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Latest podcast episodes about Nordstrom

Amplify Your Success
Episode 266: How to Get Celebrity Endorsements for Your Product With Sarah Shaw

Amplify Your Success

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 33:31


Imagine a famous celebrity showing up on Instagram, sharing how much they love your product or service. With so much noise online, finding ways to grab attention without expensive Facebook Ads is priceless marketing juice! But where do you get started? How do you find the right influencer to boost up your name brand recognition? On Amplify Your Success Podcast episode 266, fashion designer Sarah Shaw joins me to talk about how to land celebrities and influencers who can get more eyes on your products. Join the Amplify Your Authority Facebook Group to learn more strategies to stop being a best-kept secret and stand out as an industry go-to authority. Key Takeaways [5:06] Credibility is more important than ever, and celebrities can provide that “borrowed” trust in the market. [6:46] How to find the right celebrities and influencers to promote your products. [11:10] Why it pays to be good with your follow up. [13:54] The difference between celebrity endorsement and influencer marketing (and what to vett an influencer for to make sure it's a good fit.) [20:10] How to leverage an Amazon store with your promotional campaign. [22:24] The best way to leverage celebrity endorsements if you have a service. [27:54] Sarah's surprising “bold move” that propelled her business into 6 figures quickly.   About the Guest Sarah Shaw is a fashion entrepreneur, product designer and business coach. With her 20 years of experience - and 6 companies under her belt - Sarah has built a treasure trove of secrets for launching your line, getting your products into stores and boutiques, getting your products to A-List celebrities, and getting massive publicity in order to grow her companies quickly. Sarah's products have been in over 1,200 stores and boutiques across the country, including Anthropologie, Nordstrom, Barney's, Henri Bendel, Fred Segal, Neiman Marcus, Saks 5th Avenue and Bloomingdales. She's also appeared in the pages of almost every major fashion and lifestyle magazine, including InStyle, People, US Weekly, Lucky, ELLE, WWD, Marie Claire and the O-List. She's been on tv shows like Access Hollywood, Extra and the E! network. And she's been interviewed for Entrepreneur.com, Forbes.com and American Express' OPEN Forum. Sarah is the Founder & CEO of Sarah Shaw Consulting, where she teaches product designers and fashion entrepreneurs how to launch, market and sell their products into boutiques, get media placements and gift celebrities.   Resources Mentioned in This Episode: Get Access to Sarah's FREE Resource: Celebrity Access Blueprint Get Access to my 7 Step Plan to Get Booked, Get Leads and Get 5 Figure Clients when you join my Amplify Your Authority FB Group.

Green Beauty Conversations by Formula Botanica | Organic & Natural Skincare | Cosmetic Formulation | Indie Beauty Business

Does an indie beauty founder's mission matter as much as the products they formulate? This is scary territory for formulators who love creating products and dream of one day launching a beauty brand. But decisive answers to questions like this are fundamental to any beauty entrepreneur's journey. What will your brand stand for? What do you as a founder bring to the brand story? What is your philosophy and your brand's purpose? If you thinking of your own journey as an indie beauty founder but are floundering and feeling overwhelmed, this episode with Formula Botanica graduate and new business owner Sandra Velasquez is the inspiration you need. Everyone's backstory is different, however Sandra's mission in building Nopalera - a bath and body line infused with her Mexican heritage - has universal messages relevant to all would-be beauty entrepreneurs. Sandra spent a whole year honing her core philosophy and getting her branding to reflect her vision for Nopalera as an upmarket Latino beauty brand. She bucked perceived norms, plugged a gap in the market, stunned and silenced her critics and grew a community around her mission. And all because she had a clear vision of Nopolera not only as a profitable, successful brand but also as a trailblazer helping Mexican producers be valued and get the credit they deserve. Sandra launched Nopolera as a high-end Mexican bath and body line in 2020. Inspired by the indigenous Nopal cactus, Nopalera, after just one full year of trading, is now in 250 independent retailers across the States including Nordstrom. Sandra has been featured in major media outlets including NBC, Elle, Vogue and Forbes. In this episode of Green Beauty Conversations, Formula Botanica CEO and podcast host Lorraine Dallmeier invites Sandra to take us on her journey. We discover the power of creating an authentic brand with a mission far greater than that of selling skincare.

WorkParty
Consumer Culture: How Dede Raad of Dress Up Buttercup Is Leveraging Social Media to Turn Followers Into Shoppers

WorkParty

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 27:39


Turning followers into shoppers is no easy feat. The savvy social media crowd can spot a disingenuous post from a mile away, so monetizing your account with sponsored posts takes honesty, authenticity, and plenty of creativity. Which is something Dede Raad, the founder of Dress Up Buttercup, knows a thing or two about. The blogger works with major brands like Nordstrom and Amazon to sell products to her 1M Instagram followers—and she recently launched her own collection of denim jackets that sold out in minutes. She was also named one of Fortune's Top 25 Creators, along with Lil Nas X, Addison Rae, and Benny Drama, a formal recognition of her ability to monetize her platform in interesting ways. Needless to say, I can't wait to chat with Dede about how she's turned her followers into shoppers, including her go-to KPIs for measuring success and her tips for cultivating an engaged audience. To join the WorkParty click HERE To connect with Dede Raad click HERE To connect with Jaclyn Johnson click HERE To learn more about Dress Up Buttercup click HERE To follow along with Create & Cultivate click HERE To submit your questions call the WorkParty Hotline: 1-(833)-57-PARTY (577-2789) This episode is brought to you by: OneSkin • Visit oneskin.co/party and use code PARTY for 15% off your first purchase. Shopify • Go to shopify.com/party for a FREE 14-day trial and get full access to Shopify's entire suite of features. Produced by Dear Media

Up Your Creative Genius
Joseph Rosenfeld: How to transform your style, create a presence and claim your true self

