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Large island in northeastern North America

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  • Jan 14, 2022LATEST
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Latest podcast episodes about Greenland

Brothers in Armchairs
Episode 68 "Don't Look Up"

Brothers in Armchairs

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 99:42


Today's show is a discussion and review of Adam McKay's Netflix original Don't Look Up.  We cinephiles seem to love Apocalyptic movies.  Generally known as Disaster films, man made, natural, or cosmic, there's something oddly entertaining about witnessing the fictional destruction of our civilization in the same way people gawk at flashing police lights on the side of the freeway.  We love films like Armageddon, Deep Impact, Greenland, Knowing, and more.  In film as in life, we have hope that our heroes will save us, and the arduous journey to victory is the true entertainment of the story.  But what if there was no hero?  Or worse yet, there are heroes, but no one cares?  And even worse than that, no one cares at all?Well, the same questions were posed by Adam McKay as he was writing the script for this movie.  Sparked by the climate change crisis, McKay was commenting to his friend, journalist David Sirota, on how amazing it was that the climate change crisis wasn't headline news every day.  His friend replied that it was like there was a comet headed straight to Earth that is going to destroy us all and no one cares.  Immediately, McKay knew David's comet idea was the basis for his script.  And the rest is cinema history.In this show, we do more than a movie review by delving into the lives of the cast and crew, fan theories, trivia, scene breakdowns, and anything related to the film itself.  Needless to say, our shows are a little longer than your average movie review show, but we can assure you that our shows are jam packed with entertaining and interesting discussions.  If that sounds like your sort of bag, hang out with Kenny and Del as they get into Don't Look Up.Thanks for listening and feel free to hit us up on any of our social media platforms!https://linktr.ee/BiAPodcastMeryl Streep Improv Clip:  https://youtu.be/zp5hxWG_ADsBrian Cox on Don't Look Up:  https://youtu.be/ntaidEKs_KsCast Around the Table:  https://youtu.be/77pyaEoT3dQJonah Hill Streep is the GOAT:  https://youtu.be/WYeexrwLz7QJennifer Lawrence Street is the GOAT:  https://youtu.be/fDRX90-sAhETheme song "Loli'ana" written and performed by award-winning musician Kamuela Kahoano.   Listen to more of Kamuela's music on iTunes and https://kamuelamusic.com/.  Also, "Loli'ana" performed live at The Ko'olau Banquet Hall can be seen here https://youtu.be/YDJ1NNJgEiA  If you enjoyed our show, subscribe and check our new shows that drop every Friday.  Also, new this year, our non-routine Hot Topic show where we discuss what's hot in the movie world and our Anniversary Specials, which are 30 minute show that pay tribute to a movie celebrating a significant anniversary.  

How to Live in Denmark
Queen Margrethe, Denmark's good-humored, much-loved monarch

How to Live in Denmark

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 6:00


No matter how they feel about the institution of royalty, almost everyone likes Denmark's Queen Margrethe, who is celebrating 50 years on the throne this week. Every New Year's Eve, the streets of Denmark go quiet as the Queen makes her annual televised speech to her subjects. I find the speeches pretty much the same every year, they're about being kind to each other, taking care of the environment, and such. The real entertainment is in the Queen's wardrobe - she designs her own clothes, and often chooses rather un-Danishly bright colors -  and whether she'll get her carefully written note cards mixed up.  Every year she thanks the Danish military for its work, and every year she makes sure to shout out to the Faroe Islands and Greenland, the farthest flung parts of her kingdom. And she ends every annual speech with “GUD BEVARE DANMARK” – God Save Denmark.  The Queen is the head of the Danish state church, and the Danish state – she still signs all the laws, including the specific law that made me a citizen.  But the Queen is also an artist. She paints, and draws, and has designed stage sets for the Royal Ballet.     

History Vs.
Bonus Episode 4: Live from Greenland

History Vs.

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022 27:11


In the final bonus episode of The Quest for the North Pole, we travel to far northwestern Greenland to see the changing Arctic firsthand. We explore the long history of this area, from its settlement by Indigenous people, to the expeditions of Peary and Rasmussen, to secret military operations during the Cold War. With scientists from the Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland, we visit a climate-monitoring station atop the Greenland ice sheet, which gathers the data scientists need to model future changes in the Arctic—and the rest of our planet. Along the way, we'll see amazing wildlife, get frostbite, and realize how lucky we are not to be man-hauling thousand-pound sledges across the ice. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

UN News
News in Brief 10 January 2022

UN News

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2022 3:15


Ethiopia: Relief teams suspend operations in northwest Tigray Sudan: UN envoy announces talks with key civilian and military figures For 25th year in a row, Greenland ice sheet shrinks

BirdNote
A Swirl of Snow Geese

BirdNote

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 8, 2022 1:46


Snow Geese nest from far northeastern Russia to Greenland, in the arctic and subarctic. They winter in large flocks on the deltas of rivers in northwestern Washington, areas along the Eastern Seaboard, and throughout the Mississippi Flyway. Watching Snow Geese in flight, Barry Lopez described them, "as if the earth had opened and poured them forth, like a wind, a blizzard, which unfurled across the horizon above the dark soil ... great swirling currents of birds in a rattling of wings..." Learn more at BirdNote.org.

Diabetes Connections with Stacey Simms Type 1 Diabetes
(Un)Doing Diabetes Representation: What the media gets wrong (and what we can do about it)

