Podcasts about Ward

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  • Jan 21, 2022LATEST

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Best podcasts about Ward

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Latest podcast episodes about Ward

The Ornstein & Chapman Podcast
Weekend Preview: Ward-Prowse Better Than Becks, 'Tired' Tuchel & Big Dunc's Deja Vu

The Ornstein & Chapman Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 21, 2022 45:22


Hosts Dan Bardell and George Elek are joined by bet365's Steve Freeth to look ahead to another big weekend of Premier League action... Is James Ward-Prowse the best Free-Kick taker in PL history? Is Conor Gallagher better off at Selhurst Park than returning to Stamford Bridge, did Steven Gerrard's return to Goodison Park just get a whole lot harder and much more...

Tactical Fitness Report with Stew Smith Podcast
Episode 216: Tactical Fitness Report 213 w/Ward Carroll (F-14 RIO / USNA 82 Grad) and Aviation Story Teller (YouTube)

Tactical Fitness Report with Stew Smith Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2022 83:47


Check out this interview with Navy Flight Officer / Radar Intercept Officer Ward Carroll of the F-14. See ( https://www.youtube.com/c/WardCarroll ) for the latest project Ward is working on – cool stories in Aviation! In this part Tactical Fitness Report and To, Through, and After Podcast, we discuss US Naval Academy fitness, Navy Aviation Fitness, Pulling G's in F-14 and with the Blue Angels as well as Ward's journey through 20 years of Naval service and his career for the past 20 years outside of the Navy. I worked for Ward when he was the editor at Military.com and now see him in Annapolis as we work near each other at the Naval Academy. If you have not seen his Youtube Channell at https://www.youtube.com/c/WardCarroll subscribe and you will not be disappointed especially if you are considering Naval Academy as a future next step out of high school, or interested in Naval Aviation, Aircraft Carriers, Even UFOs that pilots often see. He is the author of Punk's War Trilogy – See https://www.amazon.com/Punks-Fight-Ward-Carroll/dp/0451211499Check out other videos of combat swimmer stroke, workouts, and other spec ops related training.  See http://www.stewsmithfitness.com for more information about military, law enforcement, special ops, fire fighting training programs.

49ers Talk with Matt Maiocco and Laura Britt
Jimmie Ward on Trey Lance as scout team QB, Jimmy Garoppolo's future and 49ers' keys to beating Packers

49ers Talk with Matt Maiocco and Laura Britt

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2022 71:57


49ers safety Jimmie Ward joins Matt Maiocco and Laura Britt to discuss this weekend's showdown with the Packers, the challenge the defense faces against Aaron Rodgers and what has impressed him most about Jimmy Garoppolo. Plus, Matt and Laura break down the keys for the 49ers in Green Bay and what things to look out for in the Divisional Round matchup. (1:30) Discussing the 49ers-Packers recent rivalry (9:30) Revisiting the Week 3 matchup (18:31) Garoppolo banged up but still expected to start (28:30) How are 49ers' veterans an advantage in the playoffs? (32:50) Ward on the struggles during the beginning of his career (38:13) Ward details the success of the 49ers defense (44:44) How has Lance been as scout team qb? (51:12) Ward discusses Shanahan's coaching style (57:30) Who are the 49ers' future starting corners? See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Wedded: The Wedding Planner Podcast
Everything COVID and Weddings: In Conversation With Alison Bryan Destinations

Wedded: The Wedding Planner Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 26:29


This week, we sat down with destination wedding planner extraordinaire, Alison Laesser-Keck, as she quarantines from Covid in Mexico post-wedding. How can you make your guests feel comfortable? Should you postpone your wedding? What kind of testing requirements should you implement? How do you communicate those requirements? Covid brings up tons of questions—and we're answering them all. Plus: a listener asks how early is too early to start wedding planning.Discussed in This Episode:Alison Bryan Destinations (https://www.alison-bryan.com/)Allianz Travel Insurance (https://www.allianztravelinsurance.com/)Visit Our Website:https://www.WeddedPodcast.comGrab Our Freebies And Planning Tools:www.WeddedShop.comEmail Us All Of Your Questions and Comments:Questions@WeddedPodcast.comFind Us On Social:Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/weddedpodcastRead About Our Hosts:Tracy Taylor Ward DesignWebsite: https://www.TracyTaylorWard.comInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/tracytaylorwardShannon Leahy EventsWebsite: https://www.ShannonLeahy.comInstagram: https://instagram.com/shannonleahyevents

Locked On Vols
Ward Wednesday: Uros Plavsic, Zakai Zeigler play hero as Tennessee Vols win over the Commodores at Vanderbilt

Locked On Vols

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 37:48


The Locked On Vols podcast is your daily show covering Tennessee Volunteers football and basketball with Eric Cain. Wednesday's show welcomes Josh Ward on for Ward Wednesday in segment two. We discuss some recent awards for Josh Heupel to conclude the show, but we kick things off with a recap of Tennessee's gritty hoops win over Vanderbilt on the road late Tuesday night. All that and more on a Wednesday show. Be sure to participate in #TwitterTuesday by tweeting @LockedonVols or @_Cainer all your questions. Tuesday's show will answer them! DMs are open. Follow the show on those Twitter accounts and also on host Eric Cain's Facebook page: CainerOnAir. And every Friday is 5 Star Friday here on Locked on Vols! Head over to Apple Podcasts and leave a positive review + a 5 star rating and we'll shout you out each and every Friday! Support Us By Supporting Our Sponsors! Built Bar Built Bar is a protein bar that tastes like a candy bar. Go to builtbar.com and use promo code “LOCKED15,” and you'll get 15% off your next order. BetOnline AG There is only 1 place that has you covered and 1 place we trust. Betonline.ag! Sign up today for a free account at betonline.ag and use that promocode: LOCKEDON for your 50% welcome bonus. NetSuite Over twenty-seven thousand businesses already use NetSuite and RIGHT NOW through the end of the year NetSuite is offering a one-of-a-kind financing program to those ready to upgrade at NetSuite.com/LOCKEDONNCAA. ___________________________________________________________________________________________________ A special shoutout to James Manning (@GooseManning5) and Lance Dawe (@Dawepond) for their assistance in graphic design. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

The Ken Carman Show with Anthony Lima
Doug Lesmerises: I don't like "All-In" on Baker and if he doesn't have it, you're wasting another year of Garrett, Ward and Chubb

The Ken Carman Show with Anthony Lima

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 15:58


Doug Lesmerises discussed the Mayfield Matrix from Cleveland.com. What are the best options for the Browns in 2022 with Baker. Doug discussed some of the comparable options with other QB's who were on their 5th year of their rookie deal. Listen to The Ken Carman Show with Anthony Lima weekday mornings 6-10am on Sports Radio 92.3 The Fan and the Audacy App!

Leading Saints Podcast
Giving Your Ward a Story to Tell and Other Ways to Promote Positive Ward Culture | An Interview with Kirk Weisler

Leading Saints Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 57:33


Kirk Weisler is a leadership coach and trainer focused on team building and culture training. He is currently Chief Morale Officer for companies and organizations around the globe, offering coaching, keynote addresses, and workshops. A past leader of the National Speakers Association, Kirk is a master team builder and a professional storyteller, and has been a part of seven start-ups. He previously served in the 19th Special Forces and as a US Army Ranger. Kirk and his wife have been married over 30 years, have six children, and reside in Gilbert, Arizona. Highlights 3:30 Thoughts on becoming a bishop. 7:20 Implementing a positive culture in your ward. 14:00 Examples of implementing positive culture. Give people a story to tell. 24:30 How do you actually apply this principle of implementing positive culture? What are the actionable steps? 30:00 Example of creating moments and positive culture. 32:00 Unite your presidencies. It's not enough just to go and do your calling but it's about creating unity between leaders. 35:00 Ask your members what their dream calling is. What are their talents and strengths? Give them a chance to give input. 38:30 Another way to create positive church culture is to eliminate the shame that people have about their sins. Help them see how amazing they really are. We are not our sins. 42:15 Shifting culture is about shifting the traditions and rituals. These things are not a part of our doctrine. 44:45 Culture has momentum. In order to change culture we have to slow things down. 49:00 Story of removing shame and playing with nerf guns. Links kirkweisler.com Read the TRANSCRIPT of this podcast

Career UpRising
#112 Staying Grounded In Turbulent Times (with Doyle Ward)

Career UpRising

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 37:27


The last two years have been difficult and uncertain for all of humanity. Learn from Doyle Ward, a gifted medium and life coach, about how to stay positive and grounded during the COVID-19 Pandemic and other world events. Learn more about him at www.blissfulquests.com

True Crime All The Time
Beverly Allitt

True Crime All The Time

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 75:53


In 1991 tragedy struck the Grantham and Kesteven Hospital in Lincolnshire, England. Infants and children in Ward 4 were dying at an alarming rate. The one person in the hospital who was present when all of the children died or became deathly ill was Beverly Allitt.Join Mike and Gibby as they talk about the story of the murderous nurse Beverly Allitt. The two pediatricians on staff had differing opinions on the causes of the deaths. One believed they were all just tragic coincidences, but the other believed one of their staff was harming children. The second doctor turned out to be correct. He began an inquiry that would expose nurse Beverly Allitt as a serial killer.You can help support the show at patreon.com/truecrimeallthetimeVisit the show's website at truecrimeallthetime.com for contact, merchandise, and donation informationAn Emash Digital productionSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Stories of Scotland
Merlin of the Tweed: Lowland Legends & Geologic Journeys

Stories of Scotland

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 16, 2022 49:08


Jenny and Annie learn about the geology of the Scottish Lowlands, and travel as a wee grain of sand through half a billion years of geologic movement, ending up within the River Tweed.  In more recent history, we unravel Arthurian legends to explore the story of Merlin, the wizard of the wilds. A real cornucopia of Celtic mythologies and folklore.  This episode is sponsored by Scotland Shop. If you are tempted to check out some of Scotland Shop's beautiful tartan garments and fabrics, please follow this link to Scotland Shop. https://hubs.ly/H0-0fjl0 You can support Stories of Scotland on Patreon! www.patreon.com/storiesofscotland References: Alexander Pennecuik, A Geographical, Historical Description of the Shire of Tweeddale,  Edinburgh, 1715. Francis H. Groome (ed.), Ordnance Gazetteer of Scotland, Edinburgh, 1901. H. L. D. Ward, Lailoken (or Merlin Silvester), Romania, Vol. 22, No 88. ‘How Tweed Got Its Name: Homespuns that have been famous for a thousand years,' Dundee Evening Telegraph, August 1940.  J. S. Blackie, Merlin and Kentigern, Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine, 1885.  J. S. P. Tatlock, Geoffrey of Monmouth's Vita Merlini, A Journal of Mediaeval Studies, Vol. XVIII, July 1943. Lauchlan MacLeanWatt, Scottish Life and Poetry, James Nisbet & Co., London, 1912.  ‘Merlin's Grave,' Peeblesshire Advertiser and County Newspaper, January 1992. ‘Merlin's Mysterious Death: His Last Resting Place,' Cambria Daily Leader, July 1890. ‘Obituary: The Tramp Poet,' Aberdeen Press and Journal, August 1925. Walter Scott, J. W. Lake, The Poetical Works of Sir Walter Scott, J. Crissy, Philadelphia, 1835.

