Podcasts about Wyckoff

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  • 107PODCASTS
  • 245EPISODES
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  • Sep 28, 2021LATEST

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Best podcasts about Wyckoff

Latest podcast episodes about Wyckoff

Eiryu-ji Zen Center Dharma Talks
Mumonkan Case 48, "Kempo's one way"

Eiryu-ji Zen Center Dharma Talks

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 35:40


Dharma talk by Eran Junryu Vardi Roshi of Eiryu-ji Zen Center in Wyckoff, NJ, USA on 9/26/21

Eiryu-ji Zen Center Dharma Talks

Dharma talk by Eran Junryu Vardi Roshi of Eiryu-ji Zen Center in Wyckoff, NJ, USA on 9/19/21

Eiryu-ji Zen Center Dharma Talks
Shoyoroku Case 85, "The Appearance of the National Teacher's Monument"

Eiryu-ji Zen Center Dharma Talks

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2021 59:27


Dharma talk by Eran Junryu Vardi Roshi of Eiryu-ji Zen Center in Wyckoff, NJ, USA on 9/12/21

Eiryu-ji Zen Center Dharma Talks
Mumonkan Case 46 - Talk by Reizan: "Stepping forward from the top of the pole"

Eiryu-ji Zen Center Dharma Talks

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2021 24:27


Dharma talk by Reizan of Eiryu-ji Zen Center in Wyckoff, NJ, USA on 9/3/21

Eiryu-ji Zen Center Dharma Talks
Hekiganroku Case 36 - Talk by Daibo

Eiryu-ji Zen Center Dharma Talks

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2021 23:57


Dharma talk by Daibo of Eiryu-ji Zen Center in Wyckoff, NJ, USA on 8/29/21

TalkingTrading
Wyckoff Trading 2

TalkingTrading

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2021 20:42


Roman Bogomazov, Principal of Wyckoff Analytics on profitable and consistent trading.. Louise Bedford - Mindpower What money opportunity should you follow? Louise compares trading to other businesses and the opportunities it provides. To register for Priority Notification for the up and coming Mentor Program www.tradinggame.com.au/priority   Roman Bogomazov Principal of Wyckoff Analytics, Roman Bogomazov, talks about how to be a consistent and profitable trader. He looks at how to condense your trading plan, the size of trading baskets, the movements of bitcoin and the importance of study, repetition and practice. To find out more about Roman and Wyckoff Analytics, go to www.wyckoffanalytics.com Twitter: @wyckoffanalysis   Photo by Sharon McCutcheon on Unsplash

TalkingTrading
Wyckoff Trading

TalkingTrading

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2021 23:17


Four essential steps to trading with Roman Bogomazov, Principle of Wyckoff Analytics. Louise Bedford This month is decision time to book into the Trading Game Mentor Program. The Trading Game Mentor Program has been running for 22 years and is the culmination of Louise Bedford's and Chris Tate's life's work. Go to www.tradinggame.com.au/prioritynotification     Roman Bogomazov Trader, hedge fund manager and educator Roman Bogomazov is the principal of Wycoff Analytics. He has mastered this fascinating and lucrative trading method. In this episode, Roman talks about four essential steps to successful trading:  Knowledge – Skills – Process/Routine – Mindset. He discusses acquiring knowledge and learning market movements, developing skills and practising them to become a Sherlock Holmes in the market, establishing a trading routine so trading becomes an unconscious event for you each day, then developing your psychology. To find out more about Wyckoff Analytics go to www.wyckoffanalytics.com Twitter: @wyckoffanalysis   Image by Lorenzo Cafaro from Pixabay

Eiryu-ji Zen Center Dharma Talks
Shoyoroku Case 70, "Jinshan asks about nature"

Eiryu-ji Zen Center Dharma Talks

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 16, 2021 55:43


Dharma talk by Eran Junryu Vardi Roshi of Eiryu-ji Zen Center in Wyckoff, NJ, USA on 8/15/21

We're Watching What?!
We're Interviewing Who?! - Vivo with Director Kirk DeMicco

We're Watching What?!

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2021 20:54


Welcome director Kirk DeMicco for the new animated film Vivo. We chat about balancing visuals and music in a musical film, life regrets, cookies, and career trajectories. More about Vivo: Vivo follows a one-of-kind kinkajou (aka a rainforest “honey bear,” voiced by Miranda), who spends his days playing music to the crowds in a lively Havana square with his beloved owner Andrés (Buena Vista Social Club's Juan de Marcos). Though they may not speak the same language, Vivo and Andrés are the perfect duo through their common love of music. But when tragedy strikes shortly after Andrés receives a letter from the famous Marta Sandoval (three-time Grammy-winning Latin pop legend Gloria Estefan), inviting her old partner to her farewell concert in Miami with the hope of reconnecting, it's up to Vivo to deliver a message that Andrés never could: A love letter to Marta, written long ago, in the form of a song. Yet in order to get to the distant shores of Miami, Vivo will need to accept the help of Gabi (newcomer Ynairaly Simo) – an energetic tween who bounces to the beat of her own offbeat drum. More about Kirk: In 2017, Kirk was a creative consultant on Sony Pictures Animation's “The Star.” Prior to joining Sony Pictures Animation, Kirk wrote and co-directed DreamWorks Animation's “The Croods,” which was nominated for the 2013 Academy Award for Best Animated Feature. He made his directorial debut in 2008 with VanGuard Animation's “Space Chimps,” which he also wrote. In addition to many writing credits in both TV and film, Kirk has been fortunate enough to adapt the work of many of his writing heroes such as: Roald Dahl, Jack Kirby and Elmore Leonard, and had the great opportunity to co-write two scripts with comedy legend John Cleese. Kirk was born and raised in Wyckoff, New Jersey and attended University of Southern California where he graduated in 1991 with a degree in economics and political science. He then spent three years in Italy as a journalist for an Italian film-business magazine before moving back to the United States to work for the William Morris Agency in New York City and Los Angeles. Find us at www.werewatchingwhat.com You can watch the film at www.netflix.com/vivo THEDHK can be found at instagram.com/thedhk , twitter.com/thedhk, and facebook.com/thedhkmovies --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

The Zac Cupples Show
Lateral Pelvic Tilt: Learn It All

The Zac Cupples Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2021 37:50


    If there is a frontal plane problem, you will want to check this out. Are you someone who has a lateral pelvic tilt, a lateral spine shift, or Trendelenburg gait? If so, then this is the post for you, because we outline what is going on movement-wise, and what the heck you can do about it. Check out Movement Debrief Episode 156 below to learn more. Watch the video below for your viewing pleasure. If you want to watch these live, add me on Instagram. Show notes Check out Human Matrix promo video below:  Below are some testimonials for the class:  Want to sign up? Click on the following locations below: September 25th-26th, 2021, Wyckoff, NJ (Early bird ends August 22nd at 11:55 pm) October 23rd-24th, Philadelphia, PA (Early bird ends September 26th at 11:55pm) November 6th-7th, 2021, Charlotte, NC (Early bird ends October 3rd at 11:55 pm) November 20th-21st, 2021 – Colorado Springs, CO (Early bird ends October 22nd at 11:55 pm) December 4th-5th, 2021 – Las Vegas, NV (Early bird ends November 5th at 11:55 pm) Or check out this little teaser for Human Matrix home study. Best part is if you attend the live course you'll get this bad boy for free! (Release date not known yet   Here is a signup for my newsletter to get nearly 5 hours and 50 pages of content, access to my free breathing and body mechanics course, a free acute:chronic workload calculator, basketball conditioning program, podcasts, and weekend learning goodies:   Full Name Email AddressGet learning goodies and moreEdit Form | Customize Form Fixing lateral pelvic tilt Question: Can you do some videos on how to correct a lateral pelvic tilt with breathing techniques? Answer: A lateral pelvic tilt is where one side of the pelvis appears higher than the other. Sometimes this can be structural because of differences side-to-side in pelvic morphology, other times it can manifest because of reductions of movement. Since we can't change how you look inside, and we can't accurately measure it, we are going to look at the movement side of the equation. First things first, the ability to tilt the pelvis laterally is normal. As in fam, this is a normal movement that we have the capability of performing. If you have ever seen that Reno 911 drunk driving skit, you'll know what I'm talking about. In order for this lateral tilt to occur, we need the following actions to be able to happen in the lower body: Sacrum nutates with a slight turn towards the tilted side Pelvic outlet abducts Femur adducts and internally rotates All of the aforementioned actions create an internal rotation action through the lower extremity, and it's commonly seen in the midstance of gait. If you can't do these actions for whatever reason, your body may have to utilize some type of compensatory strategy to make that happen. Think of it this way, the body is going to try and change it's orientation to where there is available space to move and demonstrate this action. There are many ways this can be done. The most common way to “make up” for an internal rotation deficit is by tilting the pelvis anteriorly, as this will change the pelvic orientation so more internal rotation can be acquired. If you notice a lateral pelvic tilt on either side, then you are likely dealing with varying degree of anterior pelvic tilt on one side of the other. Now fam, we have to appreciate that these tilts could occur differently on either side. Because of our internal organ asymmetry and the normalcy of having a right-sided bias within our spines, the lateral tilt likely will not occur in the same way from left to right. Let's first start with the left side, since it's the WAY COOLER side (trust me, I'm left-handed). The left is also easier to see and think about, as it “fits” the rightward turn that our spine has. In order for this tilt to appear the pelvis on the left will move forward and obliquely to the right (this is called a right oblique pelvic orientation according to Daddy-O Pops Bill Hartman). The pelvis orients in this fashion on this side to not push an internal rotation range that can be achieved. You'll know if you have this orientation if your straight leg raise on the left is greater than the right. When the right pelvis is tilted higher than the left, the pelvic turn is actually still to the right, only it is flatter and not on an oblique axis. In this case, both sides of the pelvis will be moving forward at a more equal rate, but the flatter turn allows the right side of the body to have more of an internal-rotation bias in comparison to the left both in the pelvis and the thorax. The combination of the right pelvic outlet abducting and the thorax right side bending gives the appearance of a right lateral pelvic tilt. Your telltale sign will be the right straight leg raise being greater than the left. Cool fam, so we know what the heck is going on, what is a fam to do about it? I'm…glad….you….asked. Regardless of either case, stacking the thorax atop the pelvis is a rock-solid starting point. Since both presentations have an anterior tilt about them, you gotta pull that bad boy back to allow for any rotation to occur. I would practice all of the moves from my stacking starter pack to get the ball rolling here. Once you've done that, let's now look at how to improve movement in each of these cases. Treating a left lateral pelvic tilt Remember, a left lateral tilt occurs because of the pelvis rotating obliquely to the right, so we have to reverse engineer this position. Our first step is to get the pelvis to turn to the left. We can use the right side of our body to push back to the left. Given that the left posterior lower pelvis is eccentric (that cray cray straight leg raise, remember), and also given that you generally want to restore external rotation measures before internal, you'll want to perform an action on the right side to get yourself some external rotation back. A great move here is a sidelying stride: Once you've nailed that, you then want to teach your supreme clientele to posteriorly tilt the left side and turn the sacrum to the left. At higher degrees of hip flexion, this will help “close” the lower posterior outlet. A posterior hip stretch on the left would do wonders here: Treating a right lateral pelvic tilt Don't forget big fam, a right lateral tilt is more of a flat pelvic turn. There is more space available on the right posterior side, so treatment here is essentially going to be closing the right posterior and opening up the left anterior. You can achieve this with something where it's more of a shift in the 90 degree range. A sidelying hip shift on the left can be great here: Gym-wise, you could similarly drive this position with either a shifted RDL: And eventually progress to a split squat with contralateral hold: Lateral shift Question: Can you make a video about lateral shift? Answer: Why yes, yes I can  First, we have to understand what exactly is going on with a lateral shift. Essentially, a lateral shift is a short-term scoliosis strategy that manifests as a way to offload any affected structures. It is commonly associated with disc injury, but not always, and can occur either side of injury. Before proceeding with any treatment on this, you have to make sure you get checked out by a medical professional to rule out any serious pathology. If you are getting any pain, weakness, sensation loss, etc down the leg, well fam check that out first! Sometimes doing something quick to reduce inflammation medically can make a world of difference. But let's say you got checked, aggressive treatments are not indicated, what the heck do you do for this lateral shift. We have to look at when I shift laterally, what range of motion is often lost in this case. It's not uncommon for a straight leg raise to be limited in this population. Moreover, sidebending maneuvers, at least based on what these occur in gait, are associated with more of an internal rotation-based strategy in my opinion. Therefore, if I sidebend in one direction, I will pick up internal rotation towards the sidebend, and reduce it away from the sidebend. If I have less internal rotation, there will be less compression over the given area. What I've found useful in these cases is to choose activities where you are doing your darndest to create some type of internal rotation restoration. The two big keys would be to perform some type of shift towards the affected side, like a sidelying hip shift: Then doing something to create lateral expansion of the ribcage. Something like this swiss ball stretch can be useful: Trendelenberg gait Question: How would you tackle trendelenberg gait? Answer: Trendelenberg gait is where there is some issue with the hip abductors that causes a drooping of the hip towards the stance side. This issue commonly happens when there is neurological weakness from back issues or after hip surgeries that didn't go so well. Can't get the relative motion, so let's just orient it there big dog!! (photo credit: S. Bhimji) Assuming you've ruled out structural issues, we have to look at what phase of gait this issues happens, and generally that's midstance. During midstance, the pelvic outlet needs to abduct, which helps create more ipsilateral adduction and internal rotation of the femur. If the above action can't happen, the pelvis orients in a way that drives a CRAZY amount of adduction and internal rotation. That, my dear fam, is your trendelenberg sign. So, what we are to do is to get the outlet to open when we need to big fam. Anything that teaches this action to occur is useful. Your classic hip hike exercises actually work pretty slick here: Sum up Lateral pelvic tilts and shifts occur to orient the body so internal rotation can be expressed Actions to increase internal rotation, which include stacking, frontal plane shifting, and rotational shifts, can be useful to increase these positions. LOWER BODY 101 ANTERIOR PELVIC TILTBOB SCHRUPPBRAD HEINECKFELDENKRAIS FOR LATERAL PELVIC TILTFIX LATERAL PELVIC TILTHIGH HIPHIP HIGHER THAN THE OTHERHOW TO FIX LATERAL PELVIC TILTLATERAL HIP TILTLATERAL PELVIC TILTLATERAL PELVIC TILT CORRECTIONLATERAL PELVIC TILT EXERCISESLATERAL PELVIC TILT FIXPELVIC TILTPHYSICAL THERAPYPOSTERIOR PELVIC TILTPOSTURE EXERCISESQUADRATUS LUMBORUMSHIFTED PELVISTILTED PELVISUNEVEN HIPS Post navigation Previous Post:Common Ankle Problems Say what's on your mind! Sign up to receive over 4.5 hours worth of free breathing and pain presentations, an acute:chronic workload calculator, and exclusive content and deals. Full Name Email AddressSubmit Edit Form | Customize Form Trending Posts Core Training Foot Compensation Patterns All About Myofunctional Therapy | Melissa Mugno 90/90 Hip Lift – A Movement Deep Dive Infrasternal Angle Treatment 101 Course Notes: PRI Pelvis Restoration The Darkside of the Movement Profession | Tim Richardt Why I Am Expanding My Maxilla at 33 Years Old Introduction to Orofacial Myofunctional Therapy Course Review Why I Had Tongue Tie Surgery at 32 Years Old Movement Chapter 8: SFMA Assessment Breakout Descriptions and Flowcharts Top 10 Exercises of 2020 Looking For More? All Things Performance All Things Rehab Anatomy & Physiology Assessing Movement Restrictions Assessments Breathing Case Studies Health & Wellness Health Experimentation Improving Athleticism Lower Body 101 Movement Debrief & The Zac Cupples Show Personal Development & Learning Professional Development Ribcage Spine 101 The Basics of Breathwork Uncategorized Upper Body 101 Zac's Favorite Courses Assessing Movement Restrictions Infrasternal Angles, Spinal Lordosis, and Restoring Shoulder Motion – Movement Debrief Episode 27 Hip Rotation Explained – Movement Debrief Episode 111 The Guide to Remote Coaching – Movement Debrief Episode 113 Compensatory Movement Patterns Which Limitations to Treat First? Interpreting Lower Body Assessments Troubleshooting Table Tests The Basics of Breathwork Infrasternal Angle Treatment 101 Breathing Mechanics 101 Preview Breathing: Biomechanics, Exercise, and Education Infrasternal Angle Updates, Flexion Intolerance, and Calves – Movement Debrief Episode 80 The Difference Between Spinal and Pelvic Motion Infrasternal Angle Compensations and Treatments Upper Body 101 All About the Scapula – Movement Debrief Episode 109 Shoulder Flexion Troubleshooting Reaching: Theory and Practice Limited Shoulder Motion, Where Should I Start? Lower Body 101 Hip Biomechanics in Movement The Foot Explained Pelvic Gait Mechanics Foot Compensation Patterns Spine 101 All About the Ribcage Military Head Posture All About the Neck All About the Spine Case Studies The Ultimate Guide to Treating Ankle Sprains How to Treat Pain with Sitting – A Case Study Treating Scoliosis with Breathing Basics – A Case Study How to Fix Neck Pain After Lifting – A Live Treatment Treating Back and Hip Pain with Breathing – Live Case Study Zac's Favorite Courses Pat Davidson's Rethinking the Big Patterns Course Review Introduction to Orofacial Myofunctional Therapy Course Review The Derek Hansen Speed Seminar Seth Oberst's Stress, Movement, and Pain Course Review Bryan Walsh's Functional Medicine and Family Tour Course Review Resilient Movement Foundations Course Review Course Notes: Explaining Pain Lorimer Moseley-Style Lessons from a Cadaver Dissection Course Notes: PRI Pelvis Restoration Course Notes: PRI Myokinematic Restoration Zac's Podcast Social Media         Navigation Home Services Online Fitness Training Online Movement Consultation Online Mentoring Courses Human Matrix Human Matrix Foundations (FREE) Reviews Book Notes Course Notes Notecards Acceleration Agility About Me Privacy Policy Disclosure Recommended Resources Frequently Asked Questions Login Categories All Things Performance All Things Rehab Anatomy & Physiology Assessing Movement Restrictions Assessments Breathing Case Studies Health & Wellness Health Experimentation Improving Athleticism Lower Body 101 Movement Debrief & The Zac Cupples Show Personal Development & Learning Professional Development Ribcage Spine 101 The Basics of Breathwork Uncategorized Upper Body 101 Zac's Favorite Courses Courses Human Matrix Foundations (FREE) Human Matrix Trending Posts Core Training Foot Compensation Patterns All About Myofunctional Therapy | Melissa Mugno 90/90 Hip Lift – A Movement Deep Dive Infrasternal Angle Treatment 101 Course Notes: PRI Pelvis Restoration The Darkside of the Movement Profession | Tim Richardt Why I Am Expanding My Maxilla at 33 Years Old Introduction to Orofacial Myofunctional Therapy Course Review Why I Had Tongue Tie Surgery at 32 Years Old Movement Chapter 8: SFMA Assessment Breakout Descriptions and Flowcharts Top 10 Exercises of 2020 Sign up to receive over 4.5 hours worth of free breathing and pain presentations, an acute:chronic workload calculator, and exclusive content and deals. Full Name Email AddressSubmit Edit Form | Customize Form    

