Podcasts about Northwestern

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  • 2,447PODCASTS
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  • May 18, 2022LATEST

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Best podcasts about Northwestern

Show all podcasts related to northwestern

Latest podcast episodes about Northwestern

HSCT Warriors
Meet Stacy and learn from reflections as she celebrates her third stem cell birthday (Ep. 83)

HSCT Warriors

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 64:01


Warrior: Stacy McNall AI: Primary Progressive Multiple Sclerosis HSCT: May 14, 2019 Superpower: being still Are you someone that trusts the process? How do you handle the need to slow down? Are you able to find calm in the storm? As a very active person who “lived in overdrive” as a nurse practitioner and marathoner, Stacy tended to set aside the symptoms she experienced for nearly 18 years before she was diagnosed. During her 14th marathon, Stacy tried her best to get moving but her legs would not cooperate and she finally went to see a doctor. After trying several disease modifying therapies that did not seem to help, Stacy looked further into HSCT while she was hospitalized with a relapse and was successful enrolling in the clinical trial at Northwestern just before it ended. From relapses, to support from reiki masters, to issues with insurance, to reactions during the stem cell transplant including a blood clot, psychosis, and extreme nausea, Stacy seems to have experienced everything along the HSCT rollercoaster. Be sure to visit our website, HSCTWarriorsPodcast.org where you can find notes from today's episode, submit ideas or feedback, or connect with HSCT Warriors, Inc. and schedule time to “Talk with a Warrior”, find the latest research and resources, or explore the world map. Special thanks to musical genius Billy Alletzhauser for sharing his superpowers to produce the soundtrack, and engineer the audio to make this podcast possible. You can find us both when you subscribe on SoundCloud, iTunes or wherever you find podcasts. It has been great to connect with Warriors worldwide, so please reach out if you're interested in sharing your story. We would love to learn how the podcast has helped your journey with autoimmune disease so if you could take a moment, leave us a comment on instagram or share feedback on our website. We hope you'll tune in next Wednesday for another episode, highlighting another HSCT Warrior. Until then, be a snowflake and embrace your superpowers. Be kind. Be well. _________________________________ Jen Stansbury Koenig and the producers disclaim medical influence and responsibility for any possible adverse effects from the use of information contained herein. If you think you have a medical problem, please contact a licensed physician. Resources: Reiki Myofascial release Vibration plate

This Is Your Brain With Dr. Phil Stieg
Coming This Friday - "While You Were Sleeping"

This Is Your Brain With Dr. Phil Stieg

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 1:00


We can hear and process information while we're asleep - sometimes we even incorporate what we hear into our dreams. Ken Paller, professor of psychology at Northwestern and a "lucid dream" researcher, is taking that one step further, working on ways to influence our dreams by communicating with sleeping test subjects. Enter the fascinating world of manipulated dream states, in which a researcher may be able to influence what you dream about.

Cougar Sports with Ben Criddle (BYU)
5-16-22 - Hour 1 - Would you rather play Northwestern/Mid Level/Low Level P5 in Vegas or Wyoming/UNLV/CSU/SJSU @ home on September 2nd 2023?

Cougar Sports with Ben Criddle (BYU)

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 50:36


Today's Co-Hosts: Ben Criddle (@criddlebenjamin) Subscribe to the Cougar Sports with Ben Criddle podcast:Apple Podcastshttps://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/cougar-sports-with-ben-criddle/id996764363Google Podcastshttps://www.google.com/podcasts?feed=aHR0cHM6Ly93d3cuc3ByZWFrZXIuY29tL3Nob3cvMTM2OTkzOS9lcGlzb2Rlcy9mZWVkSpotifyhttps://open.spotify.com/show/7dZvrG1ZtKkfgqGenR3S2mPocket Castshttps://pca.st/SU8aOvercasthttps://overcast.fm/itunes996764363/cougar-sports-with-ben-criddle-byuSpreakerhttps://www.spreaker.com/show/cougar-sports-with-ben-criddleStitcherhttps://www.stitcher.com/s?fid=66416iHeartRadiohttps://www.iheart.com/podcast/966-cougar-sports-with-29418022TuneInhttps://tunein.com/podcasts/Sports-Talk--News/Cougar-Sports-with-Ben-Criddle-p731529/

America Outdoors Radio Podcast
Northwestern Outdoors Radio - May 07, 2022

America Outdoors Radio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 44:50


This week on Northwestern Outdoors Radio Gary Brain at the Lodge at Summer Lake in Southeast Oregon shares some exciting news about new fishing opportunities at Ana Reservoir. Participants in the Northern Pikeminnow Sport Reward Fishery Program are getting a raise this year and Project Leader Eric Winther will also share some advice about where to catch these fish on the Columbia River during the month of May.  Speaking of May, gobblers are changing up their behavior and hunters have to do the same.  Outdoors writer Troy Rodakowski has some great advice to help you bag a late season turkey.  http://www.northwesternoutdoors.com  

SoundingOff_CS
Swing Away 5-15-22

SoundingOff_CS

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 74:13


Chap talks with the high school baseball coaches from Western, Taylor, Northwestern, Eastern, Tri-Central, and Kokomo.

Our Voices Matter Podcast
Diversity Matters - Pauline Chiou

Our Voices Matter Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 31:30


If you've ever wondered why diversity matters, especially in newsrooms, this week's guest has some answers for you. And then some.Pauline Chiou is a media executive who cut her journalism teeth as a reporter in local TV and network newsrooms across the U.S.From there, it was on to Hong Kong and 6 years as an anchor at CNN International. CNBC then lured her to Singapore for 3 years, before she returned to the U.S. and moved into news managementA Mentor to Young JournalistsAs a mentor to young journalists, Pauline's message is simple: be intentional and show up.And bring your whole self to the workplace.That diversity of experience and thought is needed more than ever to provide context and accuracy to the range of stories reflecting our complex culture.Case in point — coverage of the recent wave of hate-fueled violence against Asian-Americans, Jews, Black Americans, members of the LGBTQ+ community and more.As Pauline explains, reporters who reflect these communities can offer nuanced coverage and perspective others might miss. Perspective that is seminal to our understanding of each other's way of life.She shares many examples of this, as well as the challenges she has faced and overcome as an Asian-American woman.The Impact of Sharing Our StoriesPauline knows full well how sharing our stories can impact those watching and listening.In fact, it was the story of a holocaust survivor that changed her life when she was an undergraduate at Yale.That sent her on a trajectory which took her to Northwestern's Medill School of Journalism and her resulting career.A career where she helps develop the next generation of journalists and newsrooms — showing them, by example, that diversity matters.www.ourvoicesmatterpodcast.comwww.lorellemedia.comThis podcast is devoted to empowering us all to better understand each other's differences...one story at a time.  Emmy Award-winning journalist, Linda Lorelle, guides guests through insightful, unexpected conversations that reveal our common humanity.  This show is not about politics per se; it is about finding a way to reclaim civility in the context of the contentious times in which we live, by sharing our personal and professional stories, in hopes that others might find a glimpse of themselves.Support the show

Northwestern Intersections
If It Clicks, If It Feels Right, Go with Your Gut with Irene Kang '11

Northwestern Intersections

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 55:07


Irene Kang '11 has lived multiple lives. In her first she worked in the field of environmentalism and sustainability. In her second, she's the founder of Spark Collection—bilingual books for families to learn language in a fun and meaningful way. Throughout the course of these lives, the most important decisions she made were by trusting her intuition when something felt right: choosing Northwestern, pursuing environmentalism, and meeting her husband (and fellow alumni) Chris, and creating Spark Collection. Kang shares how she realized during the pandemic that there were very few accessible resources for teaching Asian languages to children. And that this was issue many Asian and multicultural families struggled with themselves. Kang decided to create Spark Collection, and published her first book with the incredible community support of Kickstarter: My Favorite Gift. Available in Mandarin, Hindi, and recently, Korean. She previews the second book in the collection, My Beautiful Earth coming out in September of 2022, and her third book Pay It Forward, which we will see in 2023. Kang tells how the books in Spark Collection reflect the values that she wants to share with her child: the importance of family, environmentalism, kindness, and resilience.  On this episode of Northwestern Intersections, Kang talks about the inspiration behind Spark Collection and the incredible impact of the first book, My Favorite Gift through feedback she's received from families. And how Spark Collection is contributing to increased Asian representation and access to Asian languages in children's literature. And finally, Kang shares her insights on making significant career transitions and asks us: what would we try if we couldn't fail? For her, the answer was Spark Collection. Visit the website or follow them on Instagram to learn more and get the latest updates on Spark Collection!

Bloodround Wrestling Podcast
Episode #377 with Ryan Warner

Bloodround Wrestling Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 76:07


With Tommy out for a work trip, we have Ryan Warner from The Wrestling Changed My Life Podcast as the guest host. We discuss his Podcast and Documentaries, wrestling media, Pan Ams, and a fun walk through Northwestern and the Midlands.

101.7 The Hammer Podcasts
Purdue shortstop Evan Albrecht previews big series at Northwestern

101.7 The Hammer Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 11:58


Senior shortstop Evan Albrecht has been a huge part of the Boilermakers' lineup this season. He hopes to guide Purdue to big wins at Northwestern this weekend.

Crain's Daily Gist
05/12/22: You've seen this condo on Netflix

Crain's Daily Gist

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 35:02


Crain's residential real estate reporter Dennis Rodkin talks with host Amy Guth about local housing news, including two proposed projects, the Chicago condo used in the beginning of the show "Ozark" and lots more. Plus: Advocate Aurora to merge with North Carolina hospital chain in blockbuster deal, relocate HQ; Lightfoot puts $500K into reproductive care amid possible Roe v. Wade reversal; Northwestern gets 'multimillion-dollar gift' for outgoing president; and CEOs of Chicago-area companies got generous raises in 2021.

KPCW The Mountain Life
The Mountain Life | May 11, 2022

KPCW The Mountain Life

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 52:38


On today's The Mountain Life, Pete and Lynn's guests include: (01:10) Pulitzer Prize winner Matt Richtel who brings some new discoveries about what it takes to be creative. His new book is INSPIRED: Understanding Creativity: A Journey Through Art, Science, and the Soul. Then, (27:12) Sarah Fay, an award-winning writer and journalist on the faculty at Northwestern. Her book, PATHOLOGICAL: The True Story of Six Misdiagnoses --is a cautionary tale about blindly accepting a psychiatric diagnosis.

Things Above
Conversation with Amy Bragg Carey

Things Above

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 25:22


James Bryan Smith has a Things Above conversation with Dr. Amy Bragg Carey. Amy is the fourteenth president of Friends University and is currently in her seventh year as president. She previously served as vice president for institutional advancement at the University of Northwestern in St. Paul, Minn. She brings to Friends a strong background […] The post Conversation with Amy Bragg Carey appeared first on Apprentice Institute.

Nebraska Athletics Podcast
Eight Huskers Honored By the Big Ten

Nebraska Athletics Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022


Freshman catcher Ava Bredwell was named the 2022 Big Ten Freshman of the Year on Wednesday, when the conference announced its postseason awards. Bredwell was also one of seven Huskers to earn All-Big Ten accolades, tying Northwestern for the most selections in the league.

Money Grab
Dave Dameshek guest hosts, Tom Brady will announce games for Fox when he retires, a full NHL playoff breakdown & is Deuce Tatum the next sensation? | Megan Fun of Sports

Money Grab

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 62:36


Megan Connolly is back with a brand new Megan Fun of Sports with special guest host - Dave Dameshek! The show starts with them joking about Big 10 rivalries - Indiana and Northwestern  and if they care about F1 racing after the event in Miami? With Rich Strike winning the Kentucky Derby at 80-1 odds they joke if the Giants or Steelers, also at 80-1 odds could win the Super Bowl this year? They discuss Mother's Day gifts as Shek brags about his special talent and Megan hands out her Moron of the Week. Tom Brady stays in the news after agreeing to announce NFL games on Fox after he retires and Megan is sick of him saying the tuck rule was actually a fumble. Megan asks Shek if Jayson Tatum's son Deuce could be the next Riley Curry and the show rounds out with Dave going over the NHL playoffs.