How to College: First Gen
E74: Alejandro - From Undocumented to Policy and Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion

How to College: First Gen

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 15, 2022 8:28


Meet Alejandro, one of our new co-hosts. He is a first-generation college graduate from St. Edward's University and a DACA recipient. He shares his story growing up in Houston's 5th Ward and learning how his citizenship status determined the resources he had access to.

Wisdom's Echo
Postured to Perceive by Elijah Ward

Wisdom's Echo

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 15, 2022 17:41


Postured to Perceive by Elijah Ward

At Liberty
How to Win an Election From Jail

At Liberty

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 30:54


Joel Castón was incarcerated when he was 18 years old. He's now 45 and in November of last year, just two months ago, Joel was released after serving over 26 years. While incarcerated, he received a degree through the Georgetown Prison Scholars Program and started a mentorship initiative called Young Men Emerging. And, because D.C. changed the law to allow incarcerated people to vote, he ran for office, and he won: he is now an Advisory Neighborhood Commissioner in Washington D.C. representing the 7th Ward including the jail that he just walked out of. He's the first incarcerated person in D.C. history to win elected office. Joel joins us today to talk about his experience, what he's focusing on as a newly elected commissioner in D.C., and how he's changing the public narrative about incarcerated people.

BHAW Radio
BHAW 69 - Update w/ Coach Ward (F&M Open/Pittsburgh Recap & Cornell Preview)

BHAW Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022 52:27


- Holiday break leading up to action this past weekend - F&M Open Recap - Pittsburgh Recap - Cornell Preview - Possible additions to the schedule - Listener Questions

The Speak to Scale Podcast
Ep 174 - Academy Student Spotlight with Magan Ward

The Speak to Scale Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022 32:35


It's easy to get lost in the noise and overwhelmed by all of the thoughts of so-called “gurus” these days, so it's important to know how to find your own way. In this episode, Magan Ward, a student of mine in Speaking Strategy Academy, joins us to share how she was able to ignore all of the noise and carved her own path, specifically when it comes to growing her email newsletter. Listen in as we discuss what's popular in the email marketing space, the unique strategy Magan took to grow her email list, and how she adapted our resources in Speaking Strategy Academy for her business. Review show notes and transcript at: https://thepublicspeakingstrategist.com/shownotes/174

Veterinary Viewfinder Podcast
What Happens When Our Own Pets Need Veterinary Care?

Veterinary Viewfinder Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022 32:31


What happens when a veterinary professional's own pet needs veterinary care? Do they schedule an appointment? Who cares for them, when are they seen, and how much do they charge? What are some of the potential disruptions and discord that bringing in our own pets for veterinary care can create in a veterinary practice? Perhaps more than you'd think… Hosts Dr. Ernie Ward and Beckie Mossor, RVT explore the benefits - and potential pitfalls - of taking our own pets into the clinics we work in. From “picking staff favorites,” to micro-aggressions and staff tensions, to determining fair fees, and being asked to perform diagnostic tests or treatments on our ailing pets, this week we tackle a tough topic rarely discussed publicly. Beckie shares her recent experiences in not being able to get prompt care for her own pet and Dr. Ward offers some of the solutions he discovered in his clinics. Both express the need for being proactive on this issue, particularly given the current state of staff shortages and overwhelmed schedules. Viewfinders, this is a good one! Viewfinders, how do handle staff pets in your clinic? What problems and solutions have you found? Share them on our social media or email us at veterinaryviewfinder@gmail.com! Finally, as Dr. Ward says, “GO DAWGS!” Congratulations on Dr. Ward's alma mater the University of Georgia for winning the 2021-22 NCAA college football national championship this week by defeating rival University of Alabama!

Rotten Mango
#130: The Murder Planned In The Psychiatric Ward (Case of Celeste Beard)

Rotten Mango

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022 92:50


The two women met in the psychiatric ward and instantly sparks were flying. Their hair was wild, they were heavily drugged up but they knew that it was only a matter of time before they had s*x. They were so different but it worked. One woman - the wife of a millionaire. The other woman - was struggling with life and addiction. But they just knew that they would be together. They just didn't know it would be in jail… for murder. Book Rec: “She Wanted It All” - by Kathryn Casey (an amazing deep dive on this case I was hooked). Full Source Notes: rottenmangopodcast.com Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

CougCenter: for Washington State Cougars fans
Podcast Vs. Everyone 154: Did WSU just upgrade at QB?

CougCenter: for Washington State Cougars fans

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022 104:27


The Cougars lost Apple Cup-winning quarterback Jayden de Laura, but they have replaced him with one of the most highly touted transfers on the market: Cameron Ward. It's entirely possible that WSU has actually upgraded at quarterback. Plus: Klay Thompson's big return for the Golden State Warriors, men's basketball's split at the mountain schools, and women's basketball's bummer of a loss to Arizona. Here's that Cougfan article we referenced on the CougsFirst! NIL deals for Ward. Music by Randy England. You can find more of his work on Instagram. Subscribe to us on ... iTunes  Google Play  Spotify  Stitcher  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Locked On Vols
Ward Wednesday: VFL Ron Slay joins the show to chat Tennessee Basketball

Locked On Vols

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022 36:36


The Locked On Vols podcast is your daily show covering Tennessee Volunteers football and basketball with Eric Cain. Wednesday's show is heavy hoops talk as we recap the Volunteers' 66-46 win over South Carolina Tuesday night. VFL Ron Slay joins the show and Josh Ward joins in on a segment three conversation. All that and more on a Wednesday show. Be sure to participate in #TwitterTuesday by tweeting @LockedonVols or @_Cainer all your questions. Tuesday's show will answer them! DMs are open. Follow the show on those Twitter accounts and also on host Eric Cain's Facebook page: CainerOnAir. And every Friday is 5 Star Friday here on Locked on Vols! Head over to Apple Podcasts and leave a positive review + a 5 star rating and we'll shout you out each and every Friday! Support Us By Supporting Our Sponsors! Built Bar Built Bar is a protein bar that tastes like a candy bar. Go to builtbar.com and use promo code “LOCKED15,” and you'll get 15% off your next order. BetOnline AG There is only 1 place that has you covered and 1 place we trust. Betonline.ag! Sign up today for a free account at betonline.ag and use that promocode: LOCKEDON for your 50% welcome bonus. NetSuite Over twenty-seven thousand businesses already use NetSuite and RIGHT NOW through the end of the year NetSuite is offering a one-of-a-kind financing program to those ready to upgrade at NetSuite.com/LOCKEDONNCAA. ___________________________________________________________________________________________________ A special shoutout to James Manning (@GooseManning5) and Lance Dawe (@Dawepond) for their assistance in graphic design. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Friends in Beauty Podcast
Ep. 94: Tatiana “Beat Face Honey” Ward Shares Her Journey From Influencer to Celebrity Makeup Artist

Friends in Beauty Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022 81:54


Today on the Friends in Beauty Podcast I welcome Tatiana Ward aka Beat Face Honey, to the Friends in Beauty guest chair.   Tatiana is a celebrity makeup artist and educator. Her very start in the beauty industry was that of educating. Her precise and easy to follow YouTube videos have amassed over 13 Million hits on Youtube worldwide.    Tatiana's mass appeal, skilled artistry, and straight forward teaching style has transcended her from an online influencer to working with celebrities and educating live. She has been featured in major publications such as Teen Vogue, Elle Magazine, Buzzfeed, Ebony Magazine and many more. Her bubbly personality and extensive knowledge of makeup has been featured on BET, The Steve Harvey Show, CNN, and the FOX Network as an on air contributor.    Having nearly half a million Instagram followers and a growing online presence, Tatiana has become a long standing and respected staple in the makeup community. So much so that her live classes and private sessions keep her traveling the world.    Let me tell you something! I'm still pinching myself that I was able to have this chat with Tatiana. She's been one of my inspirations from the beginning of my career as a Makeup Artist so this was truly a full circle moment + such an amazing + transparent conversation about her journey in the beauty industry.   In this interview Tatiana shares: -How her journey in the beauty industry began + how makeup is just a small part of who she is -How she gained a huge following on YouTube + how the platform has changed making it a little harder for creators -Her experience working with some of the top celebrities in the industry - like Brandy, Nicki Minaj, Keyshia Cole -How she uses her other skills to generate income -Her excitement about her new product line -Balancing motherhood + staying motivated -Amazing advice from Sam Fine -And she even shares something she's never shared before about a particular celebrity that you may find intriguing.   I appreciate Tatiana for sharing her experiences so openly. There are tons of learning lessons that we can all learn from sprinkled throughout our conversation. So, go ahead and jump into it with Tatiana and if you prefer to watch the interview then tune in on YouTube   Don't forget to share with another #FriendinBeauty.   Enjoy this episode!   Leave us a 5 star review and share this episode with a friend or 2 or 3. info@friendsinbeauty.com   Resources Mentioned In This Episode:   -Kevyn Aucoin - Book: Making Faces -Scott Barnes -JR Halsey Foundation -The Lohm -Sam Fine Additional Resources:   -https://www.amazon.com/shop/akuarobinson   -Skillshare - Use this link for 2 months free of the premium plan: https://skl.sh/30t352q   -Shop Mented Cosmetics - https://www.mentedcosmetics.com/?rfsn=1290937.f2481  Use Code “AKUAROBINSON” for 10% of your purchase  Announcements:   We're on Apple Podcasts - www.bit.ly/FIBPodItunes!   Join our Facebook community…   If  you're looking for a community of like minded, ambitious, and supportive #FriendsinBeauty all working to leave our mark on the beauty industry, join us here: https://www.facebook.com/groups/friendsinbeauty Join the Friends in Beauty Mailing List: www.bit.ly/FIBTribe Social Media Info: Tatiana Ward  (Instagram) - @beatfacehoney Tatiana Ward (Website) -https://www.beatfacehoney.com Friends in Beauty (Instagram, Facebook, Twitter) - @friendsinbeauty Friends in Beauty (YouTube) - Friends in Beauty https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCcYPyO8nAosEmjEE5nza9Zg?view_as=subscriber Akua Robinson (Instagram,Twitter) - @akuarobinson AkuaRobinson (Facebook) - Akua Robinson MUA Akua Robinson (Website) - www.akuarobinson.com   #FriendsinBeauty #FIBPodcast

Pocatello Business Podcast
#180 Spencer Ward - Who is Pulling You off the Race Track?

