP stuff. Neuro-linguistic programming. Um, yeah. It's white toner. Have you been to a Tony Robbins eventSpeaker 3 (26:20):Actually. So for August, that's the, I love, I love that you asked that. So for August, uh, fluent, they had a competition. So the number one, like the number, the top performer would get tickets for Tony Robbins. Yeah. So in a month for four now in November, next month I'm flying my wife and I were both flying. Like the company got us tickets hotels, and we're going to Tony Robbins for five days.Speaker 2 (26:48):Wow. That's awesome.Speaker 3 (26:50):It's always, it's been a dream man. Like I I've seen this guy in, like I'm not your guru and a lot of stuff since I was in Brazil, I was like, dude, he's the man. And now I'm going to get to see the legend myself. Yeah.Speaker 2 (27:04):He's the goat for sure. And yeah, you'll have, I've seen them seep speak a few times, but yeah, it's just all the stuff you're saying. Like his event you'll see it as event. And I know you've seen like his documentary and all that, but it's just like screaming and shout and the whole time jumping up and down. So like for managers that are listening to this podcast, make sure you're happy. You're teaching your reps, this stuff. And, uh, Christian just gave you some sweet, um, you know, and contagions manifestations, whatever you want to call them. Souls are good things to repeat. So are you, are you kind of telling yourself those things, like as you get up or as you get out on the doors or just like all the time Christian?Speaker 3 (27:42):Yeah, I repeat that one. Like today is a good day to make it a great day. And then I say three times and I was repeating myself. I'm a great salesman. I sell every day. So when it started, I would say I sell every week because that was my goal. And then I realized that like, why am I selling only every week? Because if I sell every week, I might be sending like four or five, six deals. And like, that's not for me. Like I can do more than that. And it got to a point. I was like, if I'm deciding to sell, just think about the guy. I don't know. Maybe someone listening to this show they've been selling two or three, four or five a month. And then my question is why would you cut yourself short and not sell for the other 25 days of the month? Yeah.Speaker 3 (28:32):I just, I, I kind of like punch myself in the face and I kind of had a serious conversation with myself and that's when everything started to change and I started to same days. So getting back to same days, I want to answer that question. Now I want to share my thought process and how I do it a lot behind the scenes. Like it's not the magical words that that's not, you know, it's just the game. They're like, why did I decide to sell one or two a week? And now I'm telling you, man, if someone, I fun talking to you on the, let's say on a Tuesday and they say, yeah, like, I'm going to be easy. Can you come back on Friday? I'm like, no, sir, I actually can't. So I'm going to show you the calendar. And I actually show my calendar. As you can see, like everybody's been looking into solar, like if you don't want to do this, that's okay. The government, they have a lot of tax incentives. That's okay. Like yes or no, whatever answer works fine with me. My job is to find people that is ready to take the money and take advantage of the program. I've never seen anyone in my life say no to save money. What time is it good tomorrow at four or a six? Boom.Speaker 2 (29:54):There you go. So you're saying that you, you said you don't do next day appointments all like a hundred percent, same days, or do you, do you ever do like next day appointmentsSpeaker 3 (30:06):That I've, I've driven back to houses and then all super solid guy in like four days later and then they no show, like if you just the numbers, like, just think, just trying to get to know your numbers. I think it's important. I know my numbers, like if I don't know my numbers, there's no way for me to increase my closing ratio and stuff like that. So there's a lot of stuff behind the scenes. Like getting to know your numbers, like, oh, how many deals you're closing a month? Cause some people say, oh, I closed. Yeah, you can have a good day. But that doesn't mean really good. Like everybody can have a good day. Everybody can have a good week, but you actually know a guy like for Dick consistency, like four or five months in a row or 10 months in a row, like a year or people being a top performer for years. Those are the guys that, that respect, like, I don't know, maybe selling three or four deals in a day. Yeah. That's good. But if you don't sell a deal next month, that's not good, man. That's not, you know?Speaker 2 (31:10):Yeah. I agree. And that's yeah. That's unfortunately like, like you said, a lot of people in solar, that's the curse of these big commissions. People see the checks coming in and then they don't work after. So that's why I tell a lot of our guys just don't even like, look at how much you're going to make. Like just go out and sell more. Right. It's gotten hit big numbers and do it consistently because that's, what's, that's what's missing. Is guys just hitting their hours and hitting their numbers consistently. Would you agree?Speaker 3 (31:37):Yeah. Yeah. And before I beginning to fall, just go and spend the money on stupid stuff anyway. Yeah. Yeah. It seems I started, you can ask flow in, like I never even touched a paycheck. Never like never, I never touch it because I finally feel like I just, I just invest the money. I like, I know Adam lab, some guys say invest 20% and yada, yada. But if auto manage your money, you can invest a hundred percent of it and just leave legislate broke. Yeah. But that's, that's just, I'm just trying to set myself up for the future instead of like the short-term goals. That's why like I go for same days. I really mean it. I talked to someone if I don't feel like they're a solid lead Taylor, I read her not have the lead then getting like a lead that I know that's not going to sh a no-show waste of time creating the proposal, wait for the proposal to get ready, driving back to the house. And then they know show me right. When I talk to that homeowner, I always, before setting the appointment, I say, Hey, when I come back, I'm going to show you two things. I'm going to show how many panels you're going to need on the roof. You know, where the panels go. And I'm going to show exactly the financial breakdown, how much money you're going to be saving. Uh, if everything makes sense. Is there any reason why you wouldn't move forward with this?Speaker 3 (33:16):I, the reason why I always asked that question. Cause if I take, give me any sort of resistancy, like I don't even set the appointment. That's not for me. Cause when I was doing solar in California, because it was a harder market, I felt like I really had to be a good salesman. You know, it was like, go for the appointment. It's like, cause I know in California you save people money. So if they latch you in, sometimes it's like a terrible lead. Like, dude, I don't want to go solar, but okay. You can come back and then you close the bill, you know?Speaker 2 (33:55):ISpeaker 3 (33:55):Mean this week I had people I've had that happen so many times in California, people like, oh it's solar. I know everything about solar. I will never go solar, but yeah, come back, show me the numbers. And then like, and they signed dogs andSpeaker 2 (34:13):That's awesome. And yeah, it's like, yeah, I forgot what I was going to say. But yeah, just being consistent set in the same days. And um, I think that's a big problem though. Is guys get this rush of excitement? I don't know about you, but when I was starting out, especially in IC in newer reps is they get this almost like rush of excitement when they can say, oh, I set a lead. I set an appointment for tomorrow, went in their head. They know is that this point is like a hundred percent not going to show crop appointments, but they just fill out the form whatever to say. They got an appointment. So I've talked with teams that don't even like recognize appointments booked anymore. We used to recognize and give like a ton of recognition for how many appointments were booked on a day.Speaker 2 (34:57):But now we sort of swapped it up and our teams, we don't even like posts when we book appointments for the most part it's because I don't know. I think, I think guys put too much focus on just that little rush of excitement when you say, oh, I've set an appointment. Or really like, as you know, when solar means nothing until you get it to install. Right. So at the end of the day, installs are king and um, you know, obviously you got to help people with the steps beforehand. But yeah, I agree with that a hundred percent. Um, I think people set way too many crappy appointments and get happy about it. SoSpeaker 3 (35:33):I've done it myself. Like I've done it myself, just trying to trick myself and maybe look really good for the company. Look good for the guys that you work with. But at the end of the day, like only closed deals and installs. That's the only metric that's gonna matter. Like the amount of people you you're getting from and the people you sign up. Oh yeah, I've done it like so many times. It's just that it really depends this tenders. You're holding yourself to, you know, as whenever I decided to like do same days and, and treat my time as the most valuable thing in the world, I felt like everything has changed. Just like, it's not just saying like, I love myself. It's just like, Hey, I don't know if we're going to have solar. I liked listening to the Michael Donner. When he says on his podcast, he was thinking it was, it was going to be the end of the solar. Remember that? I, I, I, I feel like I try to leave like that, like everyday, like, oh, maybe it's the inner solar. I bet I better take it of energy, the opportunity. This is the mother gold rush.Speaker 2 (36:47):Sure. I know the guys who are Trina like that, they're having the success. And so something that I really think is cool that you do Christian is I feel like another big thing you're super consistent on just your teens. I see you post on like, you know, pictures of books or reading workouts you're doing like you were talking about earlier the meal plan. And for me, I think I know myself, um, when I am being super consistent, I'm not as near as consistent as you. So I have a ton of respect for that. But the times where I'm working assistant or is where I'm falling, like both set schedules, those are routines. I'm doing my workouts reading, um, getting my healthy eating in. So for you, how, how big of a big of a factor would you say that is? Like your routines every day in the stuff you do before you go out on the doors, do you want to share a couple of those things that you're doing that maybe help you out just like get in the right mindset to hit the doors consistently every day?Speaker 3 (37:40):Yes. Yes. Taylor, I'm not, uh, you know, uh, I'm closed system when it comes to closing deals. But for example, I'm not the guy that's working out like crazy doing CrossFit. I'm not in the best shape I've lost. I've dropped 25 pounds so far.Speaker 2 (37:58):Yeah. You're not going to CrossFit with river. Isn't that thing.Speaker 3 (38:03):And yeah, he took me, he took me to CrossFit a few times, but it's just too hard for me.Speaker 2 (38:08):That's no joke.Speaker 3 (38:10):Yeah. But something that helped me, for example, the same consistency with some, some people have with the gym I have with the diet and with the meal prep. So I'm trying to get one thing at a time in order in my life. Cause I feel like the way you do one thing is the way you do everything, but there's no way to change everything at once. It's just tapped by stop. So I started with the diet and I, I'm pretty sure that pretty soon I'm going to be the guy just super consistent with working out. Because for the last 10 months I've been taking the cold showers and it's not like I hate it. I hate it. I came from Brazil like there. Yeah. It's like, it's a one country, you know, it's like, yeah. But I, I saw like Dora, Dora guys doing the cold showers, people doing for years.Speaker 3 (39:01):Like, you know what, I'm going to give it a try and then realize that now, like it's not that hard for me anymore. So even when I don't do a whole lot of things, I just, Hey, I've done hard things myself in the past. So even the days when I wake up late, which I do, I don't win the morning every day. I'm not the guy went in the morning everyday. I want to share that with you. But what happens is when it's game time, it's no joke. It's game time. Even when I was doing pest control, uh, it's not, uh, now if you are a little bit of a shame of Shea, uh, saying that, but our meetings was at 10 hours, the guy waking up literally and 9 58, and now I'm serious. My alarm was set for 9, 8 58. I was broke and I was going to brush my teeth for 30 seconds and fly.Speaker 3 (40:01):And for so many times I had to like pee one-on-one and eat it. Yeah. Eat like Marjorie or, or, yeah, just like do crazy stuff, you know, be slammed and punch. And they're like, yeah, that happened. Like, yeah, I was late like a lot of times, but still I was able to be number one by the end of the summer. So it's not only about waking up early or it's not only about winning the morning or really it's just implementing what you do. I don't read 20 books a month. I don't read, I read one book a month sometimes, but whatever I read, I try to implement as well. Yeah.Speaker 2 (40:51):I love that. And that's something my think is really cool too, is you're sharing the wins and the losses. I mean, you don't have to do it all a hundred percent to be number one, Christians. Oh yeah. Some guys think that, oh, I didn't. I missed my morning routine. Well, this day is shot. I'm going to get out on the doors late. Uh, this day's going good. But I think the guys that are having success, they're missing things here and there, but they're still being as consistent as possible. Like if they miss their workout or if they miss out on their cold shower or whatever, they're cutting their losses and they're still gonna make that day as accessible as possible. That's another lesson that I feel like I still need to learn sometimes. I don't know if you get out on late on the doors, don't like consider your whole day shot.Speaker 2 (41:34):Just go out and push as hard as you can for the hours you did get out instead of letting it effect your whole day, which I think is awesome. And you posted the other day, Christian. Um, I think it was on a Saturday. You posted, um, that you got out and knocked the whole day, but you didn't get like, I don't know if it was in a single appointment or a single close. And I thought that was cool, dude. Cause I'm used to seeing you post sale after sale, and then you kept that real scene. You didn't get anything on that. Saturday was that last Saturday you posted that.Speaker 3 (42:02):Yeah. So again, I work three weeks, super hard in a take, I don't know, like a few days off. So, uh, I realized the Saturdays are first solar in my opinion. Cause they can get people home. And because my goal is to same day, I was like, I'm going to be at the door. So what happen is over the last 16 weeks, five weeks I was out. Okay. Cause pretty much once a month, I'm out for training for traveling vacation, whatever it is. So what happened out of the 16 Saturdays? I worked at last of those. So last Saturday was the 11th Saturday. There was always selling and now was, I was trying super, super hard. I did get on the doors like nine, 10:00 AM and I D I didn't stop. Like I, I stopped to eat for three minutes, my meal prep at the guest.Speaker 3 (42:58):I dunno for some