Podcast appearances and mentions of Bob Dylan

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American singer-songwriter, musician, poet, author, and artist

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Bob Dylan

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    Best podcasts about Bob Dylan

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    Latest podcast episodes about Bob Dylan

    The Bob Lefsetz Podcast
    Jeff Gold

    The Bob Lefsetz Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2022 133:19 Very Popular


    Jeff Gold owns Recordmecca, the premier site for buying and selling music memorabilia. Jeff discovered 149 unknown Bob Dylan acetates and was also the co-appraiser of the Bob Dylan Archive in Tulsa. We discuss collecting and selling as well as Jeff's journey from Rhino Records' first employee to executive positions at A&M and Warner Bros.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Little News Ears
    Cherry Bird Cow Marathon - Episode 5 - Men Who Sew

    Little News Ears

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2022 7:31


    Cherry Bird Cow Marathon - Continued - It's December 22nd, 2020. Cherry, Bird, and Cow teach us all about the death of Frank Carney, the death of Chuck Yeager, how sewing is getting popular with men, how a 2nd Grade science experiment went into space, and how Bob Dylan sold his entire music catalog for $300 million dollars.

    The Last Bohemians
    S4 Ep5: Lynn Castle: LA's first lady barber on Elvis, the LSD-soaked Sixties and her secret music career

    The Last Bohemians

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2022 45:22


    In the north of Los Angeles, in a neighbourhood called Glendale, an unassuming bungalow is home to one of the first women in Hollywood to cut men's hair. Today she goes by the glitziest of names, Madelynn von Ritz, but back in the 60s she was called Lynn Castle and hung out with key people of the era, lopping off Jim Morrison, the Byrds, Sonny Bono and Neil Young's locks. She was also a secret musician. But despite her childhood friends being musical svengalis like Phil Spector – who she once dated – as well as Jack Nietzcshe and Lee Hazlewood, it took her a while to reveal her talent. Eventually, however, she cut a number of intimate, melancholy demos in the hazy 60s with Hazlewood, who later famously teamed up with Nancy Sinatra and helped define the decade's psychedelic sound. Lynn is now 83 (going on 53!) and still writes music to this day, with a home studio tucked in the corner of her living room. Those old demos, meanwhile, were found by the label Light in the Attic and reissued as Rose Coloured Corner in 2017 – an album 50 years in the making – including her signature song, pop gem The Lady Barber.  In this episode of The Last Bohemians: LA, supported by Audio-Technica, Lynn discusses her 'friendship' with Elvis, her series of almost-famous moments with Bob Dylan and the Stones, her positive outlook and life, and unexpectedly digs out letters from an old flame... CREDITS Presenter/Exec-Producer: Kate Hutchinson Producer: Holly Fisher Photography: Lisa Jelliffe Theme music: Pete Cunningham, Ned Pegler and Caradog Jones With thanks to Light in the Attic Records. ABOUT AUDIO-TECHNICA In 1962, with a vision of producing high-quality audio for everyone, Audio-Technica's founder Hideo Matsushita created the first truly affordable phono cartridge, the AT-1 in Shinjuku, Japan. Since then, Audio-Technica has grown into a world-renowned company devoted to Audio Excellence at every level, expanding the product range to include headphones, microphones and turntables. Audio-Technica's commitment to the user experience and their devotion to high quality design, manufacturing, marketing, and distribution has placed them at the forefront of the industry for the last 60 years. ABOUT THE LAST BOHEMIANS Journalist and broadcaster Kate Hutchinson launched The Last Bohemians in 2019, pairing the audio with stunning portraits by photographer Laura Kelly. It stole hearts with 86-year-old Molly Parkin's stories of self-pleasuring, LSD countess Amanda Feilding's trepanning tales and Pamela Des Barres' reflections on supergroupiedom. It won silver for Best New Podcast at the 2020 British Podcast Awards and was a finalist at the 2021 Audio Production Awards. Series two featured folk legend Judy Collins; British fashion icon Zandra Rhodes, dealing with the aftermath of losing her lover while celebrating 50 years in fashion; anarcho-punk innovator and illustrator Gee Vaucher; and the controversial witch at the heart of the 1970s occult boom, Maxine Sanders. In 2021, The Last Bohemians launched a lockdown special with performance artist Marina Abramović; it returned in 2022 with the UK's greatest living painter, Maggi Hambling, as well as Bowie's former best friend Dana Gillespie and theatre actor Cleo Sylvestre. thelastbohemians.co.uk patreon.com/thelastbohemians instagram.com/thelastbohemianspod twitter.com/thelastbohospod 

    Verge of the Fringe
    Remembering Thomas, Vin and Olivia

    Verge of the Fringe

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022


    Hey Dude, I fondly reflect on the passing of our beloved cat Thomas, the great Vin Scully, and the luminous Olivia Newton-John. I also find time to whine about not making it on the radio.QUOTE: "A tear welled up in his left eye."AUDIO LINKPEOPLE: Zane Grey, Vin Scully, Chick Hearn, Adolfo Guzman-Lopez, Jake Downey, John Rabe, John Doe, Petros Papadakis, Olivia Newton-John, John Travolta, Bob Dylan, George Harrison, Farrah FawcettPLACES: Zane Grey Estate, Altadena, Burbank, Los Angeles, America, Dodger Stadium, Iowa, Pasadena City CollegeRADIO/PODCASTS: KPCC, All Things Considered, Morning Edition, NPR, Radio, LAist Studios, Imperfect Paradise, Off-RampTHINGS: Thomas (The Cat), pandemic, MLB All-Star Game, Facebook, Twitter, Dodgers, Lakers, Grease, If Not For YouSOUNDS: footsteps, gravel path, cars, train, Laguna Sawdust Cowbell Chimes GENRE: storytelling, personal narrative, personal journalPHOTO: "Thomas' Last Day in the Garden" by Marisol on her iPhone XSRECORDED: August 9, 2022 from the "Wawona Lawn" under the flight path of the Bob Hope Airport in Burbank, CaliforniaGEAR: Sony ICD PX370 digital voice recorder and Sony ECM CS3 "tie-clip" microphone.HYPE: "It's a beatnik kinda literary thing in a podcast cloak of darkness." Timothy Kimo Brien (cohost on Podwrecked and host of Create Art Podcast)DISCLAIMER/WARNING: Proudly presented rough, raw and ragged. Seasoned with salty language and ideas. Not for most people's taste. Please be advised.

    eTown
    eTown Time Capsule 2012 - The Tallest Man on Earth / The Spring Standards

    eTown

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 59:16


    Nick & Helen welcome indie sensation Kristian Matsson (who performs under the moniker The Tallest Man on Earth). Kristian hails from Sweden and, of late, has burst onto the US music scene, building a huge fan base in an astonishingly short amount of time. He brings his stripped down, soulful sound (which often gets him compared to Bob Dylan) to the show. And relative newcomers The Spring Standards join us this week as well. They were childhood friends and reunited after college to continue creating their uniquely original sound; they're currently enjoying an underground following and growing buzz in the industry. Stellar music, great conversation and a moving E-Chievement Award story, too. That's this week, in eTown.

    Buffering the Vampire Slayer | A Buffy the Vampire Slayer Podcast

    Kristin is talking with with Rabbi Leah Jordan and Pam Grossman — writer, curator, and teacher of magical practice and history — to dig deep into Willow's Jewishness, her witchy-ness, and how those two identities are in conversation with each other (or how we *wish* they would have been!) across seven seasons of Buffy the Vampire Slayer.This episode contains spoilers through the end of Season 7 of Buffy!LOCATE YOUR HOSTS UPON THE INTERNETRabbi Leah Jordan: @leah_solo; Kehillah North LondonPam Grossman: @phantasmaphile; pamgrossman.comKristin Russo: @kristinnoeline; kristinnoeline.comMORE ON OUR GUESTSLeah Jordan is Rabbi of Kehillah North LondonShe received semicha from the Leo Baeck College in London and has lived and worked for over a decade in Britain. Leah is co-coordinator of Azara-Opening the Beit Midrash (www.asra.org.uk), a new initiative creating Jewish text learning for everyone in the UK, and they are a current and founding member of Na'amod: British Jews Against Occupation (@NaamodUK), a movement of British Jews dedicated to ending our community's support for the Occupation. Leah has spent three years of their adult life in Jerusalem, learning Torah and on-the-ground organising, as a Fellow at both the Conservative Yeshiva and the Pardes Institute of Jewish Studies, as well as doing a yearlong Fellowship at Yeshivat Hadar in New York City. Leah also holds an MA in Jewish Studies from King's College London, and a BA in English Literature from the University of Kansas, with concentrations in Modern European History and French language studies at the Alliance Française in Paris.Leah is from a ‘country,' as Bob Dylan wrote, ‘called the Midwest.' They especially love teaching Torah & Jewish text study, youth work, building community, and organising for change. They also love travel & the universe, both this actual one, as well as fictional universes and stories. They live in London with their partner, Benji Stanley, also a rabbi. She/TheyPam Grossman is the creator and host of internationally beloved podcast, The Witch Wave ("The Terry Gross of witches" - Vulture), the author of the critically acclaimed books, Waking the Witch: Reflections on Women, Magic, and Power  (Gallery Books) and What is a Witch (Tin Can Forest Press), and the co-editor of the WITCHCRAFT volume of Taschen's Library of Esoterica series. Her writing has appeared in such outlets as The New York Times, The Atlantic, Time, and Ms. Magazine. She is cofounder of the Occult Humanities Conference at NYU, and her art exhibitions and magical projects have been featured in such publications as Artforum, Art in America, and The New Yorker. She lives in Brooklyn with her husband and their two feline familiars. You can find her at PamGrossman.com and @Phantasmaphile, and support her work at The Witch Wave Patreon!+++Links from Leah:how Antisemitism and white supremacy are intertwinedScholar Matthew Pateman on Willow's "disappearing Jewishness"great summary of representations of anti-Jewish archetypes in media, with scholar Jonathan BranfmanConcepts in Jewish Tradition: Demons & Demonology, Is There a Jewish Afterlife?, Teshuva, or Repentance, Kabbalah and Mysticism 101, Tikkun Olam: Repairing the World, Maimonides (Rambam) and His Texts, Lilith: Lady Flying in the DarknessGenesis, chapter 4, verse 7: "Surely, if you try to do right, There is uplift. But if you do not do right Sin crouches at the door; Its urge is toward you, Yet you can be overcome it.”SVARA: a traditionally radical yeshiva, a queer yeshivaNonbinary Hebrew ProjectAND kids now are doing Willow Rosenberg-themed b'nei mitzvah!Links from Pam:Ezra RoseKey of SolomonThe Lesser Key of Solomon (Goetia)Incantation bowlsHamsaMezuzahDori MidnightRebekah ErevKohonet Hebrew Priestess InstituteAshkenazi Herbalism by Adam Siegel and Deatra CohenMargaret MurrayWitch-cult hypothesisGerald GardnerWiccaStarhawkZsuzsanna BudapestMargot AdlerHermetic Order of the Golden DawnAleister CrowleyDion FortuneTree of Life/Sefirot (Kabbalah)Kabbalah v. Cabala v. QabalahShedim (or sheydim)Golemopshprekherin+++Buffering the Vampire Slayer: @bufferingcast on twitter, facebook, and instagramLearn more about our team at bufferingthevampireslayer.com/our-team Produced by: Kristin Russo, Pam Grossman, and Leah JordanWith support from Alba Daza and Mackenzie MacDadeEdited by: John Mark Nelson & Kristin RussoLogo: Kristine Thune+++SUPPORT US ON PATREON!Advance Music, Bonus Episodes, Live Concerts, Book Clubs, wheeeee!!patreon.com/bufferingcastSCOOP SOME MERCHSmash the Patriarchy with Buffering T-Shirts, Hoodies, Sweatpants, Pins!bufferingthevampireslayer.com/shop+++We acknowledge that we and our team are occupying unceded and stolen lands and territories. Kristin occupies the Lenape territories of the Esopus Lenape Peoples. Jenny occupies the Wabanahkik territory of the Abenaki and Pennacook Peoples. Alba occupies Tiohtià:ke of the Kanien'kehá:ka Nation. Mack, LaToya, Morgan, and John Mark occupy the lands of the Kizh Peoples.Learn more about Land Acknowledgments + our continued anti-racist efforts atbufferingthevampireslayer.com/justkeepfightingJust Keep Fighting - Community Events Calendar:https://www.bufferingthevampireslayer.com/just-keep-fighting-spotlight-on-community-anti-racism