Pocatello Business Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2022 19:49


I am determined to make 2022 a banner year for me! I know you all can have that for yourselves. Being aware of the pitfalls will help you maintain your course to be happy, successful, and productive within 2022.

Screaming in the Cloud
GCP's Many Profundities with Miles Ward

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2022 42:06


About MilesAs Chief Technology Officer at SADA, Miles Ward leads SADA's cloud strategy and solutions capabilities. His remit includes delivering next-generation solutions to challenges in big data and analytics, application migration, infrastructure automation, and cost optimization; reinforcing our engineering culture; and engaging with customers on their most complex and ambitious plans around Google Cloud.Previously, Miles served as Director and Global Lead for Solutions at Google Cloud. He founded the Google Cloud's Solutions Architecture practice, launched hundreds of solutions, built Style-Detection and Hummus AI APIs, built CloudHero, designed the pricing and TCO calculators, and helped thousands of customers like Twitter who migrated the world's largest Hadoop cluster to public cloud and Audi USA who re-platformed to k8s before it was out of alpha, and helped Banco Itau design the intercloud architecture for the bank of the future.Before Google, Miles helped build the AWS Solutions Architecture team. He wrote the first AWS Well-Architected framework, proposed Trusted Advisor and the Snowmobile, invented GameDay, worked as a core part of the Obama for America 2012 “tech” team, helped NASA stream the Curiosity Mars Rover landing, and rebooted Skype in a pinch.Earning his Bachelor of Science in Rhetoric and Media Studies from Willamette University, Miles is a three-time technology startup entrepreneur who also plays a mean electric sousaphone.Links: SADA.com: https://sada.com Twitter: https://twitter.com/milesward Email: miles@sada.com TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: It seems like there is a new security breach every day. Are you confident that an old SSH key, or a shared admin account, isn't going to come back and bite you? If not, check out Teleport. Teleport is the easiest, most secure way to access all of your infrastructure. The open source Teleport Access Plane consolidates everything you need for secure access to your Linux and Windows servers—and I assure you there is no third option there. Kubernetes clusters, databases, and internal applications like AWS Management Console, Yankins, GitLab, Grafana, Jupyter Notebooks, and more. Teleport's unique approach is not only more secure, it also improves developer productivity. To learn more visit: goteleport.com. And not, that is not me telling you to go away, it is: goteleport.com.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by our friends at Redis, the company behind the incredibly popular open source database that is not the bind DNS server. If you're tired of managing open source Redis on your own, or you're using one of the vanilla cloud caching services, these folks have you covered with the go to manage Redis service for global caching and primary database capabilities; Redis Enterprise. To learn more and deploy not only a cache but a single operational data platform for one Redis experience, visit redis.com/hero. Thats r-e-d-i-s.com/hero. And my thanks to my friends at Redis for sponsoring my ridiculous non-sense.  Corey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud. I'm Corey Quinn. I am joined today, once again by my friend and yours, Miles Ward, who's the CTO at SADA. However, he is, as I think of him, the closest thing the Google Cloud world has to Corey Quinn. Now, let's be clear, not the music and dancing part that is Forrest Brazeal, but Forrest works at Google Cloud, whereas Miles is a reasonably salty third-party. Miles, thank you for coming back and letting me subject you to that introduction.Miles: Corey, I appreciate that introduction. I am happy to provide substantial salt. It is easy, as I play brass instruments that produce my spit in high volumes. It's the most disgusting part of any possible introduction. For the folks in the audience, I am surrounded by a collection of giant sousaphones, tubas, trombones, baritones, marching baritones, trumpets, and pocket trumpets.So, Forrest threw down the gauntlet and was like, I can play a keyboard, and sing, and look cute at the same time. And so I decided to fail at all three. We put out a new song just a bit ago that's, like, us thanking all of our customers and partners, covering Kool & the Gang “Celebration,” and I neither look good, [laugh] play piano, or smiling, or [capturing 00:01:46] any of the notes; I just play the bass part, it's all I got to do.Corey: So, one thing that I didn't get to talk a lot about because it's not quite in my universe, for one, and for another, it is during the pre re:Invent—pre:Invent, my nonsense thing—run up, which is Google Cloud Next.Miles: Yes.Corey: And my gag a few years ago is that I'm not saying that Google is more interested in what they're building and what they're shipping, but even their conference is called Next. Buh dum, hiss.Miles: [laugh].Corey: So, I didn't really get to spend a lot of attention on the Google Cloud releases that came out this year, but given that SADA is in fact the, I believe, largest Google Cloud partner on the internet, and thus the world—Miles: [unintelligible 00:02:27] new year, three years in a row back, baby.Corey: Fantastic. I assume someone's watch got stuck or something. But good work. So, you have that bias in the way that I have a bias, which is your business is focused around Google Cloud the way that mine is focused on AWS, but neither of us is particularly beholden to that given company. I mean, you do have the not getting fired as partner, but that's a bit of a heavy lift; I don't think I can mouth off well enough to get you there.So, we have a position of relative independence. So, you were tracking Google Next, the same way that I track re:Invent. Well, not quite the same way I track re:Invent; there are some significant differences. What happened at Cloud Next 2021, that the worst of us should be paying attention to?Miles: Sure. I presented 10% of the material at the first re:Invent. There are 55 sessions; I did six. And so I have been at Cloud events for a really long time and really excited about Google's willingness to dive into demos in a way that I think they have been a little shy about. Kelsey Hightower is the kind of notable deep exception to that. Historically, he's been ready to dive into the, kind of, heavy hands-on piece but—Corey: Wait, those were demos? [Thought 00:03:39] was just playing Tetris on stage for the love of it.Miles: [laugh]. No. And he really codes all that stuff up, him and the whole team.Corey: Oh, absol—I'm sorry. If I ever grow up, I wish to be Kelsey Hightower.Miles: [laugh]. You and me both. So, he had kind of led the charge. We did a couple of fun little demos while I was there, but they've really gotten a lot further into that, and I think are doing a better job of packaging the benefits to not just developers, but also operators and data scientists and the broader roles in the cloud ecosystem from the new features that are being launched. And I think, different than the in-person events where there's 10, 20,000, 40,000 people in the audience paying attention, I think they have to work double-hard to capture attention and get engineers to tune in to what's being launched.But if you squint and look close, there are some, I think, very interesting trends that sit in the back of some of the very first launches in what I think are going to be whole veins of launches from Google over the course of the next several years that we are working really hard to track along with and make sure we're extracting maximum value from for our customers.Corey: So, what was it that they announced that is worth paying attention to? Now, through the cacophony of noise, one announcement that [I want to note 00:04:49] was tied to Next was the announcement that GME group, I believe, is going to be putting their futures exchange core trading systems on Google Cloud. At which point that to me—and I know people are going to yell at me, and I don't even slightly care—that is the last nail in the coffin of the idea that well, Google is going to turn this off in a couple years. Sorry, no. That is not a thing that's going to happen. Worst case, they might just stop investing it as aggressively as they are now, but even that would be just a clown-shoes move that I have a hard time envisioning.Miles: Yeah, you're talking now over a dozen, over ten year, over a billion-dollar commitments. So, you've got to just really, really hate your stock price if you're going to decide to vaporize that much shareholder value, right? I mean, we think that, in Google, stock price is a material fraction of the recognition of the growth trajectory for cloud, which is now basically just third place behind YouTube. And I think you can do the curve math, it's not like it's going to take long.Corey: Right. That requires effectively ejecting Thomas Kurian as the head of Google Cloud and replacing him with the former SVP of Bad Decisions at Yahoo.Miles: [laugh]. Sure. Google has no shyness about continuing to rotate leadership. I was there through three heads of Google Cloud, so I don't expect that Thomas will be the last although I think he may well go down in history as having been the best. The level of rotation to the focuses that I think are most critical, getting enterprise customers happy, successful, committed, building macroscale systems, in systems that are critical to the core of the business on GCP has grown at an incredible rate under his stewardship. So, I think he's doing a great job.Corey: He gets a lot of criticism—often from Googlers—when I wind up getting the real talk from them, which is, “Can you tell me what you really think?” Their answer is, “No,” I'm like, “Okay, next question. Can I go out and buy you eight beers and then”— and it's like, “Yeah.” And the answer that I get pretty commonly is that he's brought too much Oracle into Google. And okay, that sounds like a bad thing because, you know, Oracle, but let's be clear here, but what are you talking about specifically? And what they say distills down to engineers are no longer the end-all be-all of everything that Google Cloud. Engineers don't get to make sales decisions, or marketing decisions, or in some cases, product decisions. And that is not how Google has historically been run, and they don't like the change. I get it, but engineering is not the only hard thing in the world and it's not the only business area that builds value, let's be clear on this. So, I think that the things that they don't like are in fact, what Google absolutely needs.Miles: I think, one, the man is exceptionally intimidating and intentionally just hyper, hyper attentive to his business. So, one of my best employees, Brad [Svee 00:07:44], he worked together with me to lay out what was the book of our whole department, my team of 86 people there. What are we about? What do we do? And like I wanted this as like a memoriam to teach new hires as got brought in. So, this is, like, 38 pages of detail about our process, our hiring method, our promotional approach, all of it. I showed that to my new boss who had come in at the time, and he thought some of the pictures looked good. When we showed it to TK, he read every paragraph. I watched him highlight the paragraphs as he went through, and he read it twice as fast as I can read the thing. I think he does that to everybody's documents, everywhere. So, there's a level of just manual rigor that he's brought to the practice that was certainly not there before that. So, that alone, it can be intimidating for folks, but I think people that are high performance find that very attractive.Corey: Well, from my perspective, he is clearly head and shoulders above Adam Selipsky, and Scott Guthrie—the respective heads of AWS and Azure—for one key reason: He is the only one of those three people who follows me on Twitter. And—Miles: [laugh].Corey: —honestly, that is how I evaluate vendors.Miles: That's the thing. That's the only measure, yep. I've worked on for a long time with Selipsky, and I think that it will be interesting to see whether Adam's approach to capital allocation—where he really, I think, thinks of himself as the manager of thousands of startups, as opposed to a manager of a global business—whether that's a more efficient process for creating value for customers, then, where I think TK is absolutely trying to build a much more unified, much more singular platform. And a bunch of the launches really speak to that, right? So, one of the product announcements that I think is critical is this idea of the global distributed cloud, Google Distributed Cloud.We started with Kubernetes. And then you layer on to that, okay, we'll take care of Kubernetes for you; we call that Anthos. We'll build a bunch of structural controls and features into Anthos to make it so that you can really deal with stuff in a global way. Okay, what does that look like further? How do we get out into edge environments? Out into diverse hardware? How do we partner up with everybody to make sure that, kind of like comparing Apple's approach to Google's approach, you have an Android ecosystem of Kubernetes providers instead of just one place you can buy an outpost. That's generally the idea of GDC. I think that's a spot where you're going to watch Google actually leverage the muscle that it already built in understanding open-source dynamics and understanding collaboration between companies as opposed to feeling like it's got to be built here. We've got to sell it here. It's got to have our brand on it.Corey: I think that there's a stupendous and extreme story that is still unfolding over at Google Cloud. Now, re:Invent this year, they wound up talking all about how what they were rolling out was a focus on improving primitives. And they're right. I love their managed database service that they launched because it didn't exist.Miles: Yeah Werner's slide, “It's primitives, not frameworks.” I was like, I think customers want solutions, not frameworks or primitives. [laugh]. What's your plan?Corey: Yeah. However, I take a different perspective on all of this, which is that is a terrific spin on the big headline launches all missed the re:Invent timeline, and… oops, so now we're just going to talk about these other things instead. And that's great, but then they start talking about industrial IOT, and mainframe migrations, and the idea of private 5G, and running fleets of robots. And it's—Miles: Yeah, that's a cool product.Corey: Which one? I'm sorry, they're all very different things.Miles: Private 5G.Corey: Yeah, if someone someday will explain to me how it differs from Wavelength, but that's neither here nor there. You're right, they're all interesting, but none of them are actually doing the thing that I do, which is build websites, [unintelligible 00:11:31] looking for web services, it kind of says it in the name. And it feels like it's very much broadening into everything, and it's very difficult for me to identify—and if I have trouble that I guarantee