Podcasts about johnny o

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American musician

  • 76PODCASTS
  • 144EPISODES
  • 1h 19mAVG DURATION
  • 1EPISODE EVERY OTHER WEEK
  • Aug 22, 2021LATEST

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Best podcasts about johnny o

Latest podcast episodes about johnny o

Lomp Podcast
18 – Vinyl Proat met Davey de Zwarte Kater. Plaat: Johnny O. - Cindy Jane

Lomp Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 22, 2021 5:51


In deze aflevering vertelt Davey over zijn single Johnny O. - Cindy Jane.

Irish Life & Lore - Voices from the Archive
A Celebration of the Music of Johnny O'Leary of Sliabh Luachra

Irish Life & Lore - Voices from the Archive

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 18, 2021 27:32


This week's podcast celebrates the musicianship of one of Sliabh Luachra's great masters - Johnny O'Leary who passed away in February 2004.  He was the custodian of the tradition handed down to him by Padraig O'Keeffe and Denis Murphy.Sliabh Luachra extends  from East Kerry and North Cork to West Limerick.  In 2003 I visited Dan O'Connell's pub in Knocknagree and recorded Johnny O'Leary playing with his friends at an evening of exquisite music to celebrate his 80th birthday.

DaUnknownAdmin Podcast
TOP CLASSIC FREESTYLE MIX – 002 DJ SMOOTH ONE

DaUnknownAdmin Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 14, 2021 30:08


TOP CLASSIC FREESTYLE MIX – 002 DJ SMOOTH ONE 1. Shannon - Give Me Tonight2. Danny Damian- More Than Ever3. Ron Esco- Give Me Your Heart4. Devan- Alone In The Night5. Ruben Gonzalez- So Close6. Johnny O.- Highways Of Love7. Full Afekt- Don't Leave Me Now8. Los Sucios - Love Is Blind9. Benny Velez- Dream Lover10. TKA- Scars Of Love *Bonus Tracks11. Monet- Who's Holding You Now?12. T.P.E.- Then Came You13. Outta Control- Sinful Wishes14. Tony Garcia Feat. Lisette Rodriguez- Clean Up Your Act

Week in Horror
Week in Horror 6/13 - 6/19

Week in Horror

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 13, 2021 93:12


This week, while Alex celebrates his birthday and J.L. is moving out of state, Eugene and Johnny O look back at the long-delayed and troubled Lucio Fulci-horror Touch of Death, the epic slasher-influenced sequel Jaws 2, the classic horror-comedy Waxwork, and the eco-horror The Food of the Gods! Stay Scared! CONTACT US: weekinhorror@gmail.com VIST US: https://www.weekinhorror.net/ FOLLOW US: https://www.facebook.com/weekinhorror https://www.twitter.com/weekinhorror https://www.instagram.com/week_in_hor... https://www.youtube.com/weekinhorror SUPPORT US: https://www.paypal.com/paypalme/weeki... https://www.patreon.com/weekinhorror JOIN US: https://discord.gg/PDGDeWJz4E --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/weekinhorror/support

Junkiosity - The Pod
Episode 41: Tinfoil Hat Time

Junkiosity - The Pod

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 9, 2021 64:53


A delayed new episode where the boys talk about fan theories, the issues with nostalgia, & Johnny O joins in! www.junkiosity.com

Uli Who
Punk Rock & Women...A Conversation With Johnny O.

Uli Who

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 9, 2021 62:00


He's a Navy veteran of the SWCC community who's hopped freight trains to chase whatever's driving his spirit; a self taught auto mechanic and electrician with a Bachelor of Arts in English and a minor in Comparative Literature who once stole a Ferrari from his father and spent some time in jail for it. Meet Johnny Ochetti, one of THE most interesting souls I've had the pleasure of hanging with. Over some smoked ribs and Coors Light, we began telling tales, some of which are here for your enjoyment. In his own words....."when you're done learning you're dead". Cheers Johnny, and cheers to you, listener!

Baltimore Positive
Proudly welcoming BMW Championship to Caves Valley and Baltimore County in August with Johnny O

Baltimore Positive

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 26, 2021 21:16


Proudly welcoming BMW Championship to Caves Valley and Baltimore County in August with Johnny O

ROCKmetalTALK Radio Network
The Plot Hole feat. ME JOHNNY O

ROCKmetalTALK Radio Network

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 3, 2021 183:06


I'm solo...unless someone joins me. We will see what happens.

The Premium Pete Show

INTERNETS! On this episode of The Premium Pete Show, Pete sits down with freestyle and Dance-pop artist CYNTHIA! Cynthia talks growing up in NYC, the impact of the Smash Hit Song Dreamboy/Dreamgirl and how the song came to life with Johnny O! How it was performing at Madison Square Garden & Radio City Music Hall.  Pete & Cynthia also break down the Freestyle movement over the years and it's High's & Lows! Stevie B, Coro, TKA, Giggles, Lil Suzy and so much more... Plus our friend Sabino from Growing Up Italian joins us after the break, Kick Back, Relax, + PRESS Play!

ROCKmetalTALK Radio Network
The Plot Hole All Alone Again...

ROCKmetalTALK Radio Network

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 13, 2021 193:27


Hey everybody, Johnny O here...all by myself! Let's have some fun.

Radio Bypass Podcast
RadioBypass Podcast Episode 200

Radio Bypass Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 21, 2021 46:24


We have a lot of new rock today! Check out new music from Joel Hoekstra's 13, Griffin Tucker, Plush, Voodoo Moonshine, Damon Johnson & The Get Ready, The Treatment, Johnny O'Neil, and Mammoth WVH, We also have some Metallica and Grand Funk Railroad. Turn it up!

ROCKmetalTALK Radio Network
The Plot Hole Survived the SnowPocalypse!

ROCKmetalTALK Radio Network

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 20, 2021 196:23


Johnny O from the Plot Hole. I'm sorry, but the rumors of my demise are greatly exaggerated! I'm back with a new episode! Let's talk...whatever the hell we want.

Three Sides of the Coin – A KISS Podcast and Radio Show
Ep. 417 Dare Force Opening for KISS on Creatures of the Night Tour Johnny O’Neil Shares Stories

Three Sides of the Coin – A KISS Podcast and Radio Show

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 1, 2021 112:13


Episode 417, February 2, 2021. This week we are joined by Johnny O’Neil from the Minneapolis band Dare Force who shares stories from the night they opened for KISS on the Creatures of the Night tour in Sioux City, IA. From there Johnny goes on to sharing stories of Van Halen, Gregg Allman, touring South […]

Copperplate Podcast
Copperplate Podcast 256

Copperplate Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 1, 2021 67:00


                                    Copperplate Podcast 256                                              presented by Alan O'Leary                                                Febuary 2021                                www.copperplatemailorder.com 1. Danu: McCahills Reel. The Road Less Traveled2. John & Catherine McEvoy:        The Glentaun/The Temple Hill/Captain Kelly.  Trad Irish Fiddle Paddy Keenan & Paddy Glackin:        Humours of Ballyconnell/Toss the Feathers.     Paddy Keenan 4. Planxty:    The Good Ship Kangaroo.  Masters of Their Trade 5. Benny McCarthy:       Shores of Lough Gowna/Will You Come Home. Press & Draw 6. Paddy Carty & Conor Tully;                    Hide & Go Seek/Eddie Kelly’s.   Trad Music of Ireland 7. Eilis Kennedy:   A Sailor’s Trade. So Ends This Day 8. Caoimhin O’Fearghaill:   Barrell Rfferty/Hummours of Castlelyons.   Uilleann Pipes from Waterford 9. Tommy McCarthy & Louise Costello:          Richie Dwyer’s/McFaddens Handsome Daughter. Grace Bay 10. Rita Gallagher:  Sweet Iniscarra.  The May Morning Dew 11. Johnny O’g Connolly & Brian McGrath:              Michael Coleman’s/Flanagan’s Meet O’Hanlon.                  Dreaming Up The Tunes  12. Brendan McAuley:           The Phaeton Carraige.  The McCartney’s of Pennyburn 13. Kevin Burke & John Carthy :         Humours of Castlefin/The Ewe Reel/McFadden’s. Sligo Made 14. The Hydes: Green & Blue   Green & Blue 15. Donal Clancy:  The Lowlands of Holland.                On The Lonesome Plain16. Mick O’Brien & Caoimhin O’Raghallaigh:        Farewell to Ireland/Maid in the Cherry Tree. Mistress of the House. Deadly Buzz

ROCKmetalTALK Radio Network
The Plot Hole LIVE! J.L. Warren speaks

ROCKmetalTALK Radio Network

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 16, 2021 182:32


J.L. Warren joins Johnny O for a chat about stuff and things!

Baltimore Positive
Johnny Olszewski talks about democracy, elections and images of Capitol siege in Washington

Baltimore Positive

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 8, 2021 31:50


Johnny Olszewski talks about democracy, elections and images of Capitol siege in Washington

Copperplate Podcast
Copperplate Podcast 255

Copperplate Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 1, 2021 69:29


                              Copperplate Podcast 255                                        presented by Alan O'Leary                                            January 2021                           www.copperplatemailorder.com 1. Danu: The Garsun Who Beat His Father/Sean Maguire’s/Jimmy                      Kelly’s.  All Things Considered Le Cheile: Bird in the Bush/Christmas Eve. Out of the West 3. Mick O’Brien:  Farewell to Miltown Malbay/West Clare                                Railway/Sporting Molly.    May Morning Dew 4. Christy Moore:  The Crack Was 90.  Masters of Their Trade 5. Johnny O’g Connolly & Brian McGrath:             Mountain Dew/Loughrea Reel.  Dreaming Up The Tunes   6. Helen Roche; Dobbin’s Flowery Vale.   Shake The Blossom Early 7. Patsy Moloney:   Humours of Carrigaholt/Donal O Phumpa.                       Temple in the Glen 8. Peter Carberry & Padraig McGovern:               Moll Roe/Lark I the Morning. Forgotten Gems 9. Open The Door for 3: Carrig River. The Joyful Hour 10. Kevin Burke & John Carthy:                    Owen Davey’s Reel/Patsy Sean Nancy’s. Sligo Made 11. Benny McCarthy: The Quilty Fisherman/Planxty Joe Burke.                           Press & Draw 12. Caoimhin O’Fearghaill:   Mary McMahon/Reel of Mullinavat.               Uilleann Pipes from Waterford 13. Urnua: Sporting Galway/The White Plains/Threadneedle Reel.                Urnua 14. Moving Hearts: The Storm.   Masters of Their Trade 15. Eilis Kennedy:  The Parting Song.  One Sweet Kiss16. The Outside Track: Auld Lang Syne. Christmas Star

ROCKmetalTALK Radio Network
The Plot Hole Running Solo!

ROCKmetalTALK Radio Network

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2020 147:28


Jeremy had something come up. Johnny O is running SOLO!

ROCKmetalTALK Radio Network
The Plot Hole Fall is Here!

ROCKmetalTALK Radio Network

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2020 199:05


Jeremy Flair and Johnny O embark on the epic descent into the season of FALL! Tonight we discuss Ride the Lightening along with many other topics. Tune in!

7th Gear Over Rev
"Mr. LeMans" Johnny O'Connell unplugged

7th Gear Over Rev

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2020 48:40


In this episode we talk with 15 time LeMans entrant and 4 time class winner, Johnny O'Connell about his career, favorite racecars, and the 24 Hours of LeMans....with NO FILTER!

ROCKmetalTALK Radio Network
The Plot Hole Theism Disscussion Are Christians persecuted?

ROCKmetalTALK Radio Network

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 22, 2020 189:56


J.L. Warren and Johnny O sit down with Andy Schatkin and discuss theism.