Diabetes Connections with Stacey Simms Type 1 Diabetes

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 45:24


Diabetes on TV and in movies is rarely anything close to accurate. Turns out, those media misconceptions can be real-life harmful. This week, Stacey is joined by Dr. Heather Walker, the co-author of (Un)Doing Diabetes: Representation, Disability, Culture and Dr. Phyllisa Deroze, who contributed a chapter called “Laughing to Keep From Dying: Black Americans with Diabetes in Sitcoms and Comedies. Dr. Deroze & Dr. Walker both live with type 1 and both have difficult diagnosis stories that influenced their experiences with diabetes going forward. This podcast is not intended as medical advice. If you have those kinds of questions, please contact your health care provider. More about Dr. Phyllisa Deroze More about Dr. Heather Walker ---- Check out Stacey's book: The World's Worst Diabetes Mom! Join the Diabetes Connections Facebook Group! Sign up for our newsletter here ----- Use this link to get one free download and one free month of Audible, available to Diabetes Connections listeners! ----- Get the App and listen to Diabetes Connections wherever you go! Click here for iPhone      Click here for Android Episode Transcription: Stacey Simms  0:00 Diabetes Connections is brought to you by Dexcom. Take control of your diabetes and live life to the fullest with Dexcom. This is Diabetes Connections with Stacey Simms. This week, diabetes on TV and in the movies is rarely anything close to accurate. And those media misconceptions can be real life harmful. Here's one from the sitcom 30 Rock.   Dr. Phyllisa Deroze  0:30 Tracy has diabetes there. And he does this skit where he replaces his foot with a skate. And he's like I'm practicing for when I lose my foot to diabetes. And that is the thing. There was a diabetes diagnosis and the next scene, he's already imagining himself with an amputation.   Stacey Simms  0:49 That's Dr. Phyllisa Deroze, who wrote a chapter in a new book we're talking about this week. The book is called (Un)Doing Diabetes Representation, Disability Culture. And it's authored by Dr. Heather Walker, Dr. Deroze and Dr. Walker both live with type one, and they join me for a great conversation. This podcast is not intended as medical advice. If you have those kinds of questions, please contact your health care provider. Welcome to another week of the show, I am always so glad to have you here. You know, we aim to educate and inspire about diabetes with a focus on people who use insulin. This is our first show of 2022. So Happy New Year, everybody. I hope you're doing okay. Still stressful days for everybody. But hopefully you can kind of come along with me every week, as we talk about what we're finding interesting in the diabetes community. And I say that because 2021, I decided I was going to focus on technology for the year, I was going to try to do as many episodes as I could, talking about new technology talking to these companies. And I did that although I gotta say the log jam at the FDA made that a little difficult, right? I mean, we thought we'd have a lot more new technology. And a lot of companies will not talk about stuff until it is FDA approved. So this year, I'm going to stay with that because the technology episodes are what you have told me you are the most interested in, in fingers crossed are going to have some approvals pretty soon. But I gotta tell you, I've also decided that I'm going to do shows on just whatever the heck I find interesting. I started this show seven years ago, this coming summer, and honestly, this might be the last year of it in this form. I mean, I love it. I love doing this but seven years is a long time for any project. I have some new things that I'm working on. I'm not sure how much time all of it is going to take. I'm not abandoning the podcast by any means. I want to hear from you too. As we go forward. You know, as the year goes by, I will keep the lines of communication open. We will figure it out together. This episode does fall into the category of something I am fascinated by and I love to talk about and that is diabetes in media. And by the way separately. Both of my guests this week have bananas misdiagnosis stories, we get to that right out of the gate. Wait till you hear what one of their doctors ended up doing. I have never heard this happening before. It was pretty wild. And we will talk about the book I mentioned that it is (Un)Doing Diabetes Representation, Disability Culture. It is authored by Dr. Heather Walker and Dr. Dr. Bianca C. Frazer. It contains essays by other authors including Dr. Phyllisa Deroze a little bit more about the book in its public description. It says undoing diabetes is the first collection of essays to use disability studies to explore representations of diabetes across a wide range of mediums from Twitter to TV and film to theater fiction, fan fiction, fashion and more. In undoing diabetes Authors deconstruct assumptions the public commonly holds while writers doing diabetes present counter narratives community members create to represent themselves. And just a little bit more about my guests. Dr. Heather Walker is Associate Director of qualitative research at the University of Utah health. She was diagnosed with type one at age 11 in 2001, and Dr. Phyllisa Deroze began blogging at diagnosed not defeated almost immediately after being misdiagnosed. She found out later with type two diabetes in 2011. And now she has been correctly diagnosed with LADA. Dr. Phyllisa Deroze is also the founder of Black diabetic info after the interview, and it's a pretty long interview. And that's okay. They have a lot of great stuff to say, I'm going to come back I want to tell you about something that happened to me. It's not quite diabetes in media, but it is diabetes jokes. So I want to tell you how I handled something in a Facebook group. But I'll come back and do that after the interview.   Dr. Phyllisa Deroze, Dr. Heather Walker, welcome. I'm so happy to talk to you both. Thanks for coming on.   Unknown Speaker  4:50 Thank you.   Stacey Simms  4:51 So let's start if we could, I mean there's so much to get to and I was so excited to see you both at friends for life and see the presentations that you were doing but which You mind kind of backing up a little bit and kind of letting people get to know you? We could start just tell me a little bit about your diabetes diagnosis story. And Phyllisa, let me let me ask you to start with that if I could.   Dr. Phyllisa Deroze  5:12 Um, yes, I was diagnosed shortly after getting my PhD in English literature. I had moved to North Carolina, I experienced the classic symptoms of hyperglycemia. I had seen a physician who didn't check my blood sugar told me that I just needed to drink Gatorade because my electrolytes were off. A little later I was in the hospital. Blood sugar didn't register. Finally, I think first reading was like 597, or something like that. So I was told I had diabetes, and what type didn't get clarified until I was discharged. When I was discharged. I was told that I had type two diabetes, and I lived with that diagnosis for eight long years, it was inaccurate, I was misdiagnosed. I live with latent autoimmune diabetes in adults. And I was correctly diagnosed and joined the T1D group in 2019. I get this   Stacey Simms  6:06 question. Every time I speak to somebody like yourself who was misdiagnosed like that it happens so often. How do you live with what is really type one for all that time? I mean, I can't imagine you felt very well.   Dr. Phyllisa Deroze  6:20 I did. Okay, after diagnosis, I had a pretty long honeymoon phase, I actually lived about three years with just diet and exercise. I think one thing in the T1D community is that we don't talk enough about honeymoon phases and people who have latent autoimmune diabetes and adults, because so much of the common knowledge about type 1 diabetes is that everyone is insulin dependent. And that's not necessarily true, everyone will become insulin dependent. And that's an important message, because I never thought to have test done until I went into DKA. Again, so I myself didn't know that it was possible to have type 1 diabetes have a long honeymoon period and be misdiagnosed.   Stacey Simms  7:09 Yeah. The more I learned about Lada, it is so similar, but it's so different. There's a lot more to it, I guess, is what I would say, than I had realized for sure. Heather, what is your diagnosis story? When were you diagnosed with diabetes?   Dr. Heather Walker  7:21 So I was diagnosed at 11. And I also sort of have a misdiagnosis story. So I had diabetes, and I was in what I assumed to be a honeymoon phase for three months before my diagnosis actually came around. Because I was seeing a physician at the time who looked at me, skinny white girl, whose parents were really afraid because she kept losing weight, who was just about to hit puberty, and he thought eating disorder. No matter how many times I told him, I was eating everything in sight and drinking everything in sight. That's still what he firmly believed. Luckily, at about three months after I started coming in to see him for this and for the symptoms, he went on vacation, and I got to see his pa instead. And his pa John, you know, it's so funny. I don't even remember his last name. But just he's just warmly John to me, right? He just looked at my chart, and he knew right away, it's like, oh, you have diabetes, you know, so calmly, and I remember that freaking me and my mom out. We were in the appointment. It actually was my dad. But still, the first thing that we did was went and got me a doughnut because I think my dad was like, alright, well, maybe this is it. You know, he'll never eat another doughnut. Yeah, like, we really don't know about this, we don't know what's gonna happen. And so they didn't do a glucose tests on me. They just drew blood. So we didn't know right away anyway. And then it was like, you know, the next day, they called and said, You need to come to the hospital and for US history.   Stacey Simms  8:45 I'm guess I'm gonna get ahead of myself a little bit here. I don't want to start drawing conclusions too early in this interview. But it is interesting how both of you were misdiagnosed. Somebody else made an assumption, because of how you present it to them. I've got to imagine. So Heather, let me ask you. And then Phyllisa, I want to ask you the same question. But other how has that stuck with you? I mean, you you kind of set it so matter of factly they're like, Hey, he assumed I had an eating disorder. Did you kind of carry that with you?   Dr. Heather Walker  9:11 Oh, yeah, absolutely. I think I got a huge chip on my shoulder. From that. I mean, there's something about you know, being 11. And being in a world that already doesn't take you seriously, and then have a life threatening disease thrown at you. And your doctor doesn't believe what you say, even before diabetes. And Stacy, I've heard on episodes of your podcast you talking with with teens about or people who were teens with diabetes, about how fast it speeds your life up, right? Like you don't really get to have a childhood you don't really get to be a teenager and like, you know, carry on with reckless abandon because you just can't because there's all these safety things that you need to take into account. And so, but even before diabetes, I was kind of like that, like I was, you know, a 30 year old and a 10 year old body. I've been the same Age since then until now, but that, for sure gave me a big chip on my shoulder. It made me want to like, look into everything and see as it's happening to other people is like what's going on with this diabetes stuff.   Stacey Simms  10:13 Phyllisa, I'm curious for your experience too, because as you you kind of already said something interesting, which was like, Well, I didn't know how were you supposed to know? Right? The doctor supposed to know.   Dr. Phyllisa Deroze  10:23 Right. What's interesting is that when I was told that I needed to look into LADA because I had given a speech in Dubai to a roomful of doctors from the MENA region, Middle East and North Africa. And I was simply telling them my diagnosis story, very similar to what I share with you is a little more in depth, but pretty much that was the basics. And you know, I'm 31 years old at the time. And so during the q&a, some of the physicians from Tunisia, they raised their hand, and I was like, yes, they were like, well, your story kind of sounds more like LADA than type two. Are you familiar with it? And I said, not really. I mean, I know Cherise Shockley has it, but I don't know any more details than that. And it was at the lunch afterwards, one of the physicians came up to me and she said, you really ought to look into seeing if you have a ladder, and don't stop until you get the answer. And that kind of haunted me like, don't stop until you get the answer. But I just thought it was a simple request. So I asked my Endo, I got told no, I asked three months later, if I had ever been tested, the answer was no. Well, can I get tested? No. I saw a second opinion. No, you have type two. So I definitely think their view of me being an African American woman living with obesity played a lot into the constant denials. It took me over a year, another decay episode, and begging my gynecologist to run type one antibody testing for me in order to get it. So it wasn't easy. I literally had to not stop until I get the answer.   Dr. Heather Walker  12:11 For Phyllisa, it was your OB they finally gave you the testing you wanted?   Dr. Phyllisa Deroze  12:15 Yes. Because I told her, I can't get an endocrinologist to run this test. I know I'm in decay, a I'm losing weight rapidly. And she listened to me and she said, Okay, she said, I don't do endocrine, I do you know, OB GYN. So we were literally on her computer on Google trying to find the codes to request the testing. And so she was calling around, what do I put in to order this? And I remember when she called and she said, Listen, you know, this is out of my field. But come get these results, because your endo was going to need to see them. That was all on me. I got the results. I just remember seeing the get 65 should be below five. And mine was greater than 7500.   Stacey Simms  13:05 Oh, I'm almost speechless. I mean, I'm not I'm never actually speechless. I came in less than that happened. But the idea that you have to work so hard to get those answers, I've got to assume just like with Heather, that had to inform not only your experiences going forward, but the way you help other people because you both are extremely active in the community. You You're both very prolific writers, you both have, you know, studies and presentations that we're going to talk to, but Felicity, that whole experience with somebody else saying, Well, I think you have lotta to I got to get answers for myself to finally getting them. When you look back on that, how does it inform how you talk to other people about   Dr. Phyllisa Deroze  13:43 diabetes? I tell people definitely to be way more assertive than then imagined. Like, I honestly did not think it would take me constantly asking for the results. I thought it was like a simple test. I mean, you're testing my cholesterol, you're testing my a one C, like you're already getting a vial of blood, like just check off one antibody. So I thought it was something simple. And it turned out it was not, which was very frustrating for me. Because like in that I realized my education level didn't matter to them. I was literally like you are African American living with obesity. And that was what I believed to be their motivating factor to deny me testing. And what's so problematic about that, in addition to everything else you can imagine is as my physician Wouldn't they want to know that they're treating the right condition. Yeah, I'm asking so my records actually have a note from my endo saying, Melissa asked multiple times for type one antibody testing, and I denied it   Stacey Simms  14:55 literally says I denied it in your file.   Dr. Phyllisa Deroze  14:57 Yes. Wow.   Stacey Simms  14:59 I'm just sorry. I got to ask, did he show that to you as an apology? Or did you sit there in the room while you made him write it?   Dr. Phyllisa Deroze  15:05 What I did was I refused to leave the appointment. I love it until there was this moment of record, like, I need you to recognize that I have been asking you for over a year for this test. We just need to come to that because it was like, Oh, you need insulin, let's go. And, you know, I was kind of being escorted out of the room. And I said, No, I'm literally not going to leave this chair until we have this conversation. And so I didn't know that my endo would put it on my records. But I definitely refused to leave until that conversation was had, they did apologize. And there was a note and my files.   Stacey Simms  15:47 It just didn't have to be that hard. This could have been an episode in and of itself. Want to make sure to get to that the research or the publications that sparked my interest here.   Right back to our conversation and right was like kidding about the diagnosis stories, and then her doctor putting in her chart that he was wrong. Oh my god. Alright, Diabetes Connections is brought to you by Dexcom. I want to talk for a minute about control IQ, the Dexcom G6 Tandem pump software program. When it comes to Benny's numbers, you know, I hardly expect perfection, I really just want him happy and healthy. And I have to say control IQ, the software from Dexcom. And Tandem has completely exceeded my expectations, Benny is able to do less checking and bolusing. And he is spending more time in range. This is in a teenager, a time when I was really prepared for him to be struggling, his sleep is better to this is great for all of us basal adjustments possible every five minutes, the system is working hard to keep him in range. And that means we hear far fewer Dexcom alerts, which means everybody is sleeping better. I am so grateful for this, of course Individual results may vary. To learn more, go to diabetes connections.com and click on the Dexcom logo. Now back to the interview. And we are moving on to Dr. Walker's book. Heather, tell me about the book that's coming out.   Dr. Heather Walker  17:14 Okay, I'm so excited to be talking about this. So you might hear that excitement in my voice. So it's awesome. The title of the book is called undoing diabetes representation, disability culture, that's a full title. And it's going to be released very soon, by the end of the year, we hope it's a collection of essays that looks at diabetes in a new way, the volume or the volume as a whole. You know, it points out that all the stereotypes of diabetes that the public really buys into are like maintained through a lens of individualism, our society looks at diabetes as a problem of the individual person right of their choices. And so to respond to that public tendency, right to like focus on the individual, all of our authors in the book do the opposite. So in the collection, they ask questions like, What do individualistic stereotypes reveal about the social conditions for the diabetic person? So it like flips it on its head? And also what do they conceal, right? What is stereotypes hide? What do they prevent us from seeing? And how do these like harmful narratives, these harmful assumptions, these stereotypes that just break down our community? How do they reinforce ideas that the public already has, for what constitutes like a normal or a good body, which is just like, as a person who's living with diabetes, this makes me so excited. And then I'll just add one final thing about the book, which is our collection is really unique in that we use disability studies frameworks to unpack all of these questions. What are disability studies? So this ability studies is a field of study that looks at the social conditions of disability. So how is disability perceived in society? How is it represented on the screen, and all of those types of things. And so we have frameworks in the field that we use, it's kind of imagined, like a camera lens, right? That's kind of like a framework and the camera lens has a filter on it. And so when we look at this movie, or this film, we're looking at it through a specific lens with a specific filter. In our book, all of our authors are looking at different types of media, through these disability studies, frames or lenses, and sort of seeing how they operate in society and what they do, and then poking holes at what it does. And every chapter is brilliant, and Phyllisa is going to talk about hers, but as a volume, like I could not be more proud of this collection and all the work that it does. And all of like the change and the shifts it's going to make for readers.   Stacey Simms  19:43 It's so interesting to me because of the mediums that you use so let's let's ask Felicity if you want to if you could talk about what you presented friends for life, what you talked about you were looking at TV shows, right and not unfortunately not more current ones which sometimes get it right.   Dr. Phyllisa Deroze  19:59 Um, yeah, I was the title of my chapter is laughing to keep from dying black Americans with diabetes in sitcoms and comedies. So I was looking at television shows as well as movies, and focusing on how those representations make meaning of diabetes within African American communities. Part of this started, when I thought about the first time I heard you have diabetes, and I was in the emergency room, my first thought was, I'm going to die. Like that. Was it? Like, I just thought like diabetes meant death? And when I started unpacking that, to find out where did I get that messaging from? Because no one in my family has diabetes. I didn't personally know anybody with diabetes. It really came from television and film, and of course, our media. And I thought it would be really nice to look at some of these classic movies and TV shows that are very popular in African American communities to see what story is told when you focus on the diabetes characters. Can you talk about some examples? Yeah. So for example, like Soul Food is one of those classic staple in African American film, a memory just like the color purple is something that people cite quotes from all the time. But when you look at Soul Food, it really stems from Big Mama who has diabetes. We understand this because she burns her arm on a stove. And a couple of things later, she passes away, she has an amputation and then a stroke. And she's no longer with us. The Big Mama character also comes up in Tyler Perry's plays and his films in his television shows. And again, these are staple matriarch characters who have diabetes. Now Madea lives on because that's a part of, you know, Tyler Perry series, but she has diabetes Boondocks I look at and of course Blackish. So blackish, I would say is probably where we first see the the image turn, where we first see a character with diabetes, checking their blood sugar, and all the other stuff we don't. And so what that tells us is that diabetes is going to cause either a slow death or quick death, perhaps an amputation, if you're familiar with 30, Rock. Tracy has diabetes there. And he does this skit where he replaces his foot with a skate. And he's like I'm practicing for when I lose my foot to diabetes. And that is the thing, there was a diabetes diagnosis, and the next thing, he's already imagining himself with an amputation. So when we look   Stacey Simms  22:59 at something like this, what do we take from it now? I mean, we you can't go back and change those representations. What do you want us to kind of learn from them.   Dr. Phyllisa Deroze  23:08 But I would ideally like for the film industry, to change their portrayal of characters with diabetes, I mean, all characters, not just African American ones. But last year, there was the release of the Clark Sisters first ladies of gospel biopic on lifetime. The Clark Sisters are like a staple in African American culture. They were these gospel singers that were absolutely phenomenal. The Lifetime movie of them ended up being the highest rated Lifetime movie and four years. This comes out last year, the mother has diabetes. She is seen not taking her medication, not caring about her diabetes. And of course, there's all these tragedies that happen. And the thing is, when we don't see African Americans using CGM technology, insulin pump technology, we don't see checking blood sugar. What happens with those messages is that it becomes the common assumption. So when someone goes to the doctor, the doctor may think, Oh, well, black people don't check their blood sugar. And so then that begins to impact the individual prime example. I was in a setting once. And a woman said, Oh, I didn't think black people ate vegetables. What? Yes, yes, literally said this. And I was just so floored, but I thought, okay, she didn't think black people ate vegetables. And so I'm wondering like, what images you know, is she being fed? Right? Yeah. came from so the thing is, is we have to look at our television and our film, not just as sources of enjoyment for some people, but also as information that provides an understanding about certain people. So literally in all of the films and television shows that I look that there were probably two that showed the African American character with diabetes, actually living a rather fruitful life. Outside of that it was amputation and death. And so when someone is diagnosed with diabetes, like I was, and I didn't know anyone with diabetes, instantly, the first thing I thought about was death and dying. And that association that comes with it, when I hadn't seen people living well, with diabetes, I just want to say this. When I was first diagnosed, I went to Barnes and Nobles sat down in a bookstore with one of Patti LaBelle cookbooks, and I flipped to a page and she said, in this book, I had diabetes, but I wasn't going to let diabetes have in me, and I cried, right there in the Barnes and Noble, because that was the first time that I had ever seen or read or heard someone who looks like me diagnosed with diabetes, and they were determined to continue living their life. Like if you want to see that image, where do you go? Because our television and our films are not that place. And that's also the fertile ground for which black diabetic info on my website started and my blog, because I didn't know where to go for that. Like, I got it in Patti LaBelle cookbook, and I cry. But then where can I go to see it again? Yeah, didn't have an answer. Heather, I   Stacey Simms  26:53 want to come back to you and ask you something I saw you posted about on on Twitter. A couple of months ago, Pixar posted a teaser for their new movie turning red, which I think comes out in the spring. And there's like a split second shot of a kid wearing some kind of what looks like diabetes device. It's, you know, an insulin pump or a CGM. And they confirmed it. I actually talked to somebody behind the scenes at Pixar and fingers crossed, we'll have them on the show in a couple of weeks. But it is a diabetes. I'm so excited. But it is a diabetes device. But you were pretty adamant about one point, would you mind sharing that? And why? Sure.   Dr. Heather Walker  27:30 So when I saw that, you know, I came late to the show. Let me preface with that, right. Like, by the time I saw that trailer, the community was abuzz. Like they everyone was so excited. And what I saw was, Oh, my goodness, we see a character with type 1 diabetes. And as someone who is completing a chapter for a book of essays on representations of diabetes, you know, my antenna went up when I saw how the community was claiming that. And I just thought to myself, This is not a representation of type 1 diabetes, this is a representation of diabetes, because people with type two can and should have access to those devices as well. And so for the type one community to be exclusive, in this moment, in this grand opportunity for all of us to celebrate together, really sort of broke me down in a way, you know, I was like, Why? Why can't we just keep this open? Why can't we make this a win for everyone? Instead of saying, quote, unquote, type two people don't use these devices? And I think that the reason why it was like it was like a jab in my heart is I think that that claiming does something in society, right? It, it functions to show us that large groups of the diabetes are the type one community feel like, maybe type two diabetics aren't using that technology, because they're the ones who don't care. And they're the ones that the stereotype is about. And so that shows me that we have pockets in our type one community that buy into the stereotype just like the public does.   Stacey Simms  29:06 I'm looking at the description of the book in terms of the different mediums you use Twitter, to TV to film to theater to fiction, fan fiction.   Dr. Heather Walker  29:13 Yeah, we have a chapter, whatever author of your chapter covering a segment of fan fiction, and it's wonderful and actually, that author and she discloses in her chapter as well, so I'm not outing her. She also lives with diabetes herself. And I'm pretty sure she has a physical science PhD. So this genre and this discipline is new for her and she just like, Oh, she did such a great job having us understand how diabetes is being pulled into fanfiction. Alright, we   Stacey Simms  29:46 now should have set this up better if you're not familiar, and I'm going to do probably a terrible job of describing this. If you're not familiar. Fanfiction is stories, poems, pictures, it's fiction, written by people who are Fans have a genre or fans of a certain bunch of characters, and then they kind of make up their own stories using the established characters most of the time. So in other words, you love Harry Potter, you write yourself into Harry Potter or you write a different adventures that the characters might have had. And it's accessible to pretty much everybody. Is that how I feel about fanfiction? Yeah, I   Dr. Heather Walker  30:18 think it's kind of a, you know, once you get into it, you know where to look. You can probably Google it. And you know, I'm not even really in the world of fanfic, full disclosure and transparency. But I feel like I want to beat now that I've read, I've read that chapter. So   Stacey Simms  30:34 these are characters people are writing about that loop with diabetes, or they are the just bringing diabetes into exactly as it sounds. It sounds silly, as I'm saying it out loud. Like I'm explaining it. I'm trying to, you know, hit it over the head to the to find a point. But just to be clear,   Dr. Heather Walker  30:48 yes. So I think in the pieces that this author talks about in their chapter, it's situations where the characters themselves do not have diabetes, and the fanfic authors write them having diabetes. Oh, so they add that to their character.   Stacey Simms  31:04 You know what we were doing that a long time ago? Because I don't know if you know, Heather, and Phyllisa, but Bob, the builder definitely has diabetes, because why else? Would he have that big belt around his equipment? Because that's where his insulin. So anytime we saw somebody on screen with that, he was like, Oh, he's got diabetes. I didn't mean to interrupt Heather. But that clarifies it for me.   Dr. Heather Walker  31:23 Oh, yeah. That's a perfect example. Right is imagine that we had a fanfic author who loves Bob the Builder when they were a kid. And now they're writing the whole story about Bob, the builder and his diabetic life. It's wonderful. The book itself,   Stacey Simms  31:37 is this something that's accessible to people? And I asked that I mean, is it more of an academic book, tell me a little bit more about that.   Dr. Phyllisa Deroze  31:43 So one of the things that I like about the book is that it's assessable. For a large reading audience, if you are a casual reader, you can get through it, if you are an academic, you can get through it. So it's not laced with academic jargon. But again, we are using theoretical frameworks, but in a language that is accessible to everybody. So that's one I definitely enjoy about the collection, is there something in there forever?   Stacey Simms  32:13 And that's a great point, because I think we do get a little nervous about academic type books, Heather, right. I mean, it's, it can be a little scary and off putting it away.   Dr. Heather Walker  32:21 Yeah. And I'll just add, you know, we have, so we have several authors who are like myself, and Phyllisa, who are scholars and community members, which is very nice, and just like really brings it home. And so, you know, you kind of know, as a community member, that you're going to get authentic pieces by people who are living with this, in addition to having a couple of us who are scholars and committee members, we do have chapters from community members, from activists who don't have their hand in academia at all, and they're writing about their personal experiences. And, you know, they're still talking about representation in different media, but they're doing so from their lens existing in the community existing in the world with diabetes. And if nothing else, although I, I would also say what, you know, Melissa said was true, all of them are accessible, but especially those that are coming, you know, from the mouths of babes that are coming from our community members, who, who many people who do pick up the book already know,   Stacey Simms  33:20 before I let you go, let me let me pose this question to each of you in kind of a different way. And that would be you know, full. So you mentioned blackish, being a bit of a turning point, the show where people are shown, you know, a character shown checking blood sugar. I'm looking back over the last year and thinking of a more accurate depiction of diabetes, or at least type one with the Babysitter's Club on Netflix with we'll see with Pixar is turning red, but with Greenland, you know, written by someone who's married to Greenland, the movie Written by someone who is married to a person with type one, do you think things are getting better? And and I would ask you, as well to include the black community, because we don't talk about that enough. You know, I mean, I'm trying to think if all of those I mentioned they did not feature people of color. Do you think it's getting better? I mean, what would you like to   Dr. Phyllisa Deroze  34:06 see, I would like to see more diversity as we get better in the American film industry. When I look at all the films that I studied, type 1 diabetes is grossly under represented like none of these characters have type 1 diabetes, which again, if you think about myself, 31 years old, being diagnosed, I never knew type 1 diabetes could be an option. I'm still not seeing African American characters using technology wearing CGM. Often when I'm out in public. People are asking me about my devices. It's the first time you're seeing them. I'm explaining insulin pumps. And so while things are getting better, I would say within shows, television shows and films that are popular within African American characters. Progress is about Very slow on that. And   Stacey Simms  35:01 Heather, from where you stand. Could you share a little bit about what you think is going on in media? Are we getting better?   Dr. Heather Walker  35:07 Yeah, I think Phyllisa what you're speaking to right is incremental ism. It's like we are getting better slowly, like painfully, slowly, bit by bit. I mean, I'm inclined to say yes, only because the number of representations that we're seeing are increasing. But, you know, I'm hesitant at the same time to say yes, because we still have to ask, okay, if we even if we have more representation, are they representations that are doing good for diabetic people in society? Right, like, not necessarily, Are they accurate? Or are they you know, a direct portrayal of what people experience? But what is the public taking away from that representation? Like, what are they leaving that with? And if we have a lot more characters all of a sudden who have diabetes, but the audience still thinks, Okay, well, diabetes is still what I thought it was, right? It's like overweight people over eating, making bad choices not exercising? If that's what they're leaving with, then the answer, of course, is no, we're not making progress, even if we're having more characters. And what I find is, what I think we would need to make really big change would be to centralize a character with diabetes instead of making them a sub character, right? Yeah, like for the baby sitters club. And Stacey is not a new character with diabetes is has old, right, like we've known that Stacey has had diabetes for a long time, it just wasn't being produced at the quality it's being produced at. So that's not really even a new one. But we do have new ones, like there's a just a year and a half ago, or so there was a new series called Sweet magnolias. And one of the characters there has, or is about to be diagnosed with diabetes, and it's the same, it's the same story. It's like, you know, if you don't fix your habits, you're gonna get diabetes, and you're gonna die like your mom and all these fear tactics. And so and I really want to be hopeful, Stacy, I really want to be hopeful and say, Yes, we're headed in the right direction. But I just don't know i We need people in the writers room with diabetes, and other health conditions and disabilities, to have a direct voice and call things out before they're produced.   Dr. Phyllisa Deroze  37:19 I agree 100%, we have to be in the room. Because some things they don't make sense. For example, blackish, you do see him check his blood sugar. However, once he puts the strip in the meter, he starts talking to his wife, and anyone who knows how to use a meter knows that you have about 30 seconds before you have to put a drop of blood on that thing, or else you've lost it. So even little things like that.   Stacey Simms  37:46 I had indicated that was the last question, but I got one more. And that would be and II feel free. Either one of you jump in? Or both? What can the community do? You know, sometimes I feel like, you know, I stopped correcting people online a lot of the time unless it's really egregious, you know, but if they make a joke, or there's a hashtag diabetes with dessert, or things like that, like I'm tired, you know, and then you have no sense of humor, you know, gosh, what can we do to try to fix this? Or what can we do to to improve the situation?   Dr. Phyllisa Deroze  38:15 I think, this research, this book, this podcast, these conversations are so important. So for example, prior to writing my book chapter, I didn't see anything talking about the representation of African American characters in television and film. Whenever I talked about diabetes characters, there was maybe the one mention of soul food, but like, there was a dearth there. So this book chapter hopefully helped spark the conversation in wider circles. And so by talking about it more, and rallying around these things, hopefully, the attention like first recognizing that there is a problem, and then getting think tanks together to talk about them is probably the best plan of action.   Dr. Heather Walker  39:06 I love that. And I would just add, you know, I think what the community needs to prioritize is inclusion, right? Like, we need to give up on being exclusive, especially in the type one community, and we need to open our doors to people with type two people with Ladda. People with all like, there are so many different types of diabetes, that even saying type one and two is, is exclusive. I really believe that if we can do that, and if we can elevate the voices of people with diabetes of all types, who are also people of color, then we'll make a lot of progress in our community because we'll start seeing those perspectives that we've been missing that make us as a community really limited to our own perspective. To me, that's the only way to do it. I love the idea of a think tank Phyllisa I think that's brilliant, and just absolutely, and I'm sure you would agree needs to be diverse, right? Like it can't Be a bunch of like, white people. I don't know. There's a lot we can do. There's a lot.   Stacey Simms  40:08 Thank you both so much for joining me. This is amazing. I'm so thrilled to have you both on the show, you've got to come back on there. We just kind of scratched the surface here. So thank you for spending so much time with me.   Dr. Phyllisa Deroze  40:18 It's a pleasure. Thank you for having me.   Dr. Heather Walker  40:21 Yeah, this has been so fun. You're listening to Diabetes Connections with Stacey Simms.   Stacey Simms  40:34 More information about my guests and about the book on diabetes all at diabetes connections.com. As you know, every episode has its own homepage with transcriptions and show notes and all that good stuff. The transcription started in January of 2020. And we're working our way back here in there, hopefully filling in all the blanks. But right now, not every episode before 2020 has a transcription. And I should tell you just I don't want to get ahead of myself here. That Pixar movie that we talked about turning red. Since our conversation, they put out another trailer and it showed more diabetes gear, another child in the movie is wearing a Dexcom. So it looks to me I mean, really can't tell yet. But it looks to me like one kiddo has some kind of pump. And another kiddo has a Dexcom. So as I said, I had a contact at Pixar. And I've got another one now. And it looks like there might be an actor, a voice actor in the movie who has diabetes. So we're to sort this all out. And I should be able to have somebody on about this. I don't want to over promise. But the folks at Pixar have been really receptive. So that looks like they won't do it too far in advance because the movie comes out in March. So as we get closer, I'll keep you posted for it. And I had mentioned a story before the interview about not necessarily diabetes in media, but about jokes. And I don't know about you, but years ago, I was on high alert for diabetes jokes, you know, I can't eat that, or the the hashtag of my dessert is diabetes. And I don't know, I got burned out. And I don't talk about it as much. I don't police it as much, certainly, but I couldn't help myself last week, at Christmas, I'm in a group. It's a very clever group. It's called fatten the curve. If you want to join it. It's a public group, a friend of mine in the Charlotte area started at the very beginning of COVID. Obviously, it's a play on flatten the curve. And as you would expect fatten the curve is all about food. And it's just become a place where people who cook and eat like to share their photos. And somebody posted around Christmas time, you know, it's my diabetic coma, and then all of this food. So I kind of did the do I want to go to I want to do this, or I want to get this person's face. So I just very nicely said, Hey, diabetes jokes are never cool. Not sure if you thought about that. But hey, the food looks absolutely delicious. You know, hope it was as good as it looked or something nice like that very casual and breezy. Just like Hey, dude, not cool. But moving on. And there's a couple of other people in the diabetes community who have joined that group, but it's not diabetes, it's just food. But you know how it is when when Facebook shows you something people, you know, jump in. So other people commented like, yeah, Stacey's right? Please think twice. And this guy apparently lives with type two posted like a non sequitur about his scientific studies and stem cells and all this stuff about diabetes. He did, obviously, not really sunk in I don't think, but he didn't respond negatively. And I just said, You know what, fine, I'm moving on, right? But then a couple of days later, somebody else popped in, it was like, nobody can make a joke anymore. You're too sensitive, and why we're just too easily offended. And that's when I was like, Alright, now I need to respond. So I very nicely, I think it was nice. You know, I wrote a response. And I said, Hey, you know, once the guy said he had diabetes, you'll notice I didn't clap back, I didn't get nasty. We are all entitled to say whatever we want. But it's important to understand that what we say does have meaning and impact. And as you listen, I know, you know, all this, I did the standard. When we joke about diabetes, we don't do this with other conditions. We don't talk about a cholesterol coma, or a high blood pressure problem when we're eating big meals like this. Why is it only diabetes? And did you realize that actually, you know, the blame and shame that can be encountered here prevents people from seeking treatment or makes them feel like it's all their fault, and nothing they do will matter. I posted all that waiting for the response. There was none, which I'm really glad about. Because I don't want to argue I just it's exhausting. But everyone's not something like that pushes my buttons and I have to save something. Hopefully that group will just go back to posting yummy pictures of food because it's been two years and we haven't had any issues like that. I mostly post pictures of what my husband cooks. Because I don't like to cook and what I do cook isn't really Facebook, really. So I guess we're often running for 2022. We are back to the Wednesday in the news episodes. I hope you'll join me for that either live on Facebook, YouTube or Instagram, or as an audio podcast which comes out on Fridays. Thanks as always to my editor John Bukenas from audio editing solutions. Thank you so much for listening. I'm Stacey Simms. I'll see you back here soon, in a Couple of days until then, be kind to yourself   Benny  45:07 Diabetes Connections is a production of Stacey Simms media. All rights reserved. All wrongs avenged