Eiryu-ji Zen Center Dharma Talks

Dharma talk by Eran Junryu Vardi Roshi of Eiryu-ji Zen Center in Wyckoff, NJ, USA on 8/1/21

Extraordinary Moms Podcast
Episode 353: Rockstar Women’s Basketball Coach Brooke Wyckoff

Extraordinary Moms Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 31, 2021


  Today my guest is Brooke Wyckoff. This past year, Brooke had the opportunity to serve as our Interim Head Coach while our regular head coach Sue Semrau took a single-season leave of absence to care for her mother (her mother is thankfully in remission from ovarian cancer). Not only did Brooke gain experience as a first-time head coach (after 10 years of being an assistant coach), she also tried to be another mouthpiece to speak out about various motherhood issues (work-life balance, the lack of quality maternity leave, encourage other Mothers that they can be a Division I Head Coach AND raise a family). Back in 2014, Brooke co-founded an organization called Moms in Coaching. This is a support group for mothers who are coaching but are unsure if they can be full-time coaches and full-time moms. The motto lately from Brooke is that You can do both. Brooke has a beautiful seven-year old girl named Avery who was born in Nov. 2013. When Brooke was pregnant, she searched around campus for other Moms in athletics that she could bond with during her pregnancy, but there weren't very many. That's why she began to start her organization and make it more national. HER ORGANIZATION ALSO HAS THEIR OWN PODCAST AND JUST BEGAN SEASON This Show is Sponsored by... 5 years ago, Felix Gray realized - Our eyes weren't meant to look at screens all day – and designed glasses to make daily screen time more comfortable and the workday more productive. Felix Gray lenses filter 15x more Blue Light that can make screen time tough on eyes and disruptive to sleep.Get yourself a pair of glasses made for the 21st century and designed for modern, hardworking eyes. And, the amazing things is the Felix Gray can also make you these great glasses with your prescription! Go to www.FelixGrayGlasses.com/EEP for the best Blue Light glasses on the market. Free Shipping. Free Returns. Free Exchanges. And.. Lovevery is an incredible play kit box, that provides quality, developmentally appropriate activities for babies and toddlers, all curated by experts. Cooper got his 0-12 weeks box filled with engaging things like a wooden mobile, black and white flash cards, and black and white play mittens. If you're looking for a great gift for your baby or toddler, or someone you loved, definitely check out Lovevery Play boxes. For free shipping, go to www.lovevery.com/EEP. And... Just like many of you, I avoided going to the doctor during the pandemic. I skipped my physical and my dental cleaning, and didn't see the eye doctor. But now that everything is opening up, it's time to catch up on our regular healthcare.  Just download the FREE Zocdoc app, the easiest way to find a great doctor and instantly book an appointment. With Zocdoc, you can search for local doctors who take your insurance, read verified patient reviews and book an appointment, in-person or video chat. Never wait on hold with a receptionist again. Go to Zocdoc.com/EEP and download the Zocdoc app to sign-up for FREE.

Coin Bureau
Crypto CRASH?!! Where Next For Bitcoin & Alts⁉ (Ep 198)

Coin Bureau

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2021 18:44


In this episode, I tell you what I think will happen next in the cryptocurrency market. First, I analyse Bitcoin price according to Wyckoff's patterns. Next, I look at the correlation between stock and crypto markets. I also show you why what big investors are saying and doing suggests the bull run is not over. Then I explain why you should be bullish about Ethereum and, lastly, give you my cryptocurrency price predictions for the rest of 2021. If you like my podcast episodes, check out my YouTube channel as well! You will love it (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCqK_GSMbpiV8spgD3ZGloSw)!Disclaimer: The information contained herein is for informational purposes only. Nothing herein shall be construed to be financial, legal or tax advice. The content of this podcast is solely the opinions of the speaker who is not a licensed financial advisor or registered investment advisor. Trading cryptocurrencies poses a considerable risk of loss. The speaker does not guarantee any particular outcome.

Eiryu-ji Zen Center Dharma Talks
Denkoroku Case 32, "Daoxin"

Eiryu-ji Zen Center Dharma Talks

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2021 52:22


Dharma talk by Eran Junryu Vardi Roshi of Eiryu-ji Zen Center in Wyckoff, NJ, USA on 7/18/21

The Theatre Podcast with Alan Seales
Ep153 - Katrina Bowden: 30 Rock, Tucker and Dale vs Evil, Great White

The Theatre Podcast with Alan Seales

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 16, 2021 38:26


Since making a name for herself in the comedy world after starring in 30 Rock, this actress has shifted her focus to explore other genres, sharing she “always likes a challenge”, and happily found exactly that while working on her new film. Katrina Bowden is an actress you may remember best as Cerie, Liz Lemon's clueless assistant on the NBC sitcom 30 Rock, or as Flo Fulton on over 217 episodes (so far) of the CBS soap opera The Bold and the Beautiful. Her additional film and TV credits are numerous and include Ugly Betty, New Girl, Psych, Dirty John, Tucker & Dale vs. Evil, Scary Movie 5, and Sex Drive. Katrina can now be seen as Kaz in a brand new movie called Great White, which comes out on July 16th.  Raised in Wyckoff, New Jersey, Katrina is a self described “big ham” who loves a camera, and began modeling, doing commercials, and taking acting classes as a teenager. She knew she wanted to pursue an acting career, and had reluctantly began preparing to head to college in NYC when she booked 30 Rock at 17 years old.  Katrina gives us an inside look to her new film Great White, chatting with us about pre-production cast bonding and rehearsals, as well as the challenges of filming on, in, and underwater. She opens up about discovering her love for acting while taking classes with Ann Ratray in New York City, and how she still uses those same techniques today. Katrina also touches on how the tides of change within the entertainment industry are shaping how she's moving forward in her own career.  In this episode, we talk about:  The whirlwind journey to landing 30 Rock Being drawn to new challenges in Great White  Avoiding sunburn while shooting on a beach all day Her love for therapy  Breath hold and scuba training for Great White Connect with Katrina: IG: @katrinakbowden Twitter: @katrinakbowden Connect with The Theatre Podcast: Support us on Patreon: Patreon.com/TheTheatrePodcast Twitter & Instagram: @theatre_podcast Facebook.com/OfficialTheatrePodcast TheTheatrePodcast.com Alan's personal Instagram: @alanseales Email me at feedback@thetheatrepodcast.com. I want to know what you think. Thank you to our friends Jukebox The Ghost for our intro and outro music. You can find them on Instagram, Twitter, and Facebook @jukeboxtheghost or via the web via jukeboxtheghost.com. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Opto Sessions: Stock market | Investing | Trading | Stocks & Shares | Finance | Business | Entrepreneurship | ETF
#72 - Jeff Ross - The Reflation to Deflation Trade, #Wyckoff Accumulation & 3 Themes to Watch

Opto Sessions: Stock market | Investing | Trading | Stocks & Shares | Finance | Business | Entrepreneurship | ETF

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 15, 2021 56:52


This week we've got Dr. Jeff Ross on the show again. Jeff is the founder of Vailshire Capital Management, a successful hedge fund which employs an innovative “all-weather” full-cycle portfolio strategy for its clients. Achieving triple-digit returns over the past year.In this interview, we discuss the macro environment along with the potential implications of a stronger dollar, the reflation to deflation trade, and Bitcoin. Enjoyhttps://vailshire.com/@VailshireCap.....Thanks to Cofruition for consulting on and producing the podcast. Want further Opto insights? Check out our daily newsletter: https://www.cmcmarkets.com/en-gb/opto/newsletter

The Basketball Podcast
Episode 172: Brooke Wyckoff, Moms in Coaching

The Basketball Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 14, 2021 61:01


Guest: Brooke Wyckoff, Florida State Associate Head Coach Florida State associate head coach Brooke Wyckoff joins the Basketball Podcast to discuss moms in coaching and serving as an interim head coach. Wyckoff was the Interim Head Coach for the 2020-21 year as Sue Sem Rau took a one-year leave of absence. The result was leading Florida State to its eighth consecutive NCAA Tournament appearance and a 4th place finish in the ACC and earned a Top-4 seed despite being picked eighth in the ACC preseason coaches poll. Since the ACC added Louisville in 2014 and set its current group of 15 teams, the 2020-21 Seminoles are the only team in the league to be picked as low as eighth in the ACC preseason coaches poll and finish with a Top-4 seed. Wyckoff has sparked the rise of the Florida State women's basketball program as a standout player, as an assistant coach, and as the interim coach. She was a Florida State women's basketball standout player on the court from 1997 to 2001. She joined Sue Semrau's revamped staff beginning in the 2011-12 season. Through 10 seasons, Wyckoff's tremendous results in defensive game planning, coaching the post players, recruiting, scouting, and other areas resulted in a reward: Being named the team's associate head coach on May 1, 2018. In her five seasons of taking over the defense, FSU's sub-60 points allowed in three of the past six years mark the only three times the program has surrendered less than 60 in a season. In 2014, Brooke co-founded an organization called Moms in Coaching. This is a support group for mothers who are coaching but are unsure if they can be full-time coaches and full-time moms. Without a doubt, Wyckoff was one of the greatest Seminoles ever to wear the Garnet and Gold on the hardwood before playing nine seasons in the WNBA. Wyckoff played in the WNBA from 2001 to 2009, competing for the Orlando Miracle, the Connecticut Sun, and the Chicago Sky. Breakdown1:00 - Head Coaching Role4:00 - Gratitude9:00 - Debrief Session12:00 - Leave of Absence15:00 - Concept of Mentorship17:30 - Having Kids at Practice21:00 - Breastfeeding and Health27:00 - Removing Mom's Guilt33:00 - Strategies to Keep Women on Coaching36:00 - Former Players on Coaching41:00 - Women Sport Coaches45:00 - Interviews47:30 - ESPN Ratings on Women's Basketball50:00 - Comparison of Men's and Women's Basketball54:30 - Why Women Not Retained on Coaching57:00 - ConclusionBrooke Wyckoff's Bio:Bio: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brooke_WyckoffTwitter: https://twitter.com/coachbrookefsuBasketball ImmersionWebsite: http://basketballimmersion.com/Twitter: https://twitter.com/bballimmersion?lang=enYouTube: https://www.youtube.com/user/basketballimmersionFacebook: https://facebook.com/basketballimmersionBetOnline Website:Website: www.betonline.agBest in the West Video SeriesBest in the West Website: http://bestinthewestclinic.comSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Eiryu-ji Zen Center Dharma Talks
Denkoroku Case 31, "Seng Ts'an"

Eiryu-ji Zen Center Dharma Talks

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 12, 2021 45:11


Dharma talk by Eran Junryu Vardi Roshi of Eiryu-ji Zen Center in Wyckoff, NJ, USA on 7/11/21

The Greg Dickerson Show
Bitcoin Wyckoff accumulation 2

The Greg Dickerson Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2021 28:28


Whenever you're ready here's how I can help you… Courses https://www.dickersoninternational.com/courses One on one Coaching https://www.dickersoninternational.com/coaching Subscribe to my YouTube channel https://www.youtube.com/user/agregdickerson/?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to my Podcast: https://www.dickersoninternational.com/podcast ----- Greg is a serial entrepreneur, real estate developer, coach, and mentor. He has bought, developed and sold over $250 million in real estate, built and renovated hundreds of custom homes and commercial buildings, developed residential and mixed-use subdivisions and started 12 different companies from the ground up. Greg currently mentors some of the top entrepreneurs, real estate investors and real estate developers in the country helping them grow and scale their business, raise more capital and do bigger deals. Greg's current clients have over $2 billion in AUM and deals in the process. ------ Follow and reach out to me on: Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/thegregdickerson Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/pg/thegregdickerson Twitter: https://twitter.com/agregdickerson LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/agregdickerson Website: https://www.dickersoninternational.com ------ #realestate #realestateinvesting #realestatedevelopment #houseflipping #biggerpockets #apartmentsyndication #realestatesyndication #entrepreneurship #realestatedeveloper #realestatedevelopervsinvestor #landdevelopment #howtobeanentrepreneur #howtobuyabusiness #howtostartabusiness #landflipping #howtoflipland #Commercialrealestateinvesting #BusinessCoaching #EntrepreneurshipCoaching #BusinessMentorship #Leadershipcoaching #businesscoach #businessaquisitons #businessbuying #cryptocurrency #bitcoin #dogecoin #ethereum #shiba #blockchain #crypto #investing #bitcoinprice #ethereumprice #dogecoinprice #ether ----- This channel is all about Entrepreneurship, Real Estate Investing, Real Estate Development and Cryptocurrency and Bitcoin Investing: How to invest in real estate, how to develop real estate, how to flip houses, how to flip land, how to develop land, how to become a real estate developer, how to wholesale houses, how to flip houses, how to invest in commercial property, how to invest in commercial real estate, how to buy apartment building, how to buy commercial property, real estate investing courses, real estate investing career, how to raise capital, how to find private investors, how to fund real estate deals, how to invest in cryptocurrency, how to invest in bitcoin, how to buy bitcoin, how to buy dogecoin, how to buy ethereum, what is blockchian --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/greg-dickerson/support

