Podcasts about hospitals

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Health care facility with specialized staff and equipment

  • 12,323PODCASTS
  • 30,408EPISODES
  • 34mAVG DURATION
  • 10+DAILY NEW EPISODES
  • Oct 17, 2021LATEST
hospitals

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Best podcasts about hospitals

Show all podcasts related to hospitals

Latest podcast episodes about hospitals

YUTORAH: R' Dr. Aaron Rakeffet-Rothkoff -- Recent Shiurim
Rav Menashe Klein: The U.S. Postage Stamp and the German Coins with God's Name on Them. Rav Moshe Feinstein and the Hospital that Requires Tefillin be Burned in Order to Prevent Infections From Spreading Outside the Hospital

YUTORAH: R' Dr. Aaron Rakeffet-Rothkoff -- Recent Shiurim

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2021 119:32


Karma Comment Chameleon
r/IDontWorkHereLady - Karen Gets Sent To The Hospital! - Reddit Stories 796

Karma Comment Chameleon

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2021 16:29


Today we visit r/IDontWorkHereLady where people get mistaken for employees at places they don't work!For business enquiries please contact karmacommentchameleon@gmail.com

Choice Classic Radio Detectives | Old Time Radio
The Shadow : The Hospital Murders

Choice Classic Radio Detectives | Old Time Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2021 30:21


Choice Classic Radio presents to you Suspense, which aired from 1940 to 1962. Today we bring to you the episode titled "The Hospital Murders.” We hope you enjoy the show! Please consider supporting our show by becoming a patron at http://choiceclassicradio.com

KFI Featured Segments
@ConwayShow: Dr. Ray Casciari Updates Us On Bill Clinton's Hospitalization

KFI Featured Segments

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2021 9:06


Our favorite doctor, Dr. Ray Casciari, joined the Tim Conway Jr. Show to discuss former President Bill Clinton's UC Irvine hospital ICU visit.

Kate Dalley Radio
101521 SHORTCAST 5 Min This Form Filed At The Hospital Can Save You From Their Protocol MUST LISTEN

Kate Dalley Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 7:18


101521 SHORTCAST 5 Min This Form Filed At The Hospital Can Save You From Their Protocol MUST LISTEN by Kate Dalley

Kate Dalley Radio
101521 UT Great Info How To Get My Show On Your Local Station & Form For Hospital Deny Protocol

Kate Dalley Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 44:55


101521 UT Great Info How To Get My Show On Your Local Station & Form For Hospital Deny Protocol by Kate Dalley

Becker’s Healthcare Podcast
Jeremiah Hodshire, CEO at Hillsdale Hospital

Becker’s Healthcare Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 12:29


This episode features Jeremiah Hodshire, CEO at Hillsdale Hospital. Here, he discusses his career, his pride in Hillsdale Hospital, COVID-19 in his area, and more.

Holmberg's Morning Sickness
10-15-21 - Terry Bradshaw Taking Heat For Telling Erin Andrews She Looks Good - Can't Comment On Appearance Anymore - Bill Clinton Enters Hospital For UTI Leading To John's UTI From Boone's Farm Story - John's Letter From Teacher Mr Delergo

Holmberg's Morning Sickness

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 42:36


Holmberg's Morning Sickness - Friday October 15, 2021

Ken Webster Jr
WJ 6AM_ BILL CLINTON IN THE HOSPITAL AS HILARY FEEDS OFF HIS LIFE FORCE

Ken Webster Jr

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 38:16


1010 WINS ALL LOCAL
Former President Clinton is in the hospital this morning being treated for an infection. A 14 year old boy was getting on a bus in Harlem when somebody opened fire on him. Cops think this might have been gang related. Teachers who oppose the City's vacci

1010 WINS ALL LOCAL

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 6:44


All Local Morning for 10/15/21 See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Drop In CEO
Matthew Carr: The Secret to Simplifying and Long-Term Success

Drop In CEO

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 31:41


Today Matthew Carr shares how he keeps his team focused on growth by eliminating obstacles and simplifying the day-to-day tasks that undermine success. Listen in as Deborah and Matt discuss the importance of listening to customers and employees, why workplace culture goes beyond organizational walls, and how Matt is focused on creating a “final employment destination” for his employees. Matthew Carr is currently the President at Beck Flavors. Matt has made growth and making Beck Flavors a top workplace his top priority. Beck Flavors looks to double it's size over the next 3-5 years. During his time as President, Beck Flavors has been named to the Inc 5000 list and has been awarded a Top Workplace by the Saint Louis Post-Dispatch. Matt led the initiative to design and build a state-of-the-art manufacturing facility to accommodate Beck Flavors growth. That facility opened in April of 2021.   Matt has a Bachelor of Science Degree from the University of Tulsa and brings experience in marketing, strategic planning, and program development.  His volunteer work is long and varied.  He was appointed by President George W. Bush and Secretary of Commerce Carlos Gutierrez to the District Expert Council in 2007. He has also volunteered at Cardinal Glennon Children's Hospital since 2003, has been a member of the Bob Costas Gala Committee since 2008, serves on the Board of Governors for Cardinal Glennon. He also had experience on the boards of Saint Martha's Hall and Rohan Woods School.  Matt and his wife of 18 years Ashley have a son Jack (15) and a daughter Taylor (11).   You can connect with Matt via LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/matt-carr-980ab37/   Are you a CEO dealing with change? Part inspiration, part strategy, I've created this resource for CEO's who leading their team through a rapid transition and looking for a resource and guide to help them stay confident, focused, and a mentor for others. You can download it here: https://mailchi.mp/coviellocm/the-ceos-compass See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

AP Audio Stories
Bill Clinton in hospital for non-COVID-related infection

AP Audio Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 1:33


Pediheart: Pediatric Cardiology Today
Pediheart Podcast #182: Contemporary Outcomes Of Aortic Arch Reconstruction

Pediheart: Pediatric Cardiology Today

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 24:06


This week we delve into the world of cardiovascular surgery to review a recent work on outcomes of arch reconstruction in the newborn and small child. We speak with Dr. Ramana Dhannapuneni, lead cardiac surgeon of Alder Hey Children's Hospital in Liverpool, UK. How often in the present era is re-operation or reintervention required? How common is the recurrent laryngeal nerve or phrenic nerve injured or affected by surgery? Dr. Dhannapuneni provides us with the surgical perspective to this complex surgery this week. doi: 10.1017/S1047951121003747

Outer Limits Of Inner Truth
Vision for Leadership with Mayor Glenn Jacobs

Outer Limits Of Inner Truth

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 30:10


The Outer Limits of Inner Truth features Hall of Fame Professional Wrestler and Knox County Mayor Glenn Jacobs. Jacobs shares his views on where he sees things headed for the future, the impact Dr. Ron Paul has had on the liberty movement, and what individuals can do to become leaders in their communities. Jacobs has served on the East Tennessee Children's Hospital advisory council and the board of the Halls/Powell Boys and Girls Club. Additionally, his small business, Jacobs Insurance Associates, became the local champion of the Kindness Revolution, a national anti-bullying initiative. And he, along with his wife Crystal, founded Kane's Crusaders, a non-profit organization with the mission of bringing joy to chronically ill teenagers in East Tennessee. Mayor Jacobs' goals for his administration include keeping taxes low, finding efficiencies in government, supporting education and encouraging diversity. LINK: 

Story Behind
UPS Driver Delivers Own Baby En Route to Hospital | Dick Van Dyke Shares Youthful Secrets at 95

Story Behind

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 5:17


There are few things more ironic than a UPS driver delivering a baby. In this video, a UPS driver makes a special delivery when his wife goes into labor. AND Is age just a number? Well, the spry and surprisingly flexible Dick Van Dyke seems to think so. He turned 95 in December and he is antsy to get back to living life the way it was pre-pandemic. To see videos associated with this episode, visit GodTube! https://www.godtube.com/watch/?v=YZGYZ7NX https://www.godtube.com/watch/?v=YZGWG7NX

VBAC Birth Stories
44 | Amy's twin VBAC following infant loss after emergency caesarean at 36 weeks due to placental abruption; Breastfeeding challenges, PICU, Gestational Diabetes, Posterior and Breech baby, Public Hospital