    Whole 'Nuther Thing
    Episode 693: Whole 'Nuther Thing August 7, 2022

    Whole 'Nuther Thing

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 115:41


    "Can't you hear that motor turning, Automobile coming into styleComing down the road for a country mile or two ?So happy just to see you smile, underneath the sky of blueOn this new morning, new morning, on this new morning with you"Please join me on this "New Morning" along with The Smiths, Linda Ronstadt, Dennis Wilson, Aerosmith, Squeeze, Beach Boys, Moby Grape, Leon Russell, XTC, Boston, Talking Heads, Traveling Wilbury's, Delaney & Bonnie, Little Feat, Beatles, New Riders Of The Purple Sage, Joe Cocker, Byrds, Rolling Stones, Flying Burrito Brothers, The Band,  Commander Cody & Lost Planet Airmen and Bob Dylan...

    On est fait pour s'entendre
    L'INTÉGRALE - Martin Luther King : le jour où il a prononcé son célèbre discours

    On est fait pour s'entendre

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 43:58


    REDIFF - Nous sommes le 28 aout 1963. Sur les marches du Lincoln Memorial à Washington, Martin Luther King, fait un rêve : Celui que ses 4 petits-enfants vivent un jour dans une nation où ils ne seront pas jugés sur la couleur de leur peau, mais sur la valeur de leur caractère. Martin Luther King rêve qu'en Alabama, un jour, les petits garçons noirs et les petites filles blanches pourront se donner la main, comme frères et sœurs. La foule, parmi laquelle on trouve Joséphine Baker, John Baez ou encore Bob Dylan, est littéralement transportée par ce discours contre le racisme qui empoisonne les Etats-Unis et pour le respect des droits civiques du peuple noir américain. Ecoutez Jour J avec Flavie Flament du 08 août 2022

    Simblified
    Why musicians are selling catalog rights

    Simblified

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 49:32


    You might have heard that Bob Dylan, RHCP, Neil Young and even David Guetta have sold the rights to their music to companies like Hipgnosis for obscene sums of money. What does this mean? Why do artists do that? Did Tony really make three puns despite not being a rock music fan?Chuck, Srikeit and Tony get together to talk about this new trend (artists selling music, that is - not Tony making rock puns) and the conversation gradually steers to what it means for the future of music, art and life itself. Referenced in the episode - Ted Gioia's predictions on the future of music. https://tedgioia.substack.com/p/12-predictions-for-the-future-ofAdd one part news, one part bad jokes, one part Wikipedia research, one part cult references from spending too much time on the internet, one part Wodehouse quotes, and one part quality puns, and you get Simblified.A weekly podcast to help you appear smarter, to an audience that knows no less! Your four hosts - Chuck, Naren, Srikeit, and Tony attempt to deconstruct topics with humor (conditions apply). Fans of the show have described it as "fun conversations with relatable folks", "irreverent humor", "the funniest thing to come out of Malad West" and "if I give you a good review will you please let me go".Started in 2016 as a creative outlet, Simblified now has over 200 episodes, including some live ones, and some with guests who are much smarter than the hosts. Welcome to the world of Simblified!You can contact the hosts on:Chuck: twitter.com/chuck_gopal / instagram.com/chuckofalltradesNaren: twitter.com/shenoyn / instagram.com/shenoynvTony: twitter.com/notytony / instagram.com/notytonySrikeit: twitter.com/srikeit / instagram.com/srikeit

    Is It Rolling, Bob? Talking Dylan
    Lenny Kaye

    Is It Rolling, Bob? Talking Dylan

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 7, 2022 51:53 Very Popular


    Patti Smith Group guitarist and author Lenny Kaye reminds us that “Bob Dylan is still experimenting, seeing who he might be, putting on the weirdest shows ever, upending barriers”. Almost in one breath, Lenny gives forth on working with or listening to Suzanne Vega, John Coltrane, Gayle, The Stooges, Brian Eno, The Byrds, Bing Crosby and Janis Joplin (“I wanted her to be my girlfriend”). His colleague Patti Smith fought for “the freedom to have a field of noise, beyond language. But also: a hit single.” Elvis “is an extraterrestrial: a mutation”. And after two tours supporting Dylan, he confirms that “Bob is private backstage. You're instructed not to look at him. But that was OK. I don't want to meet my idols”. A wise man. And a perfect podcast guest.Lenny Kaye has been the guitarist for The Patti Smith Group since the band's inception in 1974. He produced Patti's first single and worked on the band's hugely influential 70s albums: Horses, Easter, Radio Ethiopia and Wave. Lenny has also produced and/or played with dozens of artists such as R.E.M., James, Soul Asylum, Kristen Hersh and Allen Ginsberg. His seminal anthology of 60s garage rock, Nuggets, defined the genre. His first book was Waylon, The Life Story of Waylon Jennings. You Call It Madness: The Sensuous Song of the Croon was published in 2004. His current book is Lightning Striking: Ten Transformative Moments in Rock and Roll. Lenny also wrote the liner notes to the accompanying double CD (he has been nominated three times for Grammy awards in the liner notes category). As a freelancer, he has written for a wide range of periodicals, including Melody Maker, Creem and Rolling Stone.InstagramTrailerEpisode playlist on AppleEpisode playlist on SpotifyDark Eyes (duet between Dylan and Patti Smith)Listeners: please subscribe and/or leave a review and a rating.Twitter @isitrollingpodRecorded 28th June 2022This show is part of Pantheon Podcasts

    Bob Dylan: About Man and God and Law
    26: Bob Dylan Goes Electric with Kathryn Lofton

    Bob Dylan: About Man and God and Law

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 7, 2022 73:25 Very Popular


    We are going electric with Bob Dylan and  Professor Kathryn Lofton. Few pop culture moments have been analyzed more closely than Bob Dylan "going electric" at the 1965 Newport Folk Festival. We ask what is all means for American religion, race, and music with our special guest, Kathryn Lofton.Kathryn is the Lex Hixon Professor of Religious Studies and American Studies, Professor of History and Divinity, and FAS Dean of Humanities at Yale University. She has written extensively about capitalism, popular culture, and the secular, from her first book, Oprah: The Gospel of an Icon (2011) to the book Consuming Religion (2017), parsing the  relationship between religion and consumer capitalism from the Kardashian family to  Goldman Sachs. Her article on Dylan going electric in the Journal of Popular Music Studies knocked us off our feet. Enjoy this wide-ranging conversation about some of our most favorite topics in rock music, the life of the spirit, and more. Check out the book About Man and God and Law: The Spiritual Wisdom of Bob Dylan wherever fine books are sold, and learn about related projects at mangodlaw.com.We are proud to be part of the Pantheon Podcasts Network.  

    N3rdGa5m
    Suck it, Bob Dylan.

    N3rdGa5m

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 7, 2022 58:31


    The times they are a changin! Welcome to our official 100th episode of the N3rdGa5m podcast! Pokémon! Geeky Weeky, Moo's Kink Corner and more! Find us on Twitter @N3rdGa5mInc or check out our link tree; https://linktr.ee/n3rdga5m Opening theme: Vintage Education by Kevin MacLeod Link: https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/4589-vintage-education Closing theme: Easy Lemon (30 second) by Kevin MacLeod Link: https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/3695-easy-lemon-30-second- License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0 --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

    Pacific Street Blues and Americana
    Episode 107: A History of the Blues (short stories and music to entertain and, ideally, inform) 08 07 2022

    Pacific Street Blues and Americana

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 7, 2022 74:22


    There's a story behind this week's show. The Blues Society of Omaha asked me and Glenn, who fills in from time to time, to go on the main stage of our annual, In the Market for the Blues, and discuss the history of the blues. So we did. Sorta. The blues is a pretty big topic - especially to pack into 45 minutes. Instead, I put together A History of the Blues (rather than The History...). I decided to discuss some of the events that made the blues the artform it is today including The Great Migrations of Blacks from the American South to the north and west, some of the sources for blues music including field recordings, Chess Records, and John Hammond. I also told some stories like how John Lomax's efforts to get a recording label for Leadbelly tied together with the sit-com Friends, or how John Hammond's search for Robert Johnson created, in large part, the sound that was Classic Rock, or how a Memphis kid's love of a jug band player lead, indirectly, to several hit recording acts in the 60s and 70s. Or how Reg Dwight played the blues and became Elton John.  We are ecclectricity and, ideally, you find that entertaining and informative. At the very least, but perhaps the most important, the show is not predictable or driven by cliches. Thanks for giving this a lesson.It was an act of love putting this together. I hope you enjoy the effort. Pacific Street BluesAugust 7, 2022Link to Visuals1. Blue House and the Rent to Own Horns / I Put a Spell on You2. Dave Alvin / Highway 663. W.C. Handy /Beale Street Blues 4. Louis Armstrong / What Did I Do (to be so Black and Blue)? 5. Alan Lomax / Spoken Word6. Rev. Gary Davis / Candy Man 7. Bessie Jones and the Group8. Blind Willie Johnson / John the Revelator (Rex Granite Band, Mellencamp, Son House) 9. Tedeschi Trucks Band / Keep Your Lamp Trimmed and Burning 10. Leadbelly / New Orleans11. Lonnie Donegan / Rock Island Line12. The Animals / House of the Rising Sun13. Mark Knopfler (Dire Straits) / Donegan's Gone 14. Bruce Springsteen / spoken15. Woody Guthrie / This Land is Your Land 6. The Carter Family / When the World's on Fire 17. Johnny Cash & June Carter Cash / Jackson18. Bob Dylan & Johnny Cash / North Country Girl 19. Memphis Jug Band / KC Moan20. Charlie Musselwhite / Blues Gave Me a Ride (Elvin Bishop [Paul Butterfield Blues Band], Ben Harper)21. Lovin' Spoonful / What a Day for a Daydream (Even Dozen Jug Band; Jonathan Sebastian, David Grisom (Grateful Dead), Steve Katz (Blood Sweat & Tears), 22. Maria Muldaur/ Midnight at the Oasis

