The Daily

Follow The Daily
Share on
Copy link to clipboard

This is what the news should sound like. The biggest stories of our time, told by the best journalists in the world. Hosted by Michael Barbaro. Twenty minutes a day, five days a week, ready by 6 a.m.

The New York Times


    • Dec 1, 2021 LATEST EPISODE
    • weekdays NEW EPISODES
    • 27m AVG DURATION
    • 1,387 EPISODES

    Listeners of The Daily that love the show mention: michael s voice, michael barbaro, thank you nyt, delilah, odessa, listen to the daily, tilly, protesters, love barbara, michael and his team, michael and team, agony, mcneill, chauvin, one hundred, see you tomorrow, hospitals, nursing home, human interest stories, new york times.



    Search for episodes from The Daily with a specific topic:

    Latest episodes from The Daily

    Amazon and the Labor Shortage

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 27:15


    Amazon is constantly hiring. Data has shown that the company has had a turnover rate of about 150 percent a year.For the founder, Jeff Bezos, worker retention was not important, and the company built systems that didn't require skilled workers or extensive training — it could hire and lose people all of the time.Amazon has been able to replenish its work force, but the pandemic has exposed the vulnerabilities of this approach.We explore what the labor shortage has meant for Amazon and the people who work there. Guest: Karen Weise, a technology correspondent, based in Seattle for The New York Times.Sign up here to get The Daily in your inbox each morning. And for an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter. Background reading: Each year, hundreds of thousands of workers churn through Amazon's vast mechanism that hires, monitors, disciplines and fires. Amid the pandemic, the already strained system lurched.For more information on today's episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 


    What We Know About the Omicron Variant

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 20:51

    The story of the Omicron variant began a week ago, when researchers in southern Africa detected a version of the coronavirus that carried 50 mutations. When scientists look at coronavirus mutations, they worry about three things: Is the new variant more contagious? Is it going to cause people to get sicker? And how will the vaccines work against it? We explore when we will get the answers to these three questions, and look at the discovery of the variant and the international response to it. Guest: Apoorva Mandavilli, a reporter covering science and global health for The New York Times.Sign up here to get The Daily in your inbox each morning. And for an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter. Background reading: South African scientists have said that while they need more data to be sure, existing treatments and precautions seem to be effective against the Omicron variant.Mutations can work together to make a virus more fearsome, but they can also cancel one another out. This phenomenon, called epistasis, is why scientists are reluctant to speculate on Omicron.Almost two years into the pandemic, finger-pointing, lack of coordination, sparse information and fear are once again influencing policy.For more information on today's episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 

    A Prosecutor's Winning Strategy in the Ahmaud Arbery Case

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 37:05

    This episode contains strong language. Heading into deliberations in the trial of the three white men in Georgia accused of chasing down and killing Ahmaud Arbery, an unarmed Black man, it was not clear which way the jurors were leaning. In the end, the mostly white jury found all three men guilty of murder. We look at the prosecution's decision not to make race a central tenet of their case, and how the verdict was reached. Guest: Richard Fausset, a correspondent based in Atlanta. Sign up here to get The Daily in your inbox each morning. And for an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter. Background reading: How a prosecutor addressed a mostly white jury and won a conviction in the Ahmaud Arbery case.“It's good to see racism lose”: The murder convictions were praised by many. For more information on today's episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 

    The Farmers Revolt in India

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 28:08

    After a landslide re-election in 2019, Prime Minister Narendra Modi's control over India seemed impossible to challenge.But a yearlong farmers' protest against agricultural overhauls has done just that, forcing the Indian prime minister to back down.How did the protesters succeed?Guest: Emily Schmall, a South Asia correspondent for The New York Times.Sign up here to get The Daily in your inbox each morning. And for an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter. Background reading: The protesters received foreign and domestic financial support, kept their camps organized and looked for ways to be seen while trying to avoid violence.How a bungled response to Covid and a struggling economy have hurt the governing party's standing in India.For more information on today's episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 

    Righting the Historical Wrong of the Claiborne Highway

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 25:43

    In the 1950s and '60s, the Tremé neighborhood of New Orleans, one of the oldest African-American neighborhoods in the United States, was a vibrant community.But the construction of the Claiborne Expressway in the 1960s gutted the area.The Biden administration has said that the trillion-dollar infrastructure package will address such historical wrongs.How might that be achieved?Guest: Audra D.S. Burch, a national correspondent for The New York Times. Sign up here to get The Daily in your inbox each morning. And for an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter. Background reading: Generations of New Orleans residents have dreamed of the day when the Claiborne Expressway might be removed. President Biden's $1.2 trillion infrastructure package could eventually make that possible.For more information on today's episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 

    The Acquittal of Kyle Rittenhouse

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 33:52

    This episode contains strong language.On Aug. 25, 2020, Kyle Rittenhouse, a teenager, shot three men, two of them fatally, during street protests in Kenosha, Wis., over the shooting of a Black man by a white police officer.Mr. Rittenhouse's trial, which began on Nov. 1, revolved around a central question: Did his actions constitute self-defense under Wisconsin law?Last week, a jury decided that they did, finding him not guilty on every count against him.We look at key moments from the trial and at how the verdict was reached.Guest: Julie Bosman, the Chicago bureau chief of The New York Times. Sign up here to get The Daily in your inbox each morning. And for an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter. Background reading: Mr. Rittenhouse's acquittal pointed to the wide berth given to defendants who say they acted out of fear.The trial highlighted the deep division over gun rights in the United States.For more information on today's episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 

    The Sunday Read: ‘Did Covid Change How We Dream?'