Audrey Off The Cuff
Raising an Inclusive Generation with Dr. Donna Baptiste

Audrey Off The Cuff

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 44:32


We're back for another episode of Well, Not Perfect. I've been looking forward to sharing this one with you all!    I had the honor to sit down with Dr. Donna Baptiste, I had the opportunity to get to know Dr Baptiste in 2020 during Simply Bee's Diversity, Equity and Inclusion Panel Discussion. Dr. Baptiste is the Department Chair of the Master of Arts Degree in Counseling at the Family Institute at Northwestern University as well as a licensed psychologist. She is an incredible human with a passion for mentoring other professional clinicians, treating families and promoting equity.    In this episode you will hear me discuss both my personal and professional takeaways that have since then changed the way I parent and lead.    Like me, I am confident you will walk away feeling inspired!    Listen in as we dive deep into the hot topic of diversity and inclusion and the importance of raising informed children who appreciate diversity and value inclusion.  We talk about tangible ways that parents can raise a generation who embody these values in their everyday actions.   Donna's insights provide us all with a powerful reminder that one of the most essential roles in a parent's life is to bring up children who will create a world more equitable than the one we have now.    In today's episode you will learn: How to raise children to be inclusive members of society; The relationship between race, identity, and mental health; and finally Strategies and advice for how to have uncomfortable conversations with your loved ones.   Welcome to another episode of Well, Not Perfect.    To connect with Donna, you can find her at: The Family Institute at Northwestern: https://www.family-institute.org/therapists-locations/staff/donna-baptiste LinkedIn: Donna Baptiste  

The Tech Jawn
A Mother's Day Jawn: The Tech Jawn 34

The Tech Jawn

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 65:12


AI used in a Northwestern study of police departments is showing that a small percentage of officers own a disproportionate share of the misconduct.The “Chip Shortage” is actually making the chip shortage worse because chip manufacturers can't get the chips they need to make the chips we need.The Amazon union saga is far from over as it fires managers who “didn't prevent” the Staten Island warehouse from organizing right as that union's leader meets with the president and appears in front of Congress.And the fall of Roe v. Wade could have big effects on Big Tech. We discuss some of the ways tech companies are scrambling to protect employees, end-users, and the massive amounts of data it collects. Link to Show Notes See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Daily Northwestern Podcasts
Podculture: The fabric of Northwestern Theater

The Daily Northwestern Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 8:21


From sourcing clothes to sewing, the costume design process for Northwestern theatre productions involves meticulous work and collaboration. On this episode of Podculture, The Daily dives into the world of costume design at Northwestern.

SoundingOff_CS
Swing Away 5-8-22

SoundingOff_CS

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022 70:39


I talk baseball with the coaches from Western, Taylor, Northwestern, Eastern, Tri-Central, and Kokomo.

Audible Bleeding
Occupational Hazards for the Vascular Surgeon

Audible Bleeding

Play Episode Listen Later May 8, 2022 41:46


In this episode, we are fortunate to hear three interviews from guest experts in the field discussing occupational hazards in vascular surgery. We cover physical pain and discomfort with Dr. Max Wohlauer, radiation safety with Dr. Melissa Kirkwood, and pregnancy and radiation with Dr. Venita Chandra.  Show Guests: Dr. Max Wohlauer (@doctormaxw) is an assistant professor at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, as well as an associate program director of their residency and fellowship.  He founded the Vascular Surgery COVID-19 Collaborative (VASCC, https://medschool.cuanschutz.edu/surgery/divisions-centers-affiliates/vascular/research/vascc/vascc).  He obtained his medical degree from the Albany Medical College and completed general surgery residency at the University of Colorado followed by vascular surgery fellowship at the Cleveland Clinic. Audible Bleeding with Dr. Samuel Money on Ergonomics in Surgery: https://www.audiblebleeding.com/money-ergonomics/  Physical discomfort, professional satisfaction, and burnout in vascular surgeons: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jvs.2018.11.026  Physical pain and musculoskeletal discomfort in vascular surgeons: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jvs.2020.07.097  Vascular surgeon wellness and burnout: A report from the Society for Vascular Surgery Wellness Task Force: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jvs.2020.10.065  Dr. Melissa Kirkwood is an associate professor at the UT Southwestern Medical Center and chief of the division of vascular surgery. She completed her medical degree at Yale University School of Medicine, followed by a general surgery residency at The University of Chicago, and vascular surgery fellowship at the University of Pennsylvania Medical Center. One of her major research interests is radiation dose control and novel technology for decreasing radiation exposure. Dual fluoroscopy with live-image digital zooming significantly reduces patient and operating staff radiation during fenestrated-branched endovascular aortic aneurysm repair: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jvs.2020.05.031  Disposable, lightweight shield decreases operator eye and brain radiation dose when attached to safety eyewear during fluoroscopically guided interventions: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jvs.2021.11.067  Radiation brain dose to vascular surgeons during fluoroscopically guided interventions is not effectively reduced by wearing lead equivalent surgical caps: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jvs.2017.12.054    Dr. Venita Chandra (@ChandraVenita) is a clinical associate professor at Stanford University as well as the program director for vascular surgery residency and fellowship. She obtained her medical degree from the University of Chicago followed by general surgery residency and vascular surgery fellowship at Stanford University. She also completed a technology development fellowship in the Stanford Biodesign Program. She is part of the SVS Wellness Task Force and has an interest in radiation safety in pregnancy. Monitoring of fetal radiation exposure during pregnancy: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jvs.2013.01.052 Incidence of Infertility and Pregnancy Complications in US Female Surgeons: https://doi.org/10.1001/jamasurg.2021.3301   Host Introductions: Dr. Matt Chia (@chia_md) is in his 6th year in the integrated vascular surgery program at Northwestern University. He obtained his medical degree from the University of Illinois College of Medicine, and also holds a Master's in Health Services and Outcomes Research from Northwestern.    Dr. Jessie Ho (@JessieHo_) is in her 4th year general surgery resident at Northwestern University. She obtained her medical degree from the Texas A&M College of Medicine, and is completing a Master's in Clinical Investigation at Northwestern.   Authors: Matt Chia, MD, MS, Jessie Ho, MD, Janhavi Patel, BMSc Editor: Matt Chia, MD Reviewers: Sharif Ellozy, MD, Adam Johnson, MD

From Washington – FOX News Radio
From Washington: The Opposing Sides To The SCOTUS Leak

From Washington – FOX News Radio

Play Episode Listen Later May 7, 2022 37:15


A full 98-page draft opinion from the Supreme Court written by Justice Samuel Alito to overturn the landmark Roe v. Wade decision was leaked to Politico this week. The draft opinion calls to ban abortions federally, which would leave it to be a state-by-state issue. Democrats in the Senate plan a vote next week on federal protections for abortion access, and FOX News Congressional Correspondent Chad Pergram predicts the outcome and explains how the leak undermines the integrity of the court. On Tuesday, Russian forces began battling for control over the last pocket of resistance in Ukraine's besieged North-Western coast city of Mariupol. As "Victory Day" in Russia approaches, Russian President Vladimir Putin has yet to officially seize any cities in the two months of the war on Ukraine. FOX News Foreign Correspondent Trey Yingst discusses what the situations are like on the ground in Mariupol, what makes the city such a critical win, and the significance of Victory Day as it relates to the invasion of Ukraine. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The FOX News Rundown
From Washington: The Opposing Sides To The SCOTUS Leak

The FOX News Rundown

Play Episode Listen Later May 7, 2022 37:15


A full 98-page draft opinion from the Supreme Court written by Justice Samuel Alito to overturn the landmark Roe v. Wade decision was leaked to Politico this week. The draft opinion calls to ban abortions federally, which would leave it to be a state-by-state issue. Democrats in the Senate plan a vote next week on federal protections for abortion access, and FOX News Congressional Correspondent Chad Pergram predicts the outcome and explains how the leak undermines the integrity of the court. On Tuesday, Russian forces began battling for control over the last pocket of resistance in Ukraine's besieged North-Western coast city of Mariupol. As "Victory Day" in Russia approaches, Russian President Vladimir Putin has yet to officially seize any cities in the two months of the war on Ukraine. FOX News Foreign Correspondent Trey Yingst discusses what the situations are like on the ground in Mariupol, what makes the city such a critical win, and the significance of Victory Day as it relates to the invasion of Ukraine. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Hail Varsity Radio Show
International Flavor

Hail Varsity Radio Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2022 88:36


Chris Schmidt and Connor Clark get set for the weekend, and Schmidty has officially taken the plunge and booked passage to Ireland for Nebraska versus Northwestern. We talk some football and what needs to get done for Nebraska between now and then. Jacob Padilla and Steve Marik join the show. Bill Doleman is back to talk Big Red.An Exclusive Offer For Hail Varsity Radio Show Podcast Listeners!Get your subscription to Hail Varsity at a discount! Use Coupon Code: GBRA Hurrdat Media Production. Hurrdat Media is a digital media and commercial video production company based in Omaha, NE. Find more podcasts on the Hurrdat Media Network and learn more about our other services today on HurrdatMedia.com.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Chicago's Afternoon News with Steve Bertrand
What causes the BA.2 omicron subvariant to spread so rapidly?

Chicago's Afternoon News with Steve Bertrand

Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2022


Dr. Justin Fiala, pulmonary and critical care specialist at Northwestern Memorial Hospital, joins Lisa Dent on Chicago's Afternoon News to explain why the coronavirus BA.2 omicron subvariant is more contagious, and whether it will be the predominant strain in the United States. “Better knowledge means better health for you and your family. Turn to Northwestern Medicine at nm.org/healthbeatnews for health […]

WGN - The John Williams Full Show Podcast
Thank a nurse on National Nurses Day!

WGN - The John Williams Full Show Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2022


Today is National Nurses Day and joining John Williams to talk about his career is Oak Point University alum Chauncey Incarnato, Neurological Trauma Intensive Care Nurse at Northwestern. Chauncey talks about his unique path to becoming a nurse, if there was any hesitation about becoming a nurse, what he does at Northwestern, the challenges of […]

WGN - The John Williams Uncut Podcast
Thank a nurse on National Nurses Day!

WGN - The John Williams Uncut Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2022


Today is National Nurses Day and joining John Williams to talk about his career is Oak Point University alum Chauncey Incarnato, Neurological Trauma Intensive Care Nurse at Northwestern. Chauncey talks about his unique path to becoming a nurse, if there was any hesitation about becoming a nurse, what he does at Northwestern, the challenges of […]

Crain's Daily Gist
05/09/22: A look inside Northwestern's startup engine

Crain's Daily Gist

Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2022 20:58


Mike Raab, interim executive director of The Garage at Northwestern, which is the university's startup incubator, talks with host Amy Guth about the school's annual student startup pitch competition, VentureCat, which recently announced its 25 semifinalists. Plus: Ken Griffin puts another $25 million behind Irvin for governor, Baxter looks to ditch Deerfield HQ; with all eyes on Rivian, an EV rival revs up in Channahon; and on heels of HQ news, Boeing will shrink space at Riverside Plaza tower.

Mark 2.0 Podcast
Tommy Doles Gridiron Redemption

Mark 2.0 Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2022 52:39


Join with us as we chat with Tommy Doles.  Just 26 years of age but already with a lifetime of experiences.  From high school football stardom and a Michigan state championship with Grand Rapids Christian, to a college career at Northwestern in the Big 10 as a 6'4" 300 pound lineman.  From there Tommy went on to try outs with both the Chicago Bears and Atlanta Falcons.  His love of football took him across the Atlantic where he played professionally in France until Covid came along and put an end to the season and that adventure.  Rooted in faith he tells us how he navigated life's ups and downs by being anchored in Christ.  Tommy joins us from Tennessee where he works as an Assistant Athletic Director at Lincoln Memorial University as well as serving as a reservist as a Civil Affairs Specialist for the US Army.  And if that's not enough he's still finds time to be a volunteer fire fighter.   With all the life experience you would think he would have written a book already.  He has, it's called "Gridiron Redemption - The NFL, Paris and a Pandemic".   No doubt this book will have a sequel, and we look forward to having Tommy back with us to share more of his life journey.  If you're looking to pick up a copy it's available from Amazon at the following link: https://www.amazon.com/Gridiron-Redemption-NFL-Paris-Pandemic-ebook/dp/B09ZKP97H5/ref=mp_s_a_1_1?crid=2C4OP973R2N3S&keywords=gridiron%20redemption&qid=1651866306&sprefix=gridiron%20%2Caps%2C158&sr=8-1&fbclid=IwAR1lufEawriqniJo7Kzkg-5Vm2sGDRp0D-UTbwffjpOgo77Wdqfp9Zm_5NQ

Radiolab
Debatable

Radiolab

Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2022 60:40


In competitive debate future presidents, supreme court justices, and titans of industry pummel each other with logic and rhetoric.  Unclasp your briefcase. It's time for a showdown. Looking back on an episode originally aired in 2016, we take a good long look at the world of competitive college debate. This is Ryan Wash's story. He's a queer, Black, first-generation college student from Kansas City, Missouri who joined the debate team at Emporia State University on a whim. When he started going up against fast-talking, well-funded, “name-brand” teams, from places like Northwestern and Harvard, it was clear he wasn't in Kansas anymore. So Ryan became the vanguard of a movement that made everything about debate debatable. In the end, he made himself a home in a strange and hostile land. Whether he was able to change what counts as rigorous academic argument … well, that's still up for debate. Special thanks to Will Baker, Myra Milam, John Dellamore, Sam Mauer, Tiffany Dillard Knox, Mary Mudd, Darren "Chief" Elliot, Jodee Hobbs, Rashad Evans and Luke Hill.  Special thanks also to Torgeir Kinne Solsvik for use of the song h-lydisk / B Lydian from the album Geirr Tveitt Piano Works and Songs Support Radiolab by becoming a member of The Lab today.     Radiolab is on YouTube! Catch up with new episodes and hear classics from our archive. Plus, find other cool things we did in the past — like miniseries, music videos, short films and animations, behind-the-scenes features, Radiolab live shows, and more. Take a look, explore and subscribe!