Baltimore Positive
EPISODE 266: Johnny O discusses challenges of running Baltimore County government during pandemic

Baltimore Positive

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 21, 2020 33:57


AutoSalesWear - Car Guys and Gals Talk Car Sales and Much More
Car Guys and Gals Talk Car Sales Episode 1

AutoSalesWear - Car Guys and Gals Talk Car Sales and Much More

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2020 39:56


This conversation took place soon after dealers started planning for Covid19, and what that meant. Recorded April 6th 2020.From Jake in Switzerland, Johnny O in Steveston Village (Richmond, BC Canada) to Colorado Springs, Colarado and Portland Oregon.Automotive Sales Industry Leaders and others, talk car sales.Managing Dealer Partner and Closing Big's Josh LetsisWorld Famous Car Salesman and MediSpa La Bella's Jonathan Basil OvertonYour motivation, new release every Monday, for your inspirationAuto Sales WearShare Your Story*Automotive Sales Industry*Guys & Gals Talk Car Sales*All things car business (car biz)*Experienced Professional*Business*Learn*Fun*Grow*Motivate*ShareGet Better at Closing Deals Core Curriculum, train, motivate, teamed with Eric Thomas. Take your Closing to the next level!Redefine Yourself Body Sculpting and Skin Care Services Health and Wellness across CanadaLearn About Blockchain Don't know what blockchain is? Want to know what everyone is talking about? Free Blockchain PrograCar Sales Shirt Auto Sales Wear Tee enjoy your day off relax auto sales wear shirtSupport the show (https://www.blockchain.com/btc/payment_request?address=38TnbQLWKyKxycWvT29mnjdY43rwy1BKL7)

Rick Bassman's Talking Tough
John Orlandini aka Johnny O

Rick Bassman's Talking Tough

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 2, 2020


John Orlandini is an Animal Activist, Humanitarian and creator of Vegan Fit. John Orlandini knows that he could say a lot but sit back and do nothing, but that's never been his credo; he walks the walk. He follows the guiding principle that if everyone does a little it becomes a lot. With great sacrifice comes great reward, and he is the real deal in animal welfare and humanitarian work. "It's one big world, let's save it together."

Elevate Maryland
An Urgent Need for Action with Baltimore County Executive Johnny O

Elevate Maryland

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 10, 2020 48:15


In this episode, Candace and Tom interview Baltimore County Executive Johnny Olszewski Jr., about his response to the Black Lives Matter movement, the FY2021 budget, and his experiences reopening the county after Governor Larry Hogan deferred that decision to local jurisdictions. Tom also took the opportunity to tell Johnny that he doesn't like the phrase "every vote counts", which includes a reaction you won't want to miss. Three Things: 1) What does #DefundThePolice really mean? 2) Equity in Zoning - the end of single family detached zones 3) Three opportunities for action 

Vibezzz w/ DJ DNERO
Ep.11 - Freestyle - Vibezzz w/ DJ DNERO

Vibezzz w/ DJ DNERO

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 10, 2020 56:28


Episode 11 featuring Freestyle music from TKA, George Lamond, Stevie B, Will To Power, Debbie Deb, Johnny O, Collage, Gloria Estefan, Madonna, Shannon, The Cover Girls, Lisa Lisa, Noel, Lil Suzy, Technotronic, Taylor Dayne & more

AutoSalesWear - Car Guys and Gals Talk Car Sales and Much More
Episode 8 with Johnny O World Famous Car Salesman Car Guys and Gals Talk Car Sales

AutoSalesWear - Car Guys and Gals Talk Car Sales and Much More

Play Episode Listen Later May 25, 2020 48:23


Jonathan Overton talks about how he married The shopping queen!Redefine Yourself Body Sculpting and Skin Care Services Health and Wellness across CanadaSupport the show (https://www.blockchain.com/btc/payment_request?address=38TnbQLWKyKxycWvT29mnjdY43rwy1BKL7)

WICKED ALOHA.
John O'Hara, Gloucester's Finest Kind.

WICKED ALOHA.

Play Episode Listen Later May 21, 2020 116:58


Johnny O has done a lot. He keeps his door open and takes opportunities when they present themselves which has led to quite the life pursuing waves and good times. Please enjoy the stories from the man himself, John O'Hara.

Sad Punks
078 - Mother's Day Special 2020

Sad Punks

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2020 36:28


With this Mother's Day Special we bring a mix of music featuring songs by Mary J. Blige, Johnny O., Connie, Planet Soul, Prince & The Revolution, Debbie Deb, and L'Trimm! As always, thank you to Rubee for the amazing artwork! If you have a business inquiry for Rubee, just send an email to rubee@sadpunks.com. You can also pick up one of her remakes of famous paintings, which are made-to-order and can be purchased at rubeetrue.com/buy/famous-painting. Subscribe to the podcast on iTunes! Follow us on Instagram! Like us on Facebook!

A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs
Episode 81: “Shout” by the Isley Brothers

A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs

Play Episode Listen Later May 4, 2020


Episode eighty-one of A History of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs looks at “Shout” by the Isley Brothers, and the beginnings of a career that would lead to six decades of hit singles. Click the full post to read liner notes, links to more information, and a transcript of the episode. Patreon backers also have a ten-minute bonus episode available, on “Tell Laura I Love Her” by Ray Peterson. Tilt Araiza has assisted invaluably by doing a first-pass edit, and will hopefully be doing so from now on. Check out Tilt’s irregular podcasts at http://www.podnose.com/jaffa-cakes-for-proust and http://sitcomclub.com/ —-more—-  Resources As always, I’ve created a Mixcloud streaming playlist with full versions of all the songs in the episode.   Amazingly, there are no books on the Isley Brothers, unless you count a seventy-two page self-published pamphlet by Rudolph Isley’s daughter, so I’ve had to piece this together from literally dozens of different sources. The ones I relied on most were this section of a very long article on Richie Barrett, this interview with Ronald Isley, and Icons of R&B and Soul by Bob Gulla.  The information on Hugo and Luigi comes mostly from two books — Dream Boogie: The Triumph of Sam Cooke by Peter Guralnick, and  Godfather of the Music Business: Morris Levy by Richard Carlin. There are many compilations of the public-domain recordings of the Isleys. This one seems the most complete. Patreon This podcast is brought to you by the generosity of my backers on Patreon. Why not join them? Transcript Today we’re going to take one of our rare looks — at this point in the story anyway — at an act that is still touring today. Indeed, when I started writing this script back in February, I started by saying that I would soon be seeing them live in concert, as I have a ticket for an Isley Brothers show in a couple of months. Of course, events have overtaken that, and it’s extremely unlikely that anyone will be going to any shows then, but it shows a fundamental difference between the Isley Brothers and most of the other acts we’ve looked at, as even those who are still active now mostly concentrate on performing locally rather than doing international tours playing major venues. Of course, the version of the Isley Brothers touring today isn’t quite the same as the group from the 1950s, but Ronald Isley, the group’s lead singer, remains in the group — and, indeed, has remained artistically relevant, with collaborations with several prominent hip-hop artists. The Isleys had top forty hits in the sixties, seventies, eighties, nineties, and two thousands, and as recently as 2006 they had an album go to number one on the R&B charts. But today, we’re going to look back at the group’s very first hit, from 1959. [Excerpt: The Isley Brothers, “Shout”] The Isley Brothers were destined to be a vocal group even before they were born, indeed even before their parents were married. When O’Kelly Isley senior was discussing his marriage proposal with his future in-laws, he told his father-in-law-to-be that he intended to have four sons, and that they were going to be the next Mills Brothers. Isley Sr had been a vaudeville performer himself, and as with so many family groups the Isleys seem to have gone into the music business more to please their parents than because they wanted to do it themselves. As it turned out, O’Kelly and Sallye Isley had six children, all boys, and the eldest four of them did indeed form a vocal group. Like many black vocal groups in the early fifties, they were a gospel group, and O’Kelly Jr, Rudolph, Ronald, and Vernon Isley started performing around the churches in Cincinnati as teenagers, having been trained by their parents. They appeared on Ted Mack’s Amateur Hour, the popular TV talent show which launched the careers of many entertainers, and won — their prize was a jewelled watch, which the boys would take turns wearing. But then tragedy struck. Vernon, the youngest of the four singing Isleys, and the one who was generally considered to be far and away the most talented singer in the group, was hit by a car and killed while he was riding his bike, aged only thirteen. The boys were, as one would imagine, devastated by the death of their little brother, and they also thought that that should be the end of their singing career, as Vernon had been their lead singer. It would be two years before they would perform live again. By all accounts, their parents put pressure on them during that time, telling them that it would be the only way to pay respect to Vernon. Eventually a compromise was reached between parents and brothers — Ron agreed that he would attempt to sing lead, if in turn the group could stop singing gospel music and start singing doo-wop songs, like the brothers’ favourite act Billy Ward and the Dominoes. We’ve talked before about how Billy Ward & The Dominoes were a huge influence on the music that became soul, with hit records like “Have Mercy Baby”: [Excerpt: Billy Ward and the Dominoes, “Have Mercy Baby”] Both Ward’s original lead singer Clyde McPhatter and McPhatter’s later replacement Jackie Wilson sang in a style that owed a lot to the church music that the young Isleys had also been performing, and so it was natural for them to make the change to singing in the style of the Dominoes. As soon as Ronald Isley started singing lead, people started making comparisons both to McPhatter and to Wilson. Indeed, Ronald has talked about McPhatter as being something of a mentor figure for the brothers, teaching them how to sing, although it’s never been clear exactly at what point in their career they got to know McPhatter. But their real mentor was a much less well-known singer, Beulah Bryant. The three eldest Isley brothers, O’Kelly, Rudolph, and Ronald, met Bryant on the bus to New York, where they were travelling to try and seek their fortunes. Bryant was one of the many professional blues shouters who never became hugely well known, but who managed to have a moderately successful career from the fifties through to the eighties, mostly in live performances, though she did make a handful of very listenable records: [Excerpt: Beulah Bryant, “What Am I Gonna Do?”] When they got to New York, while they had paid in advance for somewhere to stay, they were robbed on their second day in the city and had no money at all. But Bryant had contacts in the music industry, and started making phone calls for her young proteges, trying to get them bookings. At first she was unsuccessful, and the group just hung around the Harlem Apollo and occasionally performed at their amateur nights. Eventually, though, Bryant got Nat Nazzaro to listen to them over the phone. Nazzaro was known as “the monster agent” — he was one of the most important booking agents in New York, but he wasn’t exactly fair to his young clients. He would book a three-person act, but on the contracts the act would consist of four people — Nazzaro would be the fourth person, and he would get an equal share of the performance money, as well as getting his normal booking agent’s share. Nazzaro listened to the Isleys over the phone, and then he insisted they come and see him in person, because he was convinced that they