of my posts. I was there to just eating at a gas station and I was like, I can't, I'm on a winning streak. You know, like just the momentum that everybody talks about. So I wanted to carry that. Cause now it's a tradition. It's like sailing on. It's not even a question anymore for sure. And yeah, so I was like, I got to find the deal. And then I did, uh, for example, when, uh, when I went to Houston for the first time, it was like a month ago actually my, my first Houston installed is going to happen tomorrow. Nice. Yeah. I realized that I was having consistency consistently, but I never had a two spot in, I, and I've seen a lot of guys just selling three, four deals in a day. I was like, oh crap. How did these guys do that?Speaker 3 (43:53):You know? And I was like, you know what, I'm doing it. And wa and I did it. And then the following day, I sold two as well. Nice. And then the following day, I sold two again. And then, and then I realized that whatever is your standard, try to raise the bar. So what I mean by that, for the listeners that I sell in four or five, six, dude, just like, there's no way you're not selling 10 a month. Like why you're not selling double digits because once you do, you just do it and then it was just do it again and there, just do it again. And then was just going to do it every month because you've done it because you've done it. So, yeah, I like, I've done like 10 and then I get 10 and then 10 and then 12 and then 15 and then 16. And now like, now I want to close 20. I want to close.Speaker 2 (44:53):Yeah. That's true. And yeah, I think that's another miss people like set their standards so low and then they hit it, get complacent. Um, but yeah, I actually just got out of pot and podcasts earlier today with the Alex Hogan hall. And she was talking about that too. Just how competitions help her reps like get to a new level. And then it's like, okay, you saw yourself do 15 in a month during this competition. Like, why can't you do, why can't you do that every month now? So I think that's a key thing for managers, leaders and stuff like that. Get your guys to hit higher levels. And then they see it's possible. It's like they, once they see the four minute mile has been done, then you can't say it's impossible anymore. Like Christian just went out and did it. Right. Just went out and did it. These guys can do it. It's possible. I mean, Christian, you didn't even know, you didn't even know English from selling pest control for crying out loud. Like anyone should be able to hear,Speaker 3 (45:49):I know you don't like roaches. I don't like cockroaches as well. Okay. We got up, we got something in common. Let's get you started. Okay. The trucks are right there. You know, the Johnsons, boom. Yeah. The trucks is going to finish and then you're next on my list. I'll do super cheap. Boom.Speaker 2 (46:05):That's why I left Brazil. There are too many roaches and spiders. That's awesome stuff, Christian. Um, and then like with goals. So can you talk about real quick before we kinda wrap up here with your numbers? What, what type of metrics is there some metrics like, you know, you need to hit to hit your goals every month, like X amount of appointments. Um, is it pretty much just 30 homeowners you're focused on focusing on and then, you know, the rest will fall into place with that or any other metrics you focus on for the month?Speaker 3 (46:39):Yup. Yup, definitely. Um, so when it comes to the numbers, uh, it's important to know your numbers. For example, I'm just going to look, I have my numbers on the notes, on my phone that way. Uh, I always track, I have, uh, I've shared my calendar on social media anywhere to anyone that wants to see my calendar and how it looks like how I have my appointments, how we book it and how I know exactly the outcome. I, what I did. I color coded what I mean by that. For example, every time when I have a showing in blue, I noticed an appointment when they shows a purple. I know it's an appointment that I pitched that didn't close when it shows green. I know the people that I showed. So I have, uh, I have a visual just right in front of me. So it's, it's kind of easy.Speaker 3 (47:29):I just opened my calendar and I know, I know that I'm doing well, and I know that I'm not doing well, and I know what I have to work on. And I know what I have improved because it's visual. I just call her a code in my calendar and knowing that I it's always there. It's always available for example, um, why don't we just go, hold on. I just, I just switched phones. I got a new phone, but it was so busy working. Like I, I had owned the bot for a month, a new phone and the brand new iPad. Like he came out, I got it. And I didn't even open. I was just busy working.Speaker 2 (48:07):I know I got to close more deals than that at bed.Speaker 3 (48:12):I just moved to Utah for like two days or something. It was like, you know what, I'm just going to take the iPad and the iPhone. So I started up, but I remember, I remember, so when it comes to July, I had 41 appointments out of this 41. I have, I don't know, 18 or shows. I had like 14 that I pitched that didn't close. And I had 15 that, a page that did close and I had three, the fail credit. So I realized that August, if I ha if I wanted to have my best month, which I did, I had to do bigger numbers because it's a numbers game. So what I did, I increased my numbers. So for August, I had 62 appointments and out of the 62, 23, no show me, which is 30%. And then out of the people that showed up, I pitched 18 that didn't close and a page 16 that they'd closed. So right now I'm sitting at a 50% closing for the people that I sit down. Wait. Yeah.Speaker 2 (49:14):That's incredible. Yeah. And yeah, that's, that's no secret to, I think a lot of guys forget is like top guys, like you, any top guy that I get on this podcast, that's closing a lot of deals. They all know their numbers like that instantly. So for our Solarpreneurs listeners, um, if you, if you can't like, you know, tell back your numbers right now and go through your ratios, like Christian just did, then you're missing something there. Cause I think that's a huge thing. If you can't know your numbers, you don't know like the back of your hand, how are you going to improve them? That's what Christian has been doing. That's how he's been all day increases numbers. He's just like, oh, I need to sit with more people than it being cheap as ratios the same or improve them. I know my best months and sales.Speaker 2 (49:57):Um, yeah, I've, I've been a mad man about tracking numbers too. So that's that's um, yeah. Huge thing. If people aren't doing that. So a Christian, I know it's getting late. You're in Utah, we're doing a late night podcast right now. So Christians appreciate you for coming on. Um, we went back and forth so glad to finally get you on the show, even though it's, you know, 10 o'clock at night for you. Awesome. But, uh, Christian. So before we kind of wrap up here, where can people find you on social media and connect with you and all that?Speaker 3 (50:29):Yeah. So when I got here in the U S I actually, I didn't have social media for about like two, almost three years now. I still use Facebook, Krisha, moron, and the ground. I that's why I have like 500 people. Just pretty much all door to door people. Yeah. I started needs to grow and like, not like maybe a year ago, stuff like that. I just want to share it. Won't last thing that the numbers, they, they didn't look like this. When I started, like, I will have to sit down with five, six people to close one. So I had to work way, way harder now because it closed at 50% every day, I just got to get inside two houses and that's it, whatever your number is. If you're closing one out of four, just do the reverse engineering. Because a lot of times people, they just do like how much money they can make, but they don't break down with the reverse engineer to see how many people they have to talk to how many hours they have to put in order to get those appointments.Speaker 3 (51:35):Well, how many of these appointments are going to show how many of these appointments are going to cancel? What's your cancellation rate? Like it's important to know that stuff and just backtrack and do the reverse engineer. So cause when it started, I was like, yeah, I want to do 40 deals. And I was like, no, I don't want to do 40 anymore. And then I wanted to do 60 deals. And then I realized that I could do 16 for months. And now, now I want to close way more than that. You know, it's just, yeah, that's pretty much what I, what I wanted to share with the guys that like, it was, it was hard. It was hard, but now I'm just grateful. So we had to push for meetings, Christian Maroney, and I'm available. Like I don't care for work for a different company hours if people, Hey, I'm going to Houston, you are invited to just stay in my place. You can just work with me. I don't care, whatever t-shirt, you're working with. I don't care whatever company, if I can provide any value, if I can. Like, if I, I dunno if I can stand for the industry, if I can support any solar fallow, because I feel like sometimes people they're not happy with their current companies or sometimes people aren't happy, but they still can learn from people, you know? Yeah. Yeah.Speaker 2 (52:49):That's huge. So yeah, no, I think abundance mindset. Um, definitely appreciate that. And um, yeah, like I always tell the story, but a lot of people starting out when I started in solar, didn't have that mindset. They're like, no, if you're from a different company, I'm not going to talk to you. I'm not like sharing anything, company secrets. So I think it's awesome that guys like you now are, you know, just coming from that abundance mindset and willing to share, what's working for you and you know, specific things you're doing and saying on the doors. So a last kind of follow up question that Christian, before we let you go here, um, you, you mentioned that you, you know, increase your closing ratio and improve those numbers a lot. I just been going anything specific that you did to like increase those ratios. Do you think it was just more, experience-based just more time you needed or were you like drill on role playing like crazy? What helped you increase those ratios in your closes and all thatSpeaker 3 (53:42):Fantastic question, Taylor. I love it. I love it. So I learned at a young age, I don't know, probably most of the listeners they know Zig Ziglar. They know Napoleon hill. They know gene rum for me. Like if you're listening to, if you listen to Zig Ziglar and Jim, like, I just compensate with numbers. What I lack in skill, that's it numbers, what are lacking skill? What I mean by that? I just had to get myself in front of a lot of people until I could learn. So what made the change is that along the process, I realized that I just needed to simplify. I was making solar too complicated. I was explaining in a way that people go like, dude, I'm not sure in my car. Did he says a confused mind? We always say no, just make it simple, like stupid, simple in a sense that now every single one of my presentations, I'm pretty pretty a hundred percent confident that if I do my presentation to a third grade, they're going to understand like a hundred percent.Speaker 2 (54:55):Hmm. That's awesome. Yeah. Love that. So Christian, thanks for all the tips you shared. So for Solarpreneurs, keep it simple out there. And guys, it's not rocket science. Christian came from Brazil, barely know in English and he's killing it in this injury. He's one of the top reps in the industry. So do those simple things, be consistent, get out on the doors at the same time, be consistent in your closes, tracked your numbers like a madman. And I think that's pretty much all there is to it. So, uh, so Christian, thanks again for coming on the show and before yep. Before we let you go, I guess we pretty much went through anything, but any, uh, any final tips you want to share with our Solarpreneurs before we say goodbye,Speaker 3 (55:37):My brother, uh, I think, I think that said something that I do know that I also do. I want to share one thing like with the international people, sometimes some guys it's like, oh, like it's hard, no doors, doors for you as well. You know, just believe in yourself. And you have, I've seen so many people just getting to the industry and crushing it. I'll say that's something that I wanted to share as well just believe in yourself, this, this is for you and know your demographics. I know exactly what type of people that I closed at a higher percentage. It better send that you ratio rate. So that's, that's kinda my, the people that I go to. So when I, same days just based on their body language, they, they react. They, they talk to me the way they carried themselves. I can save from closing that deal or no. So if I don't feel like I'm closing, I don't even set the appointment. So just kind of know the people that you close easier. Cause the Indiana, the day, you don't want to be the best salesman in the world. Just go talk to, just look for the low hanging fruit.Speaker 3 (56:48):Just look for the low hanging fruits and that's it.Speaker 2 (56:51):Yeah. I love that. So w what, what are the demographics for you, Christian? What, which ones do you go after?Speaker 3 (56:59):Um, now, now it's getting to a point that I can close. Pretty much everything. It wasn't like as now. I don't, I don't have a demographics, but yeah, in Texas, there's a lot of like, uh, black people. I feel like that's a really good demographic for me. I can connect with this people really, really well, and I haven't closed. So in my country we speak Portuguese, but I learned here in dos. I, I don't close a whole lot of deals in Spanish to be Frank with you. Nah, but I like it's, it's good people. So, but that's not my go-to. I feel like, yeah, I'll say black people, but I, I like, I like styling everyone.Speaker 2 (57:42):Yeah. Let's go. Well, Christian, thanks again, my man. Sorry. I think I've said we're going to wrap up like 10 times and then you keep, you keep, you keep dropping a cold on us. So I'm like, dang, I need to ask him about this. And he follow up withSpeaker 3 (57:56):Very, very first time speaking in public. So I just can't. I just can't hold myself.Speaker 2 (58:00):Yeah, no, you did awesome, man. So I appreciate you guys go give Krishna fall. Let them know you appreciated that episode. And thanks again. We'll be connecting and talk soon, Christian. Thanks for coming on the show.Speaker 4 (58:13):Hey, Solarpreneurs quick question. What if you could surround yourself with the industry's top performing sales pros, marketers, and CEOs, and learn from their experience and wisdom in less than 20 minutes a day. For the last three years, I've been placed in the fortunate position to interview dozens of elite level solar professionals and learn exactly what they do behind closed doors to build their solar careers to an all-star level. That's why I want to make a truly special announcement about the new learning community, exclusively for solar professionals to learn, compete, and win with top performers in the industry. And it's called the Solciety, this learning community with designed from the ground up to level the playing field to give solar pros access to proven members who want to give back to this community and help you or your team to be held accountable by the industry. Brightest minds four, are you ready for it? Less than $3 and 45 cents a day currently Solciety is open, launched, and ready to be enrolled. So go to Solciety.co To learn more and join the learning experience. Now this is exclusively for Solarpreneur listeners. So be sure to go to solciety.co and join. We'll see you on the inside. 