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2021 58:59

    As the novel coronavirus spread and much of the world moved toward isolation, dream researchers began rushing to design studies and set up surveys that might allow them to access some of the most isolated places of all, the dreamscapes unfolding inside individual brains. The first thing almost everyone noticed was that for many people, their dream worlds seemed suddenly larger and more intense.One study of more than 1,000 Italians living through strict lockdown found that some 60 percent were sleeping badly — before the pandemic, only a third of Italians reported trouble sleeping — and they were also remembering more of their dreams than during normal times and reporting that those dreams felt unusually real and emotional and bizarre.Even social media sites, researchers found, were full of people surprised at how much more active and vivid their dream lives had become. “Is it just me?” many of them asked. It was not.This story was recorded by Audm. To hear more audio stories from publications like The New York Times, download Audm for iPhone or Android.

    How Belarus Manufactured a Border Crisis

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 27:52

    For three decades, President Aleksandr Lukashenko of Belarus, a former Soviet nation in Eastern Europe, ruled with an iron fist. But pressure has mounted on him in the past year and a half. After a contested election in 2020, the European Union enacted sanctions and refused to recognize his leadership.In the hopes of bringing the bloc to the negotiating table, Mr. Lukashenko has engineered a migrant crisis on the Poland-Belarus border, where thousands from the Middle East, Africa and Asia have converged.What are the conditions like for those at the border, and will Mr. Lukashenko's political gamble reap his desired results? Guests: Monika Pronczuk, a reporter covering the European Union for The New York Times; and Anton Troianovski, the Moscow bureau chief for The New York Times. Sign up here to get The Daily in your inbox each morning. And for an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter. Background reading: Poland massed thousands of troops on its border with Belarus to keep out Middle Eastern migrants who have set up camp there, as Western officials accuse Belarus's leader of intentionally trying to create a new migrant crisis in Europe.Belarusian authorities on Thursday cleared the encampments at the main border crossing into Poland, removing for the moment a major flashpoint that has raised tensions across the continent.For more information on today's episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 

    The Economy Is Good. So Why Do We Feel Terrible About It?

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 25:12

    The U.S. economy is doing better than many had anticipated. Some 80 percent of jobs lost during the pandemic have been regained, and people are making, and spending, more.But Americans seem to feel terrible about the financial outlook.Why the gap between reality and perception?Guest: Ben Casselman, a reporter covering economics and business for The New York Times.Sign up here to get The Daily in your inbox each morning. And for an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter. Background reading: American consumers express worry about inflation and are pessimistic about the direction of the country in general. But none of that is keeping them from spending.For more information on today's episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 

    The School Board Wars, Part 2

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 42:14

    This episode contains strong language.In Bucks County, Pa., what started out as a group of frustrated parents pushing for schools to reopen devolved over the course of a year and half into partisan disputes about America's most divisive cultural issues.But those arguments have caused many to overlook a central role of the Central Bucks School District's board: providing quality education.In Part 2 of our series on school board wars in the U.S., we look beyond the fighting and examine the pandemic's harsh effects on teachers and pupils.Guest: Campbell Robertson, a national correspondent for The New York Times.Sign up here to get The Daily in your inbox each morning. And for an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter. Background reading: Republicans are heading into the 2022 midterm elections aiming to capitalize on the frustrations of suburban parents still reeling from the devastating fallout of pandemic-era schooling.The F.B.I. has begun to track threats against school administrators, teachers and board members to assess the extent of the problem.For more information on today's episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 

    The School Board Wars, Part 1

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 40:41

    This episode contains strong language.A new battleground has emerged in American politics: school boards. In these meetings, parents increasingly engage in heated — sometimes violent — fights over hot-button issues such as mask mandates and critical race theory.Suddenly, the question of who sits on a school board has become a question about which version of America will prevail.We visit the school board meeting in Central Bucks, Pa., an important county in national politics, where the meetings have been particularly wild.Guest: Campbell Robertson, a national correspondent for The New York Times. Sign up here to get The Daily in your inbox each morning. And for an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter. Background reading: Since the spring, a steady tide of school board members across the country have nervously come forward with accounts of threats they have received from enraged local parents.Republicans are heading into the 2022 midterm elections with what they believe will be a highly effective political strategy capitalizing on the frustrations of suburban parents still reeling from the devastating fallout of pandemic-era schooling.For more information on today's episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 

    How the U.S. Hid a Deadly Airstrike

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 30:25

    This episode contains strong language.In March 2019, workers inside an Air Force combat operations center in Qatar watched as an American F-15 attack jet dropped a large bomb into a group of women and children in Syria.Assessing the damage, the workers found that there had been around 70 casualties, and a lawyer decided that it was a potential war crime.We look at how the system that was designed to bring the airstrike to light, ended up keeping it hidden.Guest: Dave Philipps, a national correspondent covering the military for The New York Times. Sign up here to get The Daily in your inbox each morning. And for an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter. Background reading: The military never conducted an independent investigation into a 2019 bombing on the last bastion of the Islamic State, despite concerns about a secretive commando force.For more information on today's episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 

    The Sunday Read: ‘The Untold Story of Sushi in America'

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2021 45:09


    In 1980, when few Americans knew the meaning of toro and omakase, the Rev. Sun Myung Moon, the founder of the Unification Church, spoke to dozens of his followers in the Grand Ballroom of the New Yorker Hotel.It was said Moon could see the future, visit you in dreams and speak with the spirit world, where Jesus and Buddha, Moses and Washington, caliphs and emperors and the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and even God himself would all proclaim his greatness.“You,” Moon later recalled telling his followers in the ballroom, “are the pioneers of the fishing business — the seafood business. Go forward, pioneer the way and bring back prosperity.” They did. Today a business they grew and shaped is arguably America's only nationwide fresh-seafood company of any kind. It specializes in sushi, and its name is True World Foods.One of Moon's daughters, In Jin Moon, once asked in a sermon whether their movement really made a difference. “In an incredible way, we did,” she said: Her father created True World Foods. “When he initiated that project,” she went on, “nobody knew what sushi was or what eating raw fish was about.” Her father, she concluded, “got the world to love sushi.”This story was recorded by Audm. To hear more audio stories from publications like The New York Times, download Audm for iPhone or Android.