The Daily Northwestern Podcasts
Sound Source: Deep Dive: Ava Earl

The Daily Northwestern Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 4:03


Between opening for Maggie Rogers and running on the cross country team at Northwestern, Weinberg freshman Ava Earl's career as a singer-songwriter is already flourishing. In this episode of Sound Source, Ava breaks down “Chaos,” her favorite song from her latest album.

Chicago's Afternoon News with Steve Bertrand
Northwestern study reveals crime hotspots inside CPD

Chicago's Afternoon News with Steve Bertrand

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022


Andrew Papachristos, professor of sociology at Northwestern University, joins Lisa Dent on Chicago’s Afternoon News to discuss a study done by the university that collected years of data of misconduct by the Chicago Police Department to identify potentially corrupt groups. Follow Your Favorite Chicago’s Afternoon News Personalities on Twitter:Follow @LisaDentSpeaksFollow @SteveBertrand Follow @kpowell720 Follow @maryvandeveldeFollow […]

Holyoke Media Podcasts
Síntesis informativa. 5 de mayo de 2022.

Holyoke Media Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 2:00


Holyoke Media, en asociación con WHMP radio, emiten diariamente la Síntesis informativa en español a través del 101.5 FM y en el 1240 / 1400 AM. Esta es la síntesis informativa del jueves 5 de mayo de 2022: - El gobierno de Biden comenzó a expulsar cubanos y nicaragüenses a México bajo los poderes relacionados con la pandemia para negarles a los migrantes la oportunidad de buscar asilo, ampliando el uso de la regla incluso cuando dice públicamente que ha estado tratando de deshacerla, dijeron funcionarios el miércoles. Estados Unidos llegó a un acuerdo con México para expulsar hasta 100 cubanos y 20 nicaragüenses por día desde tres lugares: San Diego; El Paso, Texas; y Rio Grande Valley, Texas, según un funcionario estadounidense con conocimiento directo del esfuerzo. Las expulsiones comenzaron el 27 de abril y terminarán el 22 de mayo, dijo el funcionario a la Prensa Asociada bajo condición de anonimato porque el acuerdo no se ha hecho público. Se llevan a cabo bajo la autoridad del Título 42, que recibió su nombre de una ley de salud pública y se utilizó para expulsar a los migrantes con el fin de prevenir la propagación de COVID-19. El Título 42 expirará el 23 de mayo. Levantar el Título 42 ha resultado controvertido a medida que se acercan las elecciones intermedias, incluso para el Partido Demócrata de Biden, en medio de preocupaciones de que Estados Unidos no está preparado para un aumento anticipado de inmigrantes que buscan asilo. FUENTE: AP - Oficiales de la Universidad de Massachusetts en Amherst han denunciado un nuevo correo electrónico racista enviado a estudiantes y organizaciones negras en la universidad. El correo electrónico, enviado el martes, se refiere a los estudiantes negros como "animales" y se burla de la falta de progreso en una investigación sobre un correo electrónico racista similar enviado en el semestre anterior. "Es curioso que la 'investigación' sobre nuestro grupo no haya llegado a ningún lado. ¿Me pregunto por qué? Es porque somos la policía, estamos en la administración...", dice el correo electrónico. El rector de UMass Amherst, Kumble Subbaswamy, emitió un comunicado en el que llama al que mandó el correo electrónico un "cobarde" y asegura a los estudiantes que tanto el mensaje anterior, como el actual, están siendo investigados. "Soy consciente de lo frustrante que es la lentitud de la investigación y de lo profundamente preocupante que es que nuestros estudiantes negros han sido atacados de nuevo. Yo también estoy enojado y frustrado", dijo. "Evaluaré a fondo el estado de nuestra investigación y me informaré con la policía para asegurarme de que estamos haciendo todo lo posible para llevar al responsable de estos actos de odio ante la justicia". Subbaswamy agregó que, si el remitente es un estudiante o un empleado del campus, se enfrentará a "severas sanciones universitarias", incluyendo la expulsión del estudiante o la terminación de empleo. También facilitará el nombre del remitente al fiscal del distrito de Northwestern, David Sullivan. En el correo electrónico racista también se afirma que un grupo de personas involucradas en el envío de los correos electrónicos interfirió en la investigación enviando "datos falsos" a los investigadores forenses y afirmando tener conexiones dentro de la policia y la administración. En un comunicado, Sullivan calificó esto como una "falsedad", declarando ser "un socio activo del Departamento de Policía de UMass en esta investigación, que ha sido, y seguirá siendo, exhaustiva y minuciosa mientras sigamos los hechos dondequiera que nos lleven". Dijo que el correo electrónico más reciente es "incendiario" y dijo que está destinado a "sembrar la discordia y la división" dentro de la comunidad universitaria. FUENTE: NEW ENGLAND PUBLIC MEDIA

Holyoke Media Podcasts
Síntesis informativa. 5 de mayo de 2022.

Holyoke Media Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 2:00


Holyoke Media, en asociación con WHMP radio, emiten diariamente la Síntesis informativa en español a través del 101.5 FM y en el 1240 / 1400 AM. Esta es la síntesis informativa del jueves 5 de mayo de 2022: - El gobierno de Biden comenzó a expulsar cubanos y nicaragüenses a México bajo los poderes relacionados con la pandemia para negarles a los migrantes la oportunidad de buscar asilo, ampliando el uso de la regla incluso cuando dice públicamente que ha estado tratando de deshacerla, dijeron funcionarios el miércoles. Estados Unidos llegó a un acuerdo con México para expulsar hasta 100 cubanos y 20 nicaragüenses por día desde tres lugares: San Diego; El Paso, Texas; y Rio Grande Valley, Texas, según un funcionario estadounidense con conocimiento directo del esfuerzo. Las expulsiones comenzaron el 27 de abril y terminarán el 22 de mayo, dijo el funcionario a la Prensa Asociada bajo condición de anonimato porque el acuerdo no se ha hecho público. Se llevan a cabo bajo la autoridad del Título 42, que recibió su nombre de una ley de salud pública y se utilizó para expulsar a los migrantes con el fin de prevenir la propagación de COVID-19. El Título 42 expirará el 23 de mayo. Levantar el Título 42 ha resultado controvertido a medida que se acercan las elecciones intermedias, incluso para el Partido Demócrata de Biden, en medio de preocupaciones de que Estados Unidos no está preparado para un aumento anticipado de inmigrantes que buscan asilo. FUENTE: AP - Oficiales de la Universidad de Massachusetts en Amherst han denunciado un nuevo correo electrónico racista enviado a estudiantes y organizaciones negras en la universidad. El correo electrónico, enviado el martes, se refiere a los estudiantes negros como "animales" y se burla de la falta de progreso en una investigación sobre un correo electrónico racista similar enviado en el semestre anterior. "Es curioso que la 'investigación' sobre nuestro grupo no haya llegado a ningún lado. ¿Me pregunto por qué? Es porque somos la policía, estamos en la administración...", dice el correo electrónico. El rector de UMass Amherst, Kumble Subbaswamy, emitió un comunicado en el que llama al que mandó el correo electrónico un "cobarde" y asegura a los estudiantes que tanto el mensaje anterior, como el actual, están siendo investigados. "Soy consciente de lo frustrante que es la lentitud de la investigación y de lo profundamente preocupante que es que nuestros estudiantes negros han sido atacados de nuevo. Yo también estoy enojado y frustrado", dijo. "Evaluaré a fondo el estado de nuestra investigación y me informaré con la policía para asegurarme de que estamos haciendo todo lo posible para llevar al responsable de estos actos de odio ante la justicia". Subbaswamy agregó que, si el remitente es un estudiante o un empleado del campus, se enfrentará a "severas sanciones universitarias", incluyendo la expulsión del estudiante o la terminación de empleo. También facilitará el nombre del remitente al fiscal del distrito de Northwestern, David Sullivan. En el correo electrónico racista también se afirma que un grupo de personas involucradas en el envío de los correos electrónicos interfirió en la investigación enviando "datos falsos" a los investigadores forenses y afirmando tener conexiones dentro de la policia y la administración. En un comunicado, Sullivan calificó esto como una "falsedad", declarando ser "un socio activo del Departamento de Policía de UMass en esta investigación, que ha sido, y seguirá siendo, exhaustiva y minuciosa mientras sigamos los hechos dondequiera que nos lleven". Dijo que el correo electrónico más reciente es "incendiario" y dijo que está destinado a "sembrar la discordia y la división" dentro de la comunidad universitaria. FUENTE: NEW ENGLAND PUBLIC MEDIA

The Daily Northwestern Podcasts
NU Declassified: The road to success: NU's transportation and logistics minor

The Daily Northwestern Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 6:39


Offered by the Northwestern University Transportation Center on the corner of Foster Street and Sheridan Road, the transportation and logistics minor is a small, but hidden gem at Northwestern. The Daily spoke with students and the lead faculty member about what makes the transportation and logistics minor unique.

The Daily Northwestern Podcasts
Brainstorm: Background on the bunnies

The Daily Northwestern Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later May 4, 2022 5:45


From the Lakefill to the quads, bunnies are hopping their way into the hearts of Northwestern students. In this episode of Brainstorm, The Daily spoke to Northwestern students, a professor and an urban ecology expert to answer the question gnawing at Evanston residents: What's with all the bunnies?

The Daily Northwestern Podcasts
NU Declassified: The student becomes the professor

The Daily Northwestern Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later May 4, 2022 13:13


For some Northwestern professors, purple pride extends beyond the classroom. Across almost all of NU's undergraduate schools, there are professors who attended the University as students — and even one who got her bachelor's, master's and Ph.D. here. In this episode of NU Declassified, we dive into what brought these professors back to their alma mater.

America Outdoors Radio Podcast
Northwestern Outdoors Radio - April 30, 2022

America Outdoors Radio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 4, 2022 44:50


This week on Northwestern Outdoors Radio we are featuring three women with some great info!  The first is Amanda Rahn who will tell you all about the Wallowa County Fly In and Air Show taking place in Joseph, Oregon this July.  The second guest is Kristin McGill, and avid angler, hunter and single mom with a unique perspective about mentoring women and children in these sports.  After that you'll hear from Valerie Roberts with Washington State Parks.  They are looking for volunteer Park Hosts and there are some very unique and enriching opportunities available for you if you own a boat or RV.  In addition to this our recurring guests, David Sparks and Bob Loomis, will join us for another edition of Sportsman's Spotlight and an Extended Mack's Minute.  http://www.northwesternoutdoors.com    

#BLACKGIRLNEWS
Tashawnna Anderson - 26 Years Old Gone and Sister Shot During a Confrontation → Caught Friend's Boyfriend w/ Another Woman

#BLACKGIRLNEWS

Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2022 6:17


One woman is dead and another is injured after a shooting in River North early Saturday morning. Police said all of it unfolded on the sidewalk near the House of Blues just after 1 a.m. That's where police said two women were in a verbal altercation with an unknown male offender, who then pulled out a gun and shot both women multiple times. Some people nearby saw the shooting and described the initial chaos. One of them is a 26-year-old who was shot in the chest and taken to Northwestern hospital. She died soon after from her injuries. The other 31-year-old woman sustained a gunshot wound to the left thigh and was also taken to Northwestern hospital. She was last listed in good condition. Those two women, family members say, were sisters. Family has identified the woman killed as 26-year-old Tashawnna Anderson. Her sister is being treated for a gunshot wound to the thigh. Family video shows Anderson holding her young daughter, who loved ones said is just a couple of months short of turning one. This is the second weekend in a row a shooting occured in River North. In fact, a man was shot last weekend outside of a nightclub just blocks away from Saturday's deadly shooting. In this recent shooting, no one has been arrested. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/leah-gordone/support

Momentum Podcast: Sports to Business W/ Tanvir
Sam Sebastian: Leading with Authenticity