Up Your Creative Genius

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 43:18


Joseph Rosenfeld was born to be a personal style strategist. He had an epiphany in high school that remains the crux of his work for over thirty years. He theorized that personal style could transcend physical attraction. Joseph developed a strategy that saved and transformed his life. And he has gone on to transform the lives of an esteemed clientele. Clients know Joseph as a "style savant," and he is most called to serve those on a quest for transformation. His hallmark style strategy encourages clients to sync their inner and outer energy. He guides top business leaders with empathy, creativity, and precision. He shares their focus to ensure that they look on message. Quoted in The New York Times, NPR, The Washington Post, and NBC, Joseph loves sharing encouraging messages about style. He was once recognized by the San Jose Business Journal as one of its "40 Under 40." And the Silicon Valley Magazine named him best personal stylist in its It List in 2020 and 2021. In his spare time Joseph nurtures his interests in art, fashion, design, good food, and traveling. “I may never be handsome, I may never be hot, I may never be sexy. I mean, I feel good. So I mean, I got it going on. But what is true is that I could have style. And that style people would know and get to know me from the inside out, because style is about revealing who you are from deep within. It's not a surface game.” Time Stamp 1:27 How did Joseph start getting into styles at an early age? 5:02 Joseph's fashion and style design journey 7:13 Styling is not a surface game 10:26 Discovering his life's purpose from his favourite track 12:17 Joining the retail 13:29 Sharing his transformation projects experience 20:45 Joseph's workshops and fashion tips 30:34 How Joseph starts his day and his daily routine 34:01 Joseph's favourite fashion designer and how he gets inspiration from him 35:55 Joseph shares his vision and mission Social Media Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/josephrosenfeld/ LinkedIn - https://www.linkedin.com/in/josephrosenfeld/ Clubhouse - https://www.joinclubhouse.com/@josephrosenfeld Stevie Nicks “Think About It” - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2-6l3JP9mEg  Follow Patti Dobrowolski - Instagramhttps://www.instagram.com/upyourcreativegenius/ Follow Patti Dobrowolski - Linkedinhttps://www.linkedin.com/in/patti-dobrowolski-532368/ Up Your Creative Geniushttps://www.upyourcreativegenius.com/ Patti Dobrowolski 00:03 Hello superstars. Welcome to the Up Your Creative Genius podcast where you will gain insight and tips to stomp on the accelerator and blast off to transform your business and your life. I'm your host, Patti Dobrowolski. And if this is your first time tuning in, then strap in because this is serious rocket fuel. Each week, I interview fellow creative geniuses to help you learn how easy it is to up your creative genius in any part of your life. Hey, everybody, it's Patti Dobrowolski with Up Your Creative Genius. Today, I have the chief style geek here that I'm going to interview in the podcast. It is so exciting to be here with Joseph Rosenfeld. He transforms geek to Chic, and he's a style savant. I've never met a style savant. But I certainly could use one he's most called to serve those on a quest for transformation. And he's going to help you everybody that's listening, transformed. Today, we're going to interview him and ask him all the ways that things we should consider when we're getting ready to go out in the world and be our brand in life. So welcome to the show, Joseph. So nice to have you here. Joseph Rosenfeld 01:21 Thank you so much, Patti. It's great to be with you and all of your followers. Patti Dobrowolski 01:27 Yeah, thanks. So alright, so I would love it. If you would just tell everyone a little bit about yourself. Like, I would love to hear your story of how you started to do this. And then what happened once you did? Joseph Rosenfeld 01:41 Well, I'm happy to share I want to be as upbeat and uplifting about this as you are. What I have to say the story is the downer, but we have to kind of remember that we're all here. I'm here. I've made it. So there is an uplifting parts of this. So I was really beaten up and bullied kid. And that's very serious and sobering. And I'm a survivor of that survived sexual attacks in my home by a babysitter when I was a boy. And so what all that did was it kind of disempowered me, I didn't have a voice. I didn't have a connection to my own spirit. And I believed all the negative BS that all the kids threw at me about how ugly I was and how they other me, they othered me for the way that I looked Jewish. They bothered me for having a big schnoz being left handed wearing glasses, having a long face, all the things being short and for having even what I would now describe in polite company as homosexual tendencies, like yes, no, just my demeanour, my behaviour, however, which way people thought that I was gay? You know, I think that they bother me in all these ways. And when I finally got clear on honestly, like, even if the journey is up to now, like, as of two weeks ago, I finally actually got superduper clear on this Patti? Patti Dobrowolski 03:09 Yes. Joseph Rosenfeld 03:10 Why did this happen? They feared my presence. It wasn't just about my appearance, only it was what laid behind it. It was also why they were attacking me for things that weren't obviously visible, like my faith belief. Patti Dobrowolski 03:25 Yes. Joseph Rosenfeld 03:26 Or even my sexual orientation, my identity, they was really cutting me, you know, down because they could see how strong and powerful I was even as little guy and a could not take me. Patti Dobrowolski 03:40 Yeah. Joseph Rosenfeld 03:41 Is it any wonder that this is really what I do for a living is help people stand up to anybody, and to stand up to ourselves and be our best selves ever? Patti Dobrowolski 03:53 Yes. Oh, my God, I love you so much. And I think, you know, I had a similar upbringing in those ways. You know, lots of things happen, because clearly I was gay. From the time I came out, you know, the womb, I wanted to wear my real clothes, and I dressed in combat gear most of the time. And, you know, I was just always, always othered for those kinds of things. And you know, what's beautiful about what that experience does, is it takes you into what you're talking about by truly helping people to stand in their power as them their true selves. And I think for so many people, it's scary. It's scary to see someone who really is standing in their power who really is their true self and is not going to change that for anyone. And so beautiful, beautiful on you for doing that. So you had this horrific childhood experience, you know, that you worked with, etc. Now, how did you get into doing fashion and style design? Tell me what led you to do that? I'm sure you did that from the beginning, but tell me more about that. Joseph Rosenfeld 05:02 So there was an epiphany that I had. I'm a man with many epiphanies throughout life. And you could probably relate to this, you know, as a fellow creative, that every time I have another like big Whoo, epiphany thing going on, like, everything in life becomes a new, it's the same life, but it's like life at next level. Patti Dobrowolski 05:25 Yes. Joseph Rosenfeld 05:26 So when I was 15, on top of all the tumult and turmoil that was going on, another horrible thing happened, which is my father dropped dead of heart attack. Patti Dobrowolski 05:36 Oh, my gosh. Joseph Rosenfeld 05:37 Oh, now that was like really hitting the rock bottom. And I just wanted everything to end and contemplated constantly. And the whole turnaround really happen there. When I discovered this was the mid 1980s, a book that had been out already for a little while, it was very irreverent. No one was supposed to take it seriously. Except me. It was called the Official Preppy handbook. And I as a midwestern North Chicago, suburban, you know, guy teenager, was looking for a way out, but to stay alive. And so I discovered the Official Preppy handbook, and I had this high school teenage aged epiphany, which was, if I could have style, no one would be able to tell me that I was ugly anymore. That style would transcend anything about physical appearance and attractiveness. And my hypothesis was, I may never be tall, which did turn out to be true. Patti Dobrowolski 06:42 Right, you're an inch taller than me. I love that. Joseph Rosenfeld 06:47 And I thought I may never be handsome, I may never be hot, I may never be sexy. Now, I mean, I feel good. So I mean, I got it going on. But what is true is that I could have style. And that style people would know and get to know me from the inside out, because style is about revealing who you are from deep within. It's not a surface game. Patti Dobrowolski 07:13 Wow. I love that. I love that it's not a surface game. It comes from deep within style. And so you that handbook helped you to realise that if you could project that inner style outwardly, right, that inner self outwardly that it would change everything? And did it you tested it. So what happened? Joseph Rosenfeld 07:35 The hypothesis worked event, so shortly into the whole thing. And this has to do in a way with the concept around personal branding and marketing, if you will, you make a certain number of reimpressions upon people, and they finally get like, you know, hit over the head, like the old VA commercials, I could add a VA. So people finally stopped, like bothering me and telling me that I was ugly. Yeah, this was pretty incredible. Because that eliminated a lot of noise in my head, even though the tapes were still playing. Patti Dobrowolski 08:11 Yes. Joseph Rosenfeld 08:11 And a lot of reverb like a concussion. Patti Dobrowolski 08:15 Oh my God. This is so true about limiting beliefs. They are like reverb in your head, they just play over and over again until you move the record. Joseph Rosenfeld 08:23 Exactly. Like let's pick up the needle and move it. So what was really great is that it allowed me to have some quiet within myself, so I could learn who I was. Now, in 1997. Tom Peters, famously then introduced this notion around personal branding. I think I was way ahead of the curve, not understanding what the hell it was that it was personal branding, but being able to go inside to say, Who am I what am I? What do I really believe in? What would I live for? All of those things equate to things that have to do with the personal brand. And I have to tell you that the great saviour around all of this is my favourite singer songwriter ever. And a song that she wrote in 1974 that was released on her debut solo album in 1981. That by the time I was really listening to it, this particular song became my mantra. It's a Stevie Nicks song called "Think about it" as her one of the lines and there are many lines to that song. I think everyone should go and give it a listen. Patti Dobrowolski 09:36 Definitely. Joseph Rosenfeld 09:37 She sayings your fortune is your life's love. And I thought, I can't end because I don't have my fortune because I don't know what my life's love is. Patti Dobrowolski 09:50 Yes. Joseph Rosenfeld 09:50 I feel that for all of us. Our life's love has to do with our mission and our purpose and our values and just our variable being like, who we are supposed to be without any explanation or justification or action to make ourselves worthy of anything, like we just belong to exist. And that song lyric, the whole song, but that line alone just gave me, you know, laser focus, purpose and vision. So I thought, I've got to go forth and figure out what that is. Patti Dobrowolski 10:26 That's right. That's what you do. And so you did, you went out and you went forth. And what did you find? Joseph Rosenfeld 10:33 So I then came to really understand that as much as I was interested in the idea of getting involved in politics, and government, public service, those things really whet my appetite in the later part of my high school years. So yes, junior senior years of high school, I think what happened was, by the time I was enrolled in college, and was really enjoying some of the special projects I was doing, I was enjoying the special projects. More than I was enjoying classwork. Patti Dobrowolski 11:05 Yeah. Joseph Rosenfeld 11:06 And I also decided, I don't want to be known as the gay politician. Patti Dobrowolski 11:12 No, no. Joseph Rosenfeld 11:14 And this was the now that like the mid to late 1980s. And AIDS crisis was like, huge. Patti Dobrowolski 11:20 Yes, was horrible. Joseph Rosenfeld 11:23 You know, very famous people. And it was just in my head at that point where I thought, I've already come through so much I just fell in, I just didn't think I could take it anymore. So I couldn't go back into being barraged for me being me that even though I survived, and I'm tough guy, that's too hard. So I thought, I really want to help people and make a difference in their lives. And I also just decided college was not going to be my thing, even though right into learning. And I advocated for most people. I made the other choice, which was to stop. And I went to Neiman Marcus in Chicago. And I said, Look, I see that you're hiring, and I need a job, give me a job. And I was the youngest person that they ever put out on the selling floor at that time. Patti Dobrowolski 12:16 It's fantastic. Joseph Rosenfeld 12:17 Yeah, it was cool. The store on Michigan Avenue in Chicago had been open seven years. I was 19 when they put me out on the floor. Patti Dobrowolski 12:25 Wow, that's so crazy. Good. Joseph Rosenfeld 12:27 That was amazing. And kind of, you know, there's more to that. But in essence, the rest is history. I had 12 year career in high end retail before I decided to go out on my own, and work as an image consultant and personal stylist. And for the last 21 years I've been successfully self employed. Patti Dobrowolski 12:47 Well, yeah, you're crazy busy to like trying to get you was almost impossible to get an interview with you. Because you were in Austria, you were in, you know, Paris, you were in Denver, you were in, you know, you're just Silicon Valley, you're all over the place you're working with, you know, execs and pro sports people and people just like me, right business owners who want to change their brand and bring it forward in a way that aligns you. That's what you do now. Right? So say a little bit about what you love about what you're doing right now. And if you can speak, you know, without talking about client names, but speak a little bit about the kinds of projects you're working on. Joseph Rosenfeld 13:29 Sure. So, for example, I have worked with different clients to help them escalate from being at one level of authority and accompany to becoming CEO of a company. This doesn't happen overnight, because competence has to be proved. Someone show up with a strong CV to begin with, they've got to have it going on. Right, then there's also the presence piece, and how is someone pivoting to make the right appeal to the right audience. And so these are all things that I strategize with leaders to add to the competence. It's, you know, there was this, I think they may have taken the drug off the market, but there used to be this TV commercial where they would show like an ice cream sundae or something and then they would show like the human being kind of dressed like the ice cream sundae. It's like very much about being like on brand in that way. So when somebody especially my clients were in high tech and leadership, they have to look like themselves and be authentic and genuine that way. But they also have to appeal to what the brand ethos is of the company, and sometimes even to the degree that they might match a little bit. Patti Dobrowolski 14:53 Yeah, the branding colours and everything like that right. Joseph Rosenfeld 14:56 The product or the service in a way like super quick example of that would be like someone like Steve Jobs, may he rest in peace. You know, when he and Johnny Ivy designed the original iPhone concept with their team, the iPhone looks so sleek and minimal, probably looks like a better version of Steve Jobs, quite frankly. But he was a very minimalist guy like us, not a lot of bells and whistles going on with him. And all the Guts and Glory was all inside. But he looked kind of streamlined on the outside, sort of like, you know, your iPhone could like, write like an essay, Miyazaki. Patti Dobrowolski 15:34 He's holding up his iPhone right now and showing it to us. So those of you that are listening, he's just showing us how sleek and beautiful it is right? Joseph Rosenfeld 15:42 You look at your black screen. It looks yes, me Aki black mock turtleneck, sweatshirt really does it know that Steve Jobs were every day that was his uniform. So that to me is an example of how to really show up and look on brand to deliver the right message. So I love getting people to the salient points of that, so that they do what they're supposed to do as top leaders to inspire to serve. Not a self serving thing. This is really about how leaders show up to lead. Yes, leaders. Patti Dobrowolski 16:18 There we go. Joseph Rosenfeld 16:20 That to me is a really exciting thing to do. And I would say that that's part of it. There are other people who I work with, like my oldest client right now. She's 81. She is fabulous. She had an issue where she almost couldn't walk anymore. And years before she and I met she had foot surgery. Here in New York. She lives in California, by the way, her foot surgeon told her you can walk as long as you wear certain shoes, but no more dancing. No more high heels. Patti Dobrowolski 16:53 Oh, yeah. Joseph Rosenfeld 16:53 You know, those days are over? Well, she felt so disconnected from the life that she used to have that although she was alive, she didn't feel alive, she felt she was just existing. So we got to meet. And I decided that what I would do is work with her footwear based on the parameters that we had to work with and fetishize them as if she was Sarah Jessica Parker and Sex in the City. Patti Dobrowolski 17:21 I love that. Joseph Rosenfeld 17:22 We you know, there are going to be Manolo Blahniks. Louis Vuitton will be no bowls, whatever. But what we could do is take the shoes and make them look yummy and delicious with the rest of an outfit. So I started with her footwear and levelled up. One day, her daughter came in to the dressing room, here in New York City. And I was showing her a complete wardrobe, starting with the shoes, and then everything else from the ankles up. And she and her daughter had like big boohoos in the dressing room, and I knocked on the door, and I send us everything okay in there? And they open the door, and we had a group hug. And the daughter said, I have my mom back, what did you do? Patti Dobrowolski 18:13 So sweet. Joseph Rosenfeld 18:15 I mean, this is like the thing that I live for these kinds of things where the things that I'm doing are not merely transactional, like make me look good. And like, I don't want to learn how you made me look good. Just make me look good. That's a little more transactional. And I do that for people who need that. But yes, this other type of instance, it's totally about having the deepest kind of relationship really connecting soul to soul, really seeing a person and seeing into that person and then giving that back. Patti Dobrowolski 18:48 Oh, I love that. That was one of the things that I noted. You know, I dug around on you. I've stopped you a little bit, you know, on the internet to see what things were said and what you did. And one of the things that you wrote is I study you like nobody's business, like nobody's business. And I think that really says so much about the heart of what you're doing. You're really trying to see, what is somebody about? And how could I reflect that in a way that brings more of them forward no matter what it is that they're doing. And so, if you're listening today, what we are getting here is about you knowing inside who you are, and then allowing that to emerge in how you look and feel, whether it's you know, wearing something that is a T shirt and you know, some high tops that match who you would look and feel like but also how you want to be seen in the world. I work with this a lot. You know, I love glasses. And so this is my thing. This is the way that I express myself is I'm like this is part of my brand, you know, I want to be my brand in every moment. So people realise, yes, you can be creative and you can look, the part of what you do in the world. What would you say to people who are, you know, struggling to figure out how you know, with their look, what would you say to them? Where's a good place for them to start? I saw that you were doing some workshops. And I was like, Oh, that's interesting. He's doing some workshops. But I also saw that you really are starting at the core. So tell people, what can they do, just by going into their closet and their wardrobe and see how can they consider what they're doing when they're putting on their clothes. Joseph Rosenfeld 20:45 The first thing to absolutely pay attention to is colour. You know, when you go into your closet, or when you go into a store looking for something new, you're always looking for you. And colour is one of these things that we are always looking for. If you don't see the colour that you're looking for in a story tend to go right by the rack. Even if you're in the right department, you're shopping for basically, the right item might have in mind, if the colour isn't there, you're out. So thinking of colour is a wonderful and grounding place to begin, one of the things that I recommend is that you look at your own physical colouring, to look at what I call your DNA colouring, even if your DNA colouring is say this with love, manufacture DNA, like if you're colouring your hair. Patti Dobrowolski 21:41 I would have manufacturing DNA, he speaking to me right there. So I'll take it. Joseph Rosenfeld 21:46 That's true. But you know what's terrific is that if you've made that choice, you've made that choice for a reason. And that says something about your energy. So colour is energy, and there is something that is vibrational about it. So one of my favourite tips and tricks is if you can identify the colour or colours that are in your eyes, like in the iris, find those colours in clothing and then repeat it on your body. That creates a kind of elegance. Even if you're wearing like something like a simple knit top, it helps people find and connect with the truth of who you are as a human being. And you might wonder like, hey, what does you know, moss green have to do with anything. But we have and I'm wearing moss green? That's why I say that right now. Patti Dobrowolski 22:39 Yes. Right. What I knit top I might add, it's really nice. It looks beautiful. And it's great. And I bet you behind those glasses, your eyes match that colour. Am I right? They match entirely. Yes, I'm leaving. Now he's leaning in. And you can see that his eyes are that same moss green colour. Those are beautiful eyes, by the way. So I'm really great, thank you. Joseph Rosenfeld 23:02 So what is powerful about this is we may not have the language to understand with fluency, what it is that we are looking at, but we have been socialised in Western society to pick up the nuances and the vibe loves all kinds of colour. In fact, we know from looking at colour from when we are newborns, the first colour that we actually ever see is yellow, and then we move on to red, and then we move on to blue. And then other colours come about as our eyes develop more. Patti Dobrowolski 23:43 How cool. Joseph Rosenfeld 23:45 And even for people who may be listening in who can't see, you know that you can feel colour because colour does have this vibration. You can be around a person or you could be in a room where you can almost sense the colour. And even if you don't know what the colour is, if you could describe the feeling of the room that you're in, or the space that you're in, or of the energy of the person that you're in conversation with. You could really use descriptive words that somebody would come back and say, oh my gosh, you're entirely describing the vibe of the colour purple. How did you know that I'm wearing a purple blouse right now, like that kind of thing can happen. It does happen. People feel the vibration of colour. We just don't always have the language of fluency. So the reason why I say work with colour is, you know, in your gut, when there's a colour that you love, or a colour that repels you, why is my work with a colour that repels you, for example? So if you could think about that there's a lot that you can pick up on. I have a whole system that I do with my clients where I study their colours in a very in depth kind of way, but to be able to do it on your own, you can still start out by thinking through what are the colours that I really love? And if you aren't so sure, go look in your closet and look at the rhythm of colour own and see hmm, why do I own so much black? Or why do I own so much navy blue? Now, you can think critically about that. Also, by the way, and say, I have you know, hazel eyes, why am I not buying things that are in the olive tones? Or the mage tones? Like, why am I playing it so safe over here with black? So you can have a conversation with yourself and ask yourself legitimately good questions that challenge your conventional thinking about your habits. Patti Dobrowolski 25:50 I love that. I love that. Because if I look in my closet, you know, I have a lot of blue, I wear a lot of blue, and chartreuse, and these really bright colours, but I rarely wear brown and my eyes are brown. And so why do I rarely wear brown because I have an opinion about brown, right. But if I had brown, more brown in my I would be in alignment with that. And then I can accent something with the colour that I want to pull out. Right. And so I think this is part of it, that you want to really pay attention to what you're doing now. And if you want to transform and what you're talking about as up levelling yourself, is that come into alignment with who you are internally, and also externally, what your face looks like in your skin looks like like I know, you know, if I put on something that's really orange, oh, no, it just doesn't really work for me for some reason, right? I don't feel good. Right? Joseph Rosenfeld 26:50 That's right, yeah, you know, if you're not feeling good, and something or like you have a huge high energy, orange, the hottest colour and the colour wheel. And when you put orange on you, you might feel small compared to the power of the orange, which is weird, because you're a very high energy. But sometimes that's the thing about colour is it can be like blob, like, wow, you know, can be very overwhelming the thing about brown for someone like you, and I'm going to just use you as an example. Because everybody knows who you are and what you look like for you to wear brown, it would be easy for you to do in the way that you could wear black as a high contrast because your hair is so lightened and bright and platinum. And that compared to the darkness of your eyebrows, which are more like your natural hair colour, and how light and clear your skin tone is, that creates a lot of contrast. So if you were to wear brown, not a muddy brown, but like a really dark, kind of like a strict brown that you could say, this is the brown that I could wear, that would be like black, and maybe a little bit of a red undertone to it like this in your eye, then you're wearing something that is totally in alignment with you, even though it may be stark, it's in high contrast. It's bold, it's dramatic. And that is who you are. So there are ways of being able to think about it that way. And that's just an example that applies to you. But it's a way of demonstrating to other people, you know, how you actually look at a colour that you might even say, No, that's a kind of a sleeper idea for me, how do I incorporate? We're talking about that outer alignment. But as I'm describing your own colour contrast, I also am identifying with like that boldness that exists from within. So if you right now but within and then you look that way outside, why not just go for it? Patti Dobrowolski 28:47 Well, I love this because I think that I don't know about you. But I think that in our world, we become afraid of things that we have never tried sometimes. And I think it shows up in your style. That's where it shows up. So when I went to France and I visited my friend Dawn, she was like, come on, we're gonna go out to the Buddha bar, we got to get dressed up, but you need to wear a scarf and I'm like, I'm so gay. That scarf is gonna look terrible on me. She goes, No, we're going to put that scarf on because it's going to change everything. And let me just say, I was transformed in that experience. So now I often will wear a scarf all often augments something with something that I never thought of before. And I think this is what you're talking about. You can ground yourself in a colour that is aligned with you and then you can be and sort of blast off in my you know, terminology blast off to be all of you are with the rest of you. And in a way when I think about that, like that is what's beautiful about the expression of colour is that colour allows you to ground yourself in you And then from the rest of that you can become even more of who you truly are. I love that. I love this. That was just fantastic little nugget and piece of it now, knowing your world I want to know. So like, what's the day in the life of you, Joseph look like like, what do you do? What's your routine so people could get to know you on that level? Like, what do you do when you get up? What do you do? How do you stay centred, when you're flying all around like that, tell us a little bit about what the day in the life of you looks like? Joseph Rosenfeld 30:34 Well, my home life is a little bit different than when I'm travelling at home, I'm up first thing, making coffee, usually going into clubhouse now to, you know, participate in a couple of rooms in the morning, getting you know things together in my thoughts, getting some inspiration and sharing some maybe checking my email. And then I have calls or I go to the gym, and then I'm on to client appointments and meetings, and so on, either in person or on Zoom. And when I'm building a wardrobe, I have to carve out hours for that. And then like I'll be doing something like that tomorrow, where I've got a dental appointment and a hair appointment. And then the rest of the afternoon I'm dedicated to doing some, as I say Schmieding around, where I've got to go look for things for a client and have it ready to go. So that when I go back to California, the first week of December, I'm already and so those are the ways that I sort of structure my day. So very flexible, depending on what's happening now and I'm out west, I can't sleep I have way too much energy. So I'm up at like 530 Like, you know, put on yoga gear and I power out for a big walk. I will walk anywhere between 10 and 20,000 steps in the morning, depending on when I have to actually get my day started. And I just crushed it all day with meetings. You know, Friday last week, this is for anyone who's in the Bay Area. I started out in Mountain View, went to San Jose did a colour profile for three hours, got back in the car, drove to Walnut Creek, did it wow ration, Brian with a client that was all great, got in the car, drove back down to San Jose met with another client, we tried on three suits for first fitting that was all great, went up to San Francisco after that did some stuff up there had dinner as well made the most of my time came back down to Mountain View after that probably put like, an excess of 200 miles on the car. Patti Dobrowolski 32:38 That was gonna say and that's a lot of sitting in traffic right now down there in the Bay Area, although it's a little improved there. But still, like that's crazy. Well, that is. So you really have to take care of yourself and your body and all the things. So I love that you're going out there and you're getting all those steps in before you get in that car. And then you're seeing people. And this to me tells me a little bit about yourself that you're looking for inspiration first thing in the morning, and then you're going out to do whatever it is that you need to do, and pulling that inspiration through. And I think you know, you're about helping people transform themselves, their look, their brand look and their style. And this is so essential. We talk about transformation here in these podcasts all the time. And people mostly talk about transforming their career, or they talk about transforming their brand look and feel in terms of their business. But talk with seeming that together with transforming your style look, so that you really do step into the chic issue that you possibly can. I love that this is fantastic. So who right now in terms of in this space that you're in, who's inspiring your who you're watching to see what they're doing. Do you do that? Do you do that a lot watch different designers to see what they're up to? Joseph Rosenfeld 34:01 Well, I would say my favourite fashion designer for some time now is Drees Van Noten. I think that he just has such an elegance and such a flair and such a verb. If I get to show Drees to a client because his aesthetic matches their style profile. And the colours are also a good colour match. Like he made it and here I'm finding it for you know, I'm able to show it to somebody that's really very fantastic. I love when that gets to happen. I'm a Drees wear myself, I think it's when I find something exciting for me. It's awesome. I'm also a really big Tom Ford fan. He's just turned 60. So I really admire his journey. I admire the transparency around the challenges of his journey. He's been very vocally public about some of it as recently this week, just talking about the story struggles that he faced when he turned 40. Maybe he never had the challenges that folks like URI faced when we were young kids, but his challenge decade came around in his 40s with drugs and alcohol and, you know, the high life of being super high flying and successful, and yet being depressed. And so, he really shows that kind of a humanity. And yet, I love how, for example, his women's clothing is just full of unbridled sex appeal. And yet for his Menswear. I love that He has this look, not maybe not always in his suitings but in his sportswear looks that I've been fancying for me personally. Yeah, yeah. They look very fluent. Like you might live in New York City. But you have a home and Aspen or I love. Patti Dobrowolski 35:45 Yeah, yeah. Joseph Rosenfeld 35:45 They look very fluent. Like you might live in New York City. But you have a home and Aspen. Patti Dobrowolski 35:55 You have a home in New York City, which now is that affluence? You know, I mean, that's what's true, right? But it could be anywhere. I love that I love this piece of it. And when you think and you know, you listen and reflect and look at what people are doing and style, etc. What's your big dream for yourself? What is the vision that you hold for yourself, that you'll transform into or step into, as you continue on this journey? What's that vision look like? Joseph Rosenfeld 36:24 I love doing the stuff that I'm doing every day right now, it's so exciting to be doing this kind of work. One of the things that I'm branching into, that I'm very good at because of the overall modus operandi that I work under, is working with lawyers and expert witnesses to prepare them for trial, like corporate things. Patti Dobrowolski 36:48 Yes. Joseph Rosenfeld 36:49 Corporate intrigue, and helping to really connect. And to tell a better story with the jury is something that I doing quite a bit of this work right now. And I'm really enjoying that. But besides that, being able to make a difference for people, and being able to do it at the scale that I'm doing where there is intimacy is very important to me. Patti Dobrowolski 37:14 It's the 81 year old woman, right? Who had that transformation within herself. Joseph Rosenfeld 37:19 That's right may sound a little selfish of me. But I want to be able to give 100% of me to another person in exchange for them being so open and courageous, to share themselves with me, so that I can help them. It really fulfils my mission. And that in conjunction with getting out and doing more talks at high schools. Patti Dobrowolski 37:45 Yes. Joseph Rosenfeld 37:46 To inspire kids, to not bully one another, to live another day to envision what life could be, wow. Even if you have to pick out a hobby that you do all by yourself, because there is no one now me that if I could reach one kid, one teenager that needs that message, and to see me embody the success of that, that's worth everything to me. Wow, those are the kinds of things that I really want to do more of, and I am doing that. Patti Dobrowolski 38:24 I love that. And, you know, I remember reading that in there execs and you know, this sports people and etc. And then high school students was at the bottom. And I was like, yes, because that's where it all begins. That's where we feel so disempowered and disconnected from ourselves, because we're not able to live our authentic life there. Because everybody's trying to sort of step on each other to get somewhere and get seen. And that really that behaviour has to shift. And it's up to us, really, I think, as people who have lived through that, to really speak to that and let people know, you know, it's okay to be yourself. You have to bring yourself, the world needs you. There's only one YOU, you know, step out and do that. Well, I love having this time talking to you. It's been incredible. And I'm going right away to go and look at brown because I never did before. And now I really am desperate to go out there and see like, what would brown look like? Where could I find a kind of brown with a red undertones in it? That might help me and so I hope the next time that I see you, which I hope you'll come back and let me interview you again. Because after you've gone out and travelled the world will you let me do that? Joseph Rosenfeld 39:39 Oh, I would love to come back. This is a great conversation. And I feel like when you're talking about up in your creative genius, I think there's a lot of overlap between what you do and what I do just in different ways. And I feel a lot of synergy where we just scratched the surface and so lovely to do that with you Patti. Patti Dobrowolski 40:00 I would love that and I have so enjoyed getting a little peek into your world. I've never been in this world before with anybody other than the person who has dressed me before in some Nordstroms you know, dressing room. But I love this because I just know that there's so much information in what you share with people that's valuable to them, that will help them feel more aligned with themselves and love themselves. But really, in the end, you got to love who you are. And if you love who you are, you want to express who you are. And those two things help. Right and we learned that in the preppy handbook. So I can't wait to hear more tips like that from you, Joseph, thank you so much for taking time here with us. Everybody. Don't you think he was fantastic round of applause. I love this. Okay, so just for those of you that are listening, I just want you to look down below in the show notes follow him. He doesn't clubhouse room. When is your room and clubhouse Do you have a regular room people can come and talk to you. Joseph Rosenfeld 41:05 There is a regular room. I do it most Wednesdays unless I'm flying or unless I'm abroad. And I typically do it on Wednesdays at 7pm Eastern time. And the topic is around The Introverted Executive. That's the name of my clubhouse club. And we often talk about things related to executive presence and, you know, covering things around colour and style and fashion and image and personal branding and my favourite word gravitas. And all of these things come together to paint a full picture of who we really are as total people. Patti Dobrowolski 41:45 Yes, I love that. So please join him on clubhouse, follow him on Instagram. And you can find more information about him in the show notes and in the transcription on YouTube, etc. And in my blog post. And if you liked this interview, share it with people because this guy really is amazing. And he has so many great golden tips in here. For people who are feeling and struggling with their style and coming in contact with it and how to grab it. This is really helpful. And for those of you that are listening, you know, go out in the world and bring your true self there's only one you and we're waiting for you. So have a great, fantastic rest of your day, everybody. Thank you again, Joseph. Thank you for being here. Joseph Rosenfeld 42:31 Thank you, Patti. It's great. All right. Patti Dobrowolski 42:34 Thank you. Bye bye. Thanks so much for listening today. Be sure to DM me on Instagram your feedback or takeaways from today's episode on Up Your Creative Genius. Then join me next week for more rocket fuel. Remember, you are the superstar of your universe and the world needs what you have to bring. So get busy. Get out and up your creative genius. And no matter where you are in the universe, here's some big love from yours truly Patti Dobrowolski and the Up Your Creative Genius podcast. That's a wrap.

The Story Box
Dr Jenelle Kim Unboxing | Myung Sung The Korean Art of Living Meditation

The Story Box

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2021 38:54


Dr. Jenelle Kim, DACM, L.Ac., is the founder and leader formulator for JBK Wellness Labs. Dr. Kim is carrying on the medical knowledge and wisdom of her lineage. Dr. Kim is devoted to integrating the philosophy, medical wisdom, and expertise of East Asia with the advancements of modern life and medicine of the West in order to touch and positively affect the lives of others. Dr. Kim is a Doctor of Acupuncture and Chinese Medicine and is Nationally Board Certified in Herbology, Oriental Medicine, and Acupuncture. Dr. Kim completed extensive training in East Asia under some of the most respected doctors in the field of Oriental Medicine and is the custodian of her lineage's proprietary Bi Bong® formulas. Dr. Kim's teachings on meditation are currently available for pre-order under the title Myung Sung: The Korean Art to Living Meditation by Watkins Publishing and will be distributed by Penguin Random House on January 11, 2022. In her book, Dr. Kim breaks down the principles of Myung Sung, offering a way to achieve a life of balance and happiness by enjoying the positive benefits of meditation every minute of every day. Dr. Kim's unique approach to meditation combines lessons on movement and natural medicine learned from a lifetime of experience studying Eastern philosophy, Eastern medicine, and martial arts. With almost 20 years in the beauty and wellness industry, Dr. Kim has formulated some of the first all-natural luxury products carried in high-end spas across the world including Ritz Carlton, Four Season & Mandarin Oriental high-end retailers such as Nordstrom, Neiman Marcus & Bergdorf Goodman, and in the natural marketplace in stores such as Whole Foods Market & Sprouts. Her new book 'Myung Sung: The Korean Art of Living Meditation' Here:Follow The Story Box on Social Media► INSTAGRAM ► TWITTER ► FACEBOOK ► WEBSITE Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/thestorybox. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Robin Report Podcast Series
The Nordstrom Challenge: Spin Off the Rack?