    An Interview With Dr. Anthony Fauci

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 33:49

    Dr. Anthony S. Fauci, the nation's top infectious disease expert, described the current status of the pandemic in the United States as a “mixed bag” that is leaning more toward the positive than the negative.But, he said, there is still more work to do.In our conversation, he weighs in on vaccine mandates, booster shots and the end of the pandemic.Guest: Dr. Anthony Fauci, the nation's leading expert on infectious diseases. Sign up here to get The Daily in your inbox each morning. And for an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter. Background reading: In a turnaround, the Food and Drug Administration is expected to grant Pfizer's request to expand booster shot eligibility to all adults before the winter holiday season.This week, the Biden administration argued that the federal government had all the power it needed to require large employers to mandate vaccination of their workers against the virus — or to require those who refuse the shots to wear masks and submit to weekly testing.For more information on today's episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 

    The Public Health Officials Under Siege

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 26:37

    This episode contains strong language.When the coronavirus hit the United States, the nation's public health officials were in the front line, monitoring cases and calibrating rules to combat the spread.From the start, however, there has been resistance. A Times investigation found that 100 new laws have since been passed that wrest power from public health officials.What is the effect of those laws, and how might they affect the response to a future pandemic?Guest: Mike Baker, the Seattle bureau chief for The New York Times. Sign up here to get The Daily in your inbox each morning. And for an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter. Background reading: State and local public health departments have endured not only the public's fury, but also widespread staff defections, burnout, firings, unpredictable funding and a significant erosion in their authority to impose the health orders that were critical to America's early response to the pandemic.For more information on today's episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 

    ‘How Did We Let People Die This Way?'

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 32:38

    Over the past year, a record 2,000 migrants from Africa have drowned trying to reach Spain.Many of these migrants make the journey in rickety vessels, not much bigger than canoes, that often don't stand up to strong currents.What happens, then, when their bodies wash ashore?This is the story of Martín Zamora, a 61-year-old father of seven, who has committed himself to returning the bodies of drowned migrants to their families. Guest: Nicholas Casey, the Madrid bureau chief for The New York Times. Sign up here to get The Daily in your inbox each morning. And for an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter. Background reading: Martín Zamora, the owner of a funeral parlor near Gibraltar, has found an unusual line of business among the relatives of migrants who drown trying to reach Europe: He collects the bodies of those who don't make it to Spain alive. Read this article in Spanish here.For more information on today's episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 

    A Conversation With a Virginia Democrat

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 27:23

    In a bipartisan win for President Biden, Democrats and Republicans have passed a trillion-dollar infrastructure plan. Now comes the difficult part — trying to win approval for a $2 trillion social spending bill.For more moderate Democrats in swing districts, the vote will be among the toughest of the Biden era — and one that some fear could cost them their seats in next year's midterms.To gauge their concerns, we speak to one such lawmaker, Representative Abigail Spanberger of Virginia.Guest: Representative Abigail Spanberger, Democrat of Virginia.Sign up here to get The Daily in your inbox each morning. And for an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter. Background reading: After the Democrats' poor performance in last week's elections, Ms. Spanberger was critical of Mr. Biden's sweeping agenda. “Nobody elected him to be F.D.R., they elected him to be normal and stop the chaos,” she said.For more information on today's episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 

    A Case That Could Transform America's Relationship With Guns

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 30:20

    The U.S. Supreme Court is gearing up to rule on an area of the law that it has been silent on for over a decade: the Second Amendment.The case under consideration will help decide whether the right to bear arms extends beyond the home and into the streets.The implications of the decision could be enormous. A quarter of the U.S. population lives in states whose laws might be affected.Guest: Adam Liptak, a reporter covering the Supreme Court for The New York Times.Sign up here to get The Daily in your inbox each morning. And for an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter. Background reading: A New York law, which imposes strict limits on carrying guns in public, faced a skeptical reception from the Supreme Court last week. Their questions suggest that the law is unlikely to survive.For more information on today's episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 

    The Sunday Read: ‘I Fell in Love With Motorcycles. But Could I Ever Love Sturgis?'

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2021 28:14

    Like many other Americans, Jamie Lauren Keiles, the author of this week's Sunday Read, bought their first motorcycle during the coronavirus pandemic.“I thought I was just purchasing a mode of transportation — a way to get around without riding the train,” they wrote. “But after some time on the street with other riders, I started to suspect I'd signed up for a lot more.”Jamie was aware of biker culture, but had decided that these tropes — choppers, leather jackets — “were all but contentless by now, mere tchotchkes on the wall in the T.G.I. Fridays of American individualism.”However, Jamie was shocked to discover that not only did this strain of biker culture still exist, but that they existed within it. So, curious about what remained vital at its heart, Jamie set out for the Sturgis Motorcycle Rally.This story was recorded by Audm. To hear more audio stories from publications like The New York Times, download Audm for iPhone or Android. 