The Greg Dickerson Show
BITCOIN Wyckoff expert analysyis

The Greg Dickerson Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2021 57:17


Whenever you're ready here's how I can help you… Courses https://www.dickersoninternational.com/courses One on one Coaching https://www.dickersoninternational.com/coaching Subscribe to my YouTube channel https://www.youtube.com/user/agregdickerson/?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to my Podcast: https://www.dickersoninternational.com/podcast ----- Greg is a serial entrepreneur, real estate developer, coach, and mentor. He has bought, developed and sold over $250 million in real estate, built and renovated hundreds of custom homes and commercial buildings, developed residential and mixed-use subdivisions and started 12 different companies from the ground up. Greg currently mentors some of the top entrepreneurs, real estate investors and real estate developers in the country helping them grow and scale their business, raise more capital and do bigger deals. Greg's current clients have over $2 billion in AUM and deals in the process. ------ Follow and reach out to me on: Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/thegregdickerson Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/pg/thegregdickerson Twitter: https://twitter.com/agregdickerson LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/agregdickerson Website: https://www.dickersoninternational.com ------ #realestate #realestateinvesting #realestatedevelopment #houseflipping #biggerpockets #apartmentsyndication #realestatesyndication #entrepreneurship #realestatedeveloper #realestatedevelopervsinvestor #landdevelopment #howtobeanentrepreneur #howtobuyabusiness #howtostartabusiness #landflipping #howtoflipland #Commercialrealestateinvesting #BusinessCoaching #EntrepreneurshipCoaching #BusinessMentorship #Leadershipcoaching #businesscoach #businessaquisitons #businessbuying #cryptocurrency #bitcoin #dogecoin #ethereum #shiba #blockchain #crypto #investing #bitcoinprice #ethereumprice #dogecoinprice #ether ----- This channel is all about Entrepreneurship, Real Estate Investing, Real Estate Development and Cryptocurrency and Bitcoin Investing: How to invest in real estate, how to develop real estate, how to flip houses, how to flip land, how to develop land, how to become a real estate developer, how to wholesale houses, how to flip houses, how to invest in commercial property, how to invest in commercial real estate, how to buy apartment building, how to buy commercial property, real estate investing courses, real estate investing career, how to raise capital, how to find private investors, how to fund real estate deals, how to invest in cryptocurrency, how to invest in bitcoin, how to buy bitcoin, how to buy dogecoin, how to buy ethereum, what is blockchian --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/greg-dickerson/support

Eiryu-ji Zen Center Dharma Talks
Mumonkan Case 41, "Bodhidharma puts the mind to rest"

Eiryu-ji Zen Center Dharma Talks

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2021 46:06


Dharma talk by Eran Junryu Vardi Roshi of Eiryu-ji Zen Center in Wyckoff, NJ, USA on 6/27/21

Double Fries No Slaw
78: Totally Tuna Little John Ft. Brooke Wyckoff

Double Fries No Slaw

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2021 55:02


The guys welcome FSU Women's Hoops coach, Brooke Wyckoff back to the podcast. They chat with her about the crazy year that was 2020-21, a return to normalcy, Jimmy Johns, & more! Double Fries No Slaw is brought to you by Guthrie's in Tallahassee. You can visit both of their locations at 1818 W Tennessee Street and 2550 N Monroe!Support the guys: patreon.com/doublefriespodRate us 5 Stars on iTunes!

Guts, Grit & Great Business
[Republishing] - Understanding Your Inherited Financial Psychology

Guts, Grit & Great Business

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2021 63:41


With Michelle Arpin Begina, a financial advisor, a Certified Financial Planner (CFP®), and a Certified Investment Management Analyst (CIMA®). Michelle is also an author and speaker, and launched her own business, MichelleAB, which is dedicated to empowering professional women to step into financial freedom so that they can enjoy their wealth and make their boldest, most inspired decisions from a place of confidence. Join us for this fabulous conversation where Michelle's shares about her earliest memories from childhood related to money, and how her own money story was shaped. She shares her parents' feast or famine patterns with money, and how through their communication (including TMI at times) and behaviors, they taught her different lessons about money. You'll hear Michelle discuss the difference between things that are private versus things that are secret, and how secrets harm, including in our financial lives. Michelle also shares about how parents can talk in healthy, helpful, and age-appropriate ways about money and finances with their children, what the meaning of wealth is, and about contextual self-control which illuminates how our motivations show up differently, in different areas of life. Michelle has used the money lessons from her life to rethink how financial advisors and their clients have traditionally worked together. Rather than thinking of her role as a gatekeeper of portfolios, she sees real value in being a gateway to personal financial freedom. To support her clients on their unique wealth journeys, Michelle is a technician of financial planning, investment, and wealth management. But what differentiates Michelle from other financial advisors is that she has spent the last two-plus decades studying the unconventional, non-financial aspects of life satisfaction, financial therapy (it's a thing), behavioral bias, choice, and decision advising. She believes we all need to examine the money stories, scripts, and lessons that affect our financial psychology so that we can rethink what we know about money to have more of it. Michelle lives in Wyckoff, NJ with her husband, Mike and sons, Alex and Nick. She is an avid photographer – her sons are her favorite subject! Learn more by visiting the show notes at www.legalwebsitewarrior.com/podcast

Eiryu-ji Zen Center Dharma Talks
Hekiganroku Case 1, "Embracing not-knowing"

Eiryu-ji Zen Center Dharma Talks

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 14, 2021 63:34


Dharma talk by Eran Junryu Vardi Roshi of Eiryu-ji Zen Center in Wyckoff, NJ, USA on 6/13/21

Coin Bureau
Crypto Market Manipulation! Wyckoff & WHALES!! (Ep 165)

Coin Bureau

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 9, 2021 23:54


In this episode, I examine crypto market manipulation and tell you all you need to know about the Wyckoff method. I kick things off by going over the basics of technical analysis. Then I jump into Wyckoff's accumulation and distribution price patterns and see how they've been found in Bitcoin price. Lastly, I share my thoughts on what to expect next.If you like my podcast episodes, you should know that I also have a YouTube channel. Click this link (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCqK_GSMbpiV8spgD3ZGloSw) and check it out!Disclaimer: The information contained herein is for informational purposes only. Nothing herein shall be construed to be financial legal or tax advice. The content of this podcast is solely the opinions of the speaker who is not a licensed financial advisor or registered investment advisor. Trading cryptocurrencies poses a considerable risk of loss. The speaker does not guarantee any particular outcome.

The Greg Dickerson Show
Bitcoin price Wyckoff expert analysis

The Greg Dickerson Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 8, 2021 39:55


Whenever you're ready here's how I can help you… Courses https://www.dickersoninternational.com/courses One on one Coaching https://www.dickersoninternational.com/coaching Subscribe to my YouTube channel https://www.youtube.com/user/agregdickerson/?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to my Podcast: https://www.dickersoninternational.com/podcast ----- Greg is a serial entrepreneur, real estate developer, coach, and mentor. He has bought, developed and sold over $250 million in real estate, built and renovated hundreds of custom homes and commercial buildings, developed residential and mixed-use subdivisions and started 12 different companies from the ground up. Greg currently mentors some of the top entrepreneurs, real estate investors and real estate developers in the country helping them grow and scale their business, raise more capital and do bigger deals. Greg's current clients have over $2 billion in AUM and deals in the process. ------ Follow and reach out to me on: Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/thegregdickerson Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/pg/thegregdickerson Twitter: https://twitter.com/agregdickerson LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/agregdickerson Website: https://www.dickersoninternational.com ------ #realestate #realestateinvesting #realestatedevelopment #houseflipping #biggerpockets #apartmentsyndication #realestatesyndication #entrepreneurship #realestatedeveloper #realestatedevelopervsinvestor #landdevelopment #howtobeanentrepreneur #howtobuyabusiness #howtostartabusiness #landflipping #howtoflipland #Commercialrealestateinvesting #BusinessCoaching #EntrepreneurshipCoaching #BusinessMentorship #Leadershipcoaching #businesscoach #businessaquisitons #businessbuying #cryptocurrency #bitcoin #dogecoin #ethereum #shiba #blockchain #crypto #investing #bitcoinprice #ethereumprice #dogecoinprice #ether ----- This channel is all about Entrepreneurship, Real Estate Investing, Real Estate Development and Cryptocurrency and Bitcoin Investing: How to invest in real estate, how to develop real estate, how to flip houses, how to flip land, how to develop land, how to become a real estate developer, how to wholesale houses, how to flip houses, how to invest in commercial property, how to invest in commercial real estate, how to buy apartment building, how to buy commercial property, real estate investing courses, real estate investing career, how to raise capital, how to find private investors, how to fund real estate deals, how to invest in cryptocurrency, how to invest in bitcoin, how to buy bitcoin, how to buy dogecoin, how to buy ethereum, what is blockchian --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/greg-dickerson/support

Eiryu-ji Zen Center Dharma Talks
"All-Inclusive Practice"

Eiryu-ji Zen Center Dharma Talks

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 8, 2021 33:01


Dharma talk by Eran Junryu Vardi Roshi of Eiryu-ji Zen Center in Wyckoff, NJ, USA on 6/6/21

The Zac Cupples Show
Troubleshooting the Stack

The Zac Cupples Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 7, 2021 37:14


Can't talk to me? Then fine-tune your stack, fam! The stack is one of the foundational components needed for A TON of movements and for restoring movement, but what if you are struggle bus with this concept? What if you can't get a full exhale or get the expansion you need? Or maybe you don't even know where in the ribcage we should even see movement! Don't worry fam, ya boy big Z has you covered. If you want to beef up your stack, and your conversation with Zac, then check out Movement Debrief Episode 153 below! Watch the video here for your viewing pleasure. If you want to watch these live, add me on Instagram. Show notes Check out Human Matrix promo video here.   Here are some testimonials for the class.   Or check out this little teaser for Human Matrix home study. Best part is if you attend the live course you'll get this bad boy for free!  Want to sign up? Click on the following locations below: August 14th-15th, 2021, Ann Arbor, MI (Early bird ends July 18th at 11:55 pm!) September 25th-26th, 2021, Wyckoff, NJ (Early bird ends August 22nd at 11:55 pm) October 23rd-24th, Philadelphia, PA (Early bird ends September 26th at 11:55pm) November 6th-7th, 2021, Charlotte, NC (Early bird ends October 3rd at 11:55 pm) November 20th-21st, 2021 – Colorado Springs, CO (Early bird ends October 22nd at 11:55 pm) December 4th-5th, 2021 - Las Vegas, NV (Early bird ends November 5th at 11:55 pm) Here's a signup for my newsletter to get nearly 5 hours and 50 pages of content, access to my free breathing and body mechanics course, a free acute:chronic workload calculator, basketball conditioning program, podcasts, and weekend learning goodies.  Prone hamstring curl troubleshooting - This video goes through a simple way to help you get more out of your prone hamstring curls. The Difference Between Spinal and Pelvic Motion - This post outlines how to differentiate moving the spine as one unit vs creating relative motion at the pelvis. Ribcage expansion vs rib flare Question: With normal breathing appears should get expansion of all ribs, but yet With the stack it appears as though you should not allow ribs to flare out. So in a sense no expansion of ribs?  https://youtu.be/H4JS3IK0JnM Answer: Oh fam, don't you worry. I want them ribs to get #expandedAF. The key point here is we want to differentiate where the expansion is coming from. Ideally, during the stack, we should see multidirectional expansion in the ribcage when we take a breath of air. In fact, the following areas should expand: Buckethandle - Ribs will move outward and upward (predominantly lower ribcage) Pumphandle - Front ribs should move forward and upward Posterior expansion - Back ribs should move backward and upward Slight elevation - The ribcage will lift upward slightly as a unit, as the scalenes are a primary muscle of inspiration Slight depression - The ribcage will stretch downward slightly as a unit because of the pull from the abs. As you can see, the ribs move just about everywhere! This movement, however, is different from the ribs moving forward (aka the rib flare). Ribs flared AF :) With the movements listed above, you get relative motions occurring among the ribs. So the ribs will separate to make room for the increased air in the lungs. With a rib flare, we don't see this as much. Instead, the ribcage migrates forward and upward as a unit. Imagine the thorax translating forward. That is the rib flare, and it is often accompanied with increased tension in the accessory muscles. Compensations during the exhale Question: As a narrow infrasternal angle, I am going to be taking a long relaxed exaggerated sigh. However, I get to a point where nothing is happening or I actually feel like my sternum is collapsing inward causing almost an out of breath sensation. Any idea what this might be? We want to be seeing the lower ribs dropping down correct? What if upon an exhale they don't move? https://youtu.be/O9bYviWlk4Y Answer: You think you have a full exhale, but you have no idea. This is the diary of someone who needs help getting a full exhale. (gah I'm old) But don't worry, fam, it's totally common. Ideally, the deeper abdominal muscles compress the lower ribcage in all directions, assisting the diaphragm in full ascension. There are two big tells that let you know you have this position: The ab wall will get smaller, especially the lower abdomen region. The lower ribcage will drop downward and inward. If you don't have these two points, then a full exhale is not attained. The sternal collapse is a compensatory strategy to attempt to get this full exhale. Here, the rectus (damn near killed us) abdominis contracts, pulling the sternum downward. This can help create a pseudo domed position of the diaphragm, but you do not get changes in the lateral ab wall. You also can't get the complete air evacuation out that you normally would, as this altered shape change pushes air posteriorly and inferiorly, limiting posterior diaphragm ascension. Rectus damn near killed us. The worst! (Photo credit: Hitchcock, Edward, 1793-1864; Hitchcock, Edward, 1828-1911) To mitigate these compensatory strategies, we need to emphasize the ab wall getting smaller and the ribcage dropping. To get the ab wall smaller, the best way I've found this is to just utilize a self-manual cue. Put your hands right below your belly button, and do your darndest to get the abs to get smaller. The second point is the get the lower ribcage to drop. If you get the abs moving but the ribs don't, then you need some help. The Beatles got a little help from their friends, but you, my fine fam, are going to get a LOT of help from your arms. That is, you are reaching. Reaching is like icing on the stack cake, as it can promote the ribcage shape change desired by affecting the upper components of the ribcage. Depending on your infrasternal angle archetype, you have one of two options to start with. For narrow ISAs, you'll want to reach forward, as this action will bend the ribs by generating anterior and posterior compression. I like doing these unilaterally, with a move like a hooklying tilt with a one arm reach: https://youtu.be/-GwHrk0zmc8 For wide ISAs, an upward reach (around 100-120° shoulder flexion) can be quite useful. A move like this supine hip extension move can be a great choice: https://youtu.be/NIt5Ass84VQ Reaching during the stack Question:  What if the medial borders of the scaps were NOT flush with the ribcage, could then a reach at 90º be useful for posterior expansion, ribcage retraction, and getting those medials borders to find their nice cozy home along the ribs? https://youtu.be/jJAZp-NeZoY Answer: The big thing to watch on this lack of flushness on the ribcage is that it often accompanies the thorax migrating forward. If the thorax goes too far forward and you have lost the stack (and subsequently, the inability to talk to me), then you will not get posterior expansion. However, I've been known to manually pull the medial border off of the ribcage to encourage posterior thorax expansion, and it can be quite useful. Yet, it's really fricken hard to perform this action actively. UNLESS.... you create a relative motion between the scapula and humerus, aka scapular internal rotation. How do you do this? I'M GLAD YOU ASKED! If you can externally rotate the humerus without moving the scapula, this creates a relative internal rotation at the scapula. If you have internal rotation at the scapula, the scapular external rotators (which cover the dorsal rostral area) will be eccentrically oriented, which can allow for posterior expansion. A great way to achieve this action is by performing armbars with screwdrivers: https://youtu.be/EbgUI2jjN-4 Making prone and supine more comfortable during the stack Question: I find it uncomfortable in the prone and supine position for the stack. Any tips? Answer: If these positions are hurting, then there is an inability to express movement options, hence the increased pressure in respective areas. In the prone position, gravity is pushing downward, which can drive more anterior orientation. If your backside is concentric AF, then it may be that this position pushes you even more forward. Problems ensue. The prone solution? Take yourself out of the anterior orientation. This action can be done by either putting a few airex pads underneath your stomach, or even lying over a swiss ball. An airex pad underneath the stomach is s quick way to restore the anterior orientation. The same issue can cause problems in supine. If you can't reverse the posterior concentric bias, then there may be increased pressure in the sacroiliac joint and upper back. The solution could be the same. Placing a pad or wedge underneath the pelvis can help encourage the posterior orientation that you OH SO DESIRE! Side planks for the deconditioned? Question: When working with wide ISAs who are deconditioned and older, will you give them side planks right away? I worry about the shoulder. Answer: Side planks can be great for creating the lateral compression needed to make wide infrasternal angle presentations dynamic. The issue, however, is that you need to be able to produce enough force to get yourself into position. Otherwise, you are going to overload the shoulder. That said, you can still get the benefits of "side planks," you just need to regress them. Simply not lifting the body up in the air, instead pushing through the arm, can create a lot of benefits without as much load. https://youtu.be/b-m54cWG95s If that's too much, then you can bear weight through your hand like so: https://youtu.be/fHkQJ_IdwH8 If even that is too much, you can simply lie over a swiss ball to create some lateral compression: https://youtu.be/1j_9eJZRkDA Neutral pelvis or posterior tilt? Question: Neutral pelvis vs posterior tilt stack. Which/when? https://youtu.be/5PxboQFisRg Answer: While we cannot say what true "position" the pelvis is in, there are some indicators that can let us know if we have a good orientation during stack coaching. The key is to orient the pelvis in a manner that allows the viscera to bob up and down as we breathe; restoring sacral dynamics. Your key indicator that you are in a good spot is perception of the glutes and hamstrings contracting WHILE keep the pelvis and thorax stacked atop one another. If you have that, you are in a great spot :) Too much rectus abdominis during exhales Question: What kind of cues would use for someone who keeps kicking in rectus abdominis? Answer: The rectus (damn-near killed us) abdonimis kicks in when we can't get a full exhale. You'll see that when the following stuff happens: the sternum depresses the belly gets bigger the pelvis translates forward If you see these things, you can bet your bottom dollar that your stack is whack! Here are the keys to focus on to derectusify (technical term) the stack: Keep the exhale slow and drawn out Feel the lower belly get smaller Drive upper cervical extension Choose good positions that minimize rectus activity (e.g. sidelying for wide ISAs) Stacking during rotation Question: How do you ensure that you have a stack during rotation? Answer: The most important piece is to ensure that you aren't bending as a unit when you reach. Winging during front planks Question: If I try a front plank and the scaps are winging, what is going on there? Answer: If the scapulae are winging, the thorax is falling WAY too forward, which creates space between the thorax and the scapula. To create space, you need to push the ribcage backward while achieving a full exhale. Less air in the front, more air in the back. Too much lower back during the exhale Question: I have a client who uses erectors to complete the exhale. Any tips? Answer: You need to put the back muscles into an eccentric orientation so they don't create the exhale. Choosing some of the positions mentioned during the prone and supine portion of this debrief can be useful. Cueing out of overtucking Question: Any tips on client who overtuck during the stack? Answer: I usually start with this person arching their back excessively, then slowly unarching out of that position. This helps them isolate the movement to the pelvis. Sum up The ribcage should expand in all directions during the stack, not migrate forward as a unit. A full exhale should entail the ab wall getting smaller and the lower ribcage dropping downward. A reach can help facilitate a fuller exhale. Scapular internal rotation can promote posterior expansion. Prone and supine can be more comfortable by positioning passively into a posteriorly expanded position. To reduce rectus abdominis overactivity, keep exhales slow, ab wall small, and chin away from neck. To reduce overtucking, arch then unarch  