Momentum Podcast: Sports to Business W/ Tanvir

Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2022 38:36


Sam Sebastian is the President & CEO of Pelmorex Corp., the parent company of The Weather Network. Pelmorex is a market leader in operating multi-platform TV, Web and Mobile services in weather-related information categories under the leading brands; The Weather Network, MétéoMédia, eltiempo.es and Clima. The company also operates Canada's National Alerting Aggregation and Dissemination System, Alert Ready. Before joining Pelmorex, Sam was the VP & Managing Director of Google Canada, from 2013 - 2017, where he was responsible for Google's Canadian operations. He joined Google in 2006 in Chicago and held a variety of executive-level roles in the U.S. before moving to Canada. Prior to Google, he was a General Manager and Senior Vice-President at a large online classified business, Classified Ventures (cars.com, apartments.com), and started his career at Arthur Andersen as an accountant and consultant. Sam is a member of the Business Council of Canada and a Director on several Boards including Tennis Canada and Bridgit, a Kitchener-Waterloo internet start-up in the construction industry. Sam graduated from The Ohio State University and holds an MBA from Northwestern's Kellogg Graduate School of Management. At Ohio State, he played Division I NCAA tennis, where he was a two-time Captain, Big Ten Champion and Academic All American. We discuss: - Why Sam gets more done and is more confident when he has more going on (and why that works) - How Sam led Pelmorex during the Pandemic: two things he told the team when the Panemdic struck - Why a great strategy and a great team that works together towards the same goals allow you to become a powerhouse - Why being authentic is the most important trait for leadership today - Why you need to fail, and how a big failure allowed Sam to grow into his leadership roles - How leaders can encourage failure, and why it's important - Why we need to pay it forward, in order to win as an individual and as a collective team

Hollywood Dream Maker with Billy Gallo
Level Up Your Acting Career With The Right Representation with Brian Patacca

Hollywood Dream Maker with Billy Gallo

Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2022 72:38


Do you have an agent or a manager? If you're looking for representation, it's incredibly important to find someone that aligns with your goals so they can help you get to where you want to go within Hollywood. Brian Patacca, also known as “The Representation Whisperer” helps actors get what they want without suffering. He helped 542 actors find representation (and counting!), get connected to agents or managers that have their best interest and will ultimately lead them to fulfilling their potential. His coaching clients include Tony Award-winners, Broadway stars, network Series Regulars, filmmakers, writers, and stand-up comedians. Brian has led workshops at SAG-AFTRA, universities across the globe including Northwestern, Pepperdine, PACE, Columbia College Chicago, Rose Bruford, and countless acting studios in the US and abroad. In this episode, Brian and I have a fantastic conversation about his career in Hollywood helping actors find representation. Brian has a unique perspective as the middle man between actors and agents or managers, understanding what both parties are looking for in each other. Brian talks about how his experience as a reverend impacts his work with actors, his advice for actors looking for representation, mindset tips for overcoming negative thoughts, and so much more. Tune in to Episode 53 of Hollywood Dream Maker to learn how Brian helps actors find the right representation so they can land more roles and elevate their career! In This Episode You Will Learn:About Brian's work helping actors find representation (2:31)How Brian's role as a reverend impacts his work with actors (11:10)Brian's advice for actors looking for representation (27:03)Mindset tips for overcoming negative thoughts (46:55)Brian's advice for aspiring actors (58:13) Connect with BrianInstagramFacebookWebsiteEntertainment Website - FREE WEBINARBrian Breaks Character Podcast Website Let's Connect: Manhattan Actor Studio Website See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Daily Northwestern Podcasts
NU Declassified: How Northwestern's Mock Trial team raises the bar

The Daily Northwestern Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2022 10:25


Northwestern Mock Trial may sound like an activity exclusively for aspiring lawyers, but students in the program say the range of experiences Mock Trial provides and the creativity it requires means the club attracts a diverse group of people from across NU. The Daily explores what makes Mock Trial such a good team, and how those qualities got them to nationals this year.

