Podcasts about Comet

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Icy small Solar System body

  • 1,409PODCASTS
  • 2,459EPISODES
  • 47mAVG DURATION
  • 1DAILY NEW EPISODE
  • Oct 15, 2021LATEST
Comet

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Best podcasts about Comet

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Latest podcast episodes about Comet

Avatar: The Podcast
Sozin’s Comet, Part 1 & 2

Avatar: The Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 106:57


Greg and Acorn join Team Avatar days before Sozin's Comet arrives and learn of Ozai's sinister plan to burn down the Earth Kingdom. Will Aang find the advice he's looking for? Who are the mysterious members of the white lotus? All this and more on Avatar: The Podcast! The post Sozin’s Comet, Part 1 & 2 appeared first on The Geek Generation.

The Geek Generation Network
Sozin’s Comet, Part 1 & 2

The Geek Generation Network

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 106:57


Greg and Acorn join Team Avatar days before Sozin's Comet arrives and learn of Ozai's sinister plan to burn down the Earth Kingdom. Will Aang find the advice he's looking for? Who are the mysterious members of the white lotus? All this and more on Avatar: The Podcast! The post Sozin’s Comet, Part 1 & 2 appeared first on The Geek Generation.

Battleship Pretension
BP Movie Journal 10/14/21

Battleship Pretension

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 69:51


Tyler and David discuss what they've been watching, including Gook, Night of the Comet, The Many Saints of Newark, Flee, Venom: Let There Be Carnage, Bad Luck Banging or Loony Porn, Suzanna Andler, Sound of Metal, Pumpkinhead, Bergman Island, The Magnificent Seven, Deep Blues and Stand and Deliver.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

UNPLUGGED Live Concerts
Billie Eilish - Live Concert At FireFly Music Festival - 2021 | Full Concert | Pop Concert | Pop Music | Live Music | Live Concert

UNPLUGGED Live Concerts

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 85:16


All uploads on this channel are for promotional purposes only! The music has been converted before uploading to prevent ripping and to protect the artist(s) and label(s). If you don't want your content here (that goes for audio or images) please contact me immediately via email: unpluggedtube@outlook.it and I WILL REMOVE THE EPISODE OR ARTWORK IMMEDIATELY! ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Time Stamps Billie comes in/ Bury a Friend: 4:30 You should see me in a crown: 8:57 Billie talks: 11:45 I didn't change my number: 12:36 NDA: 15:17 Therefor I Am: 18:31 Billie talks: 12:22 My Strange Addiction: 23:02 Halley's Comet: 26:31 Billie's Bossa Nova/ Crowd interaction: 30:05 Billie talks: 35:05 Oxytocin: 36:46 ilomilo: 40:50 Billie talks: 43:39 When the party's over: 44:25 Lost Cause: 47:43 Everything I Wanted: 51:42 Overheated: 56:00 Bellyache/ Ocean Eyes: 59:44 Bored: 1:03:57 All the good girls go to hell: 1:05:12 Billie talks: 1:07:54 My Future: 1:08:36 Billie talks: 1:11:56 Bad guy: 1:12:43 Happier Than Ever: 1:16:04 Goodbye: 1:20:59 Team UNPLUGGED.

CrossFit Tutuli Podcast
EP 051 - 5 Errores Que Cometí Cuando Empece (en el mundo de Fitness)

CrossFit Tutuli Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 25:01


Quieres un lifehack para tener resultados mas rápido? NO cometas mis errores. Si hubiera sabido estas 5 cosas antes de empezar, mis primeros años en el mundo de fitness hubieran sido menos dolorosos. Al final, de los errores se aprende y aqui los compartimos con ustedes. version video: https://youtu.be/ccMzYpEVr90 Sponsor by: https://patcoldbrew.com — Te gustaría probar una clase GRATIS? Sucursal US | Sucursal MX Quieren saber que programas ofrecemos? https://www.crossfittutuli.com

The John Batchelor Show
1758: #LondonCalling: The Orionids of Halley's Comet soon over Britain. @JosephSternberg @WSJOpinion

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 8:55


Photo: No known restrictions on publication. CBS Eye on the World with John Batchelor CBS Audio Network @Batchelorshow #LondonCalling:  The Orionids of Halley's Comet soon over Britain. @JosephSternberg @WSJOpinion https://www.telegraph.co.uk/science/0/orionid-meteor-shower-2021-when-time-peak-uk-date-where/ The second meteor shower this month, it occurs when Earth passes through debris left by Halley's Comet - arguably the most famous comet. While this shower is not quite as visible as others, you can maximise your chances by travelling to dark and rural locations during the peak.

End Time Headlines
Great and Fearful Sights From Heaven: Giant Comet, Killer Asteroid and Solar Flares

End Time Headlines

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 34:15


In today's segment, We discuss three recent headlines that truly highlight what Christ spoke of in the Book of Luke Chapter 21 regarding “Great and Fearful sights from Heaven and “Signs in the Sun, Moon, and Stars” prior to his return from Heaven. 

Live from AC2nd
Avatar with Academics - Episode 60 - “Sozin's Comet, Part 2: The Old Masters”

Live from AC2nd

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2021 121:27


Sam Mulberry (Generation X) and Annie Berglund (Millennial) join together to watch their way through Avatar: The Last Airbender.  In this episode they examine “Book 3: Fire, Chapter 19: Sozin's Comet, Part 2: The Old Masters”. For more information about Avatar with Academics or to find all of our episodes, check out our website: https://avatarwithacademics.wordpress.com/

Land-Grant University - Beers with the Brewers
Comet Cloud Hazy IPA & Sweater Vibes Apple Cinnamon Ale

Land-Grant University - Beers with the Brewers

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 20:57


This week features two Fall releases, Comet Cloud Hazy IPA & Sweater Vibes Apple Cinnamon Ale. Join Adam, Walt, Chris and Dan as we discuss the return of these two beers just in time for sweater weather

Newsy Jacuzzi
Kid News This Week: Mega comet coming, Hollywood ups and downs, UK petrol crisis, taxi-top gardens

Newsy Jacuzzi

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 21:01


A mega comet is heading for the sun in the next 10 years, Hollywood's box office highs but threat of workers strike looms low, UK's petrol crisis and Thailand's taxi-top gardens - all this week in the Newsy Pooloozi news pool for kids!

Lockheed Martin Space Makers
Stranger Things: The Case of the Spitting Asteroid

Lockheed Martin Space Makers

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 9:22


To dig deeper into today's episode, please follow these links: OSIRIS-REx Mission OverviewMission WebsitePhotos of OSIRIS-RExVideo about OSIRIS-RExArticle – How This Invention Will Extract Secrets from an AsteroidArticle – How OSIRIS-REx is Returning an Asteroid Sample to Eartheed Martin Credits:Space Makers is a production of Lockheed Martin Space. Episode guests were Dante Lauretta from the University of Arizona, and Beau Bierhaus, Sandy Freund, and Joe Landon from Lockheed Martin. And they are Space Makers.It's executive produced by Pavan Desai.Senior Producer is Lauren Cole. Senior producer, writer, and host is Benjamin Dinsmore. Associate producers and writers are Kaitlin Benz and Audrey Dods. Sound designed and audio mastered by Julian Giraldo.Graphic Design by Tim Roesch.Marketing and recruiting by Joe Portnoy, Shannon Myers, and Stephanie Dixon.These stories would not be possible without the support from our space communications professionals Tracy Weise, Natalya Oleksik, Gary Napier, Lauren Duda, and Dani Hauf. 

Engines of Our Ingenuity
Engines of Our Ingenuity 2670: Expanding the Human Environment

Engines of Our Ingenuity

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 3:51


Episode: 2670 The Expanded Human Habitat: Our Solar System as a Defining Environment.  Today, we expand the notion of environment.

Retro Movie Geek
2021 Spooky Flix Fest – Lifeforce (1985)

Retro Movie Geek

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 51:38


In this episode, the Retro Movie Geek crew is joined by Dave "Dr. Shock" Becker (find more from Dave here or here), and they're geeking out over Lifeforce (1985) and how good the effects are the great cast Mathilda May London in chaos and much, much more! Synopsis: In the static outer limits of space, a silent terror awaits its next victim. A space exploration to examine Halley's Comet uncovers an alien spacecraft whose occupants carry a deadly secret. Three humanoid forms encased in crystal sarcophagi hover in the comet's tail. These three spacelings need humans to survive: in vampire-like fashion they murder their prey; seducing their victims… then sucking the life out of them, leaving withered shells of human forms. When the astronauts return to Earth, they unknowingly bring along their alien counterparts and systematically trigger a chain of terror impossible to stop. LIFEFORCE – In the blink of an eye, the terror begins. .......................................................................................................................... Special thanks to Midnight Syndicate (find more Midnight Syndicate scares here) for letting us use the tune Winged Fury from the album Vampyre: Symhonies from the Crypt, for Spooky Flix Fest 2021! .......................................................................................................................... ..........................................................................................................................   LISTENER FEEDBACK: Leave us your voicemail feedback at (484) 577-3876. Check out Darrell's other cool podcasts here. Check out Peter's Retro Reviews over at ForgottenFlix.com here. Check out The Forgotten Flix Podcast here. Special thanks to Kevin Spencer for the fantastic show logo! Special thanks to Hayden for the use of his fantastic music for our opening theme this episode! You can check out more from this amazing artist here! Special thanks to Retro Promenade for the use of music from the album Carpenter. Music use permitted under a Creative Commons license. CLICK HERE and get a copy of the album and support these fantastic artists!

Taking the Lead
Episode #18: Simple Tips for Finding a Fulfilling Career with Nanette George, Director of Product Marketing at Comet

Taking the Lead

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 39:56


Do you love your job? If the answer is anything but a firm yes, we suggest you listen to this uplifting episode of the Taking the Lead podcast… and even if it is a “yes” check it out anyway! Today's guest is Nanette George, a pioneer in career changes. But you know what? She is happy and thriving. So if you want to feel the same way, tune in to hear what she has to say.Nanette is the Director of Product Marketing at Comet. Prior to that, she was the Senior Manager of Product Marketing at Oracle and Senior Marketing Manager at Cloud Factory and is also launching her own podcast soon. Nanette says that over the years, she's learned how to leverage all her skills from all these different experiences and go after what she wants in business. Now she wants to help others do the same, discover their North Star, and make that career change they've been dreaming about for so long.In this episode, our host Christina Brady and Nanette chat about the role of curiosity in finding your dream job. How to stand out from others and where to start when you want to make a radical career change.

GBA Podcast
#2 - Diversity Equity Inclusion - Understanding Your Workforce

GBA Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 52:09


GBA Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Series – Episode #2 – Understanding Your Workforce Summary Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion (DEI) is a term often used in the workplace, but its meaning is often not well understood. People often mistakenly think that, with the creation of a diverse workplace, inclusion will automatically follow. Yet, inclusion should exist in tandem; it's the climate where diversity thrives. In this episode, we will be discussing the how other professions tackle diversity, equity, and inclusions within their organizations and the importance of understanding the needs of your workforce in relation to diversity and inclusion. Our Guest Cristina Bartolomei, Senior Program Manager, Diversity, Equity and Inclusion / FDA (https://www.fda.gov/) [Link to Profile] (https://www.linkedin.com/in/cristinabartolomei/) Cristina Bartolomei is an accomplished strategist, speaker, and facilitator, with over a decade of experience in affirmative employment, EEO, and D&I. She attributes her passion for civil rights, social action, and equality to her upbringing in Puerto Rico, where she developed a lifelong passion for social activism. She has channeled this passion throughout her career. As a first-generation professional, she also believes in her role in making civil service accessible for all. In March 2021, Cristina joined the FDA as the Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion (DEI) Senior Program Manager, tasked with managing short and long-term FDA-wide DEI initiatives and advising senior management on the development, enhancement, and implementation of projects, practices, and procedures to maintain an inclusive and effective diversity management program. Prior to joining the FDA, she was a Senior Specialist at the U.S. Department of Commerce, Office of Civil Rights, where she served as a key player in the development, implementation, and management of DEI programs and initiatives, which included the Inclusion is on US™ campaign and the First-Generation Professionals (FGP) Initiative – first-of-their-kind Federal initiatives promoting an organizational culture that respects, values, and engages all employees, regardless of their cultural and socio-economic backgrounds. Topics for discussion include: How to define Diversity, Equity and Inclusion How to start formulation DEI initiative The importance of understanding your workforce Employee Satisfaction vs. Employee Engagement Calls-to-action: GEOSTRATA: The Pipeline to Diversity and Inclusion in the Geoprofessions (https://www.readgeo.com/geostrata/november_december_geostrata/MobilePagedArticle.action?articleId=1637554#articleId1637554) Visit the GBA Website at https://www.geoprofessional.org (https://www.geoprofessional.org) for other training resources and reference materials and/or to become a member. Visit https://www.gbapodcast.com (https://www.gbapodcast.com) for future Podcast Episodes Contact us at info@geoprofessional.org with any podcast-related questions or comments Subscribe * Subscribe to the GBA Podcast https://www.gbapodcast.com/subscribe This episode was produced by the following GBA Members: Veronica DeFreitas, PE (host) (https://www.linkedin.com/in/veronica-t-de-freitas-p-e-25997239/) – Geotechnical Department Manager/Universal Engineering Sciences (https://universalengineering.com/) Ryan White, PE, GE (https://www.linkedin.com/in/ryankwhite/) – Principal Geotechnical Engineer/PBS Engineering and Environmental Inc. (https://www.pbsusa.com/)