Satellite Stories
A trip to Greenland: Distance Learning and Online Education

Satellite Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 11:41


There are limited schooling options and no interconnecting roads between settlements in Greenland. Many students rely on boats, planes or helicopters to access high-schools and universities.  The power of digital inclusion opens doors to online teaching and distance learning platforms previously unavailable in parts of Greenland. Anders Ogaard is a teacher at the Institute for Learning in Nuuk. He reveals the impact connectivity is having on his pupils' lives - near and far, and on the wider opportunities the internet can offer Greenlandic culture. Join Kristina Smith-Meyer, SES's Senior Creative, in discovering the world of e-education in Greenland. For more about what we do, visit SES.com

Woman's Hour
Weekend Woman's Hour: Sarah Ransome, Sheila Watt-Cloutier, Donna Ward

Woman's Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 1, 2022 57:39


British woman Sarah Ransome says she wanted to be at Ghislaine Maxwell trial when it started: not to testify but to see justice take its course. Like the four women who gave evidence, she says she's also a victim of Epstein's and Maxwell's. She tells us more about her story and Harriet Wistrich, founder of Centre for Women's Justice discusses the wider impact this case could have. Sheila Watt-Cloutier, is a world renowned human rights and climate change activist, who has made it her life's work to protect her Inuit culture and the Arctic regions where Inuit live, in Greenland, Canada and Alaska. She was born in Arctic Canada and launched the first legal petition linking climate change to human rights. We discuss the word 'spinster' and what it really means with Australian author Donna Ward. Her new book She I Dare Not Name: A Spinster's Meditations on Life., explores the meaning and purpose she has fought to find in a life lived entirely accidentally without a partner or children. BBC History is launching a 100 objects collection to mark 100 years of the BBC in 2022. Head of History Robert Seatter gives us a sneak peak into a few objects which represent the history of women at the BBC including a 1930s job advert looking to recruit the first women TV announcers, a cookbook by Madhur Jaffrey and a 1920s scrapbook from Evelyn Dove, the first black female singer to perform on BBC. British women weren't allowed to visit the Antarctic until 1983 but now scores of women are making major contributions to polar science. Morgan Seag who has just submitted her PhD in gendered institutional change in 20th century Antarctic science to the University of Cambridge and Jo Johnson who has visited Antarctica seven times tell us more.