The Other Side Of Potential
Episode 143: Developing a Healthier Relationship with Money, with Michelle Arpin Begina

The Other Side Of Potential

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 2, 2021 55:39


Michelle's earliest memories from childhood all relate to money. And yet, the stories and lessons learned from different branches of her family tree couldn't be more dichotomous!Michelle has used the money lessons from her life to rethink how financial advisors and their clients have traditionally worked together. Rather than thinking of her role as a gatekeeper of portfolios, she sees real value in being a gateway to personal financial freedom.To support her clients on their unique wealth journeys, Michelle is a technician of financial planning, investment, and wealth management. But what differentiates Michelle from other financial advisors is that she has spent the last two-plus decades studying the unconventional, non-financial aspects of life satisfaction, financial therapy (it's a thing), behavioral bias, choice, and decision advising.She believes we all need to examine the money stories, scripts, and lessons that affect our financial psychology so that we can rethink what we know about money to have more of it.Michelle lives in Wyckoff, NJ with her husband, Mike and sons, Alex and Nick. She is an avid photographer – her sons are her favorite subject!What you will learn in this episode:How Michelle received what she calls “a familial education in the emotional side of money”, and what lessons she learned growing up with wealthy but spendthrift parentsHow Michelle had a pivotal moment when her father bought a yacht but told her he couldn't afford to pay for her college education, and what lasting impact this experience had on her lifeHow Michelle experienced a deep sense of “money shame” dealing with the fact that her parents were spendthriftsWhat key fears people are experiencing related to money, scarcity and emotional health during the pandemicWhy our experience of the passage of time is both accelerating and slowing down due to the pandemic and the dramatic life changes we are forced to make to adaptWhy Michelle believes that people who are feeling a heightened sense of urgency should consider if things are really that urgent and should instead try to slow things downWhy social distancing provides an opportunity to slow things down and truly consider your goals and the next steps you need to take to get thereHow Michelle recommends parents who are dealing with financial crises speak to their kids about unexpected changesHow the global COVID-19 pandemic is creating a generational change moment that will leave permanent lasting changesWhat “financial therapy” is and how it can help people better understand their emotional and mental connection to moneyResources:Website: https://michelleab.com/LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/in/michellearpinbeginacfp/Additional Resources:Website: sharonspano.comBook: thetimemoneybook.comEvents: sharonspano.com/workshopsContact: sharon@sharonspano.comTwitter: @SharonSpano

Money Career & Motherhood Podcast
Ep 62: Moving Past Your Family Money History with Michelle Arpin Begina

Money Career & Motherhood Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 1, 2021 36:54


According to my guest Michelle Arpin Begina, there's a very big difference between income and wealth. I couldn't agree more. Too often families are caught up in a spending pattern to create an illusion of wealth, when in fact they're struggling financially. In this week's episode, I talk with Michelle about the complex relationship she developed with money as a child through her family experiences, what change you really need to focus on to improve your financial situation, and how to use your life's successes unrelated to money to meet your financial goals.   About the Guest: Michelle's earliest memories from childhood all relate to money. And yet, the stories and lessons learned from different branches of her family tree couldn't be more dichotomous! Michelle has used the money lessons from her life to rethink how financial advisors and their clients have traditionally worked together. Rather than thinking of her role as a gatekeeper of portfolios, she sees real value in being a gateway to personal financial freedom. To support her clients on their unique wealth journeys, Michelle is a technician of financial planning, investment, and wealth management. But what differentiates Michelle from other financial advisors is that she has spent the last two-plus decades studying the unconventional, non-financial aspects of life satisfaction, financial therapy (it's a thing), behavioral bias, choice, and decision advising. She believes we all need to examine the money stories, scripts, and lessons that affect our financial psychology so that we can rethink what we know about money to have more of it. Michelle lives in Wyckoff, NJ with her husband, Mike and sons, Alex and Nick. She is an avid photographer – her sons are her favorite subject! Connect with Michelle at: Website: https://www.michelleab.com Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/michelle.arpinbegina Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/michellearpinbegina/ Twitter: @Michelleab17 LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/michellearpinbeginacfp/     About the Host Janice Scholl helps moms navigate the money and career transitions that come with the different stages of motherhood through her work as coach, speaker, workshop facilitator, and host of The Money, Career & Motherhood Podcast. Janice is passionate about helping mothers gain confidence and understanding about money, career & business topics as they relate to motherhood and family – the way many women actually think about money.  Her key areas of focus to help mothers succeed are navigating maternity leave, career breaks & transitions, and  values-based budgeting.   Sign up for a FREE 30-minute strategy session with Janice here. Visit the Money, Career, & Motherhood website, Facebook page, Facebook group, or on Instagram.     Thanks for listening! Thanks so much for listening to our podcast! If you enjoyed this episode and think that others could benefit from listening, please share it using the social media buttons on this page. Do you have some feedback or questions about this episode? Leave a comment in the section below! Subscribe to the podcast If you would like to get automatic updates of new podcast episodes, you can subscribe to the podcast on iTunes or Stitcher. You can also subscribe from the podcast app on your mobile device. Leave us an iTunes review Ratings and reviews from our listeners are extremely valuable to us and greatly appreciated. They help our podcast rank higher on iTunes, which exposes our show to more awesome listeners like you. If you have a minute, please leave an honest review on iTunes.

Greater Than Code
236: Connecting Arts and Technology – The Power of Print with Marlena Compton