had been playing a record down the phone rather than singing to him live. When he found out they really did sound like that, Nazzaro started getting them the kind of bookings they could only dream of — they went from having no money at all to playing on Broadway for $750 a week, and then playing the Apollo for $950 a week, at least according to O’Kelly Isley Jr’s later recollection. This was an astonishing sum of money to a bunch of teenagers in the late 1950s. But they still hadn’t made a record, and their sets were based on cover versions of songs by other people, things like “Rock and Roll Waltz” by Kay Starr: [Excerpt: Kay Starr, “Rock and Roll Waltz”] It was hardly the kind of material they would later become famous for. And nor was their first record. They had signed to a label called Teenage Records, a tiny label owned by two former musicians, Bill “Bass” Gordon and Ben Smith. As you might imagine, there were a lot of musicians named Ben Smith and it’s quite difficult to sort out which was which — even Marv Goldberg, who normally knows these things, seems confused about which Ben Smith this was, describing him as a singer on one page and a sax player on another page. As Ben Smith the sax player seems to have played on some records for Teenage, it was probably him, in which case this Ben Smith probably also played alto sax for Lucky Millinder’s band and wrote the hit “I Dreamed I Dwelt in Harlem” for Glenn Miller: [Excerpt: The Glenn Miller Orchestra, “I Dreamed I Dwelt in Harlem”] It’s more certain exactly who Bill “Bass” Gordon was — he was the leader of Bill “Bass” Gordon and the Colonials, who had recorded the doo-wop track “Two Loves Have I”: [Excerpt: Bill “Bass” Gordon and the Colonials, “Two Loves Have I”] Smith and Gordon signed the Isley Brothers to Teenage Records, and in June 1957 the first Isley Brothers single, “Angels Cried”, came out: [Excerpt: The Isley Brothers, “Angels Cried”] Unfortunately, the single didn’t have any real success, and the group decided that they wanted to record for a better label. According to O’Kelly Isley they got some resistance from Teenage Records, who claimed to have them under contract — but the Isley Brothers knew better. They had signed a contract, certainly, but then the contract had just been left on a desk after they’d signed it, rather than being filed, and they’d swiped it from the desk when no-one was looking. Teenage didn’t have a copy of the contract, so had no proof that they had ever signed the Isley Brothers, and the brothers were free to move on to another label. They chose to sign to Gone Records, one of the family of labels that was owned and run by George Goldner. Goldner assigned Richie Barrett, his talent scout, producer, and arranger, to look after the Isleys, as he had previously done with Frankie Lymon and the Teenagers and the Chantels, as well as his own group the Valentines: [The Valentines, “The Woo Woo Train”] By this point, Barrett had established an almost production-line method of making records. He would block-book a studio and some backing musicians for up to twenty-four hours, get as many as ten different vocal groups into the studio, and record dozens of tracks in a row, usually songs written by either group members or by Barrett. The Isleys’ first record with Barrett, “Don’t Be Jealous”, was a fairly standard doo-wop ballad, written by Ron Isley: [Excerpt: The Isley Brothers, “Don’t Be Jealous”] There’s some suggestion that Barrett is also singing on that recording with the group — it certainly sounds like there are four voices on there, not just three. Either way, the song doesn’t show much of the style that the Isley Brothers would later make their own. Much more like their later recordings was the B-side, another Ronald Isley song, which could have been a classic in the Coasters’ mould had it not been for the lyrics, which were an attempt at a hip rewriting of “Old McDonald”: [Excerpt: The Isley Brothers, “Rockin’ McDonald”] They were nearly there, but not quite. The next single, “I Wanna Know”, came closer — you can hear they were clearly trying to incorporate elements of other people’s successful records — Ronald Isley’s vocal owes a lot to Little Richard, while the piano playing has the same piano “ripping” that Jerry Lee Lewis had made his own. But you can also hear the style that would make them famous coming to the fore. But they were not selling records, and Richie Barrett was stretched very thin. A few more singles were released on Gone (often pairing a previously-released track with a new B-side) but nothing was successful enough to justify them staying on with Goldner’s label. But just as they’d moved from a micro-indie label to a large indie without having had any success, now they were going to move from a large indie to a major label, still not having had a hit. They took one of their records to Hugo and Luigi at RCA records, and the duo signed them up. Hugo and Luigi were strange, strange, figures in popular music in the 1950s. They were two cousins, Hugo Peretti and Luigi Creatore, who were always known by their first names, and had started out making children’s records before being hired by Mercury Records, where they would produce, among other things, the cover versions by Georgia Gibbs of black records that we’ve talked about previously, and which were both ethically and musically appalling: [Excerpt: Georgia Gibbs, “Dance With Me Henry”] After a couple of years of consistently producing hits, they got tempted away from Mercury by Morris Levy, who was setting up a new label, Roulette, with George Goldner and Alan Freed. Goldner and Freed quickly dropped out of the label, but Hugo and Luigi ended up having a fifty percent stake in the new label. While they were there, they showed they didn’t really get rock and roll music at all — they produced follow-up singles by a lot of acts who’d had hits before they started working with Hugo and Luigi, but stopped as soon as the duo started producing them, like Frankie Lymon: [Excerpt: Frankie Lymon, “Goodie Goodie”] But they still managed to produce a string of hits like “Honeycomb” by Jimmie Rodgers (who is not either the blues singer or the country singer of the same name), which went to number one: [Excerpt: Jimmie Rogers, “Honeycomb”] And they also recorded their own tracks for Roulette, like the instrumental Cha-Hua-Hua: [Excerpt: Hugo and Luigi, “Cha-Hua-Hua”] After a year or so with Roulette, they were in turn poached by RCA — Morris Levy let them go so long as they gave up their shares in Roulette for far less than they were worth. At RCA they continued their own recording career, with records like “Just Come Home”: [Excerpt: Hugo and Luigi, “Just Come Home”] They also produced several albums for Perry Como. So you would think that they would be precisely the wrong producers for the Isley Brothers. And the first record they made with the trio would tend to suggest that there was at least some creative difference there. “I’m Gonna Knock on Your Door” was written by Aaron Schroeder and Sid Wayne, two people who are best known for writing some of the less interesting songs for Elvis’ films, and has a generic, lightweight, backing track — apart from an interestingly meaty guitar part. The vocals have some power to them, and the record is pleasant, and in some ways even ground-breaking — it doesn’t sound like a late fifties record as much as it does an early sixties one, and one could imagine, say, Gerry and the Pacemakers making a substantially identical record. But it falls between the stools of R&B and pop, and doesn’t quite convince as either: [Excerpt: The Isley Brothers, “I’m Gonna Knock on Your Door”] That combination of a poppy background and soulful vocals would soon bear a lot of fruit for another artist Hugo and Luigi were going to start working with, but it didn’t quite work for the Isleys yet. But their second single for RCA was far more successful. At this point the Isleys were a more successful live act than recording act, and they would mostly perform songs by other people, and one song they performed regularly was “Lonely Teardrops”, the song that Berry and Gwen Gordy and Roquel Davis had written for Jackie Wilson: [Excerpt: Jackie Wilson, “Lonely Teardrops”] The group would perform that at the end of their shows, and they started to extend it, with Ron Isley improvising as the band vamped behind him, starting with the line “say you will” from Wilson’s song. He’d start doing a call and response with his brothers, singing a line and getting them to sing the response “Shout”. These improvised, extended, endings to the song got longer and longer, and got the crowds more and more excited, and they started incorporating elements from Ray Charles records, too, especially “What’d I Say” and “I Got a Woman”. When they got back to New York at the end of the tour, they told Hugo and Luigi how well these performances, which they still thought of as just long performances of “Lonely Teardrops”, had gone. The producers suggested that if they went down that well, what they should do is cut out the part that was still “Lonely Teardrops” and just perform the extended tag. As it turned out, they kept in a little of “Lonely Teardrops” — the “Say you will, say you will” line — and the resulting song, like Ray Charles’ similar call-and-response based “What’d I Say”, was split over two sides of a single, as “Shout (Parts One and Two)”: [Excerpt: The Isley Brothers, “Shout (Parts One and Two)”] That was nothing like anything that Hugo and Luigi had ever produced before, and it became the Isley Brothers’ first chart hit, reaching number forty-seven. More importantly for them, the song was credited to the three brothers, so they made money from the cover versions of the song that charted much higher. In the USA, Joey Dee and the Starliters made number six in 1962 with their version: [Excerpt: Joey Dee and the Starliters, “Shout”] In the UK, Lulu and the Luvvers made number seven in 1964: [Excerpt: Lulu and the Luvvers, “Shout”] And in Australia, Johnny O’Keefe released his version only a month after the Isleys released theirs, and reached number two: [Excerpt: Johnny O’Keefe, “Shout”] Despite all these cover versions, the Isleys’ version remains the definitive one, and itself ended up selling over a million copies, though it never broke into the top forty. It was certainly successful enough that it made sense to record an album. Unfortunately, for the album, also titled Shout!, the old Hugo and Luigi style came out, and apart from one new Isleys original, “Respectable”, which became their next single, the rest of the album was made up of old standards, rearranged in the “Shout!” style. Sometimes, this almost worked, as on “Ring-A-Ling A-Ling (Let The Wedding Bells Ring)”, whose words are close enough to Little Richard-style gibberish that Ronald Isley could scream them effectively. But when the Isleys take on Irving Berlin’s “How Deep is the Ocean” or “He’s Got the Whole World in His Hands”, neither the song nor the group are improved by the combination. They released several more singles on RCA, but none of them repeated the success of “Shout!”. At this point they moved across to Atlantic, where they started working with Leiber and Stoller. Leiber and Stoller kept them recording old standards as B-sides, but for the A-sides they went back to gospel-infused soul party songs, like the Leiber and Stoller song “Teach Me How To Shimmy” and the Isleys’ own “Standing On The Dance Floor”, a rewrite of an old gospel song called “Standing at the Judgment”: [Excerpt: The Isley Brothers, “Standing on the Dance Floor”] But none of these songs scraped even the bottom of the charts, and the brothers ended up leaving Atlantic after a year, and signing with a tiny label, Scepter. After having moved from a tiny indie label to a large indie to a major label, they had now moved back down from their major label to a large indie to a tiny indie. They were still a great live act, but they appeared to be a one-hit wonder. But all that was about to change, when they recorded a cover version of a flop single inspired by their one hit, combined with a dance craze. The Isley Brothers were about to make one of the most important records of the 1960s, but “Twist and Shout” is a story for another time.  