The Robin Report Podcast Series

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2021 22:18


How can the “Closer to You” mantra of Nordstrom deliver an integrated premium customer experience if the Rack is riffed out? There are so many more questions than answers in this debate. Join Robin Lewis and Shelley E. Kohan as they discuss the pros and cons of this hot topic. And here's a bright idea as an alternative to the off-price model for luxury goods: Nordstrom should pioneer a vendor consortium for liquidating premium merchandise. They are perfect for this job and know how to pull it off without tarnishing any brand image. Listen and learn from two experts who have a lot to say on the subject.Time Stamps: 1:06 - Why the confusion? Nordstrom's new game plan, spinning off Rack was not part of it!4:45 - Early days of the Rack7:20 - What's the difference? Off-price versus outlet stores13:55 - Digital's role in the off-price model18:10 - The future of off-price inventoriesFor more strategic insights and compelling content, visit TheRobinReport.com where you can read, watch, and listen to content from Robin Lewis and other industry experts.Be sure to follow us on LinkedIn and Twitter for the latest from Robin Lewis and The Robin Report.

The Mincing Rascals
The Mincing Rascals 12.29.21: A Very COVID Christmas

The Mincing Rascals

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2021


The Mincing Rascals are John Williams of WGN Radio, Eric Zorn of The Picayune Sentinel and The Daily Herald, and Lisa Donovan of Chicago Tribune. They begin their discussion with a review of the fast recent spread of the COVID omicron variant. Then, they talk about the shooting that took place outside of Nordstrom in […]

Group Chat
Let the Party Continue | Group Chat News Ep. 577

Group Chat

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 61:30


Today we're discussing Peloton's steep drop in Google searches, Decentraland preparing for its first fashion week, Kraken's plans for a new marketplace for customers to take out loans backed by NFTs, Facebook's surging Oculus sales, the $900 billion cash pile inflating startup valuations, Nordstrom considering a spinoff of the off-price rack business, the future of buy now/ pay later businesses, COVID outbreaks in college football, and more. Connect with Group Chat! Watch The Pod #1 Newsletter In The World For The Gram Tweet With Us Exclusive Facebook Content

Up Your Creative Genius
Robin Fisher: How to personalize your wardrobe to best show your character