    The Trial of Kyle Rittenhouse

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 30:35

    This episode contains strong language and scenes of violence.Last summer, as the country reeled from the murder of George Floyd, another Black man, Jacob Blake, was shot by police in Kenosha, Wis. People took to the streets in Kenosha in protest and were soon met by civilians in militia gear — a confrontation that turned violent.On the third night of protests, a white teenager shot and killed two people, and maimed a third. The gunman, Kyle Rittenhouse, became a symbol of the moment, called a terrorist by the left and a patriot by the right. Now, he's on trial for those shootings.Guest: Julie Bosman, the Chicago bureau chief of The New York Times.Sign up here to get The Daily in your inbox each morning. And for an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter. Background reading: Here are some of the takeaways from the trial so far.These are the events that led to Mr. Rittenhouse, now 18, standing trial in the fatal shootings of two men and the wounding of another in Kenosha, Wis.For more information on today's episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 

    A Rough Election Night for the Democrats

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 26:30


    On a major night of elections across the United States on Tuesday, the Republican Glenn Youngkin claimed an unexpected victory over his Democratic opponent, Terry McAuliffe, to win the governor's race in Virginia.As the night went on, it became clear that the contest in Virginia was not a singular event — Republicans were doing well in several unlikely places.What do the results tell us about the current direction of American politics?Guest: Alexander Burns, a national political correspondent for The New York Times. Sign up here to get The Daily in your inbox each morning. And for an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter. Background reading: Reeling from a barrage of unexpected losses, an array of Democrats have pleaded with President Biden and his party's lawmakers to address the quality-of-life issues that plagued their candidates in Tuesday's elections.For more information on today's episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 


    A Last Chance to Avert Climate Disaster?

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 27:40

    In a giant conference hall in Glasgow, leaders from around the world have gathered for the Conference of Parties to the United Nations Climate Change Convention, or COP26. This is the 26th such session.Many say this may be the last chance to avoid climate disaster. Will anything change this time?Guest: Somini Sengupta, the international climate reporter for The New York Times. Sign up here to get The Daily in your inbox each morning. And for an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter. Background reading: The opening day of the COP26 summit was heavy on dire warnings and light on substantive proposals.We have a live briefing from the conference, where the focus is now turning to behind-the-scenes talks and how to finance the different proposals to combat climate change.For more information on today's episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 

    The Perilous Politics of Rising Inflation

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 24:20

    Inflation in the United States is rising at its fastest rate so far this century. At 4 percent, according to one index, it is double the Federal Reserve's target.We look at why prices are on the rise and at the tense political moment they have created.Guest: Jim Tankersley, a White House correspondent for The New York Times. Sign up here to get The Daily in your inbox each morning. And for an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter. Background reading: Supply chain disruptions, a worker shortage and pain at the gasoline pump have made inflation an economic and political problem for the White House.Pressure is on the Federal Reserve and the Biden administration as they try to calibrate policy during a tumultuous period.For more information on today's episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 

    Why Do So Many Traffic Stops Go Wrong?

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 23:57

    This episode contains strong language and scenes of violence. Over the past five years, police officers in the United States have killed more than 400 unarmed drivers or passengers — a rate of more than one a week, a Times investigation has found.Why are such cases so common, and why is the problem so hard to fix?Guest: David D. Kirkpatrick, a national correspondent for The New York Times. Love listening to New York Times podcasts? Help us test a new audio product in beta and give us your thoughts to shape what it becomes. Visit nytimes.com/audio to join the beta.Sign up here to get The Daily in your inbox each morning. And for an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter. Background reading: Officers, trained to presume danger, can react with outsize aggression during traffic stops — sometimes with fatal consequences.For more information on today's episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 

    The Sunday Read: 'Fear on Cape Cod as Sharks Hunt Again'

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2021 81:43

    Over the past decade, the waters around Cape Cod have become host to one of the densest seasonal concentrations of adult white sharks in the world. Acoustic tagging data suggest the animals trickle into the region during lengthening days in May, increase in abundance throughout summer, peak in October and mostly depart by Thanksgiving.To conservationists, the annual returns are a success story, but the phenomenon carries unusual public-safety implications.Unlike many places where adult white sharks congregate, which tend to be remote islands, the sharks' summer residency in New England overlaps with tourist season at one of the Northeast's most-coveted recreational areas.What will it take to keep people safe?This story was recorded by Audm. To hear more audio stories from publications like The New York Times, download Audm for iPhone or Android.

    A Delicate Compromise in the Capitol

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 27:38

    President Biden and Democratic leaders say they have an agreement on a historic social spending bill that they have spent months negotiating. But liberals in Congress demanded assurances that the package would survive before they would agree to an immediate vote on a separate $1 trillion infrastructure bill. Today, we explore why compromise remains a work in progress.Guest: Emily Cochrane, a correspondent based in Washington.Love listening to New York Times podcasts? Help us test a new audio product in beta and give us your thoughts to shape what it becomes. Visit nytimes.com/audio to join the beta.Sign up here to get The Daily in your inbox each morning. And for an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter. Background reading: Congressional Democrats' decision to delay a vote on the infrastructure bill left Mr. Biden empty-handed as he departed for Europe, where he had hoped to point to progress on both measures as proof that American democracy still works.For more information on today's episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 