you customers do—of, which services are for me and which are very much not? In some cases, the only answer to that is to check the pricing. I thought Kendra, their corporate information search thing was for me, then it's 7500 bucks a month to get started with that thing, and that is, “I can hire an internal corporate librarian to just go and hunt through our Google Drive.” Great.Miles: Yeah.Corey: So, there are—or our Dropbox, or our Slack. We have, like, five different information repositories, and this is how corporate nonsense starts, let me assure you.Miles: Yes. We call that luxury SaaS, you must enjoy your dozens of overlapping bills for, you know, what Workspace gives you as a single flat rate.Corey: Well, we have [unintelligible 00:12:22] a lot of this stuff, too. Google Drive is great, but we use Dropbox for holding anything that touches our customer's billing information, just because I—to be clear, I do not distrust Google, but it also seems a little weird to put the confidential billing information for one of their competitors on there to thing if a customer were to ask about it. So, it's the, like, I don't believe anyone's doing anything nefarious, but let's go ahead and just make sure, in this case.Miles: Go further man. Vimeo runs on GCP. You think YouTube doesn't want to look at Vimeo stats? Like they run everything on GCP, so they have to have arrived at a position of trust somehow. Oh, I know how it's called encryption. You've heard of encryption before? It's the best.Corey: Oh, yes. I love these rumors that crop up every now and again that Amazon is going to start scanning all of its customer content, somehow. It's first, do you have any idea how many compute resources that would take and to if they can actually do that and access something you're storing in there, against their attestations to the contrary, then that's your story because one of them just makes them look bad, the other one utterly destroys their entire business.Miles: Yeah.Corey: I think that that's the one that gets the better clicks. So no, they're not doing that.Miles: No, they're not doing that. Another product launch that I thought was super interesting that describes, let's call it second place—the third place will be the one where we get off into the technical deep end—but there's a whole set of coordinated work they're calling Cortex. So, let's imagine you go to a customer, they say, “I want to understand what's happening with my business.” You go, “Great.” So, you use SAP, right? So, you're a big corporate shop, and that's your infrastructure of choice. There are a bunch of different options at that layer.When you set up SAP, one of the advantages that something like that has is they have, kind of, pre-built configurations for roughly your business, but whatever behaviors SAP doesn't do, right, say, data warehousing, advanced analytics, regression and projection and stuff like that, maybe that's somewhat outside of the core wheelhouse for SAP, you would expect like, oh okay, I'll bolt on BigQuery. I'll build that stuff over there. We'll stream the data between the two. Yeah, I'm off to the races, but the BigQuery side of the house doesn't have this like bitching menu that says, “You're a retailer, and so you probably want to see these 75 KPIs, and you probably want to chew up your SKUs in exactly this way. And here's some presets that make it so that this is operable out of the box.”So, they are doing the three way combination: Consultancies plus ISVs plus Google products, and doing all the pre-work configuration to go out to a customer and go I know what you probably just want. Why don't I just give you the whole thing so that it does the stuff that you want? That I think—if that's the very first one, this little triangle between SAP, and Big Query, and a bunch of consultancies like mine, you have to imagine they go a lot further with that a lot faster, right? I mean, what does that look like when they do it with Epic, when they go do it with Go just generally, when they go do it with Apache? I've heard of that software, right? Like, there's no reason not to bundle up what the obvious choices are for a bunch of these combinations.Corey: The idea of moving up the stack and offering full on solutions, that's what customers actually want. “Well, here's a bunch of things you can do to wind up wiring together to build a solution,” is, “Cool. Then I'm going to go hire a company who's already done that is going to sell it to me at a significant markup because I just don't care.” I pay way more to WP Engine than I would to just run WordPress myself on top of AWS or Google Cloud. In fact, it is on Google Cloud, but okay.Miles: You and me both, man. WP Engine is the best. I—Corey: It's great because—Miles: You're welcome. I designed a bunch of the hosting on the back of that.Corey: Oh, yeah. But it's also the—I—well, it costs a little bit more that way. Yeah, but guess what's not—guess what's more expensive than that bill, is my time spent doing the care and feeding of this stuff. I like giving money to experts and making it their problem.Miles: Yeah. I heard it said best, Lego is an incredible business. I love their product, and you can build almost any toy with it. And they have not displaced all other plastic toy makers.Corey: Right.Miles: Some kids just want to buy a little car. [laugh].Corey: Oh, yeah, you can build anything you want out of Lego bricks, which are great, which absolutely explains why they are a reference AWS customer.Miles: Yeah, they're great. But they didn't beat all other toy companies worldwide, and eliminate the rest of that market because they had the better primitive, right? These other solutions are just as valuable, just as interesting, tend to have much bigger markets. Lego is not the largest toy manufacturer in the world. They are not in the top five of toy manufacturers in the world, right?Like, so chasing that thread, and getting all the way down into the spots where I think many of the cloud providers on their own, internally, had been very uncomfortable. Like, you got to go all the way to building this stuff that they need for that division, inside of that company, in that geo, in that industry? That's maybe, like, a little too far afield. I think Google has a natural advantage in its more partner-oriented approach to create these combinations that lower the cost to them and to customers to getting out of that solution quick.Corey: So, getting into the weeds of Google Next, I suppose, rather than a whole bunch of things that don't seem to apply to anyone except the four or five companies that really could use it, what things did Google release that make the lives of people building, you know, web apps better?Miles: This is the one. So, I'm at Amazon, hanging out as a part of the team that built up the infrastructure for the Obama campaign in 2012, and there are a bunch of Googlers there, and we are fighting with databases. We are fighting so hard, in fact, with RDS that I think we are the only ones that [Raju 00:17:51] has ever allowed to SSH into our RDS instances to screw with them.Corey: Until now, with the advent of RDS Custom, meaning that you can actually get in as root; where that hell that lands between RDS and EC2 is ridiculous. I just know that RDS can now run containers.Miles: Yeah. I know how many things we did in there that were good for us, and how many things we did in there that were bad for us. And I have to imagine, this is not a feature that they really ought to let everybody have, myself included. But I will say that what all of the Googlers that I talk to, you know, at the first blush, were I'm the evil Amazon guy in to, sort of, distract them and make them build a system that, you know, was very reliable and ended up winning an election was that they had a better database, and they had Spanner, and they didn't understand why this whole thing wasn't sitting on Spanner. So, we looked, and I read the white paper, and then I got all drooly, and I was like, yes, that is a much better database than everybody else's database, and I don't understand why everybody else isn't on it. Oh, there's that one reason, but you've heard of it: No other software works with it, anywhere in the world, right? It's utterly proprietary to Google. Yes, they were kind—Corey: Oh, you want to migrate it off somewhere else, or a fraction of it? Great. Step one, redo your data architecture.Miles: Yeah, take all of my software everywhere, rewrite every bit of it. And, oh all those commercial applications? Yeah, forget all those, you got, too. Right? It was very much where Google was eight years ago. So, for me, it was immensely meaningful to see the launch at Next where they described what they are building—and have now built; we have alpha access to it—a Postgres layer for Spanner.Corey: Is that effectively you have to treat it as Postgres at all times, or is it multimodal access?Miles: You can get in and tickle it like Spanner, if you want to tickle it like Spanner. And in reality, Spanner is ANSI SQL compliant; you're still writing SQL, you just don't have to talk to it like a REST endpoint, or a GRPC endpoint, or something; you can, you know, have like a—Corey: So, similar to Azure's Cosmos DB, on some level, except for the part where you can apparently look at other customers' data in that thing?Miles: [laugh]. Exactly. Yeah, you will not have a sweeping discovery of incredible security violations in the structure Spanner, in that it is the control system that Google uses to place every ad, and so it does not suck. You can't put a trillion-dollar business on top of a database and not have it be safe. That's kind of a thing.Corey: The thing that I find is the most interesting area of tech right now is there's been this rise of distributed databases. Yugabyte—or You-ji-byte—Pla-netScale—or PlanetScale, depending on how you pronounce these things.Miles: [laugh]. Yeah, why, why is G such an adversarial consonant? I don't understand why we've all gotten to this place.Corey: Oh, yeah. But at the same time, it's—so you take a look at all these—and they all are speaking Postgres; it is pretty clear that ‘Postgres-squeal' is the thing that is taking over the world as far as databases go. If I were building something from scratch that used—Miles: For folks in the back, that's PostgreSQL, for the rest of us, it's okay, it's going to be, all right.Corey: Same difference. But yeah, it's the thing that is eating the world. Although recently, I've got to say, MongoDB is absolutely stepping up in a bunch of really interesting ways.Miles: I mean, I think the 4.0 release, I'm the guy who wrote the MongoDB on AWS Best Practices white paper, and I would grab a lot of customer's and—Corey: They have to change it since then of, step one: Do not use DocumentDB; if you want to use Mongo, use Mongo.Miles: Yeah, that's right. No, there were a lot of customers I was on the phone with where Mongo had summarily vaporized their data, and I think they have made huge strides in structural reliability over the course of—you know, especially this 4.0 launch, but the last couple of years, for sure.Corey: And with all the people they've been hiring from AWS, it's one of those, “Well, we'll look at this now who's losing important things from production?”Miles: [laugh]. Right? So, maybe there's only actually five humans who know how to do operations, and we just sort of keep moving around these different companies.Corey: That's sort of my assumption on these things. But Postgres, for those who are not looking to depart from the relational model, is eating the world. And—Miles: There's this, like, basic emotional thing. My buddy Martin, who set up MySQL, and took it public, and then promptly got it gobbled up by the Oracle people, like, there was a bet there that said, hey, there's going to be a real open database, and then squish, like, the man came and got it. And so like, if you're going to be an independent, open-source software developer, I think you're probably not pushing your pull requests to our friends at Oracle, that seems weird. So instead, I think Postgres has gobbled up the best minds on that stuff.And it works. It's reliable, it's consistent, and it's functional in all these different, sort of, reapplications and subdivisions, right? I mean, you have to sort of squint real hard, but down there in the guts of Redshift, that's Postgres, right? Like, there's Postgres behind all sorts of stuff. So, as an interface layer, I'm not as interested about how it manages to be successful at bossing around hardware and getting people the zeros and ones that they ask for back in a timely manner.I'm interested in it as a compatibility standard, right? If I have software that says, “I need to have Postgres under here and then it all will work,” that creates this layer of interop that a bunch of other products can use. So, folks like PlanetScale, and Yugabyte can say, “No, no, no, it's cool. We talk Postgres; that'll make it so your application works right. You can bring a SQL alchemy and plug it into this, or whatever your interface layer looks like.”That's the spot where, if I can trade what is a fairly limited global distribution, global transactional management on literally ridiculously unlimited scalability and zero operations, I can handle the hard parts of running a database over to somebody else, but I get my layer, and my software talks to it, I think that's a huge step.