A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs
Episode 81: “Shout” by the Isley Brothers

A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs

Play Episode Listen Later May 4, 2020


Episode eighty-one of A History of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs looks at “Shout” by the Isley Brothers, and the beginnings of a career that would lead to six decades of hit singles. Click the full post to read liner notes, links to more information, and a transcript of the episode. Patreon backers also have a ten-minute bonus episode available, on “Tell Laura I Love Her” by Ray Peterson. Tilt Araiza has assisted invaluably by doing a first-pass edit, and will hopefully be doing so from now on. Check out Tilt’s irregular podcasts at http://www.podnose.com/jaffa-cakes-for-proust and http://sitcomclub.com/ —-more—-  Resources As always, I’ve created a Mixcloud streaming playlist with full versions of all the songs in the episode.   Amazingly, there are no books on the Isley Brothers, unless you count a seventy-two page self-published pamphlet by Rudolph Isley’s daughter, so I’ve had to piece this together from literally dozens of different sources. The ones I relied on most were this section of a very long article on Richie Barrett, this interview with Ronald Isley, and Icons of R&B and Soul by Bob Gulla.  The information on Hugo and Luigi comes mostly from two books — Dream Boogie: The Triumph of Sam Cooke by Peter Guralnick, and  Godfather of the Music Business: Morris Levy by Richard Carlin. There are many compilations of the public-domain recordings of the Isleys. This one seems the most complete. Patreon This podcast is brought to you by the generosity of my backers on Patreon. Why not join them? Transcript Today we’re going to take one of our rare looks — at this point in the story anyway — at an act that is still touring today. Indeed, when I started writing this script back in February, I started by saying that I would soon be seeing them live in concert, as I have a ticket for an Isley Brothers show in a couple of months. Of course, events have overtaken that, and it’s extremely unlikely that anyone will be going to any shows then, but it shows a fundamental difference between the Isley Brothers and most of the other acts we’ve looked at, as even those who are still active now mostly concentrate on performing locally rather than doing international tours playing major venues. Of course, the version of the Isley Brothers touring today isn’t quite the same as the group from the 1950s, but Ronald Isley, the group’s lead singer, remains in the group — and, indeed, has remained artistically relevant, with collaborations with several prominent hip-hop artists. The Isleys had top forty hits in the sixties, seventies, eighties, nineties, and two thousands, and as recently as 2006 they had an album go to number one on the R&B charts. But today, we’re going to look back at the group’s very first hit, from 1959. [Excerpt: The Isley Brothers, “Shout”] The Isley Brothers were destined to be a vocal group even before they were born, indeed even before their parents were married. When O’Kelly Isley senior was discussing his marriage proposal with his future in-laws, he told his father-in-law-to-be that he intended to have four sons, and that they were going to be the next Mills Brothers. Isley Sr had been a vaudeville performer himself, and as with so many family groups the Isleys seem to have gone into the music business more to please their parents than because they wanted to do it themselves. As it turned out, O’Kelly and Sallye Isley had six children, all boys, and the eldest four of them did indeed form a vocal group. Like many black vocal groups in the early fifties, they were a gospel group, and O’Kelly Jr, Rudolph, Ronald, and Vernon Isley started performing around the churches in Cincinnati as teenagers, having been trained by their parents. They appeared on Ted Mack’s Amateur Hour, the popular TV talent show which launched the careers of many entertainers, and won — their prize was a jewelled watch, which the boys would take turns wearing. But then tragedy struck. Vernon, the youngest of the four singing Isleys, and the one who was generally considered to be far and away the most talented singer in the group, was hit by a car and killed while he was riding his bike, aged only thirteen. The boys were, as one would imagine, devastated by the death of their little brother, and they also thought that that should be the end of their singing career, as Vernon had been their lead singer. It would be two years before they would perform live again. By all accounts, their parents put pressure on them during that time, telling them that it would be the only way to pay respect to Vernon. Eventually a compromise was reached between parents and brothers — Ron agreed that he would attempt to sing lead, if in turn the group could stop singing gospel music and start singing doo-wop songs, like the brothers’ favourite act Billy Ward and the Dominoes. We’ve talked before about how Billy Ward & The Dominoes were a huge influence on the music that became soul, with hit records like “Have Mercy Baby”: [Excerpt: Billy Ward and the Dominoes, “Have Mercy Baby”] Both Ward’s original lead singer Clyde McPhatter and McPhatter’s later replacement Jackie Wilson sang in a style that owed a lot to the church music that the young Isleys had also been performing, and so it was natural for them to make the change to singing in the style of the Dominoes. As soon as Ronald Isley started singing lead, people started making comparisons both to McPhatter and to Wilson. Indeed, Ronald has talked about McPhatter as being something of a mentor figure for the brothers, teaching them how to sing, although it’s never been clear exactly at what point in their career they got to know McPhatter. But their real mentor was a much less well-known singer, Beulah Bryant. The three eldest Isley brothers, O’Kelly, Rudolph, and Ronald, met Bryant on the bus to New York, where they were travelling to try and seek their fortunes. Bryant was one of the many professional blues shouters who never became hugely well known, but who managed to have a moderately successful career from the fifties through to the eighties, mostly in live performances, though she did make a handful of very listenable records: [Excerpt: Beulah Bryant, “What Am I Gonna Do?”] When they got to New York, while they had paid in advance for somewhere to stay, they were robbed on their second day in the city and had no money at all. But Bryant had contacts in the music industry, and started making phone calls for her young proteges, trying to get them bookings. At first she was unsuccessful, and the group just hung around the Harlem Apollo and occasionally performed at their amateur nights. Eventually, though, Bryant got Nat Nazzaro to listen to them over the phone. Nazzaro was known as “the monster agent” — he was one of the most important booking agents in New York, but he wasn’t exactly fair to his young clients. He would book a three-person act, but on the contracts the act would consist of four people — Nazzaro would be the fourth person, and he would get an equal share of the performance money, as well as getting his normal booking agent’s share. Nazzaro listened to the Isleys over the phone, and then he insisted they come and see him in person, because he was convinced that they had been playing a record down the phone rather than singing to him live. When he found out they really did sound like that, Nazzaro started getting them the kind of bookings they could only dream of — they went from having no money at all to playing on Broadway for $750 a week, and then playing the Apollo for $950 a week, at least according to O’Kelly Isley Jr’s later recollection. This was an astonishing sum of money to a bunch of teenagers in the late 1950s. But they still hadn’t made a record, and their sets were based on cover versions of songs by other people, things like “Rock and Roll Waltz” by Kay Starr: [Excerpt: Kay Starr, “Rock and Roll Waltz”] It was hardly the kind of material they would later become famous for. And nor was their first record. They had signed to a label called Teenage Records, a tiny label owned by two former musicians, Bill “Bass” Gordon and Ben Smith. As you might imagine, there were a lot of musicians named Ben Smith and it’s quite difficult to sort out which was which — even Marv Goldberg, who normally knows these things, seems confused about which Ben Smith this was, describing him as a singer on one page and a sax player on another page. As Ben Smith the sax player seems to have played on some records for Teenage, it was probably him, in which case this Ben Smith probably also played alto sax for Lucky Millinder’s band and wrote the hit “I Dreamed I Dwelt in Harlem” for Glenn Miller: [Excerpt: The Glenn Miller Orchestra, “I Dreamed I Dwelt in Harlem”] It’s more certain exactly who Bill “Bass” Gordon was — he was the leader of Bill “Bass” Gordon and the Colonials, who had recorded the doo-wop track “Two Loves Have I”: [Excerpt: Bill “Bass” Gordon and the Colonials, “Two Loves Have I”] Smith and Gordon signed the Isley Brothers to Teenage Records, and in June 1957 the first Isley Brothers single, “Angels Cried”, came out: [Excerpt: The Isley Brothers, “Angels Cried”] Unfortunately, the single didn’t have any real success, and the group decided that they wanted to record for a better label. According to O’Kelly Isley they got some resistance from Teenage Records, who claimed to have them under contract — but the Isley Brothers knew better. They had signed a contract, certainly, but then the contract had just been left on a desk after they’d signed it, rather than being filed, and they’d swiped it from the desk when no-one was looking. Teenage didn’t have a copy of the contract, so had no proof that they had ever signed the Isley Brothers, and the brothers were free to move on to another label. They chose to sign to Gone Records, one of the family of labels that was owned and run by George Goldner. Goldner assigned Richie Barrett, his talent scout, producer, and arranger, to look after the Isleys, as he had previously done with Frankie Lymon and the Teenagers and the Chantels, as well as his own group the Valentines: [The Valentines, “The Woo Woo Train”] By this point, Barrett had established an almost production-line method of making records. He would block-book a studio and some backing musicians for up to twenty-four hours, get as many as ten different vocal groups into the studio, and record dozens of tracks in a row, usually songs written by either group members or by Barrett. The Isleys’ first record with Barrett, “Don’t Be Jealous”, was a fairly standard doo-wop ballad, written by Ron Isley: [Excerpt: The Isley Brothers, “Don’t Be Jealous”] There’s some suggestion that Barrett is also singing on that recording with the group — it certainly sounds like there are four voices on there, not just three. Either way, the song doesn’t show much of the style that the Isley Brothers would later make their own. Much more like their later recordings was the B-side, another Ronald Isley song, which could have been a classic in the Coasters’ mould had it not been for the lyrics, which were an attempt at a hip rewriting of “Old McDonald”: [Excerpt: The Isley Brothers, “Rockin’ McDonald”] They were nearly there, but not quite. The next single, “I Wanna Know”, came closer — you can hear they were clearly trying to incorporate elements of other people’s successful records — Ronald Isley’s vocal owes a lot to Little Richard, while the piano playing has the same piano “ripping” that Jerry Lee Lewis had made his own. But you can also hear the style that would make them famous coming to the fore. But they were not selling records, and Richie Barrett was stretched very thin. A few more singles were released on Gone (often pairing a previously-released track with a new B-side) but nothing was successful enough to justify them staying on with Goldner’s label. But just as they’d moved from a micro-indie label to a large indie without having had any success, now they were going to move from a large indie to a major label, still not having had a hit. They took one of their records to Hugo and Luigi at RCA records, and the duo signed them up. Hugo and Luigi were strange, strange, figures in popular music in the 1950s. They were two cousins, Hugo Peretti and Luigi Creatore, who were always known by their first names, and had started out making children’s records before being hired by Mercury Records, where they would produce, among other things, the cover versions by Georgia Gibbs of black records that we’ve talked about previously, and which were both ethically and musically appalling: [Excerpt: Georgia Gibbs, “Dance With Me Henry”] After a couple of years of consistently producing hits, they got tempted away from Mercury by Morris Levy, who was setting up a new label, Roulette, with George Goldner and Alan Freed. Goldner and Freed quickly dropped out of the label, but Hugo and Luigi ended up having a fifty percent stake in the new label. While they were there, they showed they didn’t really get rock and roll music at all — they produced follow-up singles by a lot of acts who’d had hits before they started working with Hugo and Luigi, but stopped as soon as the duo started producing them, like Frankie Lymon: [Excerpt: Frankie Lymon, “Goodie Goodie”] But they still managed to produce a string of hits like “Honeycomb” by Jimmie Rodgers (who is not either the blues singer or the country singer of the same name), which went to number one: [Excerpt: Jimmie Rogers, “Honeycomb”] And they also recorded their own tracks for Roulette, like the instrumental Cha-Hua-Hua: [Excerpt: Hugo and Luigi, “Cha-Hua-Hua”] After a year or so with Roulette, they were in turn poached by RCA — Morris Levy let them go so long as they gave up their shares in Roulette for far less than they were worth. At RCA they continued their own recording career, with records like “Just Come Home”: [Excerpt: Hugo and Luigi, “Just Come Home”] They also produced several albums for Perry Como. So you would think that they would be precisely the wrong producers for the Isley Brothers. And the first record they made with the trio would tend to suggest that there was at least some creative difference there. “I’m Gonna Knock on Your Door” was written by Aaron Schroeder and Sid Wayne, two people who are best known for writing some of the less interesting songs for Elvis’ films, and has a generic, lightweight, backing track — apart from an interestingly meaty guitar part. The vocals have some power to them, and the record is pleasant, and in some ways even ground-breaking — it doesn’t sound like a late fifties record as much as it does an early sixties one, and one could imagine, say, Gerry and the Pacemakers making a substantially identical record. But it falls between the stools of R&B and pop, and doesn’t quite convince as either: [Excerpt: The Isley Brothers, “I’m Gonna Knock on Your Door”] That combination of a poppy background and soulful vocals would soon bear a lot of fruit for another artist Hugo and Luigi were going to start working with, but it didn’t quite work for the Isleys yet. But their second single for RCA was far more successful. At this point the Isleys were a more successful live act than recording act, and they would mostly perform songs by other people, and one song they performed regularly was “Lonely Teardrops”, the song that Berry and Gwen Gordy and Roquel Davis had written for Jackie Wilson: [Excerpt: Jackie Wilson, “Lonely Teardrops”] The group would perform that at the end of their shows, and they started to extend it, with Ron Isley improvising as the band vamped behind him, starting with the line “say you will” from Wilson’s song. He’d start doing a call and response with his brothers, singing a line and getting them to sing the response “Shout”. These improvised, extended, endings to the song got longer and longer, and got the crowds more and more excited, and they started incorporating elements from Ray Charles records, too, especially “What’d I Say” and “I Got a Woman”. When they got back to New York at the end of the tour, they told Hugo and Luigi how well these performances, which they still thought of as just long performances of “Lonely Teardrops”, had gone. The producers suggested that if they went down that well, what they should do is cut out the part that was still “Lonely Teardrops” and just perform the extended tag. As it turned out, they kept in a little of “Lonely Teardrops” — the “Say you will, say you will” line — and the resulting song, like Ray Charles’ similar call-and-response based “What’d I Say”, was split over two sides of a single, as “Shout (Parts One and Two)”: [Excerpt: The Isley Brothers, “Shout (Parts One and Two)”] That was nothing like anything that Hugo and Luigi had ever produced before, and it became the Isley Brothers’ first chart hit, reaching number forty-seven. More importantly for them, the song was credited to the three brothers, so they made money from the cover versions of the song that charted much higher. In the USA, Joey Dee and the Starliters made number six in 1962 with their version: [Excerpt: Joey Dee and the Starliters, “Shout”] In the UK, Lulu and the Luvvers made number seven in 1964: [Excerpt: Lulu and the Luvvers, “Shout”] And in Australia, Johnny O’Keefe released his version only a month after the Isleys released theirs, and reached number two: [Excerpt: Johnny O’Keefe, “Shout”] Despite all these cover versions, the Isleys’ version remains the definitive one, and itself ended up selling over a million copies, though it never broke into the top forty. It was certainly successful enough that it made sense to record an album. Unfortunately, for the album, also titled Shout!, the old Hugo and Luigi style came out, and apart from one new Isleys original, “Respectable”, which became their next single, the rest of the album was made up of old standards, rearranged in the “Shout!” style. Sometimes, this almost worked, as on “Ring-A-Ling A-Ling (Let The Wedding Bells Ring)”, whose words are close enough to Little Richard-style gibberish that Ronald Isley could scream them effectively. But when the Isleys take on Irving Berlin’s “How Deep is the Ocean” or “He’s Got the Whole World in His Hands”, neither the song nor the group are improved by the combination. They released several more singles on RCA, but none of them repeated the success of “Shout!”. At this point they moved across to Atlantic, where they started working with Leiber and Stoller. Leiber and Stoller kept them recording old standards as B-sides, but for the A-sides they went back to gospel-infused soul party songs, like the Leiber and Stoller song “Teach Me How To Shimmy” and the Isleys’ own “Standing On The Dance Floor”, a rewrite of an old gospel song called “Standing at the Judgment”: [Excerpt: The Isley Brothers, “Standing on the Dance Floor”] But none of these songs scraped even the bottom of the charts, and the brothers ended up leaving Atlantic after a year, and signing with a tiny label, Scepter. After having moved from a tiny indie label to a large indie to a major label, they had now moved back down from their major label to a large indie to a tiny indie. They were still a great live act, but they appeared to be a one-hit wonder. But all that was about to change, when they recorded a cover version of a flop single inspired by their one hit, combined with a dance craze. The Isley Brothers were about to make one of the most important records of the 1960s, but “Twist and Shout” is a story for another time.  

Lawyers on the Rocks podcast
#76 - Manhattan Cocktail with TJ Smith

Lawyers on the Rocks podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 28, 2020 89:54


This week we sample a Manhattan Cocktail with Mayoral candidate TJ Smith.  The Manhattan Cocktail is: 2 oz. whiskey (rye or bourbon) 1 oz. sweet vermouth stir over ice serve neat or on the rocks with a cherry TJ comes to the mayoral race as a newcomer to politics, being a former AA county police officer and the most recent spokesperson for Johnny O, the new County executive for Baltimore County.  We have a wide ranging conversation about TJ's plans for Baltimore City.  You can find out more about TJ at https://tjsmithforbaltimore.com/. We have a number of other good topics including: George's Corner (life as a law student during COVID) I can't Believe it's not Baltimore: Don't call 911 if you run out of toilet paper!  Finally, we raise $250 auctioning off a Healthy Holly book for charity!   Lawyers on the Rocks features Jeremy Eldridge, Kurt Nachtman and Adam Crandell. This triumvirate of lawyers will give you their unsolicited opinion on everything legal and illegal, while enjoying a handcrafted cocktail. Lawyers on the Rocks is sponsored by the Law Office of Eldridge, Nachtman & Crandell, LLC and produced by Up Next Creative, LLC.

Sketched Sounds Podcast
30 – Quarantinecast! with Austin Adams and John Owens

Sketched Sounds Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 16, 2020


An impromptu podcast with Austin Adams and John Owens. Austin is a guitarist and frontman of Mire, whose work in the local scene can be heard across the Inland Empire. John is a musician, audio engineer, and host of The Sunday Show with Johnny O.

ROCKmetalTALK Radio Network
The Plot Hole feat Joe Fuentes of Merkin!

ROCKmetalTALK Radio Network

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 14, 2020 179:01


Joe joins Johnny O as we make preperations for the apacolypse. Tune in for all the fun!

ROCKmetalTALK Radio Network
The Plot Hole feat. Matthew Leslie

ROCKmetalTALK Radio Network

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 15, 2020 189:17


Matt Leslie of Souther Train Gypsy joins Johnny O on the Plot Hole.

CPR's Clubhouse
CPR’s Clubhouse featuring Stevie B.

CPR's Clubhouse

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 9, 2020 64:38


CPR's Clubhouse featuring Stevie B. The King of Freestyle, Stevie B. joins us to discuss his new album, BEST OF LIFE available now on all of your favorite digital distribution sites. Stevie also discusses his famous 2019 Social Media rant that turned the Freestyle Community on it's ear. His relationship with Johnny O; his arrest in Springfield MA. and his stance on Freestyle and the entire community. Hosted by CPR Jose Ortiz Sevie B. LIVE INTERVIEW ON 90.7FM with CPR Jose Ortiz https://open.spotify.com/album/1F41uJayN4NZOM6asQIsL3 Stevie B - Best of Life Album https://open.spotify.com/show/6s2plXbc9mooaR6VNIlzAu Listen to CPR’s Clubhouse Podcast by clicking the links to the following apps: CLICK HERE or CHOOSE FROM THE LIST Itunes PodcastsTuneIn Radio AppGoogle Play Music (Podcasts) iHeartRADIO SPOTIFY 

ROCKmetalTALK Radio Network
Thew Plot Hole Whats on the Horizon

ROCKmetalTALK Radio Network

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 8, 2020 146:33


Johnny O, here to give you an update on the upcoming events for The Plot Hole.

ROCKmetalTALK Radio Network
The Plot Hole feat Whitnye Raquel

ROCKmetalTALK Radio Network

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 25, 2020 173:56


Whitnye joins Johnny O and Erica to discuss everything fun, political, whatever!

ROCKmetalTALK Radio Network

Johnny O here testing saystems to make sure we're good to go Friday January 24th, 2020

CPR's Clubhouse
CPR’s Top 40 Freestyle Songs of 2019 (The Complete Countdown)

CPR's Clubhouse

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2019 238:27


CPR's Top 40 Freestyle Songs of 2019 (The Complete Countdown) CPR's Top 40 Freestyle Songs of 2019: The Complete Countdown CPR’s Top 40 Freestyle Songs of 2019 (Part One) It’s the year in review on CPR’s Clubhouse as we present The Top 40 Freestyle Songs of 2019 Featuring The Artie Rodriguez, NEWBIE Spot #40, Jessee B. Plus Mr. Exclusive presents new music from In Order featuring Angel Mena, BROKEN LOVEEdee, THANK YOU We countdown the Top 40-21 Freestyle songs of 2019 featuring music from TKA, Aki Starr, AP3, Giggles, Audi Medina, Julio Mena, Stefanie Bennett, Sharyn Maceren, Mark Milan, Alex Zuniga, Luis Marte, Lorenzo D’Lan, Adelis, Rebekka, Diddle D, Ray Guell, Quadlibet CPR’s Top 40 Freestyle Songs of 2019 (Part Two) featuring EXCLUSIVE NEW CONTENT Angelica Joni COMFORT ZONE (SAL MEDINA REMIX)AP3 – JUST THE SAME (CARLOS BERRIOS REMIX)Blue Ivy LAST TIME (Jay Alams Remix) Plus 20-01! We count down the Top 20 Freestyle songs of 2019 featuring George Anthony vs George Lamond, Jenni Renee, Wendy, Audi Medina, Johnny O, Shy, Aki Starr, Lily Rose, Berrios vs Zone, Nyasia, Jae Mazor, Aiki, Jocelyn Enriquez, LisCyn, Zoe, Julio Mena, Jasmine Denis, Lisette Melendez, Shawn Davis Who will be number one? Listen to CPR’s Clubhouse Podcast by clicking the links to the following apps: CLICK HERE or CHOOSE FROM THE LIST Itunes PodcastsTuneIn Radio AppGoogle Play Music (Podcasts) iHeartRADIO SPOTIFY 

CPR's Clubhouse
CPR’s Top 40 Freestyle Songs of 2019 (Part Two)

CPR's Clubhouse

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2019 120:17


CPR’s Top 40 Freestyle Songs of 2019 (Part Two) featuring EXCLUSIVE NEW CONTENT Angelica Joni COMFORT ZONE (SAL MEDINA REMIX) AP3 - JUST THE SAME (CARLOS BERRIOS REMIX) Blue Ivy LAST TIME (Jay Alams Remix) Plus 20-01! We count down the Top 20 Freestyle songs of 2019 featuring George Anthony vs George Lamond, Jenni Renee, Wendy, Audi Medina, Johnny O, Shy, Aki Starr, Lily Rose, Berrios vs Zone, Nyasia, Jae Mazor, Aiki, Jocelyn Enriquez, LisCyn, Zoe, Julio Mena, Jasmine Denis, Lisette Melendez, Shawn Davis Who will be number one? Listen to CPR’s Clubhouse Podcast by clicking the links to the following apps: CLICK HERE or CHOOSE FROM THE LIST Itunes PodcastsTuneIn Radio AppGoogle Play Music (Podcasts) iHeartRADIO SPOTIFY 

CPR's Clubhouse
CPR’s Clubhouse (2008-2019)

CPR's Clubhouse

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 12, 2019 120:07


CPR's Clubhouse (2008-2019) Who will be number one for 2019? On this 2 hour episode of CPR's Clubhouse we play the number one songs in Freestyle for the years 2008 to 2018 We also play the top contenders for number one song of 2019 including George Anthony vs George Lamond, Lisette Melendez, Shawn Davis, Shy, Jenni Renee, Johnny O, Aiki, Audi Medina and much more Here are the number one songs from 2008-2018 A Lisa B featuring Charlie Babie - Legendary#1 song of 2018 Gabriella - Temptation#1 song of 2017 TKA - True Love# 1 song of 2016 George Anthony - Nothing Like Your Love#1 song of 2015 https://open.spotify.com/show/6s2plXbc9mooaR6VNIlzAu Previous #1 Songs of the Year (2014) Synthia Figueroa - Ready or Not (2013) George Anthony -Summer Love (2012) J. Alams -You Are The One (2011) Angel Mena - Loving You (2010) TKA - Set It Off (2009) Stevie B - Different Kind of Love (2008) Sammy Zone - Without You Listen to CPR’s Clubhouse Podcast by clicking the links to the following apps: CLICK HERE or CHOOSE FROM THE LIST Itunes PodcastsTuneIn Radio AppGoogle Play Music (Podcasts) iHeartRADIO SPOTIFY 

A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs

Episode fifty-four of A History of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs looks at “Keep A Knockin'” by Little Richard, the long history of the song, and the tension between its performer’s faith and sexuality. Click the full post to read liner notes, links to more information, and a transcript of the episode.   Patreon backers also have a ten-minute bonus episode available, on “At the Hop” by Danny and the Juniors.   —-more—- Resources As always, I’ve created a Mixcloud streaming playlist with full versions of all the songs in the episode. Most of the information used here comes from The Life and Times of Little Richard: The Authorised Biography by Charles White, which is to all intents and purposes Richard’s autobiography, as much of the text is in his own words. A warning for those who might be considering buying this though — it contains descriptions of his abuse as a child, and is also full of internalised homo- bi- and trans-phobia. This collection contains everything Richard released before 1962, from his early blues singles through to his gospel albums from after he temporarily gave up rock and roll for the church. Patreon This podcast is brought to you by the generosity of my backers on Patreon. Why not join them? Erratum In the podcast I refer to a jazz band as “the Buddy Bolden Legacy Group”. Their name is actually “the Buddy Bolden Legacy Band”.   Transcript When last we looked at Little Richard properly, he had just had a hit with “Long Tall Sally”, and was at the peak of his career. Since then, we’ve seen that he had become big enough that he was chosen over Fats Domino to record the theme tune to “The Girl Can’t Help It”, and that he was the inspiration for James Brown. But today we’re going to look in more detail at Little Richard’s career in the mid fifties, and at how he threw away that career for his beliefs. [Excerpt: Little Richard with his Band, “Keep A Knockin'”] Richard’s immediate follow-up to “Long Tall Sally” was another of his most successful records, a double-sided hit with both songs credited to John Marascalco and Bumps Blackwell — “Rip it Up” backed with “Ready Teddy”. These both went to number one on the R&B charts, but they possibly didn’t have quite the same power as RIchard’s first two singles. Where the earlier singles had been truly unique artefacts, songs that didn’t sound like anything else out there, “Rip it Up” and “Ready Teddy” were both much closer to the typical songs of the time — the lyrics were about going out and having a party and rocking and rolling, rather than about sex with men or cross-dressing sex workers. But this didn’t make Richard any less successful, and throughout 1956 and 57 he kept releasing more hits, often releasing singles where both the A and B side became classics — we’ve discussed “The Girl Can’t Help It” and “She’s Got It” in the episode on “Twenty Flight Rock”, but there was also “Jenny Jenny”, “Send Me Some Lovin'”, and possibly the greatest of them all, “Lucille”: [Excerpt: Little Richard, “Lucille”] But Richard was getting annoyed at the routine of recording — or more precisely, he was getting annoyed at the musicians he was having to work with in the studio. He was convinced that his own backing band, the Upsetters, were at least as good as the studio musicians, and he was pushing for Specialty to let him use them in the studio. And when they finally let him use the Upsetters in the studio, he recorded a song which had roots which go much further back than you might imagine. “Keep A Knockin'” had a long, long, history. It derives originally from a piece called “A Bunch of Blues”, written by J. Paul Wyer and Alf Kelly in 1915. Wyer was a violin player with W.C. Handy’s band, and Handy recorded the tune in 1917: [Excerpt: W.C. Handy’s Memphis Blues Band, “A Bunch of Blues”] That itself, though, may derive from another song, “My Bucket’s Got A Hole in It”, which is an old jazz standard. There are claims that it was originally played by the great jazz trumpeter Buddy Bolden around the turn of the twentieth century. No recordings survive of Bolden playing the song, but a group called “the Buddy Bolden Legacy Group” have put together what, other than the use of modern recording, seems a reasonable facsimile of how Bolden would have played the song: [Excerpt: “My Bucket’s Got a Hole in it”, the Buddy Bolden Legacy Band] If Bolden did play that, then the melody dates back to around 1906 at the latest, as from 1907 on Bolden was in a psychiatric hospital with schizophrenia, but the 1915 date for “A Bunch of Blues” is the earliest definite date we have for the melody. “My Bucket’s Got a Hole in it” would later be recorded by everyone from Hank Williams to Louis Armstrong, Jimmy Page and Robert Plant to Willie Nelson and Wynton Marsalis. It was particularly popular among country singers: [Excerpt: Hank Williams, “My Bucket’s Got A Hole In It”] But the song took another turn in 1928, when it was recorded by Tampa Red’s Hokum Jug Band. This group featured Tampa Red, who would later go on to be a blues legend in his own right, and “Georgia Tom”, who as Thomas Dorsey would later be best known as the writer of much of the core repertoire of gospel music. You might remember us talking about Dorsey in the episode on Rosetta Tharpe. He’s someone who wrote dirty, funny, blues songs until he had a religious experience while on stage, and instead became a writer of religious music, writing songs like “Precious Lord, Take My Hand” and “Peace in the Valley”. But in 1928, he was still Georgia Tom and still recording hokum songs. We talked about hokum music right back in the earliest episodes of the podcast, but as a reminder, hokum music is a form which is now usually lumped into the blues by most of the few people who come across it, but which actually comes from vaudeville and especially from minstrel shows, and was hugely popular in the early decades of the twentieth century. It usually involved simple songs with a verse/chorus structure, and with lyrics that were an extended comedy metaphor, usually some form of innuendo about sex, with titles like “Meat Balls” and “Banana in Your Fruit Basket”. As you can imagine, this kind of music is one that influenced a lot of people who went on to influence Little Richard, and it’s in this crossover genre which had elements of country, blues, and pop that we find “My Bucket’s Got a Hole in it” turning into the song that would later be known as “Keep A Knockin'”. Tampa Red’s version was titled “You Can’t Come In”, and seems to have been the origin not only of “Keep A Knockin'” but also of the Lead Belly song “Midnight Special” — you can hear the similarity in the guitar melody: [Excerpt: Tampa Red’s Hokum Jug Band, “You Can’t Come In”] The version by Tampa Red’s Hokum Jug Band wasn’t the first recording to combine the “Keep a Knockin'” lyrics with the “My Bucket’s Got a Hole In It” melody — the piano player Bert Mays recorded a version a month earlier, and Mays and his producer Mayo Williams, one of the first black record producers, are usually credited as the songwriters as a result (with Little Richard also being credited on his version). Mays was in turn probably inspired by an earlier recording by James “Boodle It” Wiggins, but Wiggins had a different melody — Mays seems to be the one who first combined the lyrics with the “My Bucket’s Got a Hole In It” melody on a recording. But the idea was probably one that had been knocking around for a while in various forms, given the number of different variations of the melody that turn up, and Tampa Red’s version inspired all the future recordings. As hokum music lies at the roots of both blues and country, it’s not surprising that “You Can’t Come in” was picked up by both country and blues musicians. A version of the song, for example, was recorded by, among others, Milton Brown — who had been an early musical partner of Bob Wills and one of the people who helped create Western Swing. [Excerpt: Milton Brown and his Musical Brownies: “Keep A Knockin'”] But the version that Little Richard recorded was most likely inspired by Louis Jordan’s version. Jordan was, of course, Richard’s single biggest musical inspiration, so we can reasonably assume that the record by Jordan was the one that pushed him to record the song. [Excerpt: Louis Jordan, “Keep A Knockin'”] The Jordan record was probably brought to mind in 1955 when Smiley Lewis had a hit with Dave Bartholomew’s take on the idea. “I Hear You Knockin'” only bears a slight melodic resemblance to “Keep A Knockin'”, but the lyrics are so obviously inspired by the earlier song that it would have brought it to mind for anyone who had heard any of the earlier versions: [Excerpt: Smiley Lewis, “I Hear You Knockin'”] That was also recorded by Fats Domino, one of Little Richard’s favourite musicians, so we can be sure that Richard had heard it. So by the time Little Richard came to record “Keep A Knockin'” in very early 1957, he had a host of different versions he could draw on for inspiration. But what we ended up with is something that’s uniquely Little Richard — something that was altogether wilder: [Excerpt: Little Richard and his band, “Keep A Knockin'”] In some takes of the song, Richard also sang a verse about drinking gin, which was based on Louis Jordan’s version which had a similar verse: [Excerpt: Little Richard, “Keep A Knockin'”, “drinking gin” verse from take three] But in the end, what they ended up with was only about fifty-seven seconds worth of usable recording. Listening to the session recording, it seems that Grady Gaines kept trying different things with his saxophone solo, and not all of them quite worked as well as might be hoped — there are a few infelicities in most of his solos, though not anything that you wouldn’t expect from a good player trying new things. To get it to a usable length, they copied and pasted the whole song from the start of Richard’s vocal through to the end of the saxophone solo, and almost doubled the length of the song — the third and fourth verses, and the second saxophone solo, are the same recording as the first and second verses and the first sax solo. If you want to try this yourself, it seems that the “whoo” after the first “keep a knockin’ but you can’t come in” after the second sax solo is the point where the copy/pasting ends. But even though the recording ended up being a bit of a Frankenstein’s monster, it remains one of Little Richard’s greatest tracks. At the same session, he also recorded another of his very best records, “Ooh! My Soul!”: [Excerpt: Little Richard, “Ooh! My Soul!”] That session also produced a single for Richard’s chauffeur, with Richard on the piano, released under the name “Pretty Boy”: [Excerpt: Pretty Boy, “Bip Bop Bip”] “Pretty Boy” would later go on to be better known as Don Covay, and would have great success as a soul singer and songwriter. He’s now probably best known for writing “Chain of Fools” for Aretha Franklin. That session was a productive one, but other than one final session in October 1957, in which he knocked out a couple of blues songs as album fillers, it would be Little Richard’s last rock and roll recording session for several years. Richard had always been deeply conflicted about… well, about everything, really. He was attracted to men as well as women, he loved rock and roll and rhythm and blues music, loved eating chitlins and pork chops, drinking, and taking drugs, and was unsure about his own gender identity. He was also deeply, deeply, religious, and a believer in the Seventh Day Adventist church, which believed that same-sex attraction, trans identities, and secular music were the work of the Devil, and that one should keep a vegetarian and kosher diet, and avoid all drugs, even caffeine. This came to a head in October 1957. Richard was on a tour of Australia with Gene Vincent, Eddie Cochran, and Alis Lesley, who was another of the many singers billed as “the female Elvis Presley”: [Excerpt: Alis Lesley, “He Will Come Back To Me”] Vincent actually had to miss the first couple of shows on the tour, as he and the Blue Caps got held up in Honolulu, apparently due to visa issues, and couldn’t continue on to Australia with the rest of the tour until that was sorted out. They were replaced on those early shows by a local group, Johnny O’Keefe and the Dee Jays, who performed some of Vincent’s songs as well as their own material, and who managed to win the audiences round even though they were irritated at Vincent’s absence. O’Keefe isn’t someone we’re going to be able to discuss in much detail in this series, because he had very little impact outside of Australia. But within Australia, he’s something of a legend as their first home-grown rock and roll star. And he did make one record which people outside of Australia have heard of — his biggest hit, from 1958, “Wild One”, which has since been covered by, amongst others, Jerry Lee Lewis and Iggy Pop: [Excerpt: Johnny O’Keefe, “Wild One”] The flight to Australia was longer and more difficult than any Richard had experienced before, and at one point he looked out of the window and saw the engines glowing red. He became convinced that the plane was on fire, and being held up by angels. He became even more worried a couple of days later when Russia launched their first satellite, Sputnik, and it passed low over Australia — low enough that he claimed he could see it, like a fireball in the sky, while he was performing. He decided this was a sign, and that he was being told by God that he needed to give up his life of sin and devote himself to religion. He told the other people on the tour this, but they didn’t believe him — until he threw all his rings into the ocean to prove it. He insisted on cancelling his appearances with ten days of the tour left to go and travelling back to the US with his band. He has often also claimed that the plane they were originally scheduled to fly back on crashed in the Pacific on the flight he would have been on — I’ve seen no evidence anywhere else of this, and I have looked. When he got back, he cut one final session for Specialty, and then went into a seminary to start studying for the ministry. While his religious belief is genuine, there has been some suggestion that this move wasn’t solely motivated by his conversion. Rather, John Marascalco has often claimed that Richard’s real reason for his conversion was based on more worldly considerations. Richard’s contract with Specialty was only paying him half a cent per record sold, which he considered far too low, and the wording of the contract only let him end it on either his own death or an act of god. He was trying — according to Marascalco — to claim that his religious awakening was an act of God, and so he should be allowed to break his contract and sign with another label. Whatever the truth, Specialty had enough of a backlog of Little Richard recordings that they could keep issuing them for the next couple of years. Some of those, like “Good Golly Miss Molly” were as good as anything he had ever recorded. and rightly became big hits: [Excerpt: Little Richard, “Good Golly Miss Molly”] Many others, though, were substandard recordings that they originally had no plans to release — but with Richard effectively on strike and the demand for his recordings undiminished, they put out whatever they had. Richard went out on the road as an evangelist, but also went to study to become a priest. He changed his whole lifestyle — he married a woman, although they would later divorce as, among other things, they weren’t sexually compatible. He stopped drinking and taking drugs, stopped even drinking coffee, and started eating only vegetables cooked in vegetable oil. After the lawsuits over him quitting Specialty records were finally settled, he started recording again, but only gospel songs: [Excerpt: Little Richard, “Precious Lord, Take My Hand”] And that was how things stood for several years. The tension between Richard’s sexuality and his religion continued to torment him — he dropped out of the seminary after propositioning another male student, and he was arrested in a public toilet — but he continued his evangelism and gospel singing until October 1962, when he went on tour in the UK. Just like the previous tour which had been a turning point in his life, this one featured Gene Vincent, but was also affected by Vincent’s work permit problems. This time, Vincent was allowed in the country but wasn’t allowed to perform on stage — so he appeared only as the compere, at least at the start of the tour — later on, he would sing “Be Bop A Lula” from offstage as well. Vincent wasn’t the only one to have problems, either. Sam Cooke, who was the second-billed star for the show, was delayed and couldn’t make the first show, which was a bit of a disaster. Richard was accompanied by a young gospel organ player named Billy Preston, and he’d agreed to the tour under the impression that he was going to be performing only his gospel music. Don Arden, the promoter, had been promoting it as Richard’s first rock and roll tour in five years, and the audience were very far from impressed when Richard came on stage in flowing white robes and started singing “Peace in the Valley” and other gospel songs. Arden was apoplectic. If Richard didn’t start performing rock and roll songs soon, he would have to cancel the whole tour — an audience that wanted “Rip it Up” and “Long Tall Sally” and “Tutti Frutti” wasn’t going to put up with being preached at. Arden didn’t know what to do, and when Sam Cooke and his manager J.W. Alexander turned up to the second show, Arden had a talk with Alexander about it. Alexander told Arden he had nothing to worry about — he knew Little Richard of old, and knew that Richard couldn’t stand to be upstaged. He also knew how good Sam Cooke was. Cooke was at the height of his success at this point, and he was an astonishing live performer, and so when he went out on stage and closed the first half, including an incendiary performance of “Twistin’ the Night Away” that left the audience applauding through the intermission, Richard knew he had to up his game. While he’d not been performing rock and roll in public, he had been tempted back into the studio to record in his old style at least once before, when he’d joined his old group to record Fats Domino’s “I’m In Love Again”, for a single that didn’t get released until December 1962. The single was released as by “the World Famous Upsetters”, but the vocalist on the record was very recognisable: [Excerpt: The World Famous Upsetters, “I’m In Love Again”] So Richard’s willpower had been slowly bending, and Sam Cooke’s performance was the final straw. Little Richard was going to show everyone what star power really was. When Richard came out on stage, he spent a whole minute in pitch darkness, with the band vamping, before a spotlight suddenly picked him out, in an all-white suit, and he launched into “Long Tall Sally”. The British tour was a massive success, and Richard kept becoming wilder and more frantic on stage, as five years of pent up rock and roll burst out of him. Many shows he’d pull off most of his clothes and throw them into the audience, ending up dressed in just a bathrobe, on his knees. He would jump on the piano, and one night he even faked his own death, collapsing off the piano and lying still on the stage in the middle of a song, just to create a tension in the audience for when he suddenly jumped up and started singing “Tutti Frutti”. The tour was successful enough, and Richard’s performances created such a buzz, that when the package tour itself finished Richard was booked for a few extra gigs, including one at the Tower Ballroom in New Brighton where he headlined a bill of local bands from around Merseyside, including one who had released their first single a few weeks earlier. He then went to Hamburg with that group, and spent two months hanging out with them and performing in the same kinds of clubs, and teaching their bass player how he made his “whoo” sounds when singing. Richard was impressed enough by them that he got in touch with Art Rupe, who still had some contractual claim over Richard’s own recordings, to tell him about them, but Rupe said that he wasn’t interested in some English group, he just wanted Little Richard to go back into the studio and make more records for him. Richard headed back to the US, leaving Billy Preston stranded in Hamburg with his new friends, the Beatles. At first, he still wouldn’t record any rock and roll music, other than one song that Sam Cooke wrote for him, “Well Alright”, but after another UK tour he started to see that people who had been inspired by him were having the kind of success he thought he was due himself. He went back into the studio, backed by a group including Don and Dewey, who had been performing with him in the UK, and recorded what was meant to be his comeback single, “Bama Lama Bama Loo”: [Excerpt: Little Richard, “Bama Lama Bama Loo”] Unfortunately, great as it was, that single didn’t do anything in the charts, and Richard spent the rest of the sixties making record after record that failed to chart. Some of them were as good as anything he’d done in his fifties heyday, but his five years away from rock and roll music had killed his career as a recording artist. They hadn’t, though, killed him as a live performer, and he would spend the next fifty years touring, playing the hits he had recorded during that classic period from 1955 through 1957, with occasional breaks where he would be overcome by remorse, give up rock and roll music forever, and try to work as an evangelist and gospel singer, before the lure of material success and audience response brought him back to the world of sex and drugs and rock and roll. He eventually gave up performing live a few years ago, as decades of outrageous stage performances had exacerbated his disabilities. His last public performance was in 2013, in Las Vegas, and he was in a wheelchair — but because he’s Little Richard, the wheelchair was made to look like a golden throne.

A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs

Episode fifty-four of A History of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs looks at “Keep A Knockin'” by Little Richard, the long history of the song, and the tension between its performer’s faith and sexuality. Click the full post to read liner notes, links to more information, and a transcript of the episode.   Patreon backers also have a ten-minute bonus episode available, on “At the Hop” by Danny and the Juniors.   —-more—- Resources As always, I’ve created a Mixcloud streaming playlist with full versions of all the songs in the episode. Most of the information used here comes from The Life and Times of Little Richard: The Authorised Biography by Charles White, which is to all intents and purposes Richard’s autobiography, as much of the text is in his own words. A warning for those who might be considering buying this though — it contains descriptions of his abuse as a child, and is also full of internalised homo- bi- and trans-phobia. This collection contains everything Richard released before 1962, from his early blues singles through to his gospel albums from after he temporarily gave up rock and roll for the church. Patreon This podcast is brought to you by the generosity of my backers on Patreon. Why not join them? Erratum In the podcast I refer to a jazz band as “the Buddy Bolden Legacy Group”. Their name is actually “the Buddy Bolden Legacy Band”.   Transcript When last we looked at Little Richard properly, he had just had a hit with “Long Tall Sally”, and was at the peak of his career. Since then, we’ve seen that he had become big enough that he was chosen over Fats Domino to record the theme tune to “The Girl Can’t Help It”, and that he was the inspiration for James Brown. But today we’re going to look in more detail at Little Richard’s career in the mid fifties, and at how he threw away that career for his beliefs. [Excerpt: Little Richard with his Band, “Keep A Knockin'”] Richard’s immediate follow-up to “Long Tall Sally” was another of his most successful records, a double-sided hit with both songs credited to John Marascalco and Bumps Blackwell — “Rip it Up” backed with “Ready Teddy”. These both went to number one on the R&B charts, but they possibly didn’t have quite the same power as RIchard’s first two singles. Where the earlier singles had been truly unique artefacts, songs that didn’t sound like anything else out there, “Rip it Up” and “Ready Teddy” were both much closer to the typical songs of the time — the lyrics were about going out and having a party and rocking and rolling, rather than about sex with men or cross-dressing sex workers. But this didn’t make Richard any less successful, and throughout 1956 and 57 he kept releasing more hits, often releasing singles where both the A and B side became classics — we’ve discussed “The Girl Can’t Help It” and “She’s Got It” in the episode on “Twenty Flight Rock”, but there was also “Jenny Jenny”, “Send Me Some Lovin'”, and possibly the greatest of them all, “Lucille”: [Excerpt: Little Richard, “Lucille”] But Richard was getting annoyed at the routine of recording — or more precisely, he was getting annoyed at the musicians he was having to work with in the studio. He was convinced that his own backing band, the Upsetters, were at least as good as the studio musicians, and he was pushing for Specialty to let him use them in the studio. And when they finally let him use the Upsetters in the studio, he recorded a song which had roots which go much further back than you might imagine. “Keep A Knockin'” had a long, long, history. It derives originally from a piece called “A Bunch of Blues”, written by J. Paul Wyer and Alf Kelly in 1915. Wyer was a violin player with W.C. Handy’s band, and Handy recorded the tune in 1917: [Excerpt: W.C. Handy’s Memphis Blues Band, “A Bunch of Blues”] That itself, though, may derive from another song, “My Bucket’s Got A Hole in It”, which is an old jazz standard. There are claims that it was originally played by the great jazz trumpeter Buddy Bolden around the turn of the twentieth century. No recordings survive of Bolden playing the song, but a group called “the Buddy Bolden Legacy Group” have put together what, other than the use of modern recording, seems a reasonable facsimile of how Bolden would have played the song: [Excerpt: “My Bucket’s Got a Hole in it”, the Buddy Bolden Legacy Band] If Bolden did play that, then the melody dates back to around 1906 at the latest, as from 1907 on Bolden was in a psychiatric hospital with schizophrenia, but the 1915 date for “A Bunch of Blues” is the earliest definite date we have for the melody. “My Bucket’s Got a Hole in it” would later be recorded by everyone from Hank Williams to Louis Armstrong, Jimmy Page and Robert Plant to Willie Nelson and Wynton Marsalis. It was particularly popular among country singers: [Excerpt: Hank Williams, “My Bucket’s Got A Hole In It”] But the song took another turn in 1928, when it was recorded by Tampa Red’s Hokum Jug Band. This group featured Tampa Red, who would later go on to be a blues legend in his own right, and “Georgia Tom”, who as Thomas Dorsey would later be best known as the writer of much of the core repertoire of gospel music. You might remember us talking about Dorsey in the episode on Rosetta Tharpe. He’s someone who wrote dirty, funny, blues songs until he had a religious experience while on stage, and instead became a writer of religious music, writing songs like “Precious Lord, Take My Hand” and “Peace in the Valley”. But in 1928, he was still Georgia Tom and still recording hokum songs. We talked about hokum music right back in the earliest episodes of the podcast, but as a reminder, hokum music is a form which is now usually lumped into the blues by most of the few people who come across it, but which actually comes from vaudeville and especially from minstrel shows, and was hugely popular in the early decades of the twentieth century. It usually involved simple songs with a verse/chorus structure, and with lyrics that were an extended comedy metaphor, usually some form of innuendo about sex, with titles like “Meat Balls” and “Banana in Your Fruit Basket”. As you can imagine, this kind of music is one that influenced a lot of people who went on to influence Little Richard, and it’s in this crossover genre which had elements of country, blues, and pop that we find “My Bucket’s Got a Hole in it” turning into the song that would later be known as “Keep A Knockin'”. Tampa Red’s version was titled “You Can’t Come In”, and seems to have been the origin not only of “Keep A Knockin'” but also of the Lead Belly song “Midnight Special” — you can hear the similarity in the guitar melody: [Excerpt: Tampa Red’s Hokum Jug Band, “You Can’t Come In”] The version by Tampa Red’s Hokum Jug Band wasn’t the first recording to combine the “Keep a Knockin'” lyrics with the “My Bucket’s Got a Hole In It” melody — the piano player Bert Mays recorded a version a month earlier, and Mays and his producer Mayo Williams, one of the first black record producers, are usually credited as the songwriters as a result (with Little Richard also being credited on his version). Mays was in turn probably inspired by an earlier recording by James “Boodle It” Wiggins, but Wiggins had a different melody — Mays seems to be the one who first combined the lyrics with the “My Bucket’s Got a Hole In It” melody on a recording. But the idea was probably one that had been knocking around for a while in various forms, given the number of different variations of the melody that turn up, and Tampa Red’s version inspired all the future recordings. As hokum music lies at the roots of both blues and country, it’s not surprising that “You Can’t Come in” was picked up by both country and blues musicians. A version of the song, for example, was recorded by, among others, Milton Brown — who had been an early musical partner of Bob Wills and one of the people who helped create Western Swing. [Excerpt: Milton Brown and his Musical Brownies: “Keep A Knockin'”] But the version that Little Richard recorded was most likely inspired by Louis Jordan’s version. Jordan was, of course, Richard’s single biggest musical inspiration, so we can reasonably assume that the record by Jordan was the one that pushed him to record the song. [Excerpt: Louis Jordan, “Keep A Knockin'”] The Jordan record was probably brought to mind in 1955 when Smiley Lewis had a hit with Dave Bartholomew’s take on the idea. “I Hear You Knockin'” only bears a slight melodic resemblance to “Keep A Knockin'”, but the lyrics are so obviously inspired by the earlier song that it would have brought it to mind for anyone who had heard any of the earlier versions: [Excerpt: Smiley Lewis, “I Hear You Knockin'”] That was also recorded by Fats Domino, one of Little Richard’s favourite musicians, so we can be sure that Richard had heard it. So by the time Little Richard came to record “Keep A Knockin'” in very early 1957, he had a host of different versions he could draw on for inspiration. But what we ended up with is something that’s uniquely Little Richard — something that was altogether wilder: [Excerpt: Little Richard and his band, “Keep A Knockin'”] In some takes of the song, Richard also sang a verse about drinking gin, which was based on Louis Jordan’s version which had a similar verse: [Excerpt: Little Richard, “Keep A Knockin'”, “drinking gin” verse from take three] But in the end, what they ended up with was only about fifty-seven seconds worth of usable recording. Listening to the session recording, it seems that Grady Gaines kept trying different things with his saxophone solo, and not all of them quite worked as well as might be hoped — there are a few infelicities in most of his solos, though not anything that you wouldn’t expect from a good player trying new things. To get it to a usable length, they copied and pasted the whole song from the start of Richard’s vocal through to the end of the saxophone solo, and almost doubled the length of the song — the third and fourth verses, and the second saxophone solo, are the same recording as the first and second verses and the first sax solo. If you want to try this yourself, it seems that the “whoo” after the first “keep a knockin’ but you can’t come in” after the second sax solo is the point where the copy/pasting ends. But even though the recording ended up being a bit of a Frankenstein’s monster, it remains one of Little Richard’s greatest tracks. At the same session, he also recorded another of his very best records, “Ooh! My Soul!”: [Excerpt: Little Richard, “Ooh! My Soul!”] That session also produced a single for Richard’s chauffeur, with Richard on the piano, released under the name “Pretty Boy”: [Excerpt: Pretty Boy, “Bip Bop Bip”] “Pretty Boy” would later go on to be better known as Don Covay, and would have great success as a soul singer and songwriter. He’s now probably best known for writing “Chain of Fools” for Aretha Franklin. That session was a productive one, but other than one final session in October 1957, in which he knocked out a couple of blues songs as album fillers, it would be Little Richard’s last rock and roll recording session for several years. Richard had always been deeply conflicted about… well, about everything, really. He was attracted to men as well as women, he loved rock and roll and rhythm and blues music, loved eating chitlins and pork chops, drinking, and taking drugs, and was unsure about his own gender identity. He was also deeply, deeply, religious, and a believer in the Seventh Day Adventist church, which believed that same-sex attraction, trans identities, and secular music were the work of the Devil, and that one should keep a vegetarian and kosher diet, and avoid all drugs, even caffeine. This came to a head in October 1957. Richard was on a tour of Australia with Gene Vincent, Eddie Cochran, and Alis Lesley, who was another of the many singers billed as “the female Elvis Presley”: [Excerpt: Alis Lesley, “He Will Come Back To Me”] Vincent actually had to miss the first couple of shows on the tour, as he and the Blue Caps got held up in Honolulu, apparently due to visa issues, and couldn’t continue on to Australia with the rest of the tour until that was sorted out. They were replaced on those early shows by a local group, Johnny O’Keefe and the Dee Jays, who performed some of Vincent’s songs as well as their own material, and who managed to win the audiences round even though they were irritated at Vincent’s absence. O’Keefe isn’t someone we’re going to be able to discuss in much detail in this series, because he had very little impact outside of Australia. But within Australia, he’s something of a legend as their first home-grown rock and roll star. And he did make one record which people outside of Australia have heard of — his biggest hit, from 1958, “Wild One”, which has since been covered by, amongst others, Jerry Lee Lewis and Iggy Pop: [Excerpt: Johnny O’Keefe, “Wild One”] The flight to Australia was longer and more difficult than any Richard had experienced before, and at one point he looked out of the window and saw the engines glowing red. He became convinced that the plane was on fire, and being held up by angels. He became even more worried a couple of days later when Russia launched their first satellite, Sputnik, and it passed low over Australia — low enough that he claimed he could see it, like a fireball in the sky, while he was performing. He decided this was a sign, and that he was being told by God that he needed to give up his life of sin and devote himself to religion. He told the other people on the tour this, but they didn’t believe him — until he threw all his rings into the ocean to prove it. He insisted on cancelling his appearances with ten days of the tour left to go and travelling back to the US with his band. He has often also claimed that the plane they were originally scheduled to fly back on crashed in the Pacific on the flight he would have been on — I’ve seen no evidence anywhere else of this, and I have looked. When he got back, he cut one final session for Specialty, and then went into a seminary to start studying for the ministry. While his religious belief is genuine, there has been some suggestion that this move wasn’t solely motivated by his conversion. Rather, John Marascalco has often claimed that Richard’s real reason for his conversion was based on more worldly considerations. Richard’s contract with Specialty was only paying him half a cent per record sold, which he considered far too low, and the wording of the contract only let him end it on either his own death or an act of god. He was trying — according to Marascalco — to claim that his religious awakening was an act of God, and so he should be allowed to break his contract and sign with another label. Whatever the truth, Specialty had enough of a backlog of Little Richard recordings that they could keep issuing them for the next couple of years. Some of those, like “Good Golly Miss Molly” were as good as anything he had ever recorded. and rightly became big hits: [Excerpt: Little Richard, “Good Golly Miss Molly”] Many others, though, were substandard recordings that they originally had no plans to release — but with Richard effectively on strike and the demand for his recordings undiminished, they put out whatever they had. Richard went out on the road as an evangelist, but also went to study to become a priest. He changed his whole lifestyle — he married a woman, although they would later divorce as, among other things, they weren’t sexually compatible. He stopped drinking and taking drugs, stopped even drinking coffee, and started eating only vegetables cooked in vegetable oil. After the lawsuits over him quitting Specialty records were finally settled, he started recording again, but only gospel songs: [Excerpt: Little Richard, “Precious Lord, Take My Hand”] And that was how things stood for several years. The tension between Richard’s sexuality and his religion continued to torment him — he dropped out of the seminary after propositioning another male student, and he was arrested in a public toilet — but he continued his evangelism and gospel singing until October 1962, when he went on tour in the UK. Just like the previous tour which had been a turning point in his life, this one featured Gene Vincent, but was also affected by Vincent’s work permit problems. This time, Vincent was allowed in the country but wasn’t allowed to perform on stage — so he appeared only as the compere, at least at the start of the tour — later on, he would sing “Be Bop A Lula” from offstage as well. Vincent wasn’t the only one to have problems, either. Sam Cooke, who was the second-billed star for the show, was delayed and couldn’t make the first show, which was a bit of a disaster. Richard was accompanied by a young gospel organ player named Billy Preston, and he’d agreed to the tour under the impression that he was going to be performing only his gospel music. Don Arden, the promoter, had been promoting it as Richard’s first rock and roll tour in five years, and the audience were very far from impressed when Richard came on stage in flowing white robes and started singing “Peace in the Valley” and other gospel songs. Arden was apoplectic. If Richard didn’t start performing rock and roll songs soon, he would have to cancel the whole tour — an audience that wanted “Rip it Up” and “Long Tall Sally” and “Tutti Frutti” wasn’t going to put up with being preached at. Arden didn’t know what to do, and when Sam Cooke and his manager J.W. Alexander turned up to the second show, Arden had a talk with Alexander about it. Alexander told Arden he had nothing to worry about — he knew Little Richard of old, and knew that Richard couldn’t stand to be upstaged. He also knew how good Sam Cooke was. Cooke was at the height of his success at this point, and he was an astonishing live performer, and so when he went out on stage and closed the first half, including an incendiary performance of “Twistin’ the Night Away” that left the audience applauding through the intermission, Richard knew he had to up his game. While he’d not been performing rock and roll in public, he had been tempted back into the studio to record in his old style at least once before, when he’d joined his old group to record Fats Domino’s “I’m In Love Again”, for a single that didn’t get released until December 1962. The single was released as by “the World Famous Upsetters”, but the vocalist on the record was very recognisable: [Excerpt: The World Famous Upsetters, “I’m In Love Again”] So Richard’s willpower had been slowly bending, and Sam Cooke’s performance was the final straw. Little Richard was going to show everyone what star power really was. When Richard came out on stage, he spent a whole minute in pitch darkness, with the band vamping, before a spotlight suddenly picked him out, in an all-white suit, and he launched into “Long Tall Sally”. The British tour was a massive success, and Richard kept becoming wilder and more frantic on stage, as five years of pent up rock and roll burst out of him. Many shows he’d pull off most of his clothes and throw them into the audience, ending up dressed in just a bathrobe, on his knees. He would jump on the piano, and one night he even faked his own death, collapsing off the piano and lying still on the stage in the middle of a song, just to create a tension in the audience for when he suddenly jumped up and started singing “Tutti Frutti”. The tour was successful enough, and Richard’s performances created such a buzz, that when the package tour itself finished Richard was booked for a few extra gigs, including one at the Tower Ballroom in New Brighton where he headlined a bill of local bands from around Merseyside, including one who had released their first single a few weeks earlier. He then went to Hamburg with that group, and spent two months hanging out with them and performing in the same kinds of clubs, and teaching their bass player how he made his “whoo” sounds when singing. Richard was impressed enough by them that he got in touch with Art Rupe, who still had some contractual claim over Richard’s own recordings, to tell him about them, but Rupe said that he wasn’t interested in some English group, he just wanted Little Richard to go back into the studio and make more records for him. Richard headed back to the US, leaving Billy Preston stranded in Hamburg with his new friends, the Beatles. At first, he still wouldn’t record any rock and roll music, other than one song that Sam Cooke wrote for him, “Well Alright”, but after another UK tour he started to see that people who had been inspired by him were having the kind of success he thought he was due himself. He went back into the studio, backed by a group including Don and Dewey, who had been performing with him in the UK, and recorded what was meant to be his comeback single, “Bama Lama Bama Loo”: [Excerpt: Little Richard, “Bama Lama Bama Loo”] Unfortunately, great as it was, that single didn’t do anything in the charts, and Richard spent the rest of the sixties making record after record that failed to chart. Some of them were as good as anything he’d done in his fifties heyday, but his five years away from rock and roll music had killed his career as a recording artist. They hadn’t, though, killed him as a live performer, and he would spend the next fifty years touring, playing the hits he had recorded during that classic period from 1955 through 1957, with occasional breaks where he would be overcome by remorse, give up rock and roll music forever, and try to work as an evangelist and gospel singer, before the lure of material success and audience response brought him back to the world of sex and drugs and rock and roll. He eventually gave up performing live a few years ago, as decades of outrageous stage performances had exacerbated his disabilities. His last public performance was in 2013, in Las Vegas, and he was in a wheelchair — but because he’s Little Richard, the wheelchair was made to look like a golden throne.

CPR's Clubhouse
CPR’s Clubhouse (Owl Be True)

CPR's Clubhouse

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2019 71:45


CPR's Clubhouse (Owl Be True) Introducing Cheryl Rodriguez; the newest member of CPR's Clubhouse and future host of Club House Dance Music on 90.7 FM WTCC in Western MA and CT Fondly known as Owl Be True on social media, Cheryl Rodriguez is a Freestyle historian and student of the genre. Listen to her segment at 30:50 of the podcast; dedicated to Synthia Figueroa We also countdown the hottest songs in Freestyle today featuring George Anthony vs George Lamond, Giggles (Marla), Julio Mena, Shawn Davis, Jenni Renee featuring Synthia Figueroa, Spanish Fly featuring Aki Starr, Ray Guell, Nyasia, Johnny O. and Zoe. https://open.spotify.com/show/6s2plXbc9mooaR6VNIlzAu Listen to CPR’s Clubhouse Podcast by clicking the links to the following apps: CLICK HERE or CHOOSE FROM THE LIST Itunes PodcastsTuneIn Radio AppGoogle Play Music (Podcasts) iHeartRADIO SPOTIFY  Audio Player

CPR's Clubhouse
CPR’s Clubhouse (Como Puedo Olvidar)

CPR's Clubhouse

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2019 57:36


CPR's Clubhouse (Como Puedo Olvidar) For a second week in a row Freestyle has suffered a loss. Ct. Freestyle Artist, Rick Miguel of Reza Records died today in a vehicular accident. On behalf of Club House Dance Music and the CPR's Clubhouse Podcast, we would like to send our condolences to the Bustamante Family and Friends. https://open.spotify.com/show/6s2plXbc9mooaR6VNIlzAu?t=0 CPR's Top 10 Countdown features George Anthony vs George Lamond, Jenni Renee f. Synthia Fugueroa, Johnny O, Ray Guell, Julio Mena, Spanish Fly f. Aki Starr, Giggle, Zoe, Shawn Davis and Nyasia The Battle of The Freestyle All Stars ChallengeRules If you are a "Freestyle Artist" and you have a new song (no older than 60 days) that you THINK belongs on CPR's Top 10 Countdown but it's not featured then you can challenge any of the songs currently listed on the countdown We will pit you against each otherIf you winYou get their spot Who wants to challenge the number one song?How about number 7? Put your Freestyle Where Your Mouth Is!!!-CPR Jose Ortiz Plus we countdown the hottest songs in Freestyle right now. Listen to CPR’s Clubhouse Podcast by clicking the links to the following apps: CLICK HERE or CHOOSE FROM THE LIST Itunes PodcastsTuneIn Radio AppGoogle Play Music (Podcasts) iHeartRADIO SPOTIFY  Hosted by CPR Jose Ortiz from www.cprsmusic.com

Nights With Geno
Freestyle Explosion Tampa 2019: Interviews with Stevie B, Lisa Lisa and Shannon

Nights With Geno

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2019 28:04


Saturday night was simply one of the most fun nights in my career.  We were live on the Q105 Saturday Night Dance Party from the Yuengling Center at USF in Tampa.  Plus I was the on-stage host for the Freestyle Explosion.  It was a night of chaos and running around, but my lost voice and sore body this morning are souvenirs of one hell of a night.  Here are some of my favorite moments backstage, including me completely not noticing Stevie B calling out Johnny O over the title of "King of Freestyle," Shannon showing the world how amazing she is with positivity and love, and Lisa Lisa fills us in on working with Snoop Dogg!

CPR's Clubhouse
CPR’s Clubhouse (Follow You)

CPR's Clubhouse

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2019 56:55


CPR's Clubhouse (Follow You) Listen to CPR’s Clubhouse Podcast by clicking the links to the following apps: CLICK HERE or CHOOSE FROM THE LIST Itunes PodcastsTuneIn Radio AppGoogle Play Music (Podcasts) iHeartRADIO SPOTIFY  https://open.spotify.com/show/6s2plXbc9mooaR6VNIlzAu Two new songs enter CPR's Top 10 Countdown this week as we feature the hottest songs in Freestyle today. It's the perfect 10! A combination of great writing, production and vocals. Featuring Shawn Davis, Nyasia, Julio Mena, Ray Guell, Spanish Fly/ Aki Starr, Jenni Renee, Giggles, Johnny O and Zoe Will George Anthony vs George Lamond hold on to the top spot for 5 weeks in a row? Press play and find out

CPR's Clubhouse
CPR’s Clubhouse (All Hooked Up – Sorry)

CPR's Clubhouse

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 22, 2019 66:08


CPR's Clubhouse (All Hooked Up - Sorry) Ray Guell debuts his new song Don't Take Your Love Away (Sorry), produced by Giuseppe D https://open.spotify.com/show/6s2plXbc9mooaR6VNIlzAu Plus Mr. Exclusive, CPR Jose Ortiz debuts ALL HOOKED UP (Artistik Remix) now featuring Jenni Renee and Synthia Figueroa Episode 593 also features CPR's Top 10 Countdown! Who will be number one? George Anthony and George Lamond look to remain number 1 for 2 weeks in a row with challengers like Shawn Davis, Julio Mena, Aki Starr, LisCyn, Johnny O, Nyasia, Diddle D, Audi Medina and Jenni Renee Listen to CPR’s Top 10 Countdown by clicking the links to the following apps: Itunes PodcastsTuneIn Radio AppGoogle Play Music (Podcasts) iHeartRADIO SPOTIFY 

CPR's Clubhouse
CPR’s Clubhouse (Heartbeat Away)

CPR's Clubhouse

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 5, 2019 51:40


CPR's Clubhouse (Heartbeat Away) CPR's Friday Night Top 10 Countdown returns for one night only as we present the hottest songs in Freestyle Today 4 songs debut on the countdown including Shawn Davis - Heartbeat Away, Adelis - Run To Me, Jae Mazor and Aiki - Dream of Your Love and Audi Medina - Sunrise Plus Jae Mazor - You Don't Know Me looks to make it two weeks at number one With music from Johnny O, LisCyn (Lisette Melendez and Cynthia), Aki Starr, Jenni Renee Listen to CPR's Top 10 Countdown by clicking the links to the following apps: Itunes PodcastsTuneIn Radio AppGoogle Play Music (Podcasts) iHeartRADIO SPOTIFY