Up Your Creative Genius

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2021 41:21


Fashion industry veteran and expert Robin Fisher is one of the leading image consultants in the Washington DC Metro area. In 2008 Robin left the corporate fashion world and put her passion behind a new labor of love: Polished, a full service personal styling and corporate image consulting agency. Robin's experience in the fashion industry spans over twenty five years and has included positions ranging from Executive Department Store Buyer, Magazine Creative Director, International Production Manager, and more. A certified image consultant who received intensive training in London, her personal clients include high achieving female executives, diplomats, judges, attorneys, doctors, authors, news anchors and any woman that is ready to get her style back on track! Robin has also been featured on CNN, FOX, NBC, Redbook, The Epoch Times, Washingtonian, Capital Files Magazine, Modern Luxury, and more. SOCIAL MEDIA Instagram - @polishedimage  Twitter - @polishedimage  Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/PolishedImage/ Linkedin - https://www.linkedin.com/in/polished/ Follow Patti Dobrowolski - Instagramhttps://www.instagram.com/upyourcreativegenius/ Follow Patti Dobrowolski - Linkedinhttps://www.linkedin.com/in/patti-dobrowolski-532368/ Up Your Creative Geniushttps://www.upyourcreativegenius.com/  Timestamp 2:02 Meeting Robin Fisher and understand how she gets into fashion 5:37 Her leap into fashion industry after internship 5:51 Confidence lies in what you wear 9:24 Composing her own business process 15:20 How Robin started Polished as a working mom 21:16 Robin has always been into fashion since she was a kid 23:05 Robin's shares about her first client and her business startup 26:23 Make a business out of your interest - you will never feel like work 28:59 Fashion tips from Robin 31:26 Polished - six week program 33:47 Future vision of Robin and Polished 37:46 Robin's way of starting her daily routine  Transcript Patti Dobrowolski 00:03 Hello superstars, welcome to the Up Your Creative Genius podcast, where you will gain insight and tips to stomp on the accelerator and blast off to transform your business and your life. I'm your host, Patti Dobrowolski. And if this is your first time tuning in, then strap in because this is serious rocket fuel. Each week, I interview fellow creative geniuses to help you learn how easy it is to up your creative genius in any part of your life. Hi, everybody. All right. It is so amazing. All right, because I am so excited about our guest today. She's a fashion industry veteran, and an expert - Robin Fisher. She's one of those amazing people. She's from the Washington DC area. But in 2008, she left the corporate fashion world and she went into her passion to really help people to create a look and feel for who they are. And her experience in the fashion industry has really changed the face of everything. She's worked with executive placement, store buyers and magazine creative directors. And she's been doing all of these fantastic things in the international space. And so I am super excited to have you here. Robin, you got to tell us about you and how you got started. I'm not sure I gave you all the right accreditation. Should we start that again? I'm sure we'll cover it. So that's good. So tell me all right, so you're helping people to get their look and feel together. Right? So tell me how did you get started doing this? Because you came from the fashion industry. So where did you work? And what did you do in the past? And how did you even get into that? Where were you born? And tell us a little bit about you and your past? I'd love to hear it? Robin Fisher 02:02 Sure. So I was born and raised in Oakland, California. Patti Dobrowolski 02:06 Yes. Robin Fisher 02:08 And my grandmother actually owned a business in San Francisco and she dealt with antiques and vintage. And so literally people would come to her when I was a little girl or costuming. So it would be jazz singers, theater, you know, costume designers and you know, collectors and all those kind of things. But where we would go to get the merchandise was where I really kind of fell in love with the whole process of fashion and manufacturing and all that kind of stuff. Because we would take trips into Denver to the cotton mills. And so when I was a little girl, I would climb like a story high of nothing but cotton garments. And basically they were there to get bleached back white soaked, and then the yarns come apart and then re-spun into thread. And so my grandmother was there to pull out the antiques and the vintage finds before they went through that process. So that was something that I actually just was always anamour with. And then Oakland is in San Francisco definitely is an industrial kind of town. And so as I got older, you know, my mother is a master tailor. She used to sew people, wedding gowns and prom dresses in our living room. And so I just had always been around the industry, you know, but I was a troubled teen, you know. Patti Dobrowolski 03:33 Oakland, I lived in Oakland, so I do a lot of trouble. Robin Fisher 03:38 And so but I just always wanted more for myself. But the biggest thing that I watched my family work together as a family, and if our businesses made money, that meant we ate well, that week, if our business didn't make money, it was a little bit of a struggle. And so I always have a personal goal of mine was for me to go into the fashion industry at a corporate level. However, you didn't see a lot of people back in those days that looked like me know for sure. But people definitely never really took me seriously. But it was just something that was a burning desire, because I just love the legacy of my family. So it wasn't until I went to college, got my act together, and 19, 20 years old and finally enrolled in San Francisco State that I started you know, I'd always worked retail jobs. You know, even my first job outside of my grandmother and family's business was at the Ross Dress For Less you know, yeah, yeah, for sure. And I've worked you know, high end retail, you know, Ferragamo and Nordstroms. And, you know, all that kind of stuff and I just loved you know, just the whole sales process helping people and I did that all through college, but once I was coming out, I took a non paid internship at a fashion company in San Francisco that hired me probably about six or eight months before I actually graduated. And then I was put on full time once I graduated. Patti Dobrowolski 05:02 Wow, that's fantastic. Well, you know, that's where I came from that that's what I did. When I was in college. I did all that retail, you know, Nordstrom, Frederick and Nelson when they existed, you know, just worked in all those places so that I could afford to buy some clothes, right at a discounted price. Robin Fisher 05:22 Right, exactly. Patti Dobrowolski 05:23 Yeah. Gotta get your look and feel. Robin Fisher 05:24 Yeah. Yeah. Patti Dobrowolski 05:27 So well, that's incredible. I love that you came from that history. And so then when you did that internship, then what happened? What you do after that? Robin Fisher 05:37 Sure. So I honestly got that internship, because it was at the time that we were going from flatlay patterns that people were drafting on the tables, but into computer aided drafting. And I had been writing. Patti Dobrowolski 05:50 So CAD drawing, yes? Robin Fisher 05:51 CAD, and I had been certified in AutoCAD. And so the reason they had hired me was to take their hard patterns into digitalization to you know, help lead that process. And so after that, once I graduated, and went into full time they put me on international production teams. Oh, fantastic. Yep. All right. innerwear, which is underwear, and then also special cuts, that's when companies would come to us and want us to run their private label. And so I really looked around, and because even a home girl coming out of Oakland, you know, I was going to college. I remember saying, Okay, well, I don't look like a college and really making that transition to you know, Jack Purcells vintage 501. So why as you know, t shirt, and, you know, just Eddie Bauer puff coat, and that became my uniform. And I really took on the persona of a college student, even though I was struggling through my first engineering classes, but I saw the difference, you know, that? Patti Dobrowolski 06:49 Oh, I love that, so what you put on, gave you the confidence to do what you were doing? Like, put that on? Wow, I love that. Robin Fisher 06:59 Communicated that I was a student, you know, versus right. Oh, you know, hip girl coming out of Oakland, you know? Yep. And so that's when I really, you know, thought of back, you know, working alongside my grandmother, when some of the costume designers would come or the jazz musicians would come to her and they say, oh, you know, and this kind of look has this. And that kind of look has that. So when I looked around right after college, I was like, well, I could go into Silicon Valley and make twice as much as what I'm making. But I'm just married to this whole fashion thing, right? Yeah, I thought I was thinking, but I was like, what do the people that make the money look like? And so these people were very tailored, very, you know, had a great executive Hugo Boss, Hugo Boss, right. So I knew that I was not at that level. But I knew I wanted to send the message that I was headed that way. So I took my first paycheck, went and bought three suits from the limited you know, black, gray and navy, just how we used to do back in the days, right? Patti Dobrowolski 08:01 That's right. Did you have like that little flippy scarf thing that hung down on your shirt?I've always they always tried to get me to wear one of those. I'm like, I'm gay for that, sorry. Robin Fisher 08:18 Literally, I would break the suit up, I would never wear it together. So I wear the nice slacks with a nice top or the blazer with a nice pair of jeans. And so it really started sending the non verbal message that this girl is going places. And that in conjunction with my work, opportunity came open for an international trip that was going around the world, you know, starting in Asia, ending in Europe and back into New York. And I was chosen to go and. Patti Dobrowolski 08:44 Oh fantastic. Robin Fisher 08:46 Yeah, it was six months after I never since then I just took off. Patti Dobrowolski 08:49 That's fantastic. So how old were you when that opportunity happen? Robin Fisher 08:53 God, I think I was like 25 26 years old. I was relatively young. I know, I was the youngest person to ever go. But I just really always have taken myself really seriously. Yeah, and so. Patti Dobrowolski 09:08 Climb and all that those cotton things, obviously. I want to get to the top up there. So there you go. That's just a metaphor for you. You have it. All right. So then you're out there, you're doing this thing you're traveling, right? And then what happens? Robin Fisher 09:24 Well, you know, going global, I would say I never really had been a lot of places besides Denver, Seattle, where my dad lives in summer and holidays, and then Oakland and then you know, California. So seeing the world just really opened my eyes and I just wanted more, you know, and a world differently. And I just was like, Okay, what's next? And so one of the things I loved love loved production, but I wanted to know like, after I make this stuff, what do you guys do with it? How do you write me? And so my college sweetheart, who is now my husband was on the East Coast doing grad school. And so opportunity became available for me to go and be an executive buyer for my company. And when I thought about it overall, in terms of what I wanted for my long term goals in my career, I was like, Okay, this is perfect. So they relocated me out there. And then that's when I started the buying trend. And so it was, that was really fun, because literally the merchandise that I had produced I met in store. So yeah, I was very connected to the whole process, like, how is it gonna sell? How does it sell through? How do you mark it down? You know, and margins. And that was actually a really hard transition, because it was going into finance. But from there. Patti Dobrowolski 10:45 Yeah, because you really have to understand it end to end, right. So you have to understand it from a seller's market, right? So it's not just the buying, it's that what do you do with that aftermarket? And what happens to it? And then where do they make their profit in that? And how can you get the most profit, really, and you so you got to really understand the spreadsheet. Robin Fisher 11:06 That's what I tell people all the time, like, people were like, were you going to the fashion with someone like, Absolutely, but that was like, 10% of my job. And by the end of it, I didn't want to be there. I'd rather be in my office making sure that you know, because what comes down the runway is does not always be produced. But yet, it was a great experience. And it really gave me a 360 view in the fashion industry. And, you know, after I left that company, I had my first son married my husband, and then I went to another company, but this company was very specialized. And their thing was urban fashion. And so the first time I realized like, I'm not really into like the hip hop stuff, I had more of a classic personal taste. Patti Dobrowolski 11:53 Except for the jeans and the t shirt and the puffy coat that Eddie Bauer that's about as far as it went after that you were in the suits, right? Why? Robin Fisher 12:05 I always love suits. I always have had a classic even as a kid I wore Argyle, you know, best sweaters like, you know, that was just kind of like my aesthetic probably coming from my mom, but I loved it. Right? Yeah. But when I got to DC, I personally had issues with the dress code, because it was so white. And I was like, Oh my God, and they wrote me up, because I didn't wear collared shirts, you know? Patti Dobrowolski 12:30 Oh my God. Are you kidding? Oh my gosh. Robin Fisher 12:34 Let me tell you what I did, Patti. I flew into San Francisco went to the Haight Ashbury hit up probably about three or four of my favorite vintage stores got 70 Psychedelic shirts with collars. And I started popping them underneath my suit. And people were like, Oh my god. So that's where the concept of my concept of my company comes from, like, individual taste and individual style. Because once I started putting no I was fine. You know, the plain boring, you know. Patti Dobrowolski 13:03 Why not gonna happen? That's right. It's not gonna happen. fast enough. Robin Fisher 13:08 This, aren't we exactly. So weird and bizarre. Patti Dobrowolski 13:12 And I think that really I remember this going into my first job, right? The first time I went into a consulting thing, I thought I had to wear a three piece suit. Let me just say I bought a skirt. Okay, that's me buying a skirt that I hadn't worn one in years. Skirt, heels, top and then that shirt collared shirt, you know, but a plain shirt. And let me just say it was a huge flop. I was so uncomfortable that at the end of the day, I just took that suit and I took it right to, you know, resale place and I'm like, I am never wearing that suit again. Again. No, it's not me. You know, I have to be myself. Right? Important, right? It's so it is because your confidence comes from you feeling comfortable in your skin, right? Even if you got a Hugo Boss suit on, you got to know that it really represents you, whatever it is. Alright, so then how did you get from there into dressing people? Really? That's not the right way of saying it. Of course you've given that a look. And. Robin Fisher 14:10 Yeah, well, honestly, through my whole career, and my whole life, I've had to reposition myself and I've always done that through hair, makeup and clothes. I've always done that. So, you know, as a teenager, I was really insecure. I was blessed to go into very great schools for academics, but these girls had a lot of resources because they were private schools. I was on scholarships there you know. Yeah. And I just hated the feeling of feeling inadequate. I hated the feeling of people thinking that they were better than me or me mentally forget them me mins. Yeah, right. The way that I was able to combat that was by staying in the lines of the Walgreens or CVS and the makeup and the you know, just getting myself together and so I'm a process because in the fashion industry, you know, especially when you're walking the streets in New York, and you know, all these different shows, people are looking you up and down to see if you look the part all the time. And that was something that just comes with my industry. And I'm just like, Hell, if they're going to look me up and down, let me give them something to look at. Patti Dobrowolski 15:19 Exactly, exactly. Robin Fisher 15:20 Right. Because a lot of things that don't have to be said, if you walk in and look in a certain kind of way, you know, and so I developed a process like, you know, as women, we come on done all the time, you know, for different various different types of reasons. And I realized that I had a process of getting myself back on track every single time. Yes. And when I was at the last company I was at I wasn't treated very well, I was waiting to move back into San Francisco. So I took a job, which I thought would be temporary, but my husband did not want to leave the East Coast. And so we ended up getting pregnant with a set of twins. Patti Dobrowolski 16:01 Oh, wow. Well, that's a full time job right there. Robin Fisher 16:05 And I probably been ready. I've always had an entrepreneurial spirit. It comes from the beauty of my family. But I had probably been ready to start my own thing for about three, four years, but I just wasn't listening. You know what I mean? I just wasn't, my focus was to get me and my kid and my husband back to San Francisco. And then I go work for one of the companies there. And I had communities lined up, and I was just waiting and biding my time. But I didn't work out, you know, once you get a set of twins. Patti Dobrowolski 16:36 Oh, yeah, you got to be near family to help with them. You gotta. Yeah, it's crazy. Well, Robin Fisher 16:42 We actually stayed on the East Coast. Patti Dobrowolski 16:45 Oh, did you wow, okay crazy. Robin Fisher 16:47 Post about the family support. But you know, I had a bad situation in the office one day, and I was only probably about eight or nine weeks pregnant with my twins. I'm a twin too. So it was a total shock to me that I was having twins. I was older. And literally, I was in risk of losing them. Patti Dobrowolski 17:06 Yes. Robin Fisher 17:07 I just made that decision at that very moment that no job is worth losing your kids over? Well, first of all my integrity. Patti Dobrowolski 17:17 Right. Robin Fisher 17:18 Secondly, just the respect. And I knew the power that I had at that company. I knew tribution. And it was a lot. Patti Dobrowolski 17:27 Yeah. Robin Fisher 17:28 And I was just like, No. And then when I piled on the fact that I had been under that kind of pressure. Patti Dobrowolski 17:34 That's what I'm thinking. Robin Fisher 17:35 I period of time. And now I have kids and the kids, for me was where I was like, Absolutely not get your stuff together, get your stuff, y'all out here and don't ever come back. And so yeah, I walked off. And it was very. Patti Dobrowolski 17:52 I bet that was scary. Robin Fisher 17:54 It was very scary, because my husband was newly out of grad school. Like I said, we did not have the family support here. But it was definitely me choosing myself over a job for most, even though I love the industry. And I actually love the work that I did at the company, because it was very successful. You know, most of the people there were amazing. But it was one of those things that that's what I said, you know, you got to feed yourself, you're gonna have to yourself, because Washington DC is not a fashion town at all. Opportunities here are very far and wide in between. And I felt like if I did take another opportunity, and they were presented to me, but in this region that I would just be setting myself up to go back down the same road. Patti Dobrowolski 18:39 Yeah. And what I love about what you're saying is one and this for me is key. You know, you're in a circumstance where you're not treated well, people don't respect you. It's wrong. It's just wrong. And you realize the stress, you've got these twins, and it's stressful. And that's why I said that about you know, because of the kids. I mean, because of the stress, why you can't put your body under stress and expect to have those kids feel that they feel that you know, and you don't want to birth a couple of kids who have issues because you were under stress when you were pregnant, right? And what I love about it is that you totally took it and you're like no matter what, I'm going to have to do this myself, I'm going to have to feed myself, it's going to happen. And I think that is like a huge leap that you took with your husband just out of graduate school or in graduate school. You know, I mean, that's a big leap out into the middle of nothing, right? Yeah. What did you do to get yourself to land? Robin Fisher 19:40 Well, to be honest with you, I got really depressed because everything I felt like I had worked for in my life and what saved me from myself as a young young woman, I felt was like over you know, what was I going to do? I had always played with different business things and you know in the fashion space designing jewelry selling handbags at one time. Patti Dobrowolski 20:04 Yeah, yeah. Robin Fisher 20:04 Different stuff. But it was nothing that I just said, If my husband was making it where I could have been a stay at home mom, I tried that junk with my first son and Jesus. No, I just like. Patti Dobrowolski 20:17 I need to have my own thing. I can't stay here with you. Robin Fisher 20:22 Yeah, I tried. I tried. I did. Actually I did. I wasn't saying, what I just started this, on the side where I had my little business, you know, to take care of. And oh, literally, I think once I finally got over just the depression of it all, and just how everything had happened, and really started to think about my power and my position. And what I was able to do realistically with three children, while also you know, making sure that I was filling my soul, one of the things I always loved are beautiful women, I could sit on a bench in Paris, London, a park in Oakland, or Berkeley, you know, hiking, I love to see women pulled together and looking amazing. Regardless, if they're coming down the aisle at Target, they're picking up their kids from school. Patti Dobrowolski 21:16 Yeah. Robin Fisher 21:16 We're working, you know, at a corporate office. And that's actually where it started, because my mom was an executive in San Francisco. And my grandmother used to pick her up, and I would just sit there, you know, at the window, like a little girl and just watch all the very nice dressed women and men walked by. And so I was like, You know what, I have a whole process about how I reinvent myself, or recreate myself, and I understand often. And I also had done a lot of research, you know, through the years about style and stuff like that. And I was like, I need to turn it into something. Patti Dobrowolski 21:52 Yeah. Robin Fisher 21:53 So I sat down six months pregnant with my twins, and I wrote my business plan, and I decided to go back and finish get my masters. And so as soon as they were born, I enrolled in school, I started, you know, putting the pieces together creatively. And when they were probably about one years old, I've completed my master's, I went to London, right before I completed my master's and train with one of the world's best image consultants ever, because I knew I needed a high level. Patti Dobrowolski 22:23 Yes. Robin Fisher 22:24 Serious level, and she was amazing. But then I still needed to turn that into my own. You know what I mean? Patti Dobrowolski 22:30 Yes, yes, of course, because you get a mentor, but they give you their perspective on things. And you then have to shape that for what it is. That's your thing, your niche, whatever it is, right. Robin Fisher 22:42 Absolutely. Patti Dobrowolski 22:43 That's fantastic. Robin Fisher 22:44 Yeah. And so in the night because I was there I think for two weeks, and my twin brother and my mom came in watch my kids for me. You know, during the day, I would train and in the evenings, I would write my thesis. And so when I came back, I submitted that thing. I graduated and launched Polished the same month, December 2008. Patti Dobrowolski 23:05 Yeah, I love that Polished is a perfect name for your business, because that's really what you're doing. You're helping people to get their Polish going on. So tell me then how'd you get your first client? What was that like for you? Robin Fisher 23:20 Oh my god. So like I said, I believe when you can't get it together, you go down to the bare bones and I again, a little bit over 100 pounds pregnant with my twins. The budget was definitely not the same without that income. And so I had gone to like, you know, I think targeted and shopping Macy's and I had put together this little capsule of a wardrobe and literally I was wearing a uniform once again similar. Patti Dobrowolski 23:48 Yeah. Robin Fisher 23:48 Wore back like in my old company. Patti Dobrowolski 23:49 Your new uniform, your Polished uniform. Robin Fisher 23:53 Very similar to what I have on. Patti Dobrowolski 23:55 There you go, there you go. Robin Fisher 23:57 Nurse these guys. And so I was walking through our flagship mall here, which was Pentagon City and I have my twins with me. And this woman stopped me because I was there all the time. I hadn't really you know made any traction yet and she stopped me she goes I see you all the time and you always look so well put together. And I'm a mess. I have a set of twins and you know how do you do it? And I started laughing I said well actually is a concept based on basics. And she said basics and so I said well actually an executive image consultant personal stylist I just launched a business you know here's a card, call me. Well she did and she. Patti Dobrowolski 24:36 Oh yay. Robin Fisher 24:38 You know be owning executive coaching firm here. Patti Dobrowolski 24:42 Fantastic. Robin Fisher 24:44 Oh, it just took off. Patti Dobrowolski 24:44 Oh my god. Oh, I bet I bet and then did like at the very beginning. How did you figure out your pricing and things like that those real basic things like did you start off low and then eventually just bare self up? Robin Fisher 24:57 Yes. absolutely. And I'll be be honest with you, my goal wasn't, you know, to make a ton of money. My goal was to give myself some business. And then also to pay my student loans myself, I did not want to ask my husband to help pay for my student loans. That was my independence. Okay. Patti Dobrowolski 25:15 Yeah, yeah. Robin Fisher 25:16 So literally Polish would generate them. But then after a year, it just started growing and growing and growing and growing. And I was like, Oh, my God, I don't even know where to do with my kids. Like, you know what I mean, like I was booking people in the evening hours and on the weekends when my husband can watch them. So Polished was really grown alongside the development of my children as well. Now, that is what honestly, the best part about my company is because they were there, when I was signing up for the LLC in the business office. I'm like, bottles and pushing the stroller. Patti Dobrowolski 25:50 I love it. I love this. This is really, really the life of a working mom. I mean, this is what's true, is that I love that they were there everywhere, because you were there everywhere with your mom and your grandma. And this is really what we, you know, the myth is that there's some other place that they should go. But honestly, the best way you learn about things is by watching and observing and seeing how other people are. And then you figure out, Oh, who am I within the world of that? Robin Fisher 26:17 Right. Patti Dobrowolski 26:17 And so I love that. So now, what's your favorite thing about what you do right now? Robin Fisher 26:23 You know, my favorite thing that I do right now is just work with women where they are, you know, women transition all the time, and they're always going through things. And sometimes it's like, this can be overwhelming. It's not sometimes this overwhelmed a lot of women, and I'm like, I can teach you to take, you know, everything that you need to know about yourself, when it comes to this fashion environment. Because you don't have to be an expert in everything, you know, and we fall apart. You know, like, four years ago, I was diagnosed with colon cancer. Patti Dobrowolski 26:56 Oh my god. Robin Fisher 26:57 One of the things that I feel so blessed about is that my company kept going, even when I wasn't taking new clients at times, I wasn't promoting my business, there were a lot of things, I just did not have the, you know, energy to do, because of what I was going through, but the brand of Polished and the power of Polished and what it does, kept my business moving till I got well, and then you know, I was able to pick it up again, which is my opinion, the whole essence of what Polished is about. So when I work with women that are going through those kinds of things, you know, illness or promotions, or maybe they're retiring, maybe they've done a regional move, maybe they're getting a divorce, maybe they're in a new relationship, you know, those are the kind of things that really make me extremely happy. I've always had a huge respect, especially coming out of the San Francisco Bay Area for culture. And so the fact that I attract international clientele makes me extremely happy. So I'd say everything, everything. Patti Dobrowolski 28:03 That's, that's fantastic. Well, congratulations for coming through colon cancer. And I hope you're, you know, just doing well now, and I just send that send that energy your way. But here's what I love about what is very unique about you, is that you actually are most interested in the point of pivot, you're interested in creating the new persona that you are through your look and feel. Robin Fisher 28:29 Yeah. Patti Dobrowolski 28:29 Helping you understand, here's the base and the basics of what you need to know about you. And then let's build on that based on who you've emerged and have become, is that right? Robin Fisher 28:40 Yes. Patti Dobrowolski 28:41 So then give some of our listeners a tip about the basics. Is there any kind of tip that you would give them that would just help them as they're going into their closet before they call you on the phone to get you to help them? You know, is there any simple thing that you would give them that would be helpful? Robin Fisher 28:59 Sure. So a lot of people when they think about fashion and style, they think about things, but all the bells and whistles, they really forget about the stuff just like this quick little shirt I throw on to jump on here that pull outfits together, that pull looks together. And so I want to scream that from the rooftop because there's so many times that I've looked at in a woman's wardrobe and all I'm looking for is a simple black pair of slacks, no bells and whistles, no details, or all I'm looking for is a simple blazer, or a simple collared shirt like similar to this and they're just not there. And so they get themselves in a bind because literally they'll have all these fashion items that they picked up that they just love but they have nothing to anchor them to. Patti Dobrowolski 29:44 Yeah. Robin Fisher 29:45 And so that is the one thing I would say is like check your closet, make sure based on how you're functioning so if you're a person that is working from home right now you need you know, abundance of maybe comfortable pants, right. But those comfortable pants, make sure that some of them are clean. So when you put on a fashion shirt, you just put those comfortable pants on, and you're good to go. You know what I mean? Patti Dobrowolski 30:11 Well, and for me, it's like, it's not just comfortable pants, can I wear them in public so that I can actually go out, you know, into the world and not have to change out of my sweatpants, right? So there's something like that, I have that. So it's something really, that will anchor you you said, anchor you, and then what? Robin Fisher 30:30 And then you add on the fashion, you know, and that's when I build capsule wardrobes for clients. The first thing that I invested in is finding out what their personal taste level is, you know, I'm 33%, classic, 33%, natural and 33% updated, okay, so I'm always going to have some kind of classic kind of tailoring on but you'll see that I also will play with trends, but it will only be up to 33%. If I go over that, it's just like to costuming for me. Patti Dobrowolski 31:01 I love that now, I want you to pay attention to can you see the pull through of the engineer of her that build into that percentage thing. That's what I'm listening for him, like, She's totally an engineer, she's engineered this piece of your fashion, so that you can create the closet that you need to have so that you can go in there anytime and pull together the things that and I bet everybody has different percentages. Would you say? Robin Fisher 31:26 Yeah, buddy, like I run a six week program. Okay, we're literally I help women, you know, develop their individual style and wardrobe to match within that six week program. And I can tell you that there's women there from all over the country, you know, even internationally, and literally, they're never the same. It's very rare, you know, because I it's a very intimate group. So I only take up to 10 people. Patti Dobrowolski 31:51 That's fantastic. Is this online, that you do it? Okay. So if you're listening, and you wonder, like, How can this happen for me, you want to be one of those 10 that get into that, I would say that individualized experience so that you could learn, you can learn and you can listen to what she does with other people. Oh, my God, I'm getting in that that's all there is to it. I love that. Robin Fisher 32:16 You know, I work with women one on one too. Okay, yeah, that's a faster process. Patti Dobrowolski 32:22 If they fly you to Paris, and you want to do that, or Vienna, you're okay with that, you'll be fine with that go wherever it is. Robin Fisher 32:30 You know, what I learned is I just respect differences. And people learn different. So someone can learn everything within their consultation and me pulling together their capsule, and they're like, okay, but then there's other women that they learn by doing. They learn by, you know, asking questions. And so that's why I developed the six week program, just to help them because what I basically do for all of my clients, whether it's one on one, or whether it's in a group program is I teach them what I know. But for them, okay, so they begin to own style editor. And to me, that's where the power comes from. That's where the confidence comes from. Because once you understand your personal taste level, your fashion rules, your body type, all those kinds of things gel together, then the confidence comes with, I'm killing it, because I know I am but you are talking about it's because this is my personal taste level. This is how I do it. So you know. Patti Dobrowolski 33:27 Whatever, get with it. Yeah. That's right. I love that. So when you think about the vision of the future for you, what's that look like for your business for where you're going? What do you want to be known for? What do you want to do that you haven't stepped into yet? Do you want to expand into? Robin Fisher 33:47 Yeah, well, to be honest with you, I'm working on that. Now. I want to touch as many women as I can. I think life is, you know, I have a different view of life just based on what I've gone through, especially in the last five years, where it's too short to feel insecure and not attractive, you know, full of joy, you know what I mean? And if and your appearance is what is holding you back, girl, I got you okay, yeah, you know, come on, I can we can fix this up real quick, and I can let unleash you to the world with your power, you know what I mean? So that is honestly what makes me happy. And when I was ill, I really had to do some deep soul searching. And honestly, every single time I thought about what do you want to do with the rest of your life? If you're blessed to you know, beat Patti Dobrowolski 34:35 Yes. Robin Fisher 34:35 And it was the same thing. It was the same thing. That's what I want to be known for. I want to be known for the woman that helped me get my stuff together and taught me a process that I can always keep myself together. Even when I fall apart. I can put it back together, you know, and you know, just broadening my reach because honestly, I've been in the DMV, I've been a mom so I never really focused on my reach out. I was blessed to work with a lot of international people, you know, diplomats, and you're on business just based on the region that I'm in. Patti Dobrowolski 35:08 Yep. Robin Fisher 35:08 Also my specialty, I was very attractive to them. So but I never really expanded my reach until COVID. When COVID happened, that's when I decided, like, you know, I prayed about I was like, oh, Lord, you know, with my disorder, we just in my mind, it's just not going to be safe, even they won't know, what am I going to do? And I really considered, you know, just that's it, you know, just from my head. Yeah. But I thought thought it through and talked it through, you know, with my advisers, like my family, my mom, you know, my aunts are great advisors. And finally, what I had been doing digital work for a very long time, because a lot of my diplomats would get deployed. And a lot of the people that would work with me domestically would ended up going back to their home countries, and they want to keep working with me. So I actually had the whole processes already. Patti Dobrolski 36:01 Ready in the digital space. Yeah. So I think, you know, we underestimate, I mean, me, too, I was alive illustrator. So I was often a speaker and an illustrator live and in person. And when it pivoted, I had just started doing online classes just before that, and everything, of course, became online and still is. And so when I get called to go places that real and in person, I'm like, really? Are you sure that you can't do it? Are you really gonna all get together? COVID is still really high. Because I still want to wear my, you know, comfortable bottoms instead of like, put on my suit, right. And so I love that, that you were able to easily transition into that, Oh, my God, I could ask you so many questions, I have to save it for the next time I talk to you because I want to come and do that course with you. Because I think that would be fantastic. And if you're listening, you want to look in the show notes here and get involved, I want you to really carefully look at where she is in Instagram. Because Polished is something you need, you definitely need to do this and this piece that we're in a time of pivot. So you have to understand that if you're not aligning what you look like with who you are inside, you're doing a disservice to the people to showing your full self I think and that's what you're talking about. So all right, I just want one last question I want to ask you before I gotta let you go, cuz I know you have a hard stop. So what is your day look like? Tell me from the moment you get up until what happens in your day. And you know, just give me the brief overview. But people love to get inside your world. So how do you prepare yourself in the world do you have any daily practice you do and things that help you to bring your full self into the world? Robin Fisher 37:46 Sure. So you know, I wake up relatively early, I like to be up before my twins, my oldest son is away at school, so I don't really have to worry about him. But I do a lot of meditation in the morning, just you know, focusing on my day, and just checking in with myself. And then about seven o'clock, my twins rise, we you know, do the whole morning routine, I drive them to school. And by 10 o'clock, I'm fully dressed and you know, usually working on Zoom, if not taking calls, meetings, doing marketing and stuff like that. So that goes through my day until about maybe about three o'clock and then I will go pick them up, then I'll come back. And then I'm usually working with clients in the evening time. So sometimes I'll be working with clients, but there's a window at 12 one at two and then one at five. So I only take because this is such a creative process. I only take about four clients a week. Patti Dobrowolski 38:43 I bet. Robin Fisher 38:43 And the reason why is because I'm a creative person, I want to zero in and focus on them. So I take them during the latter part of the week. Once the merchandise is you know up on the systems that you know that people have received so I can really give them the best assortments available the consultation, you know, I've had time to really go in and deep dive and study them yet so forth. So my typical week, I probably shut down at around 10 o'clock. I'm trying to get better about not working past a certain time. But yeah, honestly, it doesn't feel like work to me, and none of my jobs except for the bad. You know, treatment. Yeah, no, I've never made a single dime. I don't think even outside of the fashion industry. I don't think of it as work. Patti Dobrowolski 39:32 That's fantastic. Robin Fisher 39:34 Yeah. Patti Dobrowolski 39:34 I love that. Robin Fisher 39:35 Work as work at all. And you know, I've been doing this for 30 years, you know, over 30 years now. Patti Dobrowolski 39:43 Yeah, I love that. Well, you are incredible. I just love everything you've said today, Robin and I just want to say thank you so much for spending time with us. Listeners, just really pay attention to the show notes. Take some of these tips to heart and really upgrade what you're doing You know, so that you can get your capsule together because I want my capsule together. So it matches my brand and everything. So thank you for spending time with us and we will look forward to seeing you again because I'm having you back on the show so that you can tell us more about what we need to do to get it together. Alright everybody, let's give a big round of applause. Robin, thanks so much for coming on. And thank you everybody for listening. If you like what you're hearing, you know, be sure to forward it to your friends because we want all of you to be learning some of these great tips. And until next time Up Your Creative Genius. I mean it Robin, thank you. Thank you. Thanks so much for listening today. Be sure to DM me on Instagram your feedback or takeaways from today's episode on Up Your Creative Genius. Then join me next week for more rocket fuel. Remember, you are the superstar of your universe and the world needs what you have to bring. So get busy. Get out and up your creative genius. And no matter where you are in the universe, here's some big love from yours truly Patti Dobrowolski and the up your creative genius podcast. That's a wrap.