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by my friends at Cloud Academy. Something special just for you folks. If you missed their offer on Black Friday or Cyber Monday or whatever day of the week doing sales it is—good news! They've opened up their Black Friday promotion for a very limited time. Same deal, $100 off a yearly plan, $249 a year for the highest quality cloud and tech skills content. Nobody else can get this because they have a assured me this not going to last for much longer. Go to CloudAcademy.com, hit the "start free trial" button on the homepage, and use the Promo code cloud at checkout. That's c-l-o-u-d, like loud, what I am, with a “C” in front of it. It's a free trial, so you'll get 7 days to try it out to make sure it's really a good fit for you, nothing to lose except your ignorance about cloud. My thanks again for sponsoring my ridiculous nonsense.Corey: I think that there's a strong movement toward building out on something like this. If it works, just because—well, I'm not multiregion today, but I can easily see a world in which I'd want to be. So, great. How do you approach the decision between—once this comes out of alpha; let's be clear. Let's turn this into something that actually ships, and no, Google that does not mean slapping a beta label on it for five years is the answer here; you actually have to stand behind this thing—but once it goes GA—Miles: GA is a good thing.Corey: Yeah. How do you decide between using that, or PlanetScale? Or Yugabyte?Miles: Or Cockroach or or SingleStore, right? I mean, there's a zillion of them that sit in this market. I think the core of the decision making for me is in every team you're looking at what skills do you bring to bear and what problem that you're off to go solve for customers? Do the nuances of these products make it easier to solve? So, I think there are some products that the nature of what you're building isn't all that dependent on one part of the application talking to another one, or an event happening someplace else mattering to an event over here. But some applications, that's, like, utterly critical, like, totally, totally necessary.So, we worked with a bunch of like Forex exchange trading desks that literally turn off 12 hours out of the day because they can only keep it consistent in one geographical location right near the main exchanges in New York. So, that's a place where I go, “Would you like to trade all day?” And they go, “Yes, but I can't because databases.” So, “Awesome. Let's call the folks on the Spanner side. They can solve that problem.”I go, “Would you like to trade all day and rewrite all your software?” And they go, “No.” And I go, “Oh, okay. What about trade all day, but not rewrite all your software?” There we go. Now, we've got a solution to that kind of problem.So like, we built this crazy game, like, totally other end of the ecosystem with the Dragon Ball Z people, hysterical; your like—you literally play like Rock, Paper, Scissors with your phone, and if you get a rock, I throw a fireball, and you get a paper, then I throw a punch, and we figure out who wins. But they can play these games like Europe versus Japan, thousands of people on each side, real-time, and it works.Corey: So, let's be clear, I have lobbied a consistent criticism at Google for a while now, which is the Google Cloud global control plane. So, you wind up with things like global service outages from time to time, you wind up with this thing is now broken for everyone everywhere. And that, for a lot of these use cases, is a problem. And I said that AWS's approach to regional isolation is the right way to do it. And I do stand by that assessment, except for the part where it turns out there's a lot of control plane stuff that winds up single tracking through us-east-1, as we learned in the great us-east-1 outage of 2021.Miles: Yeah, when I see customers move from data center to AWS, what they expect is a higher count of outages that lasts less time. That's the trade off, right? There's going to be more weird spurious stuff, and maybe—maybe—if they're lucky, that outage will be over there at some other region they're not using. I see almost exactly the same promise happening to folks that come from AWS—and in particular from Azure—over onto GCP, which is, there will be probably a higher frequency of outages at a per product level, right? So, like sometimes, like, some weird product takes a screw sideways, where there is structural interdependence between quite a few products—we actually published a whole internal structural map of like, you know, it turns out that Cloud SQL runs on top of GCE not on GKE, so you can expect if GKE goes sideways, Cloud SQL is probably not going to go sideways; the two aren't dependent on each other.Corey: You take the status page and Amazon FreeRTOS in a region is having an outage today or something like that. You're like, “Oh, no. That's terrible. First, let me go look up what the hell that is.” And I'm not using it? Absolutely not. Great. As hyperscalers, well, hyperscale, they're always things that are broken in different ways, in different locations, and if you had a truly accurate status page, it would all be red all the time, or varying shades of red, which is not helpful. So, I understand the challenge there, but very often, it's a partition that is you are not exposed to, or the way that you've architected things, ideally, means it doesn't really matter. And that is a good thing. So, raw outage counts don't solve that. I also maintain that if I were to run in a single region of AWS or even a single AZ, in all likelihood, I will have a significantly better uptime across the board than I would if I ran it myself. Because—Miles: Oh, for sure.Corey: —it is—Miles: For sure they're way better at ops than you are. Me, right?Corey: Of course.Miles: Right? Like, ridiculous.Corey: And they got that way, by learning. Like, I think in 2022, it is unlikely that there's going to be an outage in an AWS availability zone by someone tripping over a power cable, whereas I have actually done that. So, there's a—to be clear in a data center, not an AWS facility; that would not have flown. So, there is the better idea of of going in that direction. But the things like Route 53 is control plane single-tracking through the us-east-1, if you can't make DNS changes in an outage scenario, you may as well not have a DR plan, for most use cases.Miles: To be really clear, it was a part of the internal documentation on the AWS side that we would share with customers to be absolutely explicit with them. It's not just that there are mistakes and accidents which we try to limit to AZs, but no, go further, that we may intentionally cause outages to AZs if that's what allows us to keep broader service health higher, right? They are not just a blast radius because you, oops, pulled the pin on the grenade; they can actually intentionally step on the off button. And that's different than the way Google operates. They think of each of the AZs, and each of the regions, and the global system as an always-on, all the time environment, and they do not have systems where one gets, sort of, sacrificed for the benefit of the rest, right, or they will intentionally plan to take a system offline.There is no planned downtime in the SLA, where the SLAs from my friends at Amazon and Azure are explicit to, if they choose to, they decide to take it offline, they can. Now, that's—I don't know, I kind of want the contract that has the other thing where you don't get that.Corey: I don't know what the right answer is for a lot of these things. I think multi-cloud is dumb. I think that the idea of having this workload that you're going to seamlessly deploy to two providers in case of an outage, well guess what? The orchestration between those two providers is going to cause you more outages than you would take just sticking on one. And in most cases, unless you are able to have complete duplication of not just functionality but capacity between those two, congratulations, you've now just doubled your number of single points of failure, you made the problem actively worse and more expensive. Good job.Miles: I wrote an article about this, and I think it's important to differentiate between dumb and terrifyingly shockingly expensive, right? So, I have a bunch of customers who I would characterize as rich, as like, shockingly rich, as producing businesses that have 80-plus percent gross margins. And for them, the costs associated with this stuff are utterly rational, and they take on that work, and they are seeing benefits, or they wouldn't be doing it.Corey: Of course.Miles: So, I think their trajectory in technology—you know, this is a quote from a Google engineer—it's just like, “Oh, you want to see what the future looks like? Hang out with rich people.” I went into houses when I was a little kid that had whole-home automation. I couldn't afford them; my mom was cleaning house there, but now my house, I can use my phone to turn on the lights. Like—Corey: You know, unless us-east-1 is having a problem.Miles: Hey, and then no Roomba for you, right? Like utterly offline. So—Corey: Roomba has now failed to room.Miles: Conveniently, my lights are Philips Hue, and that's on Google, so that baby works. But it is definitely a spot where the barrier of entry and the level of complexity required is going down over time. And it is definitely a horrible choice for 99% of the companies that are out there right now. But next year, it'll be 98. And the year after that, it'll probably be 97. [laugh].And if I go inside of Amazon's data centers, there's not one manufacturer of hard drives, there's a bunch. So, that got so easy that now, of course you use more than one; you got to do—that's just like, sort of, a natural thing, right? These technologies, it'll move over time. We just aren't there yet for the vast, vast majority of workloads.Corey: I hope that in the future, this stuff becomes easier, but data transfer fees are going to continue to be a concern—Miles: Just—[makes explosion noise]—Corey: Oh, man—Miles: —like, right in the face.Corey: —especially with the Cambrian explosion of data because the data science folks have successfully convinced the entire industry that there's value in those mode balancer logs in 2012. Okay, great. We're never deleting anything again, but now you've got to replicate all of that stuff because no one has a decent handle on lifecycle management and won't for the foreseeable future. Great, to multiple providers so that you can work on these things? Like, that is incredibly expensive.Miles: Yeah. Cool tech, from this announcement at Next that I think is very applicable, and recognized the level of like, utter technical mastery—and security mastery to our earlier conversation—that something like this requires, the product is called BigQuery Omni, what Omni allows you to do is go into the Google Cloud Console, go to BigQuery, say I want to do analysis on this data that's in S3, or in Azure Blob Storage, Google will spin up an account on your behalf on Amazon and Azure, and run the compute there for you, bring the result back. So, just transfer the answers, not the raw data that you just scanned, and no work on your part, no management, no crapola. So, there's like—that's multi-cloud. If I've got—I can do a join between a bunch of rows that are in real BigQuery over on GCP side and rows that are over there in S3. The cross-eyedness of getting something like that to work is mind blowing.Corey: To give this a little more context, just because it gets difficult to reason about these things, I can either have data that is in a private subnet in AWS that traverses their horribly priced Managed NAT Gateways, and then goes out to the internet and sent there once, for the same cost as I could take that same data and store it in S3 in their standard tier for just shy of six full months. That's a little imbalanced, if we're being direct here. And then when you add in things like intelligent tiering and archive access classes, that becomes something that… there's no contest there. It's, if we're talking about things that are now approaching exabyte scale, that's one of those, “Yeah, do you want us to pay by a credit card?”—get serious. You can't at that scale anyway—“Invoice billing, or do we just, like, drive a dump truck full of gold bricks and drop them off in Seattle?”Miles: Sure. Same trajectory, on the multi-cloud thing. So, like a partner of ours, PacketFabric, you know, if you're a big, big company, you go out and you call Amazon and you buy 100 gigabit interconnect on—I think they call theirs Direct Connect, and then you hook that up to the Google one that's called Dedicated Interconnect. And voila, the price goes from twelve cents a gig down to two cents a gig; everybody's much happier. But Jesus, you pay the upfront for that, you got to set the thing up, it takes days to get deployed, and now you're culpable for the whole pipe if you don't use it up. Like, there are charges that are static over the course of the month.So, PacketFabric just buys one of those and lets you rent a slice of it you need. And I think they've got an incredible product. We're working with them on a whole bunch of different projects. But I also expect—like, there's no reason the cloud providers shouldn't be working hard to vend that kind of solution over time. If a hundred gigabit is where it is now, what does it look like when I get to ten gigabit? When I get to one gigabit? When I get to half gigabit? You know, utility price that for us so that we get to rational pricing.I think there's a bunch of baked-in business and cost logic that is a part of the pricing system, where egress is the source of all of the funding at Amazon for internal networking, right? I don't pay anything for the switches that connect to this machine to that machine, in region. It's not like those things are cheap or free; they have to be there. But the funding for that comes from egress. So, I think you're going to end up seeing a different model where you'll maybe have different approaches to egress pricing, but you'll be paying like an in-system networking fee.And I think folks will be surprised at how big that fee likely is because of the cost of the level of networking infrastructure that the providers deploy, right? I mean, like, I don't know, if you've gone and tried to buy a 40 port, 40 gig switch anytime recently. It's not like they're those little, you know, blue Netgear ones for 90 bucks.Corey: Exactly. It becomes this, [sigh] I don't know, I keep thinking that's not the right answer, but part of it also is like, well, you know, for things that I really need local and don't want to worry about if the internet's melting today, I kind of just want to get, like, some kind of Raspberry Pi shoved under my desk for some reason.Miles: Yeah. I think there is a lot where as more and more businesses bet bigger and bigger slices of the farm on this kind of thing, I think it's Jassy's line that you're, you know, the fat in the margin in your business is my opportunity. Like, there's a whole ecosystem of partners and competitors that are hunting all of those opportunities. I think that pressure can only be good for customers.Corey: Miles, thank you for taking the time to speak with me. If people want to learn more about you, what you're up to, your bad opinions, your ridiculous company, et cetera—Miles: [laugh].Corey: —where can they find you?Miles: Well, it's really easy to spell: SADA.com, S-A-D-A dot com. I'm Miles Ward, it's @milesward on Twitter; you don't have to do too hard of a math. It's miles@sada.com, if you want to send me an email. It's real straightforward. So, eager to reach out, happy to help. We've got a bunch of engineers that like helping people move from Amazon to GCP. So, let us know.Corey: Excellent. And we will, of course, put links to this in the [show notes 00:37:17] because that's how we roll.Miles: Yay.Corey: Thanks so much for being so generous with your time, and I look forward to seeing what comes out next year from these various cloud companies.Miles: Oh, I know some of them already, and they're good. Oh, they're super good.Corey: This is why I don't do predictions because like, the stuff that I know about, like, for example, I was I was aware of the Graviton 3 was coming—Miles: Sure.Corey: —and it turns out that if your—guess what's going to come up and you don't name Graviton 3, it's like, “Are you simple? Did you not see that one coming?” It's like—or if I don't know it's coming and I make that guess—which is not the hardest thing in the world—someone would think I knew and leaked. There's no benefit to doing predictions.Miles: No. It's very tough, very happy to do predictions in private, for customers. [laugh].Corey: Absolutely. Thanks again for your time. I appreciate it.Miles: Cheers.Corey: Myles Ward, CTO at SADA. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn, and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, whereas if you've hated this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice and be very angry in your opinion when you write that obnoxious comment, but then it's going to get lost because it's using MySQL instead of Postgres.Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

Leading Saints Podcast
Finding the Why of Ward Tradition | An Interview with Nick Greer

Leading Saints Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 8, 2022 60:52


Nick Greer has been interested in all kinds of business and helping others his entire life. After serving a mission in Romania, Nick finished a degree in Finance at Brigham Young University and later shared his business-building passion as an adjunct professor. He has started multiple businesses, including Skipio–a customer-messaging platform—and Built Bar—low-calorie, high-protein bars that taste like candy. Nick and his wife, Deborah, also created the Five12 Foundation that provides a weekend meal backpack that feeds thousands of children in his community every week. Over 50,000 bags of food will be provided to kids this school year. Nick and Deborah have seven children, who Nick loves to travel and spend time with. He is currently serving as a bishop. Highlights Coming soon Links Built.com Skipio.com TRANSCRIPT coming soon

Weird AF News
Floridaman dances on police car to ward off vampires. Woman has a van she gets students high in.

Weird AF News

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 7, 2022 25:09


FLORIDA FRIDAY - Floridaman puts flyers on New Yorker cars saying, "Get out of Florida if you're woke!". Florida middle school employee meets a 14 year old at 1am to get him high in her van. Floridaman dances on police car to ward off vampires. Masshole defecates in Florida school property. // Weird AF News is the only daily weird news podcast hosted by a comedian because I believe your daily dose of weird af stories deserves a comedic spin. Show your SUPPORT by joining the Weird AF News Patreon where you'll get bonus episodes and other weird af news stuff http://patreon.com/weirdafnews  - WATCH Weird AF News on Youtube - https://www.youtube.com/weirdafnews - check out the official website https://WeirdAFnews.com and FOLLOW host Jonesy at http://instagram.com/funnyjones or http://twitter.com/funnyjones or http://facebook.com/comedianjonesy or http://Jonesy.com --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

Pocatello Business Podcast
#179 Spencer Ward - Dealing with Staff Drama

Pocatello Business Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2022 12:16


Don't you want to tell your staff at times…Save the Drama for your mama? I've been there! Tune in for some tips to deal with staff drama.

Veterinary Viewfinder Podcast
Are Veterinary Professional Certifications Worth It In 2022?

Veterinary Viewfinder Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 28:18


There's been a surge in the number of veterinary professional certifications over the past few years. But are those extra initials behind your degree worth it in 2022? Hosts Dr. Ernie Ward and Beckie Mossor, RVT start the new year off with a conversation about the what's, when's, why's, and (probably most important to employers) worth of professional certifications. It gets complicated. Viewfinders, our hosts have a number of professional certifications to their credit, yet they encourage caution before adding one (or some) to your signature these days. Beckie asks whether or not imposter syndrome is behind the need to add professional clout and Dr. Ward ponders how much profit motive is at play. Both worry that certain organizations or companies may be taking advantage of some veterinary professionals by leveraging the "need to be seen" by colleagues as capable and competent by adding certifications. Did we mention it's complicated? Beckie argues that title protection should (once again) be our profession's top priority and that we need better clarification on the difference between "credentials" and "certifications." Both hosts agree that VTS and Board-certification are true "professional credentials" but are concerned that some groups may be promoting a "certification" as a "credential," leading to confusion by the pet-owning public and dilution of value by our colleagues. Told you it was complicated. Dr. Ward challenges the notion that every certification (or credential) must carry a profit motive or "return on investment" and encourages Viewfinders to better themselves through education, and, yes, certification when appropriate. Viewfinders, this is another wide-ranging conversation that tackles a tough topic we believe needs to be talked about more in the veterinary profession. Happy New Year and staff safe! And keep it simple! ;-)

Stereo Embers: The Podcast
Stereo Embers The Podcast: Christopher Turpin and Stephanie Jean (Ida Mae)

Stereo Embers: The Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 74:56


"Click Click Domino" Christopher Turpin and Stephanie Jean were in the Bath-based alternative rock band Kill It Kid who put out three fabulous albums. With a sonic attack that fell somewhere between Nirvana and The White Stripes, Kill It Kid were a ferocious live act that radiated intensity and heart. After the band called it a day Turpin and Jean formed the duo Ida Mae. Influenced by Delta Blues, JJ Cale, John Martyn and obscure British Folk, the band hit the ground running with their 2019 debut Chasing Lights. Having left their native England for the rich musical soil of Nashville, the band dug in and got to work, playing shows all over the world, including the Newport Folk Festival and opening slots for Willie Nelson, Greta Van Fleet and Blackberry Smoke. They've recored with M. Ward and T Bone Burnett, been hailed by everyone from American Songwriter to Rolling Stone and the release of their sophomore album Click Click Domino has cemented them as one of the most exciting bands around. A wicked blend of bluesy howl, folky finesse and affecting harmonies, the husband and wife team of Ida Mae bring to mind everyone from Fleetwood Mac to The Record Company. In this intimate chat, the two talk to Alex about their record collections, family support and how to do a Meet and Greet in a COVID world…. www.idamaemusic.com www.bombshellradio.com www.alexgreenonline.com Stereo Embers The Podcast Twitter: @emberseditor Instagram: @emberspodcast Email: editor@stereoembersmagazine.com