Kermode and Mayo's Film Review

Mark Kermode and Simon Mayo with their best reviews and interviews from 2021 including their chats with Sigourney Weaver, Emma Stone and Lakeith Stanfield and Mark's reviews of Wild Mountain Thyme, Greenland, Summer of Soul, Godzilla v Kong, Nomadland and No Time to Die. Plus the best dad jokes of the year. Email: mayo@bbc.co.uk Twitter: @wittertainment

Wander Woman
Pleasant and Green(Land)

Wander Woman

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 31, 2021 45:47


Join Phoebe Smith on assignment in Greenland where she talks to locals about battling extreme weather, fighting to keep their traditions and meets a family who gave up high flying jobs to live more sustainably; discover how to be a better and greener traveller in her Travel Hack of the Month; go beyond the marketing spiel to discover the most sustainable destinations to visit in the new year in Phoebe's Top 10; journey with her to Australia's Outer Reef to meet Professor Minke aka Dr Alistair Birtles a man who has dedicated his life to learning about the rare dwarf minke whale (cetaceans of course being one of the best ways to capture carbon - so saving them, can save the planet too); don't keep it under your hat with our podcast partners Rohan as we delve into the best travel caps, sunhats and beanies for your head; and, from the archives, Phoebe catches up with Queen guitarist and astronomer Brian May about astrotourism and why Tenerife is his favourite place in the world; and meet our Wander Woman of the Month – Freda du Faur, mountaineer extraordinaire, the first known woman to summit Aoraki / Mount Cook in New Zealand despite being forced to wear a skirt.

The Overland Journal Podcast
Interviewing Scott Brady, Overlander and Publisher

The Overland Journal Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2021 44:48


Full show notes available at Overland Journal This episode sponsored in part byDometic OutdoorRedArc Electronics 

Behind the Mic with AudioFile Magazine
THE LAST WINTER by Porter Fox, read by Jeremy Arthur

Behind the Mic with AudioFile Magazine

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2021 5:55


Jeremy Arthur strikes the right balance between dramatic storytelling and a journalistic tone in Porter Fox's remarkable audiobook about climate change. Host Jo Reed and AudioFile's Alan Minskoff discuss this audiobook that features author Fox's globe-trotting climate reporting, which includes stops in the Cascades, Alaska, Greenland, and Switzerland. He interviews experts and aficionados ranging from glaciologists to alpinists to help him suss out the crushing facts of rising oceans, calving glaciers, and hottest temperatures. Read the full review of the audiobook on AudioFile's website. Published by Hachette Audio. Find more audiobook recommendations at audiofilemagazine.com Today's episode of Behind the Mic is brought to you by Oasis Audio, publisher of the 2020 Christian Book Award for Best Audiobook, Chasing Vines, find your way to an immensely fruitful life. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Nature Podcast
Our podcast highlights of 2021

Nature Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 36:07


The Nature Podcast team select some of their favourite stories from the past 12 months.In this episode:00:51 A brain interface to type out thoughtsIn May, we heard about a brain-computer interface that is able to read brain signals from people thinking about handwriting, and translate them into on-screen text. The team behind it hope this technology could be used to help people with paralysis to communicate quicker than before.Nature Podcast: 12 May 2021Research Article: Willett et al.08:28 The AI that argues backIn March, a paper was published detailing an AI that is capable of debating with humans. We found out how it worked, and why designing a debating system is difficult.Nature Podcast: 17 March 2021Research article: Slonim et al.News and Views: Argument technology for debating with humans19:41 Research HighlightsThe sea slugs that can regrow a whole body from their severed head, and research showing that people often don't know when a conversation should end.Research Highlight: Now that's using your head: a sea slug's severed noggin sprouts a new bodyResearch Highlight: How long should a conversation last? The people involved haven't a clue22:31 The inequality at the heart of the pandemicIn April's Coronapod special, Nature senior reporter Amy Maxmen took us with her through eight months of reporting in the San Joaquin Valley, a part of rural California where COVID's unequal toll has proven deadly.Coronapod: 30 April 2021Feature: Inequality's deadly toll30:07 Eavesdropping on a glacier's seismic whisperIn July, we heard about one researcher's unorthodox attempt to listen in to the seismic-whisper at the foot of a Greenland glacier – a method that might reveal more about conditions under these enormous blocks of ice.Nature Podcast:

Woman's Hour
Women of Snow and Ice; Sheila Watt-Cloutier; Antarctic Women; Nancy Campbell and Cold Water Swimming

Woman's Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021 57:27


Sheila Watt-Cloutier, is a world renowned human rights and climate change activist, who has made it her life's work to protect her Inuit culture and the Arctic regions where Inuit live, in Greenland, Canada and Alaska. Sheila was born in Kuujjuaq in Arctic Canada where she lived traditionally, travelling only by dog team for the first ten years of her life. She was elected as President of the Inuit Circumpolar Council in 1995 and launched the first legal petition linking climate change to human rights - work that led to her being nominated for the Nobel Peace Prize. Nancy Campbell is captivated by the stark, rugged beauty of ice and its solid but impermanent nature. Her book The Library of Snow and Ice is about her time spent living in Upernavik, a small town in north-western Greenland and the traces left by explorers of the Arctic and Antarctic. Her recent book Fifty Words for Snow looks at the origins and mythologies of snow around the globe. She shares with Emma her fascination for snow, ice and its place in our world. British women were banned from visiting Antarctica until 1983 when Janet Thomson was finally granted passage by the British Antarctic Survey. But now scores of women are making major contributions to polar science, especially those working on the stability of ice shelves and sheets. So how did women break through the ice ceiling to create opportunities and become leaders in their fields? Emma speaks to Morgan Seag who has just submitted her PhD in gendered institutional change in 20th century Antarctic science to the University of Cambridge and Jo Johnson who has visited Antarctica seven times with the British Antarctic Survey. We also hear from Dr Alison Banwell, a British glaciologist and research scientist who is currently based at the University of Colorado Boulder and her team conducting research on the ice right now; Rebecca Dell and Laura Stevens. Heading to the cold of the Arctic and the Antarctic wrapped up in the right gear is one thing but there are some women that actually choose to immerse themselves in freezing water, even in winter here in the UK. Hayley Dorian is one of them, she has set up a swimming group called Wild Sea Women who meet to embrace the waves in North East England and South-West Scotland . But are there benefits of cold water swimming? Emma finds out from Hayley and Dr Heather Massey who works in the Extreme Environments Lab at the University of Portsmouth.

Gone Medieval
Vikings: Surviving Winter

Gone Medieval

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021 36:50


Vikings are often depicted as fearless warriors, but they were not immune to the harsh realities of northern weather. They not only survived in countries like Greenland and Iceland but thrived. How did they adapt to the unforgiving ice and snow? In this episode, Cat is Joined by Medievalist James McMullen as we explore elements of Viking settlement and winter survival. From insulating clothing, skating, and saga sources to social adaptations and hosting.If you're enjoying this podcast and looking for more fascinating Medieval content then subscribe to our Medieval Monday newsletter here.If you'd like to learn more, we have hundreds of history documentaries, ad free podcasts and audiobooks at History Hit.To download, go to Android or Apple store See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Satellite Stories
A trip to Greenland: Sharing Art & Culture With The World

Satellite Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2021 11:52


Greenland is a country full of entrepreneurs and artists, all relying on uninterrupted internet connectivity, including Liv Jensen - founder and designer at www.InukDesign.one  Liv offers us an insight into how she works with production and shipping companies around the world via her website and social media platforms to sell her artwork. Join Kristina Smith-Meyer, SES's Senior Creative, in discovering Liv's story. For more about what we do, visit SES.com By the way, the music you hear on this episode is Rasmus Berthelsen's hymn ‘Guuterput Qutsinnermiu' (Our God In Heaven). As sung by the Avaat Choir.

6 Ranch Podcast
Sussex, Greenland and Tajikistan with Rob Gearing

6 Ranch Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2021 71:30


Rob Gearing has lived an adventurous life. He's traveled all over the world, summited mountains and hunted exotic animals. He's also the founder of Spartan Precision Equipment, a small rifle support system company out of the UK. In this episode, Rob describes the people, landscape, and fauna of some of the incredible places he's been, along with the intense experiences he's had there. From growing up in Sussex, to climbing mountains in Greenland, and hunting in Tajikistan and Kyrgyzstan, this man has some extraordinary stories to tell that you don't want to miss.InstagramRob GearingSpartan Precision Equipment OnlineSpartan Precision Equipment

Polar Geopolitics
EU Arctic Policy and Geopolitics with Amb. Michael Mann

Polar Geopolitics

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2021 46:36


The European Union updated its Arctic policy in October with a communication that took a strong stand on climate change—calling for hydrocarbons to be left in the ground—and pronounced its status as an Arctic geopolitical actor that would assert its interests across the circumpolar North. Ambassador Michael Mann, the EU Special Envoy for Arctic Matters, joins the Polar Geopolitics podcast for an in-depth discussion on the multiple dimensions of the European Union's engagement in the Arctic, from interactions with Russia, China and the United States, to plans for opening an EU office in Greenland, and its ongoing quest to become an Arctic Council observer.

Satellite Stories
A trip to Greenland: Connecting The Unconnected with Tusass

Satellite Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2021 28:30


Greenland is the world's largest island yet least densely populated... but how do you connect remote settlements like Tasiilaq and Ittoqqortoormiit to the wider world? And what impact does being connected have on the country's education, economy and health care sector? Join Kristina Smith-Meyer on a trip to the country's capital, Nuuk to discover more about SES's partnership with Tusass - Greenland's sole telecommunications provider.  For more about what we do, visit SES.com

Scripts & Scribes
S&S LIVE (Ep 35) Writer Q&A w/ screenwriter Chris Sparling (GREENLAND, BURIED, LAKEWOOD)

Scripts & Scribes

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 19, 2021 92:33


S&S Live (Episode 35): Writer Q&A w/ screenwriter Chris Sparling (writer of GREENLAND starring Gerard Butler, LAKEWOOD with Naomi Watts, THE SEA OF TREES for Gus Van Sant and Matthew McConaughey, BURIED with Ryan Reynolds and many more)!   Ever wonder what it's like to write for A-list talent? Do you hope to write and direct? How do you get a movie sold to Netflix? We'll ask Chris all these questions, so join the live stream and get the answers to all these questions and more (and ask your own Q's in the Q&A!)   Chris on Twitter: https://twitter.com/chrissparling   WATCH a VIDEO version of this Episode:  https://youtu.be/MaQCAD2tJ8c   More great screenwriting and industry interviews and resources: http://scriptsandscribes.com/   Join us on Discord: https://discord.com/invite/wey4e6E  and Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/scriptsandscribes   Stay up to date on Social Media: Twitter: https://twitter.com/ScriptsScribes  Facebook:  https://www.facebook.com/scriptsandscribes/  IG: https://www.instagram.com/scriptsandscribes/   Listen to the podcast on: Anchor.fm: https://anchor.fm/scriptsandscribes  iTunes/Apple Podcasts: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/scripts-scribes/id527744621  Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/1XcDzrHXhwIfTtiLW1SXGY  Google Podcasts: https://podcasts.google.com/feed/aHR0cDovL3d3dy5zY3JpcHRzYW5kc2NyaWJlcy5jb20vP2ZlZWQ9cnNzMg

Jason's Failed Podcast
JFP 3.41 - Archies & Jugheads

Jason's Failed Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 19, 2021 23:10


The AFE gang (Leah Bonnema, Meghan Hanley & I) do a quick wrap up of all our travels and experiences between flights in the Baltimore airport

Climate Breaking News ALLATRA
Scientists have discovered the real reason for the melting of glaciers

Climate Breaking News ALLATRA

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 19, 2021 7:18


It's no secret that the glaciers of Antarctica and Greenland are melting at a catastrophic rate. This is raising public concern, but truthful information about the true reasons is not conveyed to the general public. From this video, you will learn:

Climate Breaking News ALLATRA
How does the CORE affect climate?

Climate Breaking News ALLATRA

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 18, 2021 12:16


The planet's core is now having the greatest impact on the climate, contrary to the theory of the anthropogenic factor. Destabilization of the core leads to more volcanic eruptions and destructive earthquakes, and the weakening of the magnetic field. A number of unprecedented changes are taking place in our planet's core:

Tough Girl Podcast
Ann Bancroft - First women to ski to both poles, and lead the first all women's expedition to the South Pole. Helping girls and women find their voice and potential in whatever they do.