Greater Than Code

Play Episode Listen Later May 26, 2021 68:41


01:07 - Marlena’s Superpower: Bringing the Arts to Tech * Coming Into Tech as a Creative 04:42 - Parallels Between Art and Computer Science/Software Engineering * System Architecture * Spatial Thinking & Representation * Mind in Motion: How Action Shapes Thought by Barbara Tversky (https://www.amazon.com/Mind-Motion-Action-Shapes-Thought/dp/046509306X) * Metaphors We Live By by George Lakoff & Mark Johnson (https://www.amazon.com/Metaphors-We-Live-George-Lakoff/dp/0226468011) 09:33 - Sketchnoting and Zines * The Sketchnote Handbook: The Illustrated Guide to Visual Note Taking by Mike Rohde (https://www.amazon.com/Sketchnote-Handbook-illustrated-visual-taking/dp/0321857895/ref=asc_df_0321857895/?tag=hyprod-20&linkCode=df0&hvadid=312021252609&hvpos=&hvnetw=g&hvrand=6623941144735025539&hvpone=&hvptwo=&hvqmt=&hvdev=c&hvdvcmdl=&hvlocint=&hvlocphy=9006718&hvtargid=pla-454389960652&psc=1) 14:19 - DIY Publishing and Physicality – The Power of Print * The Pamphlet Wars (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pamphlet_wars) 20:33 - Zines at Work & Zines in Professional Settings * Slowing Down Our Thought Processes * Using Diagrams to Ask Questions & For Exploration * Graphic Facilitators 31:11 - Target Audiences, Codeswitching, & People Are Not Robots 37:58 - How We View, Study, and Treat Liberal Arts – (Not Well!) * Formulating Thoughts In A Way That’s Available For Consumption 43:01 - Using Diagrams and Images * UML (Unified Modeling Language) (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Unified_Modeling_Language) * Collaborative Whiteboarding Software and Shared Visual Language (Drawing Together) 50:41 - Handwriting Advice: Decolonize Your Mind! * SLOW DOWN * Write Larger * Practice * How to Do Nothing: Resisting the Attention Economy by Jenny Odell (https://www.amazon.com/How-Do-Nothing-Resisting-Attention/dp/1612197493) 59:45 - The “Let’s Sketch Tech!” (https://appearworks.com/) Conference * Patreon (https://www.patreon.com/letssketchtech?fan_landing=true) * Podcast (https://anchor.fm/appearworks) * Newsletter (https://appearworks.activehosted.com/f/7) Reflections: Damien: Decolonize your mind. Jamey: Zine fairs at work and valuing yourself by taking up space. Rein: Creativity is good for individuals to explore, but when we share it with people it’s a way we can become closer. Marlena: Connecting arts and technology. This episode was brought to you by @therubyrep (https://twitter.com/therubyrep) of DevReps, LLC (http://www.devreps.com/). To pledge your support and to join our awesome Slack community, visit patreon.com/greaterthancode (https://www.patreon.com/greaterthancode) To make a one-time donation so that we can continue to bring you more content and transcripts like this, please do so at paypal.me/devreps (https://www.paypal.me/devreps). You will also get an invitation to our Slack community this way as well. Transcript: JAMEY: Hello, everyone and welcome to Episode 236 of Greater Than Code. I’m one of your hosts, Jamey Hampton, and I’m here with my friend, Rein Henrichs. REIN: Thanks, Jamey. And I’m another one of your hosts and I’m here with my friend, Damien Burke DAMIEN: Thanks, Rein. And I'm here in addition to with the host, our guest today, Marlena Compton. Marlena Compton is a tech community organizer, designer, and collaboration artist who has worked in the tech industry for 18 years. She grows tech communities and organizes conferences such as “Pear Conf” and “Let’s Sketch Tech!” Marlena has worked for companies like IBM and Atlassian. This has left her with a life-long appreciation for quality code, empathy, and working together as a team. When she isn’t working, Marlena enjoys lettering, calligraphy, and walking her dog. Welcome to the show, Marlena. MARLENA: Hi, thank you so much. DAMIEN: So I know you're prepared for this. Same thing we do for all of our guests, we're going to start with the first question. What is your superpower and how did you acquire it? MARLENA: Yeah, so my superpower is bringing the arts to tech and that is teaching people the value of creative arts—such as writing, sketching, music, and more—and how this relates to the tech industry, helping creative types feel more at home in tech, and helping folks who are mostly in the science track in school learn why they need the creative arts for critical thinking and thinking through problems. So it's like, you have to give people a space to do this learning from a peer perspective versus top-down perspective. This includes building community for folks to explore these things. JAMEY: So you came to tech from art previously, is that right? MARLENA: I have a wild academic background of interdisciplinary studies, which will not get you a job for anything but like, renting a car. [laughter] Or whatever and also, later I did computer science, but while I was getting my liberal arts degree, I did a lot of art history, a lot of painting, and a lot of theater. JAMEY: I wonder if you could speak to coming into the tech industry as someone who is already an artist and considers themselves an artist, like, how that translated for you. Like, what skills from being an artist, do you think were helpful to you as you were starting in tech? MARLENA: Sure. So I think that if you know that you're an artistic type, like I knew how important arts were for me. But I think for children often they get a lot of pressure to find something that will get them a job and it's not like this isn't for good reason, it's like we’ve got to be able to pay our bills. On the other hand, when you're a creative type, it's such a core part of your personality. You can't really separate it from anything and if you try to just tamp it down, it's going to come out somehow. So I was this college graduate and I was having a really hard time getting a job and figuring out what I wanted to do that would make enough money to support me. Computer science was literally the last thing I tried and I seem to do okay at it so I kept doing it. [laughs] And that's how I got into it. I wish that we had bootcamps when I started learning computer science, but there weren't any and so, all I could do was go back to community college. So I went to community college. I had to take every single math class over again. Calculus, I had to take three times, but I stuck with it. I didn't know if I could do it, but I kept taking the classes and eventually, it worked. So [laughs] that's how I got into the tech industry and it's like, it's totally okay to do this just to make money. That's why I did it. DAMIEN: So then coming in with this art background, which seems really broad and you didn't talk about anything specific, what insights and connections were you able to make between art and computer science, and art and software engineering? MARLENA: Sure. So for me, building software is a creative process. In fact, this is something I've believed for a very long time, because as soon as I got out with my newly-minted CS degree and I knew that I needed to create, draw, write, and do all of those things. Eventually, I started looking around for okay, what in computer science is kind of more visual place and it used to be people would think of diagramming software, HoloVizio, Rational Rose, which is that is quite a throwback. Who here –? DAMIEN: UML. MARLENA: [laughs] That UML, yes! I would look at these things, like system architect, where it's like the idea was that you could literally draw out pieces and then it would make your code, which was [laughs] I think an epic fail if you look at it from, did it actually ever write successful code? I have never – REIN: There's another option, which was the expense of architects draw the boxes and then the chief engineer put the code in the boxes. MARLENA: Well, but see, you need a brain in there and this is all about the brain. [laughter] MARLENA: Yeah. I think one transformation that my thinking had to go through so, I had to go from this computer science perspective of find a way to chop up all your thoughts into little, discreet, logical pieces so that you can make classes, objects, and things like that and instead look at the brain as an organ in your body. We take more of a holistic perspective where it is your brain is connected to your thoughts is connected to like your internal axes, GPS system, and mapping system and how all of that comes together to problem solve. REIN: Yeah. I love it. Without bodies, we couldn't think about things MARLENA: Indeed. This past year, I've spent a lot of time specifically investigating this connection. One of the things I did was read Barbara Tversky's book, Mind in Motion, and the premise of her book is that spatial thinking is the foundation of abstract thought. That is how you orient yourself in the world and how you perceive a space around you and yourself in that space is what allows you to organize ideas, take perspectives that are based in imagination, and things like that. REIN: Yeah, and this ties into Wyckoff's work on basic metaphors because basic metaphors are how we structure our thought, but they're all about the world. So thinking about the metaphor of containment, you have a thing, it has an inside and an outside, there may be a portal that gets you from the inside to the outside. So this is how houses work, right? This is how we think about houses. This is also how we think about relationships. It's how we think about code. And then there's you combine that basic metaphor with the metaphor of traveling; starting at a place, traveling along a path, ending up at another place. You put those two metaphors together, you can have complex thoughts about achieving goals. But these are all metaphors based on, like you're saying, our perception of living in a world that has 3D space. Yes, and maps are such a big part of that. So when I was reading through this particular book, she goes into things like maps, how we map ideas, and things like that and there is quite a bit of science behind it. And even for metaphor, she writes that metaphor is what happens when our thoughts overflow our brains and we need to put them out into the world. DAMIEN: So putting these thoughts, these ideas back out into the world and into some sort of spatial representation, is that how you view the tech notetaking, or diagramming sort of thing? MARLENA: Absolutely. So I guess, for listeners, I want to back up a little bit because I think something that Damien knows about me and also Jamey and Rein from looking at the biography is that I'm very into sketch notes. Just to bring us out of the depth [laughs] a little bit, I can tell you about why I turned to sketchnoting and why I started doing it. It was because I was trying to learn JavaScript and yes, Damien, I know how you feel about JavaScript, some of us like it. [laughs] DAMIEN: I don't want to show my cards too much here, but I will say the fact that you had difficulty with it is telling. MARLENA: Well, but I also had difficulty learning C, Java, Erlang. DAMIEN: So how did [inaudible]? MARLENA: Well, so I went to CascadiaJS and this was my first – well, it wasn't my first, but it was the language conference and I was just learning JavaScript and I didn't understand half of it. It just went over my head. So to try and create some memory of that, or try to figure it out, I started drawing. I had seen sketch notes on the web. They were experiencing a bump in popularity at the time. I think my Mike Rohde’s book had just come out and it helped. That was what introduced me to this whole world and eventually, we're talking about when thoughts overflow and you turn to metaphor, this is exactly what was happening for me was Barbara Tyversky refers to these pictures we draw as glyphs. They can be more complicated than language and that is why when we're really trying to figure something out, we're not going to be writing an essay, maybe sometimes, but for the most part, we'll start diagramming. JAMEY: I also wanted to talk about zines while you were on. I was thinking about zines when you were talking about this because I feel like there's a few different mediums of art that I do and some of them are more intentional than others. To me, zines are about like, “I'm thinking this and it needs to exist in physical space and then it will be done and I can stop thinking about it,” because it exists. MARLENA: I love that so much and it's exactly what zines are there for. So zines are DIY publishing and zines are the publishing that happens for topics that, I think it happens a lot for people who are underrepresented in some way. Because you're not going to have access to a publisher and it's going to be harder for you to get any official book out. But then sometimes it's also just, maybe you don't want that. Maybe you want your zine to be a more informal publication. I love zines how kind of – they are all so super niche like, you can put anything. Define the word zine, ha! [laughs] JAMEY: It's so hard. People will argue about this in the zine community for like days and days. Hard to define the word. MARLENA: And that's actually part of the power of zines because it means it can be whatever you want, which means whatever you want to create is okay. I think that's really what we're trying to get down into here is having different ways of expressing and problem solving be okay and accepted. REIN: Just something to point out that containment is a metaphor we use for categories. So we're talking about what is inside the zine category? DAMIEN: I want to go back to the well, Marlena, you said zines were do-it-yourself publishing, DIY publishing, but blogs are also do-it-yourself publishing. So zines have a physicality to them and feels like that's an important aspect. Can you talk about that, or why that is? MARLENA: Well, there are also digital zines, so yeah. [laughs] But. DAMIEN: Maybe five containerization and categories. MARLENA: [laughs] Well, if we wanted to talk a little bit about physical zines, that even is interesting and Jamey, maybe you have a few thoughts about this that you can share, too because there are just so many different ways to format a zine. JAMEY: Well, I know that digital zines are a thing and I've read some digital zines that I've very much enjoyed. To me, the physicality of zines is a big part of them and a lot of what's appealing about them for me. I think that part of the reason for that is that, as you were getting at, people can write whatever they want, people who might not have a chance to write in other formats and most importantly about that, you can't censor a zine. It's impossible because someone makes it themselves and then they give it to whoever they want to have. It's a very personal experience and there's no middleman who can like tell you what you can, or can't say. So I think that having that physical piece of paper that you then hand directly to someone is what makes that possible and not putting it on the internet is also what makes that possible. Like, you have this thing, nobody can edit what's in it. It's all up to you. Nobody can search for it on a search engine. If you don't want someone to see it, then you don't give them one and it's just a holdover from what a lot of media was more like before the internet and I appreciate that about them. [chuckles] DAMIEN: Yeah. To me, it sounds so much like the Federalist Papers, like Thomas Paine's Common Sense. JAMEY: Oh, those were zines for sure. DAMIEN: I wrote this thing, [inaudible] about, I'm hazing him out of here, read this. [chuckles] Those are zines, okay. JAMEY: And political zines are a huge subsection of pamphlets and all sorts of political ideology. REIN: And that's where printing started was with the publishing of zines, that's my argument. MARLENA: This is the power of print. It's the power of print and that power, it's something that you don't necessarily get with the internet. Zines are an archive as well and I don't think we can just say – So when I did the first Let’s Sketch Tech! conference, I had an editor from Chronicle Books come and she talked about publishing. When I was talking to her about doing this talk, what I thought was most interesting about our conversation was she said, “Books aren't going away. Books are never going away because we are so connected to our hands and our eyes.” Books are always going to be there. Printed, words printed, pamphlets, zines, I think they're going to outlast computers. [chuckles] Think about how long a CD, or magnetic tape is going to last for versus the oldest book in the world. DAMIEN: Yeah. REIN: And by the way, if you don't think that printing was about zines, go Google the pamphlet wars. We think it's about publishing the Bible, but the vast majority of stuff that was printed was pamphlets. Zines! DAMIEN: And we can look at things that have survived through a history and it's really truly about paper from Shakespeare's works to the Dead Sea Scrolls, this is how things have survived. MARLENA: And on another aspect of this is the fact that we are human, we have human eyes and those eyes have limits as to how much they can look at a screen. Looking at paper and also, the physical manipulation of that paper, I think is a very important aspect of zines. So my favorite scene ever, which is sadly lost to me, was this very small print zine and it was the kind that is printed literally on one piece of paper and this folded up. But it had the most magnificent centerfolds where you open it up and this is awesome picture of Prince and the person even taped a purple feather in the centerfold part of it and it's like, that's an experience you're only going to get from this kind of printed physical medium. DAMIEN: So yeah, I'm seeing a pattern here, communicating ideas through physical mediums. JAMEY: And I think that because zines are so DIY and low tech that people do really interesting things with paper to express what they're going for. Like, I've been doing zines for a long time with friends. But my first one that I ever did by myself, I had this black and white photo of a house that had Christmas lights on it and I was trying to be like, “How am I going to express this feeling that I have about this picture that I want to express in this media?” I'm like, “I'm going to go to Kinko's and make copies of this for 5 cents and how is it going to look the way I want?” So I ended up manually using a green highlighter to highlight over all of the Christmas lights in every single copy of the zine so that everyone would see the green Christmas lights that I wanted them to feel what I was feeling about. I think that's a pretty simple example because it's not extremely a lot of work to put highlighter in your zine either. But I think that people have to think about that and how they want to convey something and then people have done a lot of really interesting things like taping feathers into their books. MARLENA: Yeah. This is a way of slowing down our thought process, which I don't think we talk about enough because right now, in our culture, it's all about being faster, being lull 10x and making a zine is a great way to reflect on things that you've learned. So I would really like to take a minute to just talk about zines at work and zines in a professional setting because I've noticed that one thing people think as soon as I start talking about zines is why do I need this in my job? Why do we need this in tech? I think that zines are a great way to help people on teams surface the unspoken knowledge that lives in the team, or it's also a way to play with something that you're trying to learn and share with other people. I’d like to hear Jamey, do you have thoughts about this? JAMEY: I have a thought, but I'm not sure how directly related it is to what you just said and I feel self-conscious about it. [chuckles] But I like to teach people to make zines who aren't familiar with zines, or haven't made them before and the thing that I try to teach people that I think zines can teach you is that you can just do this. It's not hard. Anyone can do it. It doesn't take a specific skill that you can't just learn. So they're accessible in that way, but I think it's also a bigger lesson about what you can do if you want to do something and that's how I feel about tech. If you want to learn to code, it's not magic, you can learn how to do it. If you want to do a zine, you can learn how to do it. To me, those thoughts go together. I feel like that wasn't exactly what you just asked, I’m sorry. DAMIEN: I liked it, though. [chuckles] MARLENA: It does tie into the fact that it's important to help people feel at home at work. Well, you're not at home at work, but to feel as though they are in the right place at work and this type of making zines and allowing people to surface what they know about your system, about what you're building, about ideas that your team is tinkering with. This kind of format gives people the space to surface what they're thinking even if they're not the most vocal person. DAMIEN: So one of this really ties into what I was thinking. When you said zines at work and there's a couple of great tech zines which I love and I think should be in a lot of offices. But the idea of actually creating one at work, something happened in my chest when I thought about that idea and it's because it's a very informal medium and tends to be informal and whimsical and you just kind of do it. I realize how much that is counter to so much of how tech teams and tech industry runs where it's very formal. You can't just ship code, you’ve got to get a pull request and reviewed by the senior engineer and it's got to fit our coding standards and run in ordering time, or less. [laughter] That can be very, I'll say challenging. JAMEY: I think that's also exactly why it’s easy and fun to learn about tech from zines because it feels so much more approachable than a formal tutorial and you're saying like, “Oh, will this be too hard, or what will I learn?” There's all of this baggage that comes along with it where it's like, “Oh, the zine is like cute and whimsical and I'm going to read it and it's going to be interesting,” and then like, “Whoa, I just learned about sorting from it.” DAMIEN: Yeah. Just because you’re writing software, or doing computer science doesn't mean we have to be serious. [laughter] Probably needs to be shouldn't be. REIN: It also makes me think about a shift that I would really like to see in the way diagrams and things like this are used, which is that when you're asked to produce an architecture diagram, you're generally asked to produce something authoritative. It has to be the best current understanding of what the organization has decided to do and that doesn't leave any space for exploration, or for using diagrams to ask questions. I think that's bad because naturally, on a team, or in an organization, everyone has their own models. Everyone has their own local perspective on what's happening. If there's no opportunity to surface, “Hey, here's how I think this works. Can I compare that with how you think this works?” You can't maintain common ground. I don't think producing a lot of words is a great way to do that. I think that's very inefficient. I also think that having an hour meeting with twenty people where you all talk about it is also inefficient. So I'm wondering if diagrams can be useful here. Relatively, it’s a little bit quicker to draw some boxes and connect them with arrows than it is to write a 1-page report. I'm wondering if we could promote more people putting out these low fidelity diagrams that are, “Here's what's in my head,” and sharing them, if that would help us maintain common ground. MARLENA: Absolutely, and I love the way that you brought up this situation where everyone is – because I think we've all been in these meetings where it's like, there are some technical hurdle, decisions have to be made, technology needs to be chosen, libraries needed – that type of thing. What I experienced was it was hard for me to get a word in edgewise. REIN: Yeah, like if you have twenty people in a meeting, at most three of them are paying attention and about half of them are going to be underrepresented in the meeting for a variety of reasons, if not more. MARLENA: Yeah, and well, I'm just going to say yes. For underrepresented people, this happens a lot. So one of the things that I like to promote is taking apart the traditional jam everyone into a room, let the conversation naturally happen. I'm just going to say it. I don't think that works too well and honestly, I think that a zine format, or even if it's just like take a piece of paper, let people diagram what they think is interesting, then trade, then your team is having a zine fair. [laughs] REIN: Or if you do that to prepare for the meeting and then the meeting is going over them. MARLENA: Sure. Yeah, and maybe the discussion is like a facilitated discussion. I did a lot of Agile team stuff, including I had to go down the route of learning how to facilitate just because I couldn't get a word in edgewise on my team. So I started looking at different ways to how do you have a discussion when it's like, there are two, or three people who always talk, nobody else says anything, but everyone has thoughts. It's really interesting what happens when you start trying to change how a group is having discussions. REIN: It also seems like it's super valuable for the person doing the facilitation because they have to synthesize what's happening in real-time and then they come away with the meeting, with the synthesis in their brains. Part of which they've been able to put into the diagrams, the drawings, and whatever, but only a part of it. So it seems like if you have some external consultant come in and draw diagrams for your team, that external consultant then leaves with a bunch of the knowledge you were trying to impart to everyone else. MARLENA: I don't know if that's necessarily true. In the world of graphic recording, those folks go to all kinds of meetings and I think it's true that they are going to come away with a different set of thoughts in their head, but they're also not going to have the context of your team. REIN: Yeah. MARLENA: And that's a pretty big part of it. But I know Ashton Rodenhiser, she's a graphic facilitator who does this and she'll go into meetings like the one we're describing, and while people are talking, she's drawing things out. It's really interesting what happens when people see their discussion being drawn by a third party. I've seen this happen at some conferences; it's really great way to change the way you have discussion. REIN: Yeah. So for example, we do incident analysis, we do interviews with the people who are there, and we review slot transcripts. What we find is that the people who are doing the interviews, conducting the analysis, facilitating the reviews, they become experts in the systems. MARLENA: Ah yes, because so much – it reminds me of how teaching somebody to do something, you teach it to yourself. So they are having to internalize all of this discussion and reflect it back to the team, which means of course, they're learning along with the rest of the team. REIN: Yeah. So I think my point was not don't hire consultants to do this, it was keeping them around after you do. MARLENA: [laughs] Wouldn't it be amazing if having a graphic recorder, or a graphic facilitator was just a thing that we all had in our meetings? REIN: Yeah, or even something that was democratized so that more people got the benefits of – I think doing that work has a lot of benefits to the person who's doing it. JAMEY: This is making me think a lot about the way that you engaged with something, or the way that you express it, depending on who your target audience is. Like, if I'm taking notes for myself in my own notebook, my target audience is just myself and I write things that won't make sense to anybody else. If I'm writing like a document for work, the target audience is my team, I'm writing in a way that reflects that it's going to be read and understood by my team instead of me. I think that a lot of what we're talking about here with zines, diagrams, and things like this is kind of an interesting hybrid. When I write a zine, I'm doing it for me, it's benefiting me, but not in the same way as notes in my notebook where I don't want anyone else to ever look at it. So it's like, how