VBAC Birth Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 95:19


This week Amy and her mum Janene a midwife join us to share her extraordinary three birth stories. Her first a vaginal birth, her second a caesarean birth, and her third a VBAC with twins.This episode has a trigger warning as baby loss is discussed.Amy's first pregnancy was thankfully straightforward with a positive induction experience followed by a vaginal birth under Midwifery Group Practice at her local hospital. Having her mum's guidance she was well informed ahead of time, however she was faced with breastfeeding struggles following her first birth and the positive birth experience was marred by the passing of her father from Motor neurone disease, a battle he had fought for many years.For her second pregnancy Amy was planning to have a homebirth through her hospital's birth center homebirth program and looked forward to this experience. However at 36 weeks her pregnancy took an unexpected turn. Amy experienced a concealed placental abruption and she was taken for an emergency caesarean.Her son Arlo was born premature but healthy and she was discharged from hospital, but at five days of age they returned to hospital as his health began to deteriorate. It was found he had contracted a common cold virus. Arlo was airlifted to Westmead Hospital in Sydney from Newcastle and in the coming weeks Amy and her husband would stay by his side while he was fighting for his life.Amy tells of the unspeakable grief of losing Arlo and the 29 days of his life which was cut short far too soon. Amy tells of navigating this difficult period and of the family, her church community, and the hospital staff who helped her.When Amy and her husband Sam felt ready to welcome another baby Amy prayed for twins and incredibly her prayers were answered. Amy's rainbow babies were born via VBAC, and she and Janene tell of twin A emerging direct posterior and twin B being born breech and en caul.Thank you so much Amy and Janene for reaching out to us to share your difficult yet remarkable and heartfelt journey. We know your story will be a source of comfort and inspiration to our listeners.~ Notes ~Birthing Multiples Naturally: https://www.facebook.com/groups/418436544869922/?ref=shareBirth Photographer: https://katekennedybirthphotography.comBooks:Birth Skills by Juju Sundin with Sarah Murdochhttp://www.jujusundin.comYour Baby Your Birth by Hollie De CruzPregnancy and Infant Loss Support:https://www.bearsofhope.org.auhttps://rednosegriefandloss.org.auhttps://www.sands.org.auhttps://miscarriagesupport.org.auhttps://www.gidgetfoundation.org.au**VBAC Birth Stories features women's lived experiences. It is not intended to replace medical advice. Should you have any concerns during your pregnancy please always consult your healthcare provider.Please connect with us on Facebook or Instagram: @vbacbirthstories

Myopia: Defend Your Childhood - A Nostalgic Movies Podcast

This week, turns out, he wasn't dead! Will Loomis shoot cops at random? Halloween 2: The Hospital! If you want to see Matthew and get a book of his signed, come by Tall Tale Books in Atlanta on 10/30, from 1-3pm Join the Patreon (http://patreon.com/myopia)! There are tiers to that will help us keep doing what we are doing! (Each tier unlocks all lower tiers) What is patreon? It is our way of rewarding our biggest fans with additional stuff, like movie episodes, riffs, and our back catalog! Join now for additional stuff at $1, $3, $5, and $10! Or a one time $50 to pick your own flick! What do you unlock? The Alien Franchise: Alien, Aliens, Alien 3, Alien Resurrection, Prometheus, and Alien Covenant, the rest of Harry Potter: The Half Blood Prince, Hallows part 1 and 2, plus Silver Bullet, The Watchmen, The Lawnmower Man, Demolition Man, True Lies, Van Helsing, The 39 Steps, Baby's Day Out, The 13th Warrior, Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home, The Thomas Crown Affair, Austin Powers: International Man of Mystery, and London Has Fallen! Not to mention movie riffs and much more to come! Also, because you love us, find us everywhere! Like Facebook! Or the Facebook Fan Group! Or Twitter! Or Letterboxd! Or the Fancy Website! We are also available wherever you are too! Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher, TuneIn and Alexa, Podbean, Listen Notes, YouTube, everywhere! Coming soon to Pandora, iHeartRadio, and Deezer. How will Halloween 2 hold up? Host: Nic Panel: Adam, Daniel, Jeremy

The Health Ranger Report
DEATH CULT EXPERIMENTS: Covid hospital treatments are designed to test obedience to MURDER

The Health Ranger Report

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 9:38


For more updates, visit: http://www.brighteon.com/channel/hrreport NaturalNews videos would not be possible without you, as always we remain passionately dedicated to our mission of educating people all over the world on the subject of natural healing remedies and personal liberty (food freedom, medical freedom, the freedom of speech, etc.). Together, we're helping create a better world, with more honest food labeling, reduced chemical contamination, the avoidance of toxic heavy metals and vastly increased scientific transparency. ▶️ Every dollar you spend at the Health Ranger Store goes toward helping us achieve important science and content goals for humanity: https://www.healthrangerstore.com/ ▶️ Sign Up For Our Newsletter: https://www.naturalnews.com/Readerregistration.html ▶️ Brighteon: https://www.brighteon.com/channels/hrreport ▶️ Join Our Social Network: https://brighteon.social/@HealthRanger ▶️ Check In Stock Products at: https://PrepWithMike.com

TeamPeds Talks
A Human Trafficking Work Group at a Children's Hospital S3 E2

TeamPeds Talks

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 38:16


This special edition of the National Association of Pediatric Nurse Practitioner's TeamPeds Talks podcast, FocusED sponsored by the Pediatric Emergency Care Special Interest Group. FocusED is a podcast program that offers listeners unique insight into the broad scope of pediatric emergency care by exploring a variety of emergency care topics through different lenses across the care continuum. Cassandra Newell is a pediatric nurse practitioner. She received her master's degree in nursing from Yale University School of Nursing in 2005. After graduation she worked in general pediatrics at the University of Kansas before moving to the Emergency Department (ED) at Children's Mercy Kansas City (CM-KC) Adele Hall Campus, where she has worked for the last 12 years. Cassandra currently serves as Secretary for the National Association of Pediatric Nurse Practitioner's (NAPNAP) Pediatric Emergency Care Special Interest Group. Since 2019, she has volunteered as an Advocate for the Alliance for Children in Trafficking giving peer-peer education presentations to health care providers. Cassandra serves as Secretary for the Greater Kansas City Local Chapter of NAPNAP. In this episode, Heidi and Rachel share how they developed a human trafficking work group at children's hospital in the Midwest from the ground up. They describe their future goals for this work group and provide advice for nurse practitioners who may want to start a human trafficking work group where they practice. Heidi Olson is a Certified Pediatric Nurse, Certified Pediatric Sexual Assault Nurse Examiner (SANE) and the SANE Program Manager at Children's Mercy Kansas City. Since 2019, Heidi's team has identified numerous trafficking victims through the use of an evidence-based screening tool in the Emergency Department. Additionally, Heidi started and co-leads the human trafficking work group at Children's Mercy which aims to increase recognition of victims and provide support for vulnerable kids. Rachel Whitfield is a Family Nurse Practitioner working in Adolescent Medicine at Children's Mercy Kansas City. Rachel works in both the primary care and residential mental health settings and often encounters vulnerable youth in her practice. Rachel has a particular interest in the recognition and intervention of vulnerable youth in the clinical setting which is how she got involved in human trafficking work. She is the co-founder/co-leader of the human trafficking work group at Children's Mercy which aims to increase recognition of victims in the health care setting and provide support for vulnerable youth in our area.