Tough Girl Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 18, 2021 63:13


Minnesota native. Earned a teaching degree from the University of Oregon and taught a short few years before joining a team to dogsled to the North Pole.    As first known woman to travel across the ice to the top of the world, I made a promise to not only follow my dreams but create something bigger than my own personal ambitions.    All my expeditions since have education with them - thus inspiring millions of kids. One focus always is helping girls and women find their voice and potential in whatever they do.    This theme traveled as I became first women to ski to both poles, lead the first all women's expedition to the South Pole in 1992/93 - Lead a team of all women across Greenland 1992 and later cross Antarctica with Liv Arnesen. 2000/01. Many wonderful trips in between on rock and snow, or on water - frozen and liquid.    I started the Ann Bancroft Foundation in Minnesota that gives small monetary grants to girls to try an experience to find courage to find their way in the world as strong and confident and engaged humans.   New episodes of the Tough Girl Podcast go live every Tuesday at 7am UK time - Hit the subscribe button so you don't miss out.    The Tough Girl Podcast is sponsorship and ad free thanks to the monthly financial support of patrons.    Support the mission to increase the amount of female role models in the media. Visit www.patreon.com/toughgirlpodcast and subscribe - super quick and easy to do and it makes a massive difference. Thank you.   Show notes Who is Ann Going to college to become a teacher Following her childhood dream 65, years young  Spending the past 20+ years working with Liv Arnesen Feeling very blessed about her life How her life diverted and changed into the adventure and expedition world at 29 years old Wanting to go to the South Pole How the opportunity came about  Finding herself on the team and how it changed her life Why you have to just go for it Lessons learned from the South Pole The moments of truth  Her love of long expeditions How have polar expeditions changed over the years Wanting to do something for women and girls Being a teacher outside of the classroom Do challenges get easier…. Why you can not short cut preparation Going back to focus on the basics Dealing with setbacks and failure  Why it takes courage to put yourself out there Being able to learn from past mistakes Wanting to cross all of Antarctica in 1992  Having no money and no sponsors What is the legacy they wanted to leave behind Making the most painful decision in her life Connecting with Liv Arnesen Tent life…. Focusing on raising the voices of girls and women Bancroft Arnesen Explore - Access Water  The next challenge on the Mississippi  Quick Fire Questions Honesty - Integrity - Courage Final words of advise for women and girls who want to divert to a different path “I can because she did” The power of living your potential.   Social Media   The Ann Bancroft Foundation empowers girls to imagine something bigger through grants, mentorship, and ongoing development opportunities. The Ann Bancroft Foundation is giving Minnesota girls the strength to achieve their full potential.   www.annbancroftfoundation.org    Instagram: @abfdreamers   Facebook: @AnnBancroftFoundation    Twitter: @ABFdreamers   

The Gary Null Show
The Gary Null Show - 12.17.21

The Gary Null Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2021 61:24


More evidence for vitamin D in MS prevention   University of California San Francisco and Australian National University, December 13 2021. Neurology reported findings of an association between greater time spent outdoors and a reduction in the risk of developing early onset multiple sclerosis (MS) among children and young adults. “Sun exposure is known to boost vitamin D levels,” explained study co-senior author Emmanuelle Waubant, MD, PhD, who is a professor at the UCSF Department of Neurology. “It also stimulates immune cells in the skin that have a protective role in diseases such as MS. Vitamin D may also change the biological function of the immune cells and, as such, play a role in protecting against autoimmune diseases.” Nineteen percent of participants with MS reported spending less than 30 minutes per day outdoors during the summer before the study, compared to only 6% of those without the disease. In comparison with spending less than 30 minutes outdoors during the previous summer, 30 minutes to an hour per day spent outdoors was associated with an adjusted 52% lower chance of acquiring MS and spending 1 to 2 hours daily was associated with an 81% lower risk. High ambient ultraviolet radiation exposure during summer was also protective against the disease.   (NEXT)   Social stress messes up the hippocampus Polish Academy of Sciences, December 3, 2021 Stress might endanger your hippocampus according to a research paper recently published in PLOS One by Stankiewicz and colleagues. Social stress modifies the hippocampal transcriptome Stress responses have been correlated with altered inflammatory functions; for example, infiltration of leukocytes in the brain of socially defeated mice has been reported. The fact that both the hippocampus and the prefrontal cortex stress mice led the researchers to believe that chronic stress may impact the whole brain.   (NEXT)   Popular antioxidant linked to pain relief   University of Naples Federico II (Italy), December 12, 2021 People with pain of unknown causes who took alpha-lipoic acid (ALA) experienced less pain than a placebo group, a double-blind study in the December 2021 issue of Biomedicine & Pharmacotherapy revealed.1 According to the study authors, these findings suggest that this three-decades-old ingredient might be a viable option for patients with unknown causes of joint, muscle or nerve pain. “The use of ALA…represents an interesting option, especially in primary pain with unknown etiology where no specifically-targeted drug can be selected, and where symptomatic drugs may not always be effective but may be associated with serious adverse effects under prolonged treatment,” wrote Cristina Esposito of University of Naples Federico II and associates.   (next)   Why an avocado may be the key to a healthy life (and a slim waist)   University of Wollongong (Australia), December 13, 2021 University of Wollongong's (UOW) Associate Professor Yasmine Probst has been researching the link between diet and health outcomes for years. In one of her recent scientific papers, published in the prestigious British Journal of Nutrition, she finds a correlation between avocado consumption and lower body weight and a smaller waist circumference. "Firstly, we were able to show that both lower body weight and a lower waist circumference have been positively associated with increased avocado intake. Then, we noticed that greater consumption of avocados was also associated with significantly lower consumption of discretionary (junk) foods," Professor Probst explained.   (NEXT)   Study reveals environment, behavior contribute to some 80 percent of cancers   Stony Brook University December 16, 2021 A team of researchers from Stony Brook University have found quantitative evidence proving that extrinsic risk factors, such as environmental exposures and behaviors weigh heavily on the development of a vast majority (approximately 70 to 90 percent) of cancers. The finding, reported in  Nature, in a paper titled "Substantial contribution of extrinsic risk factors to cancer development," may be important for strategizing cancer prevention, research and public health. IThe interdisciplinary team of researchers from the Departments of Applied Mathematics and Statistics, Medicine, Pathology and Biochemistry, concluded the opposite – that most cancers are the result of external risk factors.   (NEXT)   Melatonin exacerbates asthma   Tohoku University (Japan), December 10, 2021 Asthma sufferers generally find their condition gets worse at night. Now, a research group may understand why. Melatonin, a sleep hormone that is sometimes prescribed to treat insomnia, exasperates the constriction of the bronchus—the pathway that moves air to and from the lungs. Patients with asthma often experience a worsening of asthmatic symptoms at night in so-called "nocturnal asthma." According to reports, more than 50 percent of asthma deaths occur at night, exposing a link between nocturnal asthma symptoms and asthma deaths. Although some have proposed several triggers that explain the pathogenesis of nocturnal asthma, the precise mechanisms regulating this asthma phenotype remain obscure.   (OTHER NEWS NEXT)   2021 Arctic Report Card reveals a (human) story of cascading disruptions, extreme events and global connections   THE CONVERSATION. December 14, 2021 On Dec. 14, 2021, a team of 111 scientists from 12 countries released the 16th annual Arctic Report Card, a yearly update on the state of the Arctic system. Like an annual checkup with a physician, the report assesses the Arctic's vital signs – including surface air temperatures, sea surface temperatures, sea ice, snow cover, the Greenland ice sheet, greening of the tundra, and photosynthesis rates by ocean algae – while inquiring into other indicators of health and emerging factors that shed light on the trajectory of Arctic changes. As the report describes, rapid and pronounced human-caused warming continues to drive most of the changes, and ultimately is paving the way for disruptions that affect ecosystems and communities far and wide. The sea ice is also thinning at an alarming rate as the Arctic's oldest and thickest multi-year ice disappears. This loss of sea ice diminishes the Arctic's ability to cool the global climate. It can also alter lower latitude weather systems to an extent that makes previously rare and impactful weather events, like droughts, heat waves and extreme winter storms, more likely. The eight major Arctic rivers are discharging more freshwater into the Arctic Ocean, reflecting an Arctic-wide increase in water coming from land as a result of precipitation, permafrost thaw and ice melt. Remarkably, the summit of the Greenland ice sheet – over 10,000 feet above sea level – experienced its first-ever observed rainfall during summer 2021. This year's report highlights how retreating glaciers and deteriorating permafrost are also posing growing threats to human life through abrupt and localized flooding and landslides. It urges coordinated international efforts to identify these hazards. More rain in the Arctic will further multiply these threats. The Arctic Report Card compiles observations from across the circumpolar North, analyzing them within a polar projection of our planet. This puts the Arctic at the center, with all meridians extending outward to the rest of the world. In this view, the Arctic is tethered to societies worldwide through a myriad of exchanges – the natural circulation of air, ocean and contaminants, the migration of animals and invasive species, as well as human-driven transport of people, pollution, goods and natural resources. The warming of the Arctic is also allowing for greater marine access as sea ice loss permits ships to move deeper into Arctic waters and for longer periods of time.   (NEXT)   Congress cashes in: Report finds dozens of DC lawmakers held shares in vaccine companies LIFESITE NEWS, Dec 15, 2021 A Business Insider analysis has shown that at least 75 federal legislators held stock in Moderna, Johnson & Johnson, or Pfizer in 2020. Meanwhile, the paper trail shows Big Pharma corporations shelled out millions of dollars to finance electoral campaigns and lobby the federal government. The data raised serious ethical concerns about the objectivity of the legislature, prompting questions about how much government actors stand to profit from coercive jab mandates which have deprived Americans of their rights and kneecapped a struggling economy. According to the December 13 report, an analysis of federal financial records led Business Insider to conclude that “[d]ozens of Republican and Democratic lawmakers on Capitol Hill have invested in companies that have a direct stake in the nation's response to the COVID-19 pandemic.” In its analysis — part of the Conflicted Congress project — the news outlet reviewed some “9,000 financial-disclosure reports for every sitting lawmaker and their top-ranking staffers.” The report found that last year at least 35 U.S. representatives and 13 senators held shares in Johnson & Johnson, which has produced the only single-shot COVID injection on the market. Meanwhile, 34 representatives and 11 senators held shares in Pfizer, the Big Pharma giant whose double-dose mRNA jab has been approved under an “emergency use authorization” by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for children as young as five years old. Moderna's shareholders are fewer, with just two representatives and their spouses holding shares in the Bill Gates-funded corporation. “Lawmakers held these investments in COVID-19-minded companies as Congress was at the center of pandemic relief efforts,” Business Insider reported. “In 2020 and 2021, members of Congress voted on six relief bills together worth nearly $6 trillion. Congress also authorized more than $10 billion to help drug companies develop and distribute vaccines and forced health insurers to cover the cost of getting the shot.” Non-profit organization OpenSecrets, which follows the financial dealings of politicians, reported that through PACs and individuals Pfizer spent over $4 million in 2020 to bankroll candidates and committees. Employees and PACs working for Johnson & Johnson, meanwhile, spent over $2 million. “Both Pfizer and Johnson & Johnson gave more to Democrats than to Republicans,” Business Insider reported, adding that “[o]f the big three vaccine manufacturers, Pfizer leads with the most money spent lobbying members of Congress during the pandemic.” Pfizer spent nearly $11 million to lobby the federal government in 2020, OpenSecrets found, while Johnson & Johnson spent $7.9 million on lobbying last year. Business Insider added that the relative newcomer Moderna, which began to lobby the federal government back in 2019, spent $280,000 on lobbying in 2020 and $420,000 in 2021.   (NEXT)   Taiwan: 79% of Covid Cases Are People Who Are “Vaccinated”   DAILY EXPOSE, DECEMBER 13, 2021 • For the three weeks 19 November to 10 December 2021, 170 (79%) of the 215 people who tested positive for Covid had previously had at least one dose of a Covid injection. The summary of the positive tests or Covid “cases”, by vaccination status, shown by the CDC's daily reports for the period 19 November to 10 December (E&OE).  Excepting two days, 26-27 November, all days show that more than 60% of positive test were those who had been “vaccinated” against disease. Prof. Sucharit Bhakdi has said: the Covid vaccines were designed to fail.  Antibodies produced in the blood stream, such as those produced after an injection into a muscle, cannot protect anyone from a respiratory infection.  If a person is infected with a respiratory virus after being injected it is not a “breakthrough” infection as the “vaccination” did not protect against respiratory viral infection in the first place. Dr., Richard Fleming has concluded the same.  Using Pfizer, Moderna and Johnson & Johnson's trial data used to calculate efficacy of their Covid injections, Dr. Fleming demonstrated that with an absolute risk ration of 0.88%, less than 1%, “there is no statistical reduction in Covid cases between the vaccinated and the unvaccinated.”   (NEXT)   Digital Surveillance — the Real Motive Behind Push to Vaccinate Kids   “The real purpose behind the historic, unprecedented push to vaccinate the very young, even against diseases like COVID that do not pose a threat to them, is to fold the current generation of children into the blossoming global digital identity system.” By Michael Nevradakis, Ph.D., Childrens Health Defense. December 15, 2021 It was the beginning of the preceding decade, January 2010, when Bill Gates, via the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, proclaimed “[w]e must make this the decade of vaccines,” adding that “innovation will make it possible to save more children than ever before.” In launching this so-called “Decade of Vaccines,” the Gates Foundation pledged $10 billion in funding. But Gates wasn't the only actor behind this initiative. Moreover, in 2010, a “Global Vaccine Action Plan” was announced as part of this initiative. It was a collaboration with the World Health Organization (WHO), UNICEF and the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), with Dr. Anthony Fauci serving on the leadership council. As the Gates Foundation stated at the time: “The Global Vaccine Action Plan will enable greater coordination across all stakeholder groups — national governments, multilateral organizations, civil society, the private sector and philanthropic organizations — and will identify critical policy, resource and other gaps that must be addressed to realize the life-saving potential of vaccines.” What, or who, is the GAVI Alliance? Also known as the “Vaccine Alliance,” it proclaims a mission to “save lives and protect people's health,” and states it “helps vaccinate almost half the world's children against deadly and debilitating infectious diseases.” GAVI goes on to describe its core partnership with various international organizations, including names that are by now familiar: the WHO, UNICEF, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation and the World Bank. (Far from helping the world's poor, the World Bank has been described by a former insider, John Perkins, as an organization that uses “economic hit men” to subjugate financially crippled countries). In 2018, GAVI, through its INFUSE (innovation for update, scale and equity in immunization) Initiative, put forth the following “food for thought”: “Imagine a future in which all children have access to life-saving vaccines no matter where they live — a future in which parents and health workers ensure their timely vaccination, a future in which they have their own digitally stored health record that cannot be lost or stolen, a future in which, regardless of gender, economic or social standing, this record allows each child (and parents) to have access to a bank account, go to school, access services and ultimately build a prosperous life. “This future is possible today. With the latest advances in digital technologies that enable more effective ways to register, identify births and issue proof of identity and authentication for access to services — we are on the brink of building a healthier and more prosperous future for the world's most vulnerable children.” The GAVI Alliance also closely collaborates with the ID2020 Alliance, founded in 2016, which claims to advocate in favor of “ethical, privacy-protecting approaches to digital ID,” adding that “doing digital ID right means protecting civil liberties. Unsurprisingly, there is no clarification provided regarding the potential loss of civil liberties for individuals who choose, for any reason, not to be vaccinated and who are therefore excluded from large swaths of society in areas where COVID passports have been implemented and enforced. Such rhetoric on the part of ID2020 is reminiscent of the public statements put forth by the European Union (EU) as it was preparing to launch its so-called “Green Pass” earlier this year. Highlighting the possibilities that the GAVI-ID2020 collaboration could bring, the INFUSE call for innovation states: “According to the ID2020 Alliance — a public-private partnership that includes Gavi — the use of digital health cards for children could directly improve coverage rates by ensuring a verifiable, accurate record and by prompting parents to bring their children in for a subsequent dose. “From the parents' perspective, digital records can make it convenient to track a child's vaccines and eliminate unnecessary paperwork. “And as children grow, their digital health card can be used to access secondary services, such as primary school, or ease the process of obtaining alternative credentials. Effectively, the digital health card could, depending on country needs and readiness, potentially become the first step in establishing a legal, broadly recognized identity.” The final report from these sessions indicates, among other things, a desire from the stakeholders for the expansion of public-private partnerships for the further development and implementation of digital ID regimes worldwide, including in the Global South. One of the stakeholders present, the not-for-profit Secure Identity Alliance, touts its support for “the provision of legal, trusted identity for all and driving the development of inclusive digital services necessary for sustainable, worldwide economic growth and prosperity.” A paper published in July by the Security Identity Alliance discusses “making health certificates a workable reality.” One of the five principles the paper puts forth for such health passports is that they are “futureproofed,” by offering “multi-purpose functionality” in order to “ensure ongoing value beyond today's current crisis.” Moreover, one of its founding members and current board members is the Thales Group, a private company involved in aerospace, defense and security — in short, a defense contractor. On its website, the Thales Group proudly promotes its “smart health card” and Digital ID Wallettechnology. Amidst utopian language claiming “we're ready for change” and “putting citizens in control,” the Digital ID Wallet promises the public the ability to “access the rights and services to which we are entitled.” The U.S. House of Representatives on Nov. 30 passed H.R. 550, the Immunization Infrastructure Modernization Act of 2021. If passed by Congress, this law would provide $400 million in funding to expand vaccine-tracking systems at the state and local level, enabling state health officials to monitor the vaccination status of American citizens and to provide this information to the federal government. Vaccine passports and no-fly lists for the unvaccinated — a concept for which Fauci expressed his support — could be created under the law. In September, for instance, Apple announced a partnership with eight states — Arizona, Connecticut, Georgia, Iowa, Kentucky, Maryland, Oklahoma and Utah — to make those respective states' driver's licenses available in digital form via the Apple Wallet platform. Indeed, New York went so far as to make a “blueprint” of its vaccine pass platform available, “as a guide to assist other states, territories, and entities in the expansion of compatible COVID-19 vaccine credential systems to advance economic development efforts nationwide.” Looking at the EU, one of the bloc's priorities as part of its 2019-2024 five-year plan is to create a “digital identity for all Europeans.” Namely, each EU citizen and resident would have access to a “personal digital wallet” under this initiative. The EU subsequently presented its plans for the “European Digital Decade,” where under the EU's “Digital Compass,” 100% of key public services will be available digitally, with a target of 80% uptake of digital identification documents. A recent article in The Atlantic, “Why Aren't We Even Talking About Easing COVID Restrictions?” questioned why vaccine passport mandates in the U.S. have no sunset date. Indeed, if the proclamation of the Secure Identity Alliance regarding the need to “futureproof” such digital documents is any indication, it may be the case that governments have no intention to scrap vaccine passports.   (NEXT)   AmazonSmile donated more than $40,000 to anti-vaccine groups in 2020   THE GUARDIAN. 15 Dec 2021 Amazon's charitable program is paying tens of thousands of dollars to anti-vaccine groups in a move experts say is “shocking” as millions of Americans remain unvaccinated in the face of another Covid-19 wave. AmazonSmile reportedly donated more than $40,000 to leading sources of vaccine misinformation in 2020, according to separate analyses by Popular Information and the Washington Post. The charity program of the e-commerce giant donates 0.5% from purchases to designated nonprofits – including at least a dozen organizations working against widespread vaccination in the US. The National Vaccine Information Center has received $41,533.71 over the course of several years, according to an anonymous volunteer. Last year, Amazon gave them $12,675, the Post reports – one of a dozen groups to receive such funding. Children's Health Defense, headed by Robert F Kennedy Jr, received $10,969; Physicians for Informed Consent received $3,626; and Informed Consent Action Network received $2,970.41.   (NEXT)   Latest VAERS estimate: 388,000 Americans killed by the COVID vaccines   Steve Kirsch, December 14, 2021 I have argued that the anaphylaxis rate is an appropriate number to use to (under) estimate deaths because I believed that deaths would be less reported than anaphylaxis to VAERS for two reasons: 1) usually lacks the time proximity to vaccination, 2) the person seeing the death may not know the vaccination status of the victim and may not technically be required to report the death. That day has arrived courtesy of Wayne at VAERS Analysis. Wayne did a URF computation using death data in CMS. This overcomes any objections about the validity of using anaphylaxis rates as a proxy for death rates. The VAERS URF he computed was 44.64. This seems reasonable to me. It's really not far from the 41 I calculated. Also, Wayne subsequently looked at the numbers for 9 states. The average value was 40, not far from the 41 I calculated from anaphylaxis. I had one of my team members double check his numbers. No mistake. Now, let's see what that means. As of Dec 14, 2021, there are 9,136 deaths reported into VAERS. If we subtract out more than twice the total number of deaths reported in any previous year (to be super conservative about estimating background deaths): So our new best estimate of the number of “excess deaths” caused by the vaccine is 388,000. Because there isn't a plausible mechanism of excess death other than the vaccine (certainly our “always vigilant” CDC has never suggested an alternate cause), the process of elimination leads us to conclude the obvious: that these excess deaths were, in fact, caused by the vaccine. This should really be a surprise to anyone paying attention to the clinical trials. For example, in the Pfizer trial, you were much more likely to die if you got the vaccine than if you got the placebo. They simply forgot to mention that in the abstract of the paper (and they were incapable of accurately counting the number of deaths in each group as well). In short, the vaccine is a killing machine.  