    Rock N Roll Pantheon
    Vintage Rock Pod: *THIS DAY ROCKS* Robert Became Bob

    Rock N Roll Pantheon

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 6, 2022 5:50


    60 years ago today, Robert Zimmerman legally changed his name to Bob Dylan! And with me to talk about the significance of the name change, the reason behind the decision and what impact it had on Bob's career, is friend of the show, author and podcaster Stephen Arnoff! Check out Stephen's book and podcast called Bob Dylan: About Man & God & Law

    Arroe Collins
    Bob Dylan's Drive From 2016

    Arroe Collins

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 6, 2022 1:07


    Kimmer Show
    S1E462: Kimmer Show 462

    Kimmer Show

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 107:25


    Kimmer Show # 462, Fun times with TMX this morning, Battlebots are back, FBI and Christopher Wray a national disgrace, Bill Burr's WNBA rant Monkeypox nonsense, Listener feedback, Dear Abby letter, Bob Dylan appreciation, and the infamous bad texting theatreSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Armchair Historians
    Robert S. McElvaine, The Times They Were a-Changin,' 1964

    Armchair Historians

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 43:22


    In this episode, Anne Marie talks to professor of history and author Robert McElvaine about his latest book, The Times They Were a-Changin': 1964, the Year the Sixties Arrived and the Battle Lines of Today Were Drawn. 1964 is when the sixties truly arrived, from JFK's assassination in November 1963 It was then that the United States began a radical shift toward a much more inclusive definition of “American,” with a greater degree of equality and a government actively involved in social and economic improvement. It was a radical shift accompanied by a cultural revolution. The same month Bob Dylan released his iconic ballad “The Times They Are a-Changin',” in January 1964, President Lyndon Johnson announced his War on Poverty. McCelvaine uncovers 1964's moment of reckoning, when American identity began to be reimagined, tying those past battles to their legacy today. Throughout, he captures the changing consciousness of the period through its vibrant music, film, literature, and personalities.McCelvaine is the Elizabeth Chisholm Distinguished Professor of Arts & Letters and Professor of History at Millsaps College. He is the author of seven books, including The Great Depression: America, 1929–1941 and Eve's Seed: Biology, the Sexes, and the Course of History, and is the editor of three. Among his many honors are the Richard Wright Award for Literary Excellence and the B. L. C. Wailes Award for national distinction in the field of history. He has served as a historical consultant for several television programs, including the PBS series The Great Depression, and has written more than one hundred articles and opinion pieces in such national publications as the New York Times, Washington Post, Los Angeles Times, Wall Street Journal, the Nation, and Newsweek and has been a guest on about the same number of television and radio programs. He lives in Clinton, Mississippi.Author Website: http://robertsmcelvaine.com/Wikipedia: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_S._McElvaineSimon & Schuster author page: https://www.simonandschuster.com/authors/Robert-S-McElvaine/183511950Simon & Schuster book page: https://www.simonandschuster.com/books/The-Times-They-Were-a-Changin/Robert-S-McElvaine/9781950994106Amazon link: https://www.amazon.com/Times-They-Were-Changin-Sixties/dp/1950994104/Link Tree: https://linktr.ee/robertmcelvaineTwitter: https://twitter.com/robertmcelvaineFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/Bob.McElvaine/ Follow us on Social Media:Instagram: @armchairhistoriansTwitter: @ArmchairHistor1Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/armchairhistoriansSupport Armchair Historians:Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/armchairhistoriansKo-fi: https://ko-fi.com/belgiumrabbitproductionsSupport the show

    Whimsically Volatile
    185: Jack Hues (Wang Chung)!

    Whimsically Volatile

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 82:28


    The lead singer and co-architect of the wonderful Wang Chung joined me in London to discuss William Friedkin, the push-pull of art v. commerce, “Dance Hall Days”, creating the score to “To Live And Die In L.A.” before seeing a frame of the film, working with John Kalodner, Geffen Records, band dynamics, his solo works, Bob Dylan, the value of being challenged by art, “Primitif”, the spectrum of perfectionism, producing other artists, fiddling with Fairlights, collaborating with Tony Banks, band-name origins, Miles Davis, self-criticism, Jack's jazz combo, reconnecting with Wang Chung partner Nick Feldman, the impact of “Everybody Have Fun Tonight” and much more. Jack's site https://www.jackhues.com Catch Wang Chung on tour this August & September https://twitter.com/wangchung https://www.wangchung.com Get lots of hott bonus content by going to https://www.patreon.com/CraigAndFriends You'll get ad-free & early versions of these episodes, bonus episodes, Movie Club episodes and more while supporting the show. Donate to the Abortion Support Network https://www.asn.org.uk/fundraising/ Monkeypox Vaccine Info (UK) https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/monkeypox-vaccination-resources/monkeypox-waiting-for-your-vaccination Monkeypox Vaccine Info (USA) https://www.cdc.gov/poxvirus/monkeypox/considerations-for-monkeypox-vaccination.html Protect & Defend Trans Youth Fund https://www.pledge.to/protect-defend-trans-youth-fund#donate Donate to Amnesty International To Aid Ukraine https://tinyurl.com/448f36wu Rubber Child's Transition Assistance GoFundMe https://gofund.me/c2b3cd52 For ways to help fight the fascists and support Black Lives Matter & Black Trans Lives Matter: https://blacklivesmatters.carrd.co https://blacktranslivesmatter.carrd.co

    Strangelove of Movies
    An Honest Review of the Bob Dylan Center in Tulsa and our Thoughts on 'I'm Not There!' (Rewatch With Us)

    Strangelove of Movies

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 34:30


    Strangelove reviews the film, 'I'm Not There,' and discusses their recent visit to the Bob Dylan Center in Tulsa, Oklahoma. We could not recommend the museum enough! If you enjoy Bob Dylan's work, you have to visit this museum! Visit our Website Strangeloveofmovies.com and follow us on Instagram @Strangeloveofmedia --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

    Word In Your Ear
    In praise of Bernard Cribbins, Clive James and the noble art of guitar-smashing

    Word In Your Ear

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 42:54 Very Popular


    Our weekly stroll through the sunlit uplands of rock and roll visits the following topics …… Bob Dylan's worst lyrics… musicians in movies, actors who made albums (Judi Dench?) and the slight return of the Stackwaddy game… why Hole in The Ground is the greatest comedy record ever made, plus the staggering versatility of Bernard Cribbins… the contents of the basket at the beginning of Two-Way Stretch… the incomparable comic genius of Clive James… the achingly self-conscious Barack Obama summer reading and playlist. Kendrick Lamar? Bad Bunny & Bomba Estéreo? You sure?… the night at the Railway Tavern in 1964 that Pete Townshend accidently invented “auto-destruction”… and live consumption of fruity summer ale from the Ink Spot micropub in Newbiggin by the Sea (thanks to Simon and Ange).  ‘Hole In The Ground' by Bernard Cribbins …https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P-JVnlB7Onk The Ink Spot microbrewery …https://www.theinkspot49.co.uk/Grab your EXCLUSIVE NordVPN Deal by going to nordvpn.com/yourear to get up a Huge Discount off your NordVPN Plan + 1 additional month for free + a bonus gift! It's completely risk free with Nord's 30 day money-back guarantee!Subscribe to Word In Your Ear on Patreon and receive every future Word Podcast before the rest of the world - and with full visuals!: https://www.patreon.com/wordinyourear Get bonus content on Patreon See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Word Podcast
    In praise of Bernard Cribbins, Clive James and the noble art of guitar-smashing

    Word Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 42:54


    Our weekly stroll through the sunlit uplands of rock and roll visits the following topics …… Bob Dylan's worst lyrics… musicians in movies, actors who made albums (Judi Dench?) and the slight return of the Stackwaddy game… why Hole in The Ground is the greatest comedy record ever made, plus the staggering versatility of Bernard Cribbins… the contents of the basket at the beginning of Two-Way Stretch… the incomparable comic genius of Clive James… the achingly self-conscious Barack Obama summer reading and playlist. Kendrick Lamar? Bad Bunny & Bomba Estéreo? You sure?… the night at the Railway Tavern in 1964 that Pete Townshend accidently invented “auto-destruction”… and live consumption of fruity summer ale from the Ink Spot micropub in Newbiggin by the Sea (thanks to Simon and Ange).  ‘Hole In The Ground' by Bernard Cribbins …https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P-JVnlB7Onk The Ink Spot microbrewery …https://www.theinkspot49.co.uk/Grab your EXCLUSIVE NordVPN Deal by going to nordvpn.com/yourear to get up a Huge Discount off your NordVPN Plan + 1 additional month for free + a bonus gift! It's completely risk free with Nord's 30 day money-back guarantee!Subscribe to Word In Your Ear on Patreon and receive every future Word Podcast before the rest of the world - and with full visuals!: https://www.patreon.com/wordinyourear Get bonus content on Patreon See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    The Unfiltered Gentlemen
    Batch315: Healthy Beer for Old People!

    The Unfiltered Gentlemen

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 40:44


    Aloha, land lovers! This week, the salty crew is talking about vacation beers, beer styles that should make you angry, weird drinking laws for teachers, and why alcohol is good for you!Erica is researching Crooked Lane Brewing & East Brother Beer's collaboration Schwarzbier. Greg is sipping on MadeWest Brewing & Pizza Port Brewing Short Lived West Coast IPA.Greg is angry about breweries and their naming, like really angry. Also, he kegged his latest homebrew and can't wait to share it with everyone. Erica packs up and heads to Hawaii to drink her way across the islands and meets up with some influencers. And it turns out that Greg can't get seasick, how about you? Flex and Greg discuss how awful Bob Dylan is (there's a natural transition, we promise).Alabama gets very specific with its Ludicrous Libation Law.Russian River brings a lot of money to the community with the help of Pliny the Younger. A new study says alcohol is good if you're over 40. A drunk driver blames COVID for his insane ride home and losing his tires. A drunk Massachusetts man barks at dogs and kisses a child; very Boston of him. And fun facts about Dildo Brewing and Dildo, Canada. Erica: www.instagram.com/neck_nosh_llc Flexy: www.instagram.com/flex_me_a_beer Craft Beer Republic: www.CraftBeerRepublic.com www.instagram.com/CraftBeerRepublic www.facebook.com/CraftBeerRepublicPod www.twitter.com/CraftBeerRepub (805) 538-2337 Use promo code UNFILTERED on Tavour.