do I write something that's benefiting me, but also has an audience of other people that I'm hoping will get something out of it? I think that's a bit of a unique format in some ways. DAMIEN: That's interesting because everything I hear from novelists and screenwriters, it's always “Write the book, write the movie that you want.” You're the audience and if you love it, not everybody's going to love it, [chuckles] but there are other people who will, chances are other people will love it. If you write something for everybody to love, nobody is going to like it. MARLENA: Yeah, I think so, too and you never know who else is going to be thinking the same way you are and sometimes, it's that people don't have a way to speak up and share how they're feeling in a similar way. So I actually love that zines allow – I think it is important to be making something that is from your perspective and then share that. That's a way to see who else has that perspective. DAMIEN: But I also understand this need to, well, I'll say code switch. This need to code switch for different audiences. [chuckles] Rein brought up UML. I learned UML in college back in the long-ago times and I hated it. It was an interesting thing to learn, but an awful thing to do because all of my UML diagrams had to be complete, authoritative, and correct because I was doing them for my professor and I was a TA. I thought, “Well, if I had large amount of diagrams describing large systems, looking at them could be very informative and useful.” But no one in the world is going to write those things because this is way too much work unless I'm allowed to be informal, general, not authoritative, or complete and so, I'm realizing these tensions that I've been going on in my mind for decades. MARLENA: Well, and there's programs. Using those programs was so clunky, like adding a square, adding a label, adding a class, and pretty soon, if you were trying to diagram a large system, there was not a great way to change your perspective and go from macro down to micro and zoom out again. Whereas, this is, I think what is so great about the human brain. We can do that and we can do that when we're drawing with our hands. DAMIEN: Yeah. There were promises of automated UML diagrams that you get from type systems and static analysis and I think I saw some early versions of this and they created correct UML diagrams that were almost readable. But going from correct and almost readable to something that's informative and enlightening, that's an art and we don't have computers that can do that. MARLENA: Right. Like, humans are not computers. Computers are not human. [laughs] When is it not Turing complete? [laughter] I think that initially people really wanted to be robots when they were sitting down at the computer and I think we're going through a period right now where we're rethinking that. REIN: Well, in part it was management that wanted people to be robots. DAMIEN: Which reaches back to the industrial revolution. MARLENA: And still does. What I love is that having this conversation about how we work and how to build software, it brings up all of these things, including this type of management wanting people to be robots, but we're not. What's interesting to me and what I think is that if we could shift our perspective from let's make everyone a machine, we're all robots sitting, typing out the stuff for people. If we could shift to thinking about building software is a creative process, people are going to need sleep. If you want them to solve your problems, they're going to need different ways to express themselves and share ideas with each other. REIN: It's really important to uncover facts about work and human performance like, even if you have rules, policies, and procedures, humans still have to interpret them and resolve trade-offs to get them done. You can have two rules that are mutually exclusive and now a human has to resolve that conflict. Also, that we think that the old paradigm that Damien was talking about, this Taylor’s paradigm, is that manager decide how the work is to be done and then workers do what they're told. But workers, to do this, have to think about high level organizational goals that are much more abstract than what the people designing the work thought they would have to think about. I think if you can uncover – this is all creative problem solving and it's a part of the day-to-day work. DAMIEN: Yeah, that command-and-control structure was always a fantasy, less so in some places than other places, but always, always a fantasy. REIN: Even the military is reevaluating what C2 means in the face of overwhelming evidence that humans don't work that way. DAMIEN: It's nice to pretend, though. Makes things so much simpler. MARLENA: What's interesting about this changing paradigm in how we view this management and control piece is how this is manifesting in the world of academia, especially in the world of liberal arts, because liberal arts colleges are not doing well. [laughs] In fact, Mills College here in the Bay Area is not going to be taking freshmen next year and they're going to close. But I think there's a theme of education in here, too in how people learn these skills, because we've been talking about zines. You do not have to have a degree to know how to make a zine and that's awesome! [laughter] Along with these other skills and I know that there are a lot of people in tech, who they went through computer science program, or even a bootcamp and maybe they did some science before, maybe not, but they're still going to these creative skills and it may be, I think a lot of folks in the US and in tech, it's like you weren't in a position to be able to study art, or to get that much exposure, because it was about survival. Survival for your whole family and there's just not the time to try and explore this stuff. I would love to see more space in tech for people to explore all of the creative arts and see how does it help you express yourself at work. The most concrete example I have of this is writing up a software bug. So I used to be a tester and I could always tell who had writing skills and who didn't based on how they would write up a bug. [laughs] DAMIEN: No, and I can definitely feel that. I work on a team of one for several projects. So sometimes, I have to write a user story, or a bug and I have a very strict format for writing bugs. It's basically, it’s write on a Cucumber and yet I will take minutes and minutes and minutes to properly wordsmith that bug report for me [laughs] so that Tuesday – MARLENA: As you should! Doing a good job! DAMIEN: So that Tuesday, when I read that I know right away what it means and what it says. Whereas, I can write something quickly that might be accurate, but would be difficult for me to understand, or I can write something quickly that could be in complete assuming that I found the bug. I'm the one who put the bug in there; I know everything there is to know and still come back to this, no clue. I don't even know what the bug is. I actually have to throw away a feature this week because I had no clue what I meant when I wrote it. MARLENA: I used to actually give a talk about this, how to write up bugs, because it was such an issue and if you don't train developers and other folks who are looking at an app to write them, then it ends up, the testers are the only ones who can write it up and that's not okay. [laughs] DAMIEN: And when you talk about a talk, how to write a bugs, there's some obvious mechanical things. How do you reproduce this? What did you expect to happen? Who's doing it? That sort of things and these are very clear and obvious, but then there's the actual communicating via words issue. [chuckles] How can you write those things down in a way that's easy for the next person to understand? I spend a lot of time doing that sort of thing. It's hard. It's an art, I guess. REIN: I want to turn this into an even more general point about the importance of the discipline of formulating your thoughts in a way that's available for consumption. So as an example, I used to write notes in a shorthand way where if I thought I knew something, I wouldn't include it because I already knew that I don't need to take a note about it and what I've found is that I couldn't explain stuff. I couldn't integrate the new knowledge with the old knowledge when it came time for me to answer a question. The approach I've been taking more recently is formulating my thoughts in a way that if I had to write a blogpost about that topic, I can copy and paste things from my notes, ready to go, and just drop them in. That's the thing I do for myself, but what I've found is that I actually understand stuff now. DAMIEN: Yeah. I've had the same experience writing things that I thought I understood. This is the rubber duck story. You think you understand something so you try to explain to somebody else and go, “Oh, that's what it was.” But since we have Marlena here right now, [chuckles] I want to talk about using diagrams and images in that process for a person who doesn't work that way usually. MARLENA: Indeed. Well, one of the things that I think we hint at in the world of tech—this is interesting because we've all been bashing the UML and all that stuff, but it did give us a set of symbols for visual representation of programming type things. Like, you make the rectangle for your class and then you put your properties in the top and the methods in the bottom, or something like that. Something that I've noticed in the sketchnoting world is that sketchnoting 101 is how to draw at all. How to feel confident enough to put your pen on the paper and draw a line, draw a box, draw a circle, make them into objects, whatever. But once you're past that introductory, when 101 level of sketchnoting and you've done a few, the next level up is to start creating your own language of visual representation, which I think people kind of do, whether they intentionally do it, or not. I kind of find myself doing it. The way that I contain categories of information in a sketch note, I've kind of come to a particular way that I do it. That type of thing is because we don't talk about creativity and representation; we don't take the time to do these things. They're not really a practice. Everyone kind of just does their own and I've been on teams that, or I've tried to be on teams that had a fairly mature way of having a wiki, you're going to talk to each other, Agile teams. Still, we might have a wiki, but it's not like we were always drawing together. I'm interested in have you all had experiences on your teams of drawing together, collaborating on one drawing at the same time? REIN: Yeah. We use a collaborative whiteboarding software to do various things and one of them is drawing boxes that represent systems and architectures. One of the exercises we sometimes do is we say, “You get this part of the board, you get this part of the board, you get this part of the board. I want you each to diagram how you think the system works now and then in 15 minutes, we're going to look at them together.” MARLENA: Yes. That type of thing, I think it's so important and I wish that more folks did it on their teams. Have y'all found that you have any visual representation that has started repeating itself, like say certain part of a system you usually draw in a certain way? REIN: Yeah. We've definitely developed a language, or a discourse over time and some shorthand, or mnemonics for certain things. We’ve not standardized, I think is the wrong word, but we've moved closer together in a more organic way. DAMIEN: Which is how language develops. MARLENA: Indeed, indeed. But this way of having this shared visual language together is going to give you a shorthand with each other. Like, when you have a map, you have a legend, and I think that it's important Rein, like you mentioned, not necessarily having standards, but having some common ways of drawing certain things together. That type of drawing together is very powerful for developing your collective way of visualizing a system and thinking about it. REIN: And another thing I want to highlight here is that if you ask four people to diagram and architecture and you get four different diagrams, that doesn't mean that one of them is right and three of them are wrong. What that usually means is that you have four different perspectives. MARLENA: Yes. We all have our internal way of mapping things and it is not a right, or wrong, a good, or bad. It's just, every person has a different map, a way of mapping objects in the world, that is brain science stuff. DAMIEN: I get the opportunity to reference my favorite, what I discovered just now, today, I’ll just go with today's zine, Principia Discordia. JAMEY: Oh my god, that’s my favorite! DAMIEN: Marvelous work of art. They say in Principia Discordia that the world is chaos. It's chaos out there and we look at it through a window and we draw lines in the window and call that order. [chuckles] So people draw different lines and those are the diagrams you’re going to get. JAMEY: That’s so beautiful. REIN: I have to interject that John Haugeland, who's a philosopher, said something very similar, which is that the act of dividing the universe into systems with components and interactions is how we understand the universe. It's not something that's out those boxes. Aren't something that are out there in the universe. They're in here in our heads and they're necessary for us to even perceive and understand the universe. DAMIEN: Which gives us a whole new meaning to the first chapter of the book of Genesis. But [laughs] we don't have to go that far down the road. MARLENA: Well, even if we think about color and perceiving color, everyone's going to have a different theme that they see. It's going to like – REIN: Yeah, and there's philosophically no way to know if red for me means the same thing as red for you. MARLENA: Mm hm. DAMIEN: So applying that same standard to our technical systems. Some senior architects somewhere might draw a diagram and goes, “This is the truth of what we have built, or what we should be building and that there is no external representation of truth.” “Oh, look, the map is not the territory! We can go through this all day.” [laughter] REIN: And the interesting thing for me is that this is something that there are Eastern philosophies that have figured out long before Western philosophy did. So while Descartes was doing his stuff, you had the Jainism principle of Anakandavada, which is the manifoldness of the universe. There's no one right truth; there are many interlocking and overlapping truths. JAMEY: How does this relate to a GitHub [inaudible]? [laughs] DAMIEN: [overtalk] It means your diagramming is direct. REIN: It certainly says something about distributed systems and in distributed systems, we call this the consensus problem. [laughter] DAMIEN: I love the fact that Git was built to be this completely distributed, no single authority source control system and now we have GitHub. MARLENA: Indeed. REIN: I want to know how I, as someone who has terrible handwriting, can feel comfortable doing sketching. MARLENA: Sure! I just did a whole meet up about that. It's not just you, I think that it's 75% of engineers and we emphasize typing. So what I tell people about handwriting, the very, very basics, is slow down. Not what you want to hear, I know, but it makes a huge difference. So this past winter, my pandemic new skill that I learned is calligraphy, and in calligraphy, they tell you over and over and over to slow down. So that's tip number one is to slow down and then number two is try writing larger. Whatever it is you're writing, play with the size of it. Larger and slower generally gives you a way to look at what you're writing and which pieces like, there are probably some letters that you dislike more than others when you are writing and you can take those letters that you really dislike. Maybe it's just a matter of reviewing like, how are you forming the letter? If it's all of them, it'll take you longer, but. [laughs] JAMEY: When I was a kid learning cursive for the first time, I really hated to do the capital H in cursive. I think it's like an ugly letter and I think it's hard to write and it was hard to learn. My last name starts with H so I had to do it a lot. I just designed a new capital H and that's what I've been using in cursive since I was like a little kid [laughs] and nobody notices because nobody goes like, “That's not how I learned cursive in class,” if they can read it. That's how I feel that language, too and we're talking about the way language evolves. People will be like, “That's not a real word,” and I'm like, “Well, if you understood what I meant, then it's a word.” DAMIEN: Perfectly fine with it. JAMEY: And that's kind of how I was just thinking about handwriting too like, what is there right, or wrong if you can read what I'm expressing to you? [chuckles] DAMIEN: Yeah. If you look at the lowercase g in various glyph sets, you have to actually pay attention and go, “This lowercase g is not the same symbol as this lowercase g.” [laughs] You have to totally call your attention to that. They are vastly, vastly, different things. MARLENA: The letters that look the same, though are capital T, I, and F. DAMIEN: You don't put crossbars on your eye? MARLENA: Well, I'm thinking in terms of like, for calligraphy, when I got into the intermediate class, I had to come up with my own alphabet, typography, design my own alphabet. Those letters were so similar, they just gave me fits trying to make them all different. But I think it's important for people to practice their handwriting. I know that we all just scribble on the pad for charging, or whatever. You just scribble with your fingernail and it doesn't look like anything. But keeping that connection to your handwriting is also an important way of valuing yourself and this space that you take up in the world. I think it's really good if you can get to a place where you can accept your own handwriting and feel comfortable with it. Since I am into stuff like calligraphy and lettering, it's definitely part of my identity, the way that I write things out by hand. It's physically connected to you, to your brain, and so, things like that, we want to say everything is typing in tech, but there is a value for your confidence, for your brain, and for how you process information to be able to write something by hand and feel confident enough to share that with somebody else. JAMEY: That was really beautiful, actually. But I was going to ask, how do you think your handwriting relates to your voice? Because when you were saying that about feeling comfortable with your handwriting and how it's like a self-confidence thing, it made me think of the way that people also feel and interact with their voice. Like, you always hear people, “Oh, I hate listening to a recording of myself. I hate listening to my voice.” MARLENA: Well, there's that whole field of handwriting analysis, just like there's that whole field of body language and that includes what someone's voice sounds like. It is attached to your personality and how you're thinking and how you're working with ideas. [laughs] So it's not like I'm judging someone when I look at their—sometimes I am, I'm lying. Sometimes I am judging people when I look at their handwriting. I mostly don't. Honestly, I think we've lost so much education about handwriting in schools, what I dislike about that is, we were talking about the power of print earlier. Well, if you feel uncomfortable writing your name, if you feel uncomfortable writing down what you believe and sharing it, that's the type of censorship, isn't it? So I think handwriting is important for that type of thing, but I think it is connected to your personality. JAMEY: It says something about you and when you put something out into the world that says something about you in that way, it's kind of a vulnerable experience. MARLENA: It is, and you're showing people how you value yourself. I think that's partly why a lot of times in tech, we've minimized the role of handwriting so much that nobody feels comfortable sharing their handwriting. Well, it's not nobody, that's a big generalization, but a lot of people don't feel comfortable sharing their handwriting and that is a loss. That is a loss for everyone. DAMIEN: I love what you said, in part because I didn't want to hear it, when Rein asked, “How do you improve your handwriting?” You said, “Write slower and write bigger,” and I knew right away that that was correct because that's the only thing that has worked when I was trying to improve my handwriting. But I gave up on that because I didn't want to; I don't want to write slower and bigger because of what you said—taking up space. If you look at my handwriting historically, it's been not taken up – very little space, very little time. I don't want anybody to have to wait for me to finish writing. I don't want to use this whole page. I don't want to think my writing is so, so important that it's all big on the page, but allowing myself to take up space and time is how I get to better handwriting. So that was just such a beautiful way of putting it. MARLENA: Well, I read this book called How to Do Nothing by Jenny Odell and it's a wonderful book where the book blows me away and it's hard to talk about it because she has packed so much into it. But it's thinking about how we make ourselves go so fast and it's about the attention economy. How we are trying to speed ourselves up so much and I think that handwriting is part of this. If we are going to take back our own lives, that includes being able to slow down enough to write your name in a way that feels good to you and share it. I like what you wrote in the chat, Damien, but I'd like to hear you say it. DAMIEN: I wrote it in the chat so I wouldn't say it. [laughs] “Decolonize your mind.” It was a message to myself, decolonize your mind. The idea that you don't get to do nothing, you don't get to take up space and time. Yeah, and so that's just, it's all these things are so tightly connected. MARLENA: So I think y'all are ready for me to tell you the story of how I came up with a first Let’s Sketch Tech conference and this conference happened maybe 2017, 2018. I always forget the exact year, but it was post Trump getting elected. Now the Women's March, right after Trump got elected and sworn into office, was a major point in time and wake up call for me. I've always tried to learn about politics, intersectionalism, and things like that, but this March showed me the power of making something with your own hands and showing that and sharing it to someone else. I wanted everyone to feel like, even in this era of Trump, we still have the power to make something meaningful and share that with our own hands. So that was when I decided to start emphasizing more and learning more about the connection between art and tech. I'd been doing sketch notes and it sort of struck me that there was not much of a community out there that handled this topic, which I thought was just kind of strange. When I looked at sketchnoting itself, it seemed like more was happening in the world of design. Well, what about engineers? I've had to draw out things so many times to learn them, to teach somebody else, to understand what's happening and so, that's when I put together this Let’s Sketch Tech conference. I wanted people to be able to retain the power to make something with their own hands, because that can never be taken away from you, whether you have internet connection, or not. But even if you do have the internet connection, combining these together is just so powerful. So that is why I started this conference and this community and it's pretty deep. I don't bring it up all the time because it's kind of a lot, but yeah, and we had a great time. DAMIEN: Thank you so much, and thank you for sharing that story and everything else you've shared with us. How do we feel about going into reflections? I think I'm going to be reflecting on in the broad sense, it's what I didn't want to say earlier until Marlena called me out, decolonize your mind. But in a smaller sense, it's how much of my view of the tech industry, my work in there, and the environment there should be formal, structured, strict, authoritarian. I had all these ideas that are still, unbeknownst to me, having a huge influence about how we can work. The idea of a zine fest at work seems so outrageous to me because it doesn't fit into those ideas and so, I'll be reflecting on well, where else am I seeing this stuff and how has it prevented me from doing something so very effective? [laughs] I said, zine fest. I used to think I was too young to mispronounce zine, but whatever. [laughs] Who’s next? JAMEY: I can go next. So my two favorite things, I think that got said, one of them was also about like the zine fair at work. I host zine fairs in my hometown and the idea of like, well, if you both draw something and then you trade, you're having a zine fair. I absolutely love that. And then my other favorite thing was about the talk closer to the end about valuing yourself and the way and taking up space and all of those things. I feel actually like I want to mush those two things together because talking about valuing yourself, like really resonated with me the way that I do zines in my regular life, not in tech. But I think that inside of tech is a place where there are people that I really want to see value themselves more. It's a system that has a tendency to shut people down and keep talented people and I want to imbue that kind of confidence into a lot of engineers, especially newer engineers. So I think that I really like this idea of a zine fest at work, and maybe that can, in addition to helping teach us about our systems and stuff, help us encourage each other to take that time to value ourselves. REIN: I think what struck me about this conversation the most is that creativity is good for people, personally, individuals to explore our creativity. But when we share it with other people, that's a way that we can become closer. I think that for the work to happen—because to some extent, I tried to apply these ideas at work—people have to build and maintain common ground with each other. I think that encouraging people to be creative and to share that creativity—you typically wouldn't ask a junior engineer to draw an architecture diagram, but I think you should. MARLENA: I hope that after listening to this, people definitely ask their newer folks on their team to draw a diagram, then we’ll share and trade with them. I think what I've learned from this conversation is, well, I think that it validated, more than anything, the ideas that I'm trying to spread about connecting arts and technology. It was wonderful to hear each of you talking about the struggles and challenges that you have at work in bringing this together because it is a different way of thinking. But I feel so positive whenever I talk about this and seeing people be able to recognize themselves and seeing some doors and windows open about how they can incorporate the arts a little bit more into their tech lives is the reason why I do this and it's been such a privilege to share this with all of you and your listeners. So thanks for having me. DAMIEN: It's been a privilege to have you. The idea that we can start out with like, “Let's draw pictures as engineers,” and ended up with, “Oh my God, how do I become fully human?” [laughs] It's really amazing. JAMEY: Yeah, this was really great. Thank you so much for coming on and talking about this. MARLENA: It was a lot of fun. DAMIEN: Marlena, why don't you give your Patreon and your podcast? MARLENA: Sure. Well, I started the Patreon because it was an easier way for folks to sign up for the meetups that happened in Let's Sketch Tech. We do a monthly meetup and I'm starting to plan the conference for this year. There's a free newsletter, but if this podcast is giving you life, if you're getting oxygen from this conversation, I highly suggest checking out the Let’s Sketch Tech Patreon, sign up for our newsletter, and subscribe to my podcast, Make it a Pear! I talk a lot about creative process in tech. DAMIEN: Awesome. Thank you so much and thank you for joining us. Special Guest: Marlena Compton.