Tech and Science Daily | Evening Standard
How AI predicts future dementia cases

Tech and Science Daily | Evening Standard

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2021 6:43


Using machine learning a new study's found Artificial Intelligence can predict with up to 92% accuracy if a person will develop dementia within two years. TikTok school threat warning: Some US schools are cancelling classes. How the vikings were no match for climate change in Greenland. Good news for creators: Snapchat reveals a new dedicated mobile video editing app. A TikToker has traded her way up from a hairpin to a house. Meta blocks surveillance firms targeting people on Facebook, and the Oxford Union show off AI which can debate for and against its ideas. Plus, experts in Australia have discovered a millipede with 1,306 legs. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

WhatCulture
10 Recent Movies NOBODY Expected To Be This Good - The Suicide Squad! Greenland! Godzilla Vs. Kong! Pig?!

WhatCulture

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021 9:46


Free Guy was WAY better than anyone anticipated. Marcus Bronzy presents 10 Recent Movies NOBODY Expected To Be This Good... See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Earth Wise
Global Flood Risk From Melting Ice | Earth Wise

Earth Wise

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2021 2:00


Approximately 10% of the land area on Earth is covered by ice.  This includes glaciers, ice caps, and the ice sheets of Antarctica and Greenland.  Nearly 70% of all fresh water on earth is locked away in ice.  If all this land ice were to melt, global sea levels would rise by more than 200 […]

Sleep Eat Perform Repeat
#150 Adrian Hayes - British record-breaking Adventurer, Author, and Keynote Speaker

Sleep Eat Perform Repeat

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2021 38:31


Today we spoke with Adrian Hayes - British record-breaking Adventurer, Author, and Keynote Speaker. This episode was brought to you by Hauora - a performance wellbeing growth partner. Hauora aims to educate and impact individual behavioural change and organisational culture to ignite health, wellbeing, and performance. Find out more at www.HauoraLife.com Adrian is a British record-breaking polar explorer and adventurer, best known for reaching the three extreme points of the Earth—the Three Points Challenge...walking all the way to the North Pole, South Pole, and summiting Mt Everest, all in the shortest period of time (1 year, 217 days - his first Guinness World record). He has completed the straight-line vertical crossing of the Greenland ice cap, crossed the Arabian desert, and summited K2, known to be extremely challenging. A passionate social campaigner and commentator, an Arabic and Nepalese speaking former British Army Gurkha Officer, who also spent two years in the Special Forces, Adrian has also written two books and featured in three documentaries to date. He is also an Advisory Board member for one of the future Mars projects. A Fellow of the Royal Geographical Society, he has lived and worked in 8 countries and traveled to more than 100. In his social commentator and campaign work, Adrian is an ambassador on economic, social & environmental sustainability, which we discuss in this episode. We speak about themes for each year in relation to goal-setting, a huge rock of Adrian's philosophy as a leader. We unpack that moment when he reaches the top of a mountain...the experience, and how it is captured - food for thought for those of us stuck to our phones. Adrian opens up, and displays his vulnerability, shares his stories of grit...as to how there is something to be always taken from an experience, good or bad. --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Key Timestamps: - 00:49 - Gift in every circumstance - 03:41 - Write down your goals - 07:56 - Goal Setting - 08:55 - Being goals taking more importance - 09:23 - Authenticity, and victimhood - 10:35 - Active response, tap into gut instinct - 12:50 - Motivational speaker + manic self depressive - 13:30 - Feedback greatest gift we can get - 17:20 - Whatever you want to do be honest & authentic - 19:15 - Survey of Everest climbs + good causes - 19:45 - Social media subconscious hook - 22:11 - Don't even post it - 22:57- Beautiful surroundings t science - 24:16 - Top of K2 - 24:57 - The journey back down - 26:18 - Take stock after the success - 30:42 - Single issue tunnel vision and trade-offs - 32:15 - Systems and sustainability - 33:27 - What is high performance? --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Social: www.instagram.com/sleepeatperformrepeat.com www.twitter.com/SEPR_Podcast www.linkedin.com/company/sleep-eat-perform-repeat/ www.facebook.com/SleepEatPerformRepeat Thank you for supporting the show!

Finding Genius Podcast
Climate Modeling Using the Polar Ice Sheets and Changes to their Environment with Dr. Xavier Fettweis

Finding Genius Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 12, 2021 27:44


Can polar ice sheets be used as an indicator for climate health? By monitoring shifts and melting, metrics of change can be recorded to aid researchers. Press play to learn: How the sheets shift and change over time What lies below the ice in the poles What can generally be seen as the seasons change each year Dr. Xavier Fettweis, a Research Associate - Chercheur qualifié (FNRS), shares his current research on the formation and movement of ice sheets, mainly in Greenland and Antarctica. The ice caps and sheets melting have been used as rhetoric for many angles of the climate change debate for decades, but the reality of the situation can be surprising. By measuring the ice sheets over time, we can track trends and other environmental factors worldwide through only a few points of contact.  What we see with the melting and shifts of ice sheets can be intimidating when looking to the future. If a specific tipping point is reached in the next century, it may be impossible to reform any ice sheets in the future.  Search for Dr. Xavier Fettweis on your search engine of choice to learn more. Episode also available on Apple Podcast: http://apple.co/30PvU9C

Aww Shift
Dr Ruth Allan - A life or service

Aww Shift

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 10, 2021 26:01


In this episode, our guest is Dr. Ruth Mary Allan, an executive coach, professional speaker, and trainer. She is the Lead Certified Brain Health Professional in the UK, trained by the Amen Clinics, a Certified Havening Techniques Practitioner, and Certified High-Performance Coach. Ruth is passionate about helping individuals who have lost connection with who they are, reconnect with their best self so they can effectively lead their family and team to the next level of performance and potential and step into their greatness. She has over 25 years of coaching and mentoring experience, facilitating the recovery and boosting the performance of individuals, projects, and teams.   [5:58]Why should we listen to you? A reason why you should listen to me is that I'm genuinely a nice person. I meet people where they're at, without any baggage and preconceptions. I try and make my way around and help people discover stuff they don't realize is going on in their lives and give them that lever to step into their best self again. I'm one of the people who love to listen and help you discover what you're truly made of and push you to get to that next level in life.   [7:09]What lead you to have a Ph.D. in Medical Imaging and Spectroscopy? I was always interested in science as a kid. I was choosing between becoming a doctor and a medical doctor and doing physics. When I was a kid, I told myself that I wasn't intelligent enough to become a doctor, and I didn't have the memory capacity to do that. I chose physics because it's more on formula and not much memory required. You just have to apply what you learn. That's what started me in my physics field. [8:19] I started on a four-year degree and ended up spending seven years at university in the end because I just loved it so much. I didn't know what I wanted to do. I just wanted to get more education. I wanted to go into imaging the brain when I was looking for a Ph.D., and I stumbled across the Ph.D. on Terahertz Imaging and Spectroscopy. I had no idea what it was about, and it was a new field of study, so I dove straight into it. After all, I was interested in looking at cancer because my grandmother died of breast cancer. I wanted to do something meaningful from a medical perspective. [10:30]Entering the Corporate World I joined the firm because I wanted to get back to medical imaging. That was really where my passion was, and I wanted to get back to life science and healthcare. I wanted to explore. I'd always been a consultant and a contractor running my own business, and I wanted to experience life in the corporate world. I also wanted to have a family. That was my motive to join this company.   [12:59]What was the motivation for High-Performance Coaching? I realized that it wasn't just me. The framework I use for my clients was born as I felt the business wasn't looking at the facts behind what was happening to me. [13:39] I just realized that I needed to break free and discover my best self. My whole vision for my business was to help other people harness their potential, and I wasn't doing it for myself. I went on this transformational journey with coaching, and one of the drivers behind joining the corporate world was to get professional coaching.   [17:49]How did the coaching start? I had some people coming to me. My friends came to me, and then I just built it from there. I built my connections with the Amen clinics and became certified as a coach through the Amen University. But on the way, my husband and I were able to realize our dreams of ski touring across the French Alps. It turned out that it wasn't just him and I ski touring. Eight months later, our daughter Lily was born. [18:46]  That kind of really shifted me into helping my clients in the business space and helping people who have kids who are struggling with their brain health.   [19:14]What do you think is unique about the figured out mentality? Everything is kind of figure out-able. You've just got to have the patience to do it. The only person that gets in your way in terms of progress is you. No one else gets in your way because other people may tell you you're not capable. You don't have to listen to them. It's your choice as to what you choose to listen to and what you don't. [20:00] From a military perspective, we've been part of expeditions climbing unclimbed peaks in Greenland. You never know if you're going to get to the top. You have to have faith, belief, determination, and strength. Know that even if you don't get there, there will always be another way.    [20:49]Do you have hope for what's currently going on? In this situation, I have hope. We have the opportunity to change. We've got a real opportunity to make a shift. It's about whether we've got the willingness to do that. We've seen the power of the people in this pandemic. We've had phenomenal success by everybody pulling together to get people vaccinated. We're now over two-thirds of the population has been received their first vaccination. That's a phenomenal achievement in the space of a year when we've gone from not knowing what to do with no solution in sight to where we are today. [22:00] We've shown how successful as a race we can be when we work together and when we connect not just physically, but through the power of zoom and all the other available platforms, the power that we have to share our message and make a real difference to other people's lives. [22:28] It's now time for people to stand up, make their voices heard, and make it count and give that power back to people that they feel lost due to the pandemic.   [23:13]How do you see yourself showing up for the next six months? The most important thing for me is to help people unchain their pain and using havening. I've noticed with my clients that you can give people all the tools in the world, but if they're held back from past pain and can't let it go, it's like being on a bungee cord. You're running forward to your destination and get yanked back again. You have to break those chains to make that progress forward.   [24:20]Havening The great thing about havening is that it uses the power of the human touch to help you unchain yourself from emotional pain that you may have experienced from your past or your experience in your present. It's a very similar approach to other therapies like EMDR. The great thing is you can empower the person to do the work on themselves. [25:19] Everybody at every age is struggling to some degree. The power of havening gives you back that ability to release some of the emotional charges you may have from day-to-day anxiety or stress. [26:14] When I was at rock bottom, it's hard to get out of bed. It's hard to lift your feet and put them on the floor. Your emotional energy and negative energy leaks out whether you like it or not. When you bury it, it has to go somewhere. It doesn't just dissipate. It comes out in the form of anger for some people. For others, it may come out in the form of skin conditions. It leaks out of your body because there's a limit. [26:52] Havening is a great tool to help people manage their emotions, take back control of their mindset, and help them break free of the ones that aren't helping and leverage those that are, and empower them to move forward.   [27:46]What promise did God make to the world when He created you? When He created me, He promised to help people win back their power to step into their best selves. To show people how they can take back control of their power is through techniques such as havening and health coaching to break free of the things that prevent them from showing up as their best self.   Key Quotes [9:51-9:57] “When you're an entrepreneur, you've got no idea where you're going on and how to get there.” [22:54-23:02] “People need something to lift them, to lift their spirits, and to raise them out of the ashes.” Learn more about Dr. Ruth Mary Allan on: LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/ruthmaryallan Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ruthmaryallan Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/ruthmaryallan Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/ruthmaryallan Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC3-m8eWuD6-vZK1Ll92WyFA?view_as=subscriber  