Sliders and Wings
Episode 37: Touched by an Angel

Sliders and Wings

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2021 30:46


This week Val and Rachel discuss an American fantasy drama television series that premiered on CBS on September 21, 1994, and ran for 211 episodes over nine seasons until its conclusion on April 27, 2003. The series stars Roma Downey as an angel named Monica, and Della Reese as her supervisor Tess. Throughout the series, Monica is tasked with bringing guidance and messages from God to various people who are at a crossroads in their lives.  Hot Topics Include: 1.) Our thirsty Instagram account: @slidersandwingspod2.) Roma Downey trivia: too tiny for tv costumes, marriage to Mark Burnett, not sounding Irish enough 3.) Is this show forgotten? 4.) Low-stakes angel case managers 5.) Val's detailed explanation of the Nordstrom return policy 6.) James Marsden, Jack Black, and Melissa Joan Hart star in Season 2, Episode 5, featuring a classic CD black market plot and it's fabulous! 7.) What Ya Watchin': The OG Spider-man, Sex and the City/And Just Like That...   https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Touched_by_an_Angel

Small Doses with Amanda Seales
Side Effects of An Artist: Cristina Martinez

Small Doses with Amanda Seales

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2021 74:19


This week, we are joined by fine artist Cristina Martinez to talk her new line at Nordstrom, why oils are better, and betting on yourself. IG @sew_trill Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Jason & Scot Show - E-Commerce And Retail News

EP283 - Year End Review  It's our final show of 2021! We recap the US Dept of Commerce November Advanced Retail Sales Data. We do a deep dive into the retail industries growth from 2019 through November 2021. In those 23 months, the retail industry grew 22%, historically fast growth. There were clear winners and losers. If you want to follow along on with all the data, here is a visual recap of retail growth 2020-2021. (PDF Download). We also highlight the six most important trends of 2021. Amazon fulfillment capacity growth (Amazon and Walmart become shipping companies) Social Media becomes the discovery channel for e-commerce (led by live-streaming) Ultrafast delivery services Amazon invents and starts to scale a grocery store (Amazon Fresh) with just walk out technology Retail Media Networks explode, led by Amazon's $30B in ad sales. Retailers now compete with social media networks for eyeballs Apparel has shifted from designer led to consumer led, as evidenced by the meteoric rise of Shein We're so very grateful to our audience, both for the time you have shared with us, and for generous opinions, feedback, and knowledge that many of you have shared. We wish you all the very best holidays and New Years, and look forward to seeing you in 2022! Episode 283 of the Jason & Scot show was recorded on Tuesday, December 21st, 2021 http://jasonandscot.com Join your hosts Jason "Retailgeek" Goldberg, Chief Commerce Strategy Officer at Publicis, and Scot Wingo, CEO of GetSpiffy and Co-Founder of ChannelAdvisor as they discuss the latest news and trends in the world of e-commerce and digital shopper marketing. Transcript Jason: [0:23] Welcome to the Jason and Scot show this is episode 283 being recorded on Tuesday sept December twenty first twenty Twenty-One I'm your host Jason retailgeek Goldberg and as usual I'm here with your co-host Scot Wingo. Scot: [0:39] Hey Jason and welcome back Jason Scott show listeners Jason how are the holidays treating you so far. Jason: [0:46] They are treating me really well it's been super interesting what's going on in our industry and getting ready to take the family to California to see my mom and brother. Scot: [0:59] Very fun California versus Chicago seems like a smart smart choice this time. Jason: [1:04] Yes early and my relationship with my wife we agreed that we would visit her Michigan in-laws and Thanksgiving and my California relatives in December seems weather prudent if nothing else. Scot: [1:16] Yeah smart I like your like you're negotiating strategies so we are recording this here live on December 21st so we are in the very last tail end of holiday 21 and Jason you had some some interesting data that you had parse through that I thought we could start with it's going to be largely kind of the November data but it's kind of the best data we have, until we get into January and see how the holiday played out and then we'll do a quick checkpoint on what you're hearing from clients and then I think both of us wanted to kind of share our big stories for retail and e-commerce for 2021 so why don't you kick us off with some data. Jason: [1:57] That sounds amazing so yeah so the data we are talking about is the US Department of Commerce data we get a an update every month so you know last week we got the, the update that includes November and in general November sales were up sixteen percent from November of twenty twenty so I always coach people that we should look at year-over-year not month over month so pretty healthy growth in 2021 from 2020 if you look at year-to-date so January through November we are up about 18% from 2020 and if you look at e-commerce we were up about 12 percent from November of 2020 so I you know I always put this data out on social media and I got a ton of, interesting responses this year on that data everyone's like hey Jason why are you comparing to November of 2020 like we're in the middle of the pandemic everything was all topsy-turvy like it's like comparing, pandemic 2021 numbers to pain demick 2020 numbers isn't very helpful to me because everything is so confusing. [3:13] And so I kind of took that to heart like you know it is the best kind of comparison we have about how we're doing but I said oh you know the more interesting comparison is maybe we take. One step back and we compare the. The the last two years of data to two years ago so we kind of compare how much growth we've had during the pandemic with what girls look like before the pandemic and I hadn't hadn't really done that in a while and what I found was interesting and in a few cases it surprise me. Scot: [3:46] I feel like we should create a new word for this I'll work on it in the vein of a ship again yeah that's just boring I don't know. Jason: [3:54] Yeah yeah de or. Yeah every CEO in America has learned to say you're over two years ago by the way and for it's super funny for non-gaap metrics in the and in the 10-qs they. Like it's they kept they completely cherry-pick like if the number is good they take versus last year and if it's bad they take versus two years ago. Scot: [4:18] Yeah yeah that's the nice thing you need everything every number needs to be up into the right. Jason: [4:23] My takeaway there is you CEOs are oily. Scot: [4:25] We know we're strategic. Jason: [4:29] Got it potato potahto. Scot: [4:31] Cool what did this year over your year over year over last year review. Jason: [4:37] Yeah so if we say hey from how much has retailgeek grown in 2020 and 2021 as a two-year stack it has grown 22 percent, so you know people talk about like all the struggles and challenges we had during the pandemic but if I see if I got in a time machine and no pandemic just told every retail CEO how would you feel about growing 22% over the next two years, the vast majority of CEOs would have jumped at that and then if you said and our life is going to be totally disrupted by this pandemic. [5:14] I think every retail CEO in America would have said I'd be thrilled to get through the next two years with 22 percent growth so that was interesting and then I said I wonder how that compares historically so I got in the hot tub time machine and I pulled all the data from 1990 through today and I restated every year as its growth versus the previous two years to kind of come up with this standard metric to compare against the 22 percent and 22% is unprecedentedly high it's by far the biggest two-year growth we've had since 1990 there's only a few years that that just tickled 15% so I can 2000 we hit 15 percent and in 1994 we hit 15% but like, most of the. The this last decade we were kind of tickling in the kind of six to eight percent growth so 22 percent growth. On average for the whole retail industry is a huge win and unprecedentedly more growth than we would traditionally get does that surprise you at all. Scot: [6:26] It doesn't sort of make sure I understand it's all retail so it's offline and online in Aggregate and then you can't just divide it by 2 right because there's compounding in there so it's not really two years of 11 it's probably like I don't know 12 in an 8 or something. Jason: [6:41] Yes so you are correct now and. That 20 yes and all of this data it does include compounding the the compounding is an interesting point which will come up in a another piece of data in in just a minute but yeah so this is all like literally looking at the. Aggregate sales for 2019 and the aggregate sales for 2021 and saying how much bigger was 2021 than 2019. Scot: [7:08] Yeah did you run a kegger so in MBA school they would say well you can actually unpack the compounding by look at the compounded annual growth rate. Jason: [7:17] Yes yes I am familiar with the math I did not. Scot: [7:21] Okay it was two years it's not going to be that substantial yeah repeat. Jason: [7:24] No that's the yeah it's right typically like with like a five-year Horizon it makes a lot more sense but yeah it would have been interesting but it just I had to your data so I was just trying to come up with an Apples to Apples. Scot: [7:36] Not feels feels like a wind. Jason: [7:38] Yeah so then I said alright well that's interesting on average retail is a huge win. [7:44] Very obviously there are winners and losers so I said alright well let's look at all the categories that the US Department of Commerce gives us. Based on that 2-year stack and there were you know and who was at the industry average who wildly outperformed the industry average and who underperformed the industry average and there are some things that made total sense to me and we're not surprising and then there were some pretty big surprises in there so, the the category that out of the US Department of Commerce data that grew the fastest was, non store sales which is kind of our e-commerce proxy right and it grew 39 percent so almost twice as fast its total retail that's pretty intuitive you know again you're hearing a lot of. E-commerce growth is slowing. Wagon November as more people went back to stores you know compared to this like you know pandemic impacted 20/20 but when you look at onto your stack, e-commerce is still the fastest growing part of retail at group 39% from 2019 and that certainly didn't surprise me the next two categories sporting goods and building materials, also really didn't surprise me because we kind of talked about them being, the big pandemic winners that like you know people then go to the gym so they bought stuff from Dick's Sporting Goods people didn't go on vacation so they built a new patio with materials from Home Depot and so kind of all the that Services Revenue. [9:14] Shifted into retail and that gave sporting goods and building materials a big a big kiss. Motor Vehicles which at one point people were saying like oh my God that's going to be a horrible category in the pandemic Motor Vehicles actually outperformed the industry average so they grew at 24 percent versus 22 percent for total retail. And then here's where we start getting surprises. Slightly below the industry average was furniture and Home Furnishing so that grew at 21 percent versus the industry average of 22 and if you just asked me to bet I would have said in the same way that building materials and Home Improvement stores. Got extra spending from the pandemic I would have expected furniture stores to get extra spending from the pandemic as well and so it surprised me that they were only at the industry average and the only my only hypothesis is. Did they have more disruptions from supply chain like why. Was it just harder for them to scale up to make more sofas to meet the increased demand and so they, they grew healthy but they didn't grow as healthy as they might have because they they couldn't double their us Workforce to build more couches. Scot: [10:23] The feels right the furniture industry has been here in North Carolina that's our primary one and they're just destroyed by the supply chain they can't there was a series of events that couldn't get phone because of the fire and awesome remember that that seems like a year ago but it actually wasn't go to the summer and then with this quote-unquote Supply pain they haven't been able to get the other inputs like anything fabric while that stuff made in China and shipped over here and sitting on a boat somewhere. Jason: [10:50] Yeah and I feel like it's a double whammy for them because it's harder than ever to make stuff but there's actually they could sell more than ever before if they could make it so it's like, it almost feels worse than knowing there's demand that you can't meet. Scot: [11:01] Yeah it's painful. Jason: [11:03] Yeah so then general merchandise grew at 16 percent versus of retail 22 percent and then the one that surprised me most that I talk about a lot is grocery grew at 16 percent versus the industry average of 22 percent and I would have said man a ton of spending shifted from restaurants to grocery stores they were another pandemic winner and so I'll be honest I don't have a perfect hypothesis for why. Again sixteen percent is Healthy Growth and by historical standards it's better than any two-year period since 1990 so I don't want to say oh you know they had a rough time they had a good time but surprising that they were below the industry average to me a little bit. You have any great Insight that I didn't think of on why that would be. Scot: [11:52] I don't maybe it's like a mix thing underneath the hood like the e-commerce grew so much doesn't it like well I'll be in this category are rules so if. Jason: [12:02] Imperfect yes so you are right like one of the wrinkles in all of this is. The way the US Department of Commerce treats e-commerce as another category which is unfortunate right because you know when someone shifts from buying a exercise bike in a Dick Sporting Good to buying a dick exercise bike from Dick's Sporting Goods.com. The sale leaves the sporting good category in enters the non-store category and so that's. That's not really Apples to Apples and then of course this is all done with surveys that are in perfectly filled out by human beings and so how different retailers respond to that survey is also inconsistent so you got it. This data is super helpful directionally but you definitely don't want to get too wrapped around the axle of the minutiae of the data because it's just an imperfect methodology. [12:52] And so then the the categories they did the worst, do make sense with one outlier for a couple hours for me so gasoline only grew at 14%, you know again make sense to me that they you know underperformed when people aren't commuting to work surprising 14% sales are still pretty good growth clothing is near the bottom at 12% growth so again clothing over the last two years did not shrink they still grew at 12% which might have been their average rate of growth I should do that waiters pulled just the category growth over the last 30 years. But compared all these other categories obviously closing was was poor and the Very lowest category is restaurants and bars which still grew six percent so that all makes sense but then there were two two categories in the cellar that I would have expected to do better health and personal care grew at 11% and Electronics and Appliances grew at seven percent so those are both pretty far under the industry average and you know those are two categories. They had some complication they had pros and cons you know within that category but by and large I guess I was surprised to see them so well. Scot: [14:06] Yet Health and Beauty one because Aaron was zooming like the makeup sales shot way up so it's got to be a you know it was e-commerce. Jason: [14:15] Lipstick sales actually went way down because of the Mask but mascara and skincare went way up it's so funny bye. Um so, then I just did one other sanity check so you know people like a couple people a couple of Industry analysts even like responded to my data and said yeah just don't believe the numbers and I'm like just some understanding you you're saying you don't believe the US Department of Commerce numbers not like I didn't make any of these numbers upright bike. [14:45] And and the US Department of Commerce data is imperfect I would argue it's. The best we have access to and it's it's a bunch of you know PhD in statistics that have you know the force of law to you know to enforce compliance with their survey so I it's better than any other survey out there for whatever that's worth but so I thought how can I do a chance sanity check on this data and I'm like oh all the public retailers are required to report their growth every quarter so we could try to create a year over two year growth for all of these public retailers and compare it to the industry data and some of these public retailers are in a particular category so you can you know pretty safely assume all their sales are in that category so you could kind of use that as a sanity check so I pulled I don't know I guess it's about 25 companies and I converted their quarterly growth into a two-year stack and here I will confess I took a shortcut and if there's any mathematicians that want to help me solve this problem I will toy do it these. Draws numbers are not compounded growth so the problem is we don't have annual growth rates from the Retailer's we have quarterly growth rate so basically you have to. Aggregate for quarters of growth and then. [16:11] Calculate it over two years and so I took a lazy shortcut and I just added their. 20 growth to their 2021 growth so we have basically seven quarters of growth for most of these retailers and it's it's what they call a two-year stack which means growth from 2019 plus 2020 and while the math is not right there by the way right because of. Like the compounding problem of your 2020 growth include your you know growth over 2019. This is how most retailers reported in their earnings so when they talk about to your growth for these non-gaap measures where they try to put themselves in the best light and they report their two year growth they're almost never talking about a compounded number like if you read the footnote. They're they're adding the growth from those two years so this is how they're doing the math in most cases for whatever that's worth but so that's way more precursor than we need the retailer that grew the public retailer the grew the most over the last two years total shocker to me I would not have expected in a million years is Burlington Coat Factory. That Drew 85% and to put that in perspective, they sell apparel which did not do very well in the pandemic and they turned off their website their e-commerce site the month before the pandemic. So they didn't sell any a long line. Scot: [17:34] They're not really opening a lot of stores either. Jason: [17:36] No I mean they may have opened a couple stores over the whole two years but like this is mostly comp sales growth so it actually kind of, factors out new store. Scot: [17:46] Okay so it's cops okay. Jason: [17:47] Yeah this is these numbers that ye are based on currency adjusted comp sales just in the u.s. wherever possible so so Burlington's a total outliner congratulations to them surprising to me Amazon is was the second fastest grower and all public retail at 61 percent over two years which. Doesn't surprise me that super impressive but you'd expect to see them near the top of this list then you see Dick's Sporting Goods at 57 percent and again, like from from the industry data Sporting Goods was the second fastest growing category behind e-commerce so Amazon as a proxy for e-commerce and dicks is approximately for sporting goods makes total sense but then things start getting interesting the next fastest grower was Ulta which is personal care at 36 percent so they grew much better than did the. The personal care category now they're less than half the personal care category the slightly bigger version of them would be Sephora but Sephora is actually owned. Buy a house of Brands and so it's harder to get their data. [19:01] Bed Bath & Beyond group 35% which is impressive Target group 34 percent, Home Depot which again was in one of these these outperforming categories grew 33% was group 28% by comparison Best Buy grew 29% in this it doesn't surprise me the best bike route 29 percent but this is. Makes that the fact that Electronics was one of the slowest growing categories at 7% make even less percent make even less sense I guess it's it's hard to imagine how. Electronics only grew seven percent over the last two years when you know everyone bought all this extra equipment for homeschooling and home entertainment and then with Best Buy growing 29 percent it's even harder to imagine. Scot: [19:53] Yeah maybe in a perfect world you could then split like something like that into store non-store store / e-commerce and maybe that would tell the story. Jason: [20:00] Yeah yeah again that's like one of the few the, my few answers to to a number of these anomalies and then I know this is like all these numbers in a podcast sock but like then you start getting into like Abercrombie & Fitch 28% Costco 26 percent, Cole's Nordstrom's Walmart grew at 21% which again for you know a huge company, the fortune one company to grow at the industry average is pretty good Nike grew at 20%. T.j. Maxx at 15% and the the bottom three. A surprise into not surprises so the second worse and third two words were Dollar Tree in Dollar General at 10% growth which is kind of surprising. You know consumers were kind of flush with cash with all the extra economic stimulus they weren't really slowing down their spending and so like you know maybe it wasn't a great season for the value shoppers but a lot of the news was about how these dollar stores were opening tons of stores and we're really thriving so interesting that they both only Drew. 10% and then the the worst performing public company on this was Macy's which grew six percent over the two years not totally surprising. Scot: [21:18] Isn't that the one that Prophet G said was going to crush. Jason: [21:24] Be there be there the future of retailers Macy's not Amazon yeah this chart unfortunately yeah contradicts that prediction so we'll have to wait and see are you Scott Galloway fans you just hang on hang on to your stick to your guns. Scot: [21:38] Good luck with that. Jason: [21:41] Yeah so that's my the rabbit hole that the stupid November numbers took me down so as you can imagine none of my clients got any deliverables in November. Scot: [21:52] When people tell you they don't believe the data what are they reacting to. Jason: [21:57] I think there's a couple categories there are people that are like hey it's the the month-over-month is interesting but like. Who cares right because these are all anomalous months and that's why I went for this two-year stack and and so. My point was I think like when people are saying hey I don't I don't believe the data I actually don't think they meant they don't believe that this is the data that the US Department of Commerce reported I think they're both saying in some cases, I don't think the US Department of Commerce can count very well and what they mostly hang their hat on is is the non store sales not being right and that's fair right like when someone at Best Buy fills out a survey the US Department of Commerce would like them to put their e-commerce sales in one box and their store sales in another box. [22:47] And do they do that I don't know right and does every retailer do that. Properly and consistently I can tell you that the person assigned to fill out the surveys is generally not the most senior accountant at the it's usually not the CFO. Um so so that is imperfect and then what I think they're saying more is. Maybe don't make all your future plans based on like this snapshot of the world because you know we are looking at a unique set of circumstances that resulted in this data right so if you mistakenly thought my takeaway was retail is better than ever and you know everybody should double down because you know retailers is the most thriving industry in the world 22 percent growth is amazing and it's going to continue forever. [23:36] Yeah no that's not what I'm saying I'm just saying that like it's interesting there were positive and negative impacts on all these businesses as a result of the pandemic but on the aggregate. The impact was disproportionately positive and I don't think that that is sustainable right like I you know I think we will hope to drop down to the regular the sort of pre-pandemic growth levels and potentially. We pulled some growth forward and we might even see some more lean years because we you know absorb so much growth this time. Scot: [24:10] This a long way of you saying you now agree with the the Goldman Sachs chart that showed five years of acceleration. Jason: [24:15] No no I think that still is pretty clear and they were primarily talking about e-commerce which definitely didn't happen. Scot: [24:23] Checking. Jason: [24:25] So that's my my deep dive into data and if there's there can't be anything more fun than listening to a podcast about a bunch of dudes being a bunch of numbers so I will I'll do two things I'll try to put some of this data in the show notes but what I'll do is I'll put a link in the show notes to download some charts with this data in it. Scot: [24:46] Very cool I actually like you spewing data so maybe I'm just an audience of one. Jason: [24:53] You may be in a liar. Scot: [24:56] So what are you seeing so that kind of gets us through November what are you seeing here in December I poked around on the usual spots for the Adobe and the sales force and a couple others and it's really weird they've been kind of quiet since since kind of the Cyber week what what are you hearing from your clients. Jason: [25:17] Yeah so I don't know like there's not good data that's already reporting December sales for holiday but so anecdotally talking to a bunch of clients and talking to some of these companies that do have internal data. December is looking like a good month right and so the. My kind of aggregate estimate is holiday for 2021 is going to end up being about. Nine percent bigger than holiday 2020 and again you say well as nine percent good or bad by historical standards it's pretty darn good most most years we get about a holiday grows less than the rest of the year because there's so much extra volume in it so most years we get about five percent growth in holiday in 2019 we got four percent growth 9% is a big number and last year was a pretty big growth year and so. Um you know also around nine percent so nine percent on top of 9% is a. Pretty big deal I have seen some estimates that think it'll grow even more than nine percent this year to put that in perspective the last time before last year there grew nine percent would have been like 1999 so so not only do we have great growth over two years we do have great holiday growth one huge caveat. [26:43] The trend up until about a week ago was, that more people were returning to the store store traffic was going up we were seeing kind of pre-pandemic shopping behaviors and e-commerce was still a big deal bigger than ever before but the rate of growth was swelling because, there was so much pent-up demand and go to stores lots of people were planning on getting together with their family like there was a funny Walmart stat about you know how much bigger the turkeys were that got sold this year than last year because people were, we're entertaining a lot more so, unfortunately in kind of real-time chats with most of my clients in the last week we have seen foot traffic to stores dramatically curtail and it feels like. We're very quickly getting a lot of negative Media news around and I say media but I guess it's based on the data about Omicron and the hypothesis is there either, Omicron has people scared and so they're not going to stores or a second hypothesis is everyone desperately wants to have their family gathering so they're being extra cautious leading up to Christmas but in either case, we're seeing this last-minute pivot to e-commerce and that has some impacts like the shipping companies that actually been doing. [28:04] Much better job this year than last year on keeping up with ship again in but if suddenly everyone you know runs towards e-commerce these last two weeks that could really put. [28:15] Shipping in Jeopardy in a in a really vulnerable time when they have a lot of Labor challenges so yeah I don't know it's kind of a Debbie Downer bit of news in this whole thing. Scot: [28:26] Yeah yeah I'm a crime that has a it's going to put next year kind of up into a question mark of what happens is and then. The thing that's really frustrating trying to operate a business during this time frame is the bookmarks of good and bad are so wide that. Dirty you have no idea but you drive a truck through and right there 180 degrees so you read one new source it's like oh it's super mild and it's almost going to act like its own vaccine then you see another source and it's like we're all gonna die. Somewhere hopefully we're somewhere in the middle there. Jason: [28:58] Amen Ya Know It's Tricky yeah and kind of evaluating all these data sources that's like the new the new societal challenge right. Scot: [29:09] It really is. Jason: [29:12] So I'm wondering so that's that's kind of my holiday snapshot some good news and some bad news in there I wanted to take a couple minutes on this podcast because I think this is going to be our last show of the year to kind of zoom out from the minutiae and just kind of think about the year in totality and kind of, don't know you know highlight what we think are the big things that happened in our industry this year that might impact us going forward how do you feel about that. Scot: [29:39] Let's do it you want to go first. Jason: [29:41] I mostly wanted you to go first because I thought I would surprise you and make you get bet answers while I thought about it. Scot: [29:48] Okay I'll go first so so I'm going to try to limit it to three because we. Yeah we could go on for for a long time here so I think the highlights of this year for me, it would be a Jason and Scot show if we didn't think a little bit about Amazon the. Build out of Amazon's shipping infrastructure and I feel like we say this every year but it's accelerating and there's some really good data we want to have a guest on that's publishing some data on this just Amazon has built more capacity in the last two years than they had in the last 10 so they've used the pandemic as a you know the response to it and they've gotten kind of cover I guess you could say is to really. 10x down on fulfillment infrastructure where where you get the most feeling of that is that the last mile which is this DS p– program that they've just really scaled up massively. This touches my my day job because it's Biffy we'd service a lot of these folks and they're just they're everywhere and, you know it used to be they would kind of work out a fulfillment systems then they built these fulfillment centers now they've got these see the last word of station what are they call them. [31:02] Delivery stations that have a whole new nomenclature where they now are have these forward-deployed areas where the dsps are almost housed and Aggregates you'll go to these places and it's pretty well that I've seen several of them now and they'll be like 20 dsps operating out of there these little micro businesses and you know just. [31:22] Prime Vans as far as I can see. Where is the stat that I think is kind of the most interesting is the Amazon did disclose that they plan to ship more than then FedEx this year and then I think they said in the next couple of years they'll exceed the USPS as far as package delivery it doesn't surprise me just given the scale that they are throwing at this thing. For example you can't buy a van today because the Amazon is just pretty ordered all the vans so it's pretty fascinating the scale they've done there. The thing that in our will do our annual predictions but I've been annually predicting that they would compete more directly with FedEx and UPS by offering just package delivery to anybody I just feels like we're a lot closer to that but I say that every year so we'll see, the other surprise for me is the explosion of this 15-minute grocery delivery world the most people have probably their first experience this or the first company heard was go puff and it wasn't really a 15-minute thing it was just kind of faster it was almost hours then you had instacart really scale up and then what's happened is the service level on these things it's got lower to the point where they're all trying to get you something in 15 minutes. It's a smaller number of skus than you would get with like Amazon's 300 million skus available so it's typically going to be. [32:43] You know you probably have a cool word for it but it's like snacks and oh my gosh I'm out of a soda I need or ice cream things that you kind of have an urgent hankering for and are willing to pay to scratch that itch a little bit more. On the shipping and handling fees and those kinds of things these are kinds of things when I talk to people they're like yeah that little the economics will never work in the be no one will ever use it and then everyone's always surprised because you can never underestimate the convenience or any consumer that when you give them the choice to do something with convenience they will, they will do it and they will order things you would never have thought about. I remember when Amazon rolled out Prime now they were shocked that the toilet paper and personal products were such a high considered item and it's just you know. People people don't plan ahead and they run out of stuff and they want it right then and there willing to pay extra for it so that one's pretty interesting and you track this probably even better I do Amazon's going after this one and then there's like, 10 startups in there that are have all raised, billions of dollars go puff just announcer one and a half billion dollar extension of their last round by layering on some debt so there's one called like gorillas or gorillas and. [33:55] Tons of these things out there but Amazon scaling it up too so it's gonna be interesting to see if any of these guys can make Headway against Amazon or Famas on will just crush them. [34:05] And then the last one is live-streaming this one sputtering in the US, every data point outside the US indicates it's a thing and I do think this one's going to translate from I've seen it I've seen data that shows that as a has expanded out of China and that's kind of where maybe a year ago we were talking about it largely on Alibaba platform. But now I think it's there's European startups I'm starting to see some categories in the US where this is interesting I followed the collectible category and there's a couple of the hot companies are they do these live streams where they will do. Unboxings so they will they will buy a pack of cards from like the 80s and then they will open them live and and see what's in there and and you know, it's kind of riveting if you're if you're into that and you're like I wonder you know there's a one in 100 chance that this has a Michael Jordan rookie card or something and they pull that the column poles that can be fascinating so there's a lot of. Kind of very specific category activity going there that I think I think a lot of us thought okay Amazon's and do this Amazon is tried and it's been pretty terrible but I think it's going to come from these really niche of Articles at first and they're going to figure it out and then you'll see it get more more momentum up into the broader retailers so those are those are my three. Jason: [35:27] Wow those are three good ones I feel like you stole my three I'm just kidding um no but I totally agree with all those I do think like we've actually seen Amazon launch some. Selling of shipping services and I've seen Stan said they're going to deliver 90% of their own packages this holiday so like I think that definitely is a thing even Walmart is now, selling shipping services to other people including Home Depot so that's totally interesting Trend hundred percent agree on the live streaming like I kind of call it the D bundling of shopping and you know we have all these e-commerce sites that are good at buying things but we're not very good at product Discovery and it seems like social and video or where a lot of the, the new product discoveries coming from and then that that ultra-fast delivery for filling orders to give you all the words you are asking about the that that's a huge thing and if you think about you know how much retailers are struggling with with grocery profitability like it's a double whammy that wow they're trying to figure out how to solve for profitability the consumers moving to this even you know inherently less profitable order so it's going to be that that's going to be an interesting disruption of the industry so if I were to add 3 to that. I do think just the whole pandemic. [36:41] Acceleration of great digital grocery like is when I talk about a lot and I still think that that is a huge thing like all those predictions about how much the pandemic was accelerating e-commerce for probably wrong but grocery delivery Ecommerce probably did get accelerated five years and to me maybe you know what will ultimately end up being one of the most important things that happened during the pandemic is Amazon invented a new grocery store right this Amazon Fresh concept and it's starting to scale there's more than 30 of them now they have just walk out technology in them which I would have bet against them having this quickly and there are there are lots of investigative journalists that have found. Some interesting real estate footprints that would imply that it's going to scale their that there's a business plan footing out here that had like 300 of these in the UK which is a small island um I think we could look back five years from now and see Amazon is a very meaningful brick-and-mortar grocer and and I think 20:21 is the year it it happened without us totally acknowledging it so I think Jay W groceries an interesting Evolution one that I end up talking about a lot with my clients also driven by Amazon is retail media networks right so you know Amazon, is that a run right now of about 30 billion dollars in ads it's probably the most profitable business Amazon has I think this this. [38:08] Battle for eyeballs between retailers and traditional digital platforms is super interesting and I think you know you set the layer who is. One of the the. The key guys at Amazon media like we had him on the show when he moved to Fresh Direct and he's now running Walmart Connect Four for Walmart so you're seeing the Retailer's hire these like credible media sales people and I think that's a. [38:37] A going forward a significant part of every retailers plan is how to be their own media Network how to get eyeballs and how to monetize those eyeballs and that's a new new skill for a retailer so I think that's a big deal and then the last one I'm gonna throw out, is one that I am surprised doesn't get talked about more but it's the apparel retailer she in and I think they are super interesting they've had phenomenal success they're probably globally the largest apparel reseller on the planet right now and their their annual revenues are more than than H&M and Zara combined so so remarkable. [39:18] Story of fast acceleration but the bigger story here is, to me Sheehan is very representative of the democratization of apparel that like for the longest time we expected Mickey Drexler or Versace or Yeezy to tell us like what was cool to wear and then we waited until we can buy those clothes and we bought them and I just I think that model is totally dead now I think the apparel that sells best the stuff that she and sells the stuff that target cells the stuff that Stitch fix cells is frankly based on customer data it's watching customers finding out what they like and then making it really fast and so Sheehan isn't isn't fashion driven by a stylist It's Fashion driven by Tick-Tock right and an Instagram and I think that's a, a lot of apparel companies haven't gotten the memo yet that the consumer is now squarely in charge of these fashion trends. Scot: [40:18] Yeah saw an article about these guys were this this one lady she did this Argyle Sweater outfit and. It was on Instagram it got some viral love they took that and it created a hole the outfit they had copied it or I guess fast fashion and I don't know how the how the IP Works in this world but they had replicated it and they I think they even used her picture which I think was with articles about that she didn't really you know, realize that that effectively shows open sourcing this thing to the world and then it became a top seller for them like in 60 days it was insane how fast that they identified the trend and get the. The product out there it was like you know NASCAR fashion or something. Jason: [41:03] Yeah it's crazy if you think about like the fashion traditionally worked like. Dudes would show up in Paris at the Fashion Show and show these cool Styles and then everyone would steal those Styles and send them an effector he's and two years later those fact those Fashions would be available at Neiman Marcus. Two years later and in so the genius of Gap was that they got those Fashions to the mall, 18 months later instead of two years later and the the disruption of H&M and Zara was that they got them to the mall six months later instead of 18 months later right. She and sees that woman in the crop-top Argyle Sweater and they have they have that fashion available in a week and here's what super interesting they don't make a million of them and hope they sell which is what all those other retailers had to do, they make 12 of them and if those 12 sell in 8 seconds versus 20 seconds then they make thousands of them. Right and so it's really data-driven real-time a/b testing on apparel trans at a speed that that these kind of traditional apparel Brands can't even imagine. Scot: [42:13] That's because they have the factory right there that they're able to do that or like to have some. Jason: [42:17] Yeah and they. In Shane's case they don't own the factories they have a net like that it's a gig worker economy for factories right like so in the same way that boober recruits a bunch of Uber drivers she and recruits a bunch of factories that they then go to and say hey we've got some some ideas for some new models and find one of those factories that accepts the order and makes the the stuff and so in sometimes there's our Factory driven ideas sometimes there she and driven ideas but but yeah that's that's the model and you know there is a Dark Side to this I got you know a lot of its there's a lot of questions about the labor standards and practices at a bunch of these factories and of course there's. You know a lot of the stuff that gets bought on Shion is super cheap and gets worn once and so it's a ecological disaster I would argue the industry it's disrupting is also. Kind of a you know it has a lot of dark sides and and is not very sustainable so I like I'm not sure she and improves on on any of those problems but from a pure consumer demand standpoint, I don't think we're ever going back to you know these like anointed tastemakers that like decide what we're all going to wear for the next year. Scot: [43:32] Yet clearly clearly that model is sailed having. Jason: [43:36] Indeed well listen Scott I know we both have to run but that is probably a great place to wrap up our final show of 20:21 I need to take some downtime not to see my family or anything like that but in early January we always like to record the forecasts show and hit traditionally you crush me and so I feel like I need to spend a lot more time thinking about my forecast before the forecast show comes up. Scot: [44:07] Yeah challenge accepted I will also be thinking about this in a background processes I'm enjoying the holiday I think this is a good time to thank our listeners you know we've you know we've seen our listenership grow pretty steadily over the years and we really appreciate everyone giving us time to your day to talk about the topics we talk about and we get a lot of great feedback and really engaged set of listeners and we really appreciate you listening and if you want to share your appreciation one of the ways you can do that is through a five star rating so fire up your favorite podcast listening technology and if you would leave us a five starters we that would be the perfect holiday gift for us. Jason: [44:47] Yeah that's exact five stars is exactly my size to Scott. Scot: [44:50] How about that. Jason: [44:53] Awesome well most of can't appreciate enough the listeners for spending this time with us every week this is a lot of fun for us to do and I learned so much from the the chats I have with folks after they listen to the podcast so I'm that is one of the things I'm super grateful for. Scot: [45:10] Everyone have a great holiday Jason you how enjoy your trip to California. Jason: [45:14] Thank you you have a wonderful holiday as well and until next time happy commercing!  

