Podcasts about trustworthy

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Assumption of and reliance on the honesty of another party

  • 1,477PODCASTS
  • 2,147EPISODES
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  • 1DAILY NEW EPISODE
  • Jan 20, 2022LATEST
trustworthy

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Best podcasts about trustworthy

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Latest podcast episodes about trustworthy

The Situation with Michael Brown
Dstrust is Americans Default Emotion

The Situation with Michael Brown

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2022 35:01


Hour 2: Edelman's Trust Top Ten and why it's scary. Business is the most trust entity according to Edelman. It's also under constant attack from the progressive left. Biden's speech is worthless.

Dr. John Barnett on SermonAudio
Absolutely Trustworthy--You Can Trust God'S Scientific Accuracy From Beginning To End

Dr. John Barnett on SermonAudio

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 50:00


A new MP3 sermon from DTBM, International is now available on SermonAudio with the following details: Title: Absolutely Trustworthy--You Can Trust God'S Scientific Accuracy From Beginning To End Subtitle: End Of The World, Armageddon & Speaker: Dr. John Barnett Broadcaster: DTBM, International Event: Sunday Service Date: 1/19/2022 Length: 50 min.

Mount Carmel Ministries
Jesus is Trustworthy: Session 9: Ted Hill

Mount Carmel Ministries

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 61:56


In an age of many complications, evil and frantic activity, it can be easy to wonder how it is possible for light to not be overwhelmed by so much darkness around us. Jesus was never rattled by accusation or confrontation; Jesus never gave up on the disciples who didn't seem to get what Jesus was about; Jesus never lost interest when it seemed people were trying to use His notoriety to gain something for themselves; Jesus never succumbed to the pressures around Him. In the midst of what would definitely defeat me, He was compassionate, spoke with wisdom, taught with weight and eternal substance, proclaimed with joy, and engaged with love. It boggles my mind what Jesus did and what Jesus still does. We will walk through some of Jesus' parables, miracles, and challenges to the disciples, religious leaders, and gentiles to uncover how beautifully trustworthy Jesus is in our lives today! Ted Hill is the program director at the Canadian Lutheran Bible Institute.

Mount Carmel Ministries
Jesus is Trustworthy: Session 8: Ted Hill

Mount Carmel Ministries

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 47:45


In an age of many complications, evil and frantic activity, it can be easy to wonder how it is possible for light to not be overwhelmed by so much darkness around us. Jesus was never rattled by accusation or confrontation; Jesus never gave up on the disciples who didn't seem to get what Jesus was about; Jesus never lost interest when it seemed people were trying to use His notoriety to gain something for themselves; Jesus never succumbed to the pressures around Him. In the midst of what would definitely defeat me, He was compassionate, spoke with wisdom, taught with weight and eternal substance, proclaimed with joy, and engaged with love. It boggles my mind what Jesus did and what Jesus still does. We will walk through some of Jesus' parables, miracles, and challenges to the disciples, religious leaders, and gentiles to uncover how beautifully trustworthy Jesus is in our lives today! Ted Hill is the program director at the Canadian Lutheran Bible Institute.

Mount Carmel Ministries
Jesus is Trustworthy: Session 7: Ted Hill

Mount Carmel Ministries

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 26:12


In an age of many complications, evil and frantic activity, it can be easy to wonder how it is possible for light to not be overwhelmed by so much darkness around us. Jesus was never rattled by accusation or confrontation; Jesus never gave up on the disciples who didn't seem to get what Jesus was about; Jesus never lost interest when it seemed people were trying to use His notoriety to gain something for themselves; Jesus never succumbed to the pressures around Him. In the midst of what would definitely defeat me, He was compassionate, spoke with wisdom, taught with weight and eternal substance, proclaimed with joy, and engaged with love. It boggles my mind what Jesus did and what Jesus still does. We will walk through some of Jesus' parables, miracles, and challenges to the disciples, religious leaders, and gentiles to uncover how beautifully trustworthy Jesus is in our lives today! Ted Hill is the program director at the Canadian Lutheran Bible Institute.

Mount Carmel Ministries
Jesus is Trustworthy: Session 6: Ted Hill

Mount Carmel Ministries

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 65:04


In an age of many complications, evil and frantic activity, it can be easy to wonder how it is possible for light to not be overwhelmed by so much darkness around us. Jesus was never rattled by accusation or confrontation; Jesus never gave up on the disciples who didn't seem to get what Jesus was about; Jesus never lost interest when it seemed people were trying to use His notoriety to gain something for themselves; Jesus never succumbed to the pressures around Him. In the midst of what would definitely defeat me, He was compassionate, spoke with wisdom, taught with weight and eternal substance, proclaimed with joy, and engaged with love. It boggles my mind what Jesus did and what Jesus still does. We will walk through some of Jesus' parables, miracles, and challenges to the disciples, religious leaders, and gentiles to uncover how beautifully trustworthy Jesus is in our lives today! Ted Hill is the program director at the Canadian Lutheran Bible Institute.

Mount Carmel Ministries
Jesus is Trustworthy: Session 5: Ted Hill

Mount Carmel Ministries

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 23:48


In an age of many complications, evil and frantic activity, it can be easy to wonder how it is possible for light to not be overwhelmed by so much darkness around us. Jesus was never rattled by accusation or confrontation; Jesus never gave up on the disciples who didn't seem to get what Jesus was about; Jesus never lost interest when it seemed people were trying to use His notoriety to gain something for themselves; Jesus never succumbed to the pressures around Him. In the midst of what would definitely defeat me, He was compassionate, spoke with wisdom, taught with weight and eternal substance, proclaimed with joy, and engaged with love. It boggles my mind what Jesus did and what Jesus still does. We will walk through some of Jesus' parables, miracles, and challenges to the disciples, religious leaders, and gentiles to uncover how beautifully trustworthy Jesus is in our lives today! Ted Hill is the program director at the Canadian Lutheran Bible Institute.

Mount Carmel Ministries
Jesus is Trustworthy: Session 4: Ted Hill

Mount Carmel Ministries

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 29:47


In an age of many complications, evil and frantic activity, it can be easy to wonder how it is possible for light to not be overwhelmed by so much darkness around us. Jesus was never rattled by accusation or confrontation; Jesus never gave up on the disciples who didn't seem to get what Jesus was about; Jesus never lost interest when it seemed people were trying to use His notoriety to gain something for themselves; Jesus never succumbed to the pressures around Him. In the midst of what would definitely defeat me, He was compassionate, spoke with wisdom, taught with weight and eternal substance, proclaimed with joy, and engaged with love. It boggles my mind what Jesus did and what Jesus still does. We will walk through some of Jesus' parables, miracles, and challenges to the disciples, religious leaders, and gentiles to uncover how beautifully trustworthy Jesus is in our lives today! Ted Hill is the program director at the Canadian Lutheran Bible Institute.

Mount Carmel Ministries
Jesus is Trustworthy: Session 3: Ted Hill

Mount Carmel Ministries

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 50:00


In an age of many complications, evil and frantic activity, it can be easy to wonder how it is possible for light to not be overwhelmed by so much darkness around us. Jesus was never rattled by accusation or confrontation; Jesus never gave up on the disciples who didn't seem to get what Jesus was about; Jesus never lost interest when it seemed people were trying to use His notoriety to gain something for themselves; Jesus never succumbed to the pressures around Him. In the midst of what would definitely defeat me, He was compassionate, spoke with wisdom, taught with weight and eternal substance, proclaimed with joy, and engaged with love. It boggles my mind what Jesus did and what Jesus still does. We will walk through some of Jesus' parables, miracles, and challenges to the disciples, religious leaders, and gentiles to uncover how beautifully trustworthy Jesus is in our lives today! Ted Hill is the program director at the Canadian Lutheran Bible Institute.

The Credibility Nation Show
Purpose Beyond Profit with Timothy Morgan (CNS 219)

The Credibility Nation Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 6:39


In this episode, Timothy Morgan talks about purpose beyond profit: Marketing that makes a difference in the community by giving. He is a marketing expert, coach, consultant, founder, and CEO of Giver Marketing where he implements a basic marketing system, a simple and effective marketing strategy, to increase revenue and serve growing organizations. Timothy's passion is to get the word out for causes, companies, and leaders through marketing with a mission to bring awareness to meaningful and socially conscious organizations that are making a difference in local communities and beyond. His superpower is generating qualified appointments for coaches, consultants, advisors, brokers, and community leaders doing good in the world. If you're tired of deploying marketing that doesn't work and ultimately wants to add value as a socially conscious business, consider reaching out to Timothy Morgan by visiting his websites https://www.givermarketing.com/ and https://www.linkedin.com/in/coachtimothymorgan/.Mitchell Levy is the Global Credibility Expert at AHAthat, the first AHA leadership (Thought Leadership) platform on the market for thought leaders, experts and companies to unleash their genius to the world. His passion is helping entrepreneurs, business owners and C-Suite Executives get known as thought leaders & become best-selling authors with the AHA platform. He is an accomplished entrepreneur who has created 20 businesses in Silicon Valley including four publishing companies that have published over 800 books. Mitchell is an international best-selling author with 60 business books, has provided strategic consulting to over 100 companies, has advised over 500 CEOs on critical business issues, and has been chairman of the board of a NASDAQ-listed company. Visit https://www.credibilitynation.com to learn more about the Credibility Nation community.Visit https://www.ahathat.com/author to learn how you can become an Amazon best-selling author in 4 months.

Predictable B2B Success
How to be trustworthy and build a culture of innovation

Predictable B2B Success

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 56:09


Dr. Yoram Solomon is a trust and innovation expert.  He has published 16 books, 22 patents, and was one of the creators of Wi-Fi and USB 3.0 technologies, for which he was dubbed "TI's Great Innovator." He has founded several startups and sold a startup company in Silicon Valley. He has held various positions from General Manager of a $100m business unit in a Fortune 200 company to a Vice President of Corporate Strategy and Innovation, and to CEO. Dr. Solomon is an adjunct professor of entrepreneurship and innovation at Southern Methodist University, and formerly at the University of Texas at Dallas.  In this episode, he shares his experiences and research to show us how to be trustworthy and build a culture of innovation via strong relationships. Insights he shares include:  Why is trust important?Is trust a two-way streetWhat's so special about how you look at trust that we haven't heard about beforeHow can you use trust to sell more, or at a higher priceWhere in the organization do you need trust, inside or outside? Which is more importantHow to be trustworthy on a personal levelHow we can ensure we build trust during most interactionsYou seem to combine trust with forming habits. Why? How are those two related and much much more ...

Mount Carmel Ministries
Jesus is Trustworthy: Session 2: Ted Hill

Mount Carmel Ministries

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 61:06


In an age of many complications, evil and frantic activity, it can be easy to wonder how it is possible for light to not be overwhelmed by so much darkness around us. Jesus was never rattled by accusation or confrontation; Jesus never gave up on the disciples who didn't seem to get what Jesus was about; Jesus never lost interest when it seemed people were trying to use His notoriety to gain something for themselves; Jesus never succumbed to the pressures around Him. In the midst of what would definitely defeat me, He was compassionate, spoke with wisdom, taught with weight and eternal substance, proclaimed with joy, and engaged with love. It boggles my mind what Jesus did and what Jesus still does. We will walk through some of Jesus' parables, miracles, and challenges to the disciples, religious leaders, and gentiles to uncover how beautifully trustworthy Jesus is in our lives today! Ted Hill is the program director at the Canadian Lutheran Bible Institute.