Clinton Baptiste’s Paranormal Podcast
Clinton Baptiste's Paranormal Podcast Christmas Special 2021

Clinton Baptiste’s Paranormal Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 10, 2021 46:30


Let Clinton celebrate Christmas with your family!Something for everyone this year. The world famous clairvoyant medium and psychic welcomes back his former PA, Ruth Abbott to collect some of her belongings. But no touching, please. He also contacts the loving spirit of someone's father this time manifesting on earth as a Daddy Longlegs and…who's that tapping on Clinton's Yuletide knocker? - it's his scintillating sibling, Karen. Our Clinton brilliantly predicts what she's got him for Christmas Day. Next, for you younger listeners, Clinton offers up a magical story, when he reads a passage from his new kids' book “Taruak and Santa in Greenland”. What a shame then that some busybody from the Greenlandic Minstry for Culture gets in touch to complain about a piffling copyright issue. And what's this? Those bureaucratic ‘no-marks' in grey suits have even grassed him up to Sir David Attenborough no less, who is far from happy! However, when all's said and done it's festive fun that Clinton is all about and he manages to turn things around with an exciting world record attempt – to contact twenty spirits in under two minutes - Wow!Starring Alex LoweWith Sally- Anne Hayward, Sarah Thom, Toby Longworth, Rich Wilson, Kate Mcgann, Josh Cluderay and Lewis MacleodWritten by Alex Lowe and Josh Cluderay with additional material by Lewis Macleod and the cast.Produced by Andy Hughes for 11-29 MediaClinton Baptiste appears courtesy of Goodnight Vienna Productions.TO SEE CLINTON AND RAMONE LIVE ON TOUR ALL OVER THE UK FROM SEPT- DEC 2022 go to Clintonbaptiste.com/live.

Sporting Witness
The Tibetan football team

Sporting Witness

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2021 8:59


In 2001, a group of Tibetan exiles and a Danish ex-footballer teamed up to create the Tibetan national football team, in the face of many obstacles, including threats from China. Robert Nicholson talked to Michael Nybrandt and team captain Sonam Wangyal about their first ever game against Greenland. A Whistledown Production, first broadcast in 2017. PHOTO: The Tibetan team lining up for their match against Greenland (Getty Images)

Art Biz Podcast
Focusing on Self-Care to Increase Productivity with Maria Coryell Martin (#111)

Art Biz Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2021 50:43


There is an urgency to making the work and getting it out there so that you can find the people who respond to it, but it becomes much harder to accomplish much of anything if your body aches from the physically demanding work you do, or your shoulders are tense from hunkering over the computer all afternoon, or you're living on caffeine and wine, or especially if you aren't sleeping. If you want to improve your productivity, and your health, then it's time to focus on your self-care. What are you doing to take care of yourself? To keep up your energy, maintain a positive mindset, balance out the hours in the studio and on the computer? Is balance even necessary when you're doing what you love? In this episode of The Art Biz, I talk with Maria Coryell-Martin, a busy mom with a thriving art career and companion business that supports her family. With all that she has going on, Maria makes time for almost daily swims and cold, open water, healthy eating, and plenty of sleep. Listen to hear how she does it. Highlights Maria's expeditionary art combines her passions for science, art and education. (2:20) The motivation behind splitting Maria's two artist endeavors. (4:57) An income breakdown from Art Toolkit and Expeditionary Art. (7:44) Maria's art takes her all over the world. (10:31) “I want to be a capable, useful person in the field.” (14:39) How Maria successfully solicits funds for her expeditions. (17:17) Self-care is the rock for Maria's sanity. (19:25) The physical aspect of making art requires taking care of your body. (24:06) A typical day for Maria starts with getting enough sleep and swimming in the ocean. (28:21) Monitoring energy levels, controlling what you're eating, responding to stress. (35:15) Setting boundaries around your time and energy. (40:57) Getting the help you need so you can do your best work. (42:45) The simple first steps for starting self-care today. (46:00) Mentioned Bon Appetit Lentil Burgers Cooper Island Black Guillemot Research Maria Coryell Martin's Expeditionary Art Art Toolkit @ExpeditionaryArt @ArtToolkit Resources Show notes, images, and listener comments Artist Planning Sessions Free e-course: The Artist's Annual Review Quotes “Ask for what you need. You may not get it, but at least you'll learn something.” — Maria Coryell Martin “I've developed tools and habits over my life that are my rock for my sanity.” — Maria Coryell Martin “Work is like a river. You dip your toes in and do what you can and then you take your toes out and it keeps flowing.” — Maria Coryell Martin “Mistakes are part of everything you do, but you've just got to move forward and let mistakes happen.” — Maria Coryell Martin Guest Bio Maria Coryell-Martin is an expeditionary artist following the tradition of traveling artists as naturalists and educators. She graduated from Carleton College in 2004 and received a Thomas J. Watson fellowship to explore remote regions through art from 2004-2005. Since then Maria has worked with scientists, local communities, and travelers in Alaska, Canada, Greenland, and the Antarctic Peninsula. In the field, Coryell-Martin sketches with ink and watercolor, and collects multimedia recordings to build her palette of place, a record of experience, climate, and color. This led her to create the wildly popular Art Toolkit.   This work became the basis for exhibits of large-scale studio and field paintings, as well as multimedia presentations and hands-on workshops for audiences of all ages to promote observation, scientific inquiry, and environmental awareness. First posted: artbizsuccess.com/self-care-martin-podcast 

Dark Histories
The Gloucester Sea Serpent of 1817

Dark Histories

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2021 64:29


From the ancient pages of the Old Norse Edda to the interwar pages of American adventure magazines, the depths of our oceans have, in imagination, been host to unspeakable monsters for many hundreds of years. In modern times, the phrase “Here Be Dragons” has been absorbed into popular culture as titles for books, films, TV shows, bands and video games, all this despite the fact that it only ever appeared on the unknown seas of a single 16th Century Globe. Far more common were the giant sea monsters that adorned maps for hundreds of years, existing only as illustrations and in the minds of those that viewed them. In the summer of 1817, just off the coast of Massachusetts, however, these illustrations became flesh and blood for several weeks when witnesses of a Giant Sea Serpent numbered into the hundreds, in what the 19th Century Harvard Professor Jacob Bigelow called “the most interesting problem in the science of natural history.”   SOURCES   France, Robert L. (2021) Ethnozoology of Egede's “Most Dreadful Monster,” The Foundational Sea Serpent. Society of Ethnobiology, Boston, MA, USA.   Egede, Hans (1818) A Description of Greenland. T & J Allman, London, UK.   Paxton, C. G. M. & Knatterud, E. (2005) Cetaceans, sex and sea serpents: an analysis of the Egede accounts of a “most dreadful monster” seen off the coast of Greenland in 1734. Archives of Natural History, London, UK.   Nickell, Joe (2019) Gloucester Sea-Serpent Mystery: Solved after Two Centuries. Skeptical Enquirer, Vol. 43, No. 5. https://skepticalinquirer.org/2019/09/gloucester-sea-serpent-mystery-solved-after-two-centuries/   Magnus, Olaus (1658) A compendious history of the Goths, Swedes, & Vandals, and other northern nations. J. Streater, London, UK.   Pontoppidan, Erik (1755) The Natural history of Norway. A. Linde, London, UK.   Linnæan Society of New England (1817) Report of a committee of the Linnæan society of New England, relative to a large marine animal, supposed to be a serpent, seen near Cape Ann, Massachusetts, in August 1817. Cummings & Hilliard, Boston, USA   Brown, Chandos Michael (1990) A Natural History of the Gloucester Sea Serpent: Knowledge, Power, and the Culture of Science in Antebellum America. American Quarterly Vol. 42, No. 3 (Sep., 1990), pp. 402-436. The Johns Hopkins University Press, USA   The Long Island Star (1817) A Frightful Fish! The Long Island Star, 20 August, 1817, p.3. NY, USA.   Dublin Evening Mail (1842) The Missouri Leviathan. Monday 07 November, 1842, p.3. Dublin, ROI.   The Illustrated London News (1848) The Great Sea Serpent. The Illustrated London News, 28 October, 1848, p.8. London, UK.   ---------- For extended show notes, including maps, links and scripts, head over to darkhistories.com Support the show by using our link when you sign up to Audible: http://audibletrial.com/darkhistories or visit our Patreon for bonus episodes and Early Access: https://www.patreon.com/darkhistories The Dark Histories books are available to buy here: http://author.to/darkhistories Dark Histories merch is available here: https://bit.ly/3GChjk9 Connect with us on Facebook: http://facebook.com/darkhistoriespodcast Or find us on Twitter: http://twitter.com/darkhistories & Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/dark_histories/ Or you can contact us directly via email at contact@darkhistories.com or via voicemail on: (415) 286-5072 or join our Discord community: https://discord.gg/cmGcBFf The Dark Histories Butterfly was drawn by Courtney, who you can find on Instagram @bewildereye Music was recorded by me © Ben Cutmore 2017 Other Outro music was Paul Whiteman & his orchestra with Mildred Bailey - All of me (1931). It's out of copyright now, but if you're interested, that was that.

Outlook
The chicken who sailed the world

Outlook

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2021 39:10


Guirec Soudée had always dreamed of sailing around the world. He set out at the age of 21 in a rusty 30ft boat, with no communication equipment and little sailing experience. He'd wanted to take a pet but a cat or dog seemed impractical. Then, during a stop in the Canary Islands he met Monique - a Rhode Island Red chicken and, 'fell in love'. She was to become his confidante and best friend during a four-year trip. Together, they sailed across the Atlantic and then on to Greenland. They confronted icebergs and storms and were trapped in the Arctic ice for 130 days. They even crossed the treacherous Northwest Passage between the Pacific and the Atlantic. He became the youngest sailor to complete the crossing; Monique the only chicken. Guirec has written a book about his journey with Monique called A Sailor, a Chicken, an Incredible Voyage. Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com Presenter: Jo Fidgen Producer: Katy Takatsuki (Photo: Monique and Guirec. Credit: Guirec Soudée)

Paddling The Blue Podcast
Paddling the Blue #49 - Erik Jorgensen - Father and Daughter in the Wilderness for 45 Days

Paddling The Blue Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2021 50:28


Erik Jorgensen is an adventurer, author, expedition leader, and most importantly, a father. He's joining us from his home in Denmark. Erik has many amazing trips under his belt, and we're going to talk about a few with his daughter that have really captivated my attention. Thank you to listener Henning de Haas for referring Erik. If you have an idea for a future guest, please reach out to me at john@paddlingtheblue.com.  Enjoy today's episode with Erik! Connect: Erik Jorgensen Learn: Avannaq http://www.avannaq.no/ Greenland paddle, Gram https://gramkajak.dk/The one Erik uses: https://gramkajak.dk/produkter/delbare-pagajer-i-trae-og-kulfiber/gram-9100t-tredelt-carbonpagaj/ Kayak Panthera kajak fra Struer Boatshttps://komud.dk/kajakken-panthera-fra-struer-boats-danmark-rundt-i-kajak-hurtigst-muligt/ https://www.thomassondesign.com/en/catalog/my-kayaks/panthera

Living A Life In Full
Jon Gertner on the Stories Worth Telling

Living A Life In Full

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 84:01


How do we make sense of the ideas of the present, that might determine our lives in the future? How can we weigh the legitimacy of new technologies--and sort through what is hype, and what is not? Well, that's what Jon Gertner, a veteran journalist, editor, historian, and author, seems to have figured out. Jon is a contributing writer at The New York Times Magazine, and is best known for his work on science, technology, innovation, business, and society. His journalism and reviews also appear in Wired, The New York Times Book Review, The Washington Post, The Wall Street Journal, and a number of other print and digital publications. Jon served as an editor for Fast Company, Money and The American Lawyer. Jon is a graduate of Cornell University and is on the faculty of Princeton where he teaches the McGraw Seminar on writing. His first book, The Idea Factory: Bell Labs and the Great Age of American Innovation, was a New York Times bestseller. His latest book is The Ice at the End of the World: An Epic Journey into Greenland's Buried Past and Our Perilous Future. We'll be doing a deep dive on both of his books, as well as his approach to writing and journalism.