Locked On Vols
Ward Wednesday: A look back at Hendon Hooker and the Tennessee Vols quarterbacks

Locked On Vols

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 36:45


The Locked On Vols podcast is your daily show covering Tennessee Volunteers football and basketball with Eric Cain. It's Ward Wednesday time on Locked on Vols when Josh Ward of Sports180 joins the show. Plus, we begin our Vols in Review end of-the-year series as we take a look at the QBs today. All that and we conclude with getting you set for Vol Hoops against Ole Miss tonight. All that and more on a Wednesday show! Be sure to participate in #TwitterTuesday by tweeting @LockedonVols or @_Cainer all your questions. Tuesday's show will answer them! DMs are open. Follow the show on those Twitter accounts and also on host Eric Cain's Facebook page: CainerOnAir. And every Friday is 5 Star Friday here on Locked on Vols! Head over to Apple Podcasts and leave a positive review + a 5 star rating and we'll shout you out each and every Friday! Support Us By Supporting Our Sponsors! SweatBlock Get it today for 20% off at SweatBlock.com with promo code LockedOn, or at Amazon and CVS. Built Bar Built Bar is a protein bar that tastes like a candy bar. Go to builtbar.com and use promo code “LOCKED15,” and you'll get 15% off your next order. BetOnline AG There is only 1 place that has you covered and 1 place we trust. Betonline.ag! Sign up today for a free account at betonline.ag and use that promocode: LOCKEDON for your 50% welcome bonus. Rock Auto Amazing selection. Reliably low prices. All the parts your car will ever need. Visit RockAuto.com and tell them Locked On sent you. ___________________________________________________________________________________________________ A special shoutout to James Manning (@GooseManning5) for his assistance in graphic design. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Black Compass Media
Eazy Talks Kshine | Coty & Geechi Gotti | Goes crazy on A.Ward

Black Compass Media

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 60:02


SUBSCRIBE TO THE CHANNEL!! #BattleRap2021 #BlackCompassMedia #HipHop Follow Black Compass Radio @DaBlackCompass OIN BLACK COMPASS DISCORD - https://discord.gg/RX9YMfR - ALL ARE WELCOMED!!! https://www.patreon.com/THEREALBLACKCOMPASS - FOR OT AND EARLY/EXTENDED CLIPS!!! CONTACT US VIA EMAIL: blackcompasssociety@gmail.com

Pocatello Business Podcast
#178 Spencer Ward - Supercharge your Sales

Pocatello Business Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 27:05


Welcome to 2022! It's the time to dial in your numbers and supercharge your sales! Tune in to listen to some proven advice that will guarantee you more sales in 2022!

Dog Edition
Dogs as Healers | Dog Edition #46

Dog Edition

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 32:42


For centuries dogs have been regarded as (hu)man's best friend; but for many of us, sharing our lives with dogs is more than a preferred lifestyle. You may have felt it before– the sense that your dog has a massively positive impact on your overall well-being. Well, you're not alone! There is a reason why dogs are used professionally in a therapeutic setting. Dogs are natural-born healers, capable of providing the most primal form of comfort, and helping people process trauma. If you look closely, your dog may even present you with opportunities for self-reflection and personal growth. In this episode we hear from two very different people who have witnessed the incredible healing power of dogs, and discuss the ways in which dogs can have a profound positive impact on our mental health. About Karen Storey: Karen Storey grew up in Brighton, Michigan and has been a teacher in the Brighton Area School District for the last 17 years. Karen and her family are very much engrained in the local community; her husband Scott works for Brighton Area Schools as a Behavioral Management Specialist, and their four boys all attend Brighton schools. Karen's unique gift of looking outside the box to find solutions and support for students, staff and the community is what led her to found the nation's first school district-owned therapy dog program. Website: https://baspackofdogs.weebly.com/ About Ward Serrill: Ward's first feature-length film, The Heart of the Game, shot over seven years, debuted at the Toronto Film Festival in 2005 and was released nationally by Miramax Films in 2006. The film won high praise across the country from the likes of Jay Leno, Ebert and Roeper (“an Oscar level piece of work”), People Magazine, USA Today, O Magazine, Rolling Stone, and others. He has created more than 90 writings and short films including Building One House with Robert Redford, and Wild America with Sissy Spacek. Ward's new memoir, To Crack the World Open: Solitude, Alaska, and a Dog Named Woody depicts a heartfelt coming of age story about a dog as co-pilot into self-discovery. “From a remote cabin in the rugged rainforest of the Alaskan wilderness, where the untamed landscape tumbles into the ocean, a remarkable yellow Labrador retriever named Woody helped an exile from corporate America seek a fierce freedom.” Websites: https://wardserrill.com/ https://woodycreekpictures.com/

IMTalk
IMTalk Episode 804 – Triathlon Coach Loren Ward

IMTalk

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 60:52


This week I have an interview with www.passionfit.co.uk owner Loren Ward. She shares what they do to create a fitness community that brings the best out in people. Go to https://www.passionfit.co.uk to find out more about what they do there.

KGO 810 Podcast
January 3, 2022: John Rothmann - Is climate change a real threat to Stinson Beach? A warning from Carl Sagan from 1985

KGO 810 Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 38:48


Stinson Beach is part of the National Park Service's Golden Gate National Recreation Area, which manages the southern end of the beach, the most protected and broad section of sand, said Kristen Ward, an ecologist with the recreation area's division of natural resource management and science. The park service is collaborating with the county to find ways to protect the community. Ward said dunes are an ideal solution because of the potential ecological benefits. The park service began taking twice-yearly measurements of the beach several years ago to start tracking both seasonal changes and beach loss over time. It has not yet collected enough data to draw any conclusions, but similar measurements collected for decades at Ocean Beach shows how its southern shoreline is quickly eroding. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers embarked on a $7 million project completed last fall to develop a 3,000-foot-long, 30-foot-tall berm to fortify the beach. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The John Rothmann Show Podcast
January 3, 2022: John Rothmann - Is climate change a real threat to Stinson Beach? A warning from Carl Sagan from 1985

The John Rothmann Show Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 38:48


Stinson Beach is part of the National Park Service's Golden Gate National Recreation Area, which manages the southern end of the beach, the most protected and broad section of sand, said Kristen Ward, an ecologist with the recreation area's division of natural resource management and science. The park service is collaborating with the county to find ways to protect the community. Ward said dunes are an ideal solution because of the potential ecological benefits. The park service began taking twice-yearly measurements of the beach several years ago to start tracking both seasonal changes and beach loss over time. It has not yet collected enough data to draw any conclusions, but similar measurements collected for decades at Ocean Beach shows how its southern shoreline is quickly eroding. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers embarked on a $7 million project completed last fall to develop a 3,000-foot-long, 30-foot-tall berm to fortify the beach. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Holdin’ Court Podcast
MAC Formerly Of No Limit Records talks rap career, No Limit, Cash Money Records, Master P, C Murder, Depression, spending 20 years in prison, and freedom.

Holdin’ Court Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 109:29


MAC is a rapper and songwriter from New Orleans' 3rd Ward and was signed to Master P's No Limit Records and would grow to be one of the most critically acclaimed artists on the label, both as a solo rapper and as a member of the super group 504 Boyz. Mac released 2 solo albums and 1 album as part of the 504 Boyz on No Limit, including 1998's Shell Shocked, which peaked at #11 on the US Billboard 200. In 2001, Mac was convicted of manslaughter and sentenced to 30 years in prison and was recently released June 22nd 2021 after serving 20 years. Mac maintains his innocence and has campaigned to re-open the investigation into his case for many years. Mac sits down with Big Court for an exclusive and indepth interview about his life, career, and incarceration.

Ward Scott Files Podcast
January 3, 2022 - Climate Ambitions

Ward Scott Files Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 60:53


Today on The Ward Scott Files Podcast: We kick off the show with Coach Hog's Lockerroom, then Ward discusses local Alachua County news, Texas, the Conformity Crackup, and more!

SciDance
7: Biomechanics in dance shoes with Alycia Fong Yan

SciDance

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 57:00


Alycia Fong Yan discusses biomechanics in dance shoes, drawing on her experiences as a dancer, clinician, researcher and educator. We discuss the impact of different shoes on foot development, strength, and links to injury. Alycia also reflects on her personal drive to research in this area, including application and translation of research to dancers and teachers. We also look at the complication of aesthetics and tradition in applying and progressing this research in dance. Thank you to The Place London for sponsoring this episode. Located in the heart of London, The Place is a creative powerhouse for dance development that is leading the way in dance training, creation and performance. One of Europe's most exciting, innovative dance spaces, where artists from all over the world come to push creative boundaries, to experiment and to perform outstanding new work. Learn more here: https://www.theplace.org.uk Find Alycia here - Email: alycia.fongyan@sydney.edu.au Twitter: @AlyciaFongYan Resources - IADMS Dancer Wellness Book Hopper, L. and A. Fong Yan (2017). The dance environment. Dancer Wellness. M. V. Wilmerding and D. Krasnow. Champaign, IL, Human Kinetics: 3-12. Ward, R. E., A. Fong Yan, K. F. Orishimo, I. J. Kremenic, M. Hagins, M. Liederbach, C. E. Hiller and E. Pappas (2019). "Comparison of lower limb stiffness between male and female dancers and athletes during drop jump landings." Scandinavian Journal of Medicine & Science in Sports 29(1): 71-81. Fong Yan, A., R. M. Smith, C. E. Hiller and P. J. Sinclair (2017). "Impact attenuation properties of jazz shoes alter lower limb joint stiffness during jump landings." Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport 20(5): 464-468. Instagram: @scidancepodcast Contact: jasminefmcook@icloud.com Cover art by Jill North. Original image by Young Images Photography. Intro sound by William Cook.

Mike Ward Sous Écoute
#354 - Eve Côté et Mona De Grenoble

Mike Ward Sous Écoute

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 112:27


Cet épisode est une présentation de Nord VPN (www.nordvpn.com/mike73) et de La Boîte Végane (https://www.laboitevegane.ca/)Dans cet épisode de Sous Écoute Mike reçoit Eve Côté qui nous parle de son spectacle solo à venir et Mona De Grenoble qui nous raconte le chemin pris pour maintenant être en humour.--------Patreon - http://Patreon.com/sousecouteTwitter - http://twitter.com/sousecouteFacebook - https://www.facebook.com/sousecoute/instagram - https://www.instagram.com/sousecouteTwitch - https://www.twitch.tv/sousecouteDiscord - https://discord.gg/6yE63Uk

The Taylor & Jen Podcast
Too much joy in the cardiac ward: Our favorite moments of 2021

The Taylor & Jen Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 2, 2022 44:01


We had so much fun laughing with you this year. This is a collection of some of our absolute favorite moments we shared on Mornings with Taylor and Jen this year. Happy New Year!