Zacks Market Edge
Your Favorite Stock Sold Off: Is it a Deal or a Trap?

Zacks Market Edge

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 35:21


Disney, PayPal, Gap, Nordstrom and Williams-Sonoma are all on sale. Should value investors dive in? (0:45) - Finding Deals Heading Into 2022:  Avoiding Value Traps (4:30) - Tracey's Top Stock Picks (26:15) - Big Takeaways: DIS, PYPL, GPS, JWN, HET, WSM Podcast@Zacks.com

Value Investor
Your Favorite Stock Sold Off: Is it a Deal or a Trap?

Value Investor

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 35:20


Disney, PayPal, Gap, Nordstrom and Williams-Sonoma are all on sale. Should value investors dive in? (0:45) - Finding Deals Heading Into 2022:  Avoiding Value Traps (4:30) - Tracey's Top Stock Picks (26:15) - Big Takeaways: DIS, PYPL, GPS, JWN, HET, WSM Podcast@Zacks.com

Freakshow
Orlando Didn’t Tip The People Who Wrapped His Gifts At Nordstrom

Freakshow

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 5:07


Meredith was shocked! The post Orlando Didn’t Tip The People Who Wrapped His Gifts At Nordstrom appeared first on WiLD 94.1.

KMJ's Afternoon Drive
Wednesday 12/15 - Hour 3

KMJ's Afternoon Drive

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 41:40


As crime rates continue to rise in the Bay Area, Mayor Breed unveils a new plan (with colorful language) that works with law enforcement and social services to make neighborhoods safer for residents. CHP's Organized Retail Crime Task Force, working with the SFPD, busted a retail theft operation in the Vallejo area that was in possession of more than $200k in merchandise stolen from CVS, Victoria's Secret, GAP, Target, Nordstrom and more. A moment on the world's worst bank robber.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Nightly Business Report
Conversations with Kelly Evans: Hitting Resistance, Wholesale's Resurgence, and the Retail Name to Watch in 2022

Nightly Business Report

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2021 30:58


Kelly speaks with BMO's Simeon Siegel. They talk about how Peloton shares have fallen sharply, just like Simeon warned they would; how that restores his faith in efficient markets; and what it was like for him when they were trading above $100. They also talk about how wholesale is making a comeback as a business model, what that means for stores like Macy's and Nordstrom, and why Traeger grills are actually a good example of that. Plus--the name that Simeon thinks is one to watch into 2022.

The WTF California Podcast
California Experiencing the “Great Reverse” as Major Cities Ask for Targeted Policing

The WTF California Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2021 41:35


On this episode of WTF California Podcast, even with Kenny's new dog proves to be pro police. We get into San Francisco Mayor London Breed apparently is now doing a flip-flop on police by asking for more resources and policy changes. Oakland's Mayor is now requesting freeway cameras. Contra Costa County screws up as all three subjects now out of jail from the Nordstrom theft in Walnut Creek. Plus more. Articles From the Show: CHP, SFPD Arrest 2, Seize Over $200,000 Worth of Merchandise In Retail Theft Ring Bust All charges dropped against Oakland man accused of pimping Richmond police chief's relative Antioch: Man who allegedly shot public urinator outside Bonfare Market gets three years in federal prison Families, California lawmaker plead for street racing, sideshows to stop  San Francisco mayor proposes broader police access to surveillance video in light of mass retail thefts Here's how Mayor Breed's new plan would work to make SF safer for residents, visitors Oakland mayor asks governor for freeway cameras, license plate readers to deter crime All 3 suspects in Walnut Creek Nordstrom theft out of custody; DA says 2 of them shouldn't be Santa Clara County Civil Grand Jury indicts Sheriff Laurie Smith over alleged misconduct Sonoma County to increase minimum wage to $16.75 an hour Sacramento addressing policy of towing cars belonging to people experiencing homelessness San Diego Unified approves public comment policy to curb hate speech

Wedded Wellness
Crystals, Manifestation, and Wearing Magic with Jordyn Diorio of Mend Jewelry

Wedded Wellness

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2021 45:10


Ashley is joined by fiery entrepreneur, passionate business consultant, and expert manifestor Jordyn Diorio. Jordyn is also a lively designer and believes success is a mix of working hard, empowering those around her and cracking jokes along the way. Her love for simplistically designed jewelry paired with her entrepreneurial spirit led her to the creation of  MEND Jewelry in 2017. Since the launch of her brand, she's caught the attention of venture capitalists  (receiving enough to quit her job in tech), sold online at Nordstrom.com, launched a holiday store at the Mall of America and won several awards.Ashley and Jordyn discuss her manifestation and visualization process that earned her a six figure check and allowed her to leave her job to run her own company, the importance of taking Inspired action, the inspiration behind MEND and incorporating gemstones, the power of negotiation, adding personalization to your self-care practices, being conscious in our consumption and reconciling where we put our dollars, and how she allows her own self-care practice to change and evolve.Jordyn wants to blaze the trail for young women who aspire to run their own companies in the future. She currently lives in Minneapolis and when she's not full steam ahead on MEND, she mentors students at the University of Minnesota, consults business owners through marketing strategy, project management , and public relations and indulges in macarons and podcasts. Resources Mentioned:What Oprah Learned from Jim Carrey Learn More:Follow MEND on Instagram: @mendjewelryFollow Jordyn on Instagram: @jordyndiorioShop MEND Jewelry: https://mendjewelry.com/Learn more about Jordyn: https://www.jdpconsult.co/, https://founders-co-mn.myshopify.com/Follow along on Instagram: @yogamagicpodcast and @ashleysondergaard.yogaLearn more about Ashley and Yoga Magic at www.ashleysondergaard.com There's Still Time to Join the Self-Care Challenge! All December, we'll come together for a celebration of all things self-care. Packed with practice ideas, bonus episodes, giveaways, and free workshops - you won't want to miss this! If you're already on the Yoga Magic newsletter, you're in! To join, sign up here. https://tremendous-leader-9896.ck.page/614556994e Work with Ashley:Book a 1:1 Cosmic Self-Care Session with Ashley  | Learn how to use your astrological birth chart to personalize your self-care routines, rituals and practices. Book a Birth Chart Reading with Ashley | Learn about the key components of your natal chart and how you can work with the energy in your life today during this 30 minute reading. Upcoming Yoga Magic EventsCosmic Self-Care: Using Capricorn Energy | 12/22 4:00 PM CT | Learn It Live