Looking Up with Don
LUWD #0092 Comet 29P/Schwassmann-Wachmann

Looking Up with Don

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 15:48


“We'll know in two weeks, when communication with Mars resumes, if Martians have visited our rovers.” Don Machholz

Stamper Cinema
My 31 Favorite Horror Films From The 1980s

Stamper Cinema

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 34:22


In honor of Spooky Season I'm counting down my 31 favorite horror films of the 1980s. If you're big into the genre, this list may seem pretty safe - as there aren't too many deep cuts... if you're a casual fan this is the list for you! And if you don't like scary movies at all, you may just wanna skip this one. Or don't - it'll make me sad.  This episode is pretty straightforward, with a few of my occasional neurotic moments popping by to say hello. Enjoy! Or try to. :)   Edit 10/4/21 *Due to the overwhelming support I received over this installment, I'll be expending on my thoughts on films from this list in blog form. Please be patient, as it'll take time to get this completed. In the interim, here are the trailers for these films. 31. The Gate (trailer - 1987) 30. The Hitcher (trailer - 1986) 29. Maximum Overdrive (trailer - 1986) 28. The Blob (trailer - 1988) 27. Return of the Living Dead (trailer - 1985) 26. House (trailer 1986) 25. Christine (trailer - 1983) 24. April Fool's Day (trailer - 1986) 23. Child's Play (trailer - 1988) 22. Videodrome (trailer - 1983) 21. Silver Bullet (trailer - 1985) 20. Near Dark (trailer - 1987) 19. Night of the Comet (trailer - 1984) 18. Halloween 3: Season of the Witch (trailer - 1982) 17. Re-Animator (trailer - 1985) 16. Day of the Dead (trailer - 1985) 15. The Monster Squad (trailer - 1987) 14. Gremlins (trailer - 1984) 13. Pet Sematary (trailer - 1989) 12. Friday the 13th (trailer - 1980) 11. Hellraiser (trailer - 1987) 10. Creepshow (trailer - 1982) 9. The Fly (trailer - 1986) 8. The Lost Boys (trailer - 1987) 7. Fright Night (trailer - 1985) 6. An American Werewolf in London (trailer - 1981) 5. Evil Dead (trailer - 1981) 4. A Nightmare on Elm Street  (trailer - 1984) 3. The Thing (trailer - 1982) 2. Poltergeist (1982) 1. The Shining (1980)

The 365 Days of Astronomy, the daily podcast of the International Year of Astronomy 2009
Travelers in the Night Eps. 595 & 596: Monster Comet & Next Solar Cycle

The 365 Days of Astronomy, the daily podcast of the International Year of Astronomy 2009

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2021 5:30


Dr. Al Grauer hosts. Dr. Albert D. Grauer ( @Nmcanopus ) is an observational asteroid hunting astronomer. Dr. Grauer retired from the University of Arkansas at Little Rock in 2006. travelersinthenight.org Today's 2 topics: - Teddy Pruyne discovered C/2020 H2 (Pruyne) - On May 29, 2020 NASA's GEOS-16 satellite detected the first M1 X-ray flare since October 20, 2017.    We've added a new way to donate to 365 Days of Astronomy to support editing, hosting, and production costs.  Just visit: https://www.patreon.com/365DaysOfAstronomy and donate as much as you can! Share the podcast with your friends and send the Patreon link to them too!  Every bit helps! Thank you! ------------------------------------ Do go visit http://astrogear.spreadshirt.com/ for cool Astronomy Cast and CosmoQuest t-shirts, coffee mugs and other awesomeness! http://cosmoquest.org/Donate This show is made possible through your donations.  Thank you! (Haven't donated? It's not too late! Just click!) The 365 Days of Astronomy Podcast is produced by Astrosphere New Media. http://www.astrosphere.org/ Visit us on the web at 365DaysOfAstronomy.org or email us at info@365DaysOfAstronomy.org.

Live from AC2nd
Avatar with Academics - Episode 59 - “Sozin's Comet, Part 1: The Phoenix King”

Live from AC2nd

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 2, 2021 101:19


Sam Mulberry (Generation X) and Annie Berglund (Millennial) join together to watch their way through Avatar: The Last Airbender.  In this episode they examine “Book 3: Fire, Chapter 18: Sozin's Comet, Part 1: The Phoenix King”. For more information about Avatar with Academics or to find all of our episodes, check out our website: https://avatarwithacademics.wordpress.com/

Travelers In The Night
660-Double Comet(403)

Travelers In The Night

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 2:01


What at first appeared to be an asteroid turned out to be a double comet.

The Daily Space
Large Comet Discovered; Won't Get Past Jupiter

The Daily Space

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 19:11


From the Great Oxidation Event to how Earth is dimming, we look at a selection of stories about how climate changes have affected the Earth in the distant past, the recent past, and the current time. Plus, we review an app called MeteorActive.

Unfiltered
Beards, Kabobs, and So Much More at Comet Brews

Unfiltered

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 36:47


Join us and Lisa Wilke as we make fun of her husband Brian Wilke's beard and talk about Comet Brews. Are you enjoying the Unfiltered Craft podcast? Rate us and leave us a review on whatever podcast platform you use to listen. Follow the show on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and YouTube and find video of this episode at UnfilteredCraft.com. Many thanks to our sponsors, Locke and Co. Distilling and Elan Naturals.

Leading with Data
The Art of Thinking Like a Data Scientist w/ Harpreet Sahota

Leading with Data

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 35:13


Most businesses today are sitting atop an untapped mine of data, and they need a skilled workforce to uncover the real gold. Enter the Data Scientist. The Sexiest Job of the 21st Century. The demand for this role has increased rapidly— gaining significant traction across industries. The spotlight has caused many to wonder “Can I be a data scientist?” What are the skills I would need?” One need look no further than Harpreet Sahota, Data Scientist at Comet and Host of The Artists of Data Science Podcast — the only personal growth and dev elopment podcast for Data Scientists. He's a thought leader in the Data Science space with over a decade of education, experience, and technical chops in the field. By day, he's working with leadership to define and execute strategies that demonstrate the value of the data at Comet. By night, he's mentoring and providing technical guidance to nearly 2000 up-and-coming data scientists. Harpreet is on a mission to help develop today's data scientists — and not just their technical skills. But their creativity, critical thinking, and ability to actually think like a scientist. In this episode, he shares his advice for emerging data scientists as well as analytics leaders looking to build their first data team. We cover a variety of topics including: Harpreet's career journey & future aspirations Why Harpreet started a podcast The evolution & future of data science The right way to build a data team How to hire data scientists The 3 things you need to do as a data scientist What skills make for a good data scientist Technological advances in the field Check out these resources that were mentioned in the show: Register for a Data Science Happy Hour Listen to The Artists of Data Science Podcast Connect with Harpreet on https://www.linkedin.com/in/harpreetsahota204/LinkedIn If you want to hear more, subscribe to Leading with Data on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, or here. Listening on a desktop & can't see the links? Just search for Leading with Data in your favorite podcast player.

The Artists of Data Science
Comet ML Office Hour 31 | 26SEP2021

The Artists of Data Science

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 66:38


Vote in the data community content creators awards! http://bit.ly/data-creators-awards Checkout Purdeep Sangha's episode here: https://theartistsofdatascience.fireside.fm/purdeep-sangha Check it out and don't forget to register for future office hours: http://bit.ly/adsoh Register for Sunday Sessions here: http://bit.ly/comet-ml-oh YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/TheArtistsofDataScience Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/theartistsofdatascience/ Facebook: https://facebook.com/TheArtistsOfDataScience Twitter: https://twitter.com/ArtistsOfData

Tales From The Estate
Tales From The Estate Episode 46 - She Inhaled a Comet

Tales From The Estate

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 35:05


On this week's show Kaitlyn is fired up from the jump! The random fact may choke you up, we have two new reviews and then we're discussing our Top 5 favorite cereals of all time!

Only The Avatar: An Avatar The Last Airbender Rewatch

It's the finale of ATLA and the finale of our podcast! We chat about the major battles, answer listener questions, and reminisce about the previous episodes. Thank you all for listening and re-watching with us. We love you! --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/onlytheavatar/support

To The Point - Cybersecurity
"Roided-out Sitting Duck", Part Two With Juan Andres Guerrero-Saade

To The Point - Cybersecurity

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 38:03


Want to know what this week's episode title means? Listen to our two-part episode with Juan Andrés Guerrero Saade (aka JAGS), principal researcher at SentinelOne and Adjunct Professor of Strategic Studies at Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS). JAGS takes us on an exciting and educational ride through his research efforts on Moonlight Maze, one of the first widely known cyber espionage campaigns in world history, and how he came to be a featured hologram in the International Spy Museum in Washington, D.C. He also shares insights on the epic trolling endeavor through the recent “Meteor Express” wiper attack of an Iranian railway and possible ties to early versions of Stardust and Comet malware. And you won't want to miss his perspective on monetization, Linux flying below the radar, why it's important to get more savvy in determining what you want from vendors and how a philosophy major found his way into the threat intel space. For links and resources discussed in this episode, please visit our show notes at https://www.forcepoint.com/govpodcast/e152

Conspiracies Snacks and Tin Foil Hats
Episode 52: Almond Halley's Comet

Conspiracies Snacks and Tin Foil Hats

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 56:38


On this week's episode co-Conspirators Avalon Gubernick and Connor Kenworthy discuss whats really below our Earth's surface

The 365 Days of Astronomy, the daily podcast of the International Year of Astronomy 2009
Travelers in the Night Eps. 593 & 594: Kasper's First Comet & Earth Grazer

The 365 Days of Astronomy, the daily podcast of the International Year of Astronomy 2009

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2021 5:30


Dr. Al Grauer hosts. Dr. Albert D. Grauer ( @Nmcanopus ) is an observational asteroid hunting astronomer. Dr. Grauer retired from the University of Arkansas at Little Rock in 2006. travelersinthenight.org Today's 2 topics: - Kacper Wierzchos spotted C/2020 H3 (Wierzchos) in Aquila. - Hannes Growler discovered 15 foot diameter 2020 JJ.   We've added a new way to donate to 365 Days of Astronomy to support editing, hosting, and production costs.  Just visit: https://www.patreon.com/365DaysOfAstronomy and donate as much as you can! Share the podcast with your friends and send the Patreon link to them too!  Every bit helps! Thank you! ------------------------------------ Do go visit http://astrogear.spreadshirt.com/ for cool Astronomy Cast and CosmoQuest t-shirts, coffee mugs and other awesomeness! http://cosmoquest.org/Donate This show is made possible through your donations.  Thank you! (Haven't donated? It's not too late! Just click!) The 365 Days of Astronomy Podcast is produced by Astrosphere New Media. http://www.astrosphere.org/ Visit us on the web at 365DaysOfAstronomy.org or email us at info@365DaysOfAstronomy.org.

Only The Avatar: An Avatar The Last Airbender Rewatch

It's the penultimate episode of Only The Avatar! Veda and Christina review the first half of the series finale. They go into Aang's tough decision, Zuko's evolution and who was the worst avatar. Remember to leave a review and subscribe! Thanks for listening. Follow us on Instagram at @only_the_avatar_podcast and Email us at onlytheavatarpodcast@gmail.com. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/onlytheavatar/support

The Artists of Data Science
Comet ML Office Hour 30 | 19SEP2021

The Artists of Data Science

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 71:58


Vote in the data community content creators awards! http://bit.ly/data-creators-awards Checkout Purdeep Sangha's episode here: https://theartistsofdatascience.fireside.fm/purdeep-sangha Check it out and don't forget to register for future office hours: http://bit.ly/adsoh Register for Sunday Sessions here: http://bit.ly/comet-ml-oh YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/TheArtistsofDataScience Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/theartistsofdatascience/ Facebook: https://facebook.com/TheArtistsOfDataScience Twitter: https://twitter.com/ArtistsOfData

Santa By The Minute Podcast
Minute 76 - The Famous Hug

Santa By The Minute Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 28:02


Joe and Santa are reunited on the rooftop and share a hug. Joe then greets Donner, Blitzen, and Comet. Plus: we uncover some new-to-us movie trivia and begin Part 1 of a totally necessary discussion about reindeer butts. Join us as we talk about minute 76 of Santa Claus: The Movie (1985)  Our Podcast Website: bit.ly/3jWsLfr The 30th Anniversary Article we discussed at the top of the episode: https://www.feelchristmassy.co.uk/christmas-movies/santa-claus-the-movie-30-years-on/      