吃史 Eat History
吃史EP76 派出航空母艦捍衛我的龍蝦!

吃史 Eat History

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 10:23


法國和巴西在 1960 年代差點為了龍蝦引發戰爭,雙方甚至已經派出了戰機跟軍艦到對方面前發出警告,到底是怎麼回事?一起來聽聽看吧? Music: *Book Bag - E's Jammy Jams 資料來源: 時代雜誌 http://www.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,896579,00.html The National Archives:https://blog.nationalarchives.gov.uk/the-lobster-war/ The Dispute between France and Brazil over Lobster Fishing in the Atlantic:https://www.jstor.org/stable/756933 維基百科聯合國海洋法公約: https://zh.wikipedia.org/wiki/%E8%81%AF%E5%90%88%E5%9C%8B%E6%B5%B7%E6%B4%8B%E6%B3%95%E5%85%AC%E7%B4%84 全國法規資料庫:https://law.moj.gov.tw/LawClass/LawAll.aspx?pcode=A0000010 國家教育研究院:https://terms.naer.edu.tw/detail/1318727/ 小額贊助支持本節目: https://pay.firstory.me/user/ckgg4ak6hoq460875ylcn8h2p Powered by Firstory Hosting

The Intelligence
Flu into a rage: Brazil's Bolsonaro inquiry

The Intelligence

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 21:35


President Jair Bolsonaro's early dismissal of the pandemic as “a little flu” presaged a calamitous handling of the crisis. We ask how a congressional investigation's dramatic assessment of his non-actions may damage him. China's test of a hypersonic, nuclear-capable glider may rattle the global weapons order. And our obituaries editor reflects on the life of level-headed American statesman Colin Powell.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Economist Radio
Flu into a rage: Brazil's Bolsonaro inquiry

Economist Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 21:35


President Jair Bolsonaro's early dismissal of the pandemic as “a little flu” presaged a calamitous handling of the crisis. We ask how a congressional investigation's dramatic assessment of his non-actions may damage him. China's test of a hypersonic, nuclear-capable glider may rattle the global weapons order. And our obituaries editor reflects on the life of level-headed American statesman Colin Powell.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The John Batchelor Show
1783: Why defend a small country far away? @AmbJohnBolton

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 11:05


Photo: President Chen Shui-bian (far left) attended the funeral of Pope John Paul II, and as the Holy See's recognised head of state of China, was seated in the first row in alphabetical order beside the first lady and president of Brazil CBS Eye on the World with John Batchelor CBS Audio Network @Batchelorshow Why defend a small country far away? @AmbJohnBolton  https://www.wsj.com/articles/american-military-taiwan-china-taipei-diplomatic-relations-invasion-11634760999?st=et9raroi6jsq3ba&reflink=article_copyURL_share .. Permissions 8 April 2005 Source | Agência Brasil Author | Ricardo Stuckert/PR This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Brazil license. Flag of Brazil.svg You are free: to share – to copy, distribute and transmit the work to remix – to adapt the work Under the following conditions: attribution – You must give appropriate credit, provide a link to the license, and indicate if changes were made. You may do so in any reasonable manner, but not in any way that suggests the licensor endorses you or your use.

Catholic Family News's Podcast
Weekly News Roundup 10/21/2021

Catholic Family News's Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 61:35


Our stories this week include: (1) the tragic story of Sir David Amess' murder (a Catholic member of the British Parliament) and how he was denied access to the sacraments before dying from his mortal wounds, (2) Rome's approval of an episcopal conference specifically for the Amazon region, (3) two related events that took place last week (one focused on religion, the other on environmentalism) and their connection to "synodality" (and possibly even a new Council!), (4) a homosexual music video filmed inside a Capuchin church in Brazil (a video clearly intended to mock the Faith), and (5) the latest from Archbishop Viganò.

By Any Means Necessary
Daniel Hale Subjected to Solitary Confinement For Telling The Truth

By Any Means Necessary

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 113:38


In this episode of By Any Means Necessary, hosts Sean Blackmon and Jacquie Luqman are joined by Dr. Margaret Flowers, Co-Founder of Popular Resistance Director of the Health Over Profit for Everyone Campaign to discuss health insurance companies ending out of pocket cost waivers for people treated by COVID-19 in the middle of the pandemic, how this might exacerbate the pandemic as we head into the winter and other rollbacks on public health measures under the Biden administration, and the importance of an organized effort to fight for the interests of people who need medical access instead of believing the lip service of politicians.In the second segment, Sean and Jacquie are joined by John Kiriakou, Sputnik News correspondent to discuss Daniel Hale's absurd incarceration in a maximum security facility despite a suggestion to send him to a low-security prison that would have provided mental health treatment to him, the deeply isolating nature of the facility where Hale will be incarcerated, and the weaponization and inhumanity of solitary confinement, and the bipartisan nature of cracking down on whistleblowers.In the third segment, Sean and Jacquie are joined by Brian Mier, co-editor of Brasil Wire and author of Year of Lead: Washington, Wall Street and the New Imperialism in Brazil to discuss a recent report detailing the severe malpractice and mismanagement of the COVID-19 pandemic by the government of Jair Bolsonaro in Brazil, what political implications this may have on Bolsonaro's support going into the next presidential election, and the killing of Leuvis Manuel Olivero.Later in the show, Sean and Jacquie are joined by Richard Becker, author of “Palestine, Israel and the U.S. Empire” to discuss the anniversary of the assassination of Muammar Gaddafi and the toppling of his government in Libya, why Libya posed a threat to US imperialism and the demonization of Gaddafi in the run up to the war, the history of NATO and its role as the enforcer of imperialism, and hunger strikes in protest of mass incarceration in Palestine.

The Commstock Report Podcast
10/21/21 On Brazil

The Commstock Report Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 5:41


The Commstock Report: Friday, October 21st, 2021.  To get the full report, please sign up using the link below:   https://commstock.com/membership-account/membership-levels/

Media – SECOLAS
Historias 142 - AMLO WTF?

Media – SECOLAS

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 47:17


Dr. Sarah Osten and Dr. Jurgen Buchenau joined Steven to discuss the first three years of Mexico's Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador's presidency and the recent midterm elections.

Mining Stock Daily
Meridian Mining Update: Managing Exploration and Equity

Mining Stock Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 24:11


Meridian Mining Chairman, Gilbert Clark, joins us to provide some corporate updates from both the exploration and drilling work being done at the Cabacal Project in Brazil. He also chats about the recent financing.

Live Inspired Podcast with John O'Leary
Lauren Daigle: 2x Grammy-Winning Singer-Songwriter (ep. 404)

Live Inspired Podcast with John O'Leary

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 72:13


Lauren Daigle is the fastest-selling new artist in the Contemporary Christian genre of the last decade. Critically acclaimed for her unique, soulful + soaring vocals, the singer-songwriter is sincere, down-to-earth and has unwavering faith.  Today, the 2-time Grammy Award winner shares how her Louisiana-roots cultivated her appreciation for music, the uplifting inspiration behind her lyrics, and how rediscovering her childlike wonder helped her find greater joy in life. Lauren also shares how she previously embraced a period of stillness amidst a whirlwind of success, how it propelled her forward into her next fruitful season + what it could mean for you during the COVID-19 pandemic. SHOW NOTES: "We're on the precipice of something extraordinary. If the whole world is still and experiencing a level of silence, great things come on the other side of those experiences." “I need to learn to love change because it is inevitable.” Lauren grew up in Lafayette, Louisiana surrounded by a  culture of music, passion + creativity. Music was a formative way of learning, a way of life + a way to come out of hard, dark times. As a teenager, Lauren was homebound because of the immunocompromising virus cytomegalovirus and music became a way to stay motivated and out of depression.  "Being still showed me the future." "My life experiences allow a texture, tone or an emotion to come out in my voice." After high school, Lauren helped build a church on a mission trip to Brazil. While there, she saw how religion can separate others + learned to see people for who they are versus what they believe in. "There are so many things in life that make us more alike than different." Before becoming an award-winning singer, Lauren wanted to pursue a career in doing pro-bono law for human trafficking victims.   "If you're in a place in life where you have dreams, things you're hoping or longing for and they don't seem to be in close proximity, surround yourself with as much influence as you can while being diligent and persistent in the work before you." Lauren shares the meaning behind some of the lyrics to "This Girl", "Look Up Child" and "You Say". December 25, 2017: After working herself into exhaustion, and many would say at the height of her career, Lauren took close to a year off of work to "be still". Lauren relates that period to pulling back a slingshot before being propelled forward + fruitful in the next season of her life. As her world tour is on pause because of the coronavirus, Lauren again plans to get lost in the stillness to let her mind, heart + spirit be refreshed + revived. Learn more about Lauren Daigle here. LAUREN DAIGLE'S LIVE INSPIRED 7 1. What is the best book you've ever read? Love Does by Bob Goff. [Listen to Bob Goff on Live Inspired Podcast ep. 115!] 2. What is a characteristic or trait that you possessed as a child that you wish you still exhibited today? Climb trees better and get lost in wonder more frequently. 3. Your house is on fire, all living things and people are out. You have the opportunity to run in and grab one item. What would it be? My first thought once all people that matter to me are safe, I don't care. Let's roast marshmallows. My second thought is a $100 bill my grandfather gave me as he was passing away + giving the advice "you better know who you, whose you are and where you are." My third thought is a letterbox filled with letters from my childhood until now. 4. You are sitting on a bench overlooking a gorgeous beach. You have the opportunity to have a long conversation with anyone living or dead. Who would it be? My grandfather because I miss him. Also, Quincy Jones to learn + engulf myself in stories of his career and his personal pains + hardships. 5. What is the best advice you've ever received? Bob Goff told me to always remember who my 8-year-old self is. 6. What advice would you give your 20-year-old self? Steady the course, stay focused, keep moving forward and when you think you've lost yourself, God will always direct you back to who you are. 7. It's been said that all great people can have their lives summed up in one sentence. How do you want yours to read? Lauren Daigle was a woman who loved well, loved rich and loved deep.  *** About our sponsor: Keeley Companies wholeheartedly believes that if you get the people right -the results will follow. They set themselves apart with a forward-thinking culture that empowers their people and fosters loyal partnerships. Keeley Companies are a proud sponsor, partner, and super fan of the Live Inspired Podcast. Learn more about Keeley Companies.