Centered in the City
Episode 99: Taking Care of Our Gut Health

Centered in the City

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 31:08


On Today's episode, I get to interview Dr. Christina Tennyson about the importance of our gut health and how our gut is tied to our brain and emotions. A lot of people who experience anxiety have gastrointestinal problems. Christina shares how gut directed hypnotherapy and Cognitive Behavioral Therapy are proven to support people working with gastrointestinal problems. She also shares how certain foods help repopulate and diversify the microbiome in the gut and decrease inflammation in the body. Not getting enough sleep or not managing stress has a big impact on our gut health. Christina also shares some important tips on how to gain more confidence in the kitchen. Take a listen to the whole episode and share your takeaways with us on Instagram @OneWade and @lifestylegastromd    Curious how to practice mindful eating and mindful cooking? Join the Centered in the City community and build a mindfulness based ritual to support you feeling calm and centered amid the busyness of life. Learn more and sign up for your 7 day free trial at CenteredintheCity.org. ***** Dr. Christina Tennyson is a Board Certified Gastroenterologist with expertise in nutrition, lifestyle medicine and integrative medicine working at Augusta Health in Fishersville,Virginia .  She is interested in empowering people to improve their digestive health.  Dr. Tennyson received her medical degree from New York University School of Medicine and completed residency in Internal Medicine at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania.  She completed fellowship in Gastroenterology at Mount Sinai School of Medicine and received certification as a Physician Nutrition Specialist. She served as a faculty member at Columbia University.  She is a member of the American College of Lifestyle Medicine and American Gastroenterological Association. She completed a fellowship in Integrative Medicine at the Andrew Weil Center for Integrative Medicine at the University of Arizona and performed culinary coach training through the Institute of Lifestyle Medicine.  She is a Diplomate of the American College of Lifestyle Medicine.     

MS Living Well: Key Info from Multiple Sclerosis Experts
Multiple Sclerosis Clinical Trials

MS Living Well: Key Info from Multiple Sclerosis Experts

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 42:28


Interested in improving MS care? Participating in a clinical trial may have personal advantages and help others in the future. Trial design discussed including whether or not a placebo (no treatment) will be used. Criteria needed to enroll in a clinical study called inclusion and exclusion criteria explained. Key elements of clinical trials outlined including multiple safety measures and informed consent. Current clinical trials in multiple sclerosis are covered including using highly effective treatment early for someone living with multiple sclerosis. Current studies in progressive MS and remyelination shared. Compounds highlighted include BTK inhibitors, masitinib, ibudilast, simvastatin and gold nanocrystals. Barry Singer MD, Director of The MS Center for Innovations in Care, interviews: Jiwon Oh MD PhD is the Director of the BARLO MS Centre at St. Micheal's Hospital in Toronto. She is an Associate Professor of Neurology University of Toronto. Dr. Oh's research focuses on developing advanced imaging techniques of the spinal cord and brain for use in clinical settings. She is the principal investigator on local and collaborative, multi-center MRI studies. Dr. Oh is the lead of the Canadian National Progression Cohort, which is focused on better understanding progression in MS. She completed her undergraduate degree at the University of Toronto and medical school from Queen's University. Dr. Oh completed her residency at the University of Toronto, PhD in Public Health at John Hopkins and neuroimmunology fellowship at John Hopkins. Robert Bermel MD is a neurologist specializing in multiple sclerosis at the Mellen Center for Multiple Sclerosis at Cleveland Clinic. He received a medical degree with thesis honors from the State University of New York at Buffalo. Dr. Bermel completed his neurology residency training and served as Chief Resident at Cleveland Clinic. He was funded as a National MS Society postdoctoral fellow in clinical neuroimmunology and advanced imaging at Cleveland Clinic. Dr. Bermel cares for patients, conducts imaging research, and an investigator in multiple clinical trials at the Mellen Center. His current research interests focus on the identification of advanced imaging methods to evaluate and improve recovery from inflammatory demyelinating disease. Visit www.mslivingwell.org for more information.

Entre Hermanas con Alejandra Espinoza y Damaris Jimenez
Lo que yo viví: Esos días en el hospital fueron bien fuertes

Entre Hermanas con Alejandra Espinoza y Damaris Jimenez

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 19:14


Alejandra contó todo lo que vivió cuando tuvo una emergencia de salud por la que terminó en el hospital. Dice que sufrió mucho por su familia, reveló el diagnostico final, y nos cuenta lo que viene de aquí en adelante.

Jeff Caplan's Afternoon News
Utah's Hospital ICU Capacity Reaches Pandemic High

Jeff Caplan's Afternoon News

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 12:26


See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Daily Zeitgeist
To The Trendow, To The Wall 10/13: William Shatner, Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Jamie Costa, Herschel Walker, LaVar Ball, Goth Hospital

The Daily Zeitgeist

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 23:27


In this edition of To Trendow, To The Wall, Jack and Miles discuss Captain Kirk finally going to space, Katie Couric admitting to editing out negative comments in RBG interview, Jamie Costa's incredible Robin Williams impersonation, Herschel Walker cancelling fundraiser with supporter who had swastika in her Twitter profile, LaVar Ball's embarassingly ugly and expensive sneakers, and Pornhub's porn search map. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

PBS NewsHour - Health
Rural U.S. hospitals stretched thin after nurse shortage exacerbated by the pandemic

PBS NewsHour - Health

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 7:41


Nursing shortages are impacting healthcare workers and hospitals across the United States. In just the past few days, nurses and other workers in Southern California and Oregon authorized a potential strike against provider Kaiser Permanente. Staffing shortages are part of those disputes. John Yang reports from South Florida on how shortages are affecting hospitals there. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - Segments
Rural U.S. hospitals stretched thin after nurse shortage exacerbated by the pandemic

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 7:41


Nursing shortages are impacting healthcare workers and hospitals across the United States. In just the past few days, nurses and other workers in Southern California and Oregon authorized a potential strike against provider Kaiser Permanente. Staffing shortages are part of those disputes. John Yang reports from South Florida on how shortages are affecting hospitals there. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

Light of the East
LIGHTEAST 891 The Church as a Field Hospital

Light of the East

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 27:29


Pope Francis described the Church as a Field Hospital. We will hear from an author and patient of this hospital as he describes his healing by way of the spirituality of the Eastern Churches.

Mindspeak: Holistic Mental Health with Holly Higgins, NTP
049: That Thing You've Been Avoiding

Mindspeak: Holistic Mental Health with Holly Higgins, NTP

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 19:18


Are there annoying things in your life that you just don't wanna deal with? Me too. In this episode, I share personal stories about how these energy drains pile up to create a massive mountain of misery.Tune in to get the inspiration you need to tackle one sucky thing on your to-do list this week. Here's what's covered:Hospital bills and household tasks (AKA, stupid things I avoided and regretted)A story about a window that might change your lifeWhy we avoid the little things, and what to do about itFollow Holly on Instagram @hollyfisherhigginsWork with me as a hypnotherapy client: https://www.hollyfisherhiggins.com/work-with-me/rtt-rapid-transformational-hypnotherapy/Get on the sleep program waiting list: https://www.hollyfisherhiggins.com/sleep-program-vip-list/Download my free "Clear the Crap" meditation here (this will put you on my email list!)Music: Joseph McDade, "On the Verge"

Maine Calling
Hospital workers pushed to the limit with ongoing surges in the pandemic, staff shortages and uncertainty

Maine Calling

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 52:58


Hospital workers pushed to the limit with ongoing surges in the pandemic, staff shortages and uncertainty

Illinois News Now
MacombNewsNow Katie Roebush Memorial Hospital

Illinois News Now

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 8:42


Pelvic Floor Dysfunction is not an easy topic for some to discuss. It involves incontinence, constipation, bowel issues, pelvic pain and some pregnancy related issues. Katie Roebush is a physical therapist at Memorial Hospital in Carthage who specializes in treating Pelvic Floor Dysfunction and she's encouraging those who are having issues with incontinence, bowel issues, constipation and other pelvic region issues to talk to her. These issues are not issues that arise from aging. Rather, they can be symptoms of other problems that could be treated and healed.

The Health Ranger Report
Situation Update, Oct 13, 2021 - Hospitals now SUFFOCATING patients with plastic bags!