GBA Podcast
#105 - Case History - Friends Don't Sue Friends….Most of the Time

GBA Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 32:44


GBA Case History Series – Case History #105 - Friends don't sue Friends….Most of the Time Summary A GBA member-Firm was hired to perform a geotechnical engineering study of the project site and provide a written report describing its subsurface conditions. This same fir provided construction materials engineering and testing (CoMET) during site development and construction of a mechanically stabilized earth (MSE) wall. Failed communication between the field representative, member firm's project manager and the design team during construction of a MSE wall led to cracks in the building slab and in the wall blocks and ultimately a claim. Our Guest Dan Schaefer – Vice President/Froehling & Robertson, Inc. (https://www.fandr.com/) (Link to Profile) (https://www.linkedin.com/in/dan-schaefer-b479044/) Dan has more than 30 years of experience specializing in geotechnical engineering, construction inspection and materials testing, and environmental consulting. In addition to his branch management duties, he continues to serve as a senior engineer on a wide variety of site development, building, and transportation projects with particular emphasis in foundation, retaining wall, pavement and slope design. Dan is actively involved with the Geoprofessional Business Association (GBA) and has been a member of the GBA CoMET Business Committee for more than 10 years, currently serving as that body's Chair. Topics for discussion include: Case History 105 - Introductions - [1:20] Case History 105 - Overview - [1:58] Unfortunate events of Case History 105- [3:50] Did the client excluding the MSE wall testing services from your scope and fee raise any red flags? – [7:48] Several factors let to shrinkage cracks within the foundation slab– Why was the client & contractor initially unconcerned? - [12:16] Field technician – What could have been done differently during construction? – [15:00] If you were the project manager (PM) what would you have done differently? – [17:25] What are the pitfalls of residential projects? – [19:35] After litigation what did your firm do to prevent this from happening in the future? – [22:22] Could there have been better documentation by your firm, PM, or field tech? – [25:15] Discuss importance of PM and their tasks they should be performing- [26:20] What are some of the things your firm could do to reduce risk? - [28:30] After the lawsuit did your firm continue to work w/ client? – [29:45] Calls-to-action: Download Case History #105: https://www.geoprofessional.org/product/gba-case-history-no-105/ Visit the following link to access all of GBA's Case Histories: https://www.geoprofessional.org/gba-case-histories/ (https://www.geoprofessional.org/gba-case-histories/) An account is required to download the individual Case Histories, which are free for GBA Member Firms. Visit the GBA Website at https://www.geoprofessional.org (https://www.geoprofessional.org) for other training resources and reference materials and/or to become a member. Visit https://www.gbapodcast.com (https://www.gbapodcast.com) for future Podcast Episodes Contact us at info@geoprofessional.org with any podcast-related questions or comments Subscribe * Subscribe to the GBA Podcast https://www.gbapodcast.com/subscribe This episode was produced by the following GBA Members: Bryce Moore (https://www.linkedin.com/in/bryce-moore-8a44635a/) – Director Of Construction Services/Blackburn Consulting (https://blackburnconsulting.com/) Shawn Leyva, PE (https://www.linkedin.com/in/shawn-leyva-79153b1b1/) – Associate Senior Engineer/Crawford & Associates (https://crawford-inc.com/) Ryan White, PE, GE (https://www.linkedin.com/in/ryankwhite/) – Principal Geotechnical Engineer/PBS Engineering and Environmental Inc. (https://www.pbsusa.com/)