Lofi Poli Sci Podcast
Lo-fi Latin American News: Brazil, Guatemala, Trivia, Ecuador, Haiti, Mexico

Lofi Poli Sci Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 14:06


Today's Topics: Brazil president accused of crimes against humanity, Guatemala veterans take over congress, Latin American Trivia, Ecuador calls state of emergency on crime, Haitian gang wants money for kidnapped victims release, Mexico replaces Columbus statue Always remember that Lofi Poli Sci is more than just me, it's the “we”, that we be. Episode 50 Season 4 (series 366) Email: lofipolisci@planetmail.com Instagram: lofi_poli_sci_podcast Apple Podcast: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/lofi-poli-sci-podcast/id1513691477 Spotify: open.spotify.com/show/4Ii0JKbsKEzkO8SA2u3796 Google Podcast: https://podcasts.google.com/?feed=aHR0cHM6Ly9hbmNob3IuZm0vcy8xNzg1MjhjYy9wb2RjYXN0L3Jzcw YouTube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCaLg4TOVb7nh4laDatZZ3yQ LinkedIn: Michael Pickering #lofipolisci #lofi #politicalscience #news #worldnews #globalnews #lofiGlobalNews #alwaysHope #podcast #lofipoliscipodcast #Top10 #GoodNewsFriday #PickeringUnplugged #LettersOfTheLofiPoliSci #LatinAmerica #Brazil #Guatemala #trivia #latinamericantrivia #Ecuador #Haiti #Mexico

Path To Becoming
Ep. 39 Understanding Your Menstrual Cycle

Path To Becoming

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 40:31


Decades ago, women were revered for bleeding every month. Communities created rituals around our bleed phase and honored women as a portal to life and all creation. Where have we forgotten our feminine wisdom? How have we left our roots behind and how can we fully come back to the cyclic way of our bodies? ABOUT SAM:Sam is on a mission to facilitate your journey along your back to Self. Who did your soul decide to be in this lifetime? Helping you return to the true essence of your soul is the purpose of Sam's work. She is the Founder of Path To Becoming, a platform for self-healing and self-remembrance. She is also a speaker, writer, and activist. She is a Psychic Medium and a Certified Breathwork Practitioner, having received her 400-hour training certification with the Alchemy of Breath Institution.It has been a unique journey that landed Sam to where she is today. Originally from Brazil, Sam went on to travel and live all over the world, in multiple countries and continents, before finding home in the United States.More about Sam's story here.Join The Portal To Self Global Community: www.pathtobecoming.com/Download our FREE Breathwork Clarity: www.pathtobecoming.com/Resources mentioned in the podcast:Womb Awakening - Book 

Grow or Die Podcast
192. Listener Q&A

Grow or Die Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 29:08


1. Dnp for recoup application! Gh/slin recoup as well or all together? 2. Whats the deal with everyone wanting to front load orals pros/cons. 3. How do you know if you've outgrown a coach?  4. Opinion: wellness is highly genetic- do you think Brazil will keep sweeping the US? 2) Could PEDs and time level it out? 5. Timing of gh for hypertrophy (4-8 ius) along with insulin 6. Your honest/scientific opinion on RIR, curious to know 7. Way to decrease SHGB (diet intervention, drugs, etc) 8. Alex Kikel says DNP doesn't target visceral fat. I believe you said it does? Please explain.   This podcast is brought to you by Revive Supplements and RAW Nutrition. Use code Mihaly at checkout for Revive and RAW. Follow us on Instagram! Podcast: @growordie Justin: @jmihaly_ Brandon: @Brandon_longtime  

The DJ Sessions
Futuristic Polar Bears on The DJ Sessions presents the ”Secret Sessions” 10/20/21

The DJ Sessions

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 44:47


Futuristic Polar Bears on The DJ Sessions presents the "Secret Sessions" 10/20/21 About Futuristic Polar Bears - Futuristic Polar Bears combined skill set of accomplished DJs, producers and musicians has meant that Rhys and Fran have become global favourites and voted #113 in DJ Mag Top 150 Poll. In the last 12 months they have smashed dancefloors in over 5 continents including USA & Canada, India, Thailand, Singapore, South Korea, China, Jakarta, Malaysia, Holland, Germany, Italy, Brazil, France, Mauritius, Spain and Ibiza with their indisputable energy and dynamic DJ sets. With countless releases under their belt, the Futuristic Polar Bears' continued their relationship as part of the Smash The House family which saw them play the label's stages at Tommorowland Brazil & Belgium in recent years as well as their House of Madness residency at Amnesia in Ibiza and their latest stadium show in Scotland. 2018 and beyond looks set to commence an arsenal of unmissable collaborations with Wolfpack, Yves V, MATTN, Diego Miranda, Dimitri Vangelis & Wyman, and with plenty more in the pipeline including the launch of their brand new label “CMMD Records” cement the Polar Bears as one of the most exciting production outfits in the industry right now. About "The DJ Sessions" - “The DJ Sessions" is a online/downloadable series featuring the hottest electronic music DJ's with live mixes and interviews, streamed live to a global audience. Check out the website: www.thedjsessions.com   With over 2,100 episodes produced over the last eleven years “The DJ Sessions”, a Twitch and Mixcloud “Featured Partner”, has featured international artists such as: BT, Simon Patterson, Lindsey Stirling, Mako, Morgan Page, Jes, Cut Chemist, Judge Jules, DubFX, DJs From Mars, Rudosa, Thievery Corporation, Sander Van Dorn, GAWP, Hollaphonic, Kissy Sell Out, Somna, David Morales, Roxanne, JB & Scooba, Massimo Vivona, Moulinx, Futuristic Polar Bears, Many Few, Joe Stone, Reboot, Truncate, Scotty Boy, Jody Wisternoff, Benny Bennasi, Dance Loud, Christopher Lawrence, Oliver Twizt, Ricardo Torres, Alex Harrington, 4 Strings, Sunshine Jones, Elite Force, Revolvr, Kenneth Thomas, Paul Oakenfold, George Acosta, Reid Speed, TyDi, Donald Glaude, Jimbo, Ricardo Torres, Hotel Garuda, Bryn Liedl, Rodg, Kems, Mr. Sam, Steve Aoki, Funtcase, Dirtyloud, Marco Bailey, Thousand Fingers, Dirtmonkey, Crystal Method, Beltek, Dyro, Andy Caldwell, Darin Epsilon, Kyau & Albert, Kutski, Vaski, Moguai, Blackliquid, Sunny Lax, Matt Darey, and many more.   In addition to featuring national/international artists “The DJ Sessions” featured hundreds local top DJs from their homebase of Seattle.   We have also undergone a massive upgrade in our TDJS studios and to our TDJS Mobile Studio to full HD streaming and HD audio to make the quality of the shows even better than before. Along with that we have launched a new website that now features our current live streams and past episodes in a much more user friendly mobile/social environment.   About The DJ Sessions Event Services - TDJSES is a WA State Non-profit charitable organization that's main purpose is to provide music, art, fashion, dance, and entertainment to local and regional communities via events and video production programming distributed through broadcast television and the internet for live and archival viewing.   "The DJ Sessions" is a Twitch "Featured Partner" and MixCloud "Featured Partner" series and has been recognized by Apple twice as a "New and Noteworthy" and "Featured Video” podcast. UStream and Livestream have also listed TDJS as a "Featured" stream in their lineups. The TDJS combined live streaming/podcast audience is over 125,000 viewers per week.   For all press inquiries regarding “The DJ Sessions”, or to schedule an interview with Darran Bruce, please contact us at info@thedjsessions.com

All In with Chris Hayes
Mark Meadows retains top GOP lawyer for Jan. 6 probe

All In with Chris Hayes

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 44:45


Guests: Sherrilyn Ifill, Rep. Pete Aguilar, Dr. Vivek Murthy, Sen. Sherrod BrownTonight: The expansion of federal voting rights are blocked in the Senate as Trump's henchmen menace the select committee. Plus, what we're beginning to learn from the select committee about pre-insurrection planning meetings. Then, Senator Sherrod Brown on what might survive in the Build Back Better bill. And, should leaders who knowingly let Covid rip through their country, killing hundreds of thousands be charged with crimes against humanity? It's happening in Brazil, so why not here? 

Business Matters
Brazil president rejects covid lockdown claims

Business Matters

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 52:23


President Jair Bolsonaro rejects claims that he prioritised the economy over his peoples' health in Brazil, as people give moving testimony to senators, who want to bring criminal charges against him. Latvia re-enters lockdown – evening curfew, home schooling and working from home are all back in place. We speak to investigative journalist Inga Springe. An oil tanker has been marooned in the Red Sea off the coast of Yemen for years – loaded with crude oil, and rusting away, it's stuck near one of the world's biggest shipping lanes. The BBC's Ed Butler investigates why nobody is doing anything about it so far. Finally, the Frankfurt Book Fair, one of the biggest of its kind, is back: as people have dived in to reading during the pandemic to escape, we speak with Bodour Al Qasimi, founder and chief executive of publisher Kalimat, who is there. We discuss all this with guests Zyma Islam who is a journalist for the Daily Star in Dhaka, Bangladesh, and in Canada Ralph Silva, educator and broadcaster. (Image: President of Brazil Jair Bolsonaro. Credit: Andressa Anholete/Getty Images)

Dream English Teaching Tips Podcast
Teacher Talk with Tati - Classroom Activities, How Children Learn, and More!

Dream English Teaching Tips Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 38:28


Today I am talking with teacher and teacher trainer Tati! We talk about how children learn, immersive classroom activities, conversational book reading, and how Tati teaches her students in Brazil. We also talk about how Tati teaches her young learners indoors and outdoors. Very interesting conversation, thank you Tati! Follow Tati on Instagram: @tatiteach  Tati's Podcast: Passionate Teachers Podcast ----- Stream Dream English Kids Songs:  Spotify Apple Music Free Kids Song Downloads for English Class: https://www.dreamenglish.com/ Dream English Kids Songs Videos My New Book! 10 Steps To Teach English to Young Learners Book on Amazon

World Business Report
Update: Tesla profit and Latvia in lockdown

World Business Report

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 15:49


We go to Brazil where president Jair Bolsonaro is rejecting accusations of prioritising the economy over the health of his people during the height of the covid pandemic - journalist Karla Mendes in Sao Paolo tells us more. Latvia goes in to lockdown as coronavirus cases rise; we hear from Inga Springe, an investigative journalist in the country. Finally, Tesla reports an uptick in revenue compared with the same period last year, hitting all the expectations of happy investors, says Susan Schmidt of Aviva in the US.

Global News Podcast
Brazil parliament committee condemns Bolsonaro's handling of pandemic

Global News Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 30:32


It recommends he face a series of charges including crimes against humanity. Also: Kenya's president lifts a nationwide coronavirus curfew introduced 18 months ago, and new research into why the woolly mammoth died out suggests humans may be less to blame than previously thought.