Mount Carmel Ministries
Jesus is Trustworthy: Session 1: Ted Hill

Mount Carmel Ministries

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 39:17


In an age of many complications, evil and frantic activity, it can be easy to wonder how it is possible for light to not be overwhelmed by so much darkness around us. Jesus was never rattled by accusation or confrontation; Jesus never gave up on the disciples who didn't seem to get what Jesus was about; Jesus never lost interest when it seemed people were trying to use His notoriety to gain something for themselves; Jesus never succumbed to the pressures around Him. In the midst of what would definitely defeat me, He was compassionate, spoke with wisdom, taught with weight and eternal substance, proclaimed with joy, and engaged with love. It boggles my mind what Jesus did and what Jesus still does. We will walk through some of Jesus' parables, miracles, and challenges to the disciples, religious leaders, and gentiles to uncover how beautifully trustworthy Jesus is in our lives today! Ted Hill is the program director at the Canadian Lutheran Bible Institute.

THE ED MYLETT SHOW
The Dirty Truth About Passion w/ Mike Rowe

THE ED MYLETT SHOW

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 62:47


Should you chase your PASSION or should you SOLVE a PROBLEM? Fill a NEED? Are you ready for the REAL DIRT with one of the SMARTEST and MOST PRACTICAL thinkers today about work in America? MIKE ROWE has been slogging it out in trenches, coal mines, sewers, and garbage dumps for a long time now as the host of DIRTY JOBS. There's a RUGGED, DOWN-TO-EARTH and TRUSTWORTHY quality about Mike.  Coupled with the fact he can take any dirty job, tell a great story, add some humor, and hook you from the start, makes him one of the more unusual and compelling people in television for the past several years.   A self-described chronic freelancer, Mike has worked in more than 350 JOBS on his hit show.  But he's also an in-demand Fortune 500 speaker, podcaster, executive producer, and author as well as a vocal advocate and CEO of the mikeroweWORKS Foundation that debunks myths and promotes the value of skilled trades in the workforce. Mike's got some CAPTIVATING STORIES and SAGE ADVICE about THE NATURE OF WORK you're going to want to hear.  Mike redefines why and how PASSION should be a part of what you do but probably not in a way you've thought of before. He has a great take on the value of HARD WORK and MASTERING SKILLS that leads you to a path to success, whether you work with your HANDS, your HEAD, or some combination of both. There's also a big disconnect going on right now about the nature of EDUCATION and matching it up with meaningful work. Mike talks a lot about changing how we should REFRAME our thinking about both areas, and why we should always approach our work with a sense of HUMILITY AND CURIOSITY.  You, your children, and pretty much everyone you know are going to spend the better part of your lives working.  Doesn't it make sense that you should give a lot of THOUGHT about what it's going to take to be HAPPY and SUCCESSFUL in whatever you choose to do? This week's show with Mike Rowe will start that important conversation you need to have with yourself. This one is really gonna get you thinking!

The Credibility Nation Show
Bringing Your Greatness Back with Marc Jospitre (CNS 218)

The Credibility Nation Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 6:32


In this episode, Marc Jospitre talks about bringing your greatness back by pulling it out from you. He is a mindset expert for business leaders and entrepreneurs, a seasoned insurance coach, and also a keynote speaker. Marc is helping result-eeking individuals and companies worldwide to increase their results quickly providing tools for high-performance jumps. Through the teaching of a precise methodology and the study of the human mind, Marc instills effective ideas and habits (Paradigm Shift). When you ask yourself “have I not achieved what I wanted in life?”, consider reaching out to Marc Jospitre through his LinkedIn https://www.linkedin.com/in/marc-jospitre-94a38015/ or visit https://www.marcjospitre.com/.Mitchell Levy is the Global Credibility Expert at AHAthat, the first AHA leadership (Thought Leadership) platform on the market for thought leaders, experts and companies to unleash their genius to the world. His passion is helping entrepreneurs, business owners and C-Suite Executives get known as thought leaders & become best-selling authors with the AHA platform. He is an accomplished entrepreneur who has created 20 businesses in Silicon Valley including four publishing companies that have published over 800 books. Mitchell is an international best-selling author with 60 business books, has provided strategic consulting to over 100 companies, has advised over 500 CEOs on critical business issues, and has been chairman of the board of a NASDAQ-listed company. Visit https://www.credibilitynation.com to learn more about the Credibility Nation community.Visit https://www.ahathat.com/author to learn how you can become an Amazon best-selling author in 4 months.

The Ben Maller Show
Hour 4 – Trustworthy QBs

The Ben Maller Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 49:25


Brian Noe fills in for Ben Maller, and ranks the top QBs in the NFL as of right now. Brian goes out to the phones and gets some wild contributions from the Maller Militia, and breaks down the Ravens scenarios to make the division. Plus, he revisits the whining Cowboys. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

Chatham Bible Church
These Words Are Trustworthy and True (Revelation 22:6-21)

Chatham Bible Church

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 2, 2022


The Credibility Nation Show
Being Where You Are Expected To Be with George Donald Miller (CNS 217)

The Credibility Nation Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 31, 2021 7:36


This episode features George Donald Miller who is an executive coach, life coach, mentor, and motivational speaker. He talks about being in the right place where you are expected to be while having happiness and satisfaction on what you have. He coaches and trains in social, and emotional intelligence, helping small business owners and startups get out of their own way. He is an activator, coaching emerging leaders in a variety of professions and communities. He also works with teams to bring together vision, innovation and character, in the service of sustainability and meaning in business and the marketplace. If somebody in your network, you heard them say at some time in their life I'm not unhappy or I'm not where I need to be or is there something else in life, you should reach out to George Donald Miller at https://www.linkedin.com/in/coachgmiller/ or georgedonaldmiller.com.Mitchell Levy is the Global Credibility Expert at AHAthat, the first AHA leadership (Thought Leadership) platform on the market for thought leaders, experts and companies to unleash their genius to the world. His passion is helping entrepreneurs, business owners and C-Suite Executives get known as thought leaders & become best-selling authors with the AHA platform. He is an accomplished entrepreneur who has created 20 businesses in Silicon Valley including four publishing companies that have published over 800 books. Mitchell is an international best-selling author with 60 business books, has provided strategic consulting to over 100 companies, has advised over 500 CEOs on critical business issues, and has been chairman of the board of a NASDAQ-listed company. Visit https://www.credibilitynation.com to learn more about the Credibility Nation community.Visit https://www.ahathat.com/author to learn how you can become an Amazon best-selling author in 4 months.

The Credibility Nation Show
How To Avoid Failing Projects with Ken Judy (CNS 216)

The Credibility Nation Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 7:24


In this episode, Ken Judy, Chief Operating Officer at Stride Consulting, talks about how to avoid failing software projects by understanding what the leader really wants to achieve. He is also an executive manager, coach, product owner, and developer. Ken and his team seek first to understand what success looks like and what keeps you up at night. Then, they will embed and work alongside you to create a customized solution that results in the right approach for you. If you've got a software project and you fall into that 70 to 90% that is #Failing in some way or another and you want to reach out to stride, you should consider reaching out to Ken Judy by visiting www.stridenyc.com or https://www.linkedin.com/in/kenjudy/.Mitchell Levy is the Global Credibility Expert at AHAthat, the first AHA leadership (Thought Leadership) platform on the market for thought leaders, experts and companies to unleash their genius to the world. His passion is helping entrepreneurs, business owners and C-Suite Executives get known as thought leaders & become best-selling authors with the AHA platform. He is an accomplished entrepreneur who has created 20 businesses in Silicon Valley including four publishing companies that have published over 800 books. Mitchell is an international best-selling author with 60 business books, has provided strategic consulting to over 100 companies, has advised over 500 CEOs on critical business issues, and has been chairman of the board of a NASDAQ-listed company. Visit https://www.credibilitynation.com to learn more about the Credibility Nation community.Visit https://www.ahathat.com/author to learn how you can become an Amazon best-selling author in 4 months.

Hope Daily
Psalm 25 - Trustworthy God

Hope Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021 7:25


Pastor Mark continues his look at the psalms, and shares some devotional thoughts on chapter 25.

The Credibility Nation Show
Transforming Career Professionals Globally with Marie Zimenoff (CNS 215)

The Credibility Nation Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021 6:52


In this episode, Marie Zimenoff talks about transforming career professionals globally with human approach and innovative trends. She is a speaker, leader, entrepreneur, trainer, coach, careers industry advocate and counselor, and CEO of Career Thought Leaders Consortium where she provides tools that build credibility and increase effectiveness convening with thought leaders to track global influences on employment, job search, and career management. Marie understands that dedicated professionals in the careers field need and crave first-class support, training, and innovation. She merges vision and best practice training to elevate the career industry worldwide. If you want to be up to speed on trends and best practices in the career services industry, consider reaching out to Marie Zimenoff by visiting her websites https://www.careerthoughtleaders.com/ and https://www.linkedin.com/in/mariezimenoff/.Mitchell Levy is the Global Credibility Expert at AHAthat, the first AHA leadership (Thought Leadership) platform on the market for thought leaders, experts and companies to unleash their genius to the world. His passion is helping entrepreneurs, business owners and C-Suite Executives get known as thought leaders & become best-selling authors with the AHA platform. He is an accomplished entrepreneur who has created 20 businesses in Silicon Valley including four publishing companies that have published over 800 books. Mitchell is an international best-selling author with 60 business books, has provided strategic consulting to over 100 companies, has advised over 500 CEOs on critical business issues, and has been chairman of the board of a NASDAQ-listed company. Visit https://www.credibilitynation.com to learn more about the Credibility Nation community.Visit https://www.ahathat.com/author to learn how you can become an Amazon best-selling author in 4 months.

First Baptist Church Rochester Indiana
S2 Ep52: Be Honest and Trustworthy, December 26, 2021

First Baptist Church Rochester Indiana

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2021 25:34


Is it important to do what you say you will? Can people trust you? Troy Pryor uses examples from scripture of why being honest and trustworthy is important. Leviticus 27:9-15; Matthew 5:33-37

Red Mills Baptist Church
A Trustworthy Saying

Red Mills Baptist Church

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 26, 2021 26:00


The Credibility Nation Show
Scale Up Your Business by Getting the Right People in Place with Dan Goodwin (CNS 214)

The Credibility Nation Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 24, 2021 7:16


In this episode, Dan Goodwin talks about covering your assets to compete and crush results in today's economy. He is an entrepreneurial leader, business owner, coach, certified mentor, consultant, teacher, conference keynote speaker, and president/CEO of Our Connected Lives and CYA Consulting where he leads entrepreneurs as they grow their business from startup to stability and preparing for scale-up and funding opportunities. Dan helps entrepreneurs work through the scale-up process, specifically through vetting people processes as they move themselves and their businesses to the next level. If you've been in business for a couple of years and are now ready to scale up, consider reaching out to Dan Goodwin by visiting his website https://www.linkedin.com/in/dgoodwinus/ or email dan@cyaconsulting.services.Mitchell Levy is the Global Credibility Expert at AHAthat, the first AHA leadership (Thought Leadership) platform on the market for thought leaders, experts and companies to unleash their genius to the world. His passion is helping entrepreneurs, business owners and C-Suite Executives get known as thought leaders & become best-selling authors with the AHA platform. He is an accomplished entrepreneur who has created 20 businesses in Silicon Valley including four publishing companies that have published over 800 books. Mitchell is an international best-selling author with 60 business books, has provided strategic consulting to over 100 companies, has advised over 500 CEOs on critical business issues, and has been chairman of the board of a NASDAQ-listed company. Visit https://www.credibilitynation.com to learn more about the Credibility Nation community.Visit https://www.ahathat.com/author to learn how you can become an Amazon best-selling author in 4 months.