The Health Ranger Report

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 77:45


0:00 Plastic Bags 27:17 Organ Transplants 33:43 Air Transport Collapse 48:46 Boeing 1:09:44 Bisexual Superman For more updates, visit: http://www.brighteon.com/channel/hrreport NaturalNews videos would not be possible without you, as always we remain passionately dedicated to our mission of educating people all over the world on the subject of natural healing remedies and personal liberty (food freedom, medical freedom, the freedom of speech, etc.). Together, we're helping create a better world, with more honest food labeling, reduced chemical contamination, the avoidance of toxic heavy metals and vastly increased scientific transparency. ▶️ Every dollar you spend at the Health Ranger Store goes toward helping us achieve important science and content goals for humanity: https://www.healthrangerstore.com/ ▶️ Sign Up For Our Newsletter: https://www.naturalnews.com/Readerregistration.html ▶️ Brighteon: https://www.brighteon.com/channels/hrreport ▶️ Join Our Social Network: https://brighteon.social/@HealthRanger ▶️ Check In Stock Products at: https://PrepWithMike.com

NEJM This Week — Audio Summaries
NEJM This Week — October 14, 2021

NEJM This Week — Audio Summaries

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 32:44


Featuring articles on empagliflozin in heart failure with preserved ejection fraction, oxytocin in autism spectrum disorder, breakthrough Covid-19 in health care workers, a cell-culture influenza vaccine, and data in crisis; a review article on aspergillus infections; a case report of a man with sore throat, epistaxis, and oropharyngeal petechiae; and Perspective articles on vigilante injustice, eviction and the necessary conditions for health, the drug-dosing conundrum in oncology, and on a good death.

The Daily Gopher: for Minnesota Golden Gophers fans
Ski-U-Pahdcast - Ep 5.09: CHAIR WEEK IS HERE!

The Daily Gopher: for Minnesota Golden Gophers fans

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 37:55


It's a breaking news Pahd. Curtis Dunlap Jr. heads into the transfer portal and Trey Potts is out for the year. We react to both before turning our focus towards Nebraska and THE CHAIR. Here's the part of the Pahd where we remind you to head over to BrokenChairTrophy.com and donate to the Chair-ity and support the University of Minnesota Masonic Children's Hospital! Moving on to hockey, we discuss the difficulties with defense for the men and whether splitting with UMD is acceptable for the women. And of course, PREDICTIONS! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Rover's Morning Glory
Jeffrey's wrestling mentor was in the hospital, AC is broken again, & more

Rover's Morning Glory

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 177:43


The air conditioning is broken again. Duji gives a rating on Curious George's documentary. German designer announces innovative “testicle bath” that zaps sperm with ultrasonic waves. Jeffrey's wrestling mentor was in the hospital with lack of oxygen. US school outraged after student breaks football goal-scoring record. Woman says a guy followed her for 5 miles to tell her she is pretty. Superman comes out as bisexual. Kidnapping suspect previously used tracking device on victim's car.