Woman's Hour
Weekend Woman's Hour: Sarah Ransome, Sheila Watt-Cloutier, Donna Ward

Woman's Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 1, 2022 57:39


British woman Sarah Ransome says she wanted to be at Ghislaine Maxwell trial when it started: not to testify but to see justice take its course. Like the four women who gave evidence, she says she's also a victim of Epstein's and Maxwell's. She tells us more about her story and Harriet Wistrich, founder of Centre for Women's Justice discusses the wider impact this case could have. Sheila Watt-Cloutier, is a world renowned human rights and climate change activist, who has made it her life's work to protect her Inuit culture and the Arctic regions where Inuit live, in Greenland, Canada and Alaska. She was born in Arctic Canada and launched the first legal petition linking climate change to human rights. We discuss the word 'spinster' and what it really means with Australian author Donna Ward. Her new book She I Dare Not Name: A Spinster's Meditations on Life., explores the meaning and purpose she has fought to find in a life lived entirely accidentally without a partner or children. BBC History is launching a 100 objects collection to mark 100 years of the BBC in 2022. Head of History Robert Seatter gives us a sneak peak into a few objects which represent the history of women at the BBC including a 1930s job advert looking to recruit the first women TV announcers, a cookbook by Madhur Jaffrey and a 1920s scrapbook from Evelyn Dove, the first black female singer to perform on BBC. British women weren't allowed to visit the Antarctic until 1983 but now scores of women are making major contributions to polar science. Morgan Seag who has just submitted her PhD in gendered institutional change in 20th century Antarctic science to the University of Cambridge and Jo Johnson who has visited Antarctica seven times tell us more.

Million Dollar Mastermind with Larry Weidel
Episode 376: Paradox: To Get Big You Must Get Real Small with Million Dollar Earner Joe Ward

Million Dollar Mastermind with Larry Weidel

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2021 24:46


Business Leader, Joe Ward shares all the ways he learned to have great success. When you're running a business, your focus should be on the small people who are going to make the business big. Those who do small, often are trying to hardest to make it big. When you help them grow, you have to know when to let go of the reigns and allow them to spread their wings. • Find receptive people to spend your time with. • The energy exchange. • Restrain the tendency of being a control freak so you can get big. • Give people the framework and expectation TIME-STAMPED SHOW NOTES: [4:25] Have a focus to your quiet time. [10:19] Receptor people. [17:35] Make sure you're running a business that will run if you are not there.

Wet Fly Swing Fly Fishing Podcast
WFS 276 - A Guide to Classic Bamboo Fly Rods and Reels with Ward Tonsfeldt

Wet Fly Swing Fly Fishing Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2021 64:38


Show Notes: https://wetflyswing.com/276 Ward Tonsfeldt is here to share some tips on finding high-quality classic bamboo fly rods and reels - discover the difference between classic, vintage, and antique gear We find out what makes a classic rod classic - where to go to value your rod, and a classic rod and reel combo for less than $1000 Ward also explains why they don't have a shopping cart on their website but offer personal service for each client instead! Bamboo Fly Rods Show Notes with Ward Tonsfeldt 05:17 - What makes a fly fishing gear vintage, classic, or antique 05:51 - The Hardy Perfect Reel is one of the classic reels - first made in the 1890s and still being made to this day 08:57 - In the 1920s, steel fly rods were extremely fashionable 09:57 - Ward recently sold a 1950s Orvis Deluxe 12:16 - Bob Taylor rods are what Ward's clients usually look for 14:13 - One of the most successful Leonard rods is the model 50 16:13 - Ward's ideal rod setup 18:16 - The Wheatley Fly Boxes are classic 18:53 - The Creel and its history 22:33 - Why people go for the classic rods 29:17 - Join The Classic Fly Rod Forum to connect with people that talk about bamboo fly rods 30:22 - The Orvis 2 piece Battenkill 7 1/2 foot rod is a crowd-pleaser and can always be resold 33:34 - In the late 1950s, Hardy came up with the lightweight series 41:29 - Jim Adams is Ward's good friend 48:14 - There's a book about fiberglass rods by Vic Johnson 49:02 - Ferdinand Claudio is one of the early fiberglass rod makers 49:49 - Hardy has a series out called the Perfection Fiberglass Rods 50:42 - The Orvis Rivermaster fly rod was pretty popular back in the days 52:14 - The Thompson Reel 1:00:37 - Fin-Nor anti-reverse fly reel Bamboo Fly Rods Conclusion with Ward Tonsfeldt Ward Tonsfeldt shared some tips on finding high-quality classic bamboo fly rods and reels - discover the difference between classic, vintage, and antique gear We talked about what makes a classic rod classic - where to go to value your rod, and a classic rod and reel combo for less than $1000 Show Notes: https://wetflyswing.com/276

Leading Saints Podcast
Why Your Ward Needs a Podcast

Leading Saints Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 34:27


There are many reasons to start a ward podcast. It allows individuals to hear the real stories of those they worship with. This naturally creates a deeper level of unity in the ward which stimulates success on many levels. In this episode, Kurt Francom gives you a rough outline of how a ward could develop a ward podcast at no cost. Links: Canva Audacity Auphonics Ward Podcast Handout Template

The Servant Leader Coaches Bible Study
"Many Are Called, Few Are Chosen" with Juanita Ward; Former WNBA and International Basketball Player, Motivational Speaker and Author

The Servant Leader Coaches Bible Study

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 69:52


Award-Winning Professional Basketball player who Graduated from the University of Syracuse in Communication. She's a Motivational Speaker and Poet who has also won several awards in her career. McDonald's All-American, Mississippi Gatorade Player of the Year, two-time Parade All-American, Three-time Dandy Dozen, Nominated for Naismith National Player of the Year, WNBA Tulsa Shock, Bulgaria MVP & Defensive Player of the Year, Won a Professional Basketball Championship in Ukraine, Israeli Leading Score. She also holds Basketball Camps that demonstrate Leadership and Character on how to become successful in society. She now has taken a new position in Coaching where she intends to apply Leadership. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/chefranjohn/support

In The Money Players' Podcast
Players' Podcast: 2021 Christmas Quiz with Rowan Ward

In The Money Players' Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 61:57


PTF emcees and Quizmaster Rowan Ward takes over for a special Christmas Quiz edition of the show. Two teams of guests appear for charity with Jeopardy alumni Jennifer Kelly and Emily White playing for Old Friends, with In the Money regulars Nick Tammaro and Jessica Paquette competing for the Thoroughbred Retirement Foundation.

Million Dollar Mastermind with Larry Weidel
Episode 375: Mastering Distraction with Million Dollar Earner Joe Ward

Million Dollar Mastermind with Larry Weidel

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 13:34


Distractions come at us from every aspect of life. Million Dollar Earner, Joe Ward discusses the keys to conquering these distractions and the importance of focusing on what you're trying to accomplish.  • “The One Thing” book.  • Managing distractions and the roller coaster of emotions is where most people get beat.  • Learning to compartmentalize.  • Getting the whole family on board with your vision.  • If you don't have a system for your most critical activities, you'll get off track.  • It's not necessary that you do them, it's necessary that they get done.  • Finding ways to help people reach maximum efficiency.  • Finding the most important things for you.  TIME-STAMPED SHOW NOTES: [3:18] Comes down to time management. [7:10] Primary offensive method for prospecting. [11:18] Not my fault.

Memphis Tabernacle | Audio Messages
Tuesday Prayer Testimony | Carole Ward

Memphis Tabernacle | Audio Messages

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 39:44


Carole was called to Northern Uganda and South Sudan and is seeing the power of the Holy Spirit transform a nation. She visited our Tuesday prayer and shared some of her testimony.

Woman's Hour
Donna Ward on reclaiming spinsterhood; Comedian Liz Kingsman; Scars - Jayne; BBC 100 Objects

Woman's Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 57:03


Australian author Donna Ward's new book She I Dare Not Name: A Spinster's Meditations on Life explores the meaning and purpose she has fought to find in a life lived entirely accidentally without a partner or children. Donna speaks to Chloe from Melbourne. Over the next few days we're talking to women about their scars. They all talk about physical and emotional pain they've experienced and having to deal with other people's reactions on a day to day basis. They also explain how they came to terms with the skin they are in. Ena Miller went to meet Jayne in Shropshire and heard her story about surviving a flesh eating bug. Comedian Liz Kingsman, best known as a member of cult sketch group Massive Dad, is making major waves with her solo debut, One-Woman Show, which she is performing at the Soho Theatre from 5 January. She tells Chloe what inspired her. As the BBC prepares to celebrate its 100th anniversary through the lens of 100 objects, we get a sneak peek at a few items in the collection. The BBC's Head of History Robert Seatter explains the significance of a 1930s press cutting of the BBC looking to recruit the first women TV announcers, a cookbook by Madhur Jaffrey and a 1920s scrapbook from Evelyn Dove, the first black female singer to perform on BBC. Image: Donna Ward Credit: Amanda Ford

Intelligence Matters
"Best Of" Intelligence Matters: Clarissa Ward

Intelligence Matters

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 41:06


In this 'Best Of' episode of Intelligence Matters, we revisit Michael Morell's June 2021 conversation with CNN Chief International Correspondent Clarissa Ward, who shares anecdotes and personal reflections related to her memoir, "On All Fronts: The Education of a Journalist." Ward explains how the attacks on September 11, 2001, prompted her to pursue a career in broadcast journalism, and how she rose through the ranks to become an on-air correspondent. She details her experiences reporting from conflict zones in Iraq, Lebanon and Syria, and what drove her to tell the stories of people living in war-torn areas. Ward also tells Morell about her friendship with American journalist Austin Tice, as well as her efforts to search for Tice after his abduction in Syria in 2012.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Locked On Chiefs - Daily Podcast On The Kansas City Chiefs
Chiefs Take on the Steelers, Ward and Jones Return, Returning the Defense to Full Strength

Locked On Chiefs - Daily Podcast On The Kansas City Chiefs

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 24, 2021 29:33


The Kansas City Chiefs received reinforcements on defense on Thursday with the return of Chris Jones and Charvarius Ward. Both starters should be good to go for Sunday's game against the Steelers. This should allow the Chiefs to be near full strength heading into the game which should help Kansas City with a chance to win and continue to hold the #1 seed in the playoffs.