Northern Soundings: Alaska in Conversation
The Continuity of Research

Northern Soundings: Alaska in Conversation

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 58:55


University of Alaska Fairbanks Geophysicists Carl Benson and Matthew Sturm continue their discussions of Carl’s work in Greenland and Alaska. And the late Frank Soos recorded several book reviews earlier this year. This episode I include his look at Rachel Kushner’s The Hard Crowd.

Green Connections Radio -  Women Who Innovate With Purpose, & Career Issues, Including in Energy, Sustainability, Responsibil
Why Glaciers Matter – Twila Moon, Ph.D., Glacier Scientist, Univ of Colorado at Boulder – COP26

Green Connections Radio - Women Who Innovate With Purpose, & Career Issues, Including in Energy, Sustainability, Responsibil

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 24:48


“For the entire development of modern civilization, Greenland and Antarctica have been holding vast amounts of water as frozen ice and helping us to maintain very steady sea levels around our coast. And that's allowed us to build infrastructure, build mega cities, right on the coast where many of our world's mega cities sit. Now….we're raising our air temperatures …and that's adding more water to our oceans, which is arriving at shores around the world… disrupting the infrastructure we built…(and) caus(ing) health and other problems.” Dr. Twila Moon on Electric Ladies Podcast We hear about melting ice caps as a symbol of global warming. What do they mean? What does the ice caps mean? What does the fact that they're melting mean? And what does it mean for our cities, towns and communities? Listen to Dr. Twila Moon, a climate scientist from and the University of Colorado at Boulder's National Snow and Ice Data Center who specializes in the ice caps - a cryosphere scientist – in this fascinating interview with Electric Ladies host Joan Michelson where she helps us understand what those melting ice caps mean for us. You'll hear about: Why glaciers matter How glaciers melting directly affects our daily lives. Why small changes in air temperature directly affect our infrastructure, food and water supplies. What we can do in our daily conversations to help people understand the impact of climate change. Plus, insightful career advice …. “So first recognizing that you're in a continually evolving space of influence and the dreams that you, that position that you were applying for three years ago, take the time now to consider…(that) you might've already grown out of that dream and already be able to take on bigger responsibilities or bigger roles. And the second thing is learning how to say no saying no is saying yes to the things already on your plate.” Twila Moon on the Electric Ladies podcast Read Joan's related Forbes articles here too. You'll also want to listen to: Sandrine Dixson, Co-President, The Club of Rome, from COP26, about the need for transformational public-private partnerships to get to net zero. Gillian Tett, Financial Times, from COP26, about what the new financial alliance means for a net zero economy. Olivia Martin, USAFacts.org, on the State of the Earth in 2021, using various sources of government data. Michele Wucker, thought leaders and author of “You Are What You Risk: The New Art & Science to Navigating an Uncertain World.” Subscribe to our newsletter to receive our podcasts, blog, events and special coaching offers.. Thanks for subscribing on Apple Podcasts or iHeartRadio and leaving us a review! Reach us on Twitter @joanmichelson

Invasion of the Remake Podcast
Ep.316 The 31 Days of Horror Challenge 2021 Part Two

Invasion of the Remake Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 136:29


Welcome to part two of Invasion of the Remake's annual horror movie challenge in which each host watched 31 movies over the 31 days of October which we have never seen before. Which ones will make you jump in terror and which ones will make your eyes bleed? We'll spill our guts on the good and bad in our conclusion to 31 Days of Horror! Sam's List: 17. Borgman (2013, Netherlands), 18. Idila aka Idyll aka Killbillies (2015, Slovenia), 19. Horsehead (2014, France), 20. The Wolf House (2018, Chile), 21. Treehouse (2014, US/UK), 22. Sensoria (2015, Sweden), 23. Jug Face (2013, US), 24. Let's Scare Julie (2019, US) , 25, Werewolf (2015, Poland, Netherlands, German), 26. The Doll (2017, Mongolia), 27. Alpha ( 2014, Greece), 28. Hell Night (1981, US), 29. The Tag-Along (2015, Taiwan), 30. Strangled (2016, Hungary), 31. Phantasm (1979, US) Trish's List: 17. Bad Candy (2020, US), 18. Zombie for Sale (2019, South Korea), 19. The Boat (2018, UK/Malta), 20. The Thing That Couldn't Die (1958, US), 21. Sky Sharks (2020, Germany), 22. Night Teeth (2021, US), 23. Escape Room: Tournament of Champions (2021, US), 24. Devil (2010, US), 25. Bingo Hell (2021, US), 26. Sacrifice (2020, UK), 27. Werewolves Within (2021, US), 28. Dark Woods (2003, Norway), 29. The Columnist (2021, Netherlands), 30. When the Darkness Comes (2014, Greenland), 31. Thirst (2019, Iceland) Jason's List: 17. Tremors: Shrieker Island (2020, US), 18. Lord of Tears (2013, UK), 19. Till Death (2021, US), 20. The Empty Man (2020, US/UK/South Africa), 21. Tigers Are Not Afraid (2017, Mexico), 22. The Manson Brothers Midnight Zombie Massacre (2021, US), 23. Anything For Jackson (2020, Canada), 24. The Conjuring: The Devil Made Me Do It (2021, US/UK), 25. Malignant (2021, US/China), 26. Werewolves Within (2021, US), 27. Bloody Hell (2020, Australia/US), 28. Spiral: From the Book of Saw (2021, US/Canada), 29. Don't Breathe 2 (2021, US/Serbia), 30. Candyman (2021,US/Canada/Australia), 31. Halloween Kills (2021, US/UK)

Third Pod from the Sun
Staff Picks: Toxic City Under the Ice

Third Pod from the Sun

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 32:04


In 1959, the United States built an unusual military base under the surface of the Greenland ice Sheet. Camp Century was a hub for scientific research, but it also doubled as a top-secret site for testing the feasibility of deploying nuclear missiles from the Arctic. When Camp Century was decommissioned in 1967, its infrastructure and waste were abandoned under the assumption they would be forever entombed beneath the colossal sheet of ice. But climate change has warmed the Arctic more than any other region on Earth, and parts of the Greenland Ice Sheet are melting faster than snow can accumulate. What will happen in the coming decades if the melting ice exposes the biological, chemical, and radioactive waste left behind at Camp Century?As part of our Staff Picks series while Third Pod is on break, University of Colorado Boulder glaciologist Mike MacFerrin recounts Camp Century's intriguing history and its role in the Cold War. He discusses the potential hazard Camp Century's waste poses to the environment and surrounding communities and examines what, if anything, should be done about it now.This episode was produced and mixed by Lauren Lipuma and Shane M Hanlon.

SpaceTime with Stuart Gary | Astronomy, Space & Science News
Russia Slammed for Anti-Satellite Missile Test

SpaceTime with Stuart Gary | Astronomy, Space & Science News

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 33:19


The Astronomy, Technology, and Space Science News Podcast.To listen to SpaceTime on your favorite App: https://link.chtbl.com/spacetime SpaceTime Series 24 Episode 133*Russia slammed for anti-satellite missile testRussia has been condemned by nations around the world for conducting an anti-satellite missile test which not only threatened the International Space Station and its crew – but has produced a growing cloud of shrapnel and debris that will remain a threat to space navigation for decades to come.*DART planetary defense mission ready for launchAll systems are go for this weeks the launch of NASA's Dart planetary defense mission. DART is part of a joint NASA European Space Agency mission to slam an impactor into a pyramid sized moon orbiting a mountain sized near Earth asteroid.*Fate of sinking tectonic plates revealedA new study claims Earth's tectonic plates remain intact though weakened as they sink down into the planet's mantel.*The Science ReportIncreased greenhouse gas levels confirmed as main drivers of global warming.New never before seen mineral found inside a diamond hauled up from deep below the Earth's surface.Palaeontologists have identified a new species of dinosaur in Greenland.Skeptic's guide to the annual bent spoon award.For more SpaceTime and show links: https://linktr.ee/biteszHQ If you love this podcast, please get someone else to listen as well. Thank you…To become a SpaceTime supporter and unlock commercial free editions of the show, gain early access and bonus content, please visit https://bitesz.supercast.com/ . Premium version now available via Spotify and Apple Podcasts.

SpaceTime with Stuart Gary | Astronomy, Space & Science News
A Huge Pile of New Gravitational Wave Detections

SpaceTime with Stuart Gary | Astronomy, Space & Science News

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 18:29


To become a SpaceTime supporter and unlock commercial-free editions of the show, gain early access and bonus content, please visit https://bitesz.supercast.com/ . Premium version also now available via Spotify and Apple Podcasts.To listen to SpaceTime on your favorite App automatically: https://link.chtbl.com/spacetime The Astronomy, Technology, and Space Science News Podcast.SpaceTime Series 24 Episode 132*A huge pile of new gravitational-wave detectionsScientists have announced another 35 new gravitational wave detections. The new discoveries bring the total number of observations to 90 – including further confirmation of rare intermediate-mass black holes.*India latest Nuclear Missile test meant as a signal to ChinaIndia has carried out another test of its nuclear-capable Agni-5 long-range ballistic missile.*The growing popularity of remote-controlled telescopesCitizen scientists can now relocate their telescopes to some of the best astronomy viewing places on Earth and operate them remotely.*The Science ReportGlobal warming causing extreme ice melting events in Greenland.People with schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and anorexia more likely to move to cities.The new wooden knife as sharp as stainless steel.Skeptic's guide to therapeutic touch.For more SpaceTime and show links: https://linktr.ee/biteszHQ If you love this podcast, please get someone else to listen to. Thank you…For more SpaceTime visit https://spacetimewithstuartgary.com (mobile friendly). For enhanced Show Notes including photos to accompany this episode: https://www.bitesz.com/show/spacetime/blog/ RSS feed: https://www.spreaker.com/show/2458531/episodes/feed Email: mailto:SpaceTime@bitesz.comTo receive the Astronomy Daily Newsletter free, direct to your inbox...just join our mailing list at www.bitesz.com or visit https://www.bitesz.com/p/astronomy-daily/

Engines of Our Ingenuity
Engines of Our Ingenuity 2152: Far From home

Engines of Our Ingenuity

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 3:46


Episode: 2152 Far from home: Traveling with the USO.  Today, UH theatre director Sidney Berger is far from home.

The Dick Show
Episode 284 - Dick on Sean's Ding

The Dick Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 112:50


Sean's car gets hit in my driveway, a coke shortage affects me, Build Back Better (Without Men), an all fat Hooters, Cart Narcs calls in about Dr. Phil, Tammy has the last laugh as Lowtax goes to Greenland; all that and more this week on The Dick Show!

Occultae Veritatis Podcast - OVPOD
Case # 165b: Climate Change: Is it too late?

Occultae Veritatis Podcast - OVPOD

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 97:28


Classification: [Controversial Topics]   Our crisis continues as we map out the future of the oceans, life, agriculture, glaciers, costal cities, the food supply, humanity, happiness, life as we know it. Then, to tie a bow on climate change, an interview with PhD candidate Anastasia Shavrova   -Sponsored by- Our Patrons at http://www.patreon.com/ovpod   https://www.ovpod.ca/

Science Magazine Podcast
The long road to launching the James Webb Space Telescope, and genes for a longer life span

Science Magazine Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 23:33


The James Webb Space Telescope was first conceived in the late 1980s. Now, more than 30 years later, it's finally set to launch in December. After such a long a road, anticipation over what the telescope will contribute to astronomy is intense. Daniel Clery, a staff writer for Science, joins host Sarah Crespi to talk about what took so long and what we can expect after launch. You might have heard that Greenland sharks may live up to 400 years. But did you know that some Pacific rockfish can live to be more than 100? That's true, even though other rockfish species only live about 10 years. Why such a range in life span? Greg Owens, assistant professor of biology at the University of Victoria, discusses his work looking for genes linked with longer life spans. This week's episode was produced with help from Podigy. [Image: Tyson Rininger; Music: Jeffrey Cook] [Alt text: Sebastes caurinus, the copper rockfish ] Authors: Sarah Crespi; Daniel Clery See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Fine Homebuilding Podcast
#403: PRO TALK With Carpenter Laura Smarrito

The Fine Homebuilding Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 46:29


In this Pro-Talk podcast, Patrick talks to carpenter Laura Smarrito about doing carpentry in Antarctica and Greenland, how to make the trades more inclusive, and the appeal of being challenged every day.

Pop Culture Leftovers
Episode 401: Last Night In Soho, Dune, Chucky, Antlers, The Last Duel, Wakefield, Invasion, Fairfax, The Next Thing You Eat, Marvel Rumors

Pop Culture Leftovers

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2021 245:49


Welcome to Episode 401. This episode I'm joined by Joe Stark from Starkcast and Neil Thollander from the Smorgasborg podcast. Got 2 new contests this week! Listen to find out how you can get digital copies for Stillwater and 1 of 5 physical blu-rays for Snake Eyes! In this episode for Good Pop Bad Pop for Movies we talk Edgar Wright's new psychological horror film LAST NIGHT IN SOHO starring Thomasin McKenzie and Anya Taylor-Joy out now in theaters. Don't worry, we for sure talk more DUNE. Jake and Brian discuss THE LAST DUEL out now in theaters directed by Ridley Scott. Brian and Neil talk about the new horror film ANTLERS in theaters. Oh, and Brian finally watched GREENLAND! For TV this week the guys talk about the new SyFy series CHUCKY. We also talk about the new series THE NEXT THING YOU EAT hosted by David Chang. The Next Thing You Eat is a six-episode docuseries that explores the seismic changes happening all around us and what they mean for the way we'll eat in the future. Showtime has a new series WAKEFIELD and we discuss whether this is one to check out. CURB YOUR ENTHUSIASM is back on HBO for Season 11. Amazon dropped a new adult animated tv show FAIRFAX. And we talk INVASION now on Apple TV+. In News we talk more Indiana Jones 5. And in Marvel News we talk about that Eternals Rotten Tomatoes score as well as a ton of rumors for future movies such as Spider-Man: No Way Home, Morbius and even the Hawkeye Disney+ series.