People Always, Patients Sometimes
Meet the Digital Apothecary

People Always, Patients Sometimes

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 30:33


Pharmacy companies are an important part for Spencer Health Solutions, and pharmacists are an integral part of fulfilling our mission to serve patients in their homes. Hi, I'm Tom Rhodes, CEO, Spencer Health Solutions. We have had the opportunity to bring patient pharmaceutical and digital health thought leaders to previous podcasts. However, today we're speaking with our first pharmacist, digital health advocate and analyst, Timothy Aungst, also known as the digital apothecary. He joins our host Janet Kennedy for an insightful conversation and a call to action to the pharmacy industry on the People Always, Patients Sometimes podcast.   Janet Kennedy: (00:45) Welcome to People Always, Patients Sometimes. I'm very excited that today's guest is Timothy Aungst, the digital apothecary. He is an associate professor of pharmacy practice and also a clinical pharmacist. Timothy, welcome to the podcast.   Timothy Aungst: (01:03) Thank you, Janet, I'm really excited to be here today to talk about, you know, all this stuff that's been going on.   Janet Kennedy: (01:08) It's been a crazy couple of years and that's one of the things that I wanted to talk to you about. I found you because I read your primer, "Digital Health Primer for Pharmacists." You published it in February of 2019. At that time you wrote, "after being involved in the digital health space for almost a decade, I can say with complete sincerity, that the topic is still relatively out of the realm of the general pharmacy profession grasp." Okay. You put a challenge out there. 10 years you've been involved in digital health and you're saying pharmacy is still not up to speed. Would you say that that's true two years later?   Timothy Aungst: (01:52) Yes. I still would stand by that. I would argue that we have seen entrepreneurship within the pharmacy profession gravitate towards digital health at large, but I would also conversely say that as a profession for pharmacists, we have not really actually actively engaged in this area. We still lack a large number of educational roles and trying to get people aware of the space. There is a lack of discussion around it. Most of our public organizations that provide guidance on what our next steps for the profession don't really think about it in, I think it's for that reason, I still would say the gap is there. Now that is changing. I would say that there has been a semi call to action amongst several pharmacy organizations, whether it's say PHA, ACP and several others who are now trying to get the profession up to speed on what digital health is.   Timothy Aungst: (02:44) And that's been a big focus of mine serving as so-called subject matter expert or key opinion leader to help get information out there regarding the topic. But very, at this time it's quite topical just because we are not actively highly engaged with it. I would probably say we're maybe like two or three years behind other healthcare professions, such as the medical community. The American medical association has an active digital health component that they've been pushing, I would say probably for about two or three years at this point, have reports coming out, organizations associated with it. And I think pharmacists have to play catch up to that. And depending on key stakeholders at this current time that may or may not go fast or may go slow. And that's one thing I'm actively keeping my eye on.   Janet Kennedy: (03:27) Well, I'm curious about whether pharmacists or the pharmacy is even included in some of this digital health development.   Timothy Aungst: (03:36) I'm always a person who would've actually separate the two. The pharmacist and the pharmacy, I think are no longer synonymous organizations. You don't need a pharmacy to have a pharmacist. I think it's going to be what we see in the 2020s or 2030s at this point. I think those two things will actually diverge and that will just come down to logistics and also some legal parameters I think people are pushing right now. Technicians will be empowered to take on most of the stuff on site and pharmacists will probably feel remote. That being the case then to accomplish that, and also to get pharmacies up to speed where healthcare is going, I think the pharmacy businesses will engage in digital health activities. For good or for bad. The big news right now, right, is that Elizabeth Holmes is in court with Theranos. And if we look at Thernos, who was one of the biggest backers? That was Walgreens. And I always looked at what happened with Walgreens being burned there is a reason why they actually had a huge number of digital health initiatives back in the 2010s. And I think they pulled back because they got burned so heavily.   Timothy Aungst: (04:31) In the meantime, we see, let's say a business like CVS Health going down a whole vertical pipeline. Now we got Aetna involved, we got long-term care stuff, we got them pushing to go into kidney disease with dialysis treatments. They are partnering up with digital health companies all over the place. One of the biggest ones, for example, was Sleepio for a digital therapeutic that they've been piloting out there, which has actually initial positive results I'm actually reading through right now. So some of these companies are more involved than others. And I think it's going to come down to, you know, what assets they have to really push that. Whether they see the market going a certain way and they want to meet consumer demands because they are also aware of that, with the changing dynamics within healthcare, pharma is going down the digital health path. Payers are looking at this. Employers are looking at this and even the big tech companies are pushing this stuff out there. So are they going to let other people dictate to them the incumbents of what to do, or are they going to be the drivers themselves? And I think that's going to be something that's going to be interesting to watch.   Janet Kennedy: (05:34) Well, so you mentioned the need to separate the pharmacist from pharmacy. So speaking from the individual's perspective, do you hear pharmacists talking about wanting more and better tools to be able to help their patients or are they just basically the Amazon employee at the warehouse where they're just cranking out the work?   Timothy Aungst: (05:57) See, I used to think we're still on the razor's edge between two possibilities: one was pharmacists finding some kind of clinical services they pay for under some, say, value-based care agreements. And by providing clinical services would receive renumeration that would allow them to be so-called clinicians in health care. Or the other one was being fully remote and being consigned to these activities, to these virtual workshops where they basically just review medications that have been turned out by Amazon or other companies like true pill, et cetera. There might be a third path, which is a mix between the two. And that's kind of where I'm more leaning towards right now from a pharmacist perspective. Yes, there is a huge interest in digital pathway as a means to basically call back clinical services and kind of like be able to provide services that could then actually have objective feedback in terms of what they did, that they could then bill for services and, you know, make money from it.   Timothy Aungst: (06:51) But I don't know if that's going to be enough at this current point to actually say, "oh, well, you're now a remote clinical pharmacist that overviews these data's on people's adherence or their information on disease states, and you get this much," because one of the issues is actually even though they're like remote patient monitoring services that we're seeing CPT codes being pushed up by CMS and such, they're in the physician still. So the pharmacist almost has to still be partnered with someone else in order to receive the renumeration. And then at that point in time, you know, it was kind of like, what slice of the pie are you going to get? And I think that's really what concerns me is that from a healthcare perspective, the pharmacist is still really trapped in their other engagements, which has traditionally held us back. And I think this is because we again have very little stakes in digital health and we were coming to the table kind of late. The other people have already kind of figured this out and have already been making inroads. Making propositions to other organizations to get themselves ahead. And we're kind of almost, I don't want to say asking for crumbs, but we're going to have to really do our best claw back some of this stuff for ourselves. And that's going to delay, I think those aspects.   Janet Kennedy: (07:56) And do you see the trade associations being the ones that should be leading this charge?   Timothy Aungst: (08:01) I think the trade associations unfortunately all have different stances out why they would want to engage in this stuff. The trade associations value pharmacists to different extents. And within a pharmacy community, we know with the alphabet soup of different pharmacy organizations, they don't all have one central voice. They don't all have one central take on what is the role of pharmacists. I've heard some people say we have a pharmacist practice at the top of their license. I don't know what that means. To be quite honest, whenever I hear that I kind of have to roll my eyes, because what is the top of their license? I think in their eyes probably is just, you know, sending off for prescriptions. So that's great. That's what they see as the business that they have to focus on. I could see definitely some trade associations making an argument to empower technicians, to move back at scale back the role of the pharmacist as a, you know, as a rate limiting step in terms of evaluating prescriptions and getting them out the door.   Timothy Aungst: (08:53) And also because there are high cost margin right there, and that would reduce the overhead versus some other trade associations are definitely more clinically focused and would push that down too. So within pharmacy, the unfortunate thing right now is there are some tenuous arguments going on about, you know, who has the right step for the profession or which to be used, how to utilize them. And I think those are the conversations, the hard conversations to have to occur now versus later, because this whole approach of them to let's say digital health and such could become very fragmented. You could see some people that operate large corporations would probably want to use digital health for alternative means versus maybe some smaller companies. And I think that's going to really, for me, I have to bemoan them is that's gonna really muddy the waters and I guess, slow down the process of any adoption by the profession. So yes, I think the trade professions will probably be key here, but I would also, or you, because historically they don't always get along or had the same thought processes that this is going to be another area. That's going to be a sticking point where argue about how to do this.   Janet Kennedy: (09:57) You know, I find that health care was still slow to come to digital tools and platforms. I'm curious to know whether, with your ear to the ground, do you find that patients are pushing their desire for digital health into the healthcare system? And do you find that that's being impacted or felt on the pharmacy side?   Timothy Aungst: (10:21) And this is a good question because you know, who's the drivers for change. I think it's one of the things that always comes up. Patients are often said to be one of the major drivers, and I do believe that to a certain points payers are probably one of the biggest drivers I would argue though, overall, because they ultimately are paying the money. Patients themselves are vocal population that can dictate those favorable or unfavorable role, lots of different programs and services at the end of the day. So from that perspective, I think with the ongoing pandemic, we saw this huge push for, you know, delivery of services for the ability to have a so-called digital front door. And you know, what was in the news the other day was that Walgreens got in trouble apparently because they're whole vaccine signup and testing site wasn't secure. And the data is now - someone's getting into it. And this, I think is going to give some feedback to people like, you know, if we have to do remote practice, sign up and go through an app or make an account and et cetera, but you can't even keep my data secure - Is that good or bad?   Timothy Aungst: (11:17) You know, is that a company I'm going to trust? And those are the things that they're hitting people now it's not so much like, oh, you know, I have a brick and mortar business. People come and buy things and they leave. I just had to worry about the credit cards now I have to worry about their online accounts. I have to worry about health history that's been uploaded or shared. This is definitely a new area I think people are considering. Hospitals and health systems have been dealing with this for years. They've been getting hit by malware attacks for a long time. Now people will ask you for cryptocurrency just to unlock their systems, for goodness sake. And because of this, the population does expect a digital front door, digital services. And I think ultimately businesses have had to pivot to address an answer to that.   Timothy Aungst: (11:57) But I don't think they traditionally had that as a, you know, as something that is a high concern for them in the pandemic was a force multiplier that really had to make them rush into, this for good or for bad. I mean, the pandemic is going to go on for awhile. We're going to see this go up in waves, in different parts of the United States. So these companies are going to have a long time to pilot certain programs, but I think many of them have recognized, no matter what, post pandemic, this is going to be a status quo. So whatever works now has to work in the future as well.   Janet Kennedy: (12:27) Well, certainly the pandemic has made a lot of things happen faster; that we have seen an acceleration of the interest in some kinds of digital health, particularly tele-health, which sounds new to a lot of people, but it's been around for 20 years. And I know you've been around in the digital health space for over a decade. So let's step back for a second. Could you tell me a little bit about the digital apothecary and why did you start it?   Timothy Aungst: (12:54) Sure. So the digital apothecary was kind of like just a little passion product, a little thing that I spread out based on my interests. So I started off as a resident during my PGY1. I got an iPad in 2011. So keep in mind the iPad came out 2010. So one of the things that I did was I actually started processing orders in the hospital using my iPad through Citrix. And this is funny because this is a period where we had so-called COWs, or computers on wheels, or WOWs, workstation on wheels, as they're often called now, and people would argue over these things to process orders in the hospital, et cetera. And I just basically started using my iPad to do all this stuff. And people started catching attention, like why is he doing this stuff faster? He's looking for information faster in there and blah, blah, blah.   Timothy Aungst: (13:36) And I was like, yeah, cause I had this device that can do this. I start thinking of something, what is a good app? What is a good thing? And so I started reviewing and looking at stuff and then I joined another group called iMedicalApps and we start reviewing mobile apps. We actually wrote a bunch of papers about how to quantify what is and what is not a good app and to use clinically for patients in patient care. And we gave presentations all over place on this topic. And that was a huge thing for me. And this was when it was mobile health that was my focus. And then circa 2014-15, I moved on to just the bigger digital health space and started writing for different organizations and serving as a speaker advisor consultant for different companies actually were asking a lot of these questions. The years I started thinking with remote patient monitoring, questions about tele-health, pharmacy, how to adopt medication adherence is a big one for me as well.   Timothy Aungst: (14:20) And it kind of really changed my thought process in terms of like, you know, this stuff's just kind of adjunctive to care versus, okay, this is going to be actually part in driving care. Eventually digital health, I kinda thought to myself, is just a interim term. I think digital health eventually turns into just health. It's kind of the same period we went through with like digital banking. We don't call it digital banking anymore, we just call it banking. When you go onto your app cash or check or use Venmo, like no one calls it really digital banking. I think that's where healthcare is at. So I noticed there wasn't that many people around the space. There is one person I look up to is Kevin Clawson, who's now into blockchain for healthcare down at Lipscomb. He was a great mentor for me early on. And it was a few other people I've talked to them such as Brent Fox about this too.   Timothy Aungst: (15:01) And, but the reality is in the academia circles, that generally there was not a lot of pharmacists, I think, into digital health or into this technology thing. So I kind of got into it, talking about it. I had a lot of people say this was like a waste of time. And I really had to take a thought for myself academically - do I really want to dedicate all my time towards investigating and research in this space. Or should I start moving towards something else as an academic? And I chose to keep on it. And I'm actually pleased because now with the, you know, things are really changing the payment like that, people really want to talk more about it. People aren't real into telehealth. And they were like, who even knows about this in pharmacy? Then my name comes up because that's been something I've been talking about for so long.   