    The Ahmaud Arbery Trial

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 27:06

    In the coming days, a trial will begin to determine whether the fatal shooting of Amaud Arbery, an unarmed Black man, by two armed white men is considered murder under Georgia state law. Today, we explore why that may be a difficult case for prosecutors to make.Guest: Richard Fausset, a correspondent based in Atlanta who writes about the American South.Love listening to New York Times podcasts? Help us test a new audio product in beta and give us your thoughts to shape what it becomes. Visit nytimes.com/audio to join the beta.Sign up here to get The Daily in your inbox each morning. And for an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter. Background reading: Here's a look at the major moments between Mr. Arbery's killing in a Georgia suburb and the trial of three men charged with murder.A year after his killing in Georgia, Mr. Arbery's death has sparked a bipartisan effort to remake the state's 158-year-old citizen's arrest law. But a potentially divisive trial awaits.For more information on today's episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 

    The Story of Kyrsten Sinema

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 30:16

    As congressional Democrats dramatically scale back the most ambitious social spending bill since the 1960s, they're placing much of the blame on moderates who have demanded changes.One senator, Kyrsten Sinema of Arizona, has played an outsized role in shaping the bill — but has remained quiet about why. Today, we explore what brought her to this moment.Guest: Reid J. Epstein, who covers campaigns and elections for The New York Times.Love listening to New York Times podcasts? Help us test a new audio product in beta and give us your thoughts to shape what it becomes. Visit nytimes.com/audio to join the beta.Sign up here to get The Daily in your inbox each morning. And for an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter. Background reading: How Senator Kyrsten Sinema has undergone a political metamorphosis.Progressive activists have adopted more aggressive tactics against Ms. Sinema and other centrist holdouts as they have blocked aspects of President Biden's agenda.For more information on today's episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 

    Why Spending Too Little Could Backfire on Democrats

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 23:53

    When Democrats first set out to expand the social safety net, they envisioned a piece of legislation as transformational as what the party has achieved in the 1960s. In the process, they hoped that they'd win back the working-class voters the party had since lost.But now that they're on the brink of reaching a deal, the question is whether the enormous cuts and compromises they've made will make it impossible to fulfill either ambition.Guest: Jonathan Weisman, a congressional correspondent for The Times.Love listening to New York Times podcasts? Help us test a new audio product in beta and give us your thoughts to shape what it becomes. Visit nytimes.com/audio to join the beta.Sign up here to get The Daily in your inbox each morning. And for an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter. Background reading: As Democrats ponder cutting a $3.5 trillion social safety net bill down to perhaps $2 trillion, a proposal to limit programs to the poor has rekindled a debate on the meaning of government itself.For more information on today's episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 

    A Threat to China's Economy

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 30:26

    Every once in a while a company grows so big and messy that governments fear what would happen to the broader economy if it were to fail. In China, Evergrande, a sprawling real estate developer, is that company.Evergrande has the distinction of being the world's most debt-saddled property developer and has been on life support for months. A steady drumbeat of bad news in recent weeks has accelerated what many experts warn is inevitable: failure.But will the government let the company fail? And what would happen if it did?Guest: Alexandra Stevenson, a business correspondent based in Hong Kong covering Chinese corporate giants.Love listening to New York Times podcasts? Help us test a new audio product in beta and give us your thoughts to shape what it becomes. Visit nytimes.com/audio to join the beta.Sign up here to get The Daily in your inbox each morning. And for an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter. Background reading: The property giant's success mirrored the country's transformation from an agrarian economy to one that embraced capitalism. Its struggles offer a glimpse of a new financial future.Evergrande isn't the only Chinese real estate developer in trouble — another, Fantasia Holdings Group, recently missed a key payment to foreign bondholders, heightening the persistent fears of a coming crisis in China's real estate sector.For more information on today's episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 

    The Sunday Read: ‘Who Is the Bad Art Friend?'

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2021 68:26

    On June 24, 2015, Dawn Dorland, an essayist and aspiring novelist, did perhaps the kindest, most consequential thing she might ever do in her life. She donated one of her kidneys — and elected to do it in a slightly unusual and particularly altruistic way. As a so-called nondirected donation, her kidney was not meant for anyone in particular, but for a recipient who may otherwise have no other living donor.Several weeks before the surgery, Ms. Dorland decided to share her truth with others. She started a private Facebook group, inviting family and friends, including some fellow writers from GrubStreet, the Boston writing center where she had spent many years learning her craft.After her surgery, she posted something to her group: a heartfelt letter she'd written to the final recipient of the surgical chain, whoever they may be. Ms. Dorland noticed some people she'd invited into the group hadn't seemed to react to any of her posts. On July 20, she wrote an email to one of them: a writer named Sonya Larson.A year later, Ms. Dorland learned that Ms. Larson had written a story about a woman who received a kidney. Ms. Larson told Ms. Dorland that it was “partially inspired” by how her imagination took off after learning of Ms. Dorland's donation.Art often draws inspiration from life — but what happens when it's your life?This story was recorded by Audm. To hear more audio stories from publications like The New York Times, download Audm for iPhone or Android.