    Zig at the gig podcasts

    Ben Vaughn On Zig At The Gig Ben Vaughn grew up in the Philadelphia area on the New Jersey side of the river. At age 6, his uncle gave him a Duane Eddy record and forever changed his life. In 1983, he formed the Ben Vaughn Combo. The band was together five years, releasing two albums and touring the U.S. several times. They received rave reviews in Rolling Stone and People magazine and video airplay on MTV. The attention inspired Marshall Crenshaw to record Ben's "I'm Sorry (But So Is Brenda Lee)" for his "Downtown" album. Ben embarked on a solo career in 1988, recording several critically acclaimed albums, touring extensively in Europe and the U.S. and receiving more MTV exposure. During that period he produced three records for the Elektra Records American Explorer series (Memphis rockabilly legend Charlie Feathers, Muscle Shoals country soul singer Arthur Alexander) and recorded "Cubist Blues," a collaboration with Alan Vega and Alex Chilton. He also scored two films ("Favorite Mopar" and "Wild Girl's Go-Go Rama"), as well as appearing as a frequent guest commentator on nationally syndicated radio shows “Fresh Air” and "World Cafe." In 1995, Ben moved to L.A. and released "Instrumental Stylings," an album of instrumentals in a variety of styles. A guest appearance on KCRW's "Morning Becomes Eclectic" led directly to being hired as the composer for the hit TV sitcom "3rd Rock From The Sun." "That 70s Show" soon followed, and for the next ten years Ben would provide award-winning music for a dozen other TV shows and pilots ("Men Behaving Badly," "Normal, Ohio," "Grounded For Life"). He also provided scores for several films ("Psycho Beach Party," "The Independent," "Scorpion Spring") and continued producing records (Ween, Los Straitjackets, Mark Olson of the Jayhawks, Nancy Sinatra, and the "Swingers" soundtrack CD). Somehow Ben found time to create the legendary "Rambler '65." Recorded entirely in his car, this much-publicized album (and subsequent short film) is still considered by many to be a classic document of a man and his dream. Since then, Ben has released “Designs In Music," “Vaughn Sings Vaughn Vols. 1-3,” “Texas Road Trip” (recorded in Austin, Texas with Doug Sahm's band) , "Five By Five" and "Piece de Resistance" by the Ben Vaughn Quintet and the solo acoustic album, “Imitation Wood Grain And Other Folk Songs.” Add to that an Italian dance hit (a DJ re-mix of “Hey Romeo”), airplay of “Jerry Lewis in France” on Bob Dylan's radio show (complete with Dylan's recitation of Ben's resume), and two recent tours in France and you're looking at what continues to be a very interesting career. Occasionally, Ben takes a break from his syndicated radio show (“The Many Moods of Ben Vaughn”) to perform live in the US and Europe. The dates are randomly planned so catch him while you can! Ben's Info http://benvaughn.org www.facebook.com/benvaughnmusic www.instagram.com/benvaughnmusic  

    Tulsa Talks: A TulsaPeople Podcast
    Inside the Bob Dylan Center with Steven Jenkins, museum director

    Tulsa Talks: A TulsaPeople Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 55:55


    Welcome to Tulsa Talks presented by Tulsa Regional Chamber. On this episode we take the podcast on the road to the new Bob Dylan Center, 116 E. Reconciliation Way. See images from the grand opening event. Museum Director Steven Jenkins takes listeners on a tour of the two-story museum located in the Tulsa Arts District next door to the Woody Guthrie Center. He discusses the creation of the museum and shares insight into each of the exhibits that share the story of Bob Dylan and his career, to date. Following the tour hear the  song "Love Revolution" from Tom Skinner's Science Project, which released their album "First Set" on Horton Records on July 15. 

    Alben für die Ewigkeit
    Bob Dylan: The Freewheelin' Bob Dylan

    Alben für die Ewigkeit

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 26:54


    Innerhalb nur eines Jahres wird aus einem unbedeutenden Folkmusiker, der Traditionals nachspielt, ein genialer Songschreiber. The Freewheelin' Bob Dylan ist das erste wirklich wichtige Werk des vielleicht wichtigsten Musikers unserer Zeit. Aber warum eigentlich?

    Vintage Rock Pod - Classic Rock Interviews
    *THIS DAY ROCKS* Robert Became Bob

    Vintage Rock Pod - Classic Rock Interviews

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022 5:50


    60 years ago today, Robert Zimmerman legally changed his name to Bob Dylan! And with me to talk about the significance of the name change, the reason behind the decision and what impact it had on Bob's career, is friend of the show, author and podcaster Stephen Arnoff! Check out Stephen's book and podcast called Bob Dylan: About Man & God & Law

    The Imbalanced History of Rock and Roll
    The Man: Bob Dylan

    The Imbalanced History of Rock and Roll

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022 53:48 Very Popular


    For their first episode of the podcast about Bob Dylan, the Imbalanced Boys spent the last year plus trying to find their way into such a massive topic in the history of music, and rock & roll. After a few false starts, it's "The Man: Bob Dylan," in your app right now! Not the most creative title, but when it boils down to it, he is THE MAN!Future looks at Bob will dig deeper into certain periods of his music, his art, his books...you get the picture.Please check out our sponsors:Boldfoot Socks   https://boldfoot.comCrooked Eye Brewery   https://crookedeyebrewery.com/Don't forget that you can find all of our episodes, on-demand, for free right here on our web site: https://imbalancedhistory.com/And check our blog about exciting premier events for Danny Garcia's new film, "Nightclubbing!" 

    The Smartest Man in the World

    In the the newest missive from the Fortress of Proopitude, Greg and Jennifer banter on Buck O'Neil, Bo Hopkins and Bob Dylan.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Rock N Roll Pantheon
    Imbalanced History: The Man: Bob Dylan

    Rock N Roll Pantheon

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022 53:48


    For their first episode of the podcast about Bob Dylan, the Imbalanced Boys spent the last year plus trying to find their way into such a massive topic in the history of music, and rock & roll. After a few false starts, it's "The Man: Bob Dylan," in your app right now! Not the most creative title, but when it boils down to it, he is THE MAN!Future looks at Bob will dig deeper into certain periods of his music, his art, his books...you get the picture.Please check out our sponsors:Boldfoot Socks   https://boldfoot.comCrooked Eye Brewery   https://crookedeyebrewery.com/Don't forget that you can find all of our episodes, on-demand, for free right here on our web site: https://imbalancedhistory.com/And check our blog about exciting premier events for Danny Garcia's new film, "Nightclubbing!" 

    Scratch a Track: Presented by The Dude and Grimm Show
    What band has the best three album run???

    Scratch a Track: Presented by The Dude and Grimm Show

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022 23:50


    Today we list the best three album runs from our favorite bands. Who had the best 3 album run? Do you agree with our picks, or do you think we picked the wrong three? Let us know in the comments. 0:00 - How do you choose 3? 2:09 - Radiohead 5:44 - Led Zeppelin 6:59 - Rolling Stones 10:10 - Bob Dylan 11:46 - Pink Floyd 14:58 - The Beatles 19:00 - Honorable Mentions #musicreaction #musicreview #albumreview