I Survived Theatre School

Intro: It's a bad idea not to pay your student loans, The Odd Couple, Severance, chicken nugget bowls,  Let Me Run This By You: Google is bullying Gina. What's your email archive strategy? We are all mostly old because the window of youth is shockingly short. Some of your dreams are NOT out of reach.Interview: We talk to T.J. Harris about coming to acting later in life, having a background in business, having a close-knit cohort, Title IX investigations, being the victim of racial profiling while at school, the paradox of slightly shy kids being told they were shy so often that they become even more withdrawn, Our Lady of Kibeho, Neighborhood 3: Requisition of Doom, Sean Parris, Chris Anthony.FULL TRANSCRIPT (unedited):3 (10s):And I'm Gina Pulice.4 (11s):We went to theater school together. We survived it, but we didn't quite understand it.3 (15s):20 years later, we're digging deep talking to our guests about their experiences and trying to make sense of it all.4 (21s):We survived theater school and you will too. Are we famous yet?1 (34s):Anyway, so I had to like get him out of the house and like men are slow and I just, it's just, it's a really no win situation. So anyway. Hello. Hello Busy. I've been busy. We've all been busy.2 (51s):We have been doing the damn thing. Haven't we?1 (55s):Yeah.2 (56s):Yeah. I have spent the last, what feels like a week. Yeah. I think it's been a week simply reviewing every single dollar 20, 21, like literally and putting it in a spreadsheet, literally like can donuts, can you1 (1m 18s):Keep it because you can write off a lot2 (1m 20s):Of new machine. Yeah. That's yeah. That's, that's the point of it is to find everything that, that can be written off, but it's, you know, and I'm hunched and my back and my eyes strain, and it's just like, oh my God, Calgon, take me away.1 (1m 38s):Yeah. I mean, I think that taxes are one of those things where if you do them right, and legally it's a lot of work, right? It's like,2 (1m 47s):You want to skim and1 (1m 48s):Be shady, which I don't recommend, because guess what? The IRS is only job is to get your money. Like, that's their only job. They don't have any other purpose on the planet. So like, if you think that's not their job, you're wrong. But anyway, so if you do it right, like you are, it's a lot of freaking work and it also is painstaking.2 (2m 12s):And I, and, and it's painstaking. And I think, you know, to, to, to find a silver lining in it, like, I'm so glad I don't have a full-time job because this is the kind of thing that literally, I don't know how people, when it's, when everybody works, how they do it it's1 (2m 35s):Well, you can't. I mean, I think it's, that's why people end up in trouble. Like, that's why people end up trying to skin his scam or not doing them and being like, you know what, I'm going to pass on all this. I'm just going to hope for them. And like, that's what I did with my student loans, because I didn't want to, and that's not even as hard as taxes, but I just like, couldn't cope with the ins and outs of doing the work to defer or like make deals, or like get my payments lower. And thus, I had a sheriff show up at my apartment. Like that is where you're headed. You don't know that story. Oh, all right. So I thought, oh, it'd be really cool to not pay my student loans.1 (3m 15s):I mean, I didn't really have the money, but I also didn't realize that my student loans were private student loans. Oh boy. So when they're private, you're in big trouble, because guess what? It's a bank that wants their money. It's not the government who has a million other things to do. Right. So the bank is like, no, we want our money. And I did that. Know that the bank hires the Sheriff's department to serve papers when you are being sued for your private loans. So one day I am N in Rogers park at my thinking, you know, nothing of it. Like I, I owed 50 grand and I to like four different banks. Right. It's always, and they sell them to other people and it's a big scam.1 (3m 56s):Right. Okay. Fine. But I'm like going about my business thinking, but feeling bad, but like, feeling like, ah, fuck it. Like, who cares? Well, they care. Wait,2 (4m 7s):How long were you not paying them1 (4m 9s):For a couple of years? Maybe I just said, forget it in 15, 20, 15. I said, no more. And then in 27, 20 17, I'm literally, I kept getting calls. They started calling miles and I was just the guy just pay no attention. Miles, like pay no attention. And of course he's like so trusting. He was like, okay, I'll pay no attention. I'll compartmentalize. And okay. So one day there's a, our buzzer goes off and I'm like, hello. Cause no one ever. He's like, this is the Sheriff's department. Are you Jennifer Bosworth? And I was like, and then I realized, I really quickly, your mind goes, oh, what have I done wrong?1 (4m 50s):Right. And it focuses it on the thing. Cause you know what you've done right. Or what I've done wrong. And I'm like, oh, my here is the PA the Piper or the pied Piper or whoever is coming to collect chickens, home to roost all the things. And I was like, and I just said, I have a lawyer go away. And he goes, no, we just, we just want to give you these papers. Like we have to give you these papers. I'm like, no, I have a lawyer go away. Which is the wrong thing to do.2 (5m 19s):What also, what was your logic there? I have a lawyer. Okay.1 (5m 23s):There was no logic. I would say it was the opposite of logic is what's going on. So I see that they go away because, and so they're paid by the bank. So they just hire the Sheriff's department to serve people. I did not know that it's like, they, they you're there for hire basically the Sheriff's department. So they go and they serve people and they could not serve me. But then what it did was it was really actually a great kick in the pants because I was like, oh, I have a court date now. So no. So what I did was I said, okay, let me find it. So then I was like, I need a lawyer. So, and then on my 43rd birthday or 42nd, 42nd birthday.1 (6m 10s):Yeah. 42nd birthday. I went to the lawyer. I found this lawyer fucking brilliant. I can't remember her name right now. She was like legally blonde. She had these long pink nails and her only job was to get people off student loans and, and either file bankruptcy or figure out a way to talk. The loan people doubt. She was a bad-ass and I went there and I was like crying. And I was like, look. And she was like, oh, $50,000. That's nothing. And I was like, oh, she's like, I got people that I was, you know, 600,000 in medical school loans,2 (6m 43s):Medical school, that's1 (6m 45s):All. But also she goes, yeah, the private loans they get ya, you know? So, so she, she, okay. So she said, I said, well, what do I do? I can't remember her name. She was so awesome. And I, and she's like, well, do you have the money? I'm like, well, look, I have this inheritance. She's like, oh no, no, no, no, no, no. Then we can't declare bankruptcy because they'll go after your inheritance. I was like, oh, hell to the, no. So she's like, all right, well, we'll try to get him down. So she reduced $50,000 to $25,000 for a fee of $3,000 and went to court and was like, you know, so she talked them down. She's like, you're getting nothing. If you don't take this 25,000, she's like, can you get me 25,000?1 (7m 27s):I'm like, sure. So I, then it happened to be, we were selling the house around that time. Anyway, I got the money and then my life has, but my credit was literally if a here's what people don't understand. It's like, it may be stupid, but the credit matters. But if you want to live somewhere,2 (7m 46s):Right? Like if you want to be on the grid,1 (7m 49s):If you want to like have a house that is, if you ever want to apply for apartment, if you ever want to it matters. I know it shouldn't. I always tell my students like, yeah, all this shit shouldn't matter, but it does everyone. It does. I hate the fact that it does, but let's be honest about the truth here. Let's just get real. So my, my credit now, what my credit was so low, I can't remember what it was. And I was like, oh, that's not so bad. And my friend was like, that's the worst credit you're going to have? And I was like, oh, okay. I was like, I didn't understand the scale. Right? Like I was like, oh, five 40 isn't bad. Or five, some days she was like, that's like the worst. So now my credit is seven 80.1 (8m 30s):Oh no, no. I got it. All of it is seven 50 because I paid it off. And like, I don't, we don't have any debt. Thank God credit card wise. Oh, because vials is, if, if it were up to me, I probably have debt up to my eyeballs, unfortunately. But my partner is like, oh no, no, no. He's really good with that. Thank God. Oh boy. Cause I have some problems because my parents never taught me shit. You know? So no, all this to say, how did this come up?2 (8m 58s):Because we were talking about,1 (8m 60s):Sorry.2 (9m 1s):Okay. But so many things about your story. First of all, it was $50,000. Just the amount you owed from the time that you stopped paying, or are you saying it has a total of $50,000?1 (9m 15s):No, I had more than that. So I had had 80 and I had paid 30 of it off because I went to school like in oh eight. I graduated. So it's not like a long time. So I had 50, 80,000 total. I had paid 30 somehow some way and all those years around there. And then I had 50 left. Yeah. And I was used to pay the 50, but then I2 (9m 38s):Just, just asking, but like, could anybody go to a lawyer and say, reduce my,1 (9m 45s):Yeah. That's their whole, because here's what the, yes, this is what they don't tell you is that2 (9m 50s):I feel like such an asshole. Right?1 (9m 54s):Doris is literally overdosing on melatonin. Hold on. Okay.2 (9m 58s):Oh my God. I can't believe I could have. I just pay. All of my students will never1 (10m 6s):Happen again. Come2 (10m 7s):Here, Come here. I just can't believe I've paid every penny of my student loans. What is wrong with me? I'm just the worst partner ever. Sorry. No, you're not. You're not the worst person. She meets me. And I eat1 (10m 31s):That2 (10m 32s):Thing away from her and I gave her all kinds of,1 (10m 35s):Okay. So yeah. You don't feel like an asshole because here's the thing. They never tell you this, that you can everything's negotiable in this country. Okay. Every single thing is negotiable. Everything's a business deal. Everything can be reduced. Why? Because there's no set rate for anything that's capitalism. So you, you, you can charge whatever you want. And then it's negotiable. So what she told me was these companies, these banks, they're banks, they're not companies. I mean, they're banks. These banks know that they will get nothing. If someone declares bankruptcy. Okay. So they don't know that I had this inheritance, this, you know, but they, they know that most people say F you I'm part of capitalism is bankruptcy.1 (11m 22s):I'm declaring bankruptcy. You get $0. So they want anything. They'll take pennies on the goddamn dollar. So she's like, oh no. And it's a fine line. And that's why you need a lawyer to go to court and say, my client has nothing. So if you want anything, she'd lucked into 25 grand. She can, she can scrape by twenty-five grand. You want that? Or you want Jack shit. And then they'll say, give me the 25 grand.2 (11m 45s):Right? Right. Well, I, I, it doesn't matter. Now I had done this, you know, 10 years ago. I mean, because the thing is, of course, like you take, you borrow $50,000 and you pay 300, basically.1 (11m 58s):It's ridiculous. Especially with private loans. Ridiculous.2 (12m 3s):That's what, and that's what I had. I had a lot of problems, but the other thing that's so striking about your stories, the moment when you start, when you said you had this moment in 2015, where you said, fuck it. I just, that gave me such a thrill. Like if you would, just because the reason I couldn't do that is I would think about it every second of the day.1 (12m 25s):I would have. Yeah. Because my mom was my co-signer, but that lady was dead. So I was like, what are they going to do? Cause she was really, I was more afraid of my mother than the federal and then the, then the bank and the government. So the private loans and the government. So I, if she was alive, you bet your ass. I would have been paying those motherfuckers off2 (12m 45s):Of my loans for social work school had to have a co-signer of my father-in-law. And for some reason that I never did get to the bottom of Wells Fargo. If I was one day late for a payment, they wouldn't even call me or contact me in any way. They just immediately, it was all on him. Yes. And he would of course call me the second that they called him. And it was so embarrassing every time I'd be like, I mean, it happened like, I want to say it happened five or six1 (13m 19s):Times. That is so easy to do.2 (13m 22s):It's silly. But1 (13m 24s):It's2 (13m 24s):Also like, this is the mafia. Like you're you're one day late in your payment and you don't say, Hey, could you pay me? You just go, do you just threaten somebody to break?1 (13m 33s):Yeah, it's a psychological tactic. It's like some real Scientology bullshit.2 (13m 38s):It was horrible. Horrible, horrible. So if you have a few, can't pay your student loans. If you're listening to this and you cannot pay your student loans, call a lawyer,1 (13m 52s):Let me run this by you.2 (13m 58s):And then I'm also doing another, another way in which I'm an obsessive rural follower is that Google sent me a message saying, I have exceeded my storage limit by 380%. And if that, if I listen, anybody could, anybody can bully me. I am so easily bullied. It said, if you don't, if you don't pay more for storage or get rid of some of what you have, you will no longer be able to send or receive emails. So I spent five hours yesterday going through1 (14m 34s):A bad idea in some it's2 (14m 36s):Not about idea. Well, I've got it down. Sorry. I was, I was out, I was using 385%. I'm down to 340% after deleting probably 10,000 emails1 (14m 49s):With like, is it true? What they're saying?2 (14m 52s):I don't know. All I know is that when I log onto my email and I see a big red line across the top,1 (14m 60s):I can't,2 (15m 1s):I can't take it. I can't take the red line, but upside, it has been a walk down memory lane, you know, because things, I mean, people I'm having email exchanges with, it seems sort of intimate. And I'm like, I have no idea who that person is. Or like reading email. I looked for the oldest email I have from you, which on this, on this, my Gmail is from 2008. And just, you know, whatever, like you were talking about your job. And I was talking about my job and I found the, the engagement announcement. Yeah.1 (15m 40s):That's2 (15m 40s):Kind of fun too. And, and also I realized I had thousands of emails that I just simply don't need. Like I keep every email. Do you keep all of your emails?1 (15m 51s):No. So I I'm so weird. I never have more than zero unread in my inbox.2 (15m 59s):Well, wait, did I just mean you archives of metal?1 (16m 3s):No, I just delete them. Not all the good one. No, no, no, no. I, I don't, I I'm terrible that I don't know how to do shit, so I don't put them in folders or anything like that or archive.2 (16m 18s):And then you have1 (16m 19s):Zero2 (16m 20s):Emails.1 (16m 21s):Yeah. It's because I have no life maybe. And I just,2 (16m 25s):The chairman for you have a full life and now you don't have any of your emails back from you. Don't1 (16m 30s):You know, I have that.2 (16m 32s):Well, how do you have them?1 (16m 34s):I erased the ones as they come in that are know that I don't know longer that have attachments and no longer need.2 (16m 41s):Okay.1 (16m 42s):So I manage my box. So here's the thing I will run out of storage. It's just that I don't think I get a lot of emails. I don't, I actually don't like, I'm always saying, I want more emails. I'm like the only person that wants them. I'm so like, I love paperwork and I love emails. And so I don't know. I'm always like no one ever emails me. It's so weird. But anyway, the pain is,2 (17m 5s):It's not possible that no one ever emails. You Did. The thing that I did, which is I accidentally deleted all my emails from1 (17m 15s):No, I remember that. That was hilarious. And now,2 (17m 19s):For example,1 (17m 20s):So right now I have zero emails, unread, unread,2 (17m 26s):Unread, you keep everything in your inbox.1 (17m 29s):Yeah. You know me, my desktop. How2 (17m 33s):Many emails are in your inbox? Just1 (17m 38s):30,000. I mean read 30,035.2 (17m 44s):Okay. Well what do you do when you have to find?1 (17m 50s):Well, that's why I can't never find my, Why you don't say why it happened. You have ISO every time you send me, it's bad. But miles miles was like, cause now miles is really into email because of his job for the last six months, his new job. And he's like, but you have no full zero four.2 (18m 8s):No, but zero folders. My shoulder, my shoulders are getting so tough.1 (18m 16s):So, Okay. So anyway, it beans, like I'm not saying I have a good system. Like I don't have a good system. I have no system. But what it is is I'm just proud. I don't have like, I'm really judgy about people that have a lot of unread emails. So like literally if I walk by and coworking and I see someone's inbox has like 12,000 unread, I go, oh God, I go, nothing, nothing, nothing little do they know? I have not one fucking folders. So I can't pay,2 (18m 47s):I need to start in a production of the odd couple because I am.1 (18m 54s):I know I look at your, I don't even know how you make. I look at our joint email. I don't know what these folders mean. I don't know what there's like sub folders to me. I'm like,2 (19m 6s):Now that you're, now that we're discussing this, I'm realizing another fake fakery folders actually don't have any meaning because actually, well, because actually, if you wanted to find an email,1 (19m 22s):This is like from2 (19m 23s):Right. If you want to find an email from target, you can just Google. I mean, you can just search.1 (19m 29s):Yes. But the problem is if you have 4,000, let me run this by you emails. So that is my, so I need you to set it up. I thought I had set it up for, for my, let me run this links. No. So what I did was set up a ma a new G Gmail account2 (19m 47s):And it's not1 (19m 48s):Good. It's not fair. So the bottom line is, I don't think my system is great, but what I think is I like I Le well, I'm weird in that. I like having no unread emails, but at the same time, I don't feel like people are emailing me enough.2 (20m 3s):We did a freaky Friday. You and me and you were thrust into my life. And I was thrusted. I think that I would immediately feel relieved because I feel like you don't necessarily carry around you. I mean, you have a lot of stuff that you have to carry around, but you don't necessarily carry around this need to do everything. Perfect.1 (20m 27s):Oh, no. And I think that comes, I swear to God. A lot of it is with kids, because if you fuck up with yourself, okay, so you're a fuck up. But if you are a parent of three children and you don't, you fuck up, you end up like a lot of people we know, which is, and the kids ended up like, like we, us and people, we know we don't like, so that is, I feel like if I was dropped in. So, so I feel like if I was dropped into your life, I would like it. Cause you have like all this space Around and everything.2 (21m 0s):And my kids would love it because you're fun. And that's, that's like, that's like the dynamic, that's the thing in our house. It's like, mom's no fun. Mom is doing, she's got the rules. She's1 (21m 12s):No, no, I'd be like, all right, let's do, let's eat fried food. This would be my thing. I'd be like, Eat fried food. And I can't eat that anymore. But if I dropped into your life, I could write, I could eat that. And I would say, okay, this is what I used to eat before my hurt. Like what completely I would have. I was thinking about the other day, something called a chicken nugget bowls. Okay. Which was, I would a2 (21m 37s):Bowl of chicken nuggets1 (21m 39s):Mixed with, okay. So I'd go to trader Joe's and get the chicken nuggets and then bake those. And then their, their potatoes, fries, fries, and th and literally dump a bunch of that in a bowl, put some ketchup and mix it all up and just have like a chicken nugget fry. But that's not good for you, by the way.2 (22m 2s):Why was it appealing to put it in a bowl? Instead of1 (22m 5s):I liked the combo of the two together and like the ketchup was the glue that held it all together. And I loved that, but the problem was I gained a lot of weight and then my heart went down. You can't really2 (22m 18s):Mean the thing1 (22m 20s):About adulthood, the shit you really like can not be maintained if you want to live.2 (22m 25s):I mean, it's such a bummer. I recently realized that youth really only lasts for 25 years. So, so, so everybody is mostly old, right? Like everybody's friends, the majority of their life that didn't occur to me for some reason, I think because we're so youth obsessed in this culture, I had this way of fit, not logically, but like I had this way of thinking about it. Like it's this long epoch of life, but really1 (22m 59s):You're old for a very long time. And then you die.2 (23m 2s):And then you're also very young for a period of time. So the, the period of time where you're autonomous and1 (23m 14s):We also missed it.2 (23m 16s):And then we were just walking around, feeling horrible about ourselves.1 (23m 19s):That is such a waste. Right? The other thing I was going to tell you, I have a really good story to tell you about someone we know that I can