    Qaddafi's Son is Alive, and He Wants to Take Back Libya

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 34:39

    Before the Arab Spring, Seif al-Islam el-Qaddafi, the second son of the Libyan dictator Col. Muammar el-Qaddafi, was establishing himself as a serious figure internationally. Then, the Arab Spring came to Libya.His father and brothers were killed and Seif himself was captured by rebels and taken to the western mountains of Libya.For years, rumors have surrounded the fate of Seif. Now he has re-emerged, touting political ambitions, but where has he been and what has he learned?Guest: Robert F. Worth, a contributor to The New York Times Magazine. Love listening to New York Times podcasts? Help us test a new audio product in beta and give us your thoughts to shape what it becomes. Visit nytimes.com/audio to join the beta.Sign up here to get The Daily in your inbox each morning. And for an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter. Background reading: In his first meeting with a foreign journalist in a decade, Seif al-Islam Qaddafi described his years in captivity — and hinted at a bid for Libya's presidency.For more information on today's episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 

    A Showdown in Chicago

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 28:14

    Chicago is in the midst of a crime wave — but there is also a question about whether police officers will show up for work.That's because of a showdown between the mayor, Lori Lightfoot, and the police union over a coronavirus vaccine mandate.Some 30,000 city workers are subject to the mandate, but no group has expressed more discontent than the police.Guest: Julie Bosman, the Chicago bureau chief for The New York Times. Love listening to New York Times podcasts? Help us test a new audio product in beta and give us your thoughts to shape what it becomes. Visit nytimes.com/audio to join the beta.Sign up here to get The Daily in your inbox each morning. And for an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter. Background reading: The clash over coronavirus shots in Chicago intensified last week, when the city filed a complaint against the police union.Across the United States, there is friction between city governments and law enforcement unions over vaccinations. For more information on today's episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 

    How a Single Senator Derailed Biden's Climate Plan

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 25:23

    The Clean Electricity Program has been at the heart of President Biden's climate agenda since he took office.But passage was always going to come down to a single senator: Joe Manchin of West Virginia.With Mr. Manchin's support now extremely unlikely, where does that leave American climate policy?Guest: Coral Davenport, a correspondent covering energy and environmental policy for The New York Times. Love listening to New York Times podcasts? Help us test a new audio product in beta and give us your thoughts to shape what it becomes. Visit nytimes.com/audio to join the beta.Sign up here to get The Daily in your inbox each morning. And for an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter. Background reading: Senator Joe Manchin, a Democrat from coal-rich West Virginia, has told the White House that he is firmly against one of the most powerful parts of President Biden's climate agenda.Faced with the likely demise of the program, the White House and outraged lawmakers are scrambling to find alternatives.For more information on today's episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday.

    The Life and Career of Colin Powell

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 33:18


    Colin Powell, who in four decades of public service helped shape U.S. national security, died on Monday. He was 84.Despite a stellar career, Mr. Powell had expressed a fear that he would be remembered for a single event: his role in leading his country to war in Iraq.We look back on the achievements and setbacks of a trailblazing life. Guest: Robert Draper, writer for The New York Times Magazine and author of “To Start a War: How the Bush Administration Took America into Iraq.”Love listening to New York Times podcasts? Help us test a new audio product in beta and give us your thoughts to shape what it becomes. Visit nytimes.com/audio to join the beta.Sign up here to get The Daily in your inbox each morning. And for an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter. Background reading: Colin Powell was emblematic of the ability of minorities to use the military as a ladder of opportunity — one that eventually led him to the highest levels of government. He died of complications of Covid-19, his family said.For more information on today's episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 


    Why Are All Eyes on the Virginia Governor's Race?

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 25:27


    In 2020, Virginia epitomized the way in which Democrats took the White House and Congress — by turning moderate and swing counties.But President Biden's poll numbers have been waning, and in the coming race for governor, Republicans see an opportunity.Guest: Lisa Lerer, a national political correspondent for The New York Times. Love listening to New York Times podcasts? Help us test a new audio product in beta and give us your thoughts to shape what it becomes. Visit nytimes.com/audio to join the beta.Sign up here to get The Daily in your inbox each morning. And for an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter. Background reading: Republicans in Virginia are saying what their nominee for governor, Glenn Youngkin, will not: The governor's race is a proxy for Donald Trump's grievances.Though Virginia is getting bluer, the former governor Terry McAuliffe is straining to motivate Democratic voters for his comeback attempt.After months of closed classrooms and lost learning time, Republicans are making schools the focus of their final push.For more information on today's episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 


    The Sunday Read: ‘Laurie Anderson Has a Message for Us Humans'

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2021 44:41


    When the Hirshhorn Museum told Laurie Anderson that it wanted to put on a big, lavish retrospective of her work, she said no.For one thing, she was busy and has been for roughly 50 years. Over the course of her incessant career, Ms. Anderson has done just about everything a creative person can do. She helped design an Olympics opening ceremony, served as the official artist in residence for NASA, made an opera out of “Moby-Dick” and played a concert for dogs at the Sydney Opera House. And she is still going.On top of all this, Ms. Anderson had philosophical qualms about a retrospective. She is 74, which seems like a very normal age to stop and look back, and yet she seems determined, at all times, to keep moving forward.This story was written by Sam Anderson and recorded by Audm. To hear more audio stories from publications like The New York Times, download Audm for iPhone or Android.