The Brazilian Shirt Name Podcast
22nd June 1974 - Brazil V Zaire - Zaire at the World Cup

The Brazilian Shirt Name Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 81:13


Dotun and Tim welcome Ibrahim Mustapha back onto the pod to discuss Zaire at the 1974 World Cup. They look into the politics of Zaire at the time and of talk about that free kick. Ibrahim's book is 'No Longer Naive, African Football's Growing Impact at the World Cup' is avaliable here: https://www.pitchpublishing.co.uk/shop/no-longer-naive

Newshour
Brazil Covid report: Bolsonaro should be charged over pandemic

Newshour

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 52:36


A Senate inquiry in Brazil says President Jair Bolsonaro should be charged for crimes against humanity over his handling of the covid pandemic. It accused the president of deliberately acting too slowly and exposing Brazilians to the virus. Mr Bolsanaro says he is guilty of nothing. Also, the European parliament has awarded the Sakharov human rights prize to the jailed Russian opposition figure, Alexei Navalny. We hear from the Russian author, Boris Akunin. Plus, the Afghan evacuees in the UK who say their lives are on hold, and the Myanmar political prisoner let out of jail and remaining defiant. (Photo: With over 600,000 fatalities, Brazil has the second-highest Covid-related death toll in the world behind only the US. Credit: Reuters)

PRI's The World
Bolsonaro accused of crimes against humanity for COVID negligence

PRI's The World

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 47:21


A Brazilian Senate Commission investigating President Jair Bolsonaro's handling of the COVID-19 crisis in Brazil issued its final report on Wednesday, accusing him of crimes against humanity. The 1,200-page report details malfeasance, the blocking of needed health measures, and the illegal use of public funds. And in Syria, two roadside bombs that detonated under a bridge hit a bus in Damascus on Wednesday, killing 14 people. It's a sign that despite the Assad government's recent efforts to normalize relations abroad, Syria's civil war still rages. Also, after days of speculation, North Korea says it had test-fired a ballistic missile from a submarine in order to enhance its undersea capabilities. It's the first such launch since 2016, and it comes as the US, South Korea and Japan meet to discuss restarting talks with Pyongyang.

Conservative Review with Daniel Horowitz
Ep 976 | Tips for Treating the Virus from the Top COVID Doctor in the World | Guest: Dr. Flavio Cadegiani

Conservative Review with Daniel Horowitz

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 80:00


Today, we have a special treat for you. We are joined by Dr. Flavio Cadegiani, a leading Brazilian endocrinologist who is probably the top COVID doctor in the world. He now advises the FLCCC on treatment as well. Dr. Cadegiani has treated 2,400 patients without losing a single one. He has conducted more comprehensive research on the use of ivermectin, nitazoxanide, and anti-androgens than anyone in the world and has found amazing results from their use, even battling the deadly Brazilian “Gamma” variant. He shares his advice and experience with us. Sadly, rather than being heralded as a hero, he is being trashed by the medical establishment in Brazil, just as we are seeing here.   Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Media Show
Climate change and the challenge for media

The Media Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 28:10


Heat pumps, net zero, decarbonisation, the Paris agreement. With less than 2 weeks to go until Cop26, we're being deluged with detail and jargon. But how much do you actually understand about climate change? Do you even know what COP actually stands for? (It's Conference of the Parties if you don't). Katie Razzall asks what role the media has in educating us about climate change. Maybe you feel hectored rather than informed? Or maybe you think the media isn't going far enough; if we now face an existential crisis, should journalists dispense with the notion of objectivity and become activists in the fight to save the planet? Guests: Daniela Chiaretti, environment reporter at Brazil's biggest financial newspaper Valor Econômico, Natasha Clark, environment correspondent for The Sun, Tom Chivers, science editor for UnHerd, and Wolfgang Blau, co-founder of the Oxford Climate Journalism Network. Presenter: Katie Razzall Studio engineer: Tim Heffer Producer: Richard Hooper

The Candid Frame: Conversations on Photography
TCF Ep. 571 - João Velozo

The Candid Frame: Conversations on Photography

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 59:06


Based in Pernambuco, Brazil, João Velozo is a freelance photographer specializing in covering urban violence, human rights, and environmental issues, most specifically those taking place in the Brazilian Northeast.  Once a Biology major, he quit the academic area in order to focus on photography, through which he felt he could promote bigger changes and social justice. His work as a photographer reflects his continuous dedication to humanitarian and environmental causes.    Websites Sponsors Charcoal Book Club Lensrentals.com Curious Society   Workshops   Education Resources: Momenta Photographic Workshops   Candid Frame Resources Download the free Candid Frame app for your favorite smart device. Click here to download for . Click here to download Support the work we do at The Candid Frame by contributing to our Patreon effort.  You can do this by visiting or visiting the website and clicking on the Patreon button. You can also provide a one-time donation via . You can follow Ibarionex on and .

Newshour
Covid: Brazil's Bolsonaro 'should be charged with crimes against humanity'

Newshour

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 49:00


The report is the culmination of a six-month inquiry that has revealed scandals and corruption in government. President Bolsonaro has been accused of failing to control the virus that has killed more than 600,000 Brazilians. Also on the programme: we hear from one of the prisoners released in Myanmar; and how pig kidneys could be used in surgery on humans. (Image: Brazil's President Jair Bolsonaro gestures during the ceremony for the Modernization of Occupational Health and Safety Regulations on 7 October 2021. Credit: Reuters/Marcelino)

World Business Report
Brazil's economic challenges

World Business Report

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 26:27


A Brazilian parliamentary committee is calling for President Bolsonaro to face charges. These would be related to Mr Bolsonaro's handling of the coronavirus pandemic, which has claimed the lives of more than 600,000 Brazilians. We get a sense of Brazil's economic challenges as a result of how Covid ripped through the country, from economist Daniel Duque of the Brazilian Institute of Economics. Also in the programme, the BBC's Ed Butler reports on a rusting oil tanker moored off the coast of Yemen that poses a major environmental risk. Plus, as the world's largest book fair gets under way in Frankfurt, we hear how the pandemic has impacted book sales from Bodour Al Qasimi, founder of children's publisher Kalimat in the United Arab Emirates, who is also president of the International Publishers' Association.

The Onside Zone with Big O
Podcast Wednesday - MLS Way More Physical Than Brazil 10 20 2021

The Onside Zone with Big O

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 3:53


Big O talks the physicality of MLS

Fault Lines
President Jair Bolsonaro to be Charged with Crimes Against Humanity

Fault Lines

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 168:59


On this episode of Fault Lines, hosts Jamarl Thomas and Shane Stranahan talk about the constitutionality of qualified immunity, the possible genocide charges against President Jair Bolsonaro, the FBI raid on a Russian oligarch's mansion, Haitian kidnappings and deportations, and the supply chain break in America right now.Guests:Joseph Blaettler - Former Deputy Chief of Police and professor of criminology | Supreme Court Upholds Qualified ImmunityJoe Key - Former lieutenant for the Baltimore Police Department with over 25 years of experience | Supreme Court Upholds Qualified ImmunityPaulo Sotero - Retired fellow and former Director of the Wilson Center's Brazil Institute | Bolsonaro Could Face Homicide ChargesLee Stranahan - Sputnik News analyst and host of The Back Story | FBI Raids Russian Oligarch's Mansion in Washington DC & Virginia Governor RaceLeo Flores - Political Analyst and Latin America Campaign Coordinator at Code Pink | Haitian Kidnappings EscalateProf. Richard Wolff - Professor of economics Emeritus | Scale of Supply Chain Breaks & Looney Save A Buck Policy that Spawned It: 100 Ships Off the CoastIn the first hour Joseph Blaettler and Joe Key joined the show to talk about the Supreme Court's decision to uphold qualified Immunity. We had a conversation around the constitutionality of qualified immunity and if it should be eliminated as a right police officers have. Paulo Sotero also joined the show to talk about the possible charges of homicide, genocide and crimes against humanity that President Jair Bolsonaro could be charged with.In the second hour Fault Lines was joined by Lee Stranahan for a discussion on the FBI raid into Russian tycoon Oleg Deripaska. Lee says this raid is a PR stunt so the FBI can use this as leverage in the future. Leo Flores also joined the conversation to talk about the surge in kidnappings in Haiti.In the third hour Professor Richard Wolff joined the conversation to talk about the supply chain break in America right now as 100 cargo ships are unable to return to port.