share, because it's a good story. This is a story about why it's good. That life can be good. Okay. I'm teaching at DePaul, our Alma mater, as you know, if you listen to the show, okay. I teach fourth year BFA actors on zoom, which I wasn't supposed to, but I got special and that's a whole nother Oprah and itself. But so I have students and one of my things is we write pitch letters. I help them. Cause that's my jam. I love doing that. Even if it's a pitch letter for them, for a tour to a rep, to a producer, whatever we write these like bio pitch letters.1 (24m 3s):Okay, fine. So I had this student, I still have the student and he's a wonderful youngster. And he's like talking his dream. This is so crazy. His dream is to be in the Mar somehow in the Marvel universe. Okay. Like he wants his dream is to be in a movie, a Marvel movie. But of course he wants a foot in the door, anything. And he goes, and I said, okay, well, like why we're developing his pitch letter with the class. Everyone takes turns, blah, blah, blah. And he's like, I would really like the career of this guy that I, that I've heard about named Sean Gunn. I'm like, wait,2 (24m 37s):Oh my God.1 (24m 39s):He said, he said, I know he went to the theater school. And like, I know, and I'm thinking to myself, cause you know, I obviously we've interviewed Sean gone listened to his interview and obviously, and we've done it twice, right? No, didn't we do two, two parts. I wasn't that the second one. But yeah. And obviously we know him and obviously he's not like my best friend, but I, and I was like thinking to myself and he's like, I just would really love to pitch him. And I was like, oh my God. So we created a dope letter to Sean Gunn. And I wrote to Sean and said, Hey, my students are doing this thing. He would love to jump on a zoom and they're going to have a zoom. So he's going to meet his hero.2 (25m 20s):That's I1 (25m 21s):Know I couldn't have been happier. I was like, I actually am doing something that makes a difference. So I'm facilitating the zoom between Alex and Sean and Sean was gracious enough to do it. And, and it turns out that he's filming. I think in Atlanta, you know, probably some marble thing and, and he gets off this week. And so it's, he has some time and Alex is like lipping out. Out's 21, right. This kid, he's like a great kid. He did stop motion classes. Like he, like, he knows how to do that as an actor, like the guy is in his letter, I really helped him with his letter. And, and Sean said, this, your student's letter is so sweet. Like I love it. So anyway, the point is, I was like, oh my gosh, this is, this is also to say that another reason the podcast is good.1 (26m 8s):Right. Because you just don't know how you're going to like pass it along. And FYI in two months, my students are going to be our colleagues. Right. Cause they're graduating. So you don't know, like, I don't know what they'll need for me or what I need from them.2 (26m 22s):I always say, you're the person who identified from the very beginning that this podcast was going to be healing to people. And not only are you doing it in this way, but you're also doing it in a way that you're through your work as a teacher correcting the thing that almost everybody who comes on says, I, yeah, I got all this education. But then when I graduated and now I do anything, like you're giving them at least,1 (26m 47s):And I do one-on-ones with them. And because I'm like, look, yes, exactly what happens to us and happened to everyone that we've talked to almost missed, except for like three people. And we've talked to a lot of people happened to is happening again, because I think there's obviously a bigger question of the reckoning of how do we change at a theater stage, acting conservatory to become more friendly towards launching these students in a way where they actually can get work and live and not worry and not worry as much that everything is for not. And what am I doing?1 (27m 26s):And I didn't get picked or chosen and how to write a pitch letter. Like FYI, all the people that I'm helping write pitch letters, they're all getting their meetings with people. It just, anyway, you were saying like, you can access.2 (27m 41s):Yeah. People it's, I'm not suggesting that anybody you want to talk to, you can just hit them up and talk to them. But I am just sort of speaking to this barrier that I have always had myself this mental barrier of like, well, I could never talk to so-and-so it's this thing about like, I could never follow my dream. You know, I recently realized that I actually was afraid to say inside of my own head, what a dream, what my dream was like. Right. Like I, I just made 99% of life completely out of reach for me. And then just try and then just try to figure out what this 1% that I could.1 (28m 24s):Yeah. I mean, that's what trauma does to you. That's what it does. It says you are, you can't even, it's not safe to even dream in your own fantasy. So most what I'm finding is as the more I talk to people in the more I sort of do research for like my own writing on trauma, on like serial killers, really. But like that the trauma is so crystallized at a young age, right. That there, it cuts off all access to hope. That's the effect of trauma. There is no hope. So you operate in this one, teeny little place of, I'm not going to hope, but I'm still going to live. Cause I'm not going to die. So there's, it's like, it's like, yeah, yeah.1 (29m 6s):There's no hope trauma cuts off the access to pipeline, to hope and to not just joy, but hope.2 (29m 13s):Yeah. And, and if it's true, like we were saying that youth is this short window, the good on the good side is there is hope in your older years that you can evolve to be the person that1 (29m 28s):You really can't. It takes a lot of work and it takes a lot of, it's not easy. And it's like really bizarre how you get there. But if you keep putting in the work and get support, it is possible. Even at 40, like that's the other thing that I am so clear on because I launched this consulting business so crazy. Like I thought I was going to get a nine to five and like, so my consulting business has taken off. Right. Because you've just fantastic. And people are like, how are you having so many clients? This is the reason I have no imposter syndrome. When it comes to this particular skill, like I'm scared as shit to be an actor. I'm scared as shit to write, to be a writer.1 (30m 9s):I'm still doing it, but I'm scared in that way, a screenwriter, a television writer, that kind of thing. But if you ask me to sit down with somebody and help them to pitch themselves and to crystallize their vision of what their thing is, whatever their thing is, I don't care what it is. I have zero imposter syndrome. I know you don't have to hire me. I don't get that's, you know, but I know that I am good at that beyond a shadow of a doubt because things have all come together to show me that. So my own work emotionally, I'm working with you on this podcast and in the entertainment business and my past life and entertainment and getting a master's in counseling, psych literally has prepared me to do this thing.1 (30m 57s):And I have no like, fear that if I'm talking to somebody about it, that they're going to think I'm full of shit, because it's actually the truth of what it's undeniable, it's undeniable, you eat it. And it's because I put in the work. And also I just it's one of the side effects of being a traumatized and neglected child is, is, and then doing the work to work through that is noticing that in other people and where their trauma points are. So now, like I'm literally about to start pitching my services to the district attorney's office for, for trials, for people to do closing lawyers that are scared to do closing arguments in a theatrical way.1 (31m 42s):Isn't that crazy? I was watching the John Wayne Gacy trial and I was like, oh, this guy has an amazing closing in his, his closing argument. The da was so brilliant. And it's known as like, he did this beautiful theatrical, but also tasteful thing. Cause sometimes it can be like a carnival, but like, and so I was like, oh, how do I help people do that? Cause that's, you know, and that's always tricky in the legal system, but I've also worked in the legal system. So I know a little bit, so anyway, that's my new, I'm like, yeah, these, some of these lawyers2 (32m 14s):How I1 (32m 15s):Have like stage fright, so litigators even, and they need help. So anyway, we shall see where that goes, but I don't have, I don't have, I'm not afraid that doesn't, I don't have imposter syndrome about that.2 (32m 28s):Yeah. Oh, thank God. We should all have at least one thing that we don't feel like we're an imposter about1 (32m 34s):One thing. I mean, for God's sake7 (32m 43s):Today on the podcast, we are talking to TJ Harris, TJ terrorists introduced us to the idea of the artist preneur and his background in business is what helped him get to that exciting place. So please enjoy our conversation with TJ Harris.2 (33m 2s):Okay. All right. All right. Congratulations. TJ Harris, you survived1 (33m 9s):And you did it with some very like your energy just from the emails and from your life is like so positive, ridiculously positive, which I adore and which I think we need. And also you call yourself and you are an extra preneur,8 (33m 29s):Brilliant1 (33m 30s):Artists, preneur artists are brilliant. Brilliant, brilliant mixing of that. Like I love that. Did you come up with that or?8 (33m 39s):Yeah, well I think so. I probably stole it from somebody else, you know, as all artists do. Yeah. But I have, I have, I started in business before acting, so I came to lading to acting and filmmaking later in life. I'm 34 right now. And this I've been on this journey for about six years. So I, I kind of started out like in finance, I studied, I got a general studies degree in undergrad. I went to ball, state university in Indiana and I was a business administration major at first and I hated it.8 (34m 19s):Absolutely hated it, but I knew it was during the time, like right before the recession hit where it was like, just get a degree to get a job. So I was like, okay, I'll get a business degree. But I ended up switching over to general studies with a concentration in finance and sociology. And during that time, I, I, I've always felt like I've been kind of in this, this middle ground of not really knowing which route I wanted to go, because I didn't want to become a doctor and I didn't want to become a lawyer and I didn't want to go down this. Like somebody already created my path for me. So I just kind of started experimenting with things, graduated with my degree.8 (35m 2s):I got a job with a company that I'm currently still with. I worked part-time for him. Yeah. So I I'm, I'm a consultant. Part-time1 (35m 12s):Oh, you know, what's so funny. That is so rare that people keep their job after they graduate from a, from a fine arts, like from a conservatory that they, as a master's student. That is fantastic. And why did you keep it? Like, could you love that work? What makes you want to keep it?8 (35m 30s):No. So, I mean, they know, I don't really love it. So I actually quit. I quit prior to coming to going to TGS for grad school. So the plan was just to, just to be done with it because I really want to transition out of this industry, but it keeps pulling me back somehow. So I quit. And then I had an exit interview and someone that when I first started with the team, the PR one of my colleagues ended up being the manager of the team when I was leaving. So did an exit interview and I was like, Hey, if you all, like, I'll come back and help out while I'm in school, if you all need my help.8 (36m 10s):So six months later, they brought me back as a contractor. So I was working in like, ha basically all my bills were paid for through working this job. Part-time while being at TTS1 (36m 24s):Here, here's the thing. This is brilliant for a lot of reasons. But one of is which, you know, I teach BFA fours at the theater school and, and now they have a class and I don't know, you may have had something to do with it. I don't know that that's called actors as, as entrepreneurs. There's like a, but, but it reminds me of like, they're trying to, but you already did that on your own. So like you, I never, it is so brilliant that you were able to maintain that job so that you might guess is you were able to live, like you had some Dota live on. Right.8 (37m 1s):I didn't take out any additional student loans or anything like that. I did just the bare minimum. And I was living with a friend from undergrad. So my rent was like, mama shit. He charged me charged charge, like 600 or $700 to be in a really nice place. I didn't have to pay your abilities. And I was living with a friend that I knew, so, and it was, it was, so the reason I quit is because I asked to go remote from my previous manager, but they didn't really work that out for me. So I quit. And I was like, you know what? I don't, I don't need it. So they brought me back and it was like, it was a part-time remote. And I already knew that job. And I was, I was basically locked site.8 (37m 43s):So like in the middle of rehearsal on breaks, I was doing work. It's all project based work. I was doing work in between rehearsals in between classes. I would check in and check my emails and just kind of set my own hours. And so when, like when the pandemic hit, I was already in the work from home mindset.2 (38m 2s):I have to stop you for one second. Cause there's so many things that you're saying I want to respond to. One is it's always a good sign, a good omen when just organically, the conversation turns to exactly what she and I were talking about before we started talking to you, we were talking about student loans and what a albatross they are for so many people so that you did yourself, such a favor by not having to go down that path. But also what I, what we always find in the MFA's is they really already know how to hustle, right? Because they've been in the workforce, hustling is like the thing you have to be as an actor.2 (38m 42s):And I feel like that isn't writ large enough when you're in a training program. Like, listen, you can learn about intention till the cows come home. But what you really have to be able to do is figure out how to do a lot of things all the time. Right?1 (39m 0s):Go ahead, go ahead.8 (39m 1s):Oh, I was going to say, yeah, I was, I was already hustling. I was working the full-time job and then immediately go into rehearsal for four hours and then rehearsing on my own after rehearsal and then going back to a job the next day.1 (39m 13s):Well, so this leads me to a question that maybe you can answer, which is okay. So the MFA, what I'm noticing, cause I also am doing a little workshop with some of the MFA actors this year and a writing workshop because I'm really interested in writing8 (39m 28s):Ones or twos or threes. It's all weird. Now1 (39m 32s):I know it's all weird. No, these are twos. And, and anyway, what I'm learning is that maybe, and you can see what you think about this. Maybe we need to look at restructuring acting conservatories to be more like MFA programs versus BFAs. Because like yourself, we have found that the MFA actors who graduate seem way more prepared to live the life of an, of a, of an artist preneur versus the BFAs who are like, I don't know, they seem like daring, like losing it.1 (40m 12s):Right. So what is your thought on that MFA versus BFA for you?8 (40m 17s):So it's a catch 22 because obviously like I wanted my MFA experience and the BFS, you know, we worked together, we rehearsed together and we did shows together and we were offered a lot of the same classes, but also you want that distinction of like, I'm paying more to get this specialized area. And I don't know if when I was 18 or 22, if I would have been in that mindset, like, I don't know what I want it then. So I think it might've been, I think it's a lot to process studying, acting and the business of acting and to make it all make sense, unless you already have an area that you're interested in and you can like apply while you're in, in school from the business side.2 (41m 16s):Did, did your career in business set that intention for you to be an artist preneur from before you ever started the program before you were restarted your MFA?8 (41m 28s):For sure. Yeah. I, so I can, I consider getting my MBA and I was looking at like Northwestern or, and just to preface, I had really had no interesting getting my masters. DePaul was the only school that I applied for because I, I was considering moving to Chicago or LA and I just wanted the training because I didn't study theater and, and undergrad. So I just wanted the training and I was like, you know what? I grew up in I'm from Northwest Indiana. I'm from Gary. And I knew, I knew of DePaul and I really, I searched top 25 MFA programs.8 (42m 10s):And I was like, oh, this isn't in Chicago. And then I looked at like UC San Diego, because that would get me close to LA. So I applied to DePaul and going into it. I told myself that I was never going to get my masters unless it was for something that I absolutely loved, like absolutely without a doubt. So it was acting. And I knew that I knew that I didn't want to get out of school and be poor. Cause like I don't, I don't like the concept of being a struggling poor artists.2 (42m 45s):Well, thank you. Thank you for saying that, that I really appreciate that because that persists as a myth that we all need to be living in a Garret somewhere. But how did you audition when you never studied that? Or did you ever act?8 (43m 2s):I was, I was acting, I was doing like community theater and I had an agent. I was doing improv. I was doing commercials and auditioning for TV and film and doing a lot of auditioning for theater and taking like workshops and classes. I had a vocal coach, so I was training, but it was like a self study type of training. And I never really had the core foundation of what acting is all at once. So I don't honestly, it's just one of those things where I like I'm, I'm very much a spiritual. And like you put out, you get whipped back what you put out into the universe. And like this life, the life that I've been kind of creating for myself is very surreal because things just like on paper, things should not happen the way that they have, you know?1 (43m 48s):Oh, tell us about that. Okay. So what, first of all, my question, my, my feeling is good. Good for you because I think you're making it, it sounds like it's exciting. Things are happening and they're coming together for you. So I guess my first question would be is what is the most exciting thing that is happening for you? Right this second,8 (44m 9s):This second wall, I just established my production company, my film production company in December. And I haven't launched like technically to the public, right until next month. Like I have an official launch day, May 15th next year, next year, next month, while next month. And the most exciting things that are happening are like, I have a small business client lined up for mark doing marketing work. I have someone that approached me for producing a web series that we're kind of developing the scripts. And then last night, DePaul school of cinematic arts student approached me to produce their MFA thesis, which is going to be a sag, a sag agreement.8 (44m 55s):So we just locked that in and that'll be, and I, I can't talk about it too much right now, but that's, we're shooting that in August.2 (45m 4s):Congratulations.8 (45m 5s):So even all of those things are just kind of happening and I haven't even really hit the ground. Yeah.2 (45m 11s):Oh my God. You're going to skyrocket. So what ways, if any, did the theater school experience challenge what you already knew about acting from having been a professional actor before the program?8 (45m 28s):In a lot of ways, it actually made me, it kind of hurt me a lot because I was very naive going into, and I was a lot more free and a bigger risk taker. And then when I got into TTS, you know, you start peeling back all of those layers about yourself and you're getting constant criticism and people were telling you to experiment, but also it's, you can't really experiment because you're getting graded and you're supposed to be taking risks and shows, but you're also getting a rehearsal and performance grades. So they call it caused a lot of like internal conflict. Where,1 (46m 4s):Why does that happen? Is that just the nature of school? I'm really curious as to why. So we have a beginner's mindset, right. Which is a beautiful thing. A lot of us, when we go in some of us, some of, you know, some of your classmates could, like some of ours probably would have been acting since they were like one month old, but for most of us, we didn't know what the hell was going. I didn't anyway. It really was going on. Yeah. So what is it when you say it's cut? Cause you said it was kind of bad, which I totally can relate to the idea of then going from being more free, to being more self-conscious and maybe like precious more about the work, but like what happened? What is the process that makes that happen? TJ, like, I don't get it.8 (46m 42s):I think, I think a lot of it is self-induced of like being in the competitive environment and I camp, I come from a sports background and wanting to just like love competition in a healthy manner. So I think a lot of it is that. And then I think a lot of it is just taking when you're, when you're told that there's so many different things that you need to change about yourself to kind of start fresh