A Fashion Moment
Tracy Reese

A Fashion Moment

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2021 73:00


Tracy Reese is an American designer whose signature designs for the modern woman transformed the fashion industry and paved a significant path for black designers across the globe. In 1998, Tracy Reese launched her namesake fashion brand in New York City and expanded into sub-brands like Plenty, Frock! and Black Label, which sold in stores like Barney's Bergdorf Goodman, Neiman Marcus, Nordstrom, and Anthropologie for more than two decades. She is also the first black member on the Board of Directors for the Council of Fashion Designers of America. In 2012, First Lady Michelle Obama wore a custom Tracy Reese dress to address the DNC. Other notable fans of the brand include Sarah Jessica Parker, Tracee Ellis Ross, and Oprah Winfrey. Tracy Reese continues to evolve and has pivoted her business strategy to a more sustainable, slow-fashion model. Tracy recently moved her design studio to her hometown, Detroit, where she built an artisan studio to create economic opportunities for women in under-served communities. In 2019, Tracy launched Hope for Flowers by Tracy Reese, a responsibly designed and produced collection. Hope for Flowers' mission is to create a positive social impact by empowering women and young people through arts programming in public schools and collaboration with local artisans in Detroit. In this episode, host Kirsten Holtz Naim discusses Tracy Reese's legendary fashion career and the importance of sustainable design. Connect with Us! Spotify | Apple Shop + Support Instagram: @afashionmoment Twitter: @A_FashionMoment Email: AFashionMomentPodcast@gmail.com Website: A Fashion Moment Show Notes: Shop Hope for Flowers by Tracy Reese at HopeForFlowers.com  Follow Tracy Reese on Instagram @tracy_reese  Follow Hope for Flowers on Instagram @hopeforflowersbytracyreese HistoricDetroit.org article on Crowley's Department Store: https://historicdetroit.org/buildings/crowleys-department-store  Learn more about Stephen Burrows: https://stephenburrows.com/  Learn more about Parsons School of Design: https://www.newschool.edu/parsons/  Follow and learn more about designer Mariane Sitbon on Instagram @martinesitbon  Vogue Article Perry Ellis Spring 1993 Collection (feat. the work of Marc Jacobs): https://www.vogue.com/fashion-shows/spring-1993-ready-to-wear/perry-ellis  Learn more about Fe Noel: https://fenoel.com/

The Fit2Fat2Fit Experience
EP323: Become a Female Jason Bourne with Kwame Stephens and Lynn Nordstrom

The Fit2Fat2Fit Experience

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2021 40:49


Kwame Stephens has over 25 years involvement in Muay Thai and is a four times Muay Thai Champion. He is also a prolific and well-known coach who turns professional fighters into world champions, and can turn any woman willing to work into a female Jason Bourne. In this episode, Drew sits down with Kwame and his ex-wife, Lynn, to discuss the importance of practical self-defense skills, why they are a growing need, and Kwame's new program that is launching under the Fit2Fat2Fit umbrella. Be sure to welcome Kwame to the amazing F2F2F family, and check out his new program which can be found here:   A.W.A.R.E Tactical Program   HIGHLIGHTS:   [06:45] How Kwame discovered Mui Tai, what he loves about it, and what pushed him to pursue martial arts as a career.   [15:33] How Lynn met Kwame, how he transitioned from a lucrative fighting career into the world of coaching and teaching, and why he prefers coaching women.   [20:30] Lynn's story of experiencing sexual abuse, living fearfully from simply being a woman, and why transforming herself in the “female Jason Bourne” has changed the way she lives on a daily basis.   [26:45] Kwame explains how he developed his new program, and what you can expect if you decide to dive in and learn self-defense for yourself.   [38:04] A few stats on women regarding rape, violent abuse, and sexual assult that should make everyone uncomfortable - and make it clear that we live in an age where self-defense knowledge and practice is a must.   SPONSORS:   Paleovalley — Paleovalley makes 100% grass fed beef sticks that are fermented using old-world methods in order to preserve the meat in a healthy way, rather than using unnatural preservatives like other companies. They make an amazing on-the-go snack, are packed with probiotics, and they taste delicious! Use the code fit2fat2fit at checkout to receive 15% off of your order!   Redmond Real Salt — Check out Redmond's new Re-Lyte electrolyte mix - powered by real salt. Get 15% off of your order by using the offer code “fit2fat2fit” at checkout. Live your journey, live on purpose!   Complete Wellness Supplements — Shop Drew's hand-formulated, high-quality, pre-workout greens, Keto Meal Replacement with grass-fed collagen, MCT Oil soft-gels, bone broth, and more! Use the code “podcast” to get 20% off of your order!   SHOW LINKS:   A.W.A.R.E Tactical Program Fit2Fat2Fit Take the Fit2Fat2Fit Podcast Listener Survey Fit2Fat2Fit on Facebook  @Fit2Fat2Fit on Instagram Fit2Fat2Fit Book  Keto School Program Complete Keto Book Email Drew: info@fit2fat2fit.com

Tim Conway Jr. on Demand
Hour 4 | Hawaiian Alphabet @ConwayShow

Tim Conway Jr. on Demand

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2021 32:01


Driving to Vegas, just got easier / Hawaii / WHIP: Hawaii Alphabet // Premeire Radio Network Line-up / Tim's syndication lasted one night // Nordstroms video released / Torrance robberies // NOORY / Jussie Smollett

Persuasion by the Pint
238: Persuasion, Behavioral Science and the Art of Selling

Persuasion by the Pint

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2021 90:04


This week we welcome Ryan Voeltz on the show to discuss his book Ghosts in the Machine: Overcoming Decision-Making Bias in the Sales Cycle with Behavioral Science. Ryan has had just about every type of sales job there is. In college, he sold menswear at Nordstrom. In his first job out of college, he sold […]

Smart Venture Podcast
#85 Adidas's SVP of Data & Analytics, ex-SVP at Salesforce, ex- CTO of Disney, David Sobeski

Smart Venture Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2021 97:36


085 David Sobeski is the SVP of Data and Analytics at Adidas. Prior to Adidas, he was the SVP of Philanthropy Cloud at Salesforce, the SVP of Innovation at Nordstrom, and CTO at The Walt Disney Company and Playdom. He also served as the SVP of Yahoo and an executive at Microsoft, where he worked on Windows, Internet Explorer, Mobile and many other high profile products.   Check out our brand new YouTube Video Podcast!  https://www.SmartVenturePod.com IG/Twitter/FB @GraceGongGG LinkedIn:@GraceGong YouTube: https://bit.ly/gracegongyoutube Join the SVP fam with your host Grace Gong. In each episode, we are going to have conversations with some of the top investors, super star founders, as well as well known tech executives in the silicon valley. We will have a coffee chat with them to learn their ways of thinking and actionable tips on how to build or invest in a successful company.  

The WTF California Podcast
Antioch Mayor Recall Begins and Zero Bail a Giant Failure

The WTF California Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2021 48:39


On this episode of WTF California, finally the recall effort for Antioch Mayor Lamar Thorpe can move forward and proponents can gather signatures.  Signature gathering events set for this weekend. Burkholder jumps back into the Mayors press conference this week as even advocates are now challenging the mayors plan along with Brentwood Police who called it a band-aid approach. Defund the police is now dead after City of Oakland Mayoral Candidate suggests $50k hiring bonus and retention efforts. Walnut Creek to spend $2 million for more police services. Zero-bail proving to be a problem in smash-and-grab robberies—those arrested out on zero-bail! Governor Gavin Newsom updates and other tidbits from around the state. Articles From The Show Recall of Antioch Mayor Lamar Thorpe Approved to Gather Signatures Antioch Mayor Proposes $300k be Spent on Louie Rocha Emergency Housing Plan for Homeless Brentwood Police Call Antioch $300k Spend on Homeless Housing a Band-Aid Approach 4 in 10 voters say LA homelessness makes them feel unsafe; many consider moving: Poll Oakland police would offer other cops $50,000 hiring bonuses under council member's proposal Walnut Creek council spends $2M in response to Nordstrom attack Smash-and-grab robberies: 14 arrested in 11 incidents, all released on CA's zero-bail California woman suspected of stealing $300,000 in merchandise from retailers Prosecute shoplifters under existing laws, Newsom says SF's criminal case backlog called 'humanitarian crisis' as hundreds await trial Newsom says new shutdowns unlikely after CA detects 1st omicron case in U.S. More Than 100 LA Firefighters Off-Duty Without Pay Due To Vaccine Mandate Non-compliance City starts sending pre-termination letters to unvaccinated employees Go-kart driver among 2 cited after apparent YouTube stunt on 101 Freeway in Sherman Oaks: CHP Grand Jury Indicts Correctional Officer on Sexual Assault Crimes Investigation Finds Vallejo Officer's Use of Deadly Force Not ‘Reasonable' Deacon Dave's Livermore holiday light display back from pandemic, brighter than ever

Café Brasil Podcast
Cafezinho 443 –  O crime nosso de cada dia

Café Brasil Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2021 7:08


No cafezinho de hoje, vou ler uns trechos de algumas notícias recentes dos Estados Unidos. As tradicionais vitrines de Natal, que eram uma festa na Union Square em San Francisco, Califórnia, este ano são tábuas protegendo as lojas de ataques. No mais chocante dos roubos recentes, cerca de 80 homens mascarados em 25 carros assaltaram uma loja de departamentos Nordstrom em Walnut Creek, leste de São Francisco, Califórnia, levando mercadorias de luxo do primeiro andar e escapando em alguns minutos. Lojas das redes de varejo Target e Walgreens estão fechando unidades ou reduzindo seus horários de funcionamento na Califórnia, por conta de um aumento no número de pequenos furtos de produtos das prateleiras.   Em São Francisco, onde há mais registros da ação desses criminosos, muitas lojas que fechavam às 22h todos os dias agora estão baixando as portas entre 17h e 18h para diminuir os prejuízos com a ação de criminosos. A polícia, sobrecarregada com o aumento de casos de assassinatos e outros crimes violentos, "simplesmente não consegue acompanhar" o volume de mercadorias roubadas e as pessoas que as revendem. Com medo de serem acusados por agressão ou algum tipo de preconceito, os seguranças apenas observam e gravam as imagens de pessoas que entram nas lojas, enchem as sacolas de produtos e saem sem pagar e sem serem importunadas. O que acontece nos EUA não é uma doença, mas o sintoma de uma sociedade doente. E os Estados Unidos somos nós, amanhã.   No Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AiaP4rWEVS0   Gostou? De onde veio este, tem muito, mas muito mais. Acesse http://mundocafebrasil.com

Cafezinho Café Brasil
Cafezinho 443 –  O crime nosso de cada dia

Cafezinho Café Brasil

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2021 7:08


No cafezinho de hoje, vou ler uns trechos de algumas notícias recentes dos Estados Unidos. As tradicionais vitrines de Natal, que eram uma festa na Union Square em San Francisco, Califórnia, este ano são tábuas protegendo as lojas de ataques. No mais chocante dos roubos recentes, cerca de 80 homens mascarados em 25 carros assaltaram uma loja de departamentos Nordstrom em Walnut Creek, leste de São Francisco, Califórnia, levando mercadorias de luxo do primeiro andar e escapando em alguns minutos. Lojas das redes de varejo Target e Walgreens estão fechando unidades ou reduzindo seus horários de funcionamento na Califórnia, por conta de um aumento no número de pequenos furtos de produtos das prateleiras.   Em São Francisco, onde há mais registros da ação desses criminosos, muitas lojas que fechavam às 22h todos os dias agora estão baixando as portas entre 17h e 18h para diminuir os prejuízos com a ação de criminosos. A polícia, sobrecarregada com o aumento de casos de assassinatos e outros crimes violentos, "simplesmente não consegue acompanhar" o volume de mercadorias roubadas e as pessoas que as revendem. Com medo de serem acusados por agressão ou algum tipo de preconceito, os seguranças apenas observam e gravam as imagens de pessoas que entram nas lojas, enchem as sacolas de produtos e saem sem pagar e sem serem importunadas. O que acontece nos EUA não é uma doença, mas o sintoma de uma sociedade doente. E os Estados Unidos somos nós, amanhã.   No Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AiaP4rWEVS0   Gostou? De onde veio este, tem muito, mas muito mais. Acesse http://mundocafebrasil.com

She's Got Moxie
Jen Cox – The Tie-Dye Ninja & Founder/CEO of Momma Osa

She's Got Moxie

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 31:06


Today's guest Jennifer Cox has been dubbed the Tie-Dye “Ninja” and Denim Wash Specialist. She spent a highly successful 20-year career in corporate America as a Wash Specialist for Abercrombie & Fitch, Mossimo Supply at Target, and other private label denim brands. She's made & designed clothing for everyone from Nordstroms to Macy's, Target, and Walmart. “You just have to start. It doesn't have to be pretty." - Jen Cox. Learn more about this episode of She's Got Moxie at joychudacoff.com/157

Causing The Effect
154 Resilience with Billy Price

Causing The Effect

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 37:56


Billy Price is the co-founder of Billy Footwear, a shoewear company using a full length zipper design that goes along the side of the shoes and around the toe, making putting on shoes a one step process.After suffering a spinal cord injury as a teenager, BILLY Footwear became a prototype to fulfill Billy's personal needs and help those like him. Now featured in hundreds of stores like Nordstrom, as well as being featured in the upcoming ‘Ghostbusters' movie, BILLY Footwear has become the face for the chronic illness community.

The WTF California Podcast
Antioch Mayor to Speak Again, Smash and Grabs Continue and Musk Saves $2 Billion in Taxes

The WTF California Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 30:45


On this episode of WTF California Podcast, the City of Antioch will be treated to yet another press conference by Antioch Mayor Lamar Thorpe on Tuesday. Bay Area Rapid Transit to open 850 new parking spots at Antioch BART Station. Mary Knox releases three point plan to prevent smash and crab retail theft in Contra Costa County. Oakland continues to be a disaster with businesses ready to close up and leave. Plus Elon Musk move to Texas may save him $2 billion in taxes. Articles from the Show: Mary Knox Releases Three-Point Plan to Prevent Smash-and-Grab Retail Theft Contra Costa Co. Sheriff's Office 'investigating' why Nordstrom theft suspect was released I fear for my business': Oakland cannabis dispensaries say they've lost $5M in recent thefts Oakland store owner questions staying open after multiple burglaries in one year Oakland mayor, councilmembers push for more police in wake of violence Santa Clara Shoe Store Ransacked in Late Night Smash-and-Grab Robbery Thieves steal more than $3K worth of merchandise from Daly City Macy's: police Thieves Hit UC Davis, Rite Aid, CVS, Safeway Over Weekend San Leandro Police Arrest 12 and 13-Year-Old Boys in Carjacking Sacramento sheriff: Teen arrested in shooting death of other teen Elon Musk's California exit can save him $2 billion in taxes

The 6 Figure Product Business Podcast
How to Get “Retail-Ready” - Product-Based Entrepreneurs Need to Land Big Retail Contracts with Maureen Mwangi

The 6 Figure Product Business Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 49:25


Today we dive into all things RETAIL! Have you ever thought about your gorgeous products being on a Target or Nordstrom shelf?  Today's guest is Maureen Mwangi. Maureen is the brand growth strategist behind some of America's most beloved brands, like L'Oréal, Chobani, Dove, and Lays. Maureen's zone of genius is her rare ability to connect with a market and turn real data into brand growth strategies that drive multi-million dollar growth.    In this episode we dive into: Three phases of a product-based business's lifecycle and What are the most important marketing and sales strategies needed for each phase   Why it's important for product-based entrepreneurs to “know their numbers.”    When it comes to “big brand strategies” What do big brands know that growing brands don't Connect with Maureen   Website: www.startwardconsulting.com Instagram: Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/maureenmwangiofficial/ maureen@startwardconsulting.com Let's Be Friends Follow Kerrie on Instagram Follow The 6 Figure Product Business Podcast on Instagram 

The Lucky Few
143. Our 2021 Holiday Gift Guide!

The Lucky Few

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 43:44


*Cue the holiday music…It's the most wonderful (& also sort of stressful) time of the year… holiday shopping time! But don't worry, we've got you covered with our 2021 HOLIDAY GIFT GUIDE! It's here, friends. We are so excited to share about all these wonderful, narrative-shifting small businesses! Shop for soaps and sweatshirts, books and beach towels, art and educational resources, + more! There's truly something for everyone. And don't pay full price, use our discount codes! Oh and did we mention that many of these companies were founded by entrepreneurs with Down syndrome and employ individuals with disabilities?! So be sure to share this episode and follow us on Instagram for a GIVEAWAY this week where you can products from most of these businesses! Tis' the season for shopping small and shifting the narrative! __ SHOP THE GIFT GUIDE Businesses by Self-Advocates: Charlie French Art: Shop high quality abstract art and holiday prints by Charlie, an artist with Down syndrome. Instagram: @justcharliefrench Trista's Sunshine Co: Purchase hand-sewn products from Trista, a business owner (& #bosslady) with Down syndrome! Code: LUCKYSUNSHINE for 10% off burp cloths and taggies. Expires 12/10. Soap by Zach: Check out Zach's organic, small batch, goat milk and honey soap. Code: HAPPINESS anywhere on the site for a free mini peppermint goatmilk and honey soap w/your order! Dance Happy Designs: Shop handcrafted totes, bins, planters, and pouches from a team of three BFFS- one with Down syndrome! Code: LUCKYFEW15 for 15% off through 12/15. Or shop through Nordstroms here. Businesses that Shift the Narrative: So Happy to Learn w/Mrs. Brown: We can't recommend this online educational program for learners with Down syndrome enough! The perfect gift for anyone with DS, anywhere! Beachables: A beach towel, chair cover, and towel all in one! Created by a fellow lucky mama! Code: LUCKY for 20% off! Lynn Richards Art: Journals with hand lettering and custom artwork on the cover! Created by a fellow lucky mama! Code: JOURNALS for 10% off until 12/15. Celebrate Different Apparel: Super soft (& stylish) shirts/sweatshirts with advocacy messages! Created by a fellow lucky mama! The Lucky Few: Level up your advocacy (and accessory) game with our keychains, enamel pins, sweatshirts, shirts, + more! These items make the perfect gift for the worth-shouters in your life! --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/theluckyfewpod/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/theluckyfewpod/support

Remarkable Retail
Perch CEO Chris Bell Clearcuts His Way Through the Amazon Jungle

Remarkable Retail

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 41:14


We're joined by Chris Bell, CEO & Founder of Perch, one of the fastest growing and most acquisitive companies offering a platform to e-commerce brands leveraging "Fulfilled by Amazon" and other third party marketplaces. We learn how the model works, why the business model is attracting so much investor interest, and what's on the horizon for one of the hottest sectors in retail today. And if you run a brand looking to be acquired, you'll definitely want to check this episode out.But first we open up with the top retail stories that caught our attention this past week, including what to make of the "Great Rebalancing" evident in earnings reports from Best Buy, Dick's Sporting Goods and Nordstrom. We also give our take on the new hybrid format from Starbucks and Amazon Go.Steve Dennis is an advisor, keynote speaker and author on strategic growth and business innovation. You can learn more about Steve on his       website.    The expanded and revised edition of his bestselling book  Remarkable Retail: How To Win & Keep Customers in the Age of Disruption is now available at  Amazon or just about anywhere else books are sold. Steve regularly shares his insights in his role as a      Forbes senior contributor and on       Twitter and       LinkedIn. You can also check out his speaker "sizzle" reel      here.Michael LeBlanc  is the Founder & President of M.E. LeBlanc & Company Inc and a Senior Advisor to Retail Council of Canada as part of his advisory and consulting practice.   He brings 25+ years of brand/retail/marketing & eCommerce leadership experience, and has been on the front lines of retail industry change for his entire career.  Michael is the producer and host of a network of leading podcasts including Canada's top retail industry podcast,       The Voice of Retail, plus  Global E-Commerce Tech Talks  ,      The Food Professor  with Dr. Sylvain Charlebois and now in its second season, Conversations with CommerceNext!  You can learn more about Michael   here  or on     LinkedIn. Be sure and check out Michael's latest venture for fun and influencer riches - Last Request Barbecue,  his YouTube BBQ cooking channel! 