Raw Data By P3
Jeff Sagarin

Raw Data By P3

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 86:06


There's a place where sports and data meet, and it's as powerful a collision as on any football field!  Jeff Sagarin has been a figurehead in the sports analytics realm for decades, and we're thrilled to have had the chance to have him on to talk about his data journey!  There's a fair mix of math AND sports geek out time in this episode.  And, did we mention that Dr. Wayne Winston is sitting in on this episode as well? References in this Episode: 2 Frictionless Colliding Boxes Video Scorigami Episode Transcript: Rob Collie (00:00:00): Hello, friends. Today's guest is Jeff Sagarin. Is that name familiar to you? It's very familiar to me. In my life, Jeff's work might very well be my first brush with the concept of using data for any sort of advantage. His Power Ranking Columns, first appeared in USA Today in 1985, when I was 11 years old. And what a fascinating concept that was. Rob Collie (00:00:29): It probably won't surprise you if I confess that 11-year-old me was not particularly good at sports, but I was still fascinated and captivated by them. 11-year-old kids in my neighborhood were especially prone to associating sports with their tribal identity. Everyone had their favorite teams, their favorite sports stars. And invariably, this led to arguments about which sports star was better than the other sports star, who was going to win this game coming up and who would win a tournament amongst all of these teams and things of that sort. Rob Collie (00:01:01): Now that I've explained it that way though, I guess being an adult sports fan isn't too terribly different, is it? Those arguments, of course, aren't the sorts of arguments where there's anything resembling a clear winner. But in practice, the person who won was usually the one with the loudest voice or the sickest burn that they could deliver to their friends. And then in 1985, the idea was planted in my head by Jeff Sagarin's column in USA Today, that there actually was a relatively objective way to evaluate teams that had never played against one another and likely never would. Rob Collie (00:01:33): I wasn't into computers at the time. I certainly wasn't into the concept of data. I didn't know what a database was. I didn't know what a spreadsheet was. And yet, this was still an incredibly captivating and powerful idea. So in my life, Jeff Sagarin is the first public figure that I encountered in the sports analytics industry long before it was cool. And because it was sports, a topic that was relevant to 11-year-old me, he's really also my first brush with analytics at all. Rob Collie (00:02:07): It's not surprising then, that to me, Jeff is absolutely a celebrity. As a guest, in insider podcasting lingo, Jeff is what we call a good get. We owe that pleasure, of course, to him being close friends with Wayne Winston, a former guest on the show, who also joined us today as co-guest. Rob Collie (00:02:28): Now, if none of that speaks to you, let's try this alternate description. He's probably also the world's most famous active FORTRAN programmer. I admit that I was so starstruck by this that I didn't even really push as hard as I normally would, in terms of getting into the techniques that he uses. I didn't want to run afoul of asking him for trade secrets. At times, this conversation did devolve into four dudes sitting around talking about sports. Rob Collie (00:02:59): But setting that aside, there are some really, really interesting and heartwarming things happening in this conversation as well. Again, the accidental path to where he is today, the intersection of persistence and good fortune that's required really for success in anything. Bottom line, this is the story of a national and highly influential figure at the intersection of the sports industry and the analytics industry for more than three decades. It's not every day you get to hear that story. So let's get into it. Announcer (00:03:34): Ladies and gentlemen, may I have your attention, please? Announcer (00:03:39): This is the Raw Data by P3 Adaptive podcast with your host, Rob Colley and your co-host, Thomas LaRock. Find out what the experts at P3 Adaptive can do for your business. Just go to p3adaptive.com. Raw Data by P3 Adaptive is data with the human element. Rob Collie (00:04:02): Welcome to the show, Jeff Sagarin. And welcome back to the show. Wayne Winston. So thrilled to have the two of you with us today. This is awesome. We've been looking forward to this for a long time. So thank you very much gentlemen, for being here. Jeff Sagarin (00:04:16): You're welcome. Rob Collie (00:04:18): Jeff, usually we kick these things off with, "Hey, tell us a little about yourself, your background, blah, blah, blah." Let's start off with me telling you about you. It's a story about you that you wouldn't know. I remember for a very long time being aware of you. Rob Collie (00:04:35): So I'm 47 years old, born in 1974. My father had participated for many years in this shady off-the-books college football pick'em pool that was run out of the high school in a small town in Florida. Like the sheets with everybody's entries would show up. They were run on ditto paper, like that blue ink. It was done in the school ditto room and he did this every year. This was like the most fascinating thing that happened in the entire year to me. Like these things showing up at our house, this packet of all these picks, believe it or not, they were handwritten. These grids were handwritten with everyone's picks. It was ridiculous. Rob Collie (00:05:17): He got eliminated every year. There were a couple of hundred entries every year and he just got his butt kicked every year. But then one year, he did his homework. He researched common opponents and things like that or that kind of stuff. I seem to recall this having something to do timing wise with you. So I looked it up. Your column first appeared in USA Today in 1985. Is that correct? Jeff Sagarin (00:05:40): Yeah. Tuesday, January 8th 1985. Rob Collie (00:05:44): I remember my dad winning this pool that year and using the funds to buy a telescope to look at Halley's Comet when it showed up. And so I looked up Halley's Comet. What do you know? '86. So it would have been like the January ballgames of 1986, where he won this pool. And in '85, were you power ranking college football teams or was that other sports? Jeff Sagarin (00:06:11): Yes. Rob Collie (00:06:12): Okay. So when my dad said that he did his research that year, what he really did was read your stuff. You bought my dad a telescope in 1986 so that we could go have one of the worst family vacations of all time. It was just awful. Thank you. Jeff Sagarin (00:06:31): You're very welcome. Rob Collie (00:06:39): I kind of think of you as the first publicly known figure in sports analytics. You probably weren't the first person to apply math and computers to sports analytics, but you're the first person I heard of. Jeff Sagarin (00:06:51): There is a guy that people don't even talk about very much. Now a guy named Earnshaw Cook, who first inspired me when I was a sophomore in high school in the '63-'64 school year, there was an article by Frank Deford in Sports Illustrated about Earnshaw Cook publishing a book called Percentage Baseball. So I convinced my mom to let me have $10 to order it by mail and I got it. I started playing around with his various ideas in it. He was the first guy I ever heard of and that was in March of 1964. Rob Collie (00:07:28): All right, so everyone's got an origin story. Jeff Sagarin (00:07:31): The Dunkel family started doing the Dunkel ratings back I believe in 1929. Then there was a professor, I think he was at Vanderbilt, named [Lipkin House 00:07:41], he was I think at Vanderbilt. And for years, he did the high school ratings in states like maybe Tennessee and Kentucky. I think he gave Kentucky that Louisville courier his methodology before he died. But I don't know if they continue his work or not. But there were people way before me. Rob Collie (00:08:03): But they weren't in USA Today. Jeff Sagarin (00:08:04): That's true. Rob Collie (00:08:06): They weren't nationally distributed, like on a very regular basis. I've been hearing your name longer than I've even been working with computers. That's pretty crazy. How did you even get hooked up with USA Today? Jeff Sagarin (00:08:23): People might say, "You got lucky." My answer, as you'll see as well, I'd worked for 12 years to be in a position to get lucky. I started getting paid for doing this in September of 1972 with an in-house publication of pro football weekly called Insider's Pro Football Newsletter. Jeff Sagarin (00:08:45): In the Spring of '72, I'd written letters to like 100 newspapers saying because I had started by hand doing my own rating system for pro football in the fall of 1971. Just by hand, every Sunday night, I'd get the scores and add in the Monday night. I did it as a hobby. I wasn't doing it for a living. I did it week by week and charted the teams. It was all done with some charts I'd made up with a normal distribution and a slide rule. So I sent out letters in the spring of '72 to about 100 papers saying, "Hey, would you be interested in running my stuff?" Jeff Sagarin (00:09:19): They either didn't answer me or all said, "No, not interested." But I got a call right before I left to go to California when an old college friend that spring. It was from William Wallace, who was a big time football correspondent for The New York Times. That anecdote may be in that article by Andy Glockner. He called me up, he was at the New York Times, but he said also, "I write articles for extra money for pro football weekly. I wanted to just kind of talk to you." Jeff Sagarin (00:09:49): He wrote an article that appeared in Pro Quarterback magazine in September of '72. But during the middle of that summer, I got a phone call from Pro Football weekly, the publisher, a guy named [inaudible 00:10:04] said, "Hey Jeff. Have you seen our ad in street and Smith's?" It didn't matter. It could have been their pro magazine or college. I said, "Yeah, I did." And he said, "Do you notice it said we've got a world famous handicapper to do our predictions for us?" I said, "Yeah, I did see that." He said, "How would you like to be that world famous handicapper? We don't have anybody." Jeff Sagarin (00:10:25): We just said that because he said William Wallace told us to call you. So I said, "Okay, I'll be your world famous handicapper." I didn't start off that well and they had this customer, it was a paid newsletter and there was a customer from Hawaii. He had a great name, Charles Fujiwara. He'd send letters every week saying, "Sagarin's terrible, but he's winning a fortune for me. I just reverse his picks every week." So finally, finally, my numbers turn the tide and I had this one great week, where I went 8-0. He sent another letter saying, "I'm bankrupt. The kid destroyed me." Because he was reversing all my picks. That's a true story. Rob Collie (00:11:07): At least he had a sense of humor. It sounds like a pretty interesting fellow on the other end of that letter. Jeff Sagarin (00:11:13): He sounds like he could have been like the guy, if you've ever seen reruns of the old show, '77 Sunset Strip. In it, there this guy who's kind of a racetrack trout gambler named Roscoe. He sounds like he could have been Roscoe. Rob Collie (00:11:26): We have to look that one up. Dr. Wayne Winston (00:11:27): It's before your time. Rob Collie (00:11:28): I don't think I saw that show. Jeff Sagarin (00:11:29): Yeah. Wayne's seen it though. Rob Collie (00:11:31): Yes. I love that. There are things that are both before my time and I have like old man knees. So I've heard this kind of thing before, by the way. It's called the 10-year overnight success. Jeff Sagarin (00:11:47): I forgot. How did I get with USA Today? I started with Pro Football weekly and continued with them. I was with them until actually why don't we say sometime in the fall of '82. I ended up in other newspapers, little by little: The Boston Globe, Louisville Courier Journal. And then in the spring of '81, I got into a conversation over the phone with Jim van Valkenburg, who is the stat guy at the NCAA. I happened to mention that going into the tournament, I had Indiana to win the tournament. They were rated like 10th in the conventional polls. Jeff Sagarin (00:12:23): And so he remembered that and he kept talking behind the scenes to people in the NCAA about that. And so years later, in 1988, they called me out to talk to them. But anyhow, I had developed a good reputation and I gave him as a reference. Wayne called me up excitedly in let's say, early September of 1984. He said, "Hey, Jeff. You've got to buy a copy of today's USA Today and turn to the end of the sports section. You're going to be sick." Jeff Sagarin (00:12:53): I said, "Really? Okay." So I opened to where he said and I was sick. They had computer ratings by some guy. He was a good guy named Thomas Jech, J-E-C-H. And I said, "Damn, that should be me. I've been doing this for all these years and I didn't even know they were looking for this." So I call up on the phone. Sometimes there's a lot of luck involved. I got to talk to a guy named Bob Barbara who I believe is retired now there. He had on the phone this gruff sounding voice out of like a Grade B movie from the film, The War. "What's going on Kitty?" It sounds like he had a cigar in his mouth. Jeff Sagarin (00:13:30): I said, "Well, I do these computer ratings." [inaudible 00:13:33] Said "Well, really? That's interesting. We've already got somebody." He said, "But how would you even send it to us?" I said, "Well, I dictate over the phone." He said, "Dictate? We don't take dictation at USA Today, kid. Have you ever heard of personal computers and a modem?" I said, "Well, I have but I just do it on a mainframe at IU and I dictate over the phone to the Louisville Courier and the local..." Jeff Sagarin (00:13:58): Well, the local paper here, I gave them a printout. He said, "Kid, you need to buy yourself a PC and learn how to use a modem." So I kind of was embarrassed. I said, "Well, I'll see." So about 10 days later, I called him up and said, "Hey, what's the phone number for your modem?" He said, "Crap. You again, kid? I thought I got rid of you." He says, "All right. I'll give you the phone number." So I sent him a sample printout. He says, "Yeah, yeah, we got it. Keep in touch. We're not going to change for football. But this other guy, he may not want to do basketball. So keep in touch. Who knows what will happen for basketball?" Jeff Sagarin (00:14:31): So every month I'd call up saying, "It's me again, keeping touch." He said, "I can't get rid of you. You're like a bad penny that keeps turning up." So finally he says look, after about five of these calls, spreading out until maybe late November, "Look kid, why don't you wait... Call me up the first Sunday of the new year," which would have been like Sunday, January 6 of 1985 I believe. So I waited. I called him up. Sure enough, he said, "You again?" I said, "You told me you wanted to do college basketball." Jeff Sagarin (00:15:04): He said, "Yeah, you're kind of right. The other guy doesn't want to do it." So he said, "Well, do you mind if we call it the USA Today computer ratings? We kind of like to put our own name on everything." I said, "Well, wait a minute. During the World Series, you had Pete Rose as your guest columnist, you want not only gave his name, but you had a picture of him." He said, "God damn it." He said, "I can't..." He said, "You win again kid. Give us a bio." Jeff Sagarin (00:15:32): An old friend of both me and Wayne was on a business trip. He lived in California, but one of the companies he did work for was Magnavox, which at the time had a presence in Fort Wayne. So he had stopped off in Bloomington so we could say hi. We hadn't seen each other for many years. So he wrote my bio for me, which is still used in the agate in the USA Today. So it's the same bio all these years. Jeff Sagarin (00:15:56): So they started printing me on Tuesday, January 8 of 1985. On the front page that day and I got my editor of a couple years ago, he found an old physical copy of that paper and sent it to me and I thought that's pretty cool. And on the front page, they said, "Well, this would be the 50th birthday of Elvis Presley." I get, they did not have a banner headline at the top, "Turn to the sports and see Jeff Sagarin's debut." That was not what they did. It was all about Elvis Presley. And so people will tell me, "Wow! You got really lucky." Jeff Sagarin (00:16:30): Yeah, but I was in a position. I'd worked for 12 years since the fall of '72 to get in position to then get lucky. They told me I had some good recommendations from people. Rob Collie (00:16:42): Well, even that persistence to keep calling in the face of relatively discouraging feedback. So that conversation took place, and then two days later, you're in the paper. Jeff Sagarin (00:16:54): Well, yeah. He said, "Send us the ratings." They might have needed a time lag. So if I sent the ratings in on a Sunday night or Monday morning, they'd print them on Tuesday. They're not as instant. Now, I update every day on their website. For the paper, they take whatever the most recent ones they can access off their website, depending on I've sent it in, which is I always send them in early in the morning like when I get up. So they print on a Tuesday there'll be taking the ratings that they would have had in their hands Monday, which would be through Sunday's games. Rob Collie (00:17:26): That Tuesday, was that just college basketball? Jeff Sagarin (00:17:28): Then it was. Then in the fall of 85. They began using me for college football, not that they thought I was better or worse one way or the other than Thomas Jech who was a smart guy, he was a math professor at the time at Penn State. He just got tired of doing it. He had more important things to do. Serious, I don't mean that sarcastically. That was just like a fun hobby for him from what I understand. Rob Collie (00:17:50): I was going to ask you if you hadn't already gone and answered the question ahead of time. I was going to ask you well, what happened to the other guy? Did you go like all Tonya Harding on him or whatever? Did you take out your rival? No, sounds like Nancy Kerrigan just went ahead and retired. Although I hate to make you Tonya Harding in this analogy and I just realized I just Hardinged you. Jeff Sagarin (00:18:10): He was just evidently a really good math professor. It was just something he did for fun to do the ratings. Rob Collie (00:18:17): Opportunity and preparation right where they intersect. That's "luck". Jeff Sagarin (00:18:22): It would be as if Wally Pipp had retired and Lou Gehrig got to replace him in the analogy, Lou Gehrig gets the first base job but actually Wally Pipp in real life did not retire. He had the bad luck to get a cold or something or an injury and he never got back in the starting lineup after that. Rob Collie (00:18:38): What about Drew Bledsoe? I think he did get hurt. Did we ever see him again? Thomas LaRock (00:18:43): The very next season, he was in Buffalo and then he went to Dallas. Rob Collie (00:18:46): I don't remember this at all. Thomas LaRock (00:18:47): And not only that, but when he went to Dallas, he got hurt again and Tony Romo came on to take over. Rob Collie (00:18:53): Oh my god! So Drew Bledsoe is Wally Pipp X2. Thomas LaRock (00:18:58): Yeah, X2. Rob Collie (00:19:02): I just need to go find wherever Drew Bledsoe is right now and go get in line behind him. Thomas LaRock (00:19:08): He's making wine in Walla Walla, Washington. I know exactly where he is. Rob Collie (00:19:12): I'm about to inherit a vineyard gentlemen. Okay, so Wayne's already factored into this story. Dr. Wayne Winston (00:19:23): A little bit. Rob Collie (00:19:23): A bit part but an important one. We would call you Mr. Narrative Hook in the movie. Like you'd be the guy that's like, "Jeff, you've got to get a copy of USA Today and turn to page 10. You're going to be sick." Jeff Sagarin (00:19:37): Well, I was I'm glad Wayne told me to do it. If I'd never known that, who knows what I'd be doing right now? Rob Collie (00:19:44): Yeah. So you guys are longtime friends, right? Dr. Wayne Winston (00:19:47): Yeah. Jeff, should take this. Jeff Sagarin (00:19:49): September 1967 in the TV room at Ashdown Graduate's House across from the dorm we lived, because the graduate students there had rigged up, we call it a full screen TV that was actually quite huge. It's simply projected from a regular TV onto a maybe a 10 foot by 10 foot old fashioned movie projector screen. We'd go there to watch ballgames. Okay, because better than watching on a 10 inch diagonal black and white TV in the dorm. And it turned out we both had a love for baseball and football games. Thomas LaRock (00:20:26): So just to be clear, though, this was no ordinary school. This is MIT. Because this is what people at MIT would do is take some weird tech thing and go, "We can make this even better, make a big screen TV." Jeff Sagarin (00:20:38): We didn't know how to do it, which leads into Wayne's favorite story about our joint science escapades at MIT. If Wayne wants to start it off, you might like this. I was a junior and Wayne was a sophomore at the time. I'll set Wayne up for it, there was a requirement that MIT no matter what your major, one of the sort of distribution courses you had to take was a laboratory class. Why don't we let Wayne take the ball for a while on this? Dr. Wayne Winston (00:21:05): I'm not very mechanically inclined. I got a D in wood shop and a D in metal shop. Jeff's not very mechanically inclined either. We took this lab class and we were trying to figure out identifying a coin based on the sound waves it would produce under the Scylla scope. And so the first week, we couldn't get the machine to work. And the professor said, "Turn it on." And so we figured that step out and the next week, the machine didn't work. He said, "Plug it in." Jeff can take it from there. Jeff Sagarin (00:21:46): It didn't really fit the mathematical narrative exactly of what metals we knew were in the coin. But then I noticed, nowadays we'd probably figure out this a reason. If we multiplied our answers by something like 100 pi, we got the right numbers. So they were correctly proportional. So we just multiplied our answers by 100 pi and said, "As you can see, it's perfectly deducible." Rob Collie (00:22:14): There's a YouTube video that we should probably link that is crazy. It shows that two boxes on a frictionless surface a simulation and the number of times that they collide, when you slide them towards a wall together, when they're like at 10X ratio of mass, the number of times that they impact each other starts to become the digits of pi. Jeff Sagarin (00:22:34): Wow. Rob Collie (00:22:35): Before they separate. Jeff Sagarin (00:22:36): That's interesting. Rob Collie (00:22:36): It's just bizarre. And then they go through explaining like why it is pi and you understand it while the video is playing. And then the video ends and you've completely lost it. Jeff Sagarin (00:22:49): I'm just asking now, are they saying if you do that experiment an infinite amount of times, the average number of times they collide will be pi? Rob Collie (00:22:57): That's a really good question. I think it's like the number of collisions as you increase the ratios of the weight or something like that start to become. It's like you'll get 314 collisions, for instance, in a certain weight ratio, because that's the only three digits of pi that I remember. It's 3.14. It's a fascinating little watch. So the 100 pi thing, you said that, I'm like, "Yeah, that just... Of course it's 100 pi." Even boxes colliding on a frictionless surface do pi things apparently. Jeff Sagarin (00:23:29): Maybe it's a universal constant in everything we do. Rob Collie (00:23:29): You just don't expect pi to surface itself. It has nothing to do with waves, no wavelength, no arcs of circles, nothing like that. But that sneaky video, they do show you that it actually has something to do with circles and angles and stuff. Jeff Sagarin (00:23:44): Mutual friend of me and Wayne, this guy named Robin. He loves Fibonacci. And so every time I see a particular game end by a certain score, I'll just say, "Hey, Robin. Research the score of..." I think it was blooming to North against some other team. And he did. It turned out Bloomington North had won 155-34, which are the two adjacent Fibonacci, the two particular adjacent Fibonacci. Robin loves that stuff. You'll find a lot of that actually. It's hard to double Fibonacci a team though. That would be like 89-34. Rob Collie (00:24:18): I know about the Fibonacci sequence. But I can't pick Fibonacci sequence numbers out of the wild. Are you familiar with Scorigami? Jeff Sagarin (00:24:26): Who? I'd never heard of it obviously. Rob Collie (00:24:29): I think a Scorigami is a score in the NFL that's never happened. Jeff Sagarin (00:24:32): There was one like that about 10 years ago, 11-10, I believe. Pittsburgh was involved in the game or 12-11, something like that. Rob Collie (00:24:40): I think there was a Scorigami in last season. With scoring going up, the chances of Scorigami is increasing. There's just more variance at the higher end of the spectrum of numbers, right? Jeff Sagarin (00:24:50): I've always thought about this. In Canada, Canadian football, they have this extra rule that I think is kind of cool because it would probably make more scores happen. If a punter kicks the ball into the end zone, it can't roll there. Like if he kicks it on the fly into the end zone and the other team can't run it out, it's called a rouge and the kicking team gets one point for it. That's kind of cool. Because once you add the concept of scoring one point, you make a lot more scores more probable of happening. Rob Collie (00:25:21): Oh, yeah, yeah, yeah, totally. You can win 1-0. Thomas LaRock (00:25:25): So the end zone is also... It's 20 yards deep. So the field's longer, it's 110 yards. But the end zone's deeper and part of it is that it's too far to kick for a field goal. But you know what? If I can punt it into the end zone and if I get a cover team down there, we can get one point out. I'm in favor of it. I think that'd be great. Jeff Sagarin (00:25:43): I think you have to kick out on the fly into the end zone. It's not like if it rolls into it. Thomas LaRock (00:25:47): No, no, no. It's like a pop flop. Jeff Sagarin (00:25:50): Yeah. Okay. Rob Collie (00:25:50): If you punt it out of the end zone, is it also a point? Thomas LaRock (00:25:52): It's a touch back. No, touch back. Jeff Sagarin (00:25:54): That'd be too easy of a way to get a point. Rob Collie (00:25:57): You've had a 20 yard deep target to land in. In Canadian fantasy football, if there was such a thing, maybe there is, punters, you actually could have punters as a position because they can score points. That would be a really sad and un-fun way to play. Rob Collie (00:26:14): But so we're amateur sports analytics people here on the show. We're not professionals. We're probably not even very good at it. But that doesn't mean that we aren't fascinated by it. We're business analytics people here for sure. Business and sports, they might share some techniques, but it's just very, very, very different, the things that are valuable in the two spaces. I mean, they're sort of spiritually linked but they're not really tools or methods that provide value. Rob Collie (00:26:39): Not that you would give them. But we're not looking for any of your secrets here today. But you're not just writing for USA Today, there's a number of places where your skills are used these days, right? Jeff Sagarin (00:26:51): Well, not as much as that. But I want to make a favorable analogy for Wayne. In the world of sports analytics, whatever the phrases are, I consider myself to be maybe an experimental applied physicist. Wayne is an advanced theoretical physicist. I do the grunt work of collecting data and doing stuff with it. But Wayne has a large over-viewing of things. He's like a theoretical physicist. Dr. Wayne Winston (00:27:17): Jeff is too modest because he's experimented for years on the best parameters for his models. Rob Collie (00:27:27): It's again that 10-year, 20-year overnight success type of thing. You've just got to keep grinding at it. Do the two of you collaborate at all? Jeff Sagarin (00:27:35): Well, we did on two things, the Hoops computer game and Win Val. I forgot. How could I forget? It was actually my favorite thing that we did even though we've made no money doing the randomization using Game Theory of play calling for football. And we based it actually and it turned out that I got great numerical results that jive with empirical stuff that Virgil Carter had gotten and our economist, named Romer, had gotten and we had more detailed results than them. Jeff Sagarin (00:28:06): But in the areas that we intersected, we had the same as them. We used a game called Pro Quarterback and we modeled it. We had actually, a fellow, I wasn't a professor but a fellow professor of Wayne's, a great guy, just a great guy named Vic Cabot, who wrote a particular routine to insert the FORTRAN program that solved that particular linear programming problem that would constantly reoccur or else we couldn't do it. That was the favorite thing and we got to show it once to Sam White, who we really liked. And White said, "I like this guy. I may have played this particular game," we told him what we based it on, "when I was a teenager." Jeff Sagarin (00:28:46): He said, "I know exactly what you want to do." You don't make the same call in the same situation all the time. You have a random, but there's an optimal mix Game Theory, as you probably know for both offense and defense. White said, "The problem is this is my first year here. It was the summer of '83." And he said, "I don't really have the security." Said, "Imagine it's third and one, we're on our own 15 yard line. And it's third and one. And the random number generator says, 'Throw the bomb on this play with a 10% chance of calling up but it'll still be in the mix. And it happens to come up.'" Jeff Sagarin (00:29:23): He said, "It was my eight year here. I used to play these games myself. I know exactly." But then he patted his hip. He said, "It's mine on the line this first year." He said, "It's kind of nerve wracking to do that when you're a rookie coach somewhere, to call the bomb when it's third and one on your own 15. If it's incomplete, you'll be booed out of the stadium." Rob Collie (00:29:46): Yeah, I mean, it's similar to there's the general reluctance in coaches for so long to go for it on fourth and one. When the analytics were very, very, very clear that this was a plus expected value, +EV, move to go for it on fourth and one. But the thing is, you've got to consider the bigger picture. Right? The incentives, the coaches number one goal is actually don't get fired. Jeff Sagarin (00:30:14): You were right. That's what White was telling us. Rob Collie (00:30:14): Yeah. Winning a Super Bowl is a great thing to do. Because it helps you not get fired. It's actually weird. Like, if your goal is to win as many games as possible, yes, go for it on fourth and one. But if your goal is to not get fired, maybe. So it takes a bit more courage even to follow the numbers. And for good reason, because the incentives aren't really aligned the way that we think they are when you first glance at a situation. Jeff Sagarin (00:30:41): Well, there's a human factor that there's no way unless you're making a guess how to take it into account. It may be demoralizing to your defense if you go for it on fourth and one and you're on your own 15. I've seen the numbers, we used to do this. It's a good mathematical move to go for it. Because you could say, "Well, if you're forced to punt, the other team is going to start on the 50. So what's so good about that? But psychologically, your defense may be kind of pissed off and demoralized when they have to come out on the field and defend from their own 15 after you've not made it and the numbers don't take that into account. Rob Collie (00:31:19): Again, it's that judgment thing. Like the coach hung out to dry. Dr. Wayne Winston (00:31:22): Can I say a word about Vic Cabot, that Jeff mentioned? Jeff Sagarin (00:31:26): Yeah, He's great. Dr. Wayne