Timothy Aungst: (15:39) People are looking at different digital health technologies and like, okay, who's in digital talking about, oh, Timothy's talking about it. Timothy's been talking about it for so long now. So it's kind of just in many ways for me, unfortunately, the pandemic has been a driving force around trying to actually get my message out more than it was in the past. I think if the pandemic had not happened digital health would not have seen the rampant advancements that it has, and probably would have been towards the tail end of 2020s that I foresee that would have taken off in versus the early 2020s at this time.   Janet Kennedy: (16:09) One of the things you mentioned in your primer was that digital health definitely isn't informatics. Can you tell me what you mean by that?   Timothy Aungst: (16:20) Oh, this is, this is, this is a good one. Okay. So this is unbearably one of the hardest questions I had to deal with in terms of talking within my community. So there's always been a push in pharmacy, informatics, you know informational management information, using different data streams and such, EHR management, et cetera, et cetera. And that's been a group that's been around for decades. I would probably say early two thousands, 1990s. We saw them out there and there's always been pharmacy informatics people. And it's the, you know, the American informatics Association and such, or AMIA. But you know, when, when I started talking about digital health, one thing that I actually got in trouble with early on was people like, isn't it just informatics. I was like, what do you mean? Like this is technology. I was like, "technology is not synonymous with informatics." Informatics definitely plays a role in digital health and managing all the data streams that come down.   Timothy Aungst: (17:04) But I would argue that the traditional informatics thought processes around management of health. It does not mean lik,e this whole digital health kind of ecosystem. And that's actually where I would have conversations with people like, oh, they'll get all this person, their informatics person, we have the conversation and people will talk about, you know, KPIs, C-Colon and different things in programming. And they'll be like, "Yeah, I don't do any of this stuff. That's not my business. I'm more interested in the clinical workflow design associated with this stuff and how to actually evaluate one technology versus another and blah, blah, blah." And so that does overlap. Yes, it does. But I think some people have assumed that, especially in pharmacy and for pharmacists, that informatics would subsume and take over digital health. And that's one area I'm not too sure on. I think some people may want that. And some people don't. I for one don't. I think informatics works within digital health space in that it's definitely a conversation and there's been other publications around this that kind of delved into a little bit more different therapeutic areas like oncology. But early on, It was very, very difficult actually to separate the two. I think at this time, most of it is separated, but I, that was a early conversation I had had with people.   Janet Kennedy: (18:13) Okay. I'm interested in the amount of data that could be available through digital health apps and how a pharmacist might actually interact with that. So I'm really getting around to a conversation about adherence. Right now, when we think of adherence, it's the next fill - did you get the next prescription filled? But there's 30 or even 90 days in between those fills. If you had that data and it was daily, would a pharmacist be able to actually manage that information, and would they want to?   Timothy Aungst: (18:48) So here is a loaded question. And I mean this, cause this is an area that I'm fully invested - I love this topic. It is too many stakeholders, I think we can go over in detail about maybe some, the big ones like, you know, who cares about adherence at the end of the day? You know, is it, the patient, is it the clinician, is the payer? I would argue payers recognize there's enough research out there saying that on average, a patient takes for medications, hopefully their diseases won't progress and they'll get better. Same with the clinicians and same with the patients who probably think that to a certain extent. But when we look at adherence data, if we look at HEOR and stuff like that, like what do they use as their metrics? Half the time it's like medication possession ratio, right? And I am not convinced that thing is actually really, really useful.   Timothy Aungst: (19:29) I think globally? Yes. I think scalable factor for most organizations, that is the go-to way to doing this. And yet I think about all the patients that I visit in their homes that have boxes of medications still stacked away. And it's like, why are they getting it? Well, you know, I just buy it because I'm told I have to buy it. So you buy your medication and then you store it away, but you're not taking it? And you know, I can't help it go walk away and thinking back my head, like, you know, what? If they show up in a report, people are going to say they're adherent. I just walked into their house and they had like 12 Advair discuses sitting there, and their COPD is still not doing good. Why? No, they're not probably taking and using it correctly, right? But anyone else would probably see that and not make that tie together.   Timothy Aungst: (20:10) So I think the biggest problem we've focused and seen in adherence is there's been no way to actually really assess if people have been taking their medications. So we argue about a topic that is potentially anywhere between $300 and $500 billion, which is really, I think, around medication optimization - which adherence is one of those things. But we've had very little quantitative data to back up our arguments. We've had qualitative data; but from a quantitative side, we've never really been able to scale. Even pharma has struggled with this in their clinical trials. You know, we've seen things like MEMSCAP and everything else out there for years trying to make a market here, and they've never really blown up. And then the 2010s, we had a flood in the market of all these different digital health devices because they recognize that stuff, but not all of them have been successful.   Timothy Aungst: (20:54) And the question is why? And I think it's because we've come to realize that adherence is very, very, very challenging. Human behavior is very challenging. I think humans are very chaotic in terms of adherence and such. So it comes back to the key stakeholders, you know? Why does the pharmacy care about, you know, adherence? To me, if pharmacy cares about adherence, instead of talking about value for the pharmacy, is the more prescriptions that are dispensed equal more profits. So if a patient's taking their medication on time, theoretically and filling on time, then that profit margin, at least is correct - 12 refills a year for a monthly supply versus if they're not, then they're not refilling and then you're not billing and you're not making money from it. So as a pharmacy, clinicians I think also have kind of a mixed feeling around adherence. To be honest, I think this might be actually one of the biggest conversations that should occur is there are therapeutic areas where we want a hundred percent adherence or at least above 90%.   Timothy Aungst: (21:47) There are therapeutic areas where I think we could be fine if people were not truly adherent. If you miss your Metformin a few days a month, am I going to care? Probably not? Your statin, and probably not? You know, and this comes down to, you know, how maybe severe a patient is, you know, how high their co-morbidity is. But there's certain diseases where, you know, what if I miss getting a biologic therapy by a day or two? Is I can really ruin me? Some day, we'll say yes. Some day we'll say no. But there's other therapeutic areas. Like let's say schizophrenia; you know, if they miss your medication, will it be problematic? Yeah. Probably. And the payers are going to be concerned about that. Cause that increases ER visits and hospitalizations, right? So often when we talk about adherence I feel like it's such a global issue that people focus on when it's very granular and it's really around different sensitivities associated with therapeutic areas that I don't really see a lot of people talk about, at large, associate with that technology.   Timothy Aungst: (22:40) That technology always seems focused just on trying to solve adherence from a very global perspective. While I think clinically we've had a lot of research talking about adherence from a very small perspective in terms of what diseases and such does it really impact. And so there isn't this mismatch behind there. So there's a financial aspect, there is the clinical aspects I think. And then there's some design aspects, you know, solving adherence, you know? What does it take to do that? And is actually the money invested really worth it? I think it's one thing that's often not discussed like, you know, just because we can solve adherence; should we? And again, they come back to the fact that we blocked a lot of objective information in many ways. If this goes to your question, would we want to actually have this data?   Timothy Aungst: (23:21) We are opening Pandora's box. We now know more about people's habits than we have in the past. So to gives some examples would be, let's go with inhalers. Propeller both have this interesting study where they evaluated people's utilization of inhalers and found them, I think they found 60, 80% of people were using their inhaler or Saba rescue inhaler incorrectly. Okay. That's actually really, really concerning, right? Because that's higher than what we probably have historically noted in research. Secondly, if these are patients that we've been signing off saying that they've been adherent or a technique is good, this really calls into question what and how well we've actually been approaching this area for decades. And I think that's actually one of the big things I'm actually concerned about. And I think many companies are kind of thinking about is, you know, we're getting a more objective information about people's habits than we ever had a past.   Timothy Aungst: (24:09) And in many ways this could be good, or it could be downright terrible if we're not prepared for the ramifications that everything we thought we knew may be wrong. And I think that's actually an area that most of us may be concerned about because that calls in attention like; okay, we find out that we've been wrong and we've not doing things perfectly. That's great. Well now we've got to fix it. No fix is going to come out overnight. So solving adherence also probably means finding out this data and understanding it while also trying to solve the underlying questions about how do we address some of these issues? Thinking about it clinically, thinking about our workflow. So when pharmacists want to see adherence on a daily basis, I don't think that'd be a problem, but I would throw back then this, what is the value of it? What is the value knowing if someone took their medication on a daily basis? Do they skip through the center pro clinically, is that meaningful? Maybe, maybe not depending on how bad their hypertension is, right? Or maybe heart failure or some other condition? From a peer perspective then maybe yes. And then along with that though, could also be focused on the money that you get for people not refilling on time. So these are the things I think that need to really be questioned.   Janet Kennedy: (25:17) Well, it's also the question of the firehose or the very specific stream of data that's relevant. So yes, any digital solution is going to gather all the information, but you wouldn't need all the information. What you would need is the alert that says based on the parameters for this patient, with these meds, now we need to worry about adherence and it could be on day four or five for a lesser impactful drug. It could be on day two for something that is of imperative nature that they take it. So that's the benefit of course, of being overwhelmed by analytics and informatics is that you can also then design the algorithm that sets the actions.   Timothy Aungst: (26:02) And that is the biggest issue then at this time, because who decides what the algorithm looks like? And this is a question that I throw most companies. And when I actually hear back, is well do it. But do you actually have the clinical staff and know how to do it? That's the issue. So I'm actually very curious if a company will come along, and actually would build this in their backend. You know, like we already have drug information databases out there, right? You know, is someone going to make something like this that they could then sell out to other companies to then utilize? Are they going to build it in-house, or would these alerts be optionable for a clinical site or a business? That would be nice. But you know, if you gave me a package deal and say, "you know, we could default this or you can change it, whatever you want."   Timothy Aungst: (26:46) Then I think that might change the conversation because it's just, you know, how many medications are out there? It's like, you know, NDC codes sitting on the shelf in pharmacies, enormous. So from a theoretical perspective, yes, this could be very possible. For practical perspective, who's going to build it and the timeframe it's going to take to build that is going to be enormous because the fact of matter is we can't build it because we don't know the data around some of this stuff, these questions. And that's the, that's a factor with Pandora's box. It opened up this huge conversation because we have the objective data to back it up now, compared in the past. But we don't know really, you know, what is the right answer? We don't know. If you go through like the literature and start like, you know, going into like pubmed and other things, how many days can you go without skipping his medication? It's not like there's gonna be a publication saying, oh, you can do this, this, this. That stuff doesn't exist, because we've never known.   Janet Kennedy: (27:34) All right. Well that sounds like the call to action to the industry, is we've got to start talking about, you know, when you have this data from digital health, how are you going to apply it and make it be not just an endless stream of numbers, but something that is actionable that supports the patient's health journey?   Timothy Aungst: (27:53) Actionable data is key. The when to have an action is the unknown. And this is where I think companies could freak out users; because it's easy enough for a patient to call me and say, you know, I've missed my medication past three days, and be like, okay, well you should take your medication or titrate back up, or let's have you in the off spot. And having the patients take that on. All right. Cause they self activated and they chose to do this. I didn't know that until they told me, right? So my liability or whatever we want to call it is limited on a patient discretion, because they own what happened to them. The minute you start putting this subjective information out there, that means the ownership and responsibility shifted to some group that never was responsible in the past. So to expect that people like selling them, want this data and use it, you may hear people say, no, not really.   Timothy Aungst: (28:43) And if you peel back the layers, you'll probably eventually find out it's this trepidation around, "I don't know what to do with this data." And I don't really trust the company to tell me what to do with this data, because I don't know where they're pulling that from. So there's gotta be some kind of evidence-based approach around there, but where is the evidence? And then this is where the ground falls out from all of us is, that Aetna says it exists. And that to me, I think is the overwhelming issue around truly objectifying medication here is the fact that we don't know what to do with it this time. And it's very troubling. So for me personally, I think this is great. This is what we should do. Are we there yet? I don't think so. And I think one of the biggest problems has been, it's not the technology. It's not even like the process of logistics; I think it's the overloading clinical scenarios that we never really hadn't think about in the past, and who's going to be responsible for what?   Janet Kennedy: (29:37) Okay. You have now laid some pretty big questions that could take us down another rabbit hole for at least an hour. So I'm going to hold those thoughts for our next conversation. And Timothy, just thank you very much for joining us on People Always, Patients Sometimes. Would you mind sharing how they can find you online?   Timothy Aungst: (29:58) You can find me on LinkedIn, you can find me on Twitter. Usually just my name. If you look it up, you'll find it. My website, thedigitalapothecary.com is also out there where I write about a lot of stuff. A lot of it is theory crafting, a lot of it is focused on next steps and such or issues I see in the industry. So you're welcome to come and contact me and reach out.   Janet Kennedy: (30:17) Excellent. Well, I think we're going to have a part two of this conversation. So I look forward to seeing you on the podcast again soon.   Timothy Aungst: (30:24) Thank you very much for having me.