The Tim Dillon Show
279 - Flashmob Omicron Morning Star Bear

The Tim Dillon Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 68:58


Tim discusses the flash mobs at Louis Vuitton and Nordstroms, a woman self named "Morning Star Bear", and why Austin, Texas may be the most expensive city in the United States. Bonus episodes every week: ▶▶ https://www.patreon.com/thetimdillonshow See Tim Live on the road: ▶▶ http://timdilloncomedy.com/#shows ▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬ SUPPORT OUR SPONSORS:

Karen Hunter Show
Sharon Chuter - CEO, Founder & Creative Director of the Black-Owned Beauty Brand, UOMA Beauty

Karen Hunter Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 27:22


Bringing bold new ideas to an industry stuck in its ways, Chuter is revolutionizing the beauty world as the founder of two wildly successful viral initiatives Pull Up For Change and Make it Black, which spotlight the need for increased representation in corporate America and supports Black founders through small business impact funds. In the wake of Black Lives Matter protests, #PullUpForChange asked companies to share the number of Black employees on their payrolls in an act of transparency and unity. Since the challenge was released brands such as Kylie Cosmetics, ULTA, L'Oreal and Sephora have released demographic data on their employees and executives; the challenge has also ventured outside of the beauty industry, publishing lists from Facebook Google, and Netflix, to name a few. Born in Nigeria, the 32-year-old trailblazer became frustrated that none of the major beauty brands were sold in her country. After moving to Australia and working her way up through some of the biggest names in beauty, Sharon realized that none of them were creating products that catered to a diverse audience. This was her opportunity to stand up and fight for inclusion. And so began her journey to create UOMA Beauty. Drawing inspiration from her Afro heritage and infusing it with a fierce modernity, Sharon was able to create a truly fresh aesthetic, while also advocating for self-love and authentic self-expression. What emerged was a makeup range that is radical, uncompromising, and filled with both meaning and emotion.   About the Brand: UOMA Beauty is the most inclusive black-owned beauty brand. At UOMA we are an empowered tribe. Our race is human, our people are free, our language is color. All are welcome to our beautiful tribe. The makeup range is rebellious, innovative, and created for all—because beauty should come in every color. UOMA Beauty retails between $18 and $44 and is available for purchase at UOMABEAUTY.COM and in mega-retailers Ulta Beauty and Nordstrom nationwide. To Shop UOMA Beauty: https://uomabeauty.com/ 

She Did That.
Brand Elevation & the Beauty of Black Love w/Nichole Lynel

She Did That.

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 35:11


Today's episode of the She Did That. podcast is a moment for me because it's one of the very first in-studio shows I recorded at Dear Media during my recent trip to Los Angeles. When I was considering who to invite as my special guests, Nichole Lynel was one of the first women who came to mind. As a fashion designer and entrepreneur, Nichole's brand is on fire right now. Six years after launching her business, Nichole has become an official supplier for Nordstrom. She has created, designed, and produced a twenty-piece Holiday Glam Collection for the retailer that will be available in-stores and online December 1st, 2021.    I really hope you enjoy this beautiful conversation with Nichole as much as I did. Let's hear what she has to say about this magical time in her life...   Produced by Dear Media

Wine and Weed
The Wine And Weed DANKSGIVING Special!!!

Wine and Weed

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 103:18


SUBSCRIBE TO WINE AND WEED ON YOUTUBE TO HELP US HIT 100K!! IFor our annual W&W Danksgiving Special, Steelo Brim and Chris Reinacher are joined by friends and family for a rotating conversation over delicious food from Chef Biggz (https://instagram.com/biggzkitchen). Topics include Florida, an armored vehicle letting money loose on a freeway, Make A Wish choices, Kyle Rittenhouse's verdict, texts from your boss after work, the dangers of thanksgiving, pooping, mass robbery at Nordstrom and more. Guests include Sevn Thomas (https://instagram.com/sevnthomas) Zayn Carver Green (https://instagram.com/carverguru) Paris Parham Jr (http://Instagram.com/paris4badflowers) Claudia Gomez (http://Instagram.com/Clauditheyogi) And Roxanne Brown (http://Instagram.com/rox_brown) Courtney reads the facts. 

ABL Live!
ABL Live! (11.24.21) Automatic!

ABL Live!

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 188:44


In this episode of ABL Live, we covered a variety of topics including the Waukesha Christmas Parade attack, the Kyle Rittenhouse interview on Tucker Carlson's Fox News show, all three defendants being found guilty in the Ahmaud Arbery case, the San Francisco-area Nordstrom being flash looted by over 80 people in under one minute, and much more!

Tim Conway Jr. on Demand
Hour 4 | Football and Riverside Fire @ConwayShow

Tim Conway Jr. on Demand

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 34:11


Coach Morelli – what's happening in Football // Riverside Fire and another smash n grab // Santa Ana Winds / fires // NOORY / Malibu PSPS Power shutoff

Wine Thirty with Andrew & Lindsey
Lush Quits Social, Anthropologie, Black Friday

Wine Thirty with Andrew & Lindsey

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 28:28


Andrew & Lindsey are traveling for the holidays and drinking a Les Bobos red blend from Winc wines. On this episode they chat about...-Lush quitting social media-A grandmother getting kicked out of a hotel for leaving a 3 star review-A Nordstrom getting ransacked-Working at Anthropologie-Black Friday ...and more!Andrew & Lindsey are currently...WATCHING________________JoJo's Bizarre AdventureTear Along the Dotted LineThe Bachelorette AustraliaTiger KingLISTENING TO___________________Better Than YesterdayCocktails and RosesSpyCast& check out Lindsey's Last.FM herePLAYING______________Town of SalemREADING______________StartUpGet ready for your next beach vacay! Check out BeachBound and plan your next beach vacation today!Support the show (https://paypal.me/freshethic1)

FactSet U.S. Daily Market Preview
Financial Market Preview - Wednesday 24-Nov

FactSet U.S. Daily Market Preview

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 5:21


US futures are indicating a lower open as of 05:00 ET. European equity markets are mixed following a mixed session in Asia. Covid infection rates remain a key focal point in Europe amid increasing risk of more onerous mitigation measures during winter months. Fed officials talking about an accelerated taper to give flexibility on rate liftoff is in focus ahead of November minutes today. There are several US releases on the calendar ahead of the Thanksgiving holiday, including durable orders, wholesale inventories and personal income. Company's mentioned: Apple, Qualcomm, TSMC, Nordstrom, Gap, HP

Tim Conway Jr. on Demand
Hour 4 | Christmas Tree Shortage@ConwayShow @MarkTLive

Tim Conway Jr. on Demand

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 29:46


Tim on KGO with Mark // Flash Mob Smash-n Grab The Grove Nordstrom Christmas tree shortage // The Wolf! / Tim's advice on women // NOORY / submarines

Better with Dr. Stephanie
These Are The Hacks + Products I'm Obsessed With This Holiday Season

Better with Dr. Stephanie

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 34:40


Dr. Stephanie shares her favorite things - from skincare products for the winter season to unconventional beauty hacks you can try at home, red light therapy, and metabolic health. She'll teach you all her proven tips and tricks to help you survive and even enjoy the upcoming cold months. And since the season of giving is upon us, Dr. Stephanie will reveal her favorite jewelry, shoes, workout gear, and clean makeup to gift yourself or the ladies in your life.  Redeem your Black Friday Bundle at https://estimadiet.com/ Episode Overview: 00:43 Introduction2:20 Skincare For The Winter7:24 Unconventional Beauty Hacks10:52 Red Light Therapy14:54 Metabolic Health19:50 Electrolytes22:10 Jewelry25:23 Workout Gear27:18 Shoes29:15 Clean Makeup Links Mentioned (In Order):Primal Life Organics - 30% off sitewide by using our affiliate link https://www.idevaffiliate.com/32863/idevaffiliate.php?id=322&url=734Coffee Elixir SerumThe Beyond MoisturizerBlue Berry Elixir Betty Beauty Course PRIMEADINE - get 10% Off your order with Promo Code “DRSTEPHANIE10” - https://oxfordhealthspan.com/products/best-spermidine-supplement Orion Red Light Therapy - get 10% off your order with Promo Code “STEPHANIE10” https://www.orionrlt.ca/?ref=Stephanie Red Light Therapy Geeky Magic  Lumen - get $25 off your order with Promo Code “DRSTEPHANIE25” https://www.lumen.me/?fid=1799 Athletic Greens - redeem an exclusive offer here: athleticgreens.com/stephanie LMNT Electrolytes - A FREE 7-flavour sample pack! - https://www.drinklmnt.com/DrEstima Mint Chocolate LMNT: https://www.drinklmnt.com/products/lmnt-recharge-electrolyte-drink?variant=3939094528[…]e=drestima&utm_campaign=mintchocolate&utm_content=&utm_term= Robb Wolf Interview  Rocking Vibe - All jewelry 15% off using “hellobetty15” - https://rockingvibe.com/ Alo Yoga - https://www.aloyoga.com/ Zela By Nordstrom - https://www.nordstrom.com/sr/zela Lorna Jane - https://www.lornajane.com/sale On Shoes - https://www.on-running.com/en-ca/ ILIA Beauty - https://iliabeauty.com/

Weird AF News
Lady buried husband alive for his own immortality. "Sex offender" is now a negative term?

Weird AF News

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 24:34


Woman buried husband alive for immortality. Colorado drops term sex offender. Flashmob robs Nordstrom's department store. // Weird AF News is the only daily weird news podcast hosted by a comedian because I believe your daily dose of weird af stories deserves a comedic spin. Show your SUPPORT by joining the Weird AF News Patreon where you'll get bonus episodes and other weird af news stuff http://patreon.com/weirdafnews  - WATCH Weird AF News on Youtube - https://www.youtube.com/weirdafnews - check out the official website https://WeirdAFnews.com and FOLLOW host Jonesy at http://instagram.com/funnyjones or http://twitter.com/funnyjones or http://facebook.com/comedianjonesy or http://Jonesy.com --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

Nightly Business Report
SPR Release, Last of the Retailers on Deck, The “Must-Own” Energy Stock

Nightly Business Report

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 43:53


Pres. Biden announcing he plans to release 50 million barrels of crude from the Strategic Petroleum Reserves, the Deputy Secretary of Energy joins us to discuss the plan and Goldman's Jeff Currie tells us why he still sees oil going to $85/barrel. Nordstrom and Gap both report after the bell, what to watch for in the earnings report and whether these beleaguered brands can right the respective ships. And oil was a hot topic today, but there's an under-the-radar energy stock one Evercore analyst says you ‘must' own. He joins us with that name.

The Steve Gruber Show
Steve Gruber, And its time to head into the holidays, ready or not, it is Thanksgiving week—meaning the Lions will get crushed

The Steve Gruber Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 11:00


Live from the no panic zone—I'm Steve Gruber—I am America's Voice—God Bless America this is the Steve Gruber Show—FIERCE AND FEARLESS – in Pursuit of the truth—   Here are 3 big things you need to know right now—   ONE— In California—it seems ripping off high end stores is the new normal—Nordstroms getting sacked this time by an organized swarm of thieves—it's shocking—   TWO— The liberal elites in politics and in media are shoving us down a dangerous path—by continuing to call Kyle Rittenhouse a white supremacist and a vigilante—its very reckless—   THREE— And its time to head into the holidays—ready or not—it is Thanksgiving week—meaning the Lions will get crushed—so will Uncle Ernie—and so will President Joe Biden—who may have a record that's worse than any of them—by the time this whole mess is over—   And the good news for Biden is—at least he's not Kamala Harris—the Veep's numbers are stuck in the 20's—I mean how bad can it get—   Hey forget I asked that—   Let's talk about what's on the table and who is coming ovedr for the feast this year shall we? And what you're going to fork out—  

Tony Katz + The Morning News
Over 80 Looters Rob Nordstrom in San Francisco

Tony Katz + The Morning News

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 6:24


See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Inside Design
Guest Libby Langdon

Inside Design

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 29:42


We are so excited to welcome our guest, Libby Langdon. Libby is an interior designer, an author, a product designer, and a makeover television personality. Libby has her own NYC-based design firm, Libby Interiors, Inc., and is known for easy elegant styles and home furnishing collections. Her designs have been featured on NBC's Today Show, HGTV, and numerous leading shelter magazines. Tune in to this episode to hear more from Libby, Joann, and Kelly! In this episode:  [04:11] Libby's experience with product design and licensing [11:36] Using show house designs for photos and marketing [16:25] Libby's love for being on camera, YouTube, make-over television, and using these video as a way to grow her business [23:30] Libby talks about her goals for the future, where she sees her business going, and what kind of work she looks forward to doing KEY TAKEAWAYS:  Although it's not always a way to get jobs, Libby has used show houses as a way to showcase all of her pieces and designs at once. It is also a way to get professional photography done for her marketing materials and social media posts. Video is a key part of marketing for Libby and it doesn't have to be professional- people want to see authentic raw footage and details. You can keep videos super simple by just walking through and explaining your design choices. Taking on fewer jobs gives you the time to work on bigger projects to really showcase your work.  Links Mentioned: https://www.jillseale.com  https://www.fairfieldchair.com https://www.crystorama.com https://www.kazrugs.xom https://www.paragonpg.com https://www.abhomeinc.com Quotes:  Funny quote: “I just hate it when Walmart doesn't have what I need and I have to go home, change out of my pajamas and take a shower so I can go to Target” Serious quote: “Our homes, communities and surrounding environment directly affect our daily behaviors and lifestyles, and together, these determine up to 80% to 90% of our health outcomes. ‘Our spaces matter.  They have a huge impact on our health and mental wellbeing.” .....The Global Wellness Institute Sponsor:  This episode is sponsored by Jill Seale. Jill Seale Design Studio has won numerous awards and accolades in the gift and home industry and has crafted a far-reaching lifestyle brand. Jill translates her distinctive creativity into home fashions that are inspired by everything from travel and nature to fascinating color stories in everyday life. Whether partnering with manufacturers for lively gifts, tabletop, dinnerware, greeting cards and more or creating artisanal-inspired fabrics, wallcovering, home accents, furniture and rugs, Seale channels the goal of creating work that uplifts and adds a dash of sparkle. Her products are sold worldwide and through fine boutiques and leading retailers including Target, Hallmark, World Market and Pier 1, Macy's and Nordstrom. Seale's creations also represent a national memorial in the nation's capital as well as gracing the Paris runway.

The Future of Work With Jacob Morgan
Leading W/ Trust, Taking Risks, Creating Success, Seeing Around Corners, & Building a Network

The Future of Work With Jacob Morgan

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 68:15


As 2021 ends, I wanted to look back at some of the best leadership advice we heard from our guests over the last year and a half. I interview around 50 guests every year, and I've had the privilege of speaking with many great leaders around the world; these are some of my favorite conversations.  I have picked out some short clips from my interviews with five past guests. These leaders have brought their companies & their people through the pandemic and all the changes that came with it, and they have continued to thrive despite all the challenges they faced. I hope you enjoy looking back at parts of these conversations and the lessons we can learn from these leaders.  Mark Lashier is the CEO of CPChem, a company that produces petrochemicals and plastics with 5,000 employees worldwide. Chevron owns 50% of the company, and Phillips owns 50%. Mark has served in leadership roles at Chevron Phillips Chemical and Phillips Petroleum for three decades.  Mark explains that being an effective leader entails building trust, showing transparency, and simplifying your employee's workload. It is critically important that all our leaders demonstrate the behaviors of trust, transparency, and simplicity every day; we talk a lot about that as leaders.   "People are incredibly perceptive. If they smell something inconsistent, they're not going to buy it, and they're going to say, okay, you say you want trust, but you're not exhibiting trust," he says.   --------------------------- There are 6 trends that are transforming leadership forever do you know what they are and are you ready for them? Download the PDF to learn what these 6 trends are and what you should be doing about each one of them. These are crucial for your leadership and career development in the future of work! --------------------------- Shellye Archambeau is the former CEO of MetricStream, a Silicon Valley-based governance, risk, and compliance software company, and the author of the new book, Unapologetically Ambitious: Take Risks, Break Barriers, and Create Success on Your Terms. She also serves on the boards of Verizon, Nordstrom, Roper Technologies, and Okta. In our conversation Shellye explained that creating your luck is positioning yourself so that when an opportunity shows up, you can take advantage of it, and it is just as vital that you make sure you let people know what you're doing.  Tell them your job title and explain what you are responsible for in your job.   David Cote is the former Chairman and CEO of Honeywell and author of the bestselling book, Winning Now, Winning Later: How Companies Can Succeed in the Short Term While Investing for the Long Term. During his time at Honeywell, David fixed a toxic work culture and grew the company's market capitalization from around 20 billion to 120 billion, delivering returns of 800%. Currently, David is Executive Chairman of Vertiv Holdings Co, a global data center products and services provider. He is a member of the Aspen Economic Strategy Group on Foreign Relations and the Conference of Montreal. David explains how he defines leadership and his advice on how to lead in tough times.  If we do the right things in the middle of a tough time, that will cause us to come out of a much stronger company than our competitors. And the advice that I give to people is don't panic and make sure that you keep thinking independently. Never forget to put your customer first, don't let customer service suffer in any way. Lastly, start thinking about the recovery, even while you're in the middle of the recession. A good leader finds a way to take at least a couple hours a week to put their head above the fray and look around and say, okay, all these short-term actions, I'm assuming, is it going to make a difference for where I'm trying to go for the long term? Is it consistent with what I'm trying to do, and if It's not, what do I do differently so that it will be? Those are the people who will do well going into the recovery and truly establish themselves. --------------------------- There are 6 trends that are transforming leadership forever do you know what they are and are you ready for them? Download the PDF to learn what these 6 trends are and what you should be doing about each one of them. These are crucial for your leadership and career development in the future of work! --------------------------- Rita McGrath is a professor at Columbia Business School and bestselling author of the book, Seeing Around Corners: How to Spot Inflection Points in Business Before They Happen. In 2020, she was ranked #5 on the Thinkers50 list for her work in strategy, innovation, and entrepreneurship and for being a champion of harnessing disruptive influences for competitive advantage. She is widely recognized as a leading expert on leading innovation and growth during times of uncertainty. Seeing Around Corners opens your mind to possibilities that are now made real because of a strategic inflection point. It's more about expanding the range of options that you're considering and then really being prepared to challenge your assumptions. And I think that's really where the seeing around corners part is so valuable. If you think about it, any business grows up with a set of assumptions about what's possible and what's not. And what an inflection point does is it changes the nature of those assumptions. Chris McCann is the CEO of 1-800-Flowers, a floral and gourmet food gift retailer, and distribution company with over 3000 employees. The company was started back in 1976 when Chris' older brother opened his first flower shop. In the 1980s, Chris joined his brother in the business, and they have been working together ever since. In our discussion, Chris talked about what he learned from other leaders he came to know, including CEO of JP Morgan, Jamie Dimon, and the former CEO of AXA Financial, Ed Miller. He also talked about the crucial things he has learned about leading in turbulent times. Chris explains two of the most critical leadership skills in communication and visibility. The need to step up communication so that the people in your company know that you're on top of things and you're looking out for their best interest is critical. Also, a key component to leading in turbulent times is re-emphasizing the vision of your company, your values, your mission. By focusing and constantly reminding people of our job and our vision to inspire human expression, connection, and celebration. And tying everything we do back to the company vision gives employees a sense of normalcy. WHAT YOU WILL LEARN IN THIS EPISODE    How to lead with Trust, Transparency, and Simplicity How you can own your luck and create your own success How to Lead in Tough Times Leading Innovation and Growth during times of uncertainty --------------------------- This episode is sponsored by Workplace from Facebook. Whatever you bring to work to help you be you, Workplace celebrates it. Our familiar features help everyone work together in new ways. To make your place of work a great place to work, visit workplace.com/human Get the latest insights on the Future of Work, Leadership and employee experience through my daily newsletter at futureofworknewsletter.com  Let's connect on social! Linkedin: http://www.linkedin.com/in/jacobmorgan8 Instagram: https://instagram.com/jacobmorgan8 Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/jacobm Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/FuturistJacob

The Dogist: Talking Dogs
Small Business Feature: The Foggy Dog

The Dogist: Talking Dogs

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 57:52


We sat down with Rose Shattuck, who's the co-founder and CEO of The Foggy Dog, a pet lifestyle brand that creates beautiful, high-quality accessories for modern pets and their people. When Rose couldn't find a dog bed that she loved, she decided to create one herself. Today, The Foggy Dog is known for its made-in-America dog beds and accessories sold online and at retailers including Anthropologie, Nordstrom, and Williams Sonoma. Shop our Foggy Dog x Dogist holiday collection on 11/16!