    A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs

    While I'm still on hiatus, I invited questions from listeners. This is an hour-long podcast answering some of them. (Another hour-long Q&A for Patreon backers only will go up next week). Tilt Araiza has assisted invaluably by doing a first-pass edit, and will hopefully be doing so from now on. Check out Tilt's irregular podcasts at http://www.podnose.com/jaffa-cakes-for-proust and http://sitcomclub.com/ There is a Mixcloud of the music excerpted here which can be found at https://www.mixcloud.com/AndrewHickey/500-songs-supplemental-qa-edition/ Click below for a transcript: Hello and welcome to the Q&A  episode I'm doing while I'm working on creating a backlog. I'm making good progress on that, and still hoping and expecting to have episode 151 up some time in early August, though I don't have an exact date yet. I was quite surprised by the response to my request for questions, both at the amount of it and at where it came from. I initially expected to get a fair few comments on the main podcast, and a handful on the Patreon, and then I could do a reasonable-length Q&A podcast from the former and a shorter one from the latter. Instead, I only got a couple of questions on the main episode, but so many on the Patreon that I had to stop people asking only a day or so after posting the request for questions. So instead of doing one reasonable length podcast and one shorter one, I'm actually doing two longer ones. What I'm going to do is do all the questions asked publicly, plus all the questions that have been asked multiple times, in this one, then next week I'm going to put up the more niche questions just for Patreon backers. However, I'm not going to answer *all* of the questions. I got so many questions so quickly that there's not space to answer them all, and several of them were along the lines of "is artist X going to get an episode?" which is a question I generally don't answer -- though I will answer a couple of those if there's something interesting to say about them. But also, there are some I've not answered for another reason. As you may have noticed, I have a somewhat odd worldview, and look at the world from a different angle from most people sometimes. Now there were several questions where someone asked something that seems like a perfectly reasonable question, but contains a whole lot of hidden assumptions that that person hadn't even considered -- about music history, or about the process of writing and researching, or something else. Now, to answer that kind of question at all often means unpacking those hidden assumptions, which can sometimes make for an interesting answer -- after all, a lot of the podcast so far has been me telling people that what they thought they knew about music history was wrong -- but when it's a question being asked by an individual and you answer that way, it can sometimes, frankly, make you look like a horribly unpleasant person, or even a bully. "Don't you even know the most basic things about historical research? I do! You fool! Hey everyone else listening, this person thinks you do research in *this* way, but everyone knows you do it *that* way!" Now, that is never how I would intend such answers to come across -- nobody can be blamed for not knowing what they don't know -- but there are some questions where no matter how I phrased the answer, it came across sounding like that. I'll try to hold those over for future Q&A episodes if I can think of ways of unpicking the answers in such a way that I'm not being unconscionably rude to people who were asking perfectly reasonable questions. Some of the answers that follow might still sound a bit like that to be honest, but if you asked a question and my answer sounds like that to you, please know that it wasn't meant to. There's a lot to get through, so let's begin: Steve from Canada asks: “Which influential artist or group has been the most challenging to get information on in the last 50 podcasts? We know there has been a lot written about the Beatles, Beach Boys, Motown as an entity, the Monkees and the Rolling Stones, but you mentioned in a tweet that there's very little about some bands like the Turtles, who are an interesting story. I had never heard of Dino Valenti before this broadcast – but he appeared a lot in the last batch – so it got me curious. [Excerpt: The Move, “Useless Information”] In the last fifty episodes there's not been a single one that's made it to the podcast where it was at all difficult to get information. The problem with many of them is that there's *too much* information out there, rather than there not being enough. No matter how many books one reads on the Beatles, one can never read more than a fraction of them, and there's huge amounts of writing on the Rolling Stones, on Hendrix, on the Doors, on the Byrds... and when you're writing about those people, you *know* that you're going to miss out something or get something wrong, because there's one more book out there you haven't read which proves that one of the stories you're telling is false. This is one of the reasons the episodes have got so much longer, and taken so much more time. That wasn't the case in the first hundred episodes -- there were a lot of artists I covered there, like Gene and Eunice, or the Chords, or Jesse Belvin, or Vince Taylor who there's very little information about. And there are some coming up who there's far less information about than people in the last fifty episodes. But every episode since the Beatles has had a surfeit of information. There is one exception -- I wanted to do a full episode on "Rescue Me" by Fontella Bass, because it would be an interesting lens through which to look at how Chess coped with the change in Black musical styles in the sixties. But there was so little information available about her I ended up relegating it to a Patreon bonus episode, because she makes those earlier artists look well-documented. Which leads nicely into the next question. Nora Tillman asks "Forgive this question if you've answered it before: is there literally a list somewhere with 500 songs you've chosen? Has the list changed since you first composed it? Also, when did you first conceive of this list?" [Excerpt: John Reed and the D'Oyly Carte Opera Company, "As Someday it May Happen"] Many people have asked this question, or variations upon it. The answer is yes and no. I made a list when I started that had roughly two hundred songs I knew needed to be on there, plus about the same number again of artists who needed to be covered but whose precise songs I hadn't decided on. To make the initial list I pulled a list out of my own head, and then I also checked a couple of other five-hundred-song lists -- the ones put out by Rolling Stone magazine and the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame -- not because I wanted to use their lists; I have very little time for rock critical orthodoxy, as most of my listeners will likely have realised by now, but because I wanted to double-check that I hadn't missed anything obvious out, and that if I was missing something off their lists, I knew *why* I was missing it. To take a ludicrous example, I wouldn't want to get to the end of the 1960s and have someone say "Wait a minute, what about the Beatles?" and think "I *knew* I'd forgotten something!" Then, at the start of each fifty-episode season, I put together a more rigorous list of the fifty songs coming up, in order. Those lists *can* still change with the research -- for example, very early on in the research for the podcast, I discovered that even though I was completely unfamiliar with "Ko Ko Mo" by Gene and Eunice, it was a hugely important and influential record at the time, and so I swapped that in for another song. Or more recently, I initially intended to have the Doors only have one episode, but when I realised how much I was having to include in that episode I decided to give them a second one. And sometimes things happen the other way -- I planned to do full episodes on Jackie Shane and Fontella Bass, but for both of them I couldn't find enough information to get a decent episode done, so they ended up being moved to Patreon episodes. But generally speaking that fifty-song list for a year's episodes is going to remain largely unchanged. I know where I'm going, I know what most of the major beats of the story are, but I'm giving myself enough flexibility to deviate if I find something I need to include. Connected with this, Rob Johnson asks how I can be confident I'll get back to some stories in later episodes. Well, like I say, I have a pretty much absolute idea of what I'm going to do in the next year, and there are a lot of individual episodes where I know the structure of the episode long before we get to it. As an example here... I don't want to give too much away, and I'm generally not going to be answering questions about "will artist X be appearing?", but Rob also asked about one artist. I can tell you that that artist is one who will not be getting a full episode -- and I already said in the Patreon episode about that artist that they won't -- but as I also said in that episode they *will* get a significant amount of time in another episode, which I now know is going to be 180, which will also deal with another artist from the same state with the same forename, even though it's actually about two English bands. I've had the structure of that episode planned out since literally before I started writing episode one. On the other hand, episode 190 is a song that wasn't originally going to be included at all. I was going to do a 1967 song by the same artist, but then found out that a fact I'd been going to use was disputed, which meant that track didn't need to be covered, but the artist still did, to finish off a story I'd started in a previous episode. Patrick asks:"I am currently in the middle of reading 1971: Never a Dull Moment by David Hepworth and I'm aware that Apple TV have produced a documentary on how music changed that year as well and I was wondering what your opinion on that subject matter? I imagine you will be going into some detail on future podcasts, but until recently I never knew people considered 1971 as a year that brought about those changes." [Excerpt: Rod Stewart, "Angel"] I've not yet read Hepworth's book, but that it's named after an album which came out in 1972 (which is the album that track we just heard came from) says something about how the idea that any one year can in itself be a turning point for music is a little overstated -- and the Apple documentary is based on Hepworth's book, so it's not really multiple people making that argument. Now, as it happens, 1971 is one of the break points for the podcast -- episodes 200 and 201 are both records from July 1971, and both records that one could argue were in their own way signifiers of turning points in rock music history. And as with 1967 it's going to have more than its fair share of records, as it bridges the gap of two seasons. But I think one could make similar arguments for many, many years, and 1971 is  not one of the most compelling cases. I can't say more before I read Hepworth's book, which won't be for a few months yet. I'm instinctively dubious of these "this year was the big year that changed everything" narratives, but Hepworth's a knowledgeable enough writer that I wouldn't want to dismiss his thesis without even reading the book. Roger Pannell asks I'm a fairly recent joiner-in too so you may have answered this before. What is the theme tune to the podcast please. [Excerpt: The Boswell Sisters, “Rock and Roll”] The theme song to the podcast is "Rock and Roll" by the Boswell Sisters. The version I use is not actually the version that was released as a single, but a very similar performance that was used in the film Transatlantic Merry-Go-Round in 1931. I chose it in part because it may well be the first ever record to contain the phrase "rock and roll" (though as I've said many times there's no first anything, and there are certainly many records which talk about rocking and/or rolling -- just none I know of with that phrase) so it evokes rock and roll history, partly because the recording is out of copyright, and partly just because I like the Boswell Sisters. Several people asked questions along the lines of this one from Christopher Burnett "Just curious if there's any future episodes planned on any non-UK or non-North American songs? The bonus episodes on the Mops and Kyu Sakamoto were fascinating." [Excerpt: Kyu Sakamoto, "Sukiyaki"] Sadly, there won't be as many episodes on musicians from outside the UK and North America as I'd like. The focus of the podcast is going to be firmly on British, American, Irish, and Canadian musicians, with a handful from other Anglophone countries like Australia and Jamaica. There *are* going to be a small number of episodes on non-Anglophone musicians, but very few. Sadly, any work of history which engages with injustices still replicates some of those injustices, and one of the big injustices in rock history is that most rock musicians have been very insular, and there has been very little influence from outside the Anglophone world, which means that I can't talk much about influential records made by musicians from elsewhere.  Also, in a lot of cases most of the writing about them is in other languages, and I'm shamefully monolingual (I have enough schoolboy French not to embarrass myself, but not enough to read a biography without a dictionary to hand, and that's it). There *will* be quite a few bonus episodes on musicians from non-Anglophone countries though, because this *is* something that I'm very aware of as a flaw, and if I can find ways of bringing the wider story into the podcast I will definitely do so, even if it means changing my plans somewhat, but I'm afraid they'll largely be confined to Patreon bonuses rather than mainline episodes. Ed Cunard asks "Is there a particular set of songs you're not looking forward to because you don't care for them, but intend to dive into due to their importance?" [Excerpt: Jackie Shane, "Don't Play That Song"] There are several, and there already have been some, but I'm not going to say what they are as part of anything to do with the podcast (sometimes I might talk about how much I hate a particular record on my personal Twitter account or something, but I try not to on the podcast's account, and I'm certainly not going to in an episode of the podcast itself). One of the things I try to do with the podcast is to put the case forward as to why records were important, why people liked them at the time, what they got out of them. I can't do that if I make it about my own personal tastes. I know for a fact that there are people who have come away from episodes on records I utterly despise saying "Wow! I never liked that record before, but I do now!" and that to me shows that I have succeeded -- I've widened people's appreciation for music they couldn't appreciate before. Of course, it's impossible to keep my own tastes from showing through totally, but even there people tend to notice much more my like or dislike for certain people rather than for their music, and I don't feel anything like as bad for showing that. So I have a policy generally of just never saying which records in the list I actually like and which I hate. You'll often be able to tell from things I talk about elsewhere, but I don't want anyone to listen to an episode and be prejudiced not only against the artist but against the episode  by knowing going in that I dislike them, and I also don't want anyone to feel like their favourite band is being given short shrift. There are several records coming up that I dislike myself but where I know people are excited about hearing the episode, and the last thing I want to do is have those people who are currently excited go in disappointed before they even hear it. Matt Murch asks: "Do you anticipate tackling the shift in rock toward harder, more seriously conceptual moves in 1969 into 1970, with acts like Led Zeppelin, The Who (again), Bowie, etc. or lighter soul/pop artists such as Donna Summer, Carly Simon or the Carpenters? Also, without giving too much away, is there anything surprising you've found in your research that you're excited to cover? [Excerpt: Robert Plant, "If I Were a Carpenter"] OK, for the first question... I don't want to say exactly who will and won't be covered in future episodes, because when I say "yes, X will be covered" or "no, Y will not be covered", it invites a lot of follow-up discussion along the lines of "why is X in there and not Y?" and I end up having to explain my working, when the episodes themselves are basically me explaining my working. What I will say is this... the attitude I'm taking towards who gets included and who gets excluded is, at least in part, influenced by an idea in cognitive linguistics called prototype theory. According to this theory, categories aren't strictly