TIME's The Brief
Why Big Businesses in Texas Are Ignoring Gov. Abbott's Vaccine Mandate Ban... and More Stories

TIME's The Brief

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 19:58


Included in this episode: 1. Why Big Businesses in Texas Are Ignoring Gov. Abbott's Vaccine Mandate Ban 2. An Innovative Washington Law Aims to Get Foreign-Trained Doctors Back in Hospitals 3. U.S. Task Force Reconsiders Daily Low-Dose Aspirin Use for Preventing Heart Attacks in Adults Over 60 4. Prince Harry, Meghan Join New York Investing Fund as ‘Impact Partners' .

Movie Lovers Unite
Ask Us Anything!

Movie Lovers Unite

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 84:36


Hello Movie Lovers, for tonight's episode John and Charlie takes your live questions. To donate to ST. Jude's Hospital click the link https://tlbodenhamer84.scentsy.us/party/15197126/st-judes-fundraiser?fbclid=IwAR3aUQArkoGULV3xpqP-heQIecqbJToctgH9PVZfbeMCcKApMkpzZNCKw9w If you want to donate to the show feel free to do so by going to https://www.gofundme.com/f/movie-lovers-unite-podcast?utm_source=customer&utm_medium=copy_link&utm_campaign=p_cf+share-flow-1 For all of your entertainment news make sure that you check out https://movieloversunite.wixsite.com/movieloversunite To reach out to us e mail us at movieloversunite@gmail.com If you want to be apart of our Patron feel free by clicking the link https://www.patreon.com/join/movieloversunite Follow us on Facebook at https://m.facebook.com/HouseNerdGeek/?ref=bookmarks --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/movieloversunite/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/movieloversunite/support

ASRA News
Restorative Neurostimulation for Intractable Mechanical Chronic Low Back Pain

ASRA News

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 9:56


"Restorative Neurostimulation for Intractable Mechanical Chronic Low Back Pain," by Christopher Gilligan, MD, MBA, Chief of Pain Medicine, Department of Anesthesiology, Perioperative, and Pain Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts.  From ASRA News, August 2021. See original article at www.asra.com/asra-news for figures and references. This material is copyrighted. 

Hit Play Not Pause
All About Your Bones with Dr. Marci Goolsby & Dr. Alana Serota (Episode 53)

Hit Play Not Pause

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 75:26


As a woman you can lose up to 20% of your bone density during the five to seven years following menopause. Given the fact that we hit peak bone density by age 30, we can't go back in time and build more, but we can take steps right now to hang onto what we have to keep our skeleton strong and resilient. This week we bring in two guests from the Hospital for Special Surgery in New York City to explain how: Dr. Marci Goolsby and Dr. Alana Serota. Marci Goolsby, MD, is Co-Director of the Women's Sports Medicine Center at HSS. She is board certified in family medicine with a certificate of added qualification in sports medicine. She currently serves as team physician for the US Olympic Biathlon team. You can learn more about her at https://www.hss.edu/physicians_goolsby-marci.asp Alana Serota, MD, is an osteoporosis and metabolic bone disease specialist and certified Menopause Practitioner. She is committed to a patient-centered, biopsychosocial approach to the care of osteoporosis and metabolic bone issues. You can learn more about her at https://www.hss.edu/physicians_serota-alana.asp **Support the Podcast** InsideTracker: 25% off at insidetracker.com/feistymenopause Nuun Hydration: 30% off at nuunlife.com with the code HITPLAY Previnex: 15% off your first order with code HITPLAY at https://www.previnex.com/

The Robert Scott Bell Show
The RSB Show 10-12-21 - TX Governor bans mandates, Chris Scarano, Dental mercury

The Robert Scott Bell Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 110:00


The RSB Show 10-12-21 - TX Governor bans mandates, Hospital says NO, Kid mask consequences, Chris Scarano, Poisoned by the US government, Dental mercury

Kate Dalley Radio
101221 SHORT Hospital Puts Bag Over Girls Head; Psych Behind Covid Trance

Kate Dalley Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 17:33


101221 SHORT Hospital Puts Bag Over Girls Head; Psych Behind Covid Trance by Kate Dalley

The Patriotically Correct Radio Show with Stew Peters | #PCRadio
Hospital Puts Plastic Bag Over Teen COVID Patient‘s Head - Christian School Targeted by Communists - Respiratory Therapist WHISTLEBLOWER!