Winston (00:31:27): Yeah. So Vic was the greatest guy any of us in the business school ever knew. He was a fantastic person. He died of throat cancer in 1994, actually 27 years ago this week or last week. Jeff Sagarin (00:31:43): Last week. It was right around Labor Day. Dr. Wayne Winston (00:31:46): Right. But I want to mention, basically, when he died, his daughter was working in the NYU housing office. After he died, she wrote a little book called The Princess Diaries. She's worth how many millions of dollars now? But he never got to see it. Jeff Sagarin (00:32:06): He had a son, a big kid named Matt Cabot, who played at Bloomington South High School. I got a nice story about Matthew. I believe the last time I know of him, he was a state trooper in the state of Colorado. I used to tell him when I was still young enough and Spry enough, we'd play a little pickup or something. I'd say, "Matthew, forget about points. The most important thing, a real man gets rebounds." Jeff Sagarin (00:32:32): They played in the semi state is when it was just one class. In '88, me and Wayne and a couple of Wayne's professor buddies, we all... Of course, Vic would have been there but we didn't go in the same car. It was me, Wayne and maybe [inaudible 00:32:48] and somebody else, Wayne? Jeff Sagarin (00:32:49): They played against Chandler Thompson's great team from Muncie Central. In the first three minutes, Chris Lawson, who was the star of the team went up for his patented turn around jumper from six feet away in the lane and Chandler Thompson spiked it like a volleyball and on the run of Muncie Central player took it with no one near him and laid it in and the game essentially ended but Matt Cabot had the game of his life. Jeff Sagarin (00:33:21): I think he may have led the game of anyone, the most rebounds in the game. I compliment him. He was proud of that. And he's played, he said many a pickup game with Chandler Thompson, he said the greatest jumper he's ever been on the court within his entire life. You guys look up because I don't know if you know who Chandler Thompson. Is he played at Ball State. Look up on YouTube his put back dunk against UNLV in the 90 tournaments, the year UNLV won it at all. Look up Chandler Thompson's put back dunk. Rob Collie (00:33:52): Yeah, I was just getting into basketball then, I think. Like in the Loyola Marymount days. Yeah, Jerry Tarkanian. Does college basketball have the same amount of personalities it used to like in the coaching figures. I kind of doubt that it does. Rob Collie (00:34:06): With Tark gone, and of course, Bob Knight, it'll be hard to replace personalities like that. I don't know. I don't really watch college basketball anymore, so I wouldn't really know. But I get invited into those pick'em pools for the tournament March Madness every year and I never had the stamina to fill them out. And they offer those sheets where they'll fill it out for you. But why would I do that? Jeff Sagarin (00:34:28): I've got to tell you a story involving Wayne and I. Rob Collie (00:34:31): Okay. Jeff Sagarin (00:34:31): In the 80 tournament, I had gotten a program running that would to simulate the tournament if you fed in the power ratings. It understood who'd play who and you simulate it a zillion times, come up with the odds. So going into the tournament, we had Purdue maybe the true odds against him should have been let's say, I'll make it up seven to one. Purdue and Iowa, they had Ronnie Lester, I remember. Jeff Sagarin (00:34:57): The true odds against them should have been about 7-1. The bookmakers were giving odds of 40-1. So Wayne and I looked at each other and said, "That seems like a big edge." In theory, well, odds are still against them. Let's bet $25 apiece on both Purdue and Iowa. The two of them made the final four. Jeff Sagarin (00:35:20): In Indianapolis, I'll put it this way, their consolation game gave us no consolation. Rob Collie (00:35:30): Man. Jeff Sagarin (00:35:31): And then one of the games, Joe Barry Carroll of Purdue, they're down by one they UCLA. I'm sure he was being contested. I don't mean he was all by himself. It's always easy for the fan who can't play to mock the player. I don't mean... He was being fiercely contested by UCLA. The net result was he missed with fierce contesting one foot layup that would have won the game for Purdue, that would have put them into the championship game and Iowa could have beaten Louisville, except their best player, Ronnie Lester had to leave the game because he had aggravated a bad knee injury that he just couldn't play well on. Jeff Sagarin (00:36:11): But as I said, no consolation, right Wayne? Dr. Wayne Winston (00:36:14): Right. Jeff Sagarin (00:36:15): That was the next to the last year they ever had a consolation game. The last one was in '81 between LSU and Virginia. Rob Collie (00:36:23): Was it the '81 tournament that you said that you liked Indiana to win it? Jeff Sagarin (00:36:28): Wait, I'm going to show you how you get punished for hubris. I learned my lesson. The next year in '82, I had gotten a lot of notoriety, good kind of notoriety for having them to win in '81. People thought, "Wow! This is like the Oracle." So now as the tournament's about to begin in '82, I started getting a lot of calls, which I never used to do like from the media, "Who do you got Jeff?" I said confidently, "Oregon State." I had them number one, I think they'd only lost one game the whole year and they had a guy named Charlie Sitting, a 6'8 guy who was there all American forward. Jeff Sagarin (00:37:06): He was the star and I was pretty confident and to be honest, probably obnoxious when I'd be talking to the press. So they make the regional final against Georgetown and it was being held out west. I'm sort of confidently waiting for the game to be played and I'm sure there'll be advancing to the final four. And they were playing against freshmen, Patrick Ewing. Jeff Sagarin (00:37:29): In the first 10 seconds of the game, maybe you can find the video, there was a lob pass into Ewing, his back was to the basket, he's like three feet from the basket without even looking, he dunks backwards over his head over Charlie Sitton. And you should see the expression on Charlie Sitton's face. I said, "Oh my god! This game is over." The final score was 68-43 in Georgetown's favor. It was a massacre. It taught me the lesson, never be cocky, at least in public because you get slapped down, you get slapped down when you do that. Rob Collie (00:38:05): I don't want to get into this yet again on this show. But you should call up Nate Silver and maybe talk to him a little bit about the same sort of thing. Makes very big public calls that haven't been necessarily so great lately. Just for everyone's benefit, because even though I'd live in the state of Indiana, I didn't grow up here. Let's just be clear. Who won the NCAA tournament in 1981? Jeff Sagarin (00:38:29): Indiana. Rob Collie (00:38:30): Okay. All right, so there you go. Right. Jeff Sagarin (00:38:33): But who didn't win it in 1982? Oregon State. Rob Collie (00:38:38): Yeah. Did you see The Hunt for Red October where Jack Ryan's character, there's a point where he guesses. He says, "Ramy, as always, goes to port in the bottom half of the hour with his crazy Ivan maneuvers and he turns out to be right." And that's how he ends up getting the captain of the American sub to trust him as Jack Ryan knew this Captain so well, even knew which direction he would turn in the crazy Ivan. But it turns out he was just bluffing. He knew he needed a break and it was 50/50. Rob Collie (00:39:08): So it's a good thing that they were talking to you in the Indiana year, originally. Not the Oregon State year. That wouldn't be a good first impression. If you had to have it go one way or the other in those two years, the order in which it happened was the right order. Jeff Sagarin (00:39:22): Yeah, nobody would have listened to me. They would have said, "You got lucky." They said, "You still were terrible in the Oregon State year." Rob Collie (00:39:28): But you just pick the 10th rated team and be right. The chances of that being just luck are pretty low. I like it. That's a good story. So the two of you have never collaborated like on the Mark Cuban stuff? On the Mavs or any of that? Jeff Sagarin (00:39:43): We've done three things together. The Hoops computer game, which we did from '86-'95. And then we did the Game Theory thing for football, but we never got a client. But we did get White to kind of follow it. There's an interesting anecdote, I won't I mentioned the guy who kind of screwed it up. But he assigned a particular grad assistant to fill and we needed a matrix filled in each week with a bunch of numbers with regarding various things like turnovers. Jeff Sagarin (00:40:13): If play A is called against defense B, what would happen type of thing? The grad assistant hated doing it. And one week, he gave us numbers such that the computer came back with when Indiana had the ball, it should quick kick on first down every time it got the ball. We figured it out what was going on, the guy had given Indiana a 15% chance of a turnover, no matter what play they called in any situation against any defense. Jeff Sagarin (00:40:44): So the computer correctly surmised it were better to punt the ball. This is like playing Russian roulette with the ball. Let's just kick it away. So we ended up losing the game in real life 10-0. White told us then when we next saw him, we used to see him on Monday or Tuesday mornings, real early in the day, like seven o'clock, but that's when you could catch him. And he kind of looked at us and said, "You know what? We couldn't have done any worse said had we kicked [inaudible 00:41:14]." Rob Collie (00:41:13): That's nice. Jeff Sagarin (00:41:14): And then we did Mark Cuban. That was the last thing. We did that with Cuban from basically 2000-2011 with a couple of random projects in the summer for him, but really on a day to day basis during a season from 2000-2011. Rob Collie (00:41:30): And during that era is when I met Wayne at Microsoft. That was very much an active, ongoing project when Wayne was there in Redmond a couple of times that we crossed paths. Dr. Wayne Winston (00:41:43): And we worked for the Knicks one year, and they won 54 games. Jeff Sagarin (00:41:47): Here with Glen Grunwald. So they won more games than they'd ever won in a whole bunch of years. And like three weeks before the season starts or so in mid September, the next fire, Glen Grunwald. Let's put it this way, it didn't bother us that the Knicks never made the playoffs again until this past season. Rob Collie (00:42:10): That's great. You were doing, was it lineup optimization for those teams? Jeff Sagarin (00:42:15): Wayne knows more about this than I do. Because I would create the raw data, well, I call it output, but it needed refinement. That was Wayne's department. So you do all the talking now, Wayne. Dr. Wayne Winston (00:42:26): Yeah. Jeff wrote an amazing FORTRAN program. So basically, Jeff rated teams and we figured out we could rate players based on how the score of the game moved during the game. We could evaluate lineups and figure out head to head how certain players did against each other. Now, every team does this stuff and ESPN has Real Plus-Minus and Nate Silver has Raptor. But we started this. Jeff Sagarin (00:42:58): I mean, everybody years ago knew about Plus-Minus. Well, intuitively, let's say you're a gym rat, you first come to a gym, you don't know anyone there and you start getting in the crowd of guys that show up every afternoon to play pickup. You start sensing, you don't even have to know their names. Hey, when that guy is on the court, no matter who his teammates are, they seem to win. Jeff Sagarin (00:43:20): Or when this guy's on the court, they always seem to lose. Intuitively since it matters, who's on the court with you and who your opponents are. Like to make an example for Rob, let's say you happen to be in a pickup game. You've snuck into Pauley Pavilion during the summer and you end up with like four NBA current playing professionals on your team and let's say an aging Michael Jordan now shows up. He ends up with four guys who are graduate students in philosophy because they have to exercise. You're going to have a better plus-minus than Michael Jordan. But when you take into account who your teammates were and who's his were, if you knew enough about the players, he'd have a better rating than you, new Michael Jordan would. Jeff Sagarin (00:44:08): But you'd have a better raw plus-minus than he would. You have to know who the people on the court were. That was Wayne's insight. Tell them how it all started, how you met ran into Mark Cuban, Wayne, when you were in Dallas? Dr. Wayne Winston (00:44:20): Well, Mark was in my class in 1981, statistics class and I guess the year 1999, we went to a Pacers Maverick game in Dallas. Jeff Sagarin (00:44:31): March of 2000. Dr. Wayne Winston (00:44:33): March of 2000, because our son really liked the Pacers. Mark saw me in the stands. He said, "I remember you from class and I remember you for being on Jeopardy." He had just bought the team. And he said, "If you can do anything to help the Mavericks, let me know." And then I was swimming in the pool one day and I said, "If Jeff rates teams, we should rate players." And so we worked on this and Jeff wrote this amazing FORTRAN program, which I'm sure he could not rewrite today. Jeff Sagarin (00:45:04): Oh, God. Well, I was motivated then. Willingness to work hard for many hours at a time, for days at a time to get something to work when you could use the money that would result from it. I don't have that in me anymore. I'm amazed when I look at the source code. I say, "Man, I couldn't do that now." I like to think I could. Necessity is the mother of invention. Rob Collie (00:45:28): I've many, many, many times said and this is still true to this day, like a previous version of me that made something amazing like built a model or something like that, I look back and go, "Whoo, I was really smart back then." Well, at the same time I know I'm improving. I know that I'm more capable today than I was a year ago. Even just accrued wisdom makes a big difference. When you really get lasered in on something and are very, very focused on it, you're suddenly able to execute at just a higher level than what you're typically used to. Jeff Sagarin (00:46:01): As time went on, we realized what Cuban wanted and other teams like the next would want. Nobody really wanted to wade through the monster set of files that the FORTRAN would create. I call that the raw output that nobody wanted to read, but it was needed. Wayne wrote these amazing routines in Excel that became understandable and usable by the clients. Jeff Sagarin (00:46:26): The way Wayne wrote the Excel, they could basically say, "Tell us what happens when these three guys are in the lineup, but these two guys are not in the lineup." It was amazing the stuff that he wrote. Wayne doesn't give himself the credit that otherwise after a while, nobody would have wanted what we were doing because what I did was this sort of monstrous and to some extent boring. Dr. Wayne Winston (00:46:48): This is what Rob's company does basically. They try and distill data into understandable form that basically helps the company make decisions. Rob Collie (00:46:58): It is a heck of a discipline, right? Because if you have the technical and sort of mental skills to execute on something that's that complex, and it starts down in the weeds and just raw inputs, it's actually really, really, really easy to hand it off in a form that isn't yet quite actionable for the intended audience. It's really fascinating to you, the person that created it. Rob Collie (00:47:23): It's not digestible or actionable yet for the consumer crowd, whoever the target consumer is. I've been there. I've handed off a lot of things back in the day and said, "The professional equivalent of..." And it turned out to not be... It turned out to be, "Go back and actually make it useful, Rob." So I'm familiar with that. For sure. I think I've gotten better at that over the years. As a journey, you're never really complete with. Something I wanted to throw in here before I forget, which is, Jeff, you have an amazing command of certain dates. Dr. Wayne Winston (00:47:56): Oh, yeah. Jeff Sagarin (00:47:57): Give me some date that you know the answer about what day of the week it was, and I'll tell you, but I'll tell you how I did it. Rob Collie (00:48:04): Okay, how about June 6, 1974? Jeff Sagarin (00:48:08): That'd be a Thursday. Rob Collie (00:48:10): Holy cow. Okay. How do you do that? Jeff Sagarin (00:48:11): June 11th of 1974 would be a Tuesday, so five days earlier would be a Thursday. Rob Collie (00:48:19): How do you know June 11? Jeff Sagarin (00:48:19): I just do. Dr. Wayne Winston (00:48:23): It's his birthday. Rob Collie (00:48:24): No, it's not. He wasn't born in '74. Dr. Wayne Winston (00:48:27): No, but June 11th. Jeff Sagarin (00:48:29): I happen to know that June 11 was a Tuesday in 1974, that's all. Rob Collie (00:48:34): I'm still sitting here waiting what passes for an explanation. Is one coming? Jeff Sagarin (00:48:39): I'll tell you another way I could have done it, but I didn't. In 1963, John Kennedy gave his famous speech in Berlin, Ich bin ein Berliner, on Wednesday, June 26th. That means that three weeks earlier was June 5, the Wednesday. So Thursday would have been June 6th. You're going to say, "Well, why is that relevant?" Well, 1963 is congruent to 1974 days of the week was. Rob Collie (00:49:07): Okay. This is really, really impressive. Jeff, you seem so normal up until now. Thomas LaRock (00:49:16): You want throw him off? Just ask for any date before 1759? Jeff Sagarin (00:49:20): No, I can do that. It'll take me a little longer though. Thomas LaRock (00:49:22): Because once they switch from Gregorian- Jeff Sagarin (00:49:25): No, well, I'll give it a Gregorian style, all right. I'm assuming that it's a Gregorian date. The calendar totally, totally repeats every possible cycle every 400 years. For example, if you happen to say, "What was September 10, of 1621?" I would quickly say, "It's a Friday." Because 1621 is exactly the same as 2021 says. Rob Collie (00:49:52): Does this translate into other domains as well? Do you have sort of other things that you can sort of get this quick, intuitive mastery over or is it very, very specific to this date arithmetic? Jeff Sagarin (00:50:02): Probably specific. In other words, I think Wayne's a bit quicker than me. I'm certain does mental arithmetic stuff, but to put everybody in their place, I don't think you ever met him, Wayne. Remember the soccer player, John Swan? Dr. Wayne Winston (00:50:14): Yeah. Jeff Sagarin (00:50:15): He had a friend from high school, they went to Brownsburg High School. I forgot the kid's name. He was like a regular student at IU. He was not a well scholar, but he was a smart kid. I'd say he was slightly faster than me at most mental arithmetic things. So you should never get cocky and think that other people, "Oh, they don't have the pedigree." Some people are really good at stuff you don't expect them to be good at, really good. This kid was really good. Rob Collie (00:50:45): As humans, we need to hyper simplify things in order to have a mental model we can use to navigate a very, very complicated world. That's a bit of a strength. But it's also a weakness in many ways. We tend to try to reduce intelligence down to this single linear number line, when it's really like a vast multi dimensional coordinate space. There are so many dimensions of intelligence. Rob Collie (00:51:11): I grew up with the trope in my head that athletes weren't very bright. Until the first time that I had to try to run a pick and roll versus pick and pop. I discovered that my brain has a clock speed that's too slow to run the pick and roll versus pick and pop. It's not that I'm not smart enough to know if this, than that. I can't process it fast enough to react. You look at like an NFL receiver or an NFL linebacker or whatever, has to process on every single snap. Rob Collie (00:51:45): It's amazing how much information they have the processor. Set aside the physical skill that they have, which I also don't have and never did. On top of that, I don't have the brain at all to do these sorts of things. It's crazy. Jeff Sagarin (00:52:00): With the first few years, I was in Bloomington from, let's say, '77 to '81, I needed the money, so I tutored for the athletic department. They tutored math. And I remember once I was given an assignment, it was a defensive end, real nice kid. He was having trouble with the kind of math we would find really easy. But you could tell he had a mental block. These guys had had bad experiences and they just, "I can't do this. I can't do this." Jeff Sagarin (00:52:25): I asked this defensive end, "Tell me what happens when the ball snap, what do you have to do?" I said, "In real time, you're being physically pulverized, the other guy's putting a forearm or more right into your face. And your brain has to be checking about five different things going on in the backfield, other linemen." I said, "What you're doing with somebody else trying to hurt you physically is much more intellectually difficult, at least to my mind than this problem in the book in front of you and the book is not punching you in the face." Jeff Sagarin (00:52:57): He relaxed and he can do the problems in the room. I'd make sure. I picked not a problem that I had solved. I'd give him another one that I hadn't solved and he could do it. I realized, my God, what these guys they're doing takes actually very quick reacting brainpower and my own personal experience in elementary school, let's say in sixth grade after school, we'd be playing street football, just touch football. When I'd be quarterback, I'd start running towards the line of scrimmage. Jeff Sagarin (00:53:26): If the other team came after me, they'd leave a receiver wide open. I said, "This is easy." So I throw for touchdown. Well, in seventh grade, we go to junior high. We have squads in gym class, and on a particular day, I got to be quarterback. Now, instead of guys sort of leisurely counting one Mississippi, two Mississippi, they are pouring in. It's not that you're going to get hurt, but you're going to get tagged and the play would be over. It says touch football, and I'd be frantically looking for receivers to get open. Let's just say it was not a good experience. I realized there's a lot more to be in quarterback than playing in the street. It's so simple. Jeff Sagarin (00:54:08): They come after you and they leave the receivers wide open. That's what evidently sets apart. Let's say the Tom Brady's from the guys who don't even make it after one year in the NFL. If you gave them a contest throwing the ball, seeing who could throw it through a tire at 50 yards, maybe the young kid is better than Tom Brady but his brain can't process what's happening on the field fast enough. Thomas LaRock (00:54:32): As someone who likes to you know, test things thoroughly, that student of yours who was having trouble on the test, you said the book wasn't hitting him physically. Did you try possibly? Jeff Sagarin (00:54:45): I should have shoved it in his face. Thomas LaRock (00:54:49): Physically, just [crosstalk 00:54:50]. Rob Collie (00:54:50): Just throw things at him. Yeah. Thomas LaRock (00:54:52): Throw an eraser, a piece of chalk. Just something. Jeff Sagarin (00:54:56): I'll tell you now, I don't want to name him. He's a real nice guy. I'll tell you a funny anecdote about him. I had hurt my knuckle in a pickup basketball game. I had a cast on it and I was talking to my friend. And he had just missed making a pro football team the previous summer and he was on the last cut. He'd made it to the final four guys. Jeff Sagarin (00:55:18): He was trying to become a linebacker I think. They told him, "You're just not mean enough." That was in my mind. I thought, "Well, I don't know about that." He said, "Yeah, I had the same kind of fractured knuckle you got." I said, "How'd you get it?" "Pick up [inaudible 00:55:32]. Punching a guy in the face." But he wasn't mean enough for the NFL. And I heard a story from a friend of mine who I witnessed it, this guy was at one point working security at a local holiday inn that would have these dances. Jeff Sagarin (00:55:47): There was some guy who was like from the Hells Angels who was causing trouble. He's a big guy, 6'5, 300 whatever. And he actually got into an argument with my friend who was the security guy. Angel guy throws a punch at this guy who's not mean enough for the NFL. With one punch the Jeff Sagarin tutoree knocked the Hell's Angels guy flat unconscious. He was a comatose on the floor. But he wasn't mean enough for the NFL. Rob Collie (00:56:17): Tom if I told my plus minus story about my 1992 dream team on this show, I think maybe I have. I don't remember. Thomas LaRock (00:56:24): You might have but this seems like a perfect episode for that. Rob Collie (00:56:27): I think Jeff and Wayne, if I have told it before, it was probably with Wayne. Dr. Wayne Winston (00:56:31): I don't remember. Rob Collie (00:56:32): Perfect. It'll be new to everyone that matters. Tom remembers. So, in 1992, the Orlando Magic were a recent expansion team in the NBA. Sometime in that summer, the same summer where the 1992 Dream Team Olympic team went and dominated, there was a friend of our family who ran a like a luxury automotive accessories store downtown and he basically hit the jackpot. He'd been there forever. There was like right next to like the magic practice facility. Rob Collie (00:57:09): And so all the magic players started frequenting his shop. That was where they tricked out all their cars and added all the... So his business was just booming as a result of magic coming to town. I don't know this guy ever had ever been necessarily terribly athletic at any point in his life. He had this bright idea to assemble a YMCA team that would play in the local YMCA league in Orlando, the city league. Rob Collie (00:57:35): He had secured the commitment of multiple magic players to be on our team as well as like Jack Givens, who was the radio commentator for The Magic and had been a longtime NBA star with his loaded team. And then it was like, this guy, we'll call this guy Bill. It's not his real name. So it was Bill and the NBA players and me and my dad, a couple of younger guys that actually I didn't know, but were pretty good but they weren't even like college level players. Rob Collie (00:58:07): And so we signed up for the A league, the most competitive league that Orlando had to offer. And then none of the NBA players ever showed up. I said never, but they did show up one time. But we were getting blown out. Some of the people who were playing against us were clearly ex college players. We couldn't even get the ball across half court. Jeff Sagarin (00:58:33): Wayne, does this sound familiar to you? Dr. Wayne Winston (00:58:35): Yes, tell this story. Jeff Sagarin (00:58:38): Wayne, when he was a grad student at Yale, and I'm living in the White Irish neighborhood called Dorchester in Boston, I was young and spry. At that time, I would think I could play. Wayne as a grad student at Yale had entered a team with a really intimidating name of administration science in the New Haven City League, which was played I believe at Hill House high school at night. So Wayne said, "Hey Jeff, why don't you take a Greyhound bus down. We're going to play against this team called the New Haven All Stars. It ought to be interesting." Rob Collie (00:59:14): Wayne's voice in that story sound a little bit like the guy at USA Today for a moment. It was the same voice, the cigar chomping. Anyway, continue. Jeff Sagarin (00:59:25): They edged this out 75-31. I thought I was lined up against the guy... I thought it was Paul Silas who was may be sort of having a bus man's holiday playing for the New Haven all-stars. So a couple weeks later, Paul Silas was my favorite player on the Celtics. He could rebound, that's all I could do. I was pitiful at anything else. But I worked at that and I was pretty strong and I worked at jumping, etc. Jeff Sagarin (00:59:53): So a few weeks later, Wayne calls me up and says, "Hey Jeff, we're playing the New Haven All-Stars again. Why don't you come down again and we'll get revenge against them this time?" Let's just say it didn't work out that way. And I remember one time I had Paul Silas completely boxed out. It was perfect textbook and I could jump. If my hands were maybe at rim level and I could see a pair of pants a foot over mine from behind, he didn't tell me and he got the rebound and I'm at rim level. Jeff Sagarin (01:00:24): We were edged out by a score so monstrous, I won't repeat it here. I'm not a guard at all. But I ended up with the ball... They full court pressed the whole game. Rob Collie (01:00:34): Of course, once they figure out- Jeff Sagarin (01:00:36): That we can't play and I'm not even a guard. It was ludicrous. My four teammates left me in terror. They just said, "We're going down court." So I'm all alone, they have four guys on me and my computer like my thought, "Well, they've got four guys on me. That must mean my four teammates are being guarded by one guy down court. This should be easy." I look, I look. They didn't steal the ball out of my hands or nothing. I'm still holding on to it. They're pecking away but they didn't foul me. I give them credit for that. I was like, "Where the hell are my teammates?" Jeff Sagarin (01:01:08): They were in terror hiding in single file behind the one guy and I basically... I don't care if you bleeping or not, I said, "Fuck it." And I just threw the ball. Good two overhand pass, long pass. I had my four teammates down there and they had one guy and you can guess who got the ball. After the game I asked them, I said, "You guys seem fairly good. Are you anybody?" The guy said, "Yeah, we're the former Fairfield varsity we were in the NIT about two years ago." Jeff Sagarin (01:01:39): I looked it up once. Fairfield did make the NIT, I think in '72. And this took place in like February of '74. It taught me a lesson because I looked up what my computer rating for Fairfield would have been compared that to, let's say, UCLA and NC State and figured at a minimum, we'd be at least a 100-200 point underdog against them in a real game, but it would have been worse because we would never get the ball pass mid-court. Rob Collie (01:02:10): Yeah, I mean, those games that I'm talking about in that YMCA League, I mean, the scores were far worse. We were losing like 130-11. Jeff Sagarin (01:02:19): Hey, good that's worse than New Haven all-stars beat us but not quite that bad. Rob Collie (01:02:24): I remember one time actually managing to get the ball across half court and pulling up for a three-point shot off of the break. And then having the guy that had assembled the team, take me aside at the next time out and tell me that I needed to pass that. I'm just like, "No. You got us into this embarrassment. If I get to the point where like, there's actually a shot we can take like a shot, we could take a shot. I'm not going to dump it off to you." Thomas LaRock (01:02:57): Not just a shot, but the shot of gold. Rob Collie (01:03:00): The one time we did get those guys to show up, we were still kind of losing because those guys didn't want to get hurt. It didn't make any sense for them to be there. There was no upside for them to be in this game. I'm sure that they just sort of been guilted into showing up. But then this Christian Laettner lookalike on the other team. He was as big as Laettner. Rob Collie (01:03:25): This is the kind of teams we were playing against. There was a long rebound and that Laettner lookalike got that long rebound and basically launched from the free throw line and dunked over Terry Catledge, the power forward for the Magic at the time. And at that moment, Terry Catledge scored the next 45 points in the game himself. That was all it was. Rob Collie (01:03:50): He'd just be standing there waiting for me to inbound the ball to him, he would take it coast to coast and score. He'd backpedal on defense and he would somehow steal the ball and he'd go down and score again. He just sent a message. And if that guy hadn't dunked over Catledge, we would have never seen what Catledge was capable of. So remember, this is a team th