bounded like in Aristotelian thought -- things don't have strict essences that mean they definitely are or aren't members of categories. But rather, categories have fuzzy boundaries, and there are things at the centre that are the most typical examples of the category, and things at the border that are less typical. For example, a robin is a very "birdy" bird -- it's very near the centre of the category of bird, it has a lot of birdness -- while an ostrich is still a bird, but much less birdy, it's sort of in the fuzzy boundary area. When you ask people to name a bird, they're more likely to name a robin than an ostrich, and if you ask them “is an ostrich a bird?” they take longer to answer than they do when asked about robins. In the same way, a sofa is nearer the centre of the category of "furniture" than a wardrobe is. Now, I am using an exceptionally wide definition of what counts as rock music, but at the same time, in order for it to be a history of rock music, I do have to spend more time in the centre of the concept than around the periphery. My definition would encompass all the artists you name, but I'm pretty sure that everyone would agree that the first three artists you name are much closer to the centre of the concept of "rock music" than the last three. That's not to say anyone on either list is definitely getting covered or is definitely *not* getting covered -- while I have to spend more time in the centre than the periphery, I do have to spend some time on the periphery, and my hope is to cover as many subgenres and styles as I can -- but that should give an idea of how I'm approaching this. As for the second question -- there's relatively little that's surprising that I've uncovered in my research so far, but that's to be expected. The period from about 1965 through about 1975 is the most over-covered period of rock music history, and so the basic facts for almost every act are very, very well known to people with even a casual interest. For the stuff I'm doing in the next year or so, like the songs I've covered for the last year, it's unlikely that anything exciting will come up until very late in the research process, the times when I'm pulling everything together and notice one little detail that's out of place and pull on that thread and find the whole story unravelling. Which may well mean, of course, that there *are* no such surprising things. That's always a possibility in periods where we're looking at things that have been dealt with a million times before, and this next year may largely be me telling stories that have already been told. Which is still of value, because I'm putting them into a larger context of the already-released episodes, but we'll see if anything truly surprising happens. I certainly hope it does. James Kosmicki asks "Google Podcasts doesn't seem to have any of the first 100 episodes - are they listed under a different name perhaps?" [Excerpt: REM, "Disappear"] I get a number of questions like this, about various podcast apps and sites, and I'm afraid my answer is always the same -- there's nothing I can do about this, and it's something you'd have to take up with the site in question. Google Podcasts picks up episodes from the RSS feed I provide, the same as every other site or app. It's using the right feed, that feed has every episode in it, and other sites and apps are working OK with it. In general, I suggest that rather than streaming sites like Google Podcasts or Stitcher or Spotify, where the site acts as a middleman and they serve the podcast to you from their servers, people should use a dedicated podcast app like RadioPublic or Pocketcasts or gPodder, where rather than going from a library of podcast episodes that some third party has stored, you're downloading the files direct from the original server, but I understand that sometimes those apps are more difficult to use, especially for less tech-savvy people. But generally, if an episode is in some way faulty or missing on the 500songs.com webpage, that's something I can do something about. If it's showing up wrong on Spotify or Google Podcasts or Stitcher or whatever, that's a problem at their end. Sorry. Darren Johnson asks "were there any songs that surprised you? Which one made the biggest change between what you thought you knew and what you learned researching it?" [Excerpt: The Turtles, "Goodbye Surprise"] Well, there have been a few, in different ways. The most surprising thing for me actually was in the most recent episode when I discovered the true story behind the "bigger than Jesus" controversy during my reading. That was a story I'd known one way for my entire life -- literally I think I first read about that story when I was six or seven -- and it turned out that not one thing I'd read on the subject had explained what had really happened. But then there are other things like the story of "Ko Ko Mo", which was a record I wasn't even planning on covering at first, but which turned out to be one of the most important records of the fifties. But I actually get surprised relatively little by big-picture things. I'll often discover fun details or new connections between things I hadn't noticed before, but the basic outlines of the story never change that much -- I've been reading about music history literally since I learned how to read, and while I do a deep dive for each episode, it's very rare that I discover anything that totally changes my perspective. There is always a process of reevaluation going on, and a change in the emphases in my thought, so for example when I started the project I knew Johnny Otis would come up a fair bit in the early years, and knew he was a major figure, but was still not giving him the full credit he deserved in my head. The same goes for Jesse Belvin, and as far as background figures go Lester Sill and Milt Gabler. But all of these were people I already knew were important, i just hadn't connected all the dots in my head. I've also come to appreciate some musicians more than I did previously. But there are very few really major surprises, which is probably to be expected -- I got into this already knowing a *LOT*, because otherwise I wouldn't have thought this was a project I could take on. Tracey Germa -- and I'm sorry, I don't know if that's pronounced with a hard or soft G, so my apologies if I mispronounced it -- asks: "Hi Andrew. We love everything about the podcast, but are especially impressed with the way you couch your trigger warnings and how you embed social commentary into your analysis of the music. You have such a kind approach to understanding human experiences and at the same time you don't balk at saying the hard things some folks don't want to hear about their music heroes. So, the question is - where does your social justice/equity/inclusion/suffer no fools side come from? Your family? Your own experiences? School/training?” [Excerpt: Elvis Costello and the Attractions, "Little Triggers"] Well, firstly, I have to say that people do say  this kind of thing to me quite a lot, and I'm grateful when they say it, but I never really feel comfortable with it, because frankly I think I do very close to the absolute minimum, and I get by because of the horribly low expectations our society has for allocishet white men, which means that making even the tiniest effort possible to be a decent human being looks far more impressive by comparison than it actually is. I genuinely think I don't do a very good job of this at all, although I do try, and that's not false modesty there. But to accept the premise of the question for a moment, there are a couple of answers. My parents are both fairly progressive both politically and culturally,  for the time and place where they raised me. They both had strong political convictions, and while they didn't have access to much culture other than what was on TV or in charting records or what have you -- there was no bookshop or record shop in our town, and obviously no Internet back then -- they liked the stuff out of that mix that was forward-thinking, and so was anti-racist, accepting of queerness, and so on. From a very early age, I was listening to things like "Glad to be Gay" by the Tom Robinson Band. So from before I really even understood what those concepts were, I knew that the people I admired thought that homophobia and racism were bad things. I was also bullied a lot at school, because I was autistic and fat and wore glasses and a bunch of other reasons. So I hated bullying and never wanted to be a bully. I get very, very, *very* angry at cruelty and at abuses of power -- as almost all autistic people do, actually. And then, in my twenties and thirties, for a variety of reasons I ended up having a social circle that was predominantly queer and/or disabled and/or people with mental health difficulties. And when you're around people like that, and you don't want to be a bully, you learn to at least try to take their feelings into consideration, though I slipped up a great deal for a long time, and still don't get everything right. So that's the "social justice" side of things. The other side, the "understanding human experiences" side... well, everyone has done awful things at times, and I would hope that none of us would be judged by our worst behaviours. "Use every man to his desert and who should 'scape whipping?" and all that. But that doesn't mean those worst behaviours aren't bad, and that they don't hurt people, and denying that only compounds the injustice. People are complicated, societies are complicated, and everyone is capable of great good and great evil. In general I tend to avoid a lot of the worst things the musicians I talk about did, because the podcast *is* about the music, but when their behaviour affects the music, or when I would otherwise be in danger of giving a truly inaccurate picture of someone, I have to talk about those things. You can't talk about Jerry Lee Lewis without talking about how his third marriage derailed his career, you can't talk about Sam Cooke without talking about his death, and to treat those subjects honestly you have to talk about the reprehensible sides of their character. Of course, in the case of someone like Lewis, there seems to be little *but* a reprehensible side, while someone like Cooke could be a horrible, horrible person, but even the people he hurt the most also loved him dearly because of his admirable qualities. You *have* to cover both aspects of someone like him if you want to be honest, and if you're not going to be honest why bother trying to do history at all? Lester Dragstedt says (and I apologise if I mispronounced that): "I absolutely love this podcast and the perspective you bring. My only niggle is that the sound samples are mixed so low. When listening to your commentary about a song at voice level my fingers are always at the volume knob to turn up when the song comes in." [Excerpt: Bjork, "It's Oh So Quiet"] This is something that gets raised a lot, but it's not something that's ever going to change. When I started the podcast, I had the music levels higher, and got complaints about that, so I started mixing them lower. I then got complaints about *that*, so I did a poll of my Patreon backers to see what they thought, and by about a sixty-forty margin they wanted the levels to be lower, as they are now, rather than higher as they were earlier. Basically, there seem to be two groups of listeners. One group mostly listens with headphones, and doesn't like it when the music gets louder, because it hurts their ears. The other group mostly listens in their cars, and the music gets lost in the engine noise. That's a gross oversimplification, and there are headphone listeners who want the music louder and car listeners who want the music quieter, but the listenership does seem to split roughly that way, and there are slightly more headphone listeners. Now, it's literally *impossible* for me to please everyone, so I've given up trying with this, and it's *not* going to change. Partly because the majority of my backers voted one way, partly because it's just easier to leave things the way they are rather than mess with them given that no matter what I do someone will be unhappy, and partly because both Tilt when he edits the podcast and I when I listen back and tweak his edit are using headphones, and *we* don't want to hurt our ears either. Eric Peterson asks "if we are basically in 1967 that is when we start seeing Country artists like Johnny Cash and Waylon Jennings - the Man who Survived the Day the Music Died - start to bring more rock songs into their recordings and start to set the ground work in many ways for Country Rock ... how do you envision bringing the role they play in the History of Rock and Roll into the podcast?" [Excerpt: The Del McCoury Band, "Nashville Cats"] I will of course be dealing with country rock as one of the subgenres I discuss -- though there's only one real country-rock track coming up in the next fifty, but there'll be more as I get into the seventies, and there are several artists coming up with at least some country influence. But I won't be looking at straight country musicians like Jennings or Cash except through the lens of rock musicians they inspired -- things like me talking about Johnny Cash briefly in the intro to the "Hey Joe" episode. I think Cocaine and Rhinestones is already doing a better job of covering country music than I ever could, and so those people will only touch the story tangentially. Nili Marcia says: "If one asks a person what's in that room it would not occur to one in 100 to mention the air that fills it. Something so ubiquitous as riff--I don't know what a riff actually is! Will you please define riff, preferably with examples." Now this is something I actually thought I'd explained way back in episode one, and I have a distinct memory of doing so, but I must have cut that part out -- maybe I recorded it so badly that part couldn't be salvaged, which happened sometimes in the early days -- because I just checked and there's no explanation there. I would have come back to this at some point if I hadn't been thinking all along that I'd covered it right at the start, because you're right, it is a term that needs definition. A riff is, simply, a repeated, prominent, instrumental figure. The term started out in jazz, and there it was a term for a phrase that would be passed back and forth between different instruments -- a trumpet might play a phrase, then a saxophone copy it, then back to the trumpet, then back to the saxophone. But quickly it became a term for a repeated figure that becomes the main accompaniment part of a song, over which an instrumentalist might solo or a singer might sing, but which you remember in its own right. A few examples of well-known riffs might include "Smoke on the Water" by Deep Purple: [Excerpt: Deep Purple, "Smoke on the Water"] "I Feel Fine" by the Beatles: [Excerpt: The Beatles, "I Feel Fine"] "Last Train to Clarksville" by the Monkees: [Excerpt: The Monkees, "Last Train to Clarksville"] The bass part in “Under Pressure” by Queen and David Bowie: [Excerpt: Queen and David Bowie, “Under Pressure”] Or the Kingsmen's version of "Louie Louie": [Excerpt: The Kingsmen, "Louie Louie"] Basically, if you can think of a very short, prominent, instrumental idea that gets repeated over and over, that's a riff. Erik Pedersen says "I love the long episodes and I suspect you do too -- thoroughness. of this kind is something few get the opportunity to do -- but have you ever, after having written a long one, decided to cut them significantly? Are there audio outtakes you might string together one day?" [Excerpt: Bing Crosby and Les Paul, "It's Been a Long, Long Time"] I do like *having* done the long episodes, and sometimes I enjoy doing them, but other times I find it frustrating that an episode takes so long, because there are other stories I want to move on to. I'm trying for more of a balance over the next year, and we'll see how that works out. I want to tell the story in the depth it deserves, and the longer episodes allow me to do that, and to experiment with narrative styles and so on, but I also want to get the podcast finished before I die of old age. Almost every episode has stuff that gets cut, but it's usually in the writing or recording stage -- I'll realise a bit of the episode is boring and just skip it while I'm recording, or I'll cut out an anecdote or something because it looks like it's going to be a flabby episode and I want to tighten it up, or sometimes I'll realise that because of my mild speech impediments a sentence is literally unspeakable, and I'll rework it. It's very, very rare that I'll cut anything once it's been recorded, and if I do it's generally because when I listen back after it's been edited I'll realise I'm repeating myself or I made a mistake and need to cut a sentence because I said the wrong name, that sort of thing. I delete all the audio outtakes, but even if I didn't there would be nothing worth