BEHIND THE VELVET ROPE
Kathy Wakile (#RHONJ - Catching Up!)

BEHIND THE VELVET ROPE

Play Episode Listen Later May 26, 2021 66:42


The Real Housewives of New Jersey's Kathy Wakile steps Behind The Rope. Several months ago, before her daughter Victoria got married, Kathy sat down to chat about all that she has been up to since we last saw her on our TV screens. Born and raised in New Jersey, the fourth of five children, Kathy loved her first career as a Licensed Hairdresser helping make people beautiful one head at a time. One day, on her way to Florida, she met a man on a plane, who became her current husband, Rich Wakile. Family life is going well - so well, in fact, that she brought daughter Victoria with her. Oh hey there, Victoria. Did you know Victoria worked at Aydin Plastic Surgery for Bill Aydin. What a small RHONJ world it is. Speaking of RHONJ, Kathy thought she was in the mix to be cast on a new cooking / baking show during her casting process for RHONJ. Turns out, it was for Season Three of RHONJ and the rest is history. Kathy discusses what filming with her family, Melissa Gorga and Teresa Giudice was like plus the status of their relationships today. Plus, she shares her thoughts on and friendships with Caroline Manzo, Jacqueline Laurita, Jennifer Aydin, Dolores Catania, and last but not least, Margaret Josephs. Kathy and David discuss the “reality” of reality TV, the positives and negatives of being on a “Housewives” show, and how to transition back into the world when the party ends. Kathy seems to have done so quite well. P.S. Huge shout out to Pizza Love, Kathy's delicious, amazing Italian Palace in Wyckoff, NJ!!!@kathywakile@behindvelvetrope@davidyontefBonus Episodes Available at - https://www.patreon.com/behindthevelvetropeBrought to you by Better HELP https://www.betterhelp.com/velvetrope (10% Off First Month - Use Code "velvet rope") Merch Available at - https://www.teepublic.com/stores/behind-the-velvet-rope?ref_id=13198 See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Eiryu-ji Zen Center Dharma Talks
Reizan's Talk on Mumonkan Case 35, "Seijo's soul is separated"

Eiryu-ji Zen Center Dharma Talks

Play Episode Listen Later May 25, 2021 25:55


Talk by Reizan of Eiryu-ji Zen Center in Wyckoff, NJ, USA on 5/23/21

The Greg Dickerson Show
BITCOIN DOWN TO $10K?? Wyckoff Method SAYS YES!!!!!

The Greg Dickerson Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2021 3:55


When you're ready here's how I can help you… Courses https://www.dickersoninternational.com/courses One on one Coaching https://www.dickersoninternational.com/coaching Subscribe to my YouTube channel https://www.youtube.com/user/agregdickerson/?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to my Podcast: https://www.dickersoninternational.com/podcast ----- Greg is a serial entrepreneur, real estate developer, coach, and mentor. He has bought, developed and sold over $250 million in real estate, built and renovated hundreds of custom homes and commercial buildings, developed residential and mixed-use subdivisions and started 12 different companies from the ground up. Greg currently mentors some of the top entrepreneurs, real estate investors and real estate developers in the country helping them grow and scale their business, raise more capital and do bigger deals. Greg's current clients have over $2 billion in AUM and deals in the process. ------ Follow and reach out to me on: Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/thegregdickerson Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/pg/thegregdickerson Twitter: https://twitter.com/agregdickerson LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/agregdickerson Website: https://www.dickersoninternational.com ------ #realestate #realestateinvesting #realestatedevelopment #houseflipping #biggerpockets #apartmentsyndication #realestatesyndication #entrepreneurship #realestatedeveloper #realestatedevelopervsinvestor #landdevelopment #howtobeanentrepreneur #howtobuyabusiness #howtostartabusiness #landflipping #howtoflipland #Commercialrealestateinvesting #BusinessCoaching #EntrepreneurshipCoaching #BusinessMentorship #Leadershipcoaching #businesscoach #businessaquisitons #businessbuying #cryptocurrency #bitcoin #dogecoin #ethereum #shiba #blockchain #crypto ----- This channel is all about Entrepreneurship, Real Estate Investing, Real Estate Development and Cryptocurrency and Bitcoin Investing: How to invest in real estate, how to develop real estate, how to flip houses, how to flip land, how to develop land, how to become a real estate developer, how to wholesale houses, how to flip houses, how to invest in commercial property, how to invest in commercial real estate, how to buy apartment building, how to buy commercial property, real estate investing courses, real estate investing career, how to raise capital, how to find private investors, how to fund real estate deals, how to invest in cryptocurrency, how to invest in bitcoin, how to buy bitcoin, how to buy dogecoin, how to buy ethereum, what is blockchian Real Estate Development, Real Estate Development 101, Real Estate Development process, Real Estate Development career, Real Estate Development company, Real Estate Development finance, Real Estate Development process, Real Estate Development funding, Real Estate Development degree, Real Estate Development course, Real Estate Development vs investment, Real Estate Land Development, Real Estate Development Company, Real Estate Development Analysis, BiggerPockets, how to buy apartment buildings How to start a business, How to buy a business, how to grow and scale a business, how to be an Entrepreneur, entrepreneurship, leadership, how to manage people, motivational videos, leadership videos, mindset How to invest in Cryptocurrency, How to buy bitcoin, how to buy Ethereum, how to buy dogecoin, what is blockchain, what is cryptocurrency, what is bitcoin, what is ethereum, what is Dogecoin, cryptocurrency scams --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/greg-dickerson/support

Eiryu-ji Zen Center Dharma Talks
Denkoroku Case 29, "Bodhidharma"

Eiryu-ji Zen Center Dharma Talks

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2021 44:47


Dharma talk by Eran Junryu Vardi Roshi of Eiryu-ji Zen Center in Wyckoff, NJ, USA on 5/16/21

OurView
Living Life at 6mph: A Conversation About Disabilities with Carden Wyckoff

OurView

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2021 61:56


Thank you for listening to the OurView Podcast, On Today’s Episode, I welcome my guest, Carden Wyckoff. Join our conversation as we discuss how she lives her best life at 6 miles per hour, the importance of advocacy work to improve the lives of those with disabilities.     Follow Carden on Instagram: @Freewheelinwithcarden &    Subscribe to the Freewheelin with Caden Podcast Here Follow OurView on Social Media for more disability related content:  @Ourview4life on  Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, and YouTube  Visit our Website: https://linktr.ee/ourview4life