tv canada russian canadian oakland business roscoe california american fuck berlin ucla star wars man indiana colorado north god new york city war football baseball nfl mit new york times knoxville magic opportunity house super bowl hawaii hill house hell michael jordan research washington tennessee nba world series ladies league public wind greyhound nebraska indianapolis holy pirates captain nyu hunt mississippi spring buffalo pittsburgh titanic iowa fairfield microsoft sunset strip tom brady teacher bottom fivethirtyeight boston globe vic winning plug espn vanderbilt cuban angels ewing oracle march madness mutual john kennedy damn kentucky elvis presley new haven usa today yale makes jeopardy athletic wall street journal iu penn state kansas city throw louisville sports illustrated punching pc hells angels ev ymca excel bloomington ball state orlando magic hoops labor day fort wayne wilt necessity insider channel nine new york knicks berliner dunkel ncaa bcs correct tonya harding announcers unlv wilt chamberlain defensive romer red october willingness 10x my god lou gehrig references mark cuban georgetown chamberlain bye boston celtics redmond raptor gregorian nit ncaa tournament lsu nc state purdue pete rose princess diaries whoo new york yankees comet crap rpi los angeles dodgers dorchester jack ryan fortran walla walla physically magic johnson ramy los angeles lakers oregon state pro football fibonacci game theory pacers grade b mike vick chris lawson dallas mavericks loyola marymount scylla laettner michael vick x2 spry intuitively tony romo pittsburgh pirates nancy kerrigan patrick ewing nate silver bob knight william wallace kyler murray christian laettner dictate raw data magnavox sam white drew bledsoe frank deford louisville courier journal pauley pavilion glen grunwald andy glockner unitas valkenburg connie hawkins johnny unitas jerry tarkanian in canadian paul silas
To The Point - Cybersecurity
"Roided-out Sitting Duck", Part One - With Juan Andres Guerrero-Saade