The Patriotically Correct Radio Show with Stew Peters | #PCRadio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 55:50


A Washington State mom spoke to Stew Peters with a heartbreaking story of permanent damage done to children at the hands of power-abusing communists in government. The ONLY school to be shut down due to a "COVID outbreak" was the Christian school in that county, and the health department didn't have any answers. Trump surrogate, Pastor Mark Burns, is running for U.S. Congress, and joined Stew Peters for an explosive, unapologetic message of inspiration based on Christian values and American Patriotism! Mark Bishofsky has over 20 years of experience as a respected respiratory therapist at a large metropolitan hospital, and he's had enough. Bishofsky blew the whistle on today's "Stew Peters Show". A 17-year-old girl was abused by hospital staff and had a plastic bag placed over her head as what the staff and administrators called "standard procedure" in a Texas medical center. Carlos Cortez is an independent fiduciary, patriot and God-fearing family man. He's also the in-house financial expert on "The Stew Peters Show". Call him today at 813-448-3446 or visit www.AmericaFirstRetirementPlan.com Dr. Zelenko Protocol: www.zStackProtocol.com Go Ad-Free, Get Exclusive Content, Become a Premium user: https://redvoicemedia.com/premium Follow Stew on social media: http://evrl.ink/StewPeters See all of Stew's content at https://StewPeters.TV Watch full episodes here: https://redvoicemedia.net/stew-full-shows Check out Stew's store: http://StewPeters.shop Support our efforts to keep truth alive: https://www.redvoicemedia.com/support-red-voice-media/ Advertise with Red Voice Media: https://redvoicemedia.net/ads

Nurse Tori Cellfie Show
NICU Dad Energy! Adam Wood. Former Military Leader. Author of "Our Preemie Adventure". NICU Meme Creator

Nurse Tori Cellfie Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 95:32


Adam is a husband, father, retired military leader, and author of 'Our Preemie Adventure.” Adam and his wife, Jenn, spent 135 days with their son, Brady, in the NICU at Connecticut Children's Hospital. Brady was born at 1 pound 4 ounces, at just 25 weeks gestation, with complications from bronchopulmonary dysplasia, apnea of prematurity, pneumonia, and a variety of other respiratory issues. While their journey is far from over, their experiences have become https://amzn.to/3gyQQsP (a children's book for preemie families), which takes a humorous and heartwarming look at the journey shared by so many. He brings humor into the preemie parent world and opens up about his experience being a father of a 25-week preemie. Adam is also the founder of the IG @preemie_adventures, where he shares NICU parent memes and gives a fun humorous side of NICU life. Moreover, we are thrilled to bring the NICU dad experience and masculine energy today! Like many NICU families, they had many ups and downs in their roller-coaster journey. We love the community he is building with the goal of helping to support NICU families by bringing humor into their lives. ​ https://www.amazon.com/dp/1649529678/ref=cm_sw_r_as_gl_api_glt_fabc_9CPACFM0FGFQWXAG8MBS?linkCode=ml1&tag=torimeskin-20 (Our Preemie Adventures Book) To connect with Preemie Adventures click https://instagram.com/preemie_adventures?utm_medium=copy_link (HERE)  To connect with Tori click https://www.instagram.com/nurse.tori_/ (HERE)  To connect with Sam Manassero click https://www.instagram.com/heysamanthaa/ (HERE) To connect with Cellfie Show click https://www.instagram.com/cellfie_podcast/ (HERE) https://www.cellfiepodcast.com/ (Cellfie Show ) https://www.cellfiepodcast.com/shopcellfiemerch (Cellfie Podcast Merch)  Produced by: Tori + Sam  MAXIMIZE YOUR NURSING PROFESSION This 28 page eBook is a digital download that provides you with NURSE PRO TIPS to help you land that dream job! This is a fully loaded guide complete with the strategies to help you master your job application and interview process. We cover all of the juicy details to help you perfect the art of interviewing. https://9128462355707618.sellfy.store/ (THE COMPLETE NURSE INTERVIEW GUIDE TO LAND YOUR DREAM JOB! ) BEAM! (Code: CELLFIE15) 15% OFF Literally our favorite! Get your sleep in check! Better, cleaner, totally natural supplements. your nightly drink for better sleep. a delicious blend of sleep-enhancing vitamins, minerals, nano CBD and more.  https://glnk.io/8y92/nursetori (CLICK HERE) RESUME RX  (Save 20%)  STAND OUT IN YOUR JOB SEARCH!! Online courses, templates, and resources for healthcare professions to land the career of your dreams. We have BOTH used these products and can not recommend them more to you!  CLICK HERE https://cellfieshow--theresumerx.thrivecart.com/template-bundle/ (Nurse Résumé Templates)  CLICK HERE https://cellfieshow--theresumerx.thrivecart.com/template-bundle/5fac7fe4eb3e6/ (FILL-IN-THE-BLANK SOLUTION FOR YOUR RÉSUMÉ AND COVER LETTER)

CodeCast | Medical Billing and Coding Insights
Are ASC and hospital vaccine mandates helping or hurting our communities?

CodeCast | Medical Billing and Coding Insights

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 16:41


Terry's passion shines in this episode, as she discusses government-ordered vaccine mandates. Staff shortages in ASC's are prompting them to suspend services. This begs the question: are these mandates helping or hurting our communities? Giving employees a choice of getting a vaccine, versus weekly testing and PPE for safety, should be considered. Our patients need […] The post Are ASC and hospital vaccine mandates helping or hurting our communities? appeared first on Terry Fletcher Consulting, Inc..

The Birth Hour
635| Epidural-free Hospital Birth with Nitrous Oxide + NICU Stay in the UK - Poppy Child

The Birth Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 60:47


Poppy shares her birth story and discusses a five-day NICU stay postpartum. This episode is sponsored by Essembly, Head to esemblybaby.com to learn more. And use code BirthHour15 for 15% off your first order. Also available on Amazon and Target.com. Know Your Options Online Childbirth Course: https://courses.thebirthhour.com/limited-time Beyond the Latch Course: https://courses.thebirthhour.com/enroll-b2w/ Support The Birth Hour via Patreon!: https://patreon.com/birthhour

Charting Pediatrics
The Power of Play with Gabriella Gonzales, MD & Alex Rakowsky, MD (S5:E8)

Charting Pediatrics

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 28:28


While the majority of Western culture tends to focus on a child's academic readiness & success, the importance and benefits of play are critical to development. In today's episode, we are joined by our colleagues from Nationwide Children's Hospital to talk about a recent article they published about the important role that individual and group play has in child development. This episode is part of our Resident Files series where we are pleased to feature the thoughts and work of the talented pediatric residents. Today's guests are Dr. Gabriella Gonzales, PGY3 at Nationwide Children's Hospital and Dr. Alex Rakowsky, Associate Program Director of the Pediatric Residency Program at Nationwide Children's Hospital and Assistant Professor of Pediatrics at The Ohio State University. Article cited in this episode: The Importance of Play by Gabriella Gonzales, MD and Alex Rakowsky, MD to be published Fall 2021 in Peds in Review.  Do you have thoughts about today's episode or suggestions for a future topic? Write to us, chartingpediatrics@childrenscolorado.org 

LeVar Burton Reads
"The Paper Menagerie" by Ken Liu

LeVar Burton Reads

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 49:30


An immigrant mother tries to bond with her American-born son by creating a magical paper menagerie. This story appears in Ken Liu's collection THE PAPER MENAGERIE AND OTHER STORIES, available now from Saga Press.   Ken Liu's forthcoming novel, THE VEILED THRONE, is the third installment of THE DANDELION DYNASTY and will be available November 2nd from Saga Press.   Content advisory: Hospitals, death of a parent See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Global News Podcast
Czech president in hospital amid election upheaval

Global News Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 32:00


Milos Zeman is in intensive care the day after a surprise opposition win in parliamentary elections. Also: the "father of Pakistan nuclear bomb" AQ Khan dies aged eighty-five, and UK to resettle teenage Afghan women footballers.