releasing. A few odd, out of context sentences, the occasional paragraph just repeating something I'd already said, a handful of actual incorrect facts, and a lot of me burping, or trying to say a difficult name three times in a row, or swearing when the phone rings in the middle of a long section. Lucy Hewitt says "Something that interests me, and that I'm sure you will cover is how listeners consume music and if that has an impact. In my lifetime we've moved from a record player which is fixed in one room to having a music collection with you wherever you go, and from hoping that the song you want to hear might be played on the radio to calling it up whenever you want. Add in the rise of music videos, and MTV, and the way in which people access music has changed a lot over the decades. But has that affected the music itself?" [Excerpt: Bow Wow Wow "C30 C60 C90 Go!"] It absolutely has affected the music itself in all sorts of ways, some of which I've touched on already and some of which I will deal with as we go through the story, though the story I'm telling will end around the time of Napster and so won't involve streaming services and so forth. But every technology change leads to a change in the sound of music in both obvious and non-obvious ways. When AM radio was the most dominant form of broadcasting, there was no point releasing singles in stereo, because at that time there were no stereo AM stations. The records also had to be very compressed, so the sound would cut through the noise and interference. Those records would often be very bass-heavy and have a very full, packed, sound. In the seventies, with the rise of eight-track players, you'd often end up with soft-rock and what would later get termed yacht rock having huge success. That music, which is very ethereal and full of high frequencies, is affected less negatively by some of the problems that came with eight-track players, like the tape stretching slightly. Then post-1974 and the OPEC oil crisis, vinyl became more expensive, which meant that records started being made much thinner, which meant you couldn't cut grooves as deeply, which meant you lost bass response, which again changed the sound of records – and also explains why when CDs came out, people started thinking they sounded better than records, because they *did* sound better than the stuff that was being pressed in the late seventies and early eighties, which was so thin it was almost transparent, even though they sounded nowhere near as good as the heavy vinyl pressings of the fifties and sixties. And then the amount of music one could pack into a CD encouraged longer tracks... A lot of eighties Hi-NRG and dance-pop music, like the records made by Stock, Aitken, and Waterman, has almost no bass but lots of skittering high-end percussion sounds -- tons of synthesised sleighbells and hi-hats and so on -- because a lot of disco equipment had frequency-activated lights, and the more high-end stuff was going on, the more the disco lights flashed... We'll look at a lot of these changes as we go along, but every single new format, every new way of playing an old format, every change in music technology, changes what music gets made quite dramatically. Lucas Hubert asks: “Black Sabbath being around the corner, how do you plan on dealing with Heavy Metal? I feel like for now, what is popular and what has had a big impact in Rock history coincide. But that kind of change with metal, no? (Plus, prog and metal are more based on albums than singles, I think.)” [Excerpt: Black Sabbath, “Sabbath Bloody Sabbath”] I plan on dealing with metal the same way I've been dealing with every other subgenre. We are, yes, getting into a period where influence and commercial success don't correlate quite as firmly as they did in the early years -- though really we've already been there for quite some time. I've done two episodes so far on the Byrds, a group who only had three top-twenty singles in the US and two in the UK, but only did a bonus episode on Herman's Hermits, who had fourteen in the US and seventeen in the UK. I covered Little Richard but didn't cover Pat Boone, even though Boone had the bigger hits with Richard's songs. In every subgenre there are going to be massive influences who had no hits, and people who had lots of hits but didn't really make much of a wider impact on music, and I'll be dealing with the former more than the latter. But also, I'll be dealing most with people who were influential *and* had lots of hits -- if nothing else because while influence and chart success aren't a one-to-one correlation, they're still somewhat correlated. So it's unlikely you'll see me cover your favourite Scandinavian Black Metal band who only released one album of which every copy was burned in a mysterious fire two days after release, but you can expect most of the huge names in metal to be covered. Though even there, simply because of the number of subgenres I'm going to cover, I'm going to miss some big ones. Related to the question about albums, Svennie asks “This might be a bit of a long winded question so just stick with me here. As the music you cover becomes more elaborate, and the albums become bigger in scale, how do you choose a song which you build the story around while also telling the story of that album? I ask this specifically with the White Album in mind, where you've essentially got four albums in one. To that end, what song would you feel defines the White Album?” [Excerpt: The Beatles, “Revolution #9”] Well, you'll see how I cover the White Album in episode one hundred and seventy-two -- we're actually going to have quite a long stretch with no Beatles songs covered because I'm going to backfill a lot of 1967 and then we're getting to the Beatles again towards the end of 1968, but it'll be another big one when we get there. But in the general case... the majority of albums to come still had singles released off them, and a lot of what I'm going to be looking at in the next year or two is still hit singles, even if the singles are by people known as album bands. Other times, a song wasn't a single, but maybe it was covered by someone else -- if I know I'm going to cover a rock band and I also know that one of the soul artists who would do rock covers as album tracks did a version of one of their songs, and I'm going to cover that soul artist, say, then if I do the song that artist covered I can mention it in the episode on the soul singer and tie the two episodes together a bit. In other cases there's a story behind a particular track that's more interesting than other tracks, or the track is itself a cover version of someone else's record, which lets me cover both artists in a single episode, or it's the title track of the album. A lot of people have asked me this question about how I'd deal with albums as we get to the late sixties and early seventies, but looking at the list of the next fifty episodes, there's actually only two where I had to think seriously about which song I chose from an album -- in one case, I chose the title track, in the other case I just chose the first song on the album (though in that case I may end up choosing another song from the same album if I end up finding a way to make that a more interesting episode). The other forty-eight were all very, very obvious choices. Gary Lucy asks “Do you keep up with contemporary music at all? If so, what have you been enjoying in 2022 so far…and if not, what was the most recent “new” album you really got into?” [Excerpt: Stew and the Negro Problem, "On the Stage of a Blank White Page"] I'm afraid I don't. Since I started doing the podcast, pretty much all of my listening time has been spent on going back to much older music, and even before that, when I was listening to then-new music it was generally stuff that was very much inspired by older music, bands like the Lemon Twigs, who probably count as the last new band I really got into with their album Do Hollywood, which came out in 2016 but which I think I heard in 2018. I'm also now of that age where 2018 seems like basically yesterday, and when I keep thinking "what relatively recent albums have I liked?" I think of things like The Reluctant Graveyard by Jeremy Messersmith, which is from 2010, or Ys by Joanna Newsom, which came out in 2006. Not because I haven't bought records released since then, but because my sense of time is so skewed that summer 1994 and summer 1995 feel like epochs apart, hugely different times in every way, but every time from about 2005 to 2020 is just "er... a couple of years ago? Maybe?" So without going through every record I've bought in the last twenty years and looking at the release date I couldn't tell you what still counts as contemporary and what's old enough to vote. I have recently listened a couple of times to an album by a band called Wet Leg, who are fairly new, but other than that I can't say. But probably the most recent albums to become part of my regular listening rotation are two albums which came out simultaneously in 2018 by Stew and the Negro Problem, Notes of a Native Song, which is a song cycle about James Baldwin and race in America, and The Total Bent, which is actually the soundtrack to a stage musical, and which I think many listeners to the podcast might find interesting, and which is what that last song excerpt was taken from. It's basically a riff on the idea of The Jazz Singer, but set in the Civil Rights era, and about a young politically-radical Black Gospel songwriter who writes songs for his conservative preacher father to sing, but who gets persuaded to become a rock and roll performer by a white British record producer who fetishises Black music. It has a *lot* to say about religion, race, and politics in America -- a couple of the song titles, to give you some idea, are "Jesus Ain't Sitting in the Back of the Bus" and "That's Why He's Jesus and You're Not, Whitey". It's a remarkable album, and it deals with enough of the same subjects I've covered here that I think any listeners will find it interesting. Unfortunately, it was released through the CDBaby store, which closed down a few months later, and unlike most albums released through there it doesn't seem to have made its way onto any of the streaming platforms or digital stores other than Apple Music, which rather limits its availability. I hope it comes out again soon. Alec Dann says “I haven't made it to the Sixties yet so pardon if you have covered this: what was the relationship between Sun and Stax in their heyday? Did musicians work in both studios?” [Excerpt: Booker T. and the MGs, "Green Onions"] I've covered this briefly in a couple of the episodes on Stax, but the short version is that Sun was declining just as Stax was picking up. Jim Stewart, who founded Stax, was inspired in part by Sam Phillips, and there was a certain amount of cross-fertilisation, but not that much. Obviously Rufus Thomas recorded for both labels, and there were a few other connections -- Billy Lee Riley, for example, who I did an episode on for his Sun work, also recorded at the Stax studio before going on to be a studio musician in LA, and it was actually at a Billy Lee Riley session that went badly that Booker T and the MGs recorded "Green Onions". Also, Sun had a disc-cutting machine and Stax didn't, so when they wanted to get an acetate cut to play for DJs they'd take it to Sun -- it was actually Scotty Moore, who was working for Sun as a general engineer and producer as well as playing RCA Elvis sessions by 1962, who cut the first acetate copy of "Green Onions". But in general the musicians playing at Stax were largely the next generation of musicians -- people who'd grown up listening to the records Sam Phillips had put out in the very early fifties by Black musicians, and with very little overlap. Roger Stevenson asks "This project is going to take the best part of 7 years to complete. Do you have contingency plans in case of major problems? And please look after yourself - this project is gong to be your legacy." [Excerpt: Bonzo Dog Doodah Band, "Button Up Your Overcoat"] I'm afraid there's not much I can do if major problems come up -- by major problems I'm talking about things that prevent me from making the podcast altogether, like being unable to think or write or talk. By its nature, the podcast is my writing and my research and my voice, and if I can't do those things... well, I can't do them. I *am* trying to build in some slack again -- that's why this month off has happened -- so I can deal with delays and short-term illnesses and other disruptions, but if it becomes impossible to do it becomes impossible to do, and there's nothing more I can do about it. Mark Lipson asks "I'd like to know which episodes you've released have been the most & least popular? And going forward, which episodes do you expect to be the most popular? Just curious to know what music most of your listeners listen to and are interested in." [Excerpt: Sly and the Family Stone, "Somebody's Watching You"] I'm afraid I honestly don't know. Most podcasters have extensive statistical tools available to them, which tell them which episodes are most popular, what demographics are listening to the podcast, where they are in the world, and all that kind of thing. They use that information to sell advertising spots, which is how they make most of their money. You can say "my podcast is mostly listened to by seventy-five year-olds who google for back pain relief -- the perfect demographic for your orthopedic mattresses" or "seven thousand people who downloaded my latest episode also fell for at least one email claiming to be from the wallet inspector last year, so my podcast is listened to by the ideal demographic for cryptocurrency investment". Now, I'm lucky enough to be making enough money from my Patreon supporters' generosity that I don't have to sell advertising, and I hope I never do have to. I said at the very start of the process that I would if it became necessary, but that I hoped to keep it ad-free, and people have frankly been so astonishingly generous I should never have to do ads -- though I do still reserve the right to change my mind if the support drops off. Now, my old podcast host gave me access to that data as standard. But when I had to quickly change providers, I decided that I wasn't going to install any stats packages to keep track of people. I can see a small amount of information about who actually visits the website, because wordpress.com gives you that information – not your identities but just how many people come from which countries, and what sites linked them. But if you're downloading the podcast through a podcast app, or listening through Spotify or Stitcher or wherever, I've deliberately chosen not to access that data. I don't need to know who my audience is, or which episodes they like the most -- and if I did, I have a horrible feeling I'd start trying to tailor the podcast to be more like what the existing listeners like, and by doing so lose the very things that make it unique. Once or twice a month I'll look at the major podcast charts, I check the Patreon every so often to see if there's been a massive change in subscriber numbers, but other than that I decided I'm just not going to spy on my listeners (though pretty much every other link in the chain does, I'm afraid, because these days the entire Internet is based on spying on people). So the only information I have is the auto-generated "most popular episodes" thing that comes up on the front page, which everyone can see, and which shows the episodes people who actually visit the site are listening to most in the last few days, but which doesn't count anything from more than a few days ago, and which doesn't count listens from any other source, and which I put there basically so new listeners can see which ones are popular. At the moment that's showing that the most listened episodes recently are the two most recent full episodes -- "Respect" and "All You Need is Love" -- the most recent of the Pledge Week episodes, episodes one and two, so people are starting at the beginning, and right now there's also the episodes on "Ooby Dooby", "Needles and Pins", "God Only Knows", "She Loves You" and "Hey Joe". But in a couple of days' time those last five will be totally different. And again, that's just the information from people actually visiting the podcast website. I've deliberately chosen not to know what people listening in any other way are doing -- so if you've decided to just stream that bit of the Four Tops episode where I do a bad Bob Dylan impression five thousand times in a row, you can rest assured I have no idea you're doing it and your secret is totally safe. Anyway, that's all I have time for in this episode. In a week or so I'll post a similar-length episode for Patreon backers only, and then a week or two after that the regular podcast will resume, with a story involving folk singers, jazz harmony, angelic visitations and the ghost of James Dean. See you then.