The Credibility Nation Show
Understanding Organizational Inefficiency with Lee Henson (CNS 213)

The Credibility Nation Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2021 7:35


This episode features Lee Henson, the founder and president of Agile Dad. He is also a Certified Scrum Trainer (CST), Project Management Professional (PMP), motivational speaker, coach, and a mentor. He talks about understanding organizational inefficiency to gain the best certification possible. Lee's 15 years of experience spans a broad array of roles and responsibilities. His unique blend of real-world experience in various roles combined with the ability to drive home complex concepts in an easy to understand manner make him an amazing coach to get any team best focused on project related initiatives. If you're running a company that has #OperationalInefficiency, you should consider reaching out to Agile Dad. Reach out to Lee Henson by visiting his website at www.agiledad.com or through LinkedIn at https://www.linkedin.com/in/leehenson/.Mitchell Levy is the Global Credibility Expert at AHAthat, the first AHA leadership (Thought Leadership) platform on the market for thought leaders, experts and companies to unleash their genius to the world. His passion is helping entrepreneurs, business owners and C-Suite Executives get known as thought leaders & become best-selling authors with the AHA platform. He is an accomplished entrepreneur who has created 20 businesses in Silicon Valley including four publishing companies that have published over 800 books. Mitchell is an international best-selling author with 60 business books, has provided strategic consulting to over 100 companies, has advised over 500 CEOs on critical business issues, and has been chairman of the board of a NASDAQ-listed company. Visit https://www.credibilitynation.com to learn more about the Credibility Nation community.Visit https://www.ahathat.com/author to learn how you can become an Amazon best-selling author in 4 months.

Inner Room: Guided Quiet Time
333 | A trustworthy saying [The crib the cross and the consequences]

Inner Room: Guided Quiet Time

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021 29:58


The song "Mary did you know" has a line in it that says: Mary did you know... the child that you delivered will soon deliver you? And that goes for you too... 1 Timothy 1:15-17 Background Music: Link: https://www.youtu.be/InAT9hcVyo8 [No Copyright Music] Background Pad added

A Moment with Joni Eareckson Tada
Are You Trustworthy?

A Moment with Joni Eareckson Tada

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021 1:00


God appoints you to serve in his kingdom. And you are worthy of the task!

The Credibility Nation Show
Navigating Your Business Through This New Norm with Kimberly Carlson (CNS 212)

The Credibility Nation Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021 7:20


In this episode, Kimberly Carlson, President of AppWorks, talks about figuring out how to navigate your business through this new norm based on the market and what is coming your way versus what already hit you. She is also a mentor, speaker, creative consultant, and business analyst.Kimberly works with companies to help them identify, clarify, and articulate their hurdles and goals enabling them to forge a path to success. She is passionate about helping them develop and implement actionable steps and infrastructures so they can navigate their way through this new norm based on market trends and what hurdles are coming their way versus what has already hit them. If you're a business that is struggling with “What next?” and has been a brick and mortar you're entire life and all of a sudden that has gone away, you should reach out to Kimberly Carlson via https://www.consultingkimberly.com or https://www.linkedin.com/in/KimberlyACarlson.Mitchell Levy is the Global Credibility Expert at AHAthat, the first AHA leadership (Thought Leadership) platform on the market for thought leaders, experts and companies to unleash their genius to the world. His passion is helping entrepreneurs, business owners and C-Suite Executives get known as thought leaders & become best-selling authors with the AHA platform. He is an accomplished entrepreneur who has created 20 businesses in Silicon Valley including four publishing companies that have published over 800 books. Mitchell is an international best-selling author with 60 business books, has provided strategic consulting to over 100 companies, has advised over 500 CEOs on critical business issues, and has been chairman of the board of a NASDAQ-listed company.Visit https://www.credibilitynation.com to learn more about the Credibility Nation community.Visit https://www.ahathat.com/author to learn how you can become an Amazon best-selling author in 4 months.

The Simple Sophisticate - Intelligent Living Paired with Signature Style
319: How to Trust, How to Be Trustworthy and How Understanding Both Will Transform Your Entire Life

The Simple Sophisticate - Intelligent Living Paired with Signature Style

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2021 65:08


"As we practice unconditional trustworthiness, we notice a healing result: we are no longer devastated when others fail us. Our focus has shifted from ourselves as victims of others' betrayals of fidelity to our own commitment to trustworthiness. We still see that some people are not trustworthy, and we feel sad and injured. But as long as we do not follow suit, we are not so hurt as we once were—and we like ourselves more. This does not mean that we have become naive or gullible. It actually shows that we trust ourselves more. Then we become more discriminating in recognizing trustworthiness in others." —David Richo, author of Daring to Trust: Opening Ourselves to Real Love & Intimacy Often the word trust is expressed as a fundamental desire to find in other people, but what often is forgotten is how we play a role in both being fully trustworthy, but also trusting ourselves. Having self-trust, David Richo shares in his book Daring to Trust is one of the four types of trust we must possess in order to live a deeply enriching and fulfilling life. What are the other three types of trust you may be wondering? We will talk about those in today's post/episode. Over the course of this podcast, I have shared many discoveries from a vast range of books on how to improve the skills that will improve the quality of our lives (see the list of the most recent, the past two years, below). I found it especially poignant and timely that I read Daring to Trust as the year 2021 wound down. #318: How to Become a Secure Adult in Relationships, inspired by the book Attached #287: 5 Things to Do to Build Healthy Relationships and 4 Things Let Go (inspired by David Richo's first book - How to Be an Adult in Relationships: The 5 Keys to Mindful Loving) #307: How to Step into your Fullest True Self, inspired by Martha Beck's book The Way of Integrity #301: The Courage to Live Fully & Deeply, inspired by the book The Courage to Be Disliked #275: 34 Ways to Attain Emotional Freedom and Cultivate More Joy of Living, inspired by Judith Orloff's book Emotional Freedom #293: Choose a Life You Love Living Each Day (yes, it is possible), inspired by the book Nonviolent Communication: The Language of Life blog post: 9 Ways to Think Like a Monk, as taught by Jay Shetty Often we aren't certain or cannot pinpoint what exactly is preventing us from living a life of true contentment. Perhaps we have come quite close, have felt it from time to time, but not consistently. There are moments of deep fulfillment and peace, but it eludes us at other times, and we wonder what we have done wrong. For me, after reading the following books listed above (link to the episode each book inspired), I felt confident I had the ingredients to live a life of everyday contentment, and largely I did, but the said contentment would flit away when certain moments would present themselves, and so I kept searching. I told myself, there must be a missing ingredient I have overlooked. I must have missed a crucial skill for holding myself steadily in contentment each day. Turns out it was understanding what true trust is and how to be fully trustworthy all the while acknowledging that we (and others) are human. Both of these concepts are what will be discussed in today's episode/post. First, let's find common ground on what trust is. David Richo defines it simply as reliance on reliability. He underscores, "[Trust] is not dependency but rather an inner assurance, a confidence that gives us a sense of security." 1. Strengthen your trust IQ: Know when to walk away "We trust others when we feel safe and secure in their presence. Our insistence that we will spend time only with those with whom we feel safe increases our trust IQ. Over time, we become more adept at telling the difference between a con artist and a straight-up guy. When we feel unsafe with someone and still stay with them, we damage our ability to discern trustworthiness in those we will meet in the future." Understanding true trust in others and exercising trustworthiness in how we live our lives gives us the tools to know when to stay and when to leave. Richo's quote above brings to our attention the importance of how we hurt this skill of discernment each time we distrust what we know about trust. When we know we can trust, "we know longer have to protect ourselves" and the cultivation of true intimacy becomes possible. But first, what is adult trust? In other words, what is the trust we need to understand? 2. What is trust, adult trust? When I read the first chapter of David Richo's book I became immediately aware of how I had approached trust incorrectly throughout my adult life. I had placed the responsibility on the other to show trust or to be trustworthy, placing the power in someone else; however, I had it backwards and I disempowered myself in the process. Let me explain: Adult trust is "I trust myself with whatever you do" instead of "You will never hurt me." Sounds crazy to choose to let go of the latter statement, but again, you are taking back your power, taking responsibility for being trustworthy and being able to accurately determine if someone is available to be trusted. Richo points out that when we make this shift to adult trust, we remove the victim mentality and own our life, our choices and honor ourselves which improves our ability to observe those who are capable of being trusted as we move forward. By putting the trust in ourselves to discern if others are trustworthy, knowing we can walk away at the worst of it, speak up with assertiveness (not aggression) we exhibit security in ourselves. And when we demonstrate we are a secure individual, we attract healthier individuals to us as we are not seen as a burden to someone else, not seen as a victim in need of someone else's care. 3. True trust takes time As much as we desire to flat out trust the person who captures our eye, our libido, our hopes, to say we fully trust someone so quickly is foolhardy. In fact, we must count ourselves fortunate if we grew up in a family home where a healthy installation of trust as Richo calls it was part of our upbringing because we will know what true trust looks and feels like in others as we navigate into our adult lives. However, if such a childhood was not part of our life story, it is important to learn what true trust is so that we will begin to seek out those we can trust and let go of those we cannot. We forget that as a baby, our whole lives were placed in the responsibility and care of adults we didn't get to choose. Over the course of our childhood - 18 years or so - we either have a mountain of evidence that our parents were trustworthy to provide security and care or we don't, but it took time, and our parents were not perfect, so they made mistakes, but most likely, they are people you could trust. The imperfection is important to note, as is the time factor. Trust takes time. No matter how attracted you are to someone, no matter how hotly charged the chemistry that runs between you two, neither have anything to do with whether or not you can trust them. You may want to trust them, but you do not have enough experience with them, time with them or exploration of them to know whether you can or not. What does taking time to trust look like? We open a space to explore and let someone in, but gradually. We move forward when appropriate and accept when moving on is what will fit best based on the response or lack thereof from the other We keep our ego in check - we are not entitled to someone else's trust no matter how badly we want them to trust us. The building of trust is a two-way street, and each of us are in different vehicles having traveled different life journeys with trust. If someone hurts our trust as we have been open to them, we tell them - clearly but with courtesy - so they can know, and we can set a boundary and we observe if they learn from it (or visa versus - we listen we someone tells us we have hurt them and apply the lesson). Let self-disclosure happen in increments, not all at once. We are investigating with each interaction, listening closely, opening up gradually, and observing to see if the 5 A's (shared below) are present all the while exercising the 5 A's with each engagement. We engage with loving kindness, and also are loyal to an "unconditional yes to what is". We accept reality. We cannot control the other, only ourselves. We only have control over our own trustworthiness. "Our companion practice of the unconditional yes to what is directs us to be thankful for trustworthiness from others when it comes our way and be open to disappointment sometimes too." 4. Often sex is desired when it is trust we seek "Regarding touching, it is central to trusting." While there are the five languages of love as Gary Chapman talks about in his book which was the central focus of episode #87 - Romantic Love: What is it and How to Maintain It, touch is often something each of us is starved for. Healthy touch, loving touch, a safe touch. Richo brings to our attention that "in adulthood we may look to sex as a substitute for the touch and holding we need" when what we are actually seeking is a heart connection which can happen in many other ways of touching. However, because we know that other forms of touching prompt great emotional response, we are fearful of the emotion that will arise, so the sex gives us temporarily what we long for, but isn't fulfilling if it isn't with someone we trust. On the trustworthy side, which is something we have entire control over (we'll talk about what that is in the next point), when we trust ourselves (self-trust) we aren't afraid to express our emotions or let ourselves feel the emotions we have while with another, and so we are able to let go of our unnecessary inhibitions and extend touch - whether in an arm around the shoulder, a touch of the hand or a kiss. All of these actions again are exchanged with someone we trust and motivated by sincere exchange of feeling knowing the person with whom we are exchanging feels safe with us. 5. Be wholly trustworthy in your daily actions When we are trustworthy, David Richo explains, we are living with and engaging with the world with integrity and loving kindness. When we act with integrity, we may be rejected, we may even be laughed at, but because we are mature enough to understand how trust can be built with another, the opinions of those who reject or laugh or scoff matter less because we have strengthened our inner resources and know to walk away. We do not take revenge, retaliate or act in a way that is against our integrity, but instead engage with loving kindness. Richo shares this detailed list of the many ways you express loving kindness and integrity. Here is just a taste: do your best to keep your commitments, honor your word and follow through on tasks committed to take care of your body and your health (mental and physical) forgo taking advantage of others in a vulnerable situation simply because I have authority or the power to do so refrain from ingratiating myself to gain approval appreciate the love given, and have no expectations that I receive it ask for what I need with assertiveness, not aggression - ask for the love I long for otherwise how will someone know? accept, without judgment, the given of sudden unexplained absence, ghosting, or the silent treatment by others and do not use those styles myself 6. Build a full and healthy life: Rely on your partner for only 25% of your needs fulfillment It is not just a romantic partner we shouldn't rely on for more than 25% of our needs fulfillment but any one person. Why? If we remain in the child-parent trust model which is a survival approach, we are in a dependency-relationship which thwarts any attempt for a healthy, fulfilling relationship. Ironically, we are programmed to have our survival needs met - the child-parent model - but we must shift away from this comfort seeking and step into the challenge approach to living which requires that we become more comfortable with the unknown and cultivate more self-trust (we'll talk about this type of trust below). The shift occurs when we start seeking safety and security from within rather than outside of ourselves. When we make this shift, our world changes for the better. Our days and relationships more enriching and our contentment grounding. Richo shares a quote from Henry David Thoreau which I found quite succinct and accurate to describe what we seek in relationships, "I will come to you, my friend, when I no longer need you. Then you will find a palace, not an almshouse." So where does the rest of our need fulfillment come from if only 25% can come from any one person? It comes from the healthy social circle and self-care you have thoughtfully nurtured over time, and that doesn't just mean people. In this post, I share a list of different connections and relationships worth investing in and then in this post share the elements of a strong social well-being. Simply put, your friends, family, yes, even your pets, and of course your career, spiritual practice, Mother Nature and any other resource that strengthens your sense of safety and security make up the remaining 75% of your needs fulfillment. 7. Exercise, as well as be able to identify, the five A's In episode #287 - 5 Things to Do to Build Healthy Relationships, David Richo's first book How to Be An Adult in Relationships: The 5 Keys to Mindful Loving inspired the content. Detailing the five A's necessary to be exercised by both individuals in any mutually satisfying and fulfilling relationships, these 5 A's play a fundamental part in building trust. What are the A's? Attention Acceptance Appreciation Affection Allowing We are being trustworthy when we express each of these in relationships. We know someone is worthy of being trusted when they exercise them in return. (read this post to explore each of the A's in more detail). 8. When we have self-trust, there is no need, or desire, to control others "The yes of surrender to the limits in our relationship leads to serenity, the safety and security that happen from within us. Such surrender is our proof to ourselves that we really can trust ourselves. We begin to redirect our trust, an empowering venture." An intimate relationship takes time to build as both involved have taken the time to show they are trustworthy. When we trust the other, we gradually and then more largely surrender, and surrendering is possible because we hold fast and steadily to strong trust of ourselves. The surrendering has as much to do with being with another human being as it has to do with letting our feelings be what they will be in the midst of all the experiences that will arise. And letting ourselves fully feel these feelings without suppression. I speak largely of the awesome feelings that we may have thought were never possible. We are more comfortable with surrender because we trust ourselves to respond rather than react, to speak up with assertiveness not aggression when our needs are not being met as well as knowing what our needs are and why because we have done the homework of ourselves as well as acknowledged that we are still growing and learning and evolving. Richo writes about men in American culture and how often when men deny or step away from the potential of a relationship with a real, healthy and secure individual, stating the reason is because they fear losing their freedom, it is actually an inaccurate reason. Let me explain. If the person they are stepping towards is indeed real, secure and has self-trust, then what men actually fear is not the loss of their freedom, but rather the feelings that may arise when they surrender themselves to what the relationship, what the intimacy, may actually be and who they will become when they surrender to the truth of what they feel. In other words, two self-trusting adults who exchange all of the 5 A's create a space, a life of fulfillment without controlling the other. Why? Because we are not forcing the other to be engaged with us. They want to be with us because we each find comfort, affirmation, love and community with each other. It feels good because it is good to feel our best, and if we feel our best with them, even when we unintentionally make mistakes or life trips us up, so long as we are acting with integrity and loving kindness, the intimacy remains and actually strengthens. Such strength in a relationship takes time to build, just as trust does and that is why true intimacy, true fulfillment, true love, takes time and is never at first sight. 9. Strengthen your core trust and become curious about your own life journey Essentially our core trust is acceptance in the reality of the world. A letting go, a trusting in magic and truth of things beyond our control. It doesn't mean we do not engage or act passively, but we do not strangle life. We let it unfold while dancing with it. When we exercise our core trust we "generate a calm abiding, a serenity that energizes. The opposite of being in control is resting secure and being alert to what comes next." "To open to reality is to turn toward it and to trust that it makes room for us in that very same moment . . . all this happens as we let go of control and stay with whatever happens until it transforms." Understanding what core trust is and how it can open up our lives was an aha moment for me. In many ways over the past 12 years I have been exercising a core trust even though I was doing so unconsciously. When we take our life experiences and mine them for wisdom rather than wallow in them and lament about how things may have been different, we are choosing to embrace our journey and figure out what is our calling, how can we marry what we are passionate about with what the world needs - our dharma as Jay Shetty calls it and in so doing, our journey unfolds in ways we could never have imagined. We are open to possibility and brave enough to explore the unknown while staying grounded in our self-trust - our boundaries maintained, our values held once questioned and evaluated to truly be our own. "When I give up trying to direct the show and instead keep opening to how it unfolds, I unfold." Richo reminds that "without core trust, we can't relax our grasp and let reality unfold as it needs to . . . with core trust, we gain confidence that nothing can happen to us that does not offer a fulfillment of our ineradicable yearning for wholeness. Thus everything in our lives, whether from events or from people, is just what is needed for our unique story to be told." How exciting is that! How freeing is that to know that it is in the letting go, engaging, but not demanding or manipulating, that we actually infuse our life with awesome possibility. 10. As your trust strengthens, your wisdom grows "Wisdom requires us to open to what happens and be discriminating about what we let in." As we come to understand what constitutes trust in someone else, as we explore our own feelings to accurately access what our needs are and why we are feeling what we are feeling, as we communicate with assertiveness paired with courtesy our needs, as we experience the walking away and opening up to new people, as our self-trust grows, as our core trust grows, we are better able to know who to begin letting into our lives and who to walk past. 11. Understand where the need to control originates "Our need to control is actually not a need; it is a panic that our needs will not be met unless we take full charge." Richo's explanation of the truth he states above prompted many lightbulb moments to go off in my own head. I found myself shaking my head in agreement, acknowledging the truth of my own desire to control in a variety of different instances in my life, and I felt grateful to finally have found his insights as they helped me better understand myself. The truth is, when we demand to control, we let go of the core trust we must have in order to live a life of fulfillment. The ego wins when we require something go exactly our way, and when the ego wins, we are relinquishing the belief in our own powers. We are far more capable than we acknowledge in such moments, and letting the ego win keeps us in a state of dependency rather than trust in the world around us and in ourselves. 12. The four directions we give our trust In today's episode so far we have talked about self-trust (#8) and core trust (#9), and now I would like to talk about the other two because once we have all four types of trust being exercised in our lives, the quality of our relationships and our experience of life, thus a life of fulfillment, elevates. When we exercise self-trust we become better able to determine who is trustworthy and who to continue to get to know in a variety of types of relationships. Exercising self-trust in this way ushers in the third type of trust - interpersonal trust. Interpersonal trust - Richo defines it as "we believe that they have our best interests at heart. We trust that they will come through for us, stand by us, and be there for us when we need them. We believe they will not knowingly or purposely betray, disappoint, deceive or hurt us. If they do, we trust ourselves to handle those experiences by grieving and attempting to reconcile if that is appropriate to the situation." As we nurture a variety of interpersonal relationships of trust, we make sure not to place more than 25% of our needs in any one relationship. We do so because we trust ourselves, we have a core trust and, to introduce the fourth type of trust, we have trust in a higher power. Do not jump to conclusions. A "higher power" as defined by Richo "can mean belief in a personal God or in any force or spirit in nature or the universe that transcends ego and can be relied upon for grace and support. In many ways, our core trust and trust in a higher power are one. Richo is not saying our destiny has already been pre-ordained or even that there is intervention by something we don't understand. No. What he is saying is that we can have "confidence that no power on earth can hold us captive to hate or prohibit us from loving." This does not require us to have faith in a literal God, but rather to understand something we cannot fully understand but have the courage to believe in the 'friendliness of the universe'. Richo goes on to talk about Grace-full Coincidence in his epilogue, further encouragement to each of us to let go, act with integrity and loving kindness in each of our days, be engaged with the world, but not demanding, and trust in something magical. He poses this question: Does the universe position things so carefully that our hearts can open at just the right time? What mysterious power makes it all come together just like that? Is it that friendly? How can we ever doubt that we can dare to trust? My immediate response and annotation in my book was, I hope so. And so I am consciously daring to trust, to open my heart to that possibility and take control of what I can, which is only myself and how I engage. Remembering to exercise the 5 A's, remove the stories from my mind and walk with patience and self-trust along with all of the other trusts, grateful for the gift of being here on this earth. I dare you to do the same and am confident your life journey will delight and amaze you when you do. Explore the full book here. Petit Plaisir —John Coltrane's Giant Steps album https://youtu.be/30FTr6G53VU ~The Simple Sophisticate, episode #319 ~Subscribe to The Simple Sophisticate:  iTunes | Stitcher | iHeartRadio | YouTube | Spotify | Amazon Music

The Informed Life
Year in Review

The Informed Life

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 19, 2021 48:10


In observance of the winter holidays, this episode doesn't feature a guest interview. Instead, I reflect on five themes that emerged in the diverse conversations we hosted on the podcast during 2021. I wish you and yours happy holidays! Cover photo by Waldemar Brandt on Unsplash. If you're enjoying the show, please rate or review it in Apple's Podcasts directory: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/the-informed-life/id1450117117?itsct=podcast_box&itscg=30200 Show notes The Informed Life episode 53: Jason Ulaszek on Healing Social Rifts The Informed Life episode 54: Kourosh Dini on DEVONthink The Informed Life episode 55: Hà Phan on Product Leadership The Informed Life episode 56: Margot Bloomstein on Trust The Informed Life episode 57: Ben Mosior on Wardley Maps The Informed Life episode 58: Jesse James Garrett on Leadership and IA The Informed Life episode 59: Matt LeMay on One Page / One Hour The Informed Life episode 60: Kat Vellos on Friendship The Informed Life episode 61: Jeff Sussna on Customer Value Charting The Informed Life episode 63: Sophia Prater on Object Oriented UX The Informed Life episode 64: Sarah Barrett on Architectural Scale The Informed Life episode 66: Jim Kalbach on Jobs to Be Done The Informed Life episode 68: Mags Hanley on Career Architecture The Informed Life episode 69: Karl Fast on Interactionism, part 1 The Informed Life episode 70: Karl Fast on Interactionism, part 2 The Informed Life episode 71: Sunni Brown on Deep Self Design The Informed Life episode 73: Patrick Tanguay on Newsletter Curation The Informed Life episode 74: Annie Murphy Paul on The Extended Mind The Informed Life episode 75: Hans Krueger on the Cycle of Emotions The Informed Life episode 76: Dan Brown on IA Lenses Some show notes may include Amazon affiliate links. I get a small commission for purchases made through these links. Read the transcript Jorge: Welcome to the informed life. In each episode of this show, we find out how people organize information to get things done. I am your host horsehair angle. Today, I don't have a guest on the show. Instead, I'm going to try something a little different. Rather than a conversation with a single guest, I'm going to do a review of some of the things that I heard during the course of the year. So, you'll be hearing from several of the folks who graciously agreed to be on the show. And the reason why I'm doing this is because I listen to a lot of interview-based podcasts. And while I find myself getting totally engrossed in each individual conversation, I often lose track of what I've heard before in prior conversations, and I have a hard time making sense of patterns that may be emerging. So, I thought that during this quiet time of year I might take some time out to do just that, to see if there are any themes or patterns that have stood out during the interviews i've done in the past 12 months. Of course, the guests on the show, didn't speak with each other. I don't want to imply that they're somehow in conversation or responding to each other's points. In fact, the only point that any of these conversations have in common was that I was a part of all of them. I'm also aware that when you take snippets of interviews out of context, It may change their meaning, especially when put next to other snippets from other conversations. And that's definitely not my intent. I'm not going to present these in the order in which they were recorded. In fact, I'm going to talk about these in no particular order. So, in this episode, I'm just going to edit these together and see if I can highlight some of these themes that seemed to have come up in more than one conversation. If you want to check out the full conversations, which I encourage you to do, I will include links to each episode in the show notes. Hopefully, this will prove useful to you if you choose to revisit the conversations we've had over the last year. So, now onto the themes. We recorded 25 conversations during 2021. And in revisiting them now, I've grouped them into five high-level themes. There are other ideas that have come up and there are different arrangements you could make, but these are five themes that stood out to me. The first theme, I'm calling, aligning our values with our actions. The second is about using intentional structures for self-development. The third is about practicing information architecture at scale. The fourth is highlighting tools and methods for visualizing systemic intent. And the fifth is about thinking beyond the brain. I'll unpack what these are about one by one and hopefully draw connections between them to try to bring some coherence to the conversations that we've been having throughout the year. Because I do think that there are things that connect them. Aligning our values with our actions Jorge: So now, let's dive into the first of these themes, which has to do with aligning our values with our actions. And this is one that came in this year, particularly strongly and with intent on my part because I was appalled by the January 6th insurrection in Washington, DC. This horrible event brought to life the degree to which there are deep social rifts in the U.S. And I I've been thinking about what designers can do so what can I do through my work to help make these things better. So I wanted to talk with folks who have been explicitly thinking about this stuff. And this led me to reach out to Jason Ulaszek, who has used design to help heal Rwandan society in the wake of the Rwandan genocide, which I think is obviously a much more extreme situation than the one that we're facing here in the U.S. Now, Jason is not originally from Rwanda, he's from the U.S., so I asked him if there's anything that we could learn from his experience that might help us in our society to start healing the rifts that divide us. And I was very intrigued by his answer; he talked about re-engaging with cultural values. And this is what he had to say: Jason Ulaszek: What was part of the Rwandans cultural value system well before the genocide against the Tutsi, and is now swung fully back -- and they're working hard to ensure that that's the case -- is a really strong sense of cultural values. What they've really tapped into -- and I think this is where it gets into design a bit -- is that they've tapped into ways to embody these cultural values inside of the experiences people have within education. Jorge: So there's an explicit attempt there to create structures — in that case, within the educational system — that help highlight the common social values that bind a people together. And in part the way that I understood it, at least the part of the idea there is to try to rebuild a sense of trust among parties. And we had another episode this year where we talked explicitly about building trust. And this was in episode 56, where I had a conversation with Margot Bloomstein about her book on the subject, which came out this year, called Trustworthy. And, as Margot put it in our conversation, a big part of building trust has to do with authenticity: with having our actions be grounded in a clear set of values and having them be aligned with those values. This is how Margot put it: Margot Bloomstein: You used the term "authenticity." And I think that that's a term that we throw around a lot; that's a term marketers love to throw around. Who wouldn't want to be authentic? And I always wonder, authentic to what? Do you know who you are? Know thy self first, and then you can determine, well, how do we align our actions with our values? Because that's how we measure authenticity: it's the distance between our actions and our words, all of that external stuff and our values. And I think for many organizations, they can jump into kind of the national conversation, into the international conversation, around many of those social issues and say, "Here's what we're doing. Here's why we support this. Here's what we're doing internally. And here's what we're doing externally to make this better for everyone." To put a stake in the ground. And they can do it building on that long-term, authentic investment in their values. Jorge: I love this idea of being more intentional about aligning our values and our actions as we seek to be more authentic. And of course Margot was talking here about doing that at the level of organizations, but it's also possible to do it at an individual level. And in my conversation with author Kat Vellos, we dug into that specifically in the context of her work. In nurturing friendships. And I asked Kat about how we might be more authentic in looking to create the structures that allow us to nurture friendships as we get older. And she highlighted the importance of being present. This is what she had to say about it. Kat Vellos: The more you immerse yourself in what is actually happening in that time that you're connecting with the other person, the more likely you are to feel the benefit. You know, when you're spending time sharing stories with a friend say, focus on their story, focus on them. Get curious. Ask followup questions and have that be the focus of your attention, rather than halfway listening and halfway being in your own head. Like, "do I feel less lonely right now? Do I feel less awkward right now?" Get out of that mental evaluation mode and get real immersed and real curious and interested in the other person. And that's actually when somebody feels heard. That's actually when somebody feels more connected is when you're really present and holding space with each other. Intentional structures for self-development Jorge: This idea of being more present was also an important part of our second theme, which has to do with creating intentional structures for self-development. I like to think of this almost as kind of an information architecture of the self. So, while it might seem on the surface like some of these conversations run a bit further a field from the subject of the show, I see them as being quite aligned in that we are creating conceptual structures that help us affect some kind of change. And in this second theme, the change has to do with internal transformation. We delved into this in a few conversations during the year. The first I will highlight is episode 71, where I interviewed Sunni Brown about her work in Deep Self Design, which is a practice rooted in Zen Buddhism and design thinking. And during this conversation, Sunni chastised me for allowing myself to let my devices keep me from being more present during a camping trip with my family. And I loved how Sunni talked about being more present. This is what she had to say: Sunni Brown: Camping, when it's like safe and beautiful... the point of it is to actually get you into a different state. To get your regulatory system in a different state so that you can enjoy your life and be present with your family and look at the sky and realize that you're part of... you are the sky, there's no difference between you and the sky, you just project that there is. And like, you know what I mean? So, you have to understand that that space is essential for your humanity and and make it a priority. And you can tell people, I mean, there's ways to approach it that are gentle on other people. So you can let people know, "I'm going to go dark for 72 hours. You should know that," Or, "I'm going to go dark, and then I'm going to have one hour where I look at stuff," you know? You have to design it for your life and what's actually available for you. Sometimes people have sick parents at home or sick kids or whatever, but you have to start to understand the benefit of it. Because I think most people think it's just like something they would lose. Like, they wouldn't get... something taken away from them. And I'm like, "no! It's something you're giving yourself that is priceless." And you get amazing ideas. Like your productivity goes up. So, I call it going slow to go fast. Actually I read this interesting Nietzsche quote, which I don't read Nietzsche a lot or anything, but like he said like great ideas are found when you're walking. And Steve Jobs was... Also, I'mnot obsessed with Steve Jobs, but he did a lot of walking meetings. So, If you are a productivity junkie, going slow helps you go fast. And it actually frees up a lot of stuck tension in the body and stuck ideas that you can't get through and it gives you solutions and ahas and insights. So there's huge rewards in it anyway, if you need it to be aligned with productivity. But it's like, dude, we're gonna die one day, Jorge. Like all of us! And the last thing I want to do is be like, "I spent my whole life on my iPhone!" That is like the worst thing that could happen. Jorge: So, we need to be more aware about what is going on with our systems, with our bodies — and we need to be present. And this was not the only conversation that I had that delved on similar subjects. In episode 75, I talked with my friend, Hans Krueger, who has also been influenced by Buddhism, on what he calls the cycle of emotions, which is a conceptual structure — a way of thinking about emotions and how emotions affect our behavior. Here's Hans: Hans Krueger: What surprisingly few people realize is that there is like a real system behind this thing, this whole emotional complex. How they work, how they interact with each other, what leads to what, what you can do to actually cultivate your own emotional state. A state that allows you to perceive as clearly as possible what is real, versus what you imagine is real. Jorge: There's an emerging theme here in the power of visualizing, might be one way to think about it, but at the very least naming these conceptual distinctions, becoming more aware of what is happening internally. And again, this might come across to some folks as not being relevant to information architecture at all. But I do think of these as conceptual structures where there are distinctions that we label and we establish relationships between those distinctions. And the structure helps us understand what we're doing so that we can act more skillfully, more mindfully. And at least one guest during the year talked about using such conceptual models, not just to help us personally, but to help us in our careers. In episode 68, Mags Hanley shared with us her work on career architecture, which is also the subject of her book, which was published after we talked. And Mags made the connection between the methods, processes and tools that we use as information architects and how we develop our careers. Mags Hanley: Career architecture is about how we can use the methods that we think about and we use as information architects or as UX professionals and apply that in a very systematic way into how we think about our careers. Practicing information architecture at scale Jorge: I like this idea of using information, architecture and user experience methods, practices, and tools for our own personal development. But we can also use them to develop our teams and to work at a different level of impact. I think of this as information architecture at scale, which is the next theme that emerged in the conversations that we had on the podcast over the year. Two that immediately come to mind, but I'm not going to highlight as much here, are the conversation with Jim Kalbach on jobs to be done, which, in addition to Jim's book, helped me clarify my own understanding of what jobs to be done are. And this is an important subject, one that designers and product managers need to be aware of. So, if you have heard the phrase, but are not entirely clear on what it means, I encourage you to check out my conversation with Jim. Another one is the conversation that I had recently with Dan Brown on information architecture lenses. And as that explained in that episode, the lenses are a set of cards, and now podcasts and YouTube videos, that aim to serve as a tool to help designers deal with architectural conundrums. So again, if you are into information architecture, and you haven't done so already. I encourage you to check out the conversation with Dan Brown. That said, there are a few episodes that I do want to call out here and bring to your attention. One is the conversation I had on episode 63 with Sophia Prater about her object oriented user experience framework. I see this as a way of formalizing conceptual models so they can be shared and discussed with other team members. This is how sophia described it during our conversation: Sophia Prater: OOUX is all about saying, "okay. If we know that our users think in objects and just human beings think in objects - not not just our developers - human beings think in objects, and to be able to gain understanding, you need to understand what the objects are in that system. And to understand what the objects are we need a certain level of consistency and recognizability to our objects." So as the designers of these environments, if we don't get really super clear on what our objects are, there's no way. There's just absolutely no way in hell that we're going to be able to translate that to our end users. We're just not! If we can't get it straight on our team and we can't get it straight among ourselves, then 1) that's going to create a lot of communication problems internally which is a problem that I hear all the time. We've got everybody on the team coming together. And some people, depending on what department you're in or what your role is, you've got the same object, the same thing being called two or three different things and different objects being called the same thing. And you're trying to design complex software. So just getting on the same page internally is going to be absolutely intrinsic to making sure that it's clear to your end users. Jorge: Another conversation that had to do with considering design at a different level of abstraction was in episode 64, where Sarah Barrett shared with us considerations about the architectural scale of the systems we design. I was particularly drawn to the way Sarah described how we should approach the intended effects of our work: Sarah Barrett: Occasionally, I get comments or people worrying that our information architecture isn't innovative enough that we're not doing anything surprising or introducing anything brand new. And I feel very strongly that your architecture is not the place to surprise people. Like, there are actual architects out there building very innovative homes that no one wants to live in. And I have no interest in doing that. I really want us to use the oldest, most standard, most expected way of doing things. I think the example of the grocery store is another great way here. There's a lot of benefit to not innovating in the layout of a grocery store. There probably is some benefit in innovating a little bit around the edges or in some details, but you gain a lot from making it legible and making it expected for people. And so, that one is really about... okay, given these things that we expect to have: we expect to have global navigation, we expect to have metadata on content, we expect to have titles and breadcrumbs... how do we unpack what each of those things is doing for us and make sure that between the suite of those elements we are using? Because you never use just one, you use lots of them together. Between all of those elements, we are presenting a coherent, complete view of the wayfinding people need. Jorge: It's one thing to create a coherent and complete system that allows people to find and understand things, and it's another to create the conditions that allow that system to evolve over time gracefully as conditions change but to retain that cohesiveness. And doing this requires that we understand that the things that we are designing are in fact systems and they are systems that will require stewardship over time. This implies that we need leadership. And that was the subject of episode 58, where I had a conversation with Jesse James Garrett about leadership and information architecture. This is part of what jesse said during that show. Jesse James Garrett: The way that I talk to folks about design leadership, who have come from a design background -that is to say they've been doing design work - is that leadership is just another design problem. And you're working with different materials and you're working toward different outcomes and you're having to follow different principles, but the task is the same task. It is a creative problem-solving task. It is a systems-thinking task, as a leader. So looking at the ways that you're already doing that systems-thinking, the ways in which you already doing that architecture for yourself in the work that you're already doing, and those will be your strengths. And those will be the pillars that you can lean on that are going to support your work as a leader going forward. They will evolve and they will not look like what they looked like when you were doing content inventories or task flows or whatever other artifacts you might've been working on as a designer. But the skill set that you're building is the same skill set. Jorge: The relationship between design and leadership, and how designers can use our tools, methods, practices, et cetera, to take on leadership roles, was also the subject of episode 55, which featured a conversation with hop-on about her own trajectory from design to product leadership. Hà Phan: I think the difficulty was between the role I have now, or the delta between the role I have now versus being a UX designer is that, you know, it's really a leadership role to basically provide the path to clarity. So when you have a vision, even as a seasoned UX designer, you're going to present forth this vision. And usually there's a thousand questions and a thousand steps before you get there, right? And usually you don't get there entirely. You know, you don't get to the vision entirely the way you had envisioned it. You're going to take turns, right? And I think in this role, what I get to do is that I get to enable the team to find that path to clarity, and to provide the milestones or the mission for each of the goals along the way. Jorge: This idea that leaders provide clarity and vision is very important. And it's one of the reasons why designers can make good leaders, because part of what designers do is clarify and help visualize abstract ideas. I keep saying that design is about making possibilities tangible: we take these vague notions, requirements, constraints, ill defined contexts, and we make things. And these things that we make can be validated somehow. We can put them in context and have them be used by the people that we intend to serve, to see whether things are working or not. And we create feedback loops where we make them incrementally better, better suited to meeting the needs of the people they serve. Visualizing systemic intent Jorge: And this idea of leadership as a role that clarifies and articulates a vision, brings us to the fourth theme that I noticed in going back over this year's episodes, which has to do with highlighting tools and methods for visualizing systemic intent. And by that, I mean different ways of mapping systems and making systems more tangible. Again, this idea of making the abstract more relatable. And we had several conversations along those lines. The first I'm going to highlight here is episode 59, in which Matt LeMay may shared with us One Page / One Hour, an approach he's developed to help teams articulate what they're making by working fast and iterating. So, rather than creating some kind of polished deck, the idea here is to articulate a vision really quickly so that you can spend less time upfront creating polished artifacts and spend more time iterating with stakeholders and other team members. Here's Matt describing how he came up with One Page / One Hour. Matt LeMay: I wrote up this pledge to my business partners saying I'm willing to forego the sense of individual accomplishment that comes from presenting finished and polished deliverables to my colleagues. I promise that I will spend no more than one page and one hour working on any deliverable - any document - before I bring it to the team. In other words, if I show up with five beautifully formatted pages or a one-page that took me 10 hours to create, I want you to hold me accountable to that. I want you to say, "man, why did you do this? We made a deal. We made a commitment to each other! We all know that if we actually want to deliver value, if we want to do valuable work, we need to collaborate earlier on. You can't go off onto your own and create this big thing, and then just want us to tell you how great it is!" Jorge: One Page / One Hour is about trying to articulate very quickly what we have in mind and sharing it so that we can start iterating on it. A few of the other conversations that we had during the year around visualizing systems and visualizing intent were about artifacts that are a little more elaborate. An example of this is Customer Value Charting, which Jeff Sussna shared with us in episode 61. Customer Value Charting, as Jeff explained, it is a tool to balance strategy and agility. And the purpose of creating that balance is to drive customer benefits, which are related to but not the same as business benefits. Jeff illustrated this by means of an example using a common service. Jeff Sussna: The benefit of the dry cleaner is that I can get my tuxedo cleaned in time to go to the formal event. It's not fundamentally about a cash register or a counter or even cleaning chemicals. And I mention that because a lot of the conversation I see around outcomes over outputs tends to actually talk about business outcomes. You know, revenue growth and customer retention, and time on site and business outcomes are great. I don't have any problem with them, but people tend to skip this step. We have a hypothesis that this feature will cause this change in customer behavior, which will lead to this business outcome or business impact. But it leaves open the question of, well, why is the customer changing their behavior? What is the benefit to them? Jorge: These are complex questions to take on for designers or for anyone, frankly. And it's helpful to hear about how folks are going about it. Customer Value Charting is one way of doing it. Another way of visualizing systems and visualizing things like customer needs in a systemic way was shared with us by Ben Mosiure in our conversation, which focused on Wardley maps. Ben Mosior: Wardley mapping is a visual way of representing systems: its users, its needs, its capabilities, its relationships between all those three things. And then it's also positioning those things in a way that helps their qualities become more apparent. So there's this thing that Simon Research called "Evolution." It's basically how do things evolve and get better or die under the pressures of supply demand competition, and what you get is like things start out new, uncertain, high risk, high failure, but with a high potential for future value. But then as they evolve, they get better. You know, someone's always like looking at these weird ideas and trying to make them better because capitalism basically suggest there's money to be made. So someone out there is going to try to make it better. And over time, if the idea is worth investing in, it will continue to get better, more known, more boring, more predictable, and the value of it will be more concrete. And eventually, if it evolves to a certain extent, it becomes an invisible part of our everyday lives. And so, Simon says, look, you want to represent the systems that we're a part of both in terms of their parts and relationships, but also in terms of how evolved each of those parts are. Because what that does is it sets you up to understand the implications of those qualities. New stuff is going to be high failure, old stuff that everybody understands, that's just part of everyday reality like power in the wall. It is going to be less surprising, it's going to be less failure. And so that means that depending on the context, depending on the part of the system we're looking at, we need to have a different way of approaching it. And I think that's the entire point. By making visual artifacts -- by talking about our systems visually -- we can come together, look at a specific part of it, appreciate its qualities, and then together determine what our collective intent is about that part of the system. Jorge: That's a great description of this idea that we can take these complex abstract ideas and make them tangible, make them manifest in the world, and as a result, make it possible for us to have conversations about them, to somehow change the state of things, to make things better. Thinking beyond the brain Jorge: And that brings us to the fifth and final theme that emerged over the year and that I want to emphasize here, which has to do with using tools and our environment to extend our cognitive system. So, in some way, when we are putting up stickies or diagrams or anything up on the wall, we are making it possible for us to share a cognitive space of sorts. And this is true, whether we're doing it with a note-taking app or stickies on a whiteboard. In taking stuff out of our heads and putting them out into the world, we can somehow extend our minds. And that's why I'm calling this fifth theme "thinking beyond the brain." Conversations about this theme came in two different flavors. On the one hand, we had folks who shared with us their thinking processes and tools. And on the other hand, we had a few conversations that were about thinking in this way itself and I'll say a little bit more about both of those. So, first with the thinking processes and tools. In episode 75, Patrick Tanguay shared with us, how he uses a combination of tools to write one of my favorite newsletters, Sentiers. And it's a setup that mirrors somewhat closely my own setup. Another great conversation about a particular tool was in episode 54, where Kourosh Dini told us about how he's using DEVONthink for building a personal knowledge management system. I was very excited to talk with Kourosh because he wrote a book that helped me use DEVONthink better. If you're unfamiliar with this tool and you are someone who needs to manage a lot of information, let's say if you're teaching or writing, it behooves you to give episode 54 a listen. As I mentioned, I also hosted a few discussions which were not about tools in particular, but a little more meta about how the mind itself works beyond the brain. I'll be frank with you, these were some of my favorite conversations during the year. One was with Annie Murphy Paul about her book, The Extended Mind. Annie's book is the clearest explanation I've read on the science behind the field of embodied cognition. It was one of my favorite reads of the year because it does a really good job at dispelling erroneous notions about how the brain works. And I think that this is a very important subject for designers to understand. Here's Annie. Annie Murphy Paul: I always like to say we're more like animals than we are like machines. You know, the brain is a biological organ. I mean, I know this is obvious, but we really can get very entranced in a way by this metaphor of "brain as computer." The brain is a biological organ that evolved to carry out tasks that are often very different from the tasks that we expect it to execute today. And so, our misunderstanding of what the brain is leads us, as you were saying, Jorge, to create these structures in society. In education and in the workplace, in our everyday lives, that really don't suit the reality of what the brain is. I mean, I'm thinking about how, for example, we expect ourselves to be productive. Whether that's in the workplace, or what we expect our students to do in school. You know, we often expect ourselves to sit still, don't move around, don't change the space where you're in. Don't talk to other people. Just sit there and kind of work until it's done. And that's how we expect ourselves to get serious thinking done. And that makes sense, if the brain is a computer, you know? You feed it information and it processes the information, then it spits out the answer in this very linear fashion. But that's not at all how the brain works. Because the brain is so exquisitely sensitive to context, and that context can be the way our bodies are feeling and how they're moving, that context can be literally where we are situated and what we see and what we experience around us, and that context can be the social context: whether we're with other people, whether we're talking to them, how those conversations are unfolding -- all those things have an incredibly powerful impact on how we think. And so, when we expect the brain to function like a computer, whether that's in the office or in the classroom, we're really underselling its actual powers -- its actual genius -- and we're cutting ourselves off from the wellsprings of our own intelligence, which is the fact that we are embodied creatures embedded in an environment and set in this network of relationships. So, it really... we're really kind of leaving a lot of potential intelligence on the table when we limit our idea of what the brain is in that way. Jorge: While this may seem like we are venturing a little far from the ostensible subject of the show, which is about how people organize information to get things done, there's two reasons why I think it's important for us to delve into this subject. One reason is that, if we are to properly organize information so that we can find things, understand things and so on, we have to understand how our minds work, because ultimately what we're doing is we are designing for minds. And the second reason is that in so doing — in organizing information, in creating these information environments — we are creating contexts of the sort that Annie was talking about there. Even if they are not physical contexts, they are contexts that influence how we understand things. The second conversation I had this year on this subject and which I want to highlight here is the conversation I had with my friend, Karl Fast over episodes 69 and 70. And as you might know, if you've been listening to the show for a while, that's the first time I've ever done a double header. In other words, that I've split a conversation between two episodes. And it's just because we had so much to talk about. And I don't think I can do that conversation justice by extracting just any one clip. But again, I do believe that this is an important subject for you to know about, so I encourage you to check out the whole thing. Closing Jorge: So there you have it, that's a very high level overview of some of the conversations that have stood out to me in the podcast over the last year. Now, obviously there were many more — I told you that we recorded 25 episodes — I don't want to in any way suggest that the other ones weren't as interesting. I just wanted to highlight the ones that I thought manifested some of these themes. And to recap them, the five themes are: aligning our values with our actions, using intentional structures for self-development, practicing information architecture at scale, tools and methods for visualizing systemic intent and then finally, thinking beyond the brain. These are subjects that I care about. And it's no accident that we end up having conversations about these things on the show. One of the interesting things about revisiting them now at the end of the year, is that I can start seeing threads that run through several of the themes. For example, the idea that we need to visualize abstract and complex systems, and that doing so allows us to have better conversations about them. That seems to be a thread that's running through various of these themes. It's true, whether we are talking about our own internal values or our career development, or whether we're talking about a service that we are looking to develop for our clients. And like I've said before, I think that designers — and particularly structurally- and systemically-minded designers, such as information architects — are particularly well-suited to visualize systems in this way. The other thread that I see running through all of this is the importance of considering the context that we are working with and working on, and not just the content of what we're designing. The things that we make are going to be experienced in some kind of environment, whether it's a physical environment or some kind of information environment. And the environment makes a big difference. We understand things in context. And part of what we do as information architects is establish those contexts. That's one of the reasons why I've been emphasizing these conversations about embodied cognition and the extended mind. Because science is making it increasingly clear that thinking happens, not just in our nervous systems, but in our bodies. And more to the point here, it happens out in the world. It happens in our environments and it happens in the tools that we interact with. And again, it's a system that is comprised by ourselves as actors, agents, but also the environments in which we're operating. And we can configure those environments in various ways to help us think better. And I think that this is an important frontier, so to speak, an important area of development for people who design structures of information, who create contexts through language and signs. I've loved the conversations that we've had on the show this year. And that is mostly due to the fact that the guests have been great. I am very grateful to everyone who has agreed to be on the show to have me interview them, to share their ideas, their work, their research, their experience with us. I also want to thank Sarah Clarkson, who I have not acknowledged in the show before. And I'm long overdue in doing that, but Sarah helps me edit the podcast. And her help has been invaluable in getting these shows out to you on time. And of course, I'm very grateful for you; for the fact that you are listening to this, that you have decided to make the show a part of your podcast listening. I would love to know whether there's anything that we can do to make things better. So, please drop by the informed.life, and leave us a note. But for now, I'll just tell you that I am planning to keep the show going. I have guests already lined up for next year. I'm excited about these conversations: having them and also being able to share them with you. So again, thank you. I wish you and yours happy holidays and I look forward to sharing more with you next year.

Westwood Roxboro
The Final Trustworthy and True Word (part 2)

Westwood Roxboro

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 19, 2021


Revelation 22:6-21 The post The Final Trustworthy and True Word (part 2) appeared first on Westwood Roxboro.

Keystone Bible Church
Psalm 20 - The King's Trustworthy Name - John Tracy

Keystone Bible Church

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 19, 2021 60:41


THAT THEY MIGHT KNOW
A Trustworthy Ruler

THAT THEY MIGHT KNOW

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2021 53:33


In this episode, Joe Durso takes a Biblical look at the Lord Jesus Christ as a child and young man and how His character proves Him to be a trustworthy ruler.

Respark Your Life
Ep. 138: The Speed of Trust with Stephen Covey

Respark Your Life

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 79:46


“A Powerful Global Renaissance of Trust has begun.” - Stephen Covey   If you look around, we see all kinds of evidence that people are losing trust in our society. You see it in companies where there are scandals and fraud, and closer to home in our own personal relationships. However, there is also a Renaissance: a rebirth of integrity and ethics. There is a growing awareness that violating the principles that create trust and integrity is not a sustainable way to live, on the individual, family, and society levels. Trust is everything.   Today Raymond will be speaking to Stephen Covey, whose name is synonymous with trust and leadership. He is the former CEO of one of the most famous organizations in the world, Covey Leadership Center, which became the largest leadership development company in the entire world. Under his direction the company grew dramatically, achieving Inc. 5000 status and recognition. He also led the strategy that propelled the book The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People to the number one best selling business book in the entire 20th Century. Expert Action Steps: Start with yourself: increase your personal credibility. Open your agenda and create transparency. Always keep commitments to other people and always keep a commitment to yourself.   Stephen M. R. Covey is The New York Times and Wall Street Journal bestselling author of The Speed of Trust, which has been translated into 22 languages and has sold over 2 million copies worldwide. He is co-author of the #1 Amazon bestseller Smart Trust. He is the former President & CEO of the Covey Leadership Center, where he increased shareholder value by 67 times and grew the company to become the largest leadership development firm in the world. A Harvard MBA, Stephen co-founded and currently leads Franklin Covey's Global Speed of Trust Practice. He serves on numerous boards, including the Government Leadership Advisory Council - Partnership for Public Service, and he has been recognized with the Lifetime Achievement Award for “Top Thought Leaders in Trust” from the advocacy group, Trust Across America/Trust Around the World. Stephen is a highly-sought-after international speaker, who has taught trust and leadership in 56 countries to business, government, military, education, healthcare, and NGO entities.   You can find Stephen's book, The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People here.

Sermons from Calvary Chapel Twin Peaks
Words to Wait By: Trustworthy Words for Suffering (2 Tim 2:1-13)

Sermons from Calvary Chapel Twin Peaks

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021 63:08


How do we wait through suffering? This Advent, we wait for Christ with the Apostle Paul's "Trustworthy" sayings.

BibleProject
Is the Bible Trustworthy? – Paradigm Q+R #2

BibleProject

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2021 68:29


How do we teach the Bible to our children? How can a book written by humans be divinely authoritative? Is the Bible historically accurate? In this episode, Tim, Jon, and Carissa wrap up the Paradigm series by responding to your questions!View full show notes from this episode →Timestamps How Do We Teach the Bible to Our Children? (1:01)Are the Epistles Meditation Literature? (15:54)Can Anyone Understand the Bible? (25:45)How Do We Help Our Churches Learn How to Read the Bible? (32:32)How Can a Book Written by Humans Be Divine? (41:44)Is the Bible Historically Accurate? (51:32)Referenced ResourcesThe Jesus Storybook BibleWestminster Confession of Faith (Section 1.7 is referenced in this episode.)Interested in more? Check out Tim's library here.Show Music “Defender (Instrumental)” by TENTSShow produced by Cooper Peltz. Edited by Dan Gummel and Zach McKinley. Show notes by Lindsey Ponder. Powered and distributed by Simplecast.

Westwood Roxboro
The Final Trustworthy and True Word

Westwood Roxboro

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 12, 2021


Revelation 22:6-21 The post The Final Trustworthy and True Word appeared first on Westwood Roxboro.

WOMEN SIPPING ON LIFE (with doctor shannon) | Stop Drowning | Start Sipping | Daily Inspiration | Hope | Certainty | Abundanc

ILLusion starts with ILL for a reason. Today's S.O.L. STORY is inspired by the conversation we've been having about fear. I've been sharing my own recent experience with fear, and choosing to redefine her as “Here” and “Dear.” When I started to really look at fear from the WHOLE 360 degree perspective, I see how much fear has caused unnecessary pressure in my life. It was one of those AHA moments, when I realized… Wow, pressure is an illusion. It's kinda like how I see “control.” Control is also an illusion. So much of what we see or attempt to be is an illusion. So how is pressure an illusion? Pressure, as well as stress, is based on our perceptions or beliefs. So what if we simply redefined pressure and saw it another way? Look at the word, PRESSURE. It's “press” “sure.” What if we simply pressed into “sure” the next time we felt pressure? Sure is another way of saying, “certainty.” So when we feel pressure, perhaps what we need to press into is what we are certain and sure about. Make sense? So we ask ourselves, “What do I know right now? What is TRUE?” And start with that. What's true. What's certain. Because certainty allows us to take action with ease, versus dis-ease. Any time we start will ILL…it's going to rob us of EASE. So why not start with SURE and create the EASE we desire? Truth is the only way to true health and WELLTH. And this, my dear, is the TRUTH. “A trustworthy messenger brings healing.” Trustworthy = certain, sure, reliable. Are you ready to move from ILLusion to TRUTH and begin living in EASE? Please grab your SACRED S.O.L. D.A.T.E. JOURNAL (Daily Action To Engage yourself.) TODAY'S SACRED S.O.L. STEP:   Where in your life are you living an illusion? What do you believe that simply is NOT true? Are you willing to “try on” a new belief? One that brings you into truth, ease, certainty, and being absolutely SURE… YAY!! Journal about what TRUTH shows you. Thank you for being here, and allowing me to Sip On Life with you. If you've been feeling like you're stuck, overwhelmed, or perhaps you still feel like you're drowning in your life, please don't hesitate to reach out. YOU ARE NOT ALONE... Request a FREE copy of my best-selling book, Date Yourself Well — The Best-Selling 12 Engagements Of Becoming The Great Lover Of Your Life (all you'll pay for is shipping.) www.dateyourselfwell.com If you've received value from the podcast, please let me know. I'd LOVE to hear from you — please email me at: drshannon@doctorshannon.com AND PLEASE TELL YOUR BESTIES AND INVITE THEM TO SIP ON LIFE WITH US. FOLLOW ME ON INSTAGRAM @doctorshannon! See you there... And learn about an incredible opportunity for a select sacred group of 25 women who are ready and willing to RISE UP AND BE THE WOMAN. If you've been feeling like you're stuck, overwhelmed, or perhaps you still feel like you're drowning, please don't hesitate to reach out. I'd be more than happy to schedule a Discovery Call with you to see if Healing Life Coaching is a good fit for you. Email me at drshannon@doctorshannon.com Come over to the WOMEN SIPPING ON LIFE S.O.L. MOVEMENT Closed FB Group and Join the MOVEMENT: https://www.facebook.com/groups/WSOLMovement/ By the way, if you haven't already listened/downloaded my new song (EPISODE 291), you can also listen to it here: letsnottalkaboutex.com, and cast your vote for your favorite version. Visit WomenSippingOnLife.com for more free resources, including my CHECKLIST FOR CHANGE, Engagement Checklist + Evaluation Rating, Six Sacred S.O.L. DATE Secrets…and a FREE copy of my best-selling book, Date Yourself Well. You can also check out my Dr. Shannon Facebook Page for more daily S.O.L. TRAINING. I look forward to seeing you again tomorrow. Please invite your best girlfriends to come and join our S.O.L. PARTY. xo Dr. Shannon. Inspiring minds that want to grow and hearts that want to know, so you can love you, your life, and your life's work well. ONE SIP AT A TIME. A special thanks to the following souls for helping me launch our WOMEN SIPPING ON LIFE podcast… Intro/Outro done by UNI V. SOL  Outro music by Jay Man: Mind Over Matter (www.ourmusicbox.com)  Podcast cover design and web site done by: Pablo Aguilar (www.webdesigncreator.com) Podcast cover photo by Kate Montague of KM Captured (www.kmcaptured.com)