Daily News Brief
Daily News Brief for Wednesday, October 20, 2021

Daily News Brief

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 15:42


Do you love the CrossPolitic Daily News Brief? Would you consider becoming a Fight Laugh Feast Club Member? Go to FLF Network dot com and click “join the club.” We are committed to bringing the sword of God's word to everything on this planet. This is what we mean by rowdy Christians. God's word cuts all our folly, slices through all our pride, and confronts all our sin. This is considered very rude and unseemly to all the fleshly elites. And we are not sorry at all. In fact, we plan to do it more. So if you want to help us make the ungodly squirm, become a club member today. Go to FLF Network dot com and click on “join the club.” And we promise not to stop being rowdy. 127 Washington State Patrol employees let go because of vaccine mandate https://www.khq.com/news/127-washington-state-patrol-employees-let-go-because-of-vaccine-mandate/article_829db9fc-30dd-11ec-bb28-4726bc8c3a54.html 25 firefighters file lawsuit against Spokane mayor, fire chief over vaccine mandate https://www.krem.com/article/news/health/coronavirus/firefighters-lawsuit-city-of-spokane/293-5398a3d4-194d-4448-9111-b25420a365a8 But then there is this: Roll Clip: https://www.king5.com/article/news/health/coronavirus/vaccine/reports-wsu-football-coach-nick-rolovich-fired-after-refusing-to-get-covid-19-vaccine/281-e6fde806-5132-4411-a089-c38c2856ab0f Props to Nick Rolovich and his four assistant coaches that followed his lead. The news, along with the president of WAZU, keep pushing the narrative that Coach Nick would not follow the University's requirements. But what actually happened, is that WSU, and probably the Governor for that matter, refused to grant him a religious exemption. That is criminal and I hope he sues, wins, and buys his former Athletic Director a backbone. My friend, Steve Deace, texted me this article, so hold onto your hats: Marine veteran wants to sue Walmart after pharmacist denied him access to ivermectin https://www.theblaze.com/news/marine-veteran-sue-walmart-pharmacist-ivermectin According to the Blaze: “A retired marine from Albert Lea, Minnesota, wants to take Walmart to court after a pharmacist refused to fill his doctor's prescription for ivermectin to treat his case of COVID-19. Bill Salier, a Marine Corps veteran who served in Somalia and a former U.S. Senate candidate, shared his story Monday on the "Steve Deace Show," describing how a local Walmart pharmacist refused to fulfill a doctor's prescription for ivermectin for both him and his wife, who had each come down with COVID-19. Salier, 53, told BlazeTV host Steve Deace that he began feeling sick on Oct. 1, and after testing he was found positive for COVID-19. After his diagnosis, Salier said he attempted to receive monoclonal antibody treatments by applying through the Minnesota Resource Allocation Platform, but his requests went unanswered. "We never so much as heard a word back, not even in acknowledgement that the requests had been put in," Salier said. Failing that, Salier obtained a doctor's prescription for ivermectin… "The prescription was sent in to our local Walmart, here in Albert Lea, Minnesota, and it was refused to be filled by the pharmacist. This pharmacist contacted my wife, telling her that he would not fill it. My wife stated that he did not have the right to stand between our physician's prescription and the patent, he asserted that he did have that right and he refused to do so," Salier said. Salier says he and his wife were left in "limbo" after the pharmacist continued to deny them access to ivermectin, even after their physician called him to discuss the matter. "We were faced with either continuing to suffer and quite possibly ending up in the hospital," he told Deace, explaining that they decided to take a risk and purchased a horse paste version of the drug that is not intended for human consumption and could be dangerous if overdosed. "I was forced with this decision and I was either going to lay there, suffer, and be at life's peril of losing my time with my family, or I was going to eat that horse paste. And down the hatch it went," Salier said. Fortunately, Salier did not overdose and reported to Deace that "within eight hours" he began to feel relief from his COVID-19 symptoms. Now, he says he wants a reckoning with Walmart and the pharmacist who denied him access to ivermectin. "If you ever wanted to find out what it is to punch a Marine in the face and what type of response you're gonna get, well, America, you're about to see the type of response that you get. Because if you take on me and my family, and you stand between our physician and the health care that they have prescribed to me as a life-saving thing — in my opinion that is what it did — then you have got a fight on your hands and I am coming for that fight." Salier is partnering with We the Patriots USA, a nonprofit organization that defends civil liberties, to raise money to file a federal lawsuit against the pharmacist and Walmart.” Mission First Coffee: "Calling all coffee lovers! Mission First Coffee is a company owned and run by friends of ours that offer specialty coffee shipped directly to your doorstep. 10% of every order goes to Paul Washer's HeartCry Missionary Society. With a no-questions-asked, money-back guarantee, you know the coffee is going to be good. Head over to missionfirstcoffee.com to try it out yourself and support missionary work around the world!" Pfizer took hard line in push for profit https://www.washingtonpost.com/world/2021/10/19/secret-vaccine-contracts-with-governments-pfizer-took-hard-line-push-profit-report-says/?utm_campaign=wp_main&utm_medium=social&utm_source=facebook&fbclid=IwAR1RfM15QG2VKhlQ6eoKuRuV5yVBOScKDlzq2uFOAaL-_1wp6Dkn5kA4ndQ According to the Washington Post: “The coronavirus vaccine developed by Pfizer and BioNTech has proved a success. First to receive emergency use authorization in the United States, the Pfizer shot has become the world's most popular, with 3.5 billion doses purchased. Sales could double in 2022, according to projections. Analytics firm Airfinity this week predicted Pfizer will sell $54.5 billion worth of coronavirus vaccine next year, almost twice the value of Moderna's sales. In the article I could only find one country and its related pricing: “Brazil signed a $1 billion contract with the drug giant for 100 million doses. “ “Pfizer has formalized 73 deals for its coronavirus vaccine. According to Transparency International, a London-based advocacy group, only five contracts have been formally published by governments, and these with “significant redactions.”” John Piper finally chimes in on the vaccine debate, and the title of his post is: “A Reason to Be Vaccinated: Freedom” https://www.desiringgod.org/articles/a-reason-to-be-vaccinated-freedom He begins the article with: “My aim in this article is to encourage Christians to be vaccinated, if they can do so with a good conscience and judicious medical warrant.” And because I really do like John Piper, I am not going to read the rest of the article to you and further damage the respect I have for him...Ugh. The Biden administration is rolling back its awful bank-account-monitoring proposal but the new plan is pretty bad too https://notthebee.com/article/the-biden-administration-is-rolling-back-its-awful-bank-account-monitoring-proposal-but-the-new-plan-is-pretty-bad-too According to Not the Bee: “We all know that for months now the Biden administration has had grand designs for closely monitoring pretty much every single private bank account in the United States. Well, the backlash to that plan was so strong that Washington Democrats have retreated to an alternative proposal, but frankly that one stinks too:” According to the Wall Street Journal: https://www.wsj.com/articles/irs-bank-reporting-democrats-11634658560 “Democrats are trying to salvage the Biden administration's proposal to expand annual bank-account reporting to the Internal Revenue Service, fighting uphill against mounting opposition from the financial-services industry and Republicans. Sens. Ron Wyden (D., Ore.) and Elizabeth Warren (D., Mass.) will detail an updated version of the tax-compliance plan on Tuesday that will include a $10,000 annual threshold before reports are required, according to prepared remarks from Mr. Wyden. That is an increase from the administration's broader floor, which would include accounts with at least $600 in inflows, outflows or transactions.” Dont we have a right to privacy? Should the number not be $10,000 or $600, but zero, zilch, zip? Portland sets new homicide record, uses traffic barrels to combat drive-by shootings https://www.foxnews.com/us/portland-oregon-sets-new-homicide-record According to Fox News: “The number of homicides in Portland has now surpassed its previous annual record of 66, set in 1987 – and there are still more than two months to go in the calendar year. As of Tuesday, Oregon's largest city has recorded 67 killings so far this year, three-quarters of which have been carried out by firearms, according to the Associated Press. The total number of shootings – around 1,000 – has also left an additional 314 people injured. Nationally, homicides increased by nearly 30% from 2019 to 2020, based on FBI data. However, in Portland, deadly violence is increasing at a faster rate than nearly all major cities, with an 83% increase in homicides in 2020, according to the Associated Press. Portland has seen more homicides in 2021 than some larger cities, including San Francisco, and it's had twice as many slayings as its larger Pacific Northwest neighbor, Seattle. Other hard-hit Western cities include the Albuquerque, New Mexico, metro area, which has about 679,000 residents and has seen a record 97 homicides this year. Portland police have struggled to quell the violence, with the bureau 128 officers below authorized strength. Since August 2020, about 200 officers have left the department. Many, in their exit interviews, cited low morale, lack of support from city officials and burnout from months of racial justice protests, which often ended in plumes of tear gas and confrontation but have largely died down since last summer.” Closing This is Gabriel Rench with Crosspolitic News. Support Rowdy Christian media by joining our club at fightlaughfeast.com, downloading our App, and head to our annual Fight Laugh Feast Events. With your partnership, together we will fight outdated and compromised media, engage news and politics with the gospel, and replace lies and darkness with truth and light. Go to fightlaughfeast.com to take all these actions. Have a great day. Lord bless

The Best Pick movie podcast

Best Pick with John Dorney, Jessica Regan and Tom Salinsky Episode 206: Brazil (commentary) Released 20 October 2021 For this episode, we watched Brazil written by Tom Stoppard, Charles McKeown and Terry Gilliam and directed by Gilliam. The cast include Jonathan Pryce, Kim Greist, Michael Palin, Robert de Niro, Katherine Helmond, Ian Holm, Bob Hoskins, Ian Richardson and Peter Vaughan. The Los Angeles Film Critics Association awarded it Best Picture, Best Screenplay and Best Director but it won no Oscars despite nominations for its screenplay and art direction. It has a 98% rating on Rotten Tomatoes. We've been nominated in the 11th Annual Lovie Awards. Please vote for us - there's only one day to go. https://vote.lovieawards.com/PublicVoting#/2021/podcasts/general-series/arts-entertainment To send in your questions, comments, thoughts and ideas, you can join our Facebook group, Tweet us on @bestpickpod or email us on bestpickpod@gmail.com. You can also Tweet us individually, @MrJohnDorney, @ItsJessRegan or @TomSalinsky. You should also visit our website at https://bestpickpod.com and sign up to our mailing list to get notified as soon as a new episode is released. Just follow this link: http://eepurl.com/dbHO3n. BEST PICK – the book is out in February 2022 and is available now for pre-order. From the publisher https://tinyurl.com/best-pick-book-rowman UK Amazon https://amzn.to/3zFNATI US Amazon https://www.amzn.com/1538163101 UK bookstore https://www.waterstones.com/book/9781538163108 US bookstore https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/best-pick-john-dorney/1139956434 If you enjoy this podcast and you'd like to help us to continue to make it, you can now support us on Patreon for as little as £2.50 per month. Thanks go to all of the following lovely people who have already done that. Alex Frith, Alex Wilson, Alexander Capstick, Alison Sandy, Andrew Jex, Andrew Straw, Ann Blake, Anna Barker, Anna Coombs, Anna Elizabeth Rawles, Anna Jackson, Anna Joerschke, Anna Smith, Annmarie Gray, Anthea Murray, Ben Squires, Brad Morrison, Carlos Cajilig, Caroline Moyes Matheou, Catherine Jewkes, Chamois Chui, Charlotte, Claire Carr, Claire Creighton, Claire McKevett, Craig Boutlis, Daina Aspin, Dave Kloc, David Crowley, David Gillespie, David Hanneford, Della, Drew Milloy, Elis Bebb, Elizabeth McClees, Elizabeth McCollum, Eloise Lowe, Elspeth Reay, Esther de Lange, Evelyne Oechslin, Fiona, Flora, frieMo, Gavin Brown, Helen Cousins, Helle Rasmussen, Henry Bushell, Ian C Lau, Imma Chippendale, James Murray, Jane Coulson, Jess McGinn, Jo B, Joel Aarons, Jonquil Coy, Joy Wilkinson, Judi Cox, Julie Dirksen, Kate Butler, Kath, Katy Espie, Kurt Scillitoe, Lawson Howling, Lewis Owen, Linda Lengle, Lisa Gillespie, Lucinda Baron von Parker, Margaret Browne, Mary Traynor, Matheus Mocelin Carvalho, Michael Walker, Michael Wilson, Mike Evans, Ms Rebecca K O'Dwyer, Neil Goldstein, nötnflötn, Pat O'Shea, Peter, Richard Ewart, Robert Heath, Robert Orzalli, Ruth, Sally Grant, Sam Elliott, Sarah, Sharon Colley, Simon Ash, Sladjana Ivanis, Tim Gowen, Tom Stockton, Wayne Wilcox, Zarah Daniel.

MMA Fighting
Trocação Franca | Junior Cigano E Rodrigo Minotauro

MMA Fighting

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 81:22


O sétimo episódio do Trocação Franca está pesado. Ex-campeão do UFC, Junior Cigano critica a forma com que foi tratado pelo evento em sua reta final na organização, fala da experiência no prowrestling, e revela as lutas que gostaria de fazer no boxe, MMA e telecatch. Rodrigo Minotauro, ex-detentor dos cinturões do UFC e PRIDE e atual embaixador do UFC no Brasil, analisa o retorno de Paulo Borrachinha neste sábado e as disputas de título de Glover Teixeira e Charles do Bronx, além de atualizar sobre os planos de retorno da franquia ao Brasil pós-pandemia, a volta de Fedor Emelianenko no Bellator, e muito mais. O melhor do MMA brasileiro no Trocação Franca, toda quarta-feira, com o jornalista Guilherme Cruz e convidados. Former UFC heavyweight champion Junior dos Santos stops by to discuss his first experience inside a pro wrestling ring at AEW, being threatened to take fights in his final run in the UFC, and his hit-list in MMA, boxing, and pro wrestling. Then, Antonio Rodrigo Nogueira — a former UFC and PRIDE heavyweight champion who now works as UFC ambassador in Brazil — breaks down the return of Paulo Costa against Marvin Vettori, Glover Teixeira and Charles Oliveira's upcoming title bouts, Fedor Emelianenko's match with Tim Johnson in Bellator, UFC's plans to return to Brazil, and more. Listen to Trocação Franca with Guilherme Cruz every Wednesday to hear from the biggest names on the hottest topics in the Brazilian combat sports world. Follow Guilherme Cruz @Guicruzzz Subscribe: http://goo.gl/dYpsgH Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/u8VvLi Visit our playlists: http://goo.gl/eFhsvM Like MMAF on Facebook: http://goo.gl/uhdg7Z Follow on Twitter: http://goo.gl/nOATUI Read More: http://www.mmafighting.com Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

MMA Fighting
Trocação Franca | Junior Cigano E Rodrigo Minotauro

MMA Fighting

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 81:22


O sétimo episódio do Trocação Franca está pesado. Ex-campeão do UFC, Junior Cigano critica a forma com que foi tratado pelo evento em sua reta final na organização, fala da experiência no prowrestling, e revela as lutas que gostaria de fazer no boxe, MMA e telecatch. Rodrigo Minotauro, ex-detentor dos cinturões do UFC e PRIDE e atual embaixador do UFC no Brasil, analisa o retorno de Paulo Borrachinha neste sábado e as disputas de título de Glover Teixeira e Charles do Bronx, além de atualizar sobre os planos de retorno da franquia ao Brasil pós-pandemia, a volta de Fedor Emelianenko no Bellator, e muito mais. O melhor do MMA brasileiro no Trocação Franca, toda quarta-feira, com o jornalista Guilherme Cruz e convidados. Former UFC heavyweight champion Junior dos Santos stops by to discuss his first experience inside a pro wrestling ring at AEW, being threatened to take fights in his final run in the UFC, and his hit-list in MMA, boxing, and pro wrestling. Then, Antonio Rodrigo Nogueira — a former UFC and PRIDE heavyweight champion who now works as UFC ambassador in Brazil — breaks down the return of Paulo Costa against Marvin Vettori, Glover Teixeira and Charles Oliveira's upcoming title bouts, Fedor Emelianenko's match with Tim Johnson in Bellator, UFC's plans to return to Brazil, and more. Listen to Trocação Franca with Guilherme Cruz every Wednesday to hear from the biggest names on the hottest topics in the Brazilian combat sports world. Follow Guilherme Cruz @Guicruzzz Subscribe: http://goo.gl/dYpsgH Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/u8VvLi Visit our playlists: http://goo.gl/eFhsvM Like MMAF on Facebook: http://goo.gl/uhdg7Z Follow on Twitter: http://goo.gl/nOATUI Read More: http://www.mmafighting.com Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