aching. Did it eat away at you? And like, and in the midst of like your learning, all your, like exposing yourself to all of this childhood trauma that you didn't even know exist in your body is going through all of these changes.8 (47m 29s):And you're releasing of this, these emotions that you didn't know existed. The reflection was great, but I think it was also like so much in such a little time to where before I was just kinda like, fuck it. Like, I don't have anything to lose. Like I've never acted I'm going to do this my way, regardless of what they think. And I think in grad school, I got back into a mindset of like, oh no, I actually care what they think.1 (47m 58s):Well, the other thing that is because I am a, I, I was listening to the thing you said about the sports mentality or a sports background, like, okay. Like, I was really good at basketball, unbeknownst to me in eighth grade. Okay. Like, shockingly, I was like this overweight kid, but I was really good at basketball. Okay. I didn't know I was good. I just, someone was like, Hey, try out for the team. We need people. I was like, well, I'm doing nothing else. But anyway, I turned out to be really good and I had fun because I had no expectations. I was like, okay, well they want me to play. Someone wants me. And it turns out I was really good. But then when I tried out for the high school team and it was like serious business, of course I never made the team.1 (48m 41s):And I never even went back to tryouts after day one, because I was like, oh, I'm not, this is, I'm not now it's serious business. Now this is like where, where the big boys and girls really play and it's competitive, more competitive. And it's more like, it felt more businesslike, you know, instead of fun. So maybe that has, I don't know. I could really relate to that sports analogy of like, when you're free, you're going to play better. You're going to be a better athlete. Right. Cause you can. So it's like how to maintain that freedom as an artist. If we bring it back to the theater school, like how to maintain that freedom to do what you want to do and experiment. And at the same time, take what they're giving you, but not care what they think.1 (49m 22s):It doesn't seem possible to me,8 (49m 23s):It doesn't. And I think like mid grad school. So probably second year before quarantine and everything happened. I think that was the year where I was like, okay, this is my second year. I know that. I know that I w I like, I really want to set myself up for success beyond just acting. But also I know that the stakes are high, like, or I made them high for myself. Like, oh, I gotta, I have to get an agent. And then you see all of that. You see it, all of your classmates, like they're starting to get representation early, before graduation in the middle of the pandemic. So like, it's like, oh, all of this pressure, and you don't know how the industry is going to be when you get out.8 (50m 6s):And also, like, I think I got back into the mindset of which I started in of like, okay, I feel behind already, because I started acting at the age of 28 and I didn't study. I haven't been studying since I was the age of five. Like I grew up in a performing arts family, but I was not other than just doing improv and having fun and making sketches with friends. So like, I didn't have anyone around me as a mentor in my friend group or in my family that could just kind of guide me. So I got this sense of urgency when I first started like, okay, I have to learn everything possible.8 (50m 47s):So I didn't care then. But like, when I was in grad school, I just started caring more about what my life could be and what it wouldn't be if I didn't get what I wanted. And I think, I just1 (51m 4s):Think she8 (51m 4s):Was as a lot of pressure.1 (51m 6s):So did you enjoy your time there sometimes some, like, did you, what would you say if someone came to you like were coming to you and say, like, what was your takeaway from that theater school experience in terms of high points and low points?8 (51m 22s):I, you know, I've, I, I loved it despite like the first year I will say the first year was brutal. It was brutal. My, my cohort, I love my cohort. We went through like a title nine investigation the first quarter. So it was like emotionally draining, just the, you know, being in a new environment and conservatory to start. And then you have like a sexual harassment case happening that creates like our own type of social distancing thing, where the person can't be in class, we have to go through, like, we're getting Student, this was a cohort member. Who's no longer with the program.8 (52m 3s):They got expelled, but, okay. So yeah, we're going through that. And we're navigating like intimacy and like how to get around all of this in our first quarter at DePaul. So a lot happened and it drew us together a lot.2 (52m 19s):I'll say my God. I mean, that door normally happens anyway, just because of the intimacy of being in voice and speech classes, but having that to go through, I mean, that, that probably in the end, sorry for whoever got hurt in that experience, but probably in the end boded. Well, for everybody just being able to, to judge8 (52m 37s):It did it did. So yeah, that first year was rough. I also went through, like, I went through a racial profiling scenario in the theater school that ended up leaking out to media when the George Floyd things happened in 2020, like that It's a whole thing. I was there's you, where were you all in the, you, weren't in the new building. So1 (53m 5s):We're old, we're old as hell. We've we, we graduated in 97 and 98. So no,8 (53m 12s):So, so I, I was like napping before rehearsal on the second floor, which is next to like the marketing section. And there's like a couch kind of blocked off, but you know, everyone sleeps in theater school cause you spend like 98% of your time there. And there was a, there was an Encore, a duty officer patrolling. And I think he was new because he had never, I never seen him before anyway. So he like woke me up and then started questioning me and like asking why I was there and who I was and asking for my ID. And I'm like, no, I go to school here.8 (53m 52s):And then I was like, why, why did you, why did you wake me up? And then he told me that because someone saw on camera and called to check that there was someone in the building that shouldn't be there. Okay. So we went through this whole process of like investigating and there's no cameras in the theater school. So he lied about why he stopped me. It was, it was, you know, I mean older, like I'm not at a typical theater type look anyway, the case got thrown out because they couldn't like, they couldn't find enough evidence to prove that he was in the wrong, even though he did wrong.8 (54m 34s):So they kind of went by that. So that's, this is all first year, right? So the case got,2 (54m 38s):Oh my God, you've graduated.8 (54m 42s):Yeah. So the case got closed and then we just kinda let it go. But after that first year, I was like, you know what? This was a more emotional turmoil. And I refuse to have the final two years go this way. So that's when I really started focusing on, okay, I'm going to do this. I'm going to get through school and like get every ounce of it out that I can. And that, and that's kind of like this that's when I kind of started developing like truly developing my production company. It had been in the works for awhile, but that's when I really got serious about it. And then the pandemic hit and like I had a lot of extra free, free time and you know,2 (55m 23s):Oh my God, I, I don't think there, there could have been any more calamity that you were facing at this time and you and you, so you truly survive school it on such a deeper level than I think I could, I can attest to, I want to go back to something you were saying earlier, when you were talking about picking careers, you were saying, I didn't want to be a doctor and I didn't want to be a lawyer. And so my assumption was that that's what your parents are. And then you said it's a performing arts family. So tell us more about your performing arts family.8 (55m 58s):Yeah. So my mom, she trained in classical singing and she's not a professional singer. My sister was in a performing arts high school and she's 10 years older than I am. So I grew up exposed to like, I grew up exposed to her in a girl group and around artists and around theater. Like my mom was kind of a, she's a public speaker and a politician her own way because I lived in Arkansas for about five years during my childhood. And it was a small town and everyone knew her and she, she ran this, this preschool, but she also did a lot of things in the community where she would have like women's support groups and she would go do like these leadership workshops.8 (56m 46s):And she's, I also grew up in a Baptist church and in the black church. So I, I grew up seeing performances a lot in a lot of theatrical performances and seeing my mom speak and she's so like articulate and powerful and I always admired her like, wow, she can get up in front of all these people and speak and like enjoy it. And I could not because I was super shy, like super shy. And I think it's because people told me that I was shy. So I had no interest in performing. Cause I was just terrified of it. And1 (57m 24s):I have to pause there for a psychological moment. Isn't that interesting. I did not realize that about shy kids. That a lot of times they're told, oh, this is the shy one. Just like, oh, this is the, you know, whatever one. And then it becomes a self-fulfilling thing. Like this is my, this TJ, he he's the shy kid. And maybe he wouldn't have been so shy if it hadn't been reinforced and reinforced. That's so interesting. It's just like what we tell ourselves like, oh, I can't do that. I can't play basketball at camp, but I'm this one, my sisters, that one, that's so interesting to me. Cause shy you, I mean just shows how people change and w how we aren't really what people say we are.1 (58m 5s):So anyway,8 (58m 6s):I internalized it and what I've psychologically, I think what it was, I grew up around kids. There were way older than me and way more mature. So I'm a, five-year-old around a 15 year old. And my brother who was six years old or 11, and all of my cousins are like 11, 12. I'm not going to be able to articulate the way that they're articulating and expressing themselves. But, so I think I just kind of withdrew within myself when I wasn't able to do what they were doing, which ties back into me, never acting is because I never thought it was a possibility because I saw them being able to do these things, but I didn't feel like I could express myself that way. So I just did sports.2 (58m 51s):Okay. Well, and actually that's kind of a pretty good bridge. Really. If you feel like if you were any bit in your shell, sports does help people come sort of come into who they are a little bit, but what I wanted to ask you was, did you, when did you, when did you figure out that you are not shy and when did you decide that this could be something that you would do?8 (59m 19s):I think in my probably, you know, I never, I've always known that I, I wasn't shy. It just depended on who I was around. You know, what, what group I was around. Because if you, like, if you're around my childhood friends and people, I went to high school with, they'll be like, he is not fucking shy. Like what, he's the worst, actually, he's the worst. Once you get them going? I think it has a lot to do with code switching and being in environments. I was very observant as a kid, you know, because I was shy and I listened a lot.8 (1h 0m 1s):So I think it was more of, I like to observe people around me before I speak. So I knew I wasn't shy, but I, I also knew that I wanted to be able to have a voice and figure out what that looked like. And that was kind of the journey of me that led me to acting is okay. I want to be able to speak and express myself and I want the tools to be able to do it. I just don't know what that looks like.2 (1h 0m 33s):Can you tell us about some of your favorite theater school experiences like performances or, or classes8 (1h 0m 41s):Favorite? Okay. Let's Griffin is a favorite of all. She, I could talk about her for days. Phyllis is a voice, was our, my voice teacher and my second year, and just her spiritual and gentle approach and having a black woman as a faculty member was huge. Those are, so those are some of my biggest highlights. So it's probably going to be more on like me and who I had around me. So just for context, I was the only black male in the MFA program when I went in.8 (1h 1m 26s):So there were two black women in my cohort. And then the class that MFA two's ahead of me, there was one black woman. And then the, is there was one black woman. So I was the only, like, not only was I, the, I was the only black male in the MFA program in my thirties, going into an environment where like everyone out of the other younger black men were 18, 19 20. So there's like this huge gap where I didn't really, I'd never felt like I had someone that I could talk to, you know, so, but great experiences.8 (1h 2m 7s):Our lady of second year, it was majority, all black tasks, a play centered around three well Rwandan girls who saw, saw our, the Virgin mother, Mary, so apparitions of it. So that was a great to being that environment and do that. And then I did this really cool in the, the big black box in the heli. I did this, this horror comedy job, a play called neighborhood three requisition of doom. And I got to play three different characters and I love the horror genre. So it was cool to really dive into that and work with the cast.8 (1h 2m 51s):And then that final quarter of the second year, the pandemic hit. And one of our professors that we didn't know, which was great. We were terrified because we hadn't worked with him, but he's an alumni, Sean Paris. I don't know if you're aware of Sean Paris.1 (1h 3m 12s):I know Sean,8 (1h 3m 12s):Sean, Sean has become a big brother to me. He is so amazing. And that was like the point that was game-changing for me, because it was during, it was during the start of the pandemic where I had not only a black faculty member teaching, but also a black male faculty member teaching me and I, that like that was when I really felt like I was able to open up and truly start translating who I am into acting and into my art or my art1 (1h 3m 42s):So necessary. What, what did, what was Shawn teaching or was he directing?8 (1h 3m 47s):So it was all remote. He was teaching us Meisner and viewpoints, but we were translating it to on camera because everything was done. So I got to really start building my relationship with the camera, Our relationship and the environment, because there's not really on camera for, at the theater school and there needs to be more And I love TV and film is the route that I'm, I want to go mainly in my career.1 (1h 4m 18s):So what, when you say like, that really opened you up in that really? What do you think it, I guess what I'm trying to, I want to get clear about, like, what did it do for you as a performer to have that experience with Sean? Like what, what, what happened? What changed in you?8 (1h 4m 38s):I got to hear his experiences and see him work because he really, he wasn't, he was a student as well, and he, like, we got to watch him do monologues and watch him work. And I think just being in the environment where someone was like me, literally, who was like me and has experienced it, experienced the type of things that I've experienced in life. It's one of those things where like, growing up, I didn't see a lot of people that looked like me on TV or in film. So I never thought it was a possibility. And sh working with Sean in being around him really opened up what acting can look like for me.2 (1h 5m 26s):Oh, that's so beautiful. And I'm never not surprised in all of the ways that representation matters. I never thought about it mattering in the classroom, but it certainly does. I don't know if you got a chance to listen to, we interviewed Justin Ross and he talked about our lady of Cuba. And one of the things that he was talking about was that, that it sounds to me. So I'm asking you to, for clarification, it sounds to me like that production fostered a whole pivot in terms of the curriculum and, and, and how he said it to us as we warmed up differently than was sort of the, the, the usual at the theater school.2 (1h 6m 14s):And that, that production helped create a new normal for that. Is that, was that your experience?8 (1h 6m 21s):It did. And I think a lot of that has to do with our graduating class with BFA and MFA my class, my cohort was very much of like, we'll burn this institution down if we need to, like, we're, we're changing shit, like regardless. And a lot of it had to do with going through what we went through that first quarter with the title nine situation. It was like we had each other's backs and it was the same way with our lady of Cuba. Oh, if like we have each other's backs because we went through some shit in there too with like,1 (1h 6m 54s):Yeah, they, yeah, it didn't, it was like, there was a lot of bad shady shit that went down right there.8 (1h 7m 1s):A lot of shit going down. Yeah. And a lot of like unbiased prejudice and racism that was happening with the people who were working on crew, not really having an understanding of the story that we're telling and not really allowing us to tell the story and not really getting our feedback as you know, it was, it was a lot of like an all black cast, but being essentially produced by all white people was right. You know, and there was a lot of conflict during that production, but I do think,1 (1h 7m 40s):Do you feel like it changed though yeah.8 (1h 7m 43s):To change the culture of TTS? For sure. Because we start, it was, I think that production and the things that happened during it really started shifting the culture of theater in TTS before the culture started shifting in 2020s. It was kind of like the, the catalyst before that.2 (1h 8m 9s):Oh my God. Yeah. Only like 50 years too late, not too late, but 50 years late. Like w we've had a of conversations because your experience of being the only black male in, in our generation there, yeah. There was always an, any class, only one person of color, pretty much. I mean, maybe in a couple of years there were two. And certainly Phyllis was our only are ever professor of color. Is she still the only professor of, I mean, I know the new Dean is a woman,8 (1h 8m 39s):But the only 10 years1 (1h 8m 42s):Tenured and full time, even maybe, I don't know, like adjuncts. Yes. We're cause I'm adjunct. And I know in my cohort of adjuncts there are, but I think full-time like, it's still, what, what, wait, wait, what?8 (1h 8m 55s):Yep. Well, Christina, Anthony, Chris, Anthony is new. She came in our second year. So that, she's also a really great she's. She came from California and she's, she has a lot of background in activism and in the classical. So she, she is a full-time staff member, faculty member, faculty member.2 (1h 9m 18s):Do you remember your audition? And can you tell us about what your audition was like? Yeah.8 (1h 9m 22s):Yeah. So get that. So when I apply for the audition, they were like, you can do the preliminary video or you can just come to in-person and I didn't have any experience with self-tapes. And like, I was still raw. I was like, I don't want to put a monologue on video. Like I won't have a chance at all at all, if I do this, but during that time, I was already preparing for Kentucky Shakespeare auditions. So I had been working monologues and working on a lot of different things with my, my vocal coach. So I did in-person auditions. And it's very funny because I was currently in rehearsals for the show of chorus line, the musical, and then think auditions were on Wednesday, Wednesday.8 (1h 10m 17s):Yeah. Auditions were on Wednesday in Chicago. And then there was an audition for cau UC San Diego in Chicago. Like they were, you know, all of the colleges they come and I was like, okay, I'll, I'll, I'll get an audition for UC San Diego. And it happened to be the day before the DePaul auditions. So I knew that I wasn't going to go to UC San Diego just because I felt like they don't know who I am. It would be like me applying to Yale and they don't, they have no idea who I am. So I have no chance. So I used that as like a warmup for DePaul, used it for a warmup to get, just kind of get the jitters out and audition.8 (1h 10m 59s):And then as I was leaving the, I can't, we were in some hotel downtown, maybe the Hyatt or something like that, as I was leaving, they were like, Hey, we're doing auditions for Columbia and New York. If you have a headshot, a resume and want to get a slot, I'm like, oh yeah, I have these printed out. So I signed up for a slot and then I went and auditioned for Columbia. So it was like, oh, all right. I got these two auditions under my belt. I feel, I feel ready going into tomorrow. Right.1 (1h 11m 25s):Wait, can I just say how brilliant it is that you decided to use them as practice? This is the sign of someone who is ready to do their craft when they see not those opportunities as a chance to have a panic attack and die, but as a chance to use their skills and practice and get in front of people and practice, that is a true artist, entrepreneur mindset. Like that is a better mindset. Thank gosh. You had that anyway. Okay. So then do you went to Columbia? Did you do all those?8 (1h 11m 55s):I did the Columbia. I did the Columbia and you know, there were, I was in the lobby and just ki