    Something About the Beatles
    238: Remembering the 70s with Chris O'Dell and Nancy Lee Andrews

    Something About the Beatles

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2022 89:43


    As part of the Fab4ConJam online fan event, I convened these two Beatles insiders to take questions and reminisce. Chris O'Dell came from Tucson, AZ (yes! home of Jo Jo AND Linda) and was pulled into the Apple Press Office by Derek Taylor. She was a rooftop attendee as well as a one-time resident of Friar Park, witnessing the daily drama of the group as it ended, along with George and Pattie's marriage. She recalled her experiences in 2009's Miss O'Dell: My Hard Days and Long Nights with The Beatles, the Stones, Bob Dylan, Eric Clapton and the Women They Loved.   Nancy Lee Andrews was a model, actress and briefly, in the music biz as well as a photographer. More importantly, she was Ringo's romantic partner from 1974 through 1980, and likewise a witness to much of the inside relations between the former Beatles. (She also attended the Concert for Bangladesh as a guest of her then-boyfriend, bassist and future Domino, Carl Radle.) Nancy's book of spectacular photos was published as A Dose of Rock 'n' Roll in 2008.  These women have maintained a close friendship since the 70s and it was our treat to hear them recall those days during this terrific conversation. 

    Bernie and Sid
    The Rosenbergs and Uncle Bernie | 07-29-22

    Bernie and Sid

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2022 177:12


    On this Friday edition of Bernie & Sid in the Morning, Sid's son Gabriel sits in the studio and joins the boys to show them what he's got on the airwaves. Simply put, like a father-like son in that regard, Gabe was a natural on the mic all morning long offering the boys a different perspective on various issues throughout the show. In terms of the news of the day, topics included Congressman and New York Gubernatorial hopeful Lee Zeldin using the attack on his life to release one heck of a campaign ad in the process, President Biden and his administration shifting the goal posts to fit their narrative when it comes to the recession we just entered, President Reagan's would-be assassin John Hinckley is the next Bob Dylan, Herschel Walker gears up for his race against Raphael Warnock, D.C. Mayor Muriel Bowser shows her hypocrisy calling on the National Guard to help her deal with all the illegal immigrants flooding into her city, and the Republicans beat the Democrats into the ground in the Congressional baseball game last night to the tune of a 10-0 score. Former New York City Mayor Rudy Giuliani and Sid's mother Naomi join the program, and as always make sure you don't miss out on Lidia Reports or The Peerless Boilers Beat Bernie Contest. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    Sofá Sonoro
    La dulce venganza George Harrison

    Sofá Sonoro

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2022 59:02


    En los años finales de los Beatles pasó de todo, se rompió la magia, la amistad y el sueño de la banda de Liverpool, en esa guerra entre Paul y John se coló un George Harrison en pleno crecimiento que reclamaba su espacio, su foco y su mérito. Cuando todo explotó en 1970, Harrison se encontró con la ocasión de ajustar cuentas con sus viejos compañeros y de demostrar que se equivocaron descartando tantas canciones suyas.La obra de los Beatles es el santo grial de la música del siglo XX, la guía perfecta para todos los que llegaron después y siguieron sus pasos. Tras el final de la banda se abrió un nuevo episodio en sus vidas y también en las nuestras y si algo bueno tuvo ese final fue poder descubrir sus discos en solitario, las grandes canciones que fueron dejando tras el viaje juntos. Uno de los discos más interesantes y impactantes fue este All Things Must Pass, un álbum enorme repleto de canciones de todo tipo. Algunas creadas junto a Bob Dylan, otras al calor de la guitarra de Eric Clapton y otras que llevaban años esperando una oportunidad.En 1970 llegó a las tiendas Let It Be, pero también álbumes en solitario de Paul, John, George y Ringo. Tras una década de viaje musical ninguno tenía nada que demostrar ya, pero George era el que tenía más ganas de dar un golpe encima de la mesa y lo hizo con una fuerza demoledora.Esta semana dedicamos el Sofá Sonoro a recordar esa joya eterna de la música de la mano de Sheila Blanco, Fernando Neira y Lucía Taboada.

    The Paul Leslie Hour
    #753 - Ira Ingber

    The Paul Leslie Hour

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2022 77:24


    #753 - Ira Ingber Ira Ingber is a Special Guest on The Paul Leslie Hour. Now we're about to introduce you to guitarist, singer, songwriter, record producer Ira Ingber. He's been hard at it since he wrote his first song at 15 years of age. Since then he's worked with everyone from Bob Dylan, Bonnie Raitt and Captain Beefheart. He's going to cover a lot of ground with your host Paul E. Leslie. Real quick, help The Paul Leslie Hour. We depend on our audience to keep going. Visit www.thepaulleslie.com/support And now we present an interview with an endlessly creative musician, Ira Ingber! Take it away guys! The Paul Leslie Hour - Helping People Tell Their Stories is a talk show with new episodes every Monday, Wednesday and Friday. Some of the most iconic people of all time drop in to chat. Frequent topics include Arts, Entertainment and Culture. This podcast is powered by Pinecast.

    Thunder Underground
    Episode 353 - John Waite

    Thunder Underground

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2022 41:32


    In this episode John Waite joins the podcast. John talks about his new EP, recording Bob Dylan's “Masters of War”, his writing process, performing recently with Kings of Chaos at Indy 500, Matt Sorum, Gilby Clarke, why he never joined a band again after Bad English, The Baby's, James Hetfield of Metallica, his upcoming tour with Rick Springfield and Colin Hay / Men at Work, writing short stories, and a ton more! Thanks for listening, and please share! #podcast #johnwaite #allkillernofiller This episode is brought to you by DEB Concerts. Follow DEB on Facebook and Twitter to get updates on upcoming shows from Poison, Tom Keifer, Rocklahoma's Roadhouse Stage, and more! This episode is also brought to you by Med Pharm. Follow their Facebook page and visit medpharmok.com to find out why they are “Cannabis With a Cause.” 30% of profits go towards building no-kill animal shelters in the area. They have a wide selection of products, and they have a doctor on site every Friday and Saturday. Mention Thunder Underground and receive 10% off on your first purchase! This episode is also brought to you by Sunset Tattoo Tulsa. Sunset Tattoo has over 25 years of experience, and is located at 3146 E. 15th St. in Tulsa, OK. They are state licensed and Mother approved! The tattoos are "Done Good and Proper" so be sure to like their facebook page for more details. Become a Thunder Underground #patron on Patreon: www.patreon.com/thunderunderground Stream us anytime everywhere podcasts are heard.

    Rick & Bubba Show
    Lift Your Voice, Not Your Finger | Daily Best of July 29 | Rick & Bubba

    Rick & Bubba Show

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2022 71:57


    Democrat Rep. Linda Sanchez gives the GOP dugout the middle finger during the congressional baseball game. We debate who is the greatest rock and roll singer of all time, and it ain't Bob Dylan. Justice Samuel Alito hilariously mocks "foreign leaders" who condemned his opinion overturning Roe v. Wade, including Boris Johnson and Prince Harry. And lastly, the Biden administration and the President himself continue to deny that we are in a recession. Sponsor: RealEstateAgentsITrust.com - Buying or selling a home is already one of the most stressful things you can do – and it can be ten times worse if you're not working with the right agent. Generally speaking, our homes are our biggest investment – that's a lot of responsibility, and you need an agent who can take that seriously. That's why we recommend Real Estate Agents I Trust. We work with only the best agents in every market. We do our homework, talking to every agent before inviting them to join our network – and here's a big one: we only work with full-time professionals…no part-time or inexperienced agents. Our team makes the introduction, and then follows you through the buying or selling process to make sure that you're satisfied. The agents we work with have long track records, and are the best sellers in their field. They're a part of this audience; they share your values, and they're almost anywhere you want to go! The process is simple: just go to https://RealEstateAgentsITrust.com today and provide us with some basic info. Our team will contact you to make an introduction to our preferred agent in your town. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices