Podcasts about CMO

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Best podcasts about CMO

Show all podcasts related to cmo

Latest podcast episodes about CMO

B2B Mentors
Are LinkedIn Newsletters REALLY Worth It? - CC #048

B2B Mentors

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2022 9:21


Are LinkedIn Newsletters REALLY Worth It? - CC #048Attend a FREE B2B Mentors Marketing Mastermind: www.activeblogs.com/liveevent/Follow and connect with the host, Connor Dube on LinkedIn here: https://www.linkedin.com/in/socialsellingexpert/Instagram: connor_dubeIf you're already thinking you need to find a more efficient way to conquer your monthly B2B content like blogs, newsletters, and social media – we'd like to show you how we can improve the quality, save you tons of time, and achieve better results! To learn more visit www.activeblogs.com

The Jimmy Rex Show
#323 - Steve Robinson - Author of “Covert Cows” & Former CMO Of Chic-fil-A Shares How They Built One Of Americas Top Brands

The Jimmy Rex Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2022 41:16


Guest Bio:Steve Robinson is a consultant, author and speaker on organizational culture design & leadership, brand strategy development, marketing planning, and distinctive advertising principles.He is the former Executive Vice President and Chief Marketing Officer of Chick-fil-A, Inc., 1981-2015. Prior to joining the company, Steve was the director of marketing for Six Flags Over Georgia theme park in Atlanta, Georgia. This role was preceded by marketing positions at two other Six Flags properties and communications manager at Texas Instruments.After beginning his career at Chick-fil-A as director of marketing, Steve went on to serve as vice president of the department before becoming chief marketing officer. In his most recent role, he was responsible for overseeing marketing, advertising, brand development, menu development, and hospitality strategies.Today, Steve tells the story of Chic-fil-A, engages in public speaking events, and consults for up and coming entrepreneurs.

The Just Baseball Show
144 | Three Problems, Three (Attempted) Solutions for the San Diego Padres

The Just Baseball Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2022 60:17


Peter and Jack welcome Javier Reyes, CMO, and Host of Locked on Padres. Javier has three major concerns for the team in 2022, but they all get their minds together to try and solve them. Get Your Just Baseball Merch! Check out our website: https://www.justbaseball.com/ Personal Twitters: @peterappel23, @jack_mcmullen11, @aramleighton8 New MLB Prospects Podcast: The Call-Up! Please subscribe and leave a five-star review if you enjoy the Just Baseball Show on Apple Podcasts or Spotify. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Outbound Metrics | B2B Outbound Sales
#143: (Re-Air) Outbound Sales: The Next Decade of Outbound (Alex Gray)

Outbound Metrics | B2B Outbound Sales

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2022 38:40


Alex Gray is the Co-Founder and CMO of List Kit. ListKit is a Done-For-You, hyper-personalized B2B list building service that delivers contact lists straight to your inbox. Join the Facebook Group (B2B SaaS Cold Outreach Mastery): http://morgandwilliams.com/fbgroup --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/morgan-williams0/message

B2B Mentors
5 B2B Marketing Funnel Ideas (And Bonuses) - CC #047

B2B Mentors

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 20:33


5 B2B Marketing Funnel Ideas (And Bonuses) - CC #047Attend a FREE B2B Mentors Marketing Mastermind: www.activeblogs.com/liveevent/Follow and connect with the host, Connor Dube on LinkedIn here: https://www.linkedin.com/in/socialsellingexpert/Instagram: connor_dubeIf you're already thinking you need to find a more efficient way to conquer your monthly B2B content like blogs, newsletters, and social media – we'd like to show you how we can improve the quality, save you tons of time, and achieve better results! To learn more visit www.activeblogs.com

Klaviyo Growth Podcast
Breaking the Marketing Mold with William Painter

Klaviyo Growth Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 39:04


In this episode, we're sitting down with Patrick Eckstein — co-founder and CMO of William Painter. Known for their durable bottle-opening sunglasses, William Painter's origin story is anything but ordinary. Learn how two best friends took a crazy college business idea to the next level by finding mentors and always staying true to the spirit of their initial idea. Although their marketing efforts have evolved and they've professionalized in many ways, it's important to the William Painter brand that their message connects with their audience on a personal level and goes beyond just selling sunglasses. Want more interactive Klaviyo educational experiences? Visit https://www.klaviyo.com/events/live-training to see what sessions we're offering and to register for upcoming events. See you soon!

Smart Agency Masterclass with Jason Swenk: Podcast for Digital Marketing Agencies
How This Agency Got to $40 Million by Setting Clear Financial Goals

Smart Agency Masterclass with Jason Swenk: Podcast for Digital Marketing Agencies

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 24:44


Do you want to get your agency to the eight-figure mark and beyond? What are you doing to get to that level? Erik Huberman had started a few e-commerce companies and was unimpressed by the agencies he had worked with, so he decided to form a small team that could assist his clients. He quickly saw a positive response and created Hawke Media, an outsourced CMO and marketing team that customizes data-driven, performance solutions to help launch, scale, and invigorate businesses. In this interview, Erik talks about how setting financial goals helped him grow his agency to over $40 million. He also shares his marketing methodology and his book, The Hawke Method.  Plus the mistake many agencies make when they start growing, and much more. 3 Golden Nuggets On goal-setting. During the first year of his business, Erik saw things were going well and decided to set financial goals for the next couple of years. He met every one of them, so he believes there's a lot to be said about setting a goal and striving to hit it, and having incremental goals to get there. This will force you to step up when you're falling behind and keep you proactive in the market. In his case, he mainly used it as a scoreboard, as an indicator of growth. It really helped during the agency's first years and he noticed a difference when he stopped doing it around year six. Agency mistakes. According to Erik, some agencies tend to protect themselves a little too much once they get good and do it too soon. “They start throwing out long contracts, high minimums, they go upmarket, they only want to work with fortune 2000,” he says. He believes that this behavior alienates the people that got the business to that point. It is a solid way of doing business and works for many agencies, but Erik decided it wasn't for him and went on to build his business model on challenging himself to consider can you be one of the best marketing companies out there and still work with small and medium businesses too? Understanding the purchase cycle. A lot of marketers and agencies fail to understand the idea of a sales cycle or a purchase cycle. Many times agencies advertise for clients that ask for daily performance reports. “The problem with that,” he explains, “is that what we've seen in e-commerce is that for a $50 average order value will be about a three-week purchase cycle and about five weeks for a hundred dollars,” so understanding the purchase cycle will be critical for the agency-client relationship and a big part of setting realistic expectations about the work. Sponsors and Resources Verblio: Today's episode of the Smart Agency Masterclass is sponsored by Verblio. Check out Verblio.com/smartagency and get 50% off your first month of content creation. Our team loves using Verblio because of the ease in their process and their large pool of crowd-sourced writers. Subscribe Apple | Spotify | iHeart Radio | Stitcher | Radio FM Getting to $40 million by setting financial goals & understanding the purchase cycle {These transcripts have been auto-generated. While largely accurate, they may contain some errors.} Jason: [00:00:00] What's up, agency owners? Jason Swenk and I got another amazing guest. And we're going to talk with Eric of Hawke Media and how they built an almost $40 million agency, or probably by now, they're already over 40 million and cresting the many, many commas, whatever in there. So, excited to get the episode. Let's jump in. Hey, Erik. Welcome to the show. Erik: [00:00:29] Thanks for having me. Jason: [00:00:30] Yeah, man. Excited to have you on. So tell us who you are and what do you do? Erik: [00:00:35] Sure. Uh, Erik Huberman, co-founder and CEO of Hawke Media. We're basically an outsource CMO and marketing team to companies. So we go into brands, identify full-time marketing and spin up different experts. All à la carte month to month. So it could be a Facebook marketer, email marketer, web designer. We've been around about eight years up to 70 full-time people. We run marketing for about 600 brands. And then we also have a venture fund and a financing arm as well, amongst many other things. Jason: [00:01:01] Awesome. And so why did you guys start an agency? What got you into it? Erik: [00:01:06] I built and sold a couple e-comm brands and through my own experience, as well as then I started advising and consulting for a lot of other brands found out that 99% of agencies out there for lack of better word are full of shit. And kept getting frustrated over and over again and went screw it I'm just going to hire my own small team to help these companies. And so built my little SWAT team and immediately saw the benefits. Like my clients started to like what we did. They started to grow and we started to need more and more people and just started to grow from there. Jason: [00:01:35] Awesome. So you guys have been doing it for eight years. You guys are almost 40 million or maybe over it. Talk about some of the progression that you guys went through. Like how long did it take to get over the million mark? Was it fairly quick? Did it take long? Like what clicked? That kind of stuff. Erik: [00:01:53] Yeah. In the first week of business, I shouldn't say first week, I think it was like… a month in, because for the first month, I wasn't sure… I was like I built this team. I started working on clients and I was like, maybe I'll build my next company and then turn this team into my own team. And so I wasn't sure what I was going to do there. And then after a month I was like, wow, this is really working. I should double down on this. And so I set a goal and I would put it on a thermometer. I was like, all right, the first four years we're going to do one, two and a half, five, 10 million. That's, that's the goals. And we came within 1% of all four of those goals. So I think there's a lot to be said about setting a goal and then really driving to hit it and having incremental goals to get there so you know how you're tracking against that goal. Because it forces you when you're falling behind to step up. If it's too easy of a goal, you actually end up, well you will hit that goal is still. Like it's, I don't think when you set a goal, you ended up blowing past it, you manage accordingly. So setting those goals really helped the first four years. And frankly, we didn't set goals for years five and six. And I saw the downside of that. I saw us not grow as fast, not do as well and not really know which direction we're going. But also, at that point we were big enough that it felt weird to just set another financial goal. It's like, yeah, but what are we really trying to do? And it took a couple of years to develop that, but now we're pretty clear. Jason: [00:03:07] And you listed out financial goals. Were there any other goals? And not talking about the incremental goals, I want to get to those in a second. But was it just revenue goals? And then, hey, what are the little ones that we need to do to get there? Erik: [00:03:19] Yeah, frankly, it was because that was the best scoreboard we had it. It wasn't any… It was intrinsic in the sense of like the goal was a goal cause it was the goal. It wasn't because then we could afford this or if you could do that. It was more of just an indicator of growth. And we assume that if we're hitting those numbers, we're also growing in the ways we need to be growing. And so we knew what the levers that we needed to pull were between bringing in new business, retaining our business, retaining our people, all sorts of specific metrics that helped us hit those goals. That became a factor of it. But it was, that was the end scoreboard. That was sort of the result that we were looking for. Jason: [00:03:50] So let's talk about the incremental goals at the stage to get to the million in the first year. And then let's talk about the incremental goals after that for the two and a half to five. I think that'd be interesting. Erik: [00:04:01] Sure. Yeah, we just knew basically, and this is a rough number, we actually got, every year, we got better and better at this in terms of like, where do we need to be this month, next month? How do we need to be tracking? But I also knew where were we six months in needed to be basically the run rate, assuming we went from zero to, you know, like the run rate for a million bucks is what? 80? Jason: [00:04:19] 82, 50. I think. Erik: [00:04:21] A month. Is that right? Yeah. Jason: [00:04:23] Don't make me do math on the podcast. Erik: [00:04:26] There we go. 82,500 a month. So anyways, we, I knew around 80 grand and so I was like, okay, so we need to be there within six months because then we need to make up for not being there the first six months. So we need to balance it out and assume that if we're going growing steadily, that'll be where we can do it. Now, in marketing Q4 is usually a little better, so we ended up going up. But, yeah, I mean, first year we did $1.01 million. Like, literally just beat it. And it was surprising, but we did it and it was all around uh, yeah, just aiming for it. So like when we, and again, I don't remember, it's been seven and a half years, but I, you know, assuming there were months where we were falling behind a little bit, that's where we ramp it up and be like we got to bring in more business, we got to retain, what are we going to do to make sure we hit these numbers? And so we would, it would light a fire under our ass to hit it because also those were ambitious goals to grow that fast. And to grow 150% next year and a hundred percent the next year and a hundred percent the next year we had to do a lot. So anytime we were off track, it just kicked us into gear that we have to hit that. Jason: [00:05:27] And I like that, you know, too many people set out a goal, but then they don't have an action plan in order to hit it or a place where they can measure it. And they just look, oh, January came, oh, we didn't hit it. Well, no shit. Like you, you were reactive to the market. You weren't proactive. You didn't try new things. You just kind of sat back. Erik: [00:05:47] Yeah. The term I hear from the best operators out there is leading indicators. What are the actual controllable leading indicators and get to that result? And in the first year we had no idea because like, I don't know how many people I have to talk to you to how many leads we get to… Like, we didn't have a funnel built. But I did know when we weren't hitting it the levers to pull. So I didn't have it down to a science yet. Now we do. Now my forecaster can give us our revenue within 1% and its forecast to the entire year accurately based on what the inputs are. And then it's just a function of manage, you know, being disciplined about the inputs is how you scale a business at this size. And even earlier, but statistics play out the bigger you get too. Jason: [00:06:23] Yeah. What are some of the, now that you guys have figured it out up till this point what are some of the leading indicators that are really important for getting over the eight-figure mark? Erik: [00:06:34] Yeah. So I would say having a really good handle on your average retention of a client is number one. How much… those clients once you have the retention. But it depends on your agency. We run an agency with that's a different type of scale. We have 600 active clients. So if you're running more of a traditional like creative agency, or if you have bigger clients, but smaller amount, the statistics get a little harder. But for us, because of the scale averages play out. And so we know our average lifetime value of a customer, we consistently try to improve that, but we know where it is and we measure against it constantly so that we can improve it, know that we're doing things that improve it. And then what's your cost to acquire a customer and what your pipeline looks like and what are your conversions on the pipeline? So from lead to qualified lead to, for us proposal, to service agreement, to verbal commitment, to assign the commitment, what is the breakage at each of those stages? And then we know based on the pipeline we have, how much business is going to come in the next month or two. And then we can also then know what does it cost us to get a lead? How much are we investing in marketing? Which ways are we going to drive those leads? So how many leads about can we assume? And then you get that waterfall when you can start to anticipate how many leads do you need, and then you manage against that. Okay. So we're going to need… whatever it is, a thousand leads this month to hit the numbers we want to hit next month. Let's go make sure we get a thousand needs. What are the ways to do that? Well, we have outbound marketing. We also have outbound sales. We have partnerships, we have every type of inbound marketing, advertising, etcetera. These are all things we can… leverages we can pull to make sure we hit the lead count we need to. And then frankly, at this stage all leads are not created equal. So we actually measure different leads at different values. Jason: [00:08:08] I love it. I love that you look at the leading indicators because then you can make the adjustment rather than wait, wait to the very end. Let's kind of switch focus, or maybe not switch focus too much, but let's talk about the Hawke Method. Tell us a little bit more about that. Erik: [00:08:23] Yeah. So it's been, you know, basically our marketing methodology that I've leveraged right now. It's been how I look at marketing for a dozen of years, but pop media has the entire time. I've spoken about this hundreds of times at different conferences and we decided to put a book together called “The Hawke Method” that we just pre-launched that's coming out in Q1 that basically kind of digest… In a really easy-to-digest way everything we think of when we're looking at a company and their marketing. So how do we look at their strategy? How do we assess what they're doing? And how do we know where to invest? Where to pull back? What channels to use? And so it goes from like the very high level, we call it “awareness, nurturing, and trust” the three pillars of marketing. And so we look at, are they covering those three pillars? Where are they not covering? And then we dive into and that awareness breaks down into advertising and PR and word of mouth and a few other things. And then even in advertising, where do you advertise? Is it Google? Is it Facebook? Is it Tik ToK, Snapchat, etcetera. And so we break down into how to look at all these different things in a way that we try to make it replicable as things change, meaning like it's a thesis and a methodology. It's not a tactic that works right now and won't work a year from now. And so, yeah, we basically put that together in a 200-page book and are putting it out there. And working on selling 20,000 copies and making it a New York Times bestseller, and we've already had several universities picked it up, like we're really making traction on getting it out there as a new way of looking at marketing. Jason: [00:09:50] What are, I mean, obviously you've seen a ton of agencies and you guys have acquired a bunch from what I've heard. What do you think a marketing front agencies do wrong for themselves? Erik: [00:10:04] Interesting. I… So this is my, a very controversial statement, but I think that they protect themselves too much when they get good. I think that the, what I see happen with agencies that I don't agree with that has worked for plenty of people, so I'm not saying that never do this, I'm just saying this is my own view. Every agency that gets good and gets a good reputation, starts to be seen well in a, you know, sort of in the ecosystem, they start protecting themselves. They start throwing out long contracts, high minimums, they go up market. They only want to work with fortune 2000. They do all these things that yes, they created, that's a solid way of doing business. I get it. But it alienates all the people that got you there. So I'm always kind of turned sideways to that. Why can't you build a business model and now thankfully we have, but this was our thesis, but why can't you build a business model of still being one of the best marketing companies out there, but still working with small and medium businesses too? I'm not saying don't work with Nike and the big guys, but you can work with small guys too. And so that's really what built it. I think that a lot of times is interesting. I watched a lot of agencies struggle to get up to the eight-figure mark, because they get a little pretentious and they in too early. There's agencies that are doing eight figures that I know that get pretentious and do just fine with it cause they can be. I'd say WPromote, you know, in the market they're constantly trying to go up market and stop working with small and medium businesses. They, you know, got, I think it was Gartner to rate them as one of the best digital agencies, like few years ago. And like, so they started getting a bunch of Fortune 500 interest and leveraged that. I don't know how it's gone for them in the past couple of years because actually those agencies hurt really bad in COVID. But I think that, you know, there's reasons to do it later, but a lot of companies jumped the gun and then they're like, oh, well, you know… One of my favorite things is like, we're staying small and boutique because we can serve our clients better. And I always go, okay, so you're telling me that I should hire you to scale my business and you don't know how to scale your own. Like, explain that one to me. Now, if it's a creative agency, different story, but I'm talking about like the growth and performance agencies that say they're staying boutique, like then you're not good because you don't know what you don't understand growing a business. Jason: [00:12:12] Are you looking for a content creation solution for your agency or clients? Verblio can help you with everything from blog posts, eBooks to video scripts, and a lot more. Verblio is a crowdsource solution to content creation with the pool of more than 3000 highly vetted writer who produce custom SEO-rich content. In fact, my team has been using Verblio and we love the ease of their process. With Verblio, we set the criteria for the style and the tone, and then they match you with the writers that have the expertise in your subject matter. Verblio is a platform specifically designed for agencies, and that's why for a limited time, they're offering my listeners 50% off the first month of content. Just go to verblio.com/smartagency to learn more. That's Verblio V E R B L I O.com/smartagency. Well, I think what happens is they hit, like, I look at it as like six stages of scaling an agency and they get to a point where their business doesn't have the right systems in place. Everything relies on them, they haven't shared the vision with their leadership team. They don't have a leadership team, right? They've gotten to this point by accident. And I think you can get over the couple of million by accident. Getting to the eight-figure mark is not by accident, but to stay there is true skill. Erik: [00:13:41] Yeah, you brought up this point earlier that I actually think relates to that. So I drove, uh, 85% of our business up until we were about a 7 million runway. And then it was the most ridiculous story, so I'm gonna skim over it. But I was hanging out in Monaco during the Grand Prix and saying the most, the richest people in the world, living their lives and went, yeah, I'm never going to be that in the way I'm operating right now. And not that that's actually my goal. It's not really a monetary goal, but it's more like I want the option. And so I immediately objected out of sales completely. It was scary as shit. Like I had a few sales guys. I was like from now on all my leads go to you. At this, I was keeping my better leads because I could close them better, but I'm like, but if I give them the sales, like they're still going to close a lot of them, right? Hopefully. Took that leap of faith. Thankfully had a good small group of guys that, uh, ended up doing really well with those leads. But we did dip. We went, that was June, July and August were down months for us and a little scary. And then we recovered and started scaling again. So, that was what got us into eight figure range, because that was the last piece. I never, on the execution side, I immediately brought on a partner that's my co-founder that did a great job of, as he put it, I'd made promises and he'd deliver on them and… Jason: [00:14:52] You deliver broken promises without him? Erik: [00:14:56] Yeah, exactly. You got to know your strengths, but, uh, he, he definitely did a great job on that side. And so we were able to scale that side from the beginning pretty well. So delivery wasn't as much of an issue. Cause I also, because I was the one driving sales, I did a lot of things that helped us sell. So I productized our offerings. I made things really easy to sell and really easy to put together and then build a team around that. So when I built a sales team, it was teed up for them in a way that was great too, which now we have one of the more higher producing sales teams in the industry period, or, you know, bringing on 80 new clients a month. So that was built because of that, but it took that leap to be like, all right, I'm done. I can't do this. And I continue to do that. And that was three and a half years in. And that became a good lesson, that over and over again, when I find myself, you know, diving into something, that's taking a lot of my time, if I can out eject, eject, whatever that is, and continue to hone in more. Like my focus more today is like a third strategic and working with our executives online, bigger initiatives to grow the business. A third growth, what expansion can we do? Whether it's M&A, whether it's launching a fund, what else can we do to build off this business? And a third promotional being on podcasts, you know, writing a book, that kind of thing. And that becomes more and more my focus. When I find things now pulling me out of that, I look for who else could have that. Jason: [00:16:08] Yeah. I always tell everybody your goal is to transform from the owner to the CEO. And like you said, it's kind of like four or five roles set the vision of the agency… Erik: [00:16:19] I went to a program two weeks ago that actually said the exact opposite. Jason: [00:16:22] Oh, really? Erik: [00:16:23] Yeah. Cause they said your goal is to transform from a CEO to an owner, meaning your business should be working for you, not you running the business. And I think the problem is what do people, you know, the CEO of your own one person company. But when you're an owner and you're just, you're, you know, you treat yourself as a chairman or an investor, the way you operate is different. And we're getting there. Like that's been, that was the goal for this year was to get our executive team in a place where I didn't have to do a lot of what they do. And we're there and we have a great executive team. We brought in COO two months ago. And so he's now stepping up and the goal was for him to run the day-to-day of Hawke Media so my focus can be on doing a better job for our clients, expanding the business. So again, strategic and growth, not managing the data that like, whereas our accounts receivable. Jason: [00:17:09] Yeah. And I remember I was chatting with one of my clients for many, many years. He started out around 300,000 now he's well over, they figure mark. And I remember telling him when you transform from the owner to the CEO, congratulations, you're going to be depressed. And I remember going through this, like I would go into a meeting and they go, Jason, I don't need you. And then I go to the next one, Jason, I don't need you. And I'm like, shit, the business doesn't need me. Like, what the hell do I need to do? And then someone's smart that run another agency was like, no, look, set the vision, communicate it often. Be the face of the organization. Coach your leadership team, you know, assist sales when you need to like add color, right? That's, that's all I'm good at if you want me to do follow up and that shit like, nope, like… Erik: [00:17:53] You were probably really good at it at one point. Jason: [00:17:55] Oh yeah, well, when you had to be, right? But then, then when you start tasting that really fancy champagne, I don't drink champagne, but I guess when some people drink fancy champagne or what is it Don Perignon or I don't know. I drink the Coca-Cola's I guess, right? I drink about a thousand of those a day. Erik: [00:18:15] There's gotta be something unhealthy about that, but I don't know. Jason: [00:18:18] Someone told me it rots your teeth eventually. I'm like, I don't care. The Coke I used to clean my race car engine, so I might as well stop drinking that. Erik: [00:18:15] Yeah, that's probably a good idea. Jason: [00:18:18] Awesome. Well, Erik, this has been great. Is there anything I didn't ask you that you think would benefit the audience? Erik: [00:18:35] Yeah, I would say the one big thing that every, or not every, but most marketers miss that is just a huge one for agencies too is the idea of a sales cycle or a purchase cycle or consideration period where… When you advertise for a client, they're looking for daily reports on the performance. Yet what we've seen in e-commerce specifically is for a $50 average order value it's about a three-week purchase cycle. For a hundred dollars it's about five weeks. For $200 it's about six weeks. And then it goes between two and three months from there. The issue there is like, if, so, if I raised your budgets today, you're not going to see the performance on it for months potentially. And so understanding that purchase cycle so that you report against it is critical in the agency-client relationship, as well as just clients understanding the market. And we see this, we get into this fight a lot where it's like our ROAS this it's like that's a seven-day fucking window. You have a $400 product. What are you talking about? So… Jason: [00:19:26] Well, it's about too knowing the right clients to bring on. Cause, you know, I always say there's no such thing as a bad agency client, there's only a bad prospect or a bad process, and you've got to kind of figure it out and be like, hey, if this is a bad prospect, let's not let them in. And like, I'm like, dude, if you're at zero ROAS, eventually you're going to be so far in the green, who cares? You're getting free advertising. Erik: [00:19:55] A hundred percent. Jason: [00:19:56] So one last question I had, I lied, I guess… I remember maybe sometime back and maybe you've changed this. Do you guys still not have any contracts or long-term contracts? Erik: [00:20:06] Yeah. We prefer month-to-month. Jason: [00:20:08] Why is that…? Obviously, it's working well for you. I've seen some people struggle with it. I've seen some people love it, so… Erik: [00:20:16] Yeah. It's not easy. I was on the other side and everyone was asking me to get married before they ever went on a date with me. Just felt screwed up. I'm not here to protect my vendors is kind of how I felt about it. And I, sorry to use a derogatory term in our space, but if I'm running a brand and I'm hiring you to do my marketing, I don't give a shit if you want a long-term contract, I'm not signing it. And we still stand true to that. When people try to give us longer contracts we just say no, and if you don't want our business, that's fine. We walked away from a few software companies who were like, we have never used your software so like if you want to give us a three month trial we'll do. Because as they said, it's not enough time to ramp up in a month. I'm like, if you want to give us a three-month trial we'll do it, but I'm not signing a three-year contract. You're out of your fucking mind. Like, that's just doesn't make sense to me and so we just stuck to that. And then right now, or like our mission statement is accessibility to great marketing. The idea is we want to be nimble, flexible, accessible, and built that way and be the best at what we do. So by being month to month it forces us to be able to be flexible and nimble. We're just used to it. Our business has to function that way. Jason: [00:21:16] Yeah. And then going back to, you know, your leading indicators and knowing your lifetime value of a client like you can calculate, like, when I look at, you know, our mastermind average member is in their 24 month. And like when you know that that's predictability, because I always tell people, you know, when we go to buy an agency, a lot of times, you know, when you acquire agency, you want to know predictability. The longer-term contracts, a lot of times you'll get a higher valuation because of the predictability is there. But if you can show a track record of having your clients stay this long, that will act the same way. Erik: [00:21:51] And I will say, cause we've dealt with all those conversations. Like if you're looking for an investor to value or a buyer, get a smart one that understands your business. Don't go with someone that's using a cookie-cutter approach to buying the business because you're not going to get a good valuation. And my wife's a senior executive private equity. We have a venture fund. I look at those numbers all the time and it's like, I've had all those stupid conversations. I had… You know where it's like either you're stupid or you think I'm stupid because this, what you're saying is not actually how it works in this world. And that's another good piece of advice I got a long time ago is have your pulse on, if your plan is to sell, which thankfully is not ours, but I get it for a lot of people. Have your pulse on the industry, know what it is to do M&A in your industry. Talk to a banker once a quarter, talk to people, keep your information so you know what the multiples are, you know, what's happening, you know, who the buyers are having a relationship with them. And if again, your goal is to sell, call the people that would buy you and ask them what they would want to buy and just build that. It becomes really easy. Jason: [00:22:45] And I love that. I'm like, yeah, if you know, like make a target list now of the people you have love to buy you and start forming a relationship with them now. Erik: [00:22:54] Yep. It makes it so much easier to get a deal done. And then, you know, you can trust them. They can trust you. Like that part is so important and yeah, I mean, there's no reason for them not to tell you exactly what they want to buy. You just make it easy for them. Jason: [00:23:05] Unless they don't know what they want to buy. And there's a ton of people out there like that. Erik: [00:23:10] Yeah, then don't sell to them cause you don't want that type of buyer. You want someone that's very confident and knows what they're doing so that you can able, depending on what your outcome is too. The only thing I'd say the caveat is if you're really looking at just straight exit debt out and it doesn't matter as much who the buyer is, but that's a hard thing to do with an agency. And you're probably going to do a lot of headaches with an uneducated buyer. Jason: [00:23:29] Well, yeah, and you're not going to get the valuation or the money that you want. If you want straight out buyers like us, we'll be like, all right, what's wrong? Like, what are you not telling us? Erik: [00:23:40] Yep. We've looked at those deals. We actually, funny enough, we just passed on one. We look at those deals, but we offer less. We're like, key, like if you're not there, you're, there's a loss in value. Jason: [00:23:51] Yeah, exactly. And that should make you feel good. Erik: [00:23:53] The fact, especially if you're a sub eight-figure agency, like you can't tell me that you're not driving the boat. Jason: [00:24:00] Yeah, exactly. What's the title of the book and where can people get it? Erik: [00:24:03] You can get it at hawkemethod.com, hawkemethod.com. Jason: [00:24:07] Awesome. Well, everyone go check that out. Erik, thanks so much for coming on the show. And if you guys want to be around amazing agency owners that have been to where you want to go and be able to see the things that you might not be able to see and just have a lot of fun and share the strategies. I want you to all, to go to digitalagencyelite.com.  This is our exclusive mastermind for experienced seven and eight-figure agencies and beyond. So make sure you go there now, go to digitalagencyelite.com and until next time have a Swenk day.

Demand Gen Visionaries
The Power of Video to Generate Demand with Tyler Lessard, VP of Marketing & Chief Video Strategist of Vidyard

Demand Gen Visionaries

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 44:27


This episode features an interview with Tyler Lessard, VP of Marketing & Chief Video Strategist of Vidyard, a video platform for marketing and sales video hosting. Tyler has over 15 years of experience in B2B marketing, sales enablement, content marketing, brand and video. He's also the distinguished author of The Visual Sale.On this episode, Tyler breaks down how to effectively use video to generate demand, why video chops need to be in every marketer's toolkit, and how to be cost-effective and make videos at greater scale. --------------------“...up until the last few years it was costly and complex to do a lot of video. That's where it was really a barrier and people will go, ‘oh, we just do it over there because if we do it everywhere else, I don't even know how I would afford that or manage it.' But the reality is today, there are very approachable ways, very cost-effective ways to do video at a greater scale. And so that's what we're starting to see is this scaling the use of video across these different programs, having more teams, demand teams, social teams, content teams, thinking about where does video content fit into what we're delivering. How can it help us better tell this story or answer this question?” — Tyler Lessard --------------------Episode Timestamps:*(1:57) - Tyler's first job in demand*(2:55) - Tyler's role at Vidyard*(3:51) - Segment: Trust Tree*(7:17) - How Tyler's marketing team is structured*(9:03) - Tyler demand gen strategy*(16:56) - The future of video in every marketers toolkit*(33:08) - Where should listeners put their videos?*(36:10) - Segment: The Playbook*(40:35) - Segment: Quick Hits*(42:49) - Advice for a first time VP of marketing--------------------SponsorDemand Gen Visionaries is brought to you by Qualified.com, the #1 Conversational Marketing platform for companies that use Salesforce and the secret weapon for Demand Gen pros. The world's leading enterprise brands trust Qualified to instantly meet with buyers, right on their website, and maximize sales pipeline. Visit Qualified.com to learn more.--------------------LinksConnect with Tyler Lessard on LinkedInFollow Tyler on TwitterCheck out Tyler's book: “The Visual Sale” Follow Ian on TwitterConnect with Ian on LinkedInwww.caspianstudios.com

The Modern Customer Podcast
How To Create A Mobile, Social And Digital-First Strategy

The Modern Customer Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 26:08


With changing customer trends and demands on top of global supply chain disruption and a pandemic, retailers have had to continually pivot over the last few years. One of the best ways to survive the changes is with a mobile, social and digital-first strategy.  When Alicia Waters stepped into her current role as CMO of Crate & Barrel, she pushed to optimize the brand's mobile presence and create more digital services. As customers spend more time at home and more time on their phones, they are inundated with digital content. Brands need to have a strong mobile and digital strategy to cut through the noise and stand out from the competition. Alicia says Crate & Barrel's digital approach comes from a place of empathy and innovation to understand customers and connect with them digitally.   Much of that empathy comes from being transparent and showing real-world applications for the brand's products. Pandemic restrictions meant Crate & Barrel couldn't shoot on a typical photography set. But the company got creative and embraced new ways of shooting products like using CGI and having influencers shoot content at their homes. Alicia says some of the most impactful images came from photographers who shot with their kids in their own homes because it was real life and connected with customers on social media.  Alicia acknowledges that Crate & Barrel has made great strides in the mobile and digital space, but there is still room to go. The company is on a good path and wants to continue digitizing its stores and revolutionizing parts of the e-commerce experience. Crate & Barrel recently stopped sending stacks of physical catalogs to its stores and now sends a single sign with a QR code that links to a digital catalog. Alicia believes there are many opportunities for content in stores that can be delivered digitally. When customers are shopping in the store, they are doing more than just shopping in the store. They have their phones nearby as a powerful resource, and Crate & Barrel aims to create experiences that complement that behavior.  A mobile, social and digital-first strategy requires continual evolution. Alicia regularly brings in people from other areas of the company to offer a fresh perspective and create cross-functional teams that can tap into new digital strategies that resonate with customers.  Ultimately, the best mobile, social and digital-first strategy isn't just flashy or convenient but rooted in customer need. Being transparent and showing realness helps brands stand out and build strong relationships with customers, even as the world continues to change. ________ Blake Morgan is a customer experience futurist, keynote speaker, and author of the bestselling book The Customer Of The Future. For regular updates on customer experience, sign up for her weekly newsletter here.  Join the new Customer Experience Community here.

Legends of Sales and Marketing
57. Sales Legend Rashmy Chatterjee, CEO ISTARI

Legends of Sales and Marketing

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 43:36


Discover the power of listening and risk-taking from a true trailblazer: Rashmy Chatterjee. Find out how to lead massive organizations, embrace risk, and take strong positions without burning bridges from the first female engineer in the Indian Navy, former CMO of IBM North America, and now CEO of ISTARI. Legends of Sales and Marketing is produced by People.ai.

Radio Advisory
[Rerun] Seattle Children's approach to behavioral health

Radio Advisory

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 41:45


Episode 68 was originally released on April 20, 2021. Much has been said about the behavioral health crisis lurking in the background behind the Covid-19 epidemic, but much of that talk has been regarding behavioral health in adults, despite the fact the issue is significantly worse among children. In this episode, Rae sits down with a team from Seattle Children's—Ginger Hines, executive director, Sheryl Morelli, medical director and CMO, and Larry Wissow, chair of pediatric psychology and behavioral medicine, to talk about the behavioral health issues children are facing in the wake of the Covid-19 epidemic. Links: A year into the pandemic, here's how behavioral health care is changing—for the worse and for the better How 2 major hospitals teamed up—and raised $6.4M for behavioral health Collaborative Care Model Tele-behavioral Health Integrated Behavioral Health Implementation Toolkit Mental Health–Related Emergency Department Visits Among Children Aged

Metrics that Measure Up - B2B SaaS Analytics
Revenue Operations enables Revenue Intelligence - with Andy Byrne, CEO and Co-Founder Clari

Metrics that Measure Up - B2B SaaS Analytics

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 34:43


Andy Byrne is the founder and CEO of Clari, an enterprise artificial intelligence B2B SaaS platform that enables companies to build more pipeline, accelerate revenue growth and increase revenue predictability.Andy has a long-term relationship with machine learning from his previous company  Clearwell Systems (acquired by Symantec), and that experience was the foundation of his vision for Clari.  Andy identified that machine learning had not previously been used to help sales teams close deals faster, assist managers to accelerate revenue velocity, and enable executives to gain enhanced visibility into revenue forecasts.The first topic we covered was the definition of Revenue Operations? Andy defined it as the people, the process, and the technology that drives a company's revenue engine and orchestrates sales, marketing, and post-sales activity.Do we need another piece of technology to automate the revenue process?  Andy highlighted that his customers are demanding a better way to align, integrate and orchestrate every step and point of engagement with the customer journey.  Andy highlighted that with the rise of the Chief Revenue Officer (CRO), there is a real movement to re-engineer go-to-market processes and even organizational structures.When asked about the CRO having both marketing and sales, Andy highlighted that the CMO is traditionally responsible for pipeline, brand, and product marketing.  If you think about those three areas, the #1 priority is pipeline which creates an intimate connection between a CRO and CMO.  Moreover, since the CMO also owns brand,  it makes more sense for the CRO and CMO to be co-equal peers, and not worry about who reports to who.Clari actually integrated demand generation and Sales Development into one integrated organization.  Andy highlighted that took that integration one step further, but also creating a Value Engineering group into the same organization with the specific responsibility to measure and share the return on investment for their customers.Value engineering is a combination of art and science, to prove the mathematical results of using your technology or platform using empirical evidence versus ad-hoc, anectodal stories.  This approach to highlight the value received has led to the expansion of the Clari platform beyond sales, to both Marketing and Customer Success.  In fact,  the post-sales motion focused on up-sells and cross-sells directly increases Net Dollar Retention Rate is has been key to the increased acceleration of the Clari growth story.Revenue Intelligence is a "buzz phrase" that is being tossed around the B2B SaaS industry.  Revenue Intelligence is the ability to gain insights into communications and transactions with the target buyers and customers. A key term Andy highlighted was "signals" are coming from multiple sources - typically transactional systems like conversational intelligence, sales engagement, and even CRM platforms.  By aggregating all of these signals into one "system", the ability to surface key insight nuggets materially increases the visibility for executives to make better decisions and increase revenue forecast accuracy.If you are involved in a B2B company that is growing quickly, and needs to drive revenue across customer acquisition, retention, and expansion motions, listening to Andy's insights and experiences gained from hundreds of Clari customers, this is a great conversation that provides several "information nuggets" that can quickly be leveraged to accelerate predictable revenue growth.

Small Business Made Simple
189: The Foundation of Brand is Knowing Your Buyer w/ Jeff Reekers

Small Business Made Simple

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 39:05


Jeff Reekers, the CMO at Aircall joins the podcast. He discusses why B2B SaaS companies need to invest more in brand, why it's dangerous for marketers to get stuck in the 'pre-sale' portion of the buyer journey, what their 'Voice of the Customer Report' is and much more. Jeff's LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/jeffreekers/ Aircall Website: http://aircall.io/

Ordinary People Doing Extraordinary Things
How to Use Purpose to Build Brands & Teams with Siew Ting, CMO, Greater Asia, HP Inc.

Ordinary People Doing Extraordinary Things

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 26:28


How to Use Purpose to Build Brands & Teams with Siew Ting, CMO, Greater Asia, HP Inc. Did you ever wonder how to define or find your purpose? Or how to do the same for a team or a business? In episode 639 I chat with, Siew Ting who has worked for Unilever, Mars and now HP Inc. leading teams to build brands with purpose. Listen as she shares how she does this plus her advice to women to do the same in their careers.

Digital, New Tech & Brand Strategy - MinterDial.com
Defining Your Social Legacy and Leading with Authentic Purpose with Emily Chang, CEO McCann Worldgroup-China (MDE455)

Digital, New Tech & Brand Strategy - MinterDial.com

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 15, 2022 59:43


Minter Dialogue MDE455 Emily Chang is CEO, McCann Worldgroup-China. Prior to joining McCann, Emily has been the CMO for Starbucks China, CCO for InterContinental Hotels Group, Greater China, headed Retail Marketing for Apple across APAC and spent the first eleven years of her career at Procter & Gamble. She's also author of “The Spare Room: Define Your Social Legacy to Live a More Intentional Life and Lead with Authentic Purpose.” In this conversation, we discuss how she came up with her social legacy, including how she shared it within her household. We talk about her book, how to combine your offer and offence, how to effectively and authentically bring your personal life into the professional sphere, the place for empathy as a leader and much more.   If you've got comments or questions you'd like to see answered, send your email or audio file to nminterdial@gmail.com; or you can find the show notes and comment on minterdial.com. If you liked the podcast, please take a moment to rate/review the show on RateThisPodcast. Otherwise, you can find me @mdial on Twitter.

B2B Mentors
The Devil Is In the Marketing Details - CC #046

B2B Mentors

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 10:39


The Devil Is In the Marketing Details - CC #046Follow and connect with the host, Connor Dube on LinkedIn here: https://www.linkedin.com/in/socialsellingexpert/Instagram: connor_dubeAttend a FREE B2B Mentors Marketing Mastermind: www.activeblogs.com/liveevent/If you're already thinking you need to find a more efficient way to conquer your monthly B2B content like blogs, newsletters, and social media – we'd like to show you how we can improve the quality, save you tons of time, and achieve better results! To learn more visit www.activeblogs.com

FUTUREPROOF.
Is the CMO Role Broken? (ft. John Connors, Boathouse)

FUTUREPROOF.

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 27:05


The world of marketing is shifting broadly, and that's why I wanted to speak to someone who can speak broadly to the future of marketing. Enter John Connors. He started Boathouse in 2001 after years at the biggest agencies in New England and the world, whe wanted to bring a new type of performance-mindedness to the agency business. He previously served as a part of the McCann World Group Management team—at the time the largest agency in the world. We talk to John about whether or not the CMO role is broken, what chief marketing officers are doing wrong, how they can improve, and whether or not they need to do a better job aligning with CEOs' visions.As always, we welcome your feedback. Please make sure to subscribe, rate, and review on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher, and Google Play - and make sure to follow us on Facebook and LinkedIn!

Renegade Thinkers Unite: #2 Podcast for CMOs & B2B Marketers
275: Calling All Compelling Content!

Renegade Thinkers Unite: #2 Podcast for CMOs & B2B Marketers

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 51:52


Can your content cut through? Through the 27 touchpoints in a B2B buyer's journey. Through the flurry of emails hitting everyone's inbox every day. Through the clutter of millions of blogs, social posts, and videos online. It's a heavy task for any company to run a truly remarkable content program, but when done right, it can boost your brand to new heights. In this episode, CMOs Jamie Gier of Ceros, Suzanne Reed of LBMC, and Heidi Bullock of Tealium gather together to discuss all things content marketing. Tune in to learn how to create a content engine that will not only engage prospects in increasingly complicated sales cycles but will excite existing customers, garner partnerships, and draw in top talent. For full show notes and transcripts, visit https://renegade.com/podcasts/ To learn more about CMO Huddles, visit https://cmohuddles.com/

B2B Mentors
You Can Do That with LinkedIn Ads?? - CC #045

B2B Mentors

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 11:01


You Can Do That with LinkedIn Ads?? - CC #045Follow and connect with the host, Connor Dube on LinkedIn here: https://www.linkedin.com/in/socialsellingexpert/Instagram: connor_dubeAttend a FREE B2B Mentors Marketing Mastermind: www.activeblogs.com/liveevent/If you're already thinking you need to find a more efficient way to conquer your monthly B2B content like blogs, newsletters, and social media – we'd like to show you how we can improve the quality, save you tons of time, and achieve better results! To learn more visit www.activeblogs.com

Making Marketing
PepsiCo's Fabiola Torres on making Rockstar Energy relevant with gamers young and old

Making Marketing

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 26:40


Energy drinks are in the midst of a renaissance. According to Fabiola Torres, CMO and svp of PepsiCo's energy drinks category -- which includes big brands like Rockstar -- the renaissance is about finding who the core customer is. Her focus, she said on the Modern Retail Podcast is to “really go deep into storytelling, making sure that our products continue to get better and better.” Torres joined the PepsiCo team in April 2020, right when the pandemic hit. Before, she worked at high-end brands like Beats By Dre and Nike. In her eyes, she was excited about leading the marketing for a ubiquitous product that still resonated with unique subcultures. That's no easy task, however. Energy drinks have a bunch of connotations, and their popularity has risen and fallen like changing tides. But as gaming platforms continue to reach new users, and with Gen Z being such a driving force of culture, energy drinks are making a comeback. According to July data from IRI, the energy drink category grew 11.6% year-over-year. PepsiCo's strategy with Rockstar, which it acquired in 2020, is to team up with people and events that are popular in the communities it wants to target. This includes teaming up with Microsoft on its latest Halo release, as well as a bunch of influencer campaigns. That's especially true for social campaigns; “When we talk about TikTok, it works with influencers that have the reach,” she said. The hope is to find the gaming, youthful zeitgeist while also figuring out areas for growth. What's more, according to Torres, Rockstar is just the beginning of energy drinks under Pepsi. “The future is bright for us,” she said.

B2B Mentors
#1 Skillset of The Successful (You NEED to Master) - CC #044

B2B Mentors

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022 6:34


#1 Skillset of The Successful (You NEED to Master) - CC #044Follow and connect with the host, Connor Dube on LinkedIn here: https://www.linkedin.com/in/socialsellingexpert/Instagram: connor_dubeAttend a FREE B2B Mentors Marketing Mastermind: www.activeblogs.com/liveevent/If you're already thinking you need to find a more efficient way to conquer your monthly B2B content like blogs, newsletters, and social media – we'd like to show you how we can improve the quality, save you tons of time, and achieve better results! To learn more visit www.activeblogs.com

Lochhead on Marketing
139 How To Inspire Legendary Marketing Work

Lochhead on Marketing

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022 11:22


On this episode, let's talk about how to inspire legendary creative marketing people to do their legendary creative marketing work. Welcome to Lochhead on Marketing. The number one charting marketing podcast for marketers, category designers, and entrepreneurs with a different mind. Letting Legendary Creative Marketing People Do Legendary Creative Marketing Work Years ago, I was the head of marketing for a red-hot internet company called Scient. We had engaged with a group of creative marketers, designers, and copywriters led by the legend himself, John Bielenberg. At the beginning of the project, this is what I said to him: “Look, I know you guys are standalone, in terms of the incredible legendary marketing creative you guys create. So what I'm asking you to do is go away, and design the most legendary piece of work you've ever done.” In this case, it was a brochure that will serve as “grenade”: it was the kind of piece that when you got it, you knew you got it, and you never forgot getting it. They did just that. So when they came back a week or two to present their work, I asked the question that I always ask, “Do you think what you're about to show us is legendary work?” John smiled and looked at me and said, “Yes, we do,” and he showed us this most legendary brochure that he created. Acknowledge Your Legendary Creative Marketing Team's Efforts Another thing to address is to let your creatives know that you are aware that their best works don't usually see the light of day. This is either due to poor follow-through by the higher-ups, or poor feedback from people who weren't involved in the project, but higher up the food chain. So acknowledge this and then tell them, that once they deliver a legendary creative marketing piece that will blow away everyone, you will fight tooth-and-nail for it to see the light of day. Once they do so, remind them to remind you to not fuck it up. The Takeaway So what's the lesson here? One, when you're talking to creative people about doing creative work, let them know you want them to do their most legendary work. Second, let them know that you also know that most of their most legendary work has never seen the light of day. This is because most of the companies they worked for or the clients that they had didn't have the courage to execute their legendary work. They didn't have the courage to say to them, once they presented truly legendary work, “Don't let us fuck this up.” Now, here's the other AHA about this. If you as a marketing leader/CEO/CMO get a reputation with the creative people in your company for A) inspiring it and asking them to do legendary work, and then B) with very few modifications, actually execute the legendary work, guess what happens the next time they have to do something creative. They know that you want their most legendary work. Also, they know that if they put the thinking and their heart and their soul and their blood, sweat, tears and whiskey into that work, that you are not going to be the leader who takes that legendary work and lets it get crushed and watered down so that it never sees the light of day. And when legendary creative people know that you want them to do their legendary work and that you're actually going to implement it, guess what? They're going to keep giving you legendary work. Bio Christopher Lochhead is a #1 Apple podcaster and #1 Amazon bestselling co-author of books: Niche Down and Play Bigger. He has been an advisor to over 50 venture-backed startups; a former three-time Silicon Valley public company CMO and an entrepreneur. Furthermore, he has been called “one of the best minds in marketing” by The Marketing Journal, a “Human Exclamation Point” by Fast Company, a “quasar” by NBA legend Bill Walton and “off-putting to some” by The Economist. In addition, he served as a chief marketing officer of software juggernaut Mercury Interactive. Hewlett-Packard acquired the company in 2006, for $4.5 billion.

The Glossy Podcast
J.Jill CEO Claire Spofford: 'We're keeping the focus on what's new and full price'

The Glossy Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022 26:02


More than seven years after working at J.Jill as CMO, Claire Spofford returned in February of 2021 to take on the role of CEO. “I already knew a lot about the customer and how connected and engaged she is with the J.Jill brand – that's a strong foundation for any business,” Spofford said on the latest Glossy Podcast. “Plus, its premium casual positioning in the market is really relevant now. And there were all the fundamentals of it being a great brand with heritage.”  Indeed, J.Jill is more than 60 years old. But Spofford has moved fast to ensure evolution across the business and adoption of emerging tools and technologies that can contribute to its current growth. Personalization, an optimized store fleet and next-level customer experience – the latter, with the help of a new hire – are among her priorities. In mid-December, J.Jill reported a nearly 30% year-over-year increase in quarterly revenue.   “We've made great progress against our [pandemic] recovery this year and have gained some real traction,” she said. “And that gives us a much stronger foundation from which to really drive profitable growth as we go forward.”

B2B Mentors
Do You Have What it Takes to Be a Mentor? - CC #043

B2B Mentors

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2022 11:45


Do You Have What it Takes to Be a Mentor? - CC #043Follow and connect with the host, Connor Dube on LinkedIn here: https://www.linkedin.com/in/socialsellingexpert/Instagram: connor_dubeAttend a FREE B2B Mentors Marketing Mastermind: www.activeblogs.com/liveevent/If you're already thinking you need to find a more efficient way to conquer your monthly B2B content like blogs, newsletters, and social media – we'd like to show you how we can improve the quality, save you tons of time, and achieve better results! To learn more visit www.activeblogs.com

Demand Gen Visionaries
How Marketers Should Think About Events in 2022 with Alon Alroy, Co-founder, CMO & CCO of Bizzabo

Demand Gen Visionaries

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2022 40:34


This episode features an interview with Alon Alroy, Co-founder, CMO & CCO of Bizzabo, a  hybrid events platform that has raised $195M and has acquired several companies to date. Alon is a distinguished marketing executive shaping the future of the martech industry.  On this episode, Alon provides a crystal ball into the future of events, why he believes experiences play a vital role in this future, and why everything as a marketer leads back to delighting your customers.------------------“When you think about the future, the future is really not about event management software anymore. It's really about event experiences. People can consume content anywhere. People can get a Netflix like experience in terms of, on demand almost anywhere. So those who want to stay relevant, we need to evolve their offering to be focused on experiences, the attendee experience, the sponsor experience, the speaker experience, and the other experiences. So the future is really about experiences and this is what we have been experiencing as well. And this is what we have been demonstrating. To provide this immersive experience in which people feel connected, the rich transforming from attendees to participants.” — Alon Alroy------------------Episode Timestamps: *(2:00) - Alon's first job in marketing*(2:35) - What it means to be CMO of Bizzabo*(4:02) - The latest happenings at Bizzabo*(6:54) - How marketers should think about events for 2022*(8:24) - Segment: The Trust Tree*(11:00) - How Alon structures his marketing team*(12:16) - Alon's marketing strategy*(16:26) - Segment: The Playbook*(18:10) - The future of events *(26:13) - Making experiences memorable*(29:46) - How Alon views content, Bizzabo's website, & event lifecycle*(33:31) - Segment: The Dust-Up*(35:36) - What's going away in marketing*(36:26) - Segment: Quick Hits ------------------SponsorDemand Gen Visionaries is brought to you by Qualified.com, the #1 Conversational Marketing platform for companies that use Salesforce and the secret weapon for Demand Gen pros. The world's leading enterprise brands trust Qualified to instantly meet with buyers, right on their website, and maximize sales pipeline. Visit Qualified.com to learn more.------------------LinksFollow Alon on TwitterConnect with Alon on LinkedInFollow Ian on TwitterConnect with Ian on LinkedInwww.caspianstudios.com

Unleashed - How to Thrive as an Independent Professional
465. Marshall Butler on How Data Is Revolutionizing Marketing

Unleashed - How to Thrive as an Independent Professional

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2022 39:26


Marshall has over twenty years of experience defining, managing, and growing the world's best-known investing brands. He has been an executive committee leader and CMO for Fortune 250 businesses in North America and the Asia-Pacific region. In today's episode, he talks about how the world of data is revolutionizing marketing, particularly for wealth and investment management firms. You can learn more about the work Marshall does at WellsFargo.com, or reach out to him on LinkedIn.  Key points include: 00:50: Data in terms of wealth Investment Management 08:39: Lead scoring in practice 20:10: Identifying poor leads 22:53: Identifying customer tiers Unleashed is produced by Umbrex, which has a mission of connecting independent management consultants with one another, creating opportunities for members to meet, build relationships, and share lessons learned. Learn more at www.umbrex.com.

The Lindsey Elmore Show
How to work with our genes, instead of against them. | Dr. Erika Gray

The Lindsey Elmore Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2022 50:02


Dr. Erika Gray is the co-founder and CMO at ToolBox Genomics and MyToolBox Genomics. As a pharmacist having had years of experience in both alternative and allopathic medicine, Dr. Erika is passionate about integrating the two modalities of both to inspire people to live healthier lives. She believes that helping people understand who they are from their genes outward will help provide them with the tools to understand how they interact with their environment and the role this interaction has with their health. Topics covered in this episode: • What are genes, genetics, and genomics? • Why do our genes matter? • What is gene mutation? • How to work with our genes, instead of against them? • The most important genes. • Epigenetics testing. • Regular recommended interventions. • How to slow down aging. • Best way to figure out your chronotype. To learn more about Guest and her/his work, head over to www.mytoolboxgenomics.com If you would like to leverage your DNA and your epigenetics; test, don't guess, head over to www.lindseyelmore.com/toolboxgenomics , and you can save 10% on your test kit today. __________________________________________________________ The BioMat Professional is an FDA 510K Class II medical device that harnesses the best of nature's wisdom to activate your inner healing power. Filled with 18lbs of Amethyst channels, the BioMat is powerful at alleviating pain, inflammation, and stress as well as improving sleep and immunity. Head to www.lindseyelmore.com/biomat and you could be on your way to relaxation and less stress and fatigue throughout your day. __________________________________________________________ Somavedic is a device that can reliably mitigate unwanted influences of: • EMF radiation (4G/5G, WiFi, phones) • Geopathic stress, water crosses • Curry and Hartmann lines • Oxidative stress / Free radicals Head over to www.somavedic.com and use the code: LKE to save 10% off. __________________________________________________________ We hope you enjoyed this episode. Come check us out at www.lindseyelmore.com/podcast.

Español Automático Podcast
¿Estancado en tu nivel de ESPAÑOL? La SOLUCIÓN es…

Español Automático Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2022 18:26


Hay mucha gente que cree que estudia mucho pero, en realidad, su manera de estudiar es completamente improductiva. Únicamente van picoteando un poco de esto, un poco de aquello… Y no es de extrañar que pierdan la motivación, que luego se tomen unos días de descanso… y una cosa lleva a la otra y, finalmente, incluso abandonan del todo. Si alguien desea HABLAR UN IDIOMA CON FLUIDEZ, lo importante no es tanto QUÉ estudias sino CÓMO estudias. Hoy te mostramos una técnica para lograr un progreso rápido y satisfactorio en ESPAÑOL. -=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-  

Real Personal Branding Podcast
Setting Goals, Reflecting for a Successful Year with Katrina Kibben

Real Personal Branding Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2022 44:32


Today on THE REAL PERSONAL BRANDING podcast, Lauren welcomes guest Katrina Kibben. Over the New Year holiday, Lauren met up with them, and they reminded her of a reflection exercise that they do every month and that the New Year is a great time to start this exercise.    Katrina Kibben is a highly sought-after keynote speaker, a nonbinary LGBTQ+ advocate, and a writing expert. They founded Three Ears Media, and they're a featured expert in publications like the New York Times, Chicago Tribune, and Forbes and have been named a top HR and recruiting expert in numerous best-of lists. Katrina Kibben is a nonbinary writer who founded Three Ears Media to teach recruiters how to develop inclusive, unbiased job postings and candidate experience content. No one cares about the humanity apparent in a job posting as much as they do, and their compassion is contagious and gets results.   In this episode, you'll hear:   How Katrina Kibben shifted their career from a CMO in the corporate world to launching Three Ears Media and becoming CEO of their own company and what they wish they had known when they were first starting their business. How they found their niche and why recruiters need to master the ask. How you can apply Katrina Kibben's goal-setting exercise in your business. The six questions to ask yourself during your monthly reflection exercise. The bonus question Lauren asks herself and how to identify your bonus question. Why it's important to complete this exercise with a letter to yourself. What Katrina Kibben is researching and exploring right now. The myth they want to debunk about their industry and the advice they would give to someone who is dreaming of entrepreneurship.   Connect with Lauren V. Davis here: Instagram.com/Ldaviscreative facebook.com/groups/understandsocialmedia bit.ly/rpbpodcast   Connect with Katrina Kibben here: instagram.com/katrinakibbenlinkedin.com/in/katrinakibben threeearsmedia.com

The Marketing Secrets Show
How To Build A Great Team…The Right Way

The Marketing Secrets Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2022 17:01


The skill set for building an effective team is WAY different than the skills needed for marketing and sales. For one, you have to learn how to become a true LEADER. So the two key questions to ask yourself are 1. Who do you have to become to lead a great team? And 2. What are the critical strategies you need to implement to get your team onboard to follow your vision? Hit me up on IG! @russellbrunson Text Me! 208-231-3797 Join my newsletter at marketingsecrets.com ClubHouseWithRussell.com Magnetic Marketing ---Transcript--- Russell Brunson: What's up, everyone? This is Russell, welcome back to the Marketing Secrets Podcast. Today's episode, we're going to be talking about building a team. How do you do it? What are the pitfalls? What are the pros, the cons? And some of the things that I learned along the way. Hopefully this'll help you as you're building out your team to be able to do whatever it is you're trying to do in your life. Whatever your mission, whatever your goal, whatever the business you're trying to build. I hope that this episode will help you as you're thinking through it, to help you to build the team that's going to get you to the finish line. So with that said, I'm going to cue up the theme song. We come back, you have a chance to listen in on a cool interview, talking about how to build your team. What's up, everybody? Welcome back to the Marketing Secrets Podcast, I'm here today with Josh Forti and we've been having fun today. The last two episodes- Josh Forti: We have. Russell: We recorded went longer, but- Josh: It's been fun. Russell: I think they've been fun. So today will be a little bit shorter episode, but it's something that, again, Josh brings things that I don't ever really typically talk about. So it's been fun to talk about some of the stuff like I think about, but I've never really verbally shared. So do you want to set up what we were talking about today? Josh: Yeah, for sure. Yeah, so very specifically here, I want to focus for you specifically. The question is, well, leadership and team building, what are some of the biggest shifts around building a team and becoming a leader? Because as someone who built a team myself that failed miserably, it wasn't that we hated each other, but it's just like, it was chaos. When you're trying to manage like six or seven different people and they're all like contracting everywhere. And now I'm like kind of going back and rebuilding. And I'm building it right and I have full-time people that we're bringing in and going. And it's like, man, the skillset of making money, the skillset of being a marketer is way so totally different- Russell: Yeah. Josh: Than building a team. And even being like the attractive character and building a following, like building a following is a completely different skillset than it is of growing a team and being a leader and things like that. And so I guess like two part is number one, who did you have to become? And like, secondly, what are like some of the hacks, tips, or I know you like secrets. So what are some of the secrets that you use to build a team and really like sell them on the vision and like really make sure that they were thriving in that role? Russell: Cool. So I want to just second what you said, building a team is way different than all the other things. And I've struggled over the years. I have an amazing team, as you guys know, if you've seen everything. And I wouldn't say most of it's because of my own doing, I'll talk about some of the stuff I've learned along the way. But it's a different skillset. And I think making money is an easier skill, I think creating a movement of people that are following you is different. I always tell people, like I'm such a good leader and communicator to like my tribe and I'm not as good to my internal team. It's interesting. And so a couple things that I'll share again, I don't have this perfect. And if you ask people on my team, like Russell's not perfect at this because I'm not. But I'll share some of the things I've learned because I'm always trying to figure this out and trying to get better at it. One of the biggest lessons I had and I did a podcast on this probably two or three years ago. Was this realization that I had to make a transition. Because I was always like the All Star. Like if you look at basketball, like I was the All Star, like I was really good. I could write copy, I could build a funnel, I could drive traffic, I could sell from stage, I could do all the different things. And so I was like, Michael Jordan out there and I'd be on stage, I'd be doing, I'd be dunking and slamming and three points. And like just amazing and people would tell me how great I was and I loved it. And then I start building a team. And so I started building a team, but the problem is that as I was building a team, I still thought I was Michael Jordan. So I'd build the team and I'd be in there, all of a sudden, I'd have the person writing copy and they'd be going up with the ball, about to do the layup. And I'm like, "Ah, I could actually do it better." So I grab the ball from my own teammate and rip it out of their hands and I'd go dunk it like, "Ah." And I would get everyone cheering for me again. Or someone would be coming down ... I'm trying to get these analogies working. But basically what's happening is that I was the All Star and- Josh: That one worked. That analogy worked. Russell: That one did work? Okay, good. Josh: Yeah. Russell: And I was trying to bring in other All Stars. But the problem is I'd bring these All Stars in and then as they were trying to perform, I'd be like, "I can do it better." And I would take the ball from them because I want to be the All Star. And I had this realization, like for me to actually build a team, I cannot continue to be the All Star. And this is hard- Josh: Mm-hmm (affirmative). Russell: For achievers like us, especially for someone like me. Like I was the achiever, I had done all the roles because I had built the company by myself initially. It was me doing all the roles, so I learned all the roles, I got good at all the roles. And so as I started trying to like bring on these different All Stars, it was tough. It's kind of like if you watch the All Star game or like the dream team. Like all of a sudden you got like the best players on a team and usually they're not the best playing with each other because they're all the All Stars, they all want a ball hog and it gets really, really difficult. And so I had to make this realization, like if I'm going to be successful growing a team and getting click funnels from hundred million to a billion dollars, like I can't continue to be the All Star. I have to retire and I have to become the coach. That's a hard transition. Because now you're coming back and like you're successful, not now by your skillset, but you're successful by like cultivating other people's skillsets. And that's a different skillset to have, by the way. Like it's way harder. For me, it's always been easier for me to go and like to do the thing. Like I'm finding it now with I'm coaching my kids wrestling. And I'm watching my kids, I'm watching the team and like, man, I was such a good athlete. I'd go out there, I'd kill myself, I'd work so hard and I was an amazing athlete. But it's way harder for me to coach other athletes because I can't give them desire, I can't give them these different things. And so that was difficult. And so that's the first thing to realize is that if you're going to start growing a team, you have to be willing to like take your Jersey off and say, "I'm no longer the All Star, I am now the coach. And I've got new people." And that's been the hardest thing for me and I still struggle with that, I still like jump back in. I'm like, "Ah." But that's the key, if you want to get a good group people around you. Because otherwise if you're the one that's taking the ball from him, from the other people on the team, the All Stars are going to leave you. Like they're not going to stick around, they want to be the All Star too, they want the recognition, they want to be doing the thing. So that's the first big shift that you got to have. Any questions on that before I go to kind of- Josh: No, no. Super good. Yeah, you're good. Russell: Okay. So the second thing is you have to be good at hiring All Stars. I remember when we first started building ClickFunnels, Todd read an article or something and he was talking about ... in the article was like, there's A players, B players, C player, there's different levels. But what people don't understand, it's not like A players, like 100% and B players like 50%. Like the article said the difference between an A player and a B player is like 2200% difference. So it's like a B player, you can have like one A player going to give you the output of like 50 or 100 or how many B players. And so what most of us try to do, is try to come in and say, "Okay, I don't want to spend as much money getting the right person. So I'm going to find somebody who's cheaper. Maybe they're not going to be an A player, but they'll be a B player, but I can afford them." And that's like this mindset that most people have. I see it all the time, I see it in Facebook groups, in ClickFunnels Facebook group, like, how do I get a cheap funnel builder? Like, that's the problem, you're looking for a B player. Or you find an A player, you get 2200 times better thing. And so it's been interesting because we launched ClickFunnels the first time, like I had a couple A players, which is why it grew. We had a couple All Stars, we had some like Todd Dickerson. You guys know our team, like we had A players who were able to go and intergrow. But then from there, we had to hire whoever we could afford. Right now we're building ClickFunnels 2.0 and we're in a unique spot where it's like, we don't have to just hire who we can afford. Like let's hire the best. And so we're going out there trying to figure out who are the A players in each regard. And it's crazy because I look at the team that's building ClickFunnels 2.0, it's a small team. What they're accomplishing is amazing, but they're all A players. When we started like looking at rolling out Click Funnels 2.0 and our marketing team, we started trying to bring in A players and they're expensive. And so a lot of times the questions like, well, I don't have any money. How do I recruit the A players? Well, I recruited Todd and I was broke. A players aren't necessarily looking for money today. The A players are people who are looking for money in the future. They're the ones who are like, "I want to be part of a team. I want to build something cool, something I believe in. And I want to be able to get paid insane amounts of money over here. And I'm willing to give up that for this over here." The right people will be willing to do that. So as I come back, if I was to like be building my team over from scratch right now. There's number one, again, taking off the All Star, say I'm going to be the coach. And number two is like, if I'm going to be the coach and I'm out there building the team, like I'm going to try to build the dream team. And to do that, I've got to sell them on the vision of why this is cool and like where it's going to go, and what's the opportunity for them. Because just like you're trying to sell your customers on the opportunity of like funnels are the opportunity or whatever. It's like, you're selling your dreams team, like this is the opportunity. Like if you join the team, you're going to get paid nothing right now or very little right now. But this is how we're going to structure things so that it'll be worth it for you over here. And the right people will hear that because that's what they're looking for. Someday when I retire from this whole, whatever I'm doing. If I was ever getting a job again, it's not going to be based on money, I could care less about money. Someone's going to sell me someday on the vision. In fact, I just saw Sean Wayland just hired the dude who started Tapout- Josh: Yeah, I saw that. Russell: And like how powerful is that? The Tapout dude does not need Sean's money. He sold his company for insane amounts of money. But I'm sure Sean's like, "Hey dude, here's the opportunity. You help me do this thing and flip it like, this is what's possible for you." And now he's got literally like there's no better person that Sean could have hired to run that company- Josh: Yeah, I know. Russell: Than this dude. Josh: When I saw that one, I was like, "Oh my Gosh." Russell: It's brilliant. So for all of us, we got to start linking more strategically. Not like, who can I afford for this role? It's like, who is the person that's going to be getting a million bucks a year in five years from now in this role? And how do I sell them on the opportunity? How do I create an opportunity where they can grow and they can monetize? Where they can make this kind of money. And that's how you recruit the right people into your world, who are going to help you to actually have success. And so those are the things ... because you get a good A player, you don't have to be really good at managing, you don't have to be really good at micro- Josh: Yeah. Russell: All those kind things. Like you get the right people in place, they're going to do the things and it makes you look like the All Star, the coach of the year that you are. Because you built the right team. Building the team- Josh: Yeah. Russell: Is more valuable than all the other pieces, I believe. Josh: Yeah. Like getting the right people is more important. The systems, the process, like those are all important. But like if you have B players on the team, it's like you're going to get a mediocre result. Russell: Yeah. And then- Josh: Yeah. Russell: And B player, you're going to be one in charge if you know the process. We brought Todd and I didn't have to like sit down with Todd and like, "Okay, how are we going to manage the projects? How are we going to do this?" Like Todd came in, he's like, "All right, I got it." And he just ran and he was able to run and like, all right, he's done. Josh: Yeah. Russell: Like we just brought in this guy named Kevin Richards, who we brought him in into like be the CMO of ClickFunnels. And Kevin had worked for a whole bunch of really big companies doing this. And it's crazy because like he came in and we gave him the reins, he started running. And I was like, "Oh my gosh, this is way better than I was running." Like there's structures, organization. Because he's done it before, over and over and over again. He's going to come in and plug in and just do it. And I'm watching it right now, I'm like- Josh: Yeah. Russell: "Man, like he's an A player who I could hire." In fact, I have over the last decade, a whole bunch of B players to do this role and no one's been able to hit it. And it's been me being involved so much. Where now it's like literally the first two weeks I was like all nervous because I want to make sure that everything's perfect. And finally like gave him the reins and I stepped back and it's like, "Whoa, this is so much better than when I was running it." Josh: Yeah. Russell: And it's easier and less stressed on me and he's loving it and it's just powerful. So those are the key. Josh: Okay. Couple rapid fire questions here, so that we make time. Number one, have you ever run into challenges or how have you dealt with communication differences inside of a team? Because one of the things that I've noticed is like, I just thought everybody would communicate like I was if we're all part of a team. I'm like the most expressive person, like when I talk. Like I use emojis and exclamation points and like if I'm texting, if I'm going like my voice or whatever. And like someone on my team is like, "Okay." I'm like, "Ah, are you mad? Do you understand? Like what do you mean, okay?" Do you have systems in place? Or do you typically go and just try to like find people to do that? Or is that something you just learn? Because I'm sure like, Melanie, I mean she was with you for how long? Right before Shelia, I'm sure she had a very unique communication style and I'm sure your next assistant is probably not the same as her. Russell: Yeah. Josh: Right. So like how have you learned like how to deal with that? Russell: Yeah. A couple things. One is like personality profiling is huge. In fact, we're working on a whole project right now and that'll probably be a book and a membership side, bunch of stuff, all based on personality profiling. Because that's how you understand like what motivates people? How do they speak? How do they not speak? How do they understand? Because again, Melanie and Jenny are very different people. But I'm able to work with both of them because I understood their personality types, I understood like, what are the things that would light Melanie up? What are the things that'd get Jenny excited to work? And vice versa. Like, if you look at Melanie was a very high S, so very faithful. And so like she would like die for you to be able to get something done. Jenny on their hand has very low S, almost no S. And so for her, it's like, man, if she gets bored, she's gone. So I got to make sure that she's got 8,000 projects and she's juggling them all. The more things she's having, the more successful she's going to be. Similar to me. And so I give her tons of projects and she thrives that she's able to juggle all these things. Whereas if I treat her like I taught Melanie, she would've been here for a week and a half, like, I'm out, like this is horrible. So understanding those kind of things. Like DISC profile's big, Meyers Briggs is big. Those are my two favorites. I'm trying to learn to master all the other ones, but those ones help a ton when you're hiring and all also when you're managing people. Josh: Yeah. Russell: The other thing is, this is one that helped me. Actually, Julie Story actually was one that taught it to me initially. And I don't remember all the things, but there's these different hats. There's like a black hat and a green hat and a red hat and yellow hat and all these things like that. So I'm a very green hat person, so are you. Put on the green hat and it's like creative ideas and we're flowing. I'm like, we get so excited about sharing stuff. And there's people who have like a black hats, they're the ones who always like ... they look at what could go wrong. What about this? And what about this? Josh: They take away all the fun. Oh my God. Russell: Yeah. Josh: They ruin it. Russell: And then like the white hats. So there's all these different hats. The ones I really remember is like green and black because I'm green hat. And like, Jamie Smith's a good example of a black hat. I love Jamie, one of my favorite humans in the world. But when we would do meetings together, I literally wanted jump over the table and strangle him. Because I'm like, "I did, I did, I did." And he's like, "Well, you think about this? You think about this? Think about this?" And like you're sucking the life out of me. Josh: Yeah. Russell: My wife's a very black hat person, as well. I'm like, "We should take the kids and like fly around the world and blah, blah, blah, blah, blah." Like just brainstorming things that are probably never going to happen. She's like, "What about this, this, this?" And so we started learning like based on this ... this is something that Julie brought that was really powerful. It was like, "Hey, we're in now in a green hat phase. Well, Russell's going to green hat, we're talking about ideas. No one's allowed to black hat this at all. Let's just share ideas." So then everyone's just sharing ideas and like, we have a chance to be excited and creative and get these things out there. And after it's like all the creative steps out, it's like, "Okay, now let's put a black hat on, now it's black hat this." And now we can all look at it objectively you're like, "Okay, we're going to black hat this and go through the black hat things." And then we put on a different colored hat and go through those things. Josh: Mm-hmm (affirmative). Russell: And we go through different hats, but they're separately, they're not all happening at the same time. Because if it happens at the same time, it destroys my creativity and excitement and energy. I want to like strangle the person. But like, man, I need those people. I need Jamie to look at this and be like, "Here's 40 ways why this isn't going to work." Like, oh crap, I didn't think about that, that or that. We stack the different hats as opposed to doing them all at the same time and making us all want to kill each other. And that has been- Josh: That's so helpful. Russell: Huge for us. Like for me, it's huge. I always tell people like when I start brainstorming, like, "Okay, green hat time, no negative, no what ifs. Let's go." And then we just do that. And you see like the black hat people are like twitching and they're like, don't worry, you're going to get your shot, but not yet. Until everything's out and it's like, "Okay, black hat's on. What do you guys got?" And then they can go do their thing. Josh: You need some anxiety medication over there. Russell: Yeah. We can do a whole, like two day training on that, too. Because it's such a powerful thing. But conceptually, it's breaking those things in that way. Josh: All right, Russell. Well, in your other life, we'll just have an entire podcast where all we do is just do deep dives all day long. But in this life, we have to stick with constraints of where we're at. So anyway, thank you for sharing that. Super, super helpful. I appreciate it. Russell: No worries. Thank you, Josh. Appreciate you guys. Hopefully you enjoyed this episode. As you guys are building your teams, remember the principles we talked about. You've got to become the coach, you've got to attract A players, you got to put them in the right spots, figure out ways to make it profitable for them in the long term, figure out personality types, you can serve them the right way. Black hat, green hat, red hats. We should do an episode on just on all hat ... I have to go back to remember all the other colored hats. But anyway- Josh: All right, our next- Russell: There you go. Josh: Go around, I'll be like you have homework for this. Russell: Russell, prepare for this and we'll go. Josh: Prepare for this one. That'd be awesome. Russell: That'd be awesome. Thanks everyone for listening. Thank you, Josh. And we'll see you guys on the next episode.

The Sales Engagement Podcast
A Healthy Dose of Customer Obsession

The Sales Engagement Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2022 26:31


Being customer-centric is a discipline. Yes, all companies say they are customer-obsessed, but few actually employ the discipline to allow customer-centricity to permeate the whole company. In this episode, I speak with Jennifer Davis, CMO at Learfield IMG College, about the discipline to become customer-centric. Join us as we discuss: - How companies can stop diminishing what makes them great - The discipline of customer centricity - Leadership that stays customer obsessed - Personal resource management: time and attention - Discipline, communication, and goal setting Check out this resource we mentioned: - Well-Made Decisions by Jennifer Davis For more engaging sales conversations, subscribe to The Sales Engagement Podcast on Apple Podcasts, on Spotify, or on our website. Listening on a desktop & can't see the links? Just search for Sales Engagement in your favorite podcast player.

Real Relationships Real Revenue - Video Edition
Jeff Berardi on The Power of an Established Business Development System

Real Relationships Real Revenue - Video Edition

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 8, 2022 74:58


Jeff Berardi shares how the business development skills he developed during his career became the foundation for his consulting practice's success after launching right at the beginning of the pandemic. Discover the mindset shift that takes someone from struggling with business development to becoming the rainmaker of their organization, why you need to understand sales if you want to succeed at marketing, and the counterintuitive way to showcase your expertise and land paying clients that most consultants get completely backward.   Mo asks Jeff Berardi: Tell us the story of the time where you realized that business development was great. Jeff first realized the importance of business development in the marketing class at business school. The first question his professor asked was “Who here is interested in pursuing a career in marketing? And who here is interested in pursuing a career in sales?” The majority of the class had their hands up for the first part and not the second part, and that was the first lesson of the class. If you're thinking about marketing and you don't have a clear understanding and appreciation for sales you have a fundamental disconnect. Marketing is meant to drive sales. Where a lot of organizations fail is turning the one-to-many marketing experience into one-to-one sales conversations. Nobody hires someone after they give a speech, they have to talk with them about how they can solve their problems. When Jeff took over as CMO, he introduced the organization's first business development group. A lot of the difficulty an organization faces is when marketing and sales are not in alignment and are treated as completely separate activities. Jeff didn't just publish unique content. He created events around the content and a follow-up process for turning it into actionable conversations. The key is to work backwards from the goal of the campaign. For Jeff, that meant showcasing their expertise to companies that they wanted to work with in Europe. He started off with a survey to understand what is happening with potential clients. Once the research was conducted, they discovered that some issues were local and some were more widespread, but no matter the scope the research became the basis for the report that could be leveraged in a number of different ways. This sort of deep dive research into a client's problems and needs can be as broad or as narrow as you need it to be.   Mo asks Jeff Berardi: What is your personal definition of business development? Business development is creating a pipeline of future growth opportunities. You won't know when they come to fruition or how, but it's a steady process of cultivating and building relationships. There is never enough when it comes to business development because you never know when the well is going to go dry. By having a large pipeline, you have the ability to choose who you work with rather than having to take whatever comes your way. The lack of control is a major source of stress for people. Business development activities give you back the control over who you work with and how. You may be busy, but you must set aside time for business development opportunities or you might end up resentful of how much you are working. By having more opportunities than you need, you can say no to stuff you don't want and the more you're going to get paid. You also regain control on who you work with and which big ideas you get to work on. The commonality in cases where people are struggling with business development and people who thrive is fear. For those who are already successful, it's a fear of losing what they've achieved. For those who are struggling, it's a fear that they can't be successful or that business development is beyond them. When you change the mindset from a fear of not being capable, to being afraid of too much success, you open the door of opportunity. The rainmakers have learned the tools they need to succeed and they have confidence in the process. Knowing that business development is a learnable skill is what flips someone from fear to confidence.   Mo asks Jeff Berardi: What is your favorite GrowBIG or Snowball System principle? Build everything together is Jeff's all-time favorite principle. When you work with something in conjunction with your prospect they are going to like you, and the work, more. Jeff uses the example of bake-at-home cake mixes and how one small change that increased the engagement of the consumer in the process led to an increase in sales. Everybody wants to add value in life, and when you send somebody a project that's done they have no way to participate. Even a small step or contribution can increase the sense of ownership on a project. Include your client in the planning process and ditch the inclination to have a perfect fully baked proposal. You can't give too much to the client, but giving them small steps that get them engaged on the big picture helps them understand the value you are bringing to the table. Work together to nail down the scope of the project and get their stamp on what's going to be done. You convey your authority in the details. Not asking for the client's thoughts and perspective can actually be the weaker position compared to asking for input.   Mo asks Jeff Berardi: Tell us about a business development story that you are particularly proud of. Jeff has had a long and successful career, but his proudest business development story happened at the very beginning of the pandemic when he launched his own consulting practice. Jeff had the training and the experience leading up to that moment, and the launch of his consulting practice simply became reaching out to his contacts and helping them figure things out. Those initial relationships and just being valuable eventually turned into client work. Even when Jeff became busy with client work he made sure to stick to the business development habits that built those relationships. Having the Snowball System to rely on was a big asset. The habits of business development combined with being helpful became the basis for Jeff's consulting success. When you experience the result of the process, you get more motivation to keep it going. Finding the time to continue business development activities once you become successful is challenging but vital to continued growth. For Jeff, he made sure to put names and tasks in his calendar about following up. These became visual reminders that he couldn't ignore and kept him on track. To-dos can always be kicked down the road, blocking off time is hard to ignore.   Mo asks Jeff Berardi: If you could record a video and send it back to your younger self, what would it say? Jeff would tell himself to ask more questions and to be more intentional on directing the conversation to the ways he could help the other party. Asking questions and getting the client engaged is much more beneficial than just telling people what you do. A lot of consultants make the mistake of just wanting to showcase their expertise, but the counterintuitive part is that by getting the other person to talk about what's happening on their end they view you as having that expertise. There are three big benefits of asking questions: they light up the pleasure center of the person being asked, you learn their perspectives in their specific words, and it highly correlates to likeability. Asking questions releases the pressure you have when you assume you know what the client needs and then telling them how you can help without really understanding the situation. The end goal of your questions is to understand their needs and how you can address them. The essence of the questions is to build trust and also to help the client understand what they need because often they haven't defined the problem precisely on their own. If you uncover their needs over the course of the conversation in an authentic and meaningful way that shows you understand their issues and you have the skill set to help them, it feels less like you aren't trying to sell them something and more like you are trying to simply help them.     Mentioned in this Episode: GrowBIGPlaybook.com jberardi@baretzbrunelle.com Jeff Berardi on LinkedIn Jeff Berardi's Bio

Plan A Konversations
If It's Simple or Easy, You're Not Growing, Peter Giorgi, CMO, Equinox

Plan A Konversations

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 7, 2022 56:31


Season 9, Episode 7 - If It's Simple or Easy, You're Not Growing - Peter Giorgi, CMO, Equinox WELCOME TO SEASON 9! We're honored that you're here with us and very grateful to have you as a listener.About Peter GiorgiPeter Giorgi is the Chief Marketing Officer of Equinox, the global leader in luxury fitness and high-performance living. As CMO, Peter oversees all marketing functions, operations and strategy for the company which includes the brand's 105 Equinox Fitness Clubs globally, as well as the Equinox+ app that provides members access to in-club and digital programming across preeminent brands including SoulCycle, HeadStrong, PURE Yoga, and TB12, among others.  Peter is a passionate storyteller, fanatical creative advocate and true believer in the power of great ideas to change the course of business and culture.  Prior to joining Equinox, Peter held the role of Chief Marketing Officer of Celebrity Cruises where he looked after all aspects of the cruise line's global marketing, including brand strategy and creative development, digital marketing, social media, research, loyalty, direct marketing and advertising. Earlier, Peter served as Global Head of Advertising for Airbnb, where he contributed to the brand's creative and strategic excellence, leading the development of marketing platforms that dramatically increased the global growth and adoption of the brand. Prior to joining Airbnb, Peter was VP Account Director at Crispin Porter + Bogusky, one of the world's most awarded advertising agencies, where he worked on clients including Volkswagen, Jose Cuervo, vitaminwater, Kraft.Connect and learn more about Peter and Equinox: Equinox, Twitter + LinkedIn. Klay's NoteWant more information on our custom meditations? Email: Assistant@PlanAwithKlay.com.If you're looking for a cool scripted podcast drama, check out Venice HERE by Marisa Bramwell.Thank you for listening to Season 8 of Plan A Konversations! Share your thoughts and follow Klay on your favorite social media: @PlanAwithKlay and use the hashtag #PlanA101​​​. Want more Plan A? Subscribe to Klay's website: KlaySWilliams.com.If you've been motivated, inspired and called to action by this podcast, please consider contributing with the link provided below.Support the show (https://paypal.me/PlanAEnterprises?locale.x=en_US)

B2B Mentors
How CMOs Become CEOs - CC #042

B2B Mentors

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 7, 2022 11:36


How CMOs Become CEOs - CC #042Follow and connect with the host, Connor Dube on LinkedIn here: https://www.linkedin.com/in/socialsellingexpert/Instagram: connor_dubeJoin us for a FREE B2B Marketing Mastermind THIS FRIDAY, and get Feedback on your 2022 Marketing plan from expert mentors: www.activeblogs.com/liveevent/If you're already thinking you need to find a more efficient way to conquer your monthly B2B content like blogs, newsletters, and social media – we'd like to show you how we can improve the quality, save you tons of time, and achieve better results! To learn more visit www.activeblogs.com

Boomer & Gio
FanDuel CMO, Mike Raffensperger

Boomer & Gio

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 7, 2022 11:27


With mobile sports gambling se to become legal in New York state on Saturday morning at 9am, Boomer & Gio we thrilled to chat with the CMO of FanDuel, Mike Raffensperger, Friday morning to discuss the new law and all that comes along with it. 

The Marketing Book Podcast
365 CMO to CRO by Rolly Keenan

The Marketing Book Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 7, 2022 74:45


CMO to CRO: The Revenue Takeover by the Next Generation Executive by Mike Geller, Rolly Keenan, and Brandi Starr About the Book: As your company's chief marketing officer, you're responsible for your organization's growth and reputation—but you don't have enough control. Your organization works in departmental silos, with functional leaders pushing their own solutions and feeling satisfied with functional KPIs. But the kind of exponential growth that creates unstoppable momentum requires your customer-facing departments to fight for the customer instead of their own departmental wins. You're not the only one who notices—but you are the only one in the perfect position to do something about it. Discover how to reach your potential and stand out as more than a marketing professional. In CMO to CRO, industry experts Brandi Starr, Mike Geller, and Rolly Keenan show you how to bring revenue to the forefront and make every team's number one objective a seamless customer experience. You'll learn how to create consistency by reorganizing your business, following the customer, prioritizing revenue, and using CX technology to succeed where your competition fails. This book presents a revolutionary approach to not only unite the silos but position you as an innovative leader and finally uncover what CX is really about: revenue growth. About the Author: Rolly Keenan has more than 20 years of experience in Enterprise software Consulting and marketing strategy and is the Chief Revenue Officer of Tegrita, a full-service marketing technology consulting firm. He is a graduate of Northwestern University's Kellogg School of Management. And interesting facts – Rolly is a trained hostage negotiator, and before getting into the business of marketing, technology, and revenue, Rolly was on staff at USA Volleyball in Colorado Springs, working with the best volleyball teams in the country! Click here for this episode's website page with the links mentioned during the interview... https://www.salesartillery.com/marketing-book-podcast/cmo-cro-rolly-keenan

Renegade Thinkers Unite: #2 Podcast for CMOs & B2B Marketers
274: B2B Renegade: Meet David Koerner, 75F Marketing VP

Renegade Thinkers Unite: #2 Podcast for CMOs & B2B Marketers

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 7, 2022 48:35


75F is not here to market via Fear, Uncertainty, and Doubt (FUD). That's why the smart building automation brand has banished the words "climate change crisis," and "global warming." Not because they are not dedicated to making the world a better, more sustainable place, no—that's integral to 75F's mission. In this exciting episode, 75F's VP of Global Marketing David Koerner joins the show to share how 75F is marketing sustainability in a whole new way while going up against some heavy, well-known competition in their space. Having helped close the largest Series-A funding round in Minnesota history, David is a master marketer. Tune in to hear all about how the B2B brand has rolled out a truly renegade marketing strategy—cutting through the clutter to do what they do best in a big way. For full show notes and transcripts, visit https://renegade.com/podcasts/ To learn more about CMO Huddles, visit https://cmohuddles.com/

B2B Mentors
4 Secret LinkedIn Company Page Hacks to Use Tomorrow - CC #041

B2B Mentors

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2022 13:01


4 Secret LinkedIn Company Page Hacks to Use Tomorrow - CC #041Follow and connect with the host, Connor Dube on LinkedIn here: https://www.linkedin.com/in/socialsellingexpert/Instagram: connor_dubeJoin us for a FREE B2B Marketing Mastermind THIS FRIDAY, and get Feedback on your 2022 Marketing plan from expert mentors: www.activeblogs.com/liveevent/If you're already thinking you need to find a more efficient way to conquer your monthly B2B content like blogs, newsletters, and social media – we'd like to show you how we can improve the quality, save you tons of time, and achieve better results! To learn more visit www.activeblogs.com

Extraordinary Women Radio with Kami Guildner
Courtney Smith Kramer – Top Global Marketing Influencer – Episode 232

Extraordinary Women Radio with Kami Guildner

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2022 55:18


Today I'm pleased to introduce you to Courtney Smith Kramer, a friend and an extraordinary woman who has influenced my own and many others' marketing  approaches. She is one of the only 3% of female creative directors in the United States and was named a “Top 200 Global Marketing Influencer” and “Top 20 Agency Strategy Global Influencer” by Onalytica, a UK-based Influencer firm.- Top Global Marketing Influencer. In this episode: Courtney shares her journey from marketing entrepreneur to global marketing influencer. We discuss the importance of PLAY in creativity and how we all have innate creativity. We discover Courtney's favorite way to do business planning and marketing planning to get great results while staying sane (!) Courtney tells us the biggest mistake she sees entrepreneurs make and a simple strategy to avoid it. Courtney Smith Kramer is an accomplished creative strategist, storyteller, writer and designer, she has earned hundreds of creative awards, and her work has been featured in the Print International Design Annual. She has served as a juror for the ADDY Awards, W3 Awards, Davey Awards and the National Student Advertising Competition (NSAC), and is a former board member for the American Advertising Federation (AAF) and World Brand Congress. Courtney has founded two companies with husband Bryan Kramer; Silicon Valley marketing consultancy purematter, and H2H (or Human-to-Human) Companies. Together, they launched the H2H Growth Accelerator, a 12-week hybrid program that helps entrepreneurs recover from burnout in their own businesses. In her career, she has built campaigns for global brands like Plantronics, Cisco, Pitney Bowes, MasterCard, International Culinary Center, IBM and Netflix DVD.com, to name a few. She most recently completed a 4-year tenure as Global Head of Marketing for the Co-Active Training Institute. Her first book, “Be Your Creative Sexy Self: Humorous Stories to Help You Live a Happier Life” launched in July, 2020 at the #1 spot in Business Humor on Amazon. Today, Courtney is helping purpose-driven brands as an outsourced Creative Director and CMO, and inspiring positive change by co-leading the H2H Growth Accelerator alongside co-founder Bryan Kramer. “My value in this world is not what I do; it's who I am, my impact on others, and what I stand for.” – Courtney Smith Kramer To learn more about Courtney and her work, visit her blog, the H2H Growth Accelerator website, or the purematter agency website. You can also follow her on Twitter, Instagram, LinkedIn, and Facebook or buy her book on Amazon. Let's meet Courtney Smith Kramer. Courtney Smith Kramer Show Notes

Finding Brave
209: Holiday Pick: How to Tell a Riveting True Story About Who You Are and Why That Matters, with Tony Vlahos

Finding Brave

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2022 41:14


Thank you for listening to our Finding Brave show, ranked in the Top 100 Apple Career Podcasts! “Feeling connection is the same whether I'm in front of an audience with a guitar, or behind a desk talking to someone about what they've done the last 40 years. As a corporate executive, you have to connect with people and then pick up that thread and pass it along to someone else.” - Tony Vlahos As we have just celebrated the holidays and are beginning another chapter in a brand new year, once again I'll be sharing my “Holiday Picks” selections, featuring some of the top Finding Brave episodes that have previously aired, to help you have even more bravery and motivation to pursue your most exciting goals in 2022. Today we look back on a powerful episode from October 2019, where our guest revealed how your personal story and the difference that you can make with it is something that can set you apart from others. He also shared the way that storytelling your career can be your secret competitive advantage, and how stand-out brands and the compelling stories those brands communicate are deeply connected to each other. And he reveals the components of a riveting story that you can use to craft your story and growing your own brand today.  Tony Vlahos is the Chief Storyteller and Head of Brand and Partnerships (aka CMO) of ExecuNet, one of the most trusted brands in senior-level executive job search and a premier destination for high performers who want to stay on top of their game in the world of work, as leaders, and as a matter of wellbeing. Since Tony joined the company in 2007, membership has grown exponentially, through meaningful marketing stories that capture attention, entertain, enlighten, and persuade all in the course of just a few minutes. The past several years the ExecuNet brand has also come to be known as the Storytelling Capital for Individual Executives seeking compelling ways to set themselves apart in the corporate world and achieve greater results in their careers and in business. The impactful strategies that Tony presents here will change how you talk about yourself, and allow you to more fully embrace and value all of who you are, which will be the quickest path to your ultimate success.  To learn more about today's guest, visit: https://www.execunet.com/   

20 Minute Leaders
Ep703: Adi Itach | Chief Marketing Officer, Sayollo

20 Minute Leaders

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2022 21:04


Adi has more than 10 years of end-to-end marketing experience in B2C&BTC in some of the leading companies in IL and is now a leading global CMO at Sayollo. Adi is also a business & marketing consultant to start-ups from North America and Europe and has her own podcast called ""Gluten-Free Marketing"" where she connects business, strategy and spirituality.Her strengths are strategic-creative thinking, demand gen, brand building, strategic business development, start-ups scaling and creating high-impact multi-channel global campaigns.

Marketing Trends
The Challenges of the Modern CMO Addressed with Ingrid Burton, CMO Quantcast

Marketing Trends

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 41:55


Marketing leaders are faced with a litany of challenges, an ocean of tools, and seemingly infinite amounts of data, which can all get a bit overwhelming. Ingrid Burton, CMO of Quantcast, is passionate about the industry and on Marketing Trends she discusses with me some of the obstacles the modern marketer faces. “The challenges of today's CMO are very different than the challenges of even five years ago, 10 years ago. It is such a fast-moving space and CMOs have to be well versed in strategy and data in understanding the market. It's such a big job now. I wonder how my fellow CMOs are doing, because like I said, I started my day at four-thirty this morning because I lay awake at night with all these asks and I [wonder] how am I gonna get it all done? Do I have the right team on the field? Can we really execute this? Can we measure our results and make sure we're getting the attribution that we need. We need to be thinking about how we make sure CMOs don't burn out. How do we make sure CMOs are able to lead through this? And how do we make sure that the expectations are realistic?” There will never be an end to all of the additional things a marketer does, another channel to add to the mix, but be careful not to push yourself or your team beyond your limits. In this episode, Ingrid unpacks what they mean at Quantcast when they talk about providing a free and open internet. She delves into her passion and in-depth knowledge of machine learning, and how marketers can best utilize their endless amount of tools. She also explains why ESG is going to be a main driver for them next year and how they're ensuring true Diversity, Equality, and Inclusion. There's so much to enjoy, up ahead with Ingrid here on Marketing Trends. Main TakeawaysThe Challenges of the Modern CMO: The rapid pace of the software-driven industry is a lot to keep up with. Getting more data and analytics capabilities has driven a lot of growth in the last 5-10 years. The constant rush of information combined with the constant demand to put information out can lead some of even the most passionate marketers to burnout. Guarding against that is going to be what separates the leaders of the future. The expectations of many CMOs and marketing leaders are very high. The Value of a Free and Open Internet: The value of having clear and factual information widely acknowledged and accepted in culture is essential for unity. The internet disrupted the journalism industry, and this change has brought about the conversion to subscription fee-based models over the traditional ad-based mode. This means that some people don't have access to the factual information they could be learning their news from. Machine Learning - The Power of Noticing Patterns: Pattern recognition is one of the most useful tools in leadership and in scaling business. Machines that can be taught to recognize certain patterns can do so and scan the entire database instantaneously. If you can notice patterns in marketing that can help you predict what your customers may be interested in or looking for at certain times of the year, times of day, devices, or locations. The power of machine learning in marketing is just in the early stages.Key Quotes“Hopefully I don't say ‘I' too much. I always want to say ‘we' - We did this. We did that. I'm just the guide; here's the north star we want to take. Or as I put it, here's the mountain we need to take. I put that out there very early on. I think my team here was very surprised. And when I showed them just a few baby steps of how you're gonna climb small hills to get to the top of the peak, they saw that they could do it. They accomplished it. Some of it's confidence-building and having them believe in themselves.”“Who can afford to subscribe to all these news publications. There's gotta be a different way. I'm afraid for a society that if we charge for every piece of content, what's going to happen to people that can't afford it [is that] they're gonna be left behind. They get left behind because they're not getting the right news. The internet is a great equalizer and we need to make sure that it's not a fee-based internet.” “One of the things that's unique about Quantcast is we have this unique, real-time data set and it's one of the largest in the world behind Google and Facebook. Since we started the company, we have established a relationship with all the publishers out there. This is Hurst which is huge, Conde Nast...we have a hundred million websites. Their data is feeding into this anonymized data set. That is one of the largest actually running in the Amazon cloud, one of the largest that they have. We're using machine learning to find patterns and make predictions about the behavior of what's happening in this data set.”“The challenges of today's CMO, are very different than the challenges of even five years ago, 10 years ago. It is such a fast-moving space and CMOs have to be well versed in strategy and data in understanding the market. It's such a big job now. I wonder how my fellow CMOs are doing, because like I said, I started my day at four-thirty this morning because I lay awake at night with all these asks coming at me and I [wonder] how am I gonna get it all done? Do I have the right team on the field? Can we really execute to this? Can we measure our results and um, really make sure we're getting the attribution that we need. We need to really be thinking about how do we make sure CMOs don't burn out? How do we make sure CMOs are able to lead through this? And how do we make sure that the expectations are realistic?”BioIngrid Burton is a unique leader in the world of tech as she bridges the gap between technology and marketing in leading teams to unparalleled successes driving strategies for market trends including AI and machine learning, Java and HANA technologies, SaaS, Cloud Computing, Open Source, Internet of Things (IOT), community engagement and Big Data that have had a positive impact on the evolving technology landscape.Ingrid's career includes her role as a member of the board of directors at Extreme Networks. She also held the role of Chief Marketing Officer at H2O.ai, the open source leader in AI and machine learning, where she led marketing teams while positioning the company through its growth stages. Prior to H2O.ai, Ingrid advised companies including DriveScale, MapR (acquired by HPE) and Paxata (acquired by DataRobot). She was CMO of Hortonworks, a Big Data company, where she drove a brand and marketing transformation, positioning the company for growth and subsequent acquisition.Ms. Burton led the Product and Innovation marketing team at SAP, where she was the marketing leader of SAP HANA, analytics, and mobile offerings, and where she co-created the company Cloud strategy. As CMO of pre-IPO Silver Spring Networks, she positioned the company for their IPO as the leader in energy networks. While CMO at Plantronics she reshaped a 50-year-old brand into a modern and exciting communications model for both consumers and business.Previously at Sun Microsystems, Ingrid held various leadership roles including head of marketing for the company, driving both the company and Java brand, global citizenship, championing open source initiatives, and leading product and strategic marketing teams. Early in her career, Ingrid was a developer.Ms. Burton actively engages with and mentors people in both technology and business functions, and provides guidance for them in their careers. She has received numerous awards including the 2005 Silicon Valley TWIN award.---Marketing Trends podcast is brought to you by Salesforce. Discover marketing built on the world's number one CRM: Salesforce. Put your customer at the center of every interaction. Automate engagement with each customer. And build your marketing strategy around the entire customer journey. Salesforce. We bring marketing and engagement together. Learn more at salesforce.com/marketing.

The Tech Blog Writer Podcast
1837: How Unified Data Model Platforms Can Beat Adobe and Oracle

The Tech Blog Writer Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 28:12


Cheetah Digital is a marketing tech platform that has collected over 2 billion data entries for brands including Arsenal FC, Hilton, BBC, Citibank, Vodafone UK, and the Postcode Lottery, McDonald's, Pizza Hut UK, Godiva, Urban Outfitters. Richard Jones, CMO of Cheetah Digital, joins me on Tech Talks Daily in a conversation about why smaller enterprise-specific marketing technology and unified data model platforms provide far more benefits for customers than those from more prominent players. For more than 20 years, I have learned how Richard has worked in technology, specifically, building marketing technology for the likes of Adobe, Oracle, and how he has been a CMO integrating martech to deliver business results. We discuss the growth of customer engagement suites that ingest various kinds of data, batch data, streaming data, point of sale data, and weather data according to a businesses' requirements. We also talk about how companies can use machine learning and artificial intelligence to segment and analyze that data. Finally, we discuss why leveraging the same data model with the customer engagement data platform at its heart is key if you're building software from the ground up.

Marketing Mistakes (And How To Avoid Them)
The Key To Building A Major Brand

Marketing Mistakes (And How To Avoid Them)

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 32:34


In today's episode, Stacy sits down with Doug Zarkin, who is the VP and CMO of Pearle Vision, which is one of the largest optical retailers in North America. Doug has a wealth of experience in marketing; he has five North American Effie Awards, a Clio Award, and has been twice recognized as Innovative Marketer of the Year by the CMO Club. Here, the two chat about the 80-20 rule, and the importance of celebrating your progress. They also discuss why passion is necessary in building a successful team. Doug also shares his take on the metaverse, and the downfalls of partnering with a celebrity who lacks authenticity and enthusiasm for your brand.

Essential Ingredients Podcast
016: Plant-Powered Energy and Immunity Coffee that Tackles Food Waste with Paul Evers

Essential Ingredients Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 23:27


“The cascara is the better half of what the coffee plant has to offer. We see even greater potential with cascara and the last thing that should be done is throw it to waste.” -Paul Evers   Episode Description:  Coffee is one of the most loved beverages around the world. According to data, around two billion cups of coffee are consumed every day! It's not surprising, therefore, that it has become a multi-billion dollar industry. However, the question still arises, “Are we really utilizing 100% of coffee's agricultural value?”    Coffee is made from coffee cherries. Yes! Coffee actually comes from a fruit. Each pulp covers two beans, sometimes one, called a peaberry. Processing starts with separating the beans from the “CASCARA”, or the pulp. The beans are then roasted, brewed, and extracted depending on how strong or mild you want your coffee to be. What happens to the pulp, you may ask? Because there is little demand, the cascara is left to ferment, converted to fertilizer or animal feed, or thrown into a landfill. Needless to say, that accounts for billions of food waste and millions of metric tons of carbon emissions.    Thankfully, more and more companies are acting to solve a significant portion of this problem. One of them is Riff. Co-founded by Paul Evers, Riff aims to impact the planet by “creating possibilities out of coffee beans and the whole dang coffee plant!” Riff created plant-based products that provide energy and immunity. Their energy+ drinks and cold brews come in fun flavors, are gluten-free, vegan-friendly, non-GMO, and ethically-sourced.    In this episode, Justine and Paul discuss how we can weave our love for coffee and our love for the planet together. They talk about a brewing problem in the coffee industry that affects consumers, farmers, and the environment. If you're interested in investing in Riff's mission, tune in as Paul shares how you can show your support in building a better-for-you food system.    Connect with Paul Evers:  A celebrated veteran in brand strategy, design, and advertising— Paul led the teams behind the creative development of craft beverage brands such as Humm Kombucha, 21st Amendment, Deschutes Brewery, Odell Brewing, and Crux Fermentation Project—which he co-founded, and served as President and CMO. In 2017, Paul co-founded Riff Cold Brewed Coffee along with veterans from Stumptown and LinkedIn. Paul is also a long-time active community member, having played a significant role in launching both the Bend Volunteer Corps and TEDxBend.   Website Facebook  Twitter Instagram LinkedIn   Connect with Justine:  Website Facebook Instagram LinkedIn   Connect with NextGenChef: Website  Facebook  Twitter  Instagram  YouTube NextGenChef App (Apple) NextGenChef App (Android)    Episode Highlights: 01:54 Food Waste and the Coffee Industry 08:58 Creating Relationship Over Traditional Advertising 14:37 Solving Multiple Problems At the Same Time 18:31 Success Redefined 21:59 Cascara Foster Child

Demand Gen Visionaries
The Rise of Data Driven Marketers with Heidi Bullock, CMO of Tealium

Demand Gen Visionaries

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 42:36


This episode features an interview with Heidi Bullock, CMO of Tealium, a company that connects data from all different sources so brands can better connect to their customers. Prior to Tealium, Heidi was the CMO of Engagio and Global VP of Marketing at Marketo. On this episode, Heidi talks about what it means to be CMO of Tealium, why the rise of data driven marketers is so important, and her top do's and don't for customer event marketing during a pandemic. -------------------“...know where your audience is. And I know that seems obvious, but I think even in social, you often see people saying, ‘oh, we've got to do LinkedIn, Facebook, Tiktok', you name it. But if your audience isn't there, maybe that doesn't make sense. So I think before you even think about channels and tactics, make sure you know who you're marketing to. Who you're trying to engage with and where they are and then how they prefer to be communicated to.” — Heidi Bullock-------------------Episode Timestamps:*(1:52) - Heidi's first job in demand*(2:17) - What being CMO means at Tealium*(3:44) - Segment: The Trust Tree*(4:49) - Who Tealium's customers are*(8:45) - The rise of date driven marketers *(11:00) - How Heidi structures her marketing organization*(14:26) - Segment: The Playbook*(16:34) - Tips on customer events*(20:20) - Heidi's marketing don'ts*(31:49) - Heidi's all-time favorite campaign she's ran*(32:14) - Segment: The Dust-Up*(35:50) - How Heidi views Tealium's website*(37:14) - Segment: Quick Hits-------------------SponsorDemand Gen Visionaries is brought to you by Qualified.com, the #1 Conversational Marketing platform for companies that use Salesforce and the secret weapon for Demand Gen pros. The world's leading enterprise brands trust Qualified to instantly meet with buyers, right on their website, and maximize sales pipeline. Visit Qualified.com to learn more.-------------------LinksConnect with Heidi on LinkedInFollow Heidi on Twitter Follow Ian on TwitterConnect with Ian on LinkedInwww.caspianstudios.com

FratChat Podcast
Season 4 Ep #13: New Years Resolutions 2022

FratChat Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 60:51


The guys make their very own New Years resolutions, to be totally better people. The problem? You know they are going to do this ALL wrong. Listen along for their hilarious resolutions, plus a terrifying story about a man whose life (and nuts) had a terrible ending, this week on the FratChat Podcast! Get 20% OFF + Free Shipping on all MANSCAPED products with promo code FRATCHAT at MANSCAPED.com! The FratChat Podcast is part of the Bleav Network! Follow us on all social media: Instagram: http://Instagram.com/FratChatPodcast Facebook: http://Facebook.com/FratChatPodcast Twitter: http://Twitter.com/FratChatPodcast Follow Carlos and CMO on Instagram! Carlos: http://Instagram.com/CarlosDoesTheWorld CMO: http://Instagram.com/Chris.Moore.Comedy

IoT For All Podcast
Edge Computing Benefits and Considerations

IoT For All Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 26:44


This week on the IoT For All Podcast, Pratexo CEO Blaine Mathieu joins us to share everything companies should know about edge computing and how it complements IoT. Blaine shares some of the most transformative and unique use cases he's seen edge computing enable, including windmills that automatically slow to prevent collisions with birds.Blaine also shares his thoughts on what companies should consider before deciding to implement edge computing into their solutions - when it might be most beneficial, especially in environments where connectivity is difficult or unstable, and what some of the biggest benefits companies can expect. Blaine also shares his thoughts on distributed computing and swarm computing, how they work, and in what use cases the technology really shines.Blaine Mathieu is a former Gartner analyst, software company founder, CEO, and multi-time CMO and Chief Products Officer at both public tech giants and private software and IIoT startups. He is based out of the SF Bay area and leads intelligent edge platform company Pratexo.

Brand Yourself
174: The Power of Being Your Own Best Resource with Ara Katz

Brand Yourself

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 2, 2022 63:37


Ara Katz is the co-founder and co-CEO of Seed Health, a microbial sciences company pioneering applications of microbes for human and planetary health. It was her breastfeeding experience that led her to the microbiome and inspired her personal mission to explore the importance and impact of microbes. She is also a co-founder of Seed Health's environmental initiative, SeedLabs, and its first therapeutics partner company, LUCA Biologics. Ara previously co-founded and served as CMO of digital commerce company Spring, where she helped launch ApplePay on iPhone, and was on the founding team of social commerce company BeachMint. As an advisor and angel investor across health tech, ed tech, consumer, and sustainability, Ara has supported companies like RXDefine, Newness, C16 Biosciences, MindBodyGreen, Mahmee Maternal Care, Stadium Goods, and Unicycle. She is also the author of A Kids Book About Your Microbiome and lives in Venice, California with her husband and six-year-old son, Pax.   To learn more about Ara Katz and the resources mentioned in this episode, visit the show notes.   Follow Me On: Facebook Instagram

Learnings from Leaders: the P&G Alumni Podcast
Suzy Deering: Ford Motor Company CMO

Learnings from Leaders: the P&G Alumni Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 2, 2022 44:35


“Get uncomfortable. Don't feel like you can't keep creating new value in an environment of curiosity.” Suzy Deering is Ford's global Chief Marketing Officer - leading Ford's North America marketing and driving strategy across the company's global business units – to constantly enhance and release the huge customer and company value across Ford's iconic brands. Suzy was previously global CMO of eBay, where she helped revive the company's brand and drive sharply higher revenue. She also served as CEO of Moxie, a technology-led marketing agency, and spent many years in senior media and brand roles at Verizon and Home Depot. And she actually got her start at the Walt Disney Company, and studied Advertising at the University of Georgia. Suzy's been recognized as an AdAge “40 Under 40” and as one of Business Insider's “Top 50 Most Innovative CMOs.” While Suzy may not be a P&G Alumni - she is a purpose driven leader. Suzy also happens to be a longtime friend of fellow P&G Alumni leader (and past podcast guest) Kirk Perry, now CEO of IRI Worldwide, who joins for the first of many “deep dives” - where past guests invite non-Alumni leaders to for a candid conversation on their leadership journeys. Which purpose driven leaders do YOU know and want to hear? Let us know at pgalumpod@gmail.com, and who knows, maybe you'll hear them on our podcast soon!