    The Great Supply Chain Disruption

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 33:03

    Throughout the pandemic, businesses of all sizes have faced delays, product shortages and rising costs linked to disruptions in the global supply chain. Consumers have been confronted with an experience rare in modern times: no stock available, and no idea when it will come in.Our correspondent, Peter Goodman, went to one of the largest ports in the United States to witness the crisis up close. In this episode, he explains why this economic havoc might not be temporary — and could require a substantial refashioning of the world's shipping infrastructure.Guest: Peter Goodman, a global economics correspondent for The New York Times.Love listening to New York Times podcasts? Help us test a new audio product in beta and give us your thoughts to shape what it becomes. Visit nytimes.com/audio to join the beta.Sign up here to get The Daily in your inbox each morning. And for an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter. Background reading: An enduring traffic jam at the Port of Savannah reveals why the chaos in global shipping is likely to persist.This week, President Biden announced that major ports and companies, including Walmart, UPS and FedEx, would expand their working hours as his administration struggles to relieve growing backlogs in the global supply chains.For more information on today's episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 

    ‘No Crime Is Worth That'

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 25:59


    This episode contains strong language and descriptions of violence.A Times investigation has uncovered extraordinary levels of violence and lawlessness inside Rikers, New York City's main jail complex. In this episode, we hear about one man's recent experience there and ask why detainees in some buildings now have near-total control over entire units.Guest: Jan Ransom, an investigative reporter for The Times focusing on criminal justice issues, spoke with Richard Brown, a man detained at Rikers.Love listening to New York Times podcasts? Help us test a new audio product in beta and give us your thoughts to shape what it becomes. Visit nytimes.com/audio to join the beta.Sign up here to get The Daily in your inbox each morning. And for an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter. Background reading: Here's more reporting on how a staffing emergency has disrupted basic functions of the jail system, giving detainees at the Rikers Island jail complex free rein inside.Now, amid the chaos, women and transgender people are expected to be transferred.For more information on today's episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 


    ‘The Decision of My Life'

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 44:43

    This episode contains descriptions of violence and a suicide attempt.When the Taliban took over Afghanistan in August, our producer started making calls. With the help of colleagues, she contacted women in different cities and towns to find out how their lives had changed and what they were experiencing.Then she heard from N, whose identity has been concealed for her safety.This is the story of how one 18-year-old woman's life has been transformed under Taliban rule.Guest: Lynsea Garrison, a senior international producer for The Daily, spoke with N, a young woman whose life changed drastically after the fall of Kabul.Love listening to New York Times podcasts? Help us test a new audio product in beta and give us your thoughts to shape what it becomes. Visit nytimes.com/audio to join the beta.Sign up here to get The Daily in your inbox each morning. And for an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter. Background reading: “When we think about our future, we can't see anything.” This is what some Afghan girls said when they were asked about life under the Taliban.Four Afghan women who sought refuge in the United States talk about their lives now and everything they gave up.For more information on today's episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 

    Is Child Care a Public Responsibility?

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 22:27

    Many Americans pay more for child care than they do for their mortgages, even though the wages for those who provide the care are among the lowest in the United States.Democrats see the issue as a fundamental market failure and are pushing a plan to bridge the gap with federal subsidies.We went to Greensboro, N.C., to try to understand how big the problem is and to ask whether it is the job of the federal government to solve.Guest: Jason DeParle, a senior writer for The New York Times.Sign up here to get The Daily in your inbox each morning. And for an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter. Background reading: Democrats are moving to bring in the most significant expansion of the U.S. social safety net since the war on poverty in the 1960s, introducing legislation that would touch virtually every American's life, from cradle to grave.Some fear the plan would raise taxes and create additional red tape on private services. Here's more information about what the bill proposes.For more information on today's episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday.

    Which Towns Are Worth Saving?

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 41:31

    An enormous infusion of money and effort will be needed to prepare the United States for the changes wrought by the climate crisis.We visited towns in North Carolina that have been regularly hit by floods to confront a heartbreaking question: How does a community decide whether its homes are worth saving?Guest: Christopher Flavelle, a climate reporter for The New York Times.Sign up here to get The Daily in your inbox each morning. And for an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter. Background reading: For the first time, there is bipartisan acknowledgement — through actions, if not words — that the United States is unprepared for global warming and will need huge amounts of cash to cope.Homeowners in the Outer Banks of North Carolina are facing a tax increase of almost 50 percent to protect their homes. Is this the future of coastal towns?For more information on today's episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday.

    The Sunday Read: ‘He Was the “Perfect Villain” for Voting Conspiracists'

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2021 65:02


    Over the past decade, Eric Coomer has helped make Dominion Voting Systems one of the largest providers of voting machines and software in the United States.He was accustomed to working long days during the postelection certification process, but November 2020 was different.President Trump was demanding recounts. His allies had spent months stoking fears of election fraud. And then, on Nov. 8, Sidney Powell, a lawyer representing the Trump campaign, appeared on Fox News and claimed, without evidence, that Dominion had an algorithm that switched votes from Trump to Joe Biden.This is the story of how the 2020 election upended Mr. Coomer's life.This story was written by Susan Dominus and recorded by Audm. To hear more audio stories from publications like The New York Times, download Audm for iPhone or Android.


    A Troubling C.I.A. Admission

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 23:35

    The C.I.A. sent a short but explosive message last week to all of its stations and bases around the world.The cable, which said dozens of sources had been arrested, killed or turned against the United States, highlights the struggle the agency is having as it works to recruit spies around the world. How did this deterioration occur?Guest: Julian E. Barnes, a national security reporter for The New York Times. Sign up here to get The Daily in your inbox each morning. And for an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter. Background reading: Counterintelligence officials said in a top secret cable to all stations and bases around the world that too many of the people it recruits from other countries to spy for the U.S. are being lost.For more information on today's episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 

    The State of the Pandemic

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 19:21

    The coronavirus seems to be in retreat in the United States, with the number of cases across the country down about 25 percent compared with a couple of weeks ago. Hospitalizations and deaths are also falling.So, what stage are we in with the pandemic? And how will developments such as a new antiviral treatment and the availability of booster shots affect things?Guest: Apoorva Mandavilli, a science and global health reporter for The New York Times. Sign up here to get The Daily in your inbox each morning. And for an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter. Background reading: The authorization for booster shots applies to groups of people in the United States fully vaccinated with the Pfizer vaccine, but about 45 percent of the country's fully inoculated people received Moderna or Johnson & Johnson doses.Merck said it would seek authorization for molnupiravir, an antiviral pill that the company says is effective against Covid. Experts said such treatments could be a powerful tool against the virus.Despite a fall in new cases, hospitalizations and deaths, public health officials said the pandemic remained a potent threat.For more information on today's episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday.