To The Point - Cybersecurity

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 35:00


Want to know what this week's episode title means? Listen to our two-part episode with Juan Andrés Guerrero Saade (aka JAGS), principal researcher at SentinelOne and Adjunct Professor of Strategic Studies at Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS). JAGS takes us on an exciting and educational ride through his research efforts on Moonlight Maze, one of the first widely known cyber espionage campaigns in world history, and how he came to be a featured hologram in the International Spy Museum in Washington, D.C. He also shares insights on the epic trolling endeavor through the recent “Meteor Express” wiper attack of an Iranian railway and possible ties to early versions of Stardust and Comet malware. And you won't want to miss his perspective on monetization, Linux flying below the radar, why it's important to get more savvy in determining what you want from vendors and how a philosophy major found his way into the threat intel space. For links and resources discussed in this episode, please visit our show notes at https://www.forcepoint.com/govpodcast/e151

The 365 Days of Astronomy, the daily podcast of the International Year of Astronomy 2009
Travelers in the Night Eps. 591 & 592: Teddy's First Comet & Invasion

The 365 Days of Astronomy, the daily podcast of the International Year of Astronomy 2009

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2021 5:29


Dr. Al Grauer hosts. Dr. Albert D. Grauer ( @Nmcanopus ) is an observational asteroid hunting astronomer. Dr. Grauer retired from the University of Arkansas at Little Rock in 2006. travelersinthenight.org Today's 2 topics: - Teddy Pruyne discovered Comet P/2019 X1 (Pruyne) in Gemini. - Zdnenek Bardon in the Czech Republic was surprised, while taking images of Comet Atlas,  when his camera's field of view was crossed by two perpendicular swarms of SpaceX Starlink satellites.   We've added a new way to donate to 365 Days of Astronomy to support editing, hosting, and production costs. Just visit: https://www.patreon.com/365DaysOfAstronomy and donate as much as you can! Share the podcast with your friends and send the Patreon link to them too! Every bit helps! Thank you! ------------------------------------ Do go visit http://astrogear.spreadshirt.com/ for cool Astronomy Cast and CosmoQuest t-shirts, coffee mugs and other awesomeness! http://cosmoquest.org/Donate This show is made possible through your donations. Thank you! (Haven't donated? It's not too late! Just click!) The 365 Days of Astronomy Podcast is produced by Astrosphere New Media. http://www.astrosphere.org/ Visit us on the web at 365DaysOfAstronomy.org or email us at info@365DaysOfAstronomy.org.

Ember Island Sayers
3.21 Sozin's Comet Part IV: Avatar Aang

Ember Island Sayers

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2021 84:00


In this episode we discuss Book 3, Episode 21 of Avatar: The Last Airbender, Katara's creativity in waterbending and how it becomes useful to her in her fight against Azula, Aang's alternative solution to violence and how it honors his people, and Suki's inability to quip. Leave the nicknames to us, honey. Please give us a rating on Apple Podcasts, and check us out on twitter @embersayers. You can also find us on youtube if you'd like to leave a comment, and all suggestions and questions can be emailed to emberislandsayers@gmail.com. Stay flamin'!

The Artists of Data Science
Comet ML Office Hour 29 | 12SEP2021

The Artists of Data Science

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2021 67:53


Vote in the data community content creators awards! http://bit.ly/data-creators-awards Checkout Max Frenzel's episode here: https://theartistsofdatascience.fireside.fm/max-frenzel Check it out and don't forget to register for future office hours: http://bit.ly/adsoh Register for Sunday Sessions here: http://bit.ly/comet-ml-oh YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/TheArtistsofDataScience Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/theartistsofdatascience/ Facebook: https://facebook.com/TheArtistsOfDataScience Twitter: https://twitter.com/ArtistsOfData

Lockheed Martin Space Makers
A Match Made in Space: OSIRIS-REx and Bennu, Part II

Lockheed Martin Space Makers

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2021 59:23


Episode NotesTo dig deeper into some of the missions referenced in today's episode, please follow these links:OSIRIS-REx Mission OverviewMission WebsitePhotos of OSIRIS-RExVideo about OSIRIS-RExArticle – How This Invention Will Extract Secrets from an AsteroidArticle – How OSIRIS-REx is Returning an Asteroid Sample to Eartheed MartinArticle - Beyond Apollo: Taking one Giant Leap Credits:Space Makers is a production of Lockheed Martin Space. Episode guests were Dante Lauretta from the University of Arizona, and Beau Bierhaus, Sandy Freund, and Joe Landon from Lockheed Martin. And they are Space Makers.It's executive produced by Pavan Desai.Senior Producer is Lauren Cole. Senior producer, writer, and host is Benjamin Dinsmore. Associate producers and writers are Kaitlin Benz and Audrey Dods. Sound designed and audio mastered by Julian Giraldo.Graphic Design by Tim Roesch.Marketing and recruiting by Joe Portnoy, Shannon Myers, and Stephanie Dixon.These stories would not be possible without the support from our space communications professionals Tracy Weise, Natalya Oleksik, Gary Napier, Lauren Duda, and Dani Hauf. 