The Radio Vagabond
215 RIO DE JANEIRO: Samba, Singing and Nomads Giving Back

The Radio Vagabond

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 36:43


Uma recepção calorosa from Rio de Janeiro My first Sunday morning in Rio gave me the quintessential Brazilian experience: chilling on a packed Copacabana beach listening to traditional samba music performed by a group of local friends sitting around a breakfast table. It didn't seem like these people were an organised band, and they weren't doing it to make money from tips. I just got the feeling that they were doing it for the love of samba. How can you not have a smile on your face when you find yourself experiencing this beauty on the world's most iconic beach only a few minutes' walk from where you stay? What a city! The night before, I also got to hear some Brazilian samba. I teamed up with a friend of mine, Shannon from Los Angeles, and asked some locals where we could find a unique samba experience. SATURDAY NIGHT SAMBA We were given insiders information on where to find a tiny samba bar known only to locals. When we arrived, we couldn't believe just how authentic this place was. It was a small bar – kinda like a bodega. The band was not on a stage; they were just sitting around a table with their instruments and drinks. The place was packed, and we were standing around their table in a circle. It was a truly unique experience. After the band put down their instruments in favour of their drinks, we stepped outside onto the street and walked a bit until we came across another very local place where they had a karaoke night. It didn't have any windows, so people walking by could hear the not-so-great 'singers' attempting their versions of famous songs. Shannon's face lit up, and with a big smile, she said, "Hey Palle, let's go in and get a drink". The thing is, Shannon "Sangin' Diva" Pearson is a professional singer. She began her professional career at the age of 15, doing studio work around Los Angeles. Over the years, she's had the privilege of sharing the stage as a backing singer for artists like Natalie Cole, George Duke, Stanley Clark, Al Jarreau, Patti Labelle, Chaka Khan, Evelyn Champagne King, Sean "P-diddy" Combs, Kelis, Leona Lewis, Katy Perry, and many others. She's also appeared on TV shows like Saturday Night Live, Jimmy Kimmel, America's Got Talent, and even How I Met Your Mother. As a solo artist, she's performed all over the world as Sangindiva Shannon. And now this singing diva was about to have her Brazilian debut in a not-so-fancy little karaoke bar in Rio de Janeiro. The people in there had no idea what was about to happen.  Shannon was almost jumping in her seat and smiled like a kid in a candy store when she was flipping through the song folder to pick a song. She then went up to the lady controlling the show and pointed at a song. When it was her turn, we all sensed that this was a professional from the second she was handed the microphone. She connected instantly with the sleepy people in the room with her presence. She then belted out a loud "Hello from Los Angeles California!". And then the music started: Whitney Houston's I Wanna Dance with Somebody. Unlike other karaoke singers, she was not looking at the screen for the lyrics. She was looking at the audience, dancing and spinning around. The people on the street stopped and looked in awe of what was going on. It was like they were looking and thinking, "Wait a minute, didn't Whitney pass away a long time ago?". We ended up staying there for hours, and Shannon kept going back on stage again and again… Check out Shannon's outstanding performance below. https://youtu.be/nZnWVsxriJE ESCADARIA SELARÓN OR SELARÓN STEPS The following day, I met up with Shannon on Copacabana beach, and we were both still high on the musical experience from the night before. We strolled along the beachside, taking in the sights and sounds of this splendid place. We then slowly headed to the next beach over, Ipanema. We found ourselves at the 'hippy market', a lovely little flea market kitted out with artsy items such as musical instruments, brightly coloured shirts, hats, and curiosities.  We then headed up to Escadaria Selarón, also known as the Selarón Steps – a world-famous steps attraction in Rio de Janeiro and the work of Chilean-born artist Jorge Selarón who claimed it as his "tribute to the Brazilian people". In 1990, Selarón began renovating the steps that ran along the front of his house. At first, neighbours mocked him for his choice of colours as he covered the steps in fragments of blue, green and yellow tiles – the colours of the Brazilian flag. It started as a side-project to his main passion, painting, but it soon became an obsession. He was constantly running out of money for the project, so he sold paintings to fund his work. It was long and exhausting work, but he continued on and eventually covered the entire set of steps in tiles, ceramics and mirrors. There are 215 steps, measuring 125 metres long, covered in more than 2000 tiles collected from over 60 countries around the world. It is considered an iconic tourist attraction of Rio de Janeiro, with travellers from across the globe visiting it every day. The steps have been featured in many famous magazines, newspapers, travel shows, documentaries, commercials, and music videos.  National Geographic Channel, American Express, Coca-Cola, Kellogg's Corn Flakes, Time and Playboy are just some of the media outlets that have featured the iconic steps. The steps have also been featured in many music videos, such as Snoop Dogg and Pharrell Williams' Beautiful. Snoop and Pharrell are not here today, but halfway up the steps, we met a young local couple with hip-hop names: Biggie and Dou. They were relaxing at a pop-up bar that was selling the iconic Brazilian drink, Caipirinha.   "There are so many amazing things to experience when living in Rio. Us locals are very warm and inviting. The stories are true: we listen to samba and dance every day of our lives. Plus, we give the best warm hugs." I sampled a Brazilian hug from Dou, and they weren't wrong. When I asked about the crime aspect of the city, they said that it is like any city in the world: as locals, there are certain places to avoid at night. Using common sense, they said, is key. Shannon and I ended up having quite a few Caipirinhas. It was a fun weekend with a friend I met on Nomad Cruise 7: a two-week "floating conference at sea" from Spain to Brazil. NOMAD CRUISE I hopped on a cruise ship in Spain with 500 other digital nomads and aspiring entrepreneurs from 42 countries for a two-week networking conference across the Atlantic. I met up with old friends from previous Nomad Cruises and made new friends along the way.  On Nomad Cruise 7, I met Tarek Kholoussy, founder of Nomads Giving Back, who has a corporate background in Wall Street. He was working for Goldman Sachs when he decided to get out of the rat race and become a digital nomad. On the cruise, Tarek gave a talk about his journey and goals: one of which was to create a social enterprise. At the end of his talk, he publicly announced the launch of Nomads Giving Back. A few days after we set foot on land, I pulled Tarek aside in a café in Porto de Galinhas on the east coast of Brazil for a chat. This was before I arrived in Rio. DITCHING CORPORATE FOR SOCIAL Tarek told me he always had a passion for social causes thanks to his entrepreneurial heart, but his background had always been corporate. He joined Nomad Cruise to pitch his Nomads Giving Back concept to the nomad community: to inspire nomads and travellers to give back to the communities they visit.  From his inspiring talk, he was met with overwhelming support from the nomad community, including the founder of Nomad Cruise, Johannes Voelkner, who suggested they collaborate.  "Every digital nomad realises just how amazing our lives are having the opportunity to travel the world and experience things many will never the chance to. And it becomes more meaningful when we are able to engage with local communities we travel to uplift and help develop. The aim is to make this global world feel like a close-knit community helping each other along the way." BACK IN RIO WITH NOMADS GIVING BACK Jumping back to the present in Rio, I met up again with Tarek who found the first project here for Nomads Giving Back. They teamed up with the philanthropic organisation/school Solar Meninos de Luz situated in a favela close to Copacabana. Tarek tells me that the idea for this first NGB-program is inspired by the power of the Nomad Cruise conference, where attendees learn how to improve their digital marketing skills (among many other things). Tarek and the Nomads Giving Back team decided to use some of the funds collected at the fundraising dinner on the ship to create a digital skills program for students who would not otherwise have access to it.  Many digital nomads earn their income from digital skills, and Tarek and the team sought to pay it forward by channelling donations to advance digital skill learning among disadvantaged youth here in Rio de Janeiro. Tarek and I caught up again to talk more about the new project. We both realised how fortunate we are to live a nomadic lifestyle and how much we have always wanted to give back to the communities we visit. "Digital nomads are mostly entrepreneurs working light without the backing of large corporations, so we don't have deep pockets. But there are so many other ways we can give back that doesn't require loads of money. Being a nomad is about freedom of choice, and part of that is defining what is important to you. For instance, in one night at the charity dinner on Nomad Cruise 7, we raised thousands of Euros." "Over and above, nomads are volunteering to help with their skills and talents: like the website and branding and business development. This shows the power of the nomad community and the power connecting through the same principles and values." Solar Meninos de Luz has spent nearly 40 years serving their local community. We were given a tour by Manu, a former student of the school and the perfect ambassador for the program. In fact, she came here when she was only three months old. "We have been here for 27 years doing a great job at educating the local community, with a holistic approach. We have 420 students, 115 volunteers, and 113 employees working in the school. We also provide over 1,200 meals every day as students arrive at 7am and leave at 6pm, so we provide 3 meals to each student every day. It is a lot of hard work but we love what we do here." Manu tells us that the school relies on public and private funds and donations to keep the facilities running.  We walked around the school and met some of the students. We were then treated to a nativity themed music and dance performance by the students. It was really great and so lovely to see the kids singing and dancing. Then an adult choir came onto the stage and gave an incredible performance. MORE ABOUT SOLAR MENINOS DE LUZ In walking distance from Solar Meninos de Luz is the Copacabana Palace, one of Brazil's biggest and most luxurious hotels. It was the location of a fundraising event I was attending for the project. The luxury of the place is quite the contrast to the favela up the road. But that is both the charm and complexity of this historical city. Solar Meninos de Luz is a philanthropic organisation that promotes education, sports, arts and culture, basic healthcare, and professional training support. It was founded 34 years ago and have assisted over 5,000 locals. Famous Brazilian author Paolo Cohelo who wrote The Alchemist (1988) and The Pilgrimage (1987), among many others, is a major long-time sponsor of the school. He donated his villa, which is now part of the campus and serves as the library. After months of planning, the Digital Skills Program officially launched a few months later. Nomads Giving Back were able to teach things like content marketing, SEO, and Facebook, Instagram, and LinkedIn Marketing. The 14 students learned how to think strategically, generate their leads, promote their personal brand, effectively use each social media platform, and much more. Upon completion, they were able to implement what they learned to start and grow their own business or better prepare themselves for job opportunities.  MIT MASTERCARD BLEV KOPIERET Out of nowhere, I received a call from my bank back in Denmark informing me of suspicious activity on my Mastercard. Apparently, some dick in the USA tried to draw $400 from my account. So, my Mastercard was blocked for security purposes, but thankfully your dapper Danish vagabond travels with a spare Visa, so my samba-licious adventures could continue. I later found out that my card was copied by someone moving close to me with some kind of electronic device that copied all the info of the wireless function on my card. Maybe it happened at the market on Sunday, where I was close to a lot of people. Since then, I've gotten a new wallet where my cards are protected in a metal case. SUGARLOAF MOUNTAIN Sugarloaf Mountain is one of Rio's most iconic attractions. It is a beautiful peak that rises 396 meters high and presents a bird's eye view of Rio de Janeiro from the mouth of Guanabara Bay.  The cable car trip up is a sensation, and the panoramic views from the peak are absolutely breath-taking. The original cable car was built in 1912 and then rebuilt in the '70s and again in 2008. I planned to meet up with a few digital nomads for a hike on one of the hills. Then, we planned to catch the cable car to Sugarloaf Mountain to enjoy the sunset. We made it to the summit just in time to watch the sunset. And boy, was the hike worth it. And as the sun was setting with a stunning view of Rio de Janeiro, it's also time to let the sun go down on this episode. My name is Palle Bo, and I gotta keep moving. See ya.      FLASHBACK EPISODES WITH TAREK You should also go back to the archive and listen to the two episodes I recorded with Tarek to learn more about his story. It's genuinely fascinating.  SUPPORT SOLAR MENINOS DE LUZ If you would like to help support the continuous education and development of the youth in Rio de Janeiro, visit their website to find out more. SUPPORT NOMADS GIVING BACK Join the community of nomads giving back by visiting their website to find out how you start your giving back journey today. COVID-19 TRAVEL and TOURISM RULES FOR BRAZIL (OCT 2021) This episode was recorded when Brazil was open for travel. For the latest COVID-19 travel restrictions and tourist regulations, please visit the Brazilian government's official website. Make sure Brazil is open for tourism before booking your trip.