    The Facebook Whistle-Blower Testifies

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 28:34

    The Senate testimony of Frances Haugen on Tuesday was an eagerly awaited event.Last month, Ms. Haugen, a former Facebook product manager, leaked internal company documents to The Wall Street Journal that exposed the social media giant's inner workings.How will Ms. Haugen's insights shape the future of internet regulation?Guest: Sheera Frenkel, a technology reporter for The New York Times. Sign up here to get The Daily in your inbox each morning. And for an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter. Background reading: Ms. Haugen told how Facebook deliberately made efforts to keep users — including children — hooked to its service.Here are other key takeaways from her testimony.For more information on today's episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 

    The Most Important Supreme Court Term in Decades

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 22:55

    The latest term of the U.S. Supreme Court will include blockbuster cases on two of the most contentious topics in American life: abortion and gun rights.The cases come at a time when the court has a majority of Republican appointees and as it battles accusations of politicization.Why is the public perception of the court so important? And how deeply could the coming rulings affect the fabric of American society?Guest: Adam Liptak, a reporter covering the United States Supreme Court for The New York Times. Sign up here to get The Daily in your inbox each morning. And for an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter. Background reading: The Supreme Court's highly charged docket will test the leadership of Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr., who has said that he prefers to guide the court toward consensus and incrementalism.For more information on today's episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 

    What's Behind the Ivermectin Frenzy?

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 21:28

    Ivermectin is a drug that emerged in the 1970s, used mainly for deworming horses and other livestock.But during the pandemic, it has been falsely lauded in some corners as a kind of miracle cure for the coronavirus.What is fueling the demand for a drug that the medical establishment has begged people not to take?Guest: Emma Goldberg, a writer for The New York Times. Sign up here to get The Daily in your inbox each morning. And for an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter. Background reading: Public health warnings against using the anti-parasitic ivermectin as a treatment for Covid-19 appear to have made little progress in stemming its popularity in parts of the United States.Veterinarians, ranchers and farmers say they are struggling with the effects of the surging demand for the drug.For more information on today's episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 

    The Sunday Read: ‘I Had a Chance to Travel Anywhere. Why Did I Pick Spokane?'

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2021 31:29

    Jon Mooallem, the author of today's Sunday Read, had a bad pandemic.“I began having my own personal hard time,” he writes. “The details aren't important. Let's just say, I felt as if I were moldering in place.”Then, The New York Times Magazine offered him the opportunity to fly somewhere for its travel issue — at that point he had spent 17 months parenting two demanding children. So, he asked: “What if I drove to Spokane?” Jon had been curious about it for years.Spokane, Wash., is the birthplace of Father's Day, the hometown of Bing Crosby and a city with a sequence of wide, rocky waterfalls pouring through its center like a Cubist boulevard.“I also knew that Spokane was a city with a history of minor-league baseball that stretched back more than a hundred years,” Jon writes. “A minor-league game felt like a manageable, belated step into the mid-pandemic lifestyle that people were calling post-pandemic life.”This story was written and narrated by Jon Mooallem. To hear more audio stories from publications like The New York Times, download Audm for iPhone or Android.

    ‘They Don't Understand That We're Real People'

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 37:30

    This episode contains strong language.A month ago, Texas adopted a divisive law which effectively banned abortions in the state. Despite a number of legal challenges, the law has survived and is having an impact across state lines. Trust Women is abortion clinic in Oklahoma just three hours north of Dallas — one of the closest clinics Texas women can go to. On the day the Texas law came into effect, “it was like a light had been flipped,” said one of the workers who staffs the clinic's phone lines. “We had everyone's line lit up for almost eight hours straight.” We visit Trust Women and speak to workers and patients about the real-world impact of the most restrictive abortion law in the country. Sign up here to get The Daily in your inbox each morning. And for an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter. Background reading: The new Texas law prohibits abortions after about six weeks, a very early stage of pregnancy. Many women are now traveling out of state for the procedure.For more information on today's episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday.

    The Democrats Who Might Block Biden's Infrastructure Plan

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 30:48

    The first year of a Congress is usually the best time for a president to put forward any sort of ambitious policy. For President Biden, whose control of Congress is fragile, the urgency is particularly intense.But now members of his own party are threatening to block one big part of his agenda — his $1 trillion infrastructure plan — in the name of protecting an even bigger part.We speak to Representative Pramila Jayapal of Washington State, the chairwoman of the  Progressive Caucus, about why she is willing to vote no on the infrastructure bill.Guest: Emily Cochrane, a correspondent covering Congress for The New York Times; and Representative Pramila Jayapal, the chairwoman of the Progressive Caucus.  Sign up here to get The Daily in your inbox each morning. And for an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter. Background reading: Democrats prepared legislation on Wednesday to avert a government shutdown, but they were desperately trying to salvage President Biden's domestic agenda as conservative-leaning holdouts dug in against an ambitious $3.5 trillion bill that carries many of the party's top priorities.For more information on today's episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 

    Claim The Daily

    In order to claim this podcast we'll send an email to with a verification link. Simply click the link and you will be able to edit tags, request a refresh, and other features to take control of your podcast page!

    Claim Cancel