Thrivve Podcast
#39: Algorithmic Decisions for Security, Standardisation and Trustworthy AI

Thrivve Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2021 45:29


"Regulation is coming" — David Berend David Berend is leading the standardisation of AI Security in Singapore where he and his team are about to publish the world first version of the standard in the next 2 months. Furthermore, he developed the research tools for AI quality assurance as part of his Ph.D., which he is now commercialising as a spin off from Nanyang Technological University, Singapore. Finally, he is member of the German Standards Commission and ISO, to integrate the Singapore Standard Achievements into global context. *** For show notes and past guests, please visit https://aiasiapacific.org/podcast/ If you have questions, please email us at contact@aiasiapacific.org or follow us on Twitter to stay in touch.

The Credibility Nation Show
Creating Multiple Streams of Income with Nicole Roberts Jones (CNS 211)

The Credibility Nation Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2021 7:46


In this episode, Nicole Roberts Jones talks about building your billion-dollar brand and creating multiple streams of income through corporate programs. She is the Founder and CEO of NRJ Enterprises. She is also a nationally-recognized transformational speaker, purpose to paycheck expert, and best-selling author of four books, the most recent being, Find Your Fierce.Nicole is uniquely gifted in drawing out the best in her clients, especially women, and helping them take their brilliance to the bank. She is passionate about helping women build billion-dollar brands and create multiple streams of income by developing corporate programs out of their genius. If you've been a successful female executive, but you're building somebody else's billion-dollar brand and you need support to do the same for yourself, reach out to Nicole Roberts Jones via https://www.nicolerobertsjones.com or https://www.linkedin.com/in/NicoleRobertsJones.Mitchell Levy is the Global Credibility Expert at AHAthat, the first AHA leadership (Thought Leadership) platform on the market for thought leaders, experts and companies to unleash their genius to the world. His passion is helping entrepreneurs, business owners and C-Suite Executives get known as thought leaders & become best-selling authors with the AHA platform. He is an accomplished entrepreneur who has created 20 businesses in Silicon Valley including four publishing companies that have published over 800 books. Mitchell is an international best-selling author with 60 business books, has provided strategic consulting to over 100 companies, has advised over 500 CEOs on critical business issues, and has been chairman of the board of a NASDAQ-listed company.Visit https://www.credibilitynation.com to learn more about the Credibility Nation community.Visit https://www.ahathat.com/author to learn how you can become an Amazon best-selling author in 4 months.

THE RICH CELENZA SHOW
#889 - Not Forgiving Others or Yourself May Be Holding You Back (RICH CELENZA Podcast)

THE RICH CELENZA SHOW

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 5, 2021 8:00


RICH CELENZA talks about how not forgiving others or yourself may be holding you back.  Life is too short to be so bitter throughout our entire life. Sometimes it may be very hard to forgive family members, friends, or colleagues. But we need to remember that at the end of the day no one is perfect. 

Grace Church Benbrook
Patient & Trustworthy - James 5:7-12

Grace Church Benbrook

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 5, 2021


The Credibility Nation Show
Gaining Personal Momentum with Carolyn Landesman (CNS 210)

The Credibility Nation Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2021 8:01


This episode features Carolyn Landesman who talks about gaining personal momentum and bringing out the potential in you and your people with success coaching. She is a small to medium business coach and growth strategist, and Chief Vision Officer at Strategize for Success.Carolyn is passionate about creating a destiny train to serve as her clients' passports to success. She believes that momentum is what you need to achieve your personal, professional, and business goals in life. If you're a leader who is lacking in personal momentum, maybe external in nature, and you want to learn more about this, you should reach out to Carolyn Landesman by going to her website at https://www.strategez.com/ or visiting her profile at https://www.linkedin.com/in/carolyn-landesman-mba-3534691a/.Mitchell Levy is the Global Credibility Expert at AHAthat, the first AHA leadership (Thought Leadership) platform on the market for thought leaders, experts and companies to unleash their genius to the world. His passion is helping entrepreneurs, business owners and C-Suite Executives get known as thought leaders & become best-selling authors with the AHA platform. He is an accomplished entrepreneur who has created 20 businesses in Silicon Valley including four publishing companies that have published over 800 books. Mitchell is an international best-selling author with 60 business books, has provided strategic consulting to over 100 companies, has advised over 500 CEOs on critical business issues, and has been chairman of the board of a NASDAQ-listed company. Visit https://www.credibilitynation.com to learn more about the Credibility Nation community.Visit https://www.ahathat.com/author to learn how you can become an Amazon best-selling author in 4 months.

The Credibility Nation Show
Optimizing Performance with Quinn Ferrall (CNS 209)

The Credibility Nation Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 7:01


In this episode, Quinn Ferrall, the founder and performance mindset coach at Infinite Humans, talks about optimizing performance by harnessing the power of emotional intelligence. He helps engineers and other design professionals find success in their careers by bridging the gap between their hard and soft skills. He helps harness the power of emotional intelligence and provides the opportunity for his clients and their team to achieve optimum performance every time. If you are an engineer who is product-focused and not people-focused, you should consider reaching out to Quinn Ferrall by visiting his website https://www.infinitehumans.me/ and going to https://www.linkedin.com/in/quinn-ferrall-pe-mba/.Mitchell Levy is the Global Credibility Expert at AHAthat, the first AHA leadership (Thought Leadership) platform on the market for thought leaders, experts and companies to unleash their genius to the world. His passion is helping entrepreneurs, business owners and C-Suite Executives get known as thought leaders & become best-selling authors with the AHA platform. He is an accomplished entrepreneur who has created 20 businesses in Silicon Valley including four publishing companies that have published over 800 books. Mitchell is an international best-selling author with 60 business books, has provided strategic consulting to over 100 companies, has advised over 500 CEOs on critical business issues, and has been chairman of the board of a NASDAQ-listed company. Visit https://www.credibilitynation.com to learn more about the Credibility Nation community.Visit https://www.ahathat.com/author to learn how you can become an Amazon best-selling author in 4 months.

The B2B Revenue Executive Experience
How Content Strategy Shapes Your Customer Relationships w/ Margot Bloomstein

The B2B Revenue Executive Experience

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 28:10


It's the mid-70's and you've just purchased your first new car — a Ford Pinto. The commercials convinced you that this car was built to survive a demolition derby, while the salesman in the lounge suit convinced you it didn't matter that you couldn't drive stick. Now you don't know what's worse — grinding the gears and stalling every 200 yards or that the bike messenger who bumped into your fender last time you did sent the entire car up in flames. Could anything make you trust a brand's content (or yourself) again? If anyone could, it would be today's guest, Margot Bloomstein, author of Trustworthy and Brand & Strategy Consultant at Appropriate, Inc, who joins the show to discuss how effective content strategy is for building customer confidence and trust in your brand. In this episode, we discuss: Why customers need to be confident in you and themselves How to help your customers succeed (and why that builds trust) The 3 V's of content strategy Why you need a consistent voice across all channels Now that you know how to build trust and confidence with your content strategy, are you ready to learn how to optimize your tech stack or dive into how Google's new rules impact your SEO? Check out the full list of episodes: The B2B Revenue Executive Experience.

The Credibility Nation Show
Creating More Income and Scaling Your Impact with Brigette Iarrusso (CNS 208)

The Credibility Nation Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 9:02


In this episode, Brigette Iarrusso talks about creating more income and scaling your impact in total integrity. She is the CEO, Master Coach and Lead Consultant, Board Member Marketing Chair, Conscious Capitalism, and Steering Committee Member of the Women Entrepreneur's of Berkeley at Berkeley Chamber of Commerce.Brigette is passionate about helping conscious CEOs, coaches, consultants, and thought leaders with a serious purpose of generating more revenue in total integrity. She believes in implementing business strategies that put impact before income and service before sales. If you're a conscious coach, consultant, or healer, and somebody you know who's like that, doesn't want to feel like this slimsy salesperson, you might want to reach out to Brigette Iarusso by visiting her website at https://embracechange.us/ or going to her profile at https://www.linkedin.com/in/brigetteiarrusso/.Mitchell Levy is the Global Credibility Expert at AHAthat, the first AHA leadership (Thought Leadership) platform on the market for thought leaders, experts and companies to unleash their genius to the world. His passion is helping entrepreneurs, business owners and C-Suite Executives get known as thought leaders & become best-selling authors with the AHA platform. He is an accomplished entrepreneur who has created 20 businesses in Silicon Valley including four publishing companies that have published over 800 books. Mitchell is an international best-selling author with 60 business books, has provided strategic consulting to over 100 companies, has advised over 500 CEOs on critical business issues, and has been chairman of the board of a NASDAQ-listed company. Visit https://www.credibilitynation.com to learn more about the Credibility Nation community.Visit https://www.ahathat.com/author to learn how you can become an Amazon best-selling author in 4 months.

Sermons from Calvary Chapel Twin Peaks
Words to Wait By: Christ Jesus Came to Save Sinners (1 Tim 1:15)

Sermons from Calvary Chapel Twin Peaks

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 42:10


This Advent, as we await the coming of Christ, we need trustworthy words to wait by. These dependable words come from Paul's phrase "the saying is trustworthy."

TechStuff
How a human-centered approach is building trustworthy AI.

TechStuff

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 31:48


Creating trust and transparency in AI isn't just a business requirement, it's a social responsibility. In this episode of Smart Talks, Malcolm talks to Christina Montgomery, IBM's Chief Privacy Officer and AI Ethics Board Co-Chair, and Dr. Seth Dobrin, Global Chief AI Officer, about IBM's approach to AI and how it's helping businesses transform the way they work with AI systems that are fair and address bias so AI can benefit everyone, not just a few. This is a paid advertisement from IBM. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

Stuff To Blow Your Mind
Smart Talks with IBM and Malcolm Gladwell: How a Human-Centered Approach is Building Trustworthy AI

Stuff To Blow Your Mind

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 30:48


Creating trust and transparency in AI isn't just a business requirement, it's a social responsibility. In this episode of Smart Talks, Malcolm talks to Christina Montgomery, IBM's Chief Privacy Officer and AI Ethics Board Co-Chair, and Dr. Seth Dobrin, Global Chief AI Officer, about IBM's approach to AI and how it's helping businesses transform the way they work with AI systems that are fair and address bias so AI can benefit everyone, not just a few. This is a paid advertisement from IBM. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com