Intercollegiate Tennis Association
“Winning Will Take Care of Itself….”

Intercollegiate Tennis Association

Play Episode Listen Later May 2, 2022 49:01


Audra Cohen, the Head Women's Tennis Coach at the University of Oklahoma, is no stranger to winning. In her freshman year at Northwestern, she won 51 singles matches. The following year she won an NCAA singles title at the University of Miami. She reached a career-high of #229 on the WTA tour before joining the college coaching ranks as an assistant coach at the University of Wisconsin. She took over the head coaching responsibilities at North Florida in 2011, where she was named a three-time Atlantic Sun Coach of the year winning four Atlantic Sun Tournament titles. Audra is now the head women's coach at the University of Oklahoma, where she is having a breakout year, reaching the finals of the ITA National Indoor Championships in February, winning a Big-12 regular-season title, and will enter the NCAA tournament later this month as one of the favorites to win it all.   In this podcast, Audra shares many aspects of her coaching philosophy and processes for recruiting, doubles, and sports psychology, as well as her role as the CEO of the OU women's tennis program.  

Maryland Baseball Network Podcast
Highlights: #23 Maryland vs. Northwestern (Game 3) | 5-1-22

Maryland Baseball Network Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 2, 2022 3:18


Highlights: #23 Maryland vs. Northwestern (Game 3) | 5-1-22 by Maryland Baseball Network

Duke Basketball Report
#420 - Jai Lucas and Ryan Young join the Brotherhood

Duke Basketball Report

Play Episode Listen Later May 1, 2022 50:40


On this episode of the DBR Podcast, we're breaking down two new members of the Duke Basketball family: assistant coach Jai Lucas, who joins Duke from a similar role at Kentucky, and senior transfer Ryan Young, who comes to Duke from Chris Collins and Northwestern. Lucas is the big headline for us, though, as Duke has added an assistant without any Duke ties for the first time in almost 30 years. Lucas brings playing success, coaching success, and an impressive pedigree to Durham, where his father John Lucas II, Maryland and NBA legend, once upon a time played high school basketball. Lucas is taking Nolan Smith's spot on the bench, and he brings plenty of recruiting chops to the role. We are all excited to see all the things that Lucas will bring to the program, as an outsider with a great resume. Young, meanwhile, will be a backup big man for Duke, or so we think. His role on the 2023 team should primarily be spelling Dereck Lively II, not to mention his enormous role in the practice, preparing Lively for big-time college basketball. Given the extra year of eligibility for student-athletes who were in school in 2020, Young could be at Duke for two years. We'll be back soon for our Duke one-and-done draft, and of course as more offseason news trickles in. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

People in Transition
53. Dr. Benjamin Ritter - Leadership and Career Coach

People in Transition

Play Episode Listen Later May 1, 2022 33:23


Dr. Benjamin Ritter is a leadership, executive, and career coach, L&D director, values geek, international speaker, podcaster, author, mentor, and passionate about guiding leaders in finding, creating, and sustaining a career they love. With over 10 years of experience working with clients from companies such as Amazon, Coursera, Doordash, Google, Fiserv, Northwestern, Pinterest, and Yelp, Ben understands how to navigate any career path you decide you want to travel. From empowering professionals to get unstuck, to guiding senior leadership on how to stand out from the competition, develop executive presence, and feel confident in being a leader, Ben is an expert in his field and will guide you toward truly living for yourself at work and in life.  Key links(s): Liveforyourselfconsulting.com / youtube.com/c/benjaminritter / linkedin.com/in/ritterbenj Some of the information he shared during our discussion include: ·         Sometimes, you need to do a hard audit on yourself to really know what you want and where you are going to.·         If you are running away from a job, you might just run right back into the problems you have had, always better to run to the next great opportunity.·         You must believe in yourself to be successful in the job search, rejection is not directed at who you are, the skills you have just don't match the need.·         When the inner critic is shooting at you, bring clarity, confidence, and control to deal with it.·         If you are at a job impasse, give yourself some kindness, break for a while and then start back slowly and explore where you are at and where you need to go to. Ben provided so much thoughtful, helpful, and actionable advice in this episode.  You are going to want to listen to the recording several times to make sure you got it all.   He lives his life with this philosophy, “I think there is a way to beat the system. To work outside of it. To change the boundaries of work for myself and for everyone.” and shares how we all can achieve this success.

Nebraska Athletics Podcast
Huskers Drop B1G Quarterfinal Match

Nebraska Athletics Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 29, 2022


Iowa City, Iowa - The Nebraska women's tennis team wrapped up play at the Big Ten Tournament, as the Huskers fell to Northwestern 4-3 on Friday afternoon.

The Whole Health Cure
"Plant-Based Prescription for Digestive Health" with Will Bulsiewicz, MD

The Whole Health Cure

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 28, 2022 38:50


Dr. Will Bulsiewicz (or "Dr. B") is an award winning gastroenterologist, internationally recognized gut health expert and the New York Times, Publishers Weekly, USA Today, and Indie Bound-bestselling author of Fiber Fueled and The Fiber Fueled Cookbook.With a passion for plants and helping people, he sits on the Scientific Advisory Board and is the U.S. Medical Director of ZOE, has authored more than twenty articles published in peer-reviewed scientific journals, has given more than forty presentations at national meetings, presented to Congress and the USDA, and has taught over 10,000 students how to heal and optimize their gut health.He completed a bachelor's degree from Vanderbilt University, a medical degree from Georgetown University, and a master's