What A Day
Striketober Fest

What A Day

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 23:58


Thousands of John Deere workers are on strike after the company and the United Automobile Workers union failed to negotiate a new contract. Jonah Furman, a staff writer and organizer with Labor Notes, joins us to discuss what led to the Deere strike and the national movement by workers demonstrating for better pay and rights. And in headlines: the Haitian gang that abducted 17 people has asked for $1 million per person in ransom, Brazil's Senate calls for homicide charges against President Jair Bolsonaro for his handling of COVID-19, and the January 6th House commission holds Steve Bannon in criminal contempt. Show Notes: Jonah Furman's Substack, “Who Gets The Bird?” – https://whogetsthebird.substack.com/ Labor Notes – https://labornotes.org/ A More Perfect Union on Deere strike – https://twitter.com/MorePerfectUS/status/1450093618962878467 For a transcript of this episode, please visit crooked.com/whataday Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Tech Transfer IP
Technology Transfer in Brazil with Gilberto Medeiros Ribeiro

Tech Transfer IP

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 46:31


The field of technology transfer looks different all over the world, and in today's episode I'm joined by Gilberto Medeiros Ribeiro, the Director of Innovation and Technology Transfer Coordination at UMFG, who is here to talk about the current technology transfer environment in Brazil. The field is faced with a number of challenges, including a high turnover rate, a federal aversion to funding basic science, and a lack of effective processes. Despite this, Gilberto's office is responsible for some impressive successes over the past few years, including the development of a vaccine and a mosquito trap, and a compounded annual growth in revenue of 25%.   You can expect to walk away from this episode with a deeper understanding of the dynamic nature of technology transfer in a country that operates very differently to the United States, and for which the future is looking promising!    In This Episode: [00:53] What Gilberto's career journey has consisted of up until today. [03:21] How Brazil's university system works.  [04:47] Some of the key differences between the technology transfer field in Brazil in comparison to other parts of the world.  [06:20] An example of the challenges with the technology transfer process in Brazil.  [09:13] The Bayh-Dole Act, and how this differs from Brazil's equivalent.  [10:13] Three ways that technology transfer offices are structured in Brazil.  [11:51] Why having private employees to license technology is often better for technology transfer offices.  [12:24] Benefits of licensing university technologies to companies that professors have started up (as a one-time deal).  [14:21] A few of the perks of the Brazilian equivalent of the Bayh-Dole Act.  [15:18] Challenges for cooperation between Brazilian universities and the private sector.  [17:05] Gilberto explains how his office works with start-ups, and what this environment looks like currently, using an example.  [19:30] Macro economic policies which have hindered innovation in Brazil in the past, and how this has changed recently.   [21:12] How Gilberto feels about the future of technology transfer.  [23:01] A positive impact of the COVID-19 pandemic.  [23:30] Gilberto's opinion on IP rights and contracts in technology transfer in university settings.   [24:55] Practices that Gilberto sees as critical to handling IP processes at universities.  [27:35] How Gilberto's team at UMFG is structured.  [29:10] The unexpected highlight of the past year for Gilberto and his team.  [29:40] Revenue growth that Gilberto's office is experiencing, and some of their other impressive metrics. [32:58] Factors that Gilberto believes are vital to the success of technology transfer. [34:20] How Gilberto's office deals with foreign companies, and the percentage of patent filings that come from overseas.  [36:29] Corporations that Gilberto's office has partnered with.  [37:24] Gilberto shares some of the greatest success stories that have come from his office.  [38:13] The main challenges that Gilberto's office is facing currently.  [39:52] How the federal university programs in Brazil assist unrepresented groups in getting into universities.   [41:04] Diversity in Gilberto's team, and the long road ahead for diversity in STEM field as a whole.  [43:01] Brazil's version of AUTM.  [44:11] Gilberto's view on credentialing, and how this differs from Brazil's view on it. [44:46] Three wishes that Gilberto has for the future of technology transfer.     Find Gilberto: Email LinkedIn  

Pod Save the World
We booked a Nobel Prize winner

Pod Save the World

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 92:21


Tommy and Ben discuss the murder of a British member of parliament, Colin Powell's legacy, missiles, climate change, the fight against Viktor Orban, kidnappings in Haiti, democracy in Sudan, covid in Brazil, her majesty's cocktails, why Australia hates Ted Cruz, and wizards. Then Nobel Peace Prize winning journalist Maria Ressa joins to talk about her battles against President Rodrigo Duterte and Facebook.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

The Final Word Cricket Podcast
Yes, it most certainly is a double hat-trick

The Final Word Cricket Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 96:38


Season 11, Ep 4: Four wickets in four balls. The talking point of the cricket week, after Curtis Campher did it for Ireland. Scotland also had a win after a huge comeback, so we got Matt Roller from Cricinfo to make his Final Word debut, telling us all about the early T20 World Cup quallies, warm-ups, and the IPL final. Also on the show this week: Brazil's women start their next campaign, the Mr Sheffield Shield is back, the WBBL beings, the county champo has yet another format, and Cricket Australia are being pointlessly stubborn about making things much harder than they need to be. What a surprise.Your Nerd Pledge number this week:4.35 - The Rev. Dylan NicholsSend us a Nerd Pledge at patreon.com/thefinalwordFind previous episodes at finalwordcricket.com44% off Wisden Cricket Monthly at bit.ly/wcmtfw20% off primo WoodstockCricket.co.uk kit with the code TFW20Check out Brick Lane Brewing on Instagram, FB and TwitterThe Final Word is part of the Bad Producer Podcast NetworkTitle track by Urthboy See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

In The Game Podcast
123: Caring for girls one toilet at a time by Mark Balla

In The Game Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 41:39


Today, we continue the conversation with a man who is full of SHIT!  Don't get mad at me Mom for swearing, Mark Balla is actually the “Toilet Warrior” and has been advocating and changing the story about sanitation worldwide.In 2013, he founded the not-for-profit “We can't wait”.  He then joined forces with Rotary and began using his business connections to Mumbai to change the reality for girls in that region and then the country as a whole.  Did you know that of the 1.4M schools in India, 400,000 of them do NOT have toilets?  And the schools that do have toilets, do not have separate ones for girls. So, why does this matter so much? 25% of girls in India drop out and skip school when they reach puberty.  When their menstruation begins, its just too much to go to school and be humiliated.Many of these girls homes also do NOT have toilets so after holding their bodily functions in all day, their desperate attempts to go to the bathroom results in 50% of sexual assaults occurring while these innocent girls are seeking a quiet place to do so.If you want to dive deeper into this reality that's happening right now before our eyes, read Mark's book the Toilet Warrior or google his TedX talk to be enthralled.As sanitation goals worldwide continued to not be met; this linguist and global supply-chain expert from Melbourne took it on.  Thanks to Mark, he is proving the truth of his own TedX quote, that “Children are the most spectacular agents for LASTING change”! The Goods on Mark:* Accomplished public speaker on humanitarian issues both in Australia and internationally, ready to change your perception of the world we live in* Founder of a charity with an international focus on improving life opportunity for girls and women in developing countries* A deep passion for opportunities in corporate social responsibility* Board level experience in both for profit and not for profit environments in both Australia, India and Globally* Committed advocate for global causes that matter* Fluent in German, Spanish and Portuguese, conversant in French* Inter-cultural business specialist* Extensive experience outsourcing to China, India and SE Asia* 15 years experienced in manufacturing, and supply chain management in China.* Five years experience with manufacturing supply chains in India.* Five years experienced with IT supply chain and IT project management in India and Sri Lanka* Knowledge of supply chain processes in Brazil. * Five years of general business experience in Germany.  Contact Mark:         LinkedIn: linkedin.com/in/markballa1         TedX talk: youtube.com/watch?v=r3xr13xFfto   Get Mark's Sister Trace's book “Cycling Together” at www.TraceBalla.com (based on these incredible Indian girls) Go to http://www.bit.ly/InTheGamePodcast to become part of this growing community of DREAMERS!

Crystal Paine Show
144. You Were Made for This Moment (with Max Lucado)

Crystal Paine Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 30:54


Are you looking for your moment? I am really honored that we have in the studio today, Max Lucado. I shared with him early on that I only have people on the show, whose work, or life, or what they share has deeply impacted my life. Max Lucado is from Texas. He is an author, father, grandfather, husband, and minister. Max tells us about how he got started in the church and Max acknowledges his struggles and what he overcame when he pivoted towards the Lord and reflecting on what he cherishes now are some of things that he overlooked when he was younger. We talk about one of the only books I have ever read by him, a children's book about Punchinello called You Are Special and besides his newest book release, You Were Made For This Moment: Courage for Today and Hope for Tomorrow. This story comes from the book of Esther from the bible and talks about experiences of overcoming challenges. Max also gives us examples of different Mordecai moments. I share with Max how Punchinello has deeply, deeply impacted my life, even for a little children's book. The concept that our Maker, what he says and what he thinks about us is what sticks. It is a very powerful message. It goes to show us how the story impacts us in a deep way. Max shares the story behind the creation of Punchinello and we dive into how something that can come from an assignment instead of inspiration and shows that God blesses those who keep their promise. We talk about showing up and how God uses that moment of showing up, even when you don't recognize it. That you never know when your moment will make a difference and if you are looking for encouragement, this is a great book to check out.   In This Episode [00:37] - Welcome to The Crystal Paine Show today we have in the studio is Max Lucado. [01:01] - I am probably one of the few people in all the world that has only read one and the one that I read was a children's book.   [04:54] - Everyone listening, how God can use those things that he is calling you to do even though it might feel like, “I got to get this done because this is an assignment” but you never know how he is going to use that for His Glory. [05:10] - I'd love for you, for the few people who maybe don't know the whole host of things you have done and who you are, just introduce yourself to us. [07:15] - You met the Lord and then you kind of immediately signed up to be a missionary, talk to us about that. [09:24] - And then when you were in Brazil, is when you started writing, how did that come to be? [12:19] - How can a good God be allowing all the things that have happened in the world in the last 18 months, talk to us about that. [15:14] - What is it about the Esther story that you see that is going to infuse people with hope? [16:13] - It reveals to us truly the, also kinda the quiet providence of God, because it's famous for being one of the two books in the bible where the name of God does not appear and yet the fingerprints of God are on every paragraph. [19:03] - The story is not really positive about them in the beginning because they don't, they have blended into the culture. They are so Persian in identity, in language, in dress, in style, and culture that he can work for the king and she can sleep with the king and they never - no one knows they are Jewish. [22:20] - What does that look like practically, for people who they're saying “I want to do something with my life, I feel like there's more than just what I am living for right now but I don't even know how to take the first step. [26:07] - But they are scared; it's hard; what encouragement would you have for someone who is feeling that way?   Links & ResourcesCrystal Paine Max Lucado   Books You Are Special (Punchinello) by Max LucadoYou Were Made For This Moment: Courage for Today and Hope for Tomorrow by Max Lucado Social Media Crystal Paine on Instagram Crystal Paine on Twitter Crystal Paine on Goodreads   Money Saving Mom Money Saving Mom on Facebook Money Saving Mom Deal Seekers Facebook group crystal@moneysavingmom.com   Max Lucado on Facebook Max Lucado on Instagram Max Lucado on Twitter   The Max Lucado Encouraging Word Podcast