El Partidazo de COPE
Sergi Enrich, en COPE: "Cometí un error, pero no soy ningún delincuente ni ningún asesino"

El Partidazo de COPE

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2021 12:32


The CodeX Cantina
The Comet by W. E. B. DuBois - Short Story Summary, Analysis, Review

The CodeX Cantina

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2021 20:25


Welcome to the CodeX Cantina where our mission is to get more people talking about books! Today we are looking at "The Comet" by W. E. B. DuBois. One of the greatest writers to have ever picked up the pen! Let's talk about the color line as well as some possible religious angles for understanding the piece today. W. E. B. DuBois Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z3XMVcadnJ8&list=PLHg_kbfrA7YC2FILVlf5sdh4GzTviU6vr ✨Do you have a Short Story or Novel you'd think we'd like or would want to see us cover? Submit an entry via the Wheel of Destiny on Patreon.

Ember Island Sayers
3.20 Sozin's Comet Part III: Into the Inferno

Ember Island Sayers

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2021 76:14


In this episode we discuss Book 3, Episode 20 of Avatar: The Last Airbender, Azula's waivering mental stability and consequent self-isolation, Aang finding power in choosing peace, and Ozai being the biggest drama king of them all. Happy Birthday! Please give us a rating on Apple Podcasts, and check us out on twitter @embersayers. You can also find us on youtube if you'd like to leave a comment, and all suggestions and questions can be emailed to emberislandsayers@gmail.com. Stay flamin'!

Lockheed Martin Space Makers
A Match Made in Space: OSIRIS-REx and Bennu, Part I

Lockheed Martin Space Makers

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2021 50:51


To dig deeper into some of the missions referenced in today's episode, please follow these links:OSIRIS-REx Mission OverviewMission WebsitePhotos of OSIRIS-RExVideo about OSIRIS-RExArticle – How This Invention Will Extract Secrets from an AsteroidArticle – How OSIRIS-REx is Returning an Asteroid Sample to Eartheed Martin Credits:Space Makers is a production of Lockheed Martin Space. Episode guests were Dante Lauretta from the University of Arizona, and Beau Bierhaus and Sandy Freund from Lockheed Martin. And they are Space Makers.It's executive produced by Pavan Desai.Senior Producer is Lauren Cole. Senior producer, writer, and host is Benjamin Dinsmore. Associate producers and writers are Kaitlin Benz and Audrey Dods. Sound designed and audio mastered by Julian Giraldo.Graphic Design by Tim Roesch.Marketing and recruiting by Joe Portnoy, Shannon Myers, and Stephanie Dixon.These stories would not be possible without the support from our space communications professionals Tracy Weise, Natalya Oleksik, Gary Napier, Lauren Duda, and Dani Hauf.  

GBA Podcast
#86 - Case History - Dream Home or Nightmare instead?

GBA Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2021 28:42


GBA Case History Series – Case History #86 - Dream Home or Nightmare instead? Summary GBA has published over 100 case histories based on real-life events that have happened to geoprofessional firms. This episode in the series explores Case History #86 where the GBA member firm conducted a geotechnical engineering study and performed COMET services during earthwork for a builder on a single family home in an area where expansive shales are interbedded with sandstone. The member firm advised for slope-stability analyses. Eight months after construction was complete, the foundation started to move, creating distress in the slab and some walls. Remediation attempts were unsuccessful and as a result the project went to litigation. Our Guest Carrie Foulk, PE, GE – Geotechnical Group Manager/Senior Geotechnical Engineer/BSK Associates (https://www.bskassociates.com/) (Link to Profile) (https://www.linkedin.com/in/carrie-foulk-pe-ge-ab108533/) Carrie Foulk is a senior geotechnical engineer at BSK Associates in Livermore, California. She has been in this business for about 20 years, and is the geotechnical technical lead for the company, as well as the geotechnical group manager in Livermore. She has a bachelor's degree in civil engineering from University of Washington (1996) and a master's degree in geotechnical engineering from University of California at Berkeley (2002). She is professionally licensed as both a civil engineer and geotechnical engineer in California. She serves as chair of the Geotechnical Business Committee for the GBA and is currently part of the Emerging Leaders Committee. Her career highlights include taking 5 years off when her children were born to be a stay-at-home mom. Topics for discussion include: Case History 86 background. [1:42 min.] What is Shale? [1:56 min] What are pier foundation? [2:38 min] What are spread foundation? [2:54 min] The difference between pier foundations with a structural slab and spread foundation? [11:45 min] Benefits and drawbacks of a structural slab built on deep pier foundations [12:55 min] Imporatnce of soil removal and replacement (overexcavation). [14:40 min] Differential settlement and causes. [15:40 min] Standard of Care: Statewide vs. Local Standards. [20:04 min] Lessons Learned: Known risk of residential work. [21:25 min] Providing clients with multiple solutions - How to emphasize the importance of the foundation decision? [ 23:02 min] What went wrong with construction testing? [23:45 min] Why did the slope stability become such a big deal when it initially seemed like it was not? [25:25 min] Smaller projects do not equate to smaller risks. [26:40 min] Calls-to-action: Download Case History #86: https://www.geoprofessional.org/product/gba-case-history-no-86/ Visit the following link to access all of GBA's Case Histories: https://www.geoprofessional.org/gba-case-histories/ (https://www.geoprofessional.org/gba-case-histories/) An account is required to download the individual Case Histories, which are free for GBA Member Firms. Visit the GBA Website at https://www.geoprofessional.org (https://www.geoprofessional.org) for other training resources and reference materials and/or to become a member. Visit https://www.gbapodcast.com (https://www.gbapodcast.com) for future Podcast Episodes Contact us at info@geoprofessional.org with any podcast-related questions or comments Subscribe * Subscribe to the GBA Podcast https://www.gbapodcast.com/subscribe This episode was produced by the following GBA Members: Tiffany Vorhies, NACE CIP-2 (https://www.linkedin.com/in/tiffanyvorhies/) – Vice President/SME (https://sme-usa.com/) Carrie Foulk, PE, GE (https://www.linkedin.com/in/carrie-foulk-pe-ge-ab108533/) – Geotechnical Group Manager/Senior Geotechnical Engineer/BSK Associates (https://www.bskassociates.com/) Shawn Leyva, PE (https://www.linkedin.com/in/shawn-leyva-79153b1b1/) – Associate Senior Engineer/Crawford & Associates (https://crawford-inc.com/) Ryan White, PE, GE (https://www.linkedin.com/in/ryankwhite/) – Principal Geotechnical Engineer/PBS Engineering and Environmental Inc. (https://www.pbsusa.com/)

Un Mensaje a la Conciencia
«No salí embarazada, pero...»

Un Mensaje a la Conciencia

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 4, 2021 4:01


En este mensaje tratamos el siguiente caso de una adolescente que «descargó su conciencia» de manera anónima en nuestro sitio www.conciencia.net, autorizándonos a que la citáramos: «Tengo dieciséis años, y desde hace algún tiempo he tenido un novio. Cometí el error de entregarme a él. Lo bueno es que no salí embarazada, pero mi familia se enteró y ya no confían en mí. Me dijeron que termine con la relación; pero no puedo, ya que lo quiero mucho. No sé si lo que siento es amor, o si sólo es costumbre o apego. Quiero hacer las cosas bien esta vez, pero no sé qué hacer.» Este es el consejo que le dio mi esposa: «Estimada amiga: »La edad de dieciséis años es difícil. No eres una niña, pero tampoco eres una mujer adulta.... »Lamentablemente, en el caso tuyo hay estudios que demuestran que el cerebro humano no termina de desarrollarse sino hasta cumplidos los veinticinco años. A tu edad, la parte del cerebro que te da la capacidad de sentir no está del todo conectada con la parte del cerebro que te faculta para razonar con claridad. Así que es posible que lo que sientes te parezca más verdadero que las consecuencias si te dejas llevar por esos sentimientos. »Otra manera de expresarlo es que la capacidad que tienes de tomar decisiones no está tan desarrollada como la de tener emociones y sentimientos. El amor que sientes por tu novio es mucho más fuerte que tu preocupación por prevenir un posible embarazo o una enfermedad. »Por eso Dios te dio los padres que tienes. Claro que no todos los padres son buenos, y todos, en definitiva, cometen errores. Pero la mayoría de ellos se preocupan por sus hijos y desean protegerlos del peligro. Al parecer, eso es lo que están tratando de hacer tus padres. »Uno de los Diez Mandamientos dice que debes honrar a tu padre y a tu madre.1 Mientras vivas en casa con tus padres, y ellos te estén sustentando económicamente, honrar significa obedecer. Por eso el apóstol Pablo también nos enseñó que debemos obedecer a nuestros padres.2 »Algún día, cuando puedas vivir por tu cuenta y proveer para tu propio sustento económico, ya no tendrás la obligación de obedecerlos. Pero hasta entonces es mucho más seguro y prudente reconocer que tus padres tienen la responsabilidad de protegerte al establecer reglas que tienes que obedecer. »Haces bien en admitir que no estás segura si lo que sientes por tu novio es amor o si es sólo costumbre. También es bueno que quieras hacer las cosas bien. Te aconsejamos que obedezcas a tus padres y termines por completo la relación con él. Ellos saben que, luego de haber tenido relaciones sexuales con él una vez, sería casi imposible dejar de volver a hacerlo si continuaran viéndose.» Con eso termina lo que recomienda Linda, mi esposa. El consejo completo, que por falta de espacio no pudimos incluir en esta edición, se puede leer si se ingresa en el sitio www.conciencia.net y se pulsa la pestaña que dice: «Casos», y luego se busca el Caso 530. Carlos ReyUn Mensaje a la Concienciawww.conciencia.net 1 Éx 20:12 2 Ef 6:1

The Thoughtful Entrepreneur
863 - How Google Has Changed the Digital Marketing Space with Comet Fuel's Jarod Spiewak

The Thoughtful Entrepreneur

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 3, 2021 22:15


863 - How Google Has Changed the Digital Marketing Space with Comet Fuel's Jarod Spiewak

The 365 Days of Astronomy, the daily podcast of the International Year of Astronomy 2009
Guide To Space - Catching The Next Interstellar Asteroid Or Comet

The 365 Days of Astronomy, the daily podcast of the International Year of Astronomy 2009

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 3, 2021 11:48


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p0SMNucXwgo On October 19th, 2017 astronomers detected the first interstellar asteroid (or maybe comet) passing through the Solar System: Oumuamua. It had a brief encounter with the inner Solar System and then hurtled back out into interstellar space.   Once astronomers noticed it, they directed the world's telescopes on the object, but it was too far away to reveal anything more than a faint dot. Until now, we've only been able to study objects in our own Solar System. We have no idea what the rest of the Milky Way is like.   But we were too late to catch it, no spacecraft was ready to make a quick intercept.   Well, scientists aren't going to make that mistake again. The European Space Agency announced their plans to build a comet interceptor. A spacecraft that will lurk out at the Earth-Sun L2 Lagrange point, waiting for a long-period comet or interstellar object to pounce on, and give us the first close up view ever.   We've added a new way to donate to 365 Days of Astronomy to support editing, hosting, and production costs. Just visit: https://www.patreon.com/365DaysOfAstronomy and donate as much as you can! Share the podcast with your friends and send the Patreon link to them too! Every bit helps! Thank you! ------------------------------------ Do go visit http://astrogear.spreadshirt.com/ for cool Astronomy Cast and CosmoQuest t-shirts, coffee mugs and other awesomeness! http://cosmoquest.org/Donate This show is made possible through your donations. Thank you! (Haven't donated? It's not too late! Just click!) The 365 Days of Astronomy Podcast is produced by Astrosphere New Media. http://www.astrosphere.org/ Visit us on the web at 365DaysOfAstronomy.org or email us at info@365DaysOfAstronomy.org.

Ember Island Sayers
3.19 Sozin's Comet Part II: The Old Masters

Ember Island Sayers

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2021 80:14


In this episode we discuss Book 3, Episode 19 of Avatar: The Last Airbender, the importance of being able to see the bigger picture, sacred geometry and the significance of the hexagon on the lion turtle's back, and the return of our favorite recurring character... I think it's kind of sweet. Please give us a rating on Apple Podcasts, and check us out on twitter @embersayers. You can also find us on youtube if you'd like to leave a comment, and all suggestions and questions can be emailed to emberislandsayers@gmail.com. Stay flamin'!

The Artists of Data Science
Comet ML Office Hour 28 | 29AUG2021

The Artists of Data Science

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2021 71:25


Vote in the data community content creators awards! http://bit.ly/data-creators-awards Checkout Jeffery Li's episode here: https://theartistsofdatascience.fireside.fm/jeff-li Check it out and don't forget to register for future office hours: http://bit.ly/adsoh Register for Sunday Sessions here: http://bit.ly/comet-ml-oh YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/TheArtistsofDataScience Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/theartistsofdatascience/ Facebook: https://facebook.com/TheArtistsOfDataScience Twitter: https://twitter.com/ArtistsOfData

Jean & Mike Do The New York Times Crossword
Tuesday, August 31, 2021 - A crossword that's not just EYECANDY

Jean & Mike Do The New York Times Crossword

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2021 13:04


A tasty Tuesday puzzle, with some delicious clues from Eric Bornstein, including 18A, Good snack for a pilot?, WINGNUTS, and Jean's favorite, 24A, Good snack for a gangster?, TOUGHCOOKIES. Between WINGNUTS, SENECA, COMET, RADAR and ETA, one could also make the argument that besides food, there was a hidden aviation theme ... but only the crossword constructor knows for sure.In other news, it's Triplet Tuesday, and Mike scores 2 out of 3, tripping up on DOD, but nailing BOX and GAG.