The Zac Cupples Show
Split Squat Biomechanics

The Zac Cupples Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2021 34:16


A complete guide to split squat biomechanics  The split squat is incredibly versatile, but how can I most effectively use it to drive the range of motions I need. Or why in the heck is my person compensating in that way when they do the split squat? We will answer that with this post, as the split squat can vary its rotational qualities depending on factors such as depth, arm positioning, and more! If you are ready to absolutely crush all things split squat, then check out Movement Debrief Episode 152 below to find out! Watch the video here for your viewing pleasure. If you want to watch these live, add me on Instagram. Show notes Check out Human Matrix promo video here. Here are some testimonials for the class.  Want to sign up? Click on the following locations below: May 29th-30th, 2021 Boston, MA (Early bird ends May 7th at 11:55 pm!) August 14th-15th, 2021, Ann Arbor, MI (Early bird ends July 18th at 11:55 pm!) September 25th-26th, 2021, Wyckoff, NJ (Early bird ends August 22nd at 11:55 pm) October 23rd-24th, Philadelphia, PA (Early bird ends September 26th at 11:55pm) November 6th-7th, 2021, Charlotte, NC (Early bird ends October 3rd at 11:55 pm) November 20th-21st, 2021 – Colorado Springs, CO (Early bird ends October 22nd at 11:55 pm) Or check out this little teaser for Human Matrix home study. Best part is if you attend the live course you'll get this bad boy for free! (Release date not known yet :(  Here's a signup for my newsletter to get nearly 5 hours and 50 pages of content, access to my free breathing and body mechanics course, a free acute:chronic workload calculator, basketball conditioning program, podcasts, and weekend learning goodies. Hand and Wrist Rehabilitation - The bible for all things elbow and wrist Foot Compensation Patterns - This post goes over many of the common foot compensations we may see and what to do about it.  Kinesiology of the hip: a focus on muscular actions - If you want to understand hip biomechanics, getting your hands on this paper is a must.  Trunk Position Influences the Kinematics, Kinetics, and Muscle Activity of the Lead Lower Extremity During the Forward Lunge Exercise - This article outlines how altering trunk position can influence muscle activity as the split squat occurs.  Pelvic and femoral split squat mechanics  Question: During Split squat which mechanics can be observed? Nutation on the front leg? Counternutation back leg?  Watch the answer here. Answer: It depends on what we are talking about respective to the point in the split squat. So, fam, let's dive into the various aspects of the split squat. For all positions, let's assume we are talking about a split squat with the left leg in front.  [caption id="attachment_14459" align="aligncenter" width="810"] No asses outta me or you fam![/caption] Split squat start position At the start, the sacrum is right facing, but beginning to turn to the left.  Based on the relative rotation that occurs throughout the movement of flexion, the front leg will have a relative external rotation bias. This bias is due to the top leg being at around 20-30 degrees of hip flexion.  [caption id="attachment_14460" align="aligncenter" width="515"] Sacrum turns left, front leg ER'd, back leg IR'd.[/caption] The back leg will have a relative internal rotation bias due to being at around 0 degrees of hip extension.  Split squat descent As I descend through the squat, the sacrum will progressively turn more and more left, kinda like that one song by Joe but less seductive.  In order for this turn to occur, there will be progressive counternutation on the left side of the sacrum and nutation on the right. As we move downward, we start to see a shift in the rotational influences of the femurs. On the front, once the femur passes around 60 degrees of hip flexion, there is a progressive move towards internal rotation.  The back femur, staying at roughly 0 degrees of hip flexion, maintains slight internal rotation bias throughout the course of the movement.  Bottom of the split squat Once we are at the bottom of the split squat, we've officially reached internal rotation city. Congratulations, you are the mayor.  The influence of 90 degrees of hip flexion on the front leg and maintenance of 0 degrees of hip flexion on the right both lends towards internal rotation occurring at the femurs. Although the sacrum is continually turning to the left, this rotational influence causes the sacrum to perform the act of nutation. That doesn't mean that the sacrum is nutated, but this is the direction it is moving.  Split Squat ascent As I push out of the bottom of the split squat, the sacrum rotates back to the “start” position via external rotation of the front leg and maintenance of back leg internal rotation.  [caption id="attachment_14462" align="alignnone" width="810"] The rotational  difference on the way up creates the turn back to the start[/caption] How do offset loads influence mechanics? All of the above points assume that there is no change with load distribution, but what if I hold a weight in one hand. How does that change things? I'M GLAD YOU ASKED!!!!!! Think of whatever arm I hold the weight in as creating a reach. Whatever arm I reach with will aid in driving rotation in the opposite direction: Ipsilateral load: rotate away from the front leg Contralateral load: rotate towards the front leg [caption id="attachment_14463" align="alignnone" width="810"] Think of the weight distribution as reaching[/caption] Therefore, an ipsilateral load will limit the sacral rotation towards the front leg, and a contralateral load will increase the sacral rotation towards the front leg. Femoral, tibial, and foot split squat mechanics  Question: I watched the video of the Front Foot Elevate Split Squat Shift for driving supination/calcaneal inversion. Does this happen as a result of femoral internal rotation --> tibial external rotation -->supination--> calcaneal inversion. Would this line of thinking be correct? If so, I am having a tough time wrapping my head around the fact that femoral IR (an exhalation measure) would bias supination (an inhalation measure) further down the chain, would it be possible to clarify?  Watch the answer here. Answer: Your line of thinking is tots mcgoats correct. The reason why we have alternating actions occurring with the femur, tibia, and foot has to do with the relative motion occurring between the bones as I bend the knee. There is this concept at the knee joint called the screwhome mechanism. As the knee extends fully, the tibia externally rotates to glide along the condylar grooves. This creates a relative femoral internal rotation. As the knee unlocks from extension, we see the reverse of this mechanism. The tibia internally rotates, and the femur externally rotates. These actions roughly "cancel" each other out to create what appears to us as a purely sagittal movement at the knee (but it's not, folks). According to these two studies (here and here), we actually see these rotational differences throughout the range of knee flexion: Knee hyperextension: tibial external rotation & femoral internal rotation 0-30 knee flexion: tibial internal rotation & femoral external rotation 30-90 knee flexion: tibial external rotation & femoral internal rotation 90 to full knee flexion: tibial internal rotation & femoral external rotation Taking into consideration what is happening as I drop into the bottom of the split squat, we hit roughly Taking into consideration what is happening as I drop into the bottom of the split squat, we hit roughly 90 degrees of hip flexion and knee flexion. Therefore, we can see that we will be moving toward a tibial external rotation and femoral internal rotation orientation.  Given that tibial external rotation is paired with calcaneal inversion and subsequent supination, we now have a way to link a pairing of inhalation and exhalation orientations. What doesn't necessarily change in this orientation is what is going on at the pelvis. There will still be the turn towards the front leg occurring.  One thing we have to be clear on is that although we have biases of specific movements, there are likely inhalation and exhalation actions happening simultaneously everywhere. So too with internal and external rotation. The combination of these movements working together is what provides us several movement options to put our bodies where we need to. Deep hip flexion in a split squat  Question: Would mechanics change if I can dip below 90 degrees of hip flexion in a split squat? Watch the answer here. Answer: As we pass 100 degrees of hip flexion, the femur begins to externally rotate again, and the sacral will turn even further towards the front leg, which will alter the mechanics at the bottom of the split squat to reflect in this fashion. Peep this article to learn more!  Hip shifting in the split squat  Question: Do you consider hip shifting in the lead leg of the split squat more external or internal rotation? Watch the answer here. Answer: The rotation driven will depend on the range at which the shift occurs. Heuristic: Hip shifting will increase the relative rotation in a given direction Given that higher ranges of hip flexion have more external rotation bias, shifting here will increase external rotation. If I shift towards the bottom of the split squat, more internal rotation will be driven in the motion.  What direction should the knee move in a split squat?  Question: In the descent of the split squat, do we want to cue the knee to go toward the big toe? Watch the answer here. Answer: The midline of the foot is the second toe, so I generally want the knee to go over this position. To keep it simple, I just cue my supreme clientele to keep the knee centered over the foot.   Lumbopelvic compensation during a split squat  Question: What happens on a split squat if someone throws the front hip in front of the thorax and the pelvis is overtucked? Watch the answer here. Answer: The split squat requires relative motions to occur at the various joints of the pelvis to create the motion. If you can't create these motions, body regions will begin to move as one unit, and definitely not the cool G-Unit. A common one you might say is the back hip flexed forward as opposed to going straight down. When this happens, the pelvis and lumbar spine posteriorly orient as a unit, which flexes both hips forward. This allows me to attain depth while minimizing the sacral turn towards the front leg.  You could also see shifting backwards of the hip, which is essentially the sacrum turning away from the front leg.  What's more, you could also see a long stance that anteriorly orients the pelvis to create intenral rotation and depth.  In each of these instances, the major key is to keep the stance length shorter, stack, push the front knee forward and the back knee down. One can use a foam roller as a target can help with this latter cue.  Front foot elevated split squats can be good starting points for this: Watch the answer here. Split squats for powerlifting? Question: Split squats for powerlifting? Answer: Since powerlifting involves restricting motion and increasing tension to some degree, the rotational nature of splits squats can be useful to restore any lost range of motion to reduce the risk of tissue overload.  The difference between front heel elevated and front foot elevated split squats  Question: What are the differences in mechanics between front heel and front foot elevation in a split squat? Watch the answer here. Answer: The front foot elevation helps shift weight backwards to reduce front leg loading. A front heel elevation biases calcaneal inversion, which will drive further external rotation through the leg and sacral counternutation.  Lateral split squat vs regular split squat  Question: What biomechanically changes in a lateral split squat versus a regular split squat? Watch the answer here. Answer: A lateral split squat induces more pelvic lateral tilt, whereas a regular split squat provides more pelvic rotation.  A lateral tilt will drive even greater internal rotation bias than your traditional split squats.  Dorsiflexion loss in a split squat Question: Would a heels elevated split squat be better than squatting for a dorsiflexion loss? Answer: Anytime you can use rotation and do it savagely well, you. can drive both anterior and posterior expansion. This will generate WAY more motion than bilateral stuff, whcih is why it's easier for peeps to generate more motion.  Back leg position in a rear-foot elevated split squat  Question: What position do I like for the back foot in a rear foot elevated split squat? Watch the answer here. Answer: As I lower into the squat, the back knee is going to be in a relative tibial external rotation and femoral internal rotation position, which will bias calcaneal inversion. Inversion is associated with plantarflexion, which is a good reason to keep the back foot plantarflexed when. you are using this modality.  Sum up The split squat starts with an external rotation bias, but progresses towards an internal rotation as we hit the bottom; the sacrum progressively turns towards the front leg Ipsilateral loads decrease rotation towards the front leg. Contralateral load increases rotation towards the front leg With progressive knee flexion, femoral and tibial movements rotate in opposing directions. The deeper the hip flexion in a split squat, the more the sacrum turns towards the front leg. Hip shifting magnifies the sacral turning depending on the depth at which it occurs.  The knee should be centered over the second toe in a split squat. Loss of "ideal" motion in the split squat often results in the lumbopelvic complex moving as one unit.  Lateral split squats create lateral pelvic tilts; regular split squats create pelvic rotation Front foot elevation shifts bodyweight posteriorly; heel elevation increases leg external rotation The back foot in a rear-foot elevated split squat should be plantarflexed, as this promotes the foot, tibial, and hip position needed throughout the range of motion.   

Dugout Chatter Podcast Powered by Stick & Ball TV
65. Travis Wyckoff, Kingdom Coaching

Dugout Chatter Podcast Powered by Stick & Ball TV

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2021 94:37


Wow...just wow! What a tremendous episode and conversation as we connect with Kingdom Coaching's Travis Wyckoff who certainly delivers 'Certified Audio Gold' inside this one! A powerful walk through his journey learning with some of the most elite leaders in college sports, taking away commonalities that we can study and learn from but also personality traits that thread these exceptional folks together. An episode that will keep you wanting more! Enjoy! @KingdomCoachTW @Coaching_DNA Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Dugout Chatter Podcast Powered by Stick & Ball TV
65. Travis Wyckoff, Kingdom Coaching

Dugout Chatter Podcast Powered by Stick & Ball TV

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 29, 2021 94:38


Wow...just wow! What a tremendous episode and conversation as we connect with Kingdom Coaching's Travis Wyckoff who certainly delivers 'Certified Audio Gold' inside this one! A powerful walk through his journey learning with some of the most elite leaders in college sports, taking away commonalities that we can study and learn from but also personality traits that thread these exceptional folks together. An episode that will keep you wanting more! Enjoy! @KingdomCoachTW @Coaching_DNA

Sports Daily
Catching up with former two-way Shocker Travis Wyckoff

Sports Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 27, 2021 15:54


Travis talks hitting .400, pitching in the College World Series and handling pitching and hitting duties.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Zac Cupples Show
How to Program Chops and Lifts

The Zac Cupples Show

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 19, 2021 27:04


Why are you doing chops and lifts? Chops and lifts; a staple of “functional” training, but do you ever ask yourself why you program them? Do you program these moves because: They help with rotation? They help with anti-rotation? Cuz PNF? Cuz Gray Cook said so? I say this to not poo-poo these moves. I actually think that chops and lifts are AWESOME. But critically thinking through why we'd program these moves can help so much with knowing when to program what. I've found these moves to be useful for many reasons: Promoting thorax expansion Increasing hip range of motion Making infrasternal angles dynamic And so much more! Want the when, how, and why to take your chops and lift game up a notch? Check out Movement Debrief Episode 151 below to find out! Watch the video here for your viewing pleasure. If you want to watch these live, add me on Instagram. Show notes Check out Human Matrix promo video here.   Here are some testimonials for the class. Want to sign up? Click on the following locations below: May 29th-30th, 2021 Boston, MA (Early bird ends April 25th at 11:55 pm!) August 14th-15th, 2021, Ann Arbor, MI (Early bird ends July 18th at 11:55 pm!) September 25th-26th, 2021, Wyckoff, NJ (Early bird ends August 22nd at 11:55 pm) October 23rd-24th, Philadelphia, PA (Early bird ends September 26th at 11:55pm) November 6th-7th, 2021, Charlotte, NC (Early bird ends October 3rd at 11:55 pm) November 20th-21st, 2021 – Colorado Springs, CO (Early bird ends October 22nd at 11:55 pm) Or check out this little teaser for Human Matrix home study. Best part is if you attend the live course you'll get this bad boy for free!    Here's a signup for my newsletter to get nearly 5 hours and 50 pages of content, access to my free breathing and body mechanics course, a free acute:chronic workload calculator, basketball conditioning program, podcasts, and weekend learning goodies.  Kinesiology of the hip: a focus on muscular actions - This article outlines the different hip and muscular actions that we see at various ranges of motion.  Bill Hartman - Daddy-O Pops. My mentor. Thought leader on propulsion arc concept and more! Using Chops to Increase Range of Motion  Question: How can you use chops to bias expansion and compression to restore shoulder range of motion? Answer: I'll do you one better. Let's dive into how chops and lifts can be used to improve BOTH hip AND shoulder range of motion! Generally, chops and lifts are driving rotation about the ventral cavity. So if I chop to the right, the effects of expansion within the ventral cavity will be shown left anterior and right posterior: [caption id="attachment_14181" align="aligncenter" width="600"] Blue areas are where expansion occurs to create the turn.[/caption] But now how does this change when we go into each respective area? Lower body component of chops and lifts Generally, there are two ways to use these movements: Increase rotation into a given area (chops) Maintain position into a given area (lifts) Let's take a half-kneeling cable chop for an example. [caption id="attachment_14367" align="alignnone" width="600"] Just call me a worldwide chopper![/caption] Both legs are in a relatively internally rotated bias, with slight sacral rotation towards the left [caption id="attachment_14368" align="alignnone" width="600"] There is an IR bias at each respective femur[/caption] If I chop towards the down leg, I'm going to rotate the sacrum towards down leg, from a leftward facing position. This will increase external rotation occurring on the left side, and further internal rotation on the right. Conversely, if I chop towards the up leg, I will drive further sacral rotation towards the front leg, increasing front leg internal rotation and reducing the amount on the right.  [caption id="attachment_14370" align="alignnone" width="600"] More IR on the left, less IR on the right[/caption] This is generally how I incorporate chops.  Chops help increase rotation towards a given area. The way I utilize lifts is slightly different. Because I am reaching more overhead, there is more extension occurring throughout the axial skeleton, which limits rotation. Therefore, a lift can be useful to focus on maintaining lower extremity position. Lifts help maintain position in a given area If I perform a half-kneeling lift towards the front leg, I would be challenging my ability to maintain the position. There won't be as much rotational increase.  [caption id="attachment_14371" align="alignnone" width="600"] I keep the rough amount of IR I started with in the beginning.[/caption] Upper body components of chops and lifts You can bias airflow even further depending on what type of diagonal movement you perform.  Let's again, assume I am performing a rotational action to the right. In this case, I will be driving left anterior expansion and right posterior expansion.  [caption id="attachment_14181" align="alignnone" width="810"] Blue areas are where expansion occurs to create the turn.[/caption] From there, you can manipulate airflow with various reaching directions. We can utilize the flexion arc model made popular by Daddy-O Pops Bill Hartman to illustrate this concept: Chop (60°): Posterior expansion (T6-8 level) Horizontal chop (90°): Anterior expansion  Lift (120°): Anterior expansion Again, you have to look at the above ventral cavity orientation to appreciate that this is the starting point that we go from. We then superimpose the reach performed to alter airflow gradients. Since rotation is still occurring, you will have the above differential in airflow, but you'll notice different airflow biases occurring in each. With a chop, there will be more posterior expansion occurring on the left, but it'll be less so than on the right. I still need that gradient to drive the rotation. [caption id="attachment_14184" align="aligncenter" width="425"] Dotted lines indicate less relative airflow compared to straight lines. so you can see, there will still be rightward rotation, even with the posterior expansion bias.[/caption] Conversely, a lift is going to drive a BOATLOAD of anterior expansion, with more occurring on the left to drive the rotation.  [caption id="attachment_14183" align="aligncenter" width="390"] Dotted lines indicate less relative airflow compared to straight lines. so you can see, there will still be rightward rotation even with the anterior expansion bias.[/caption] Horizontal chops simply magnify the original rotation.  Head motion during chops and lifts Question:   With chops/lifts in particular, what is the ideal motion of the head? Are there circumstances where you might coach it differently? For example, instead of turning the head with the rest of the axial skeleton towards the direction of the chop/lift, is there a circumstance you might coach it where the shoulders are moving around a non-moving head? Would this be incorrect? If not, how would you explain the difference between the two in terms of axial skeleton mechanics and expansion/compression? And what would be the implications for when to coach it one way or the other? Answer: The ideal head position depends on what you are trying to drive. If the eyes follow the rope, you will be orienting the entire spine in the direction you are rotating. Again, if we use right rotation as an example, turning the head can magnify the rotation. But what if you are an ABSOLUTE REBEL and want to keep the head fixed forward as you chop or lift... I'm Glad You Asked! Remember from our cervical rotation debrief, turning the head will create movement all the way down to T5-6. So if you keep your head pointing forward, you would bias expansion in the uppermost segments of the thorax. Let's take our classic half-kneeling cable chop to the right. Only this time, let's fix the head forward. As we recall, the thorax will be rotating right, creating left anterior and right posterior expansion. [caption id="attachment_14186" align="alignnone" width="768"] Dotted lines indicate relative rotation from a given starting position. In this case, the upper thoracic segments would be rotating left from a rightward orientation[/caption] If we look forward, the spine will rotate in the opposite direction from T5 on up. Crazy right?!?!? [caption id="attachment_14185" align="alignnone" width="810"] I might make this an NFT[/caption] To be clear, that doesn't mean you are getting this crazy torque of the spine going from one extreme range to another. T2-5 would be turning left from a relative rightward state. The spine could still have a rightward orientation in this example, but you'd have better uppermost expansion in the places you desired. In the above example, someone with shoulder restrictions such as decreased left horizontal abduction and flexion and right horizontal adduction and extension, this chop variation could be money in the bank! Sum up Chops are useful to bias posterior expansion and increase lower body rotation. Lifts are useful to bias anterior expansion and hold lower body positioning. Fixing the head forward will help drive contralateral rotation in the opposing direction. 

Love Your Mom Life
Working, Momming and Winning Trophies with Brooke Wyckoff, College Basketball Coach

Love Your Mom Life

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 14, 2021 43:56


In this episode, Nikki is joined by Brooke Wyckoff, a working mama who is walking the walk and making big strides in the workplace for moms who want to pursue their careers while still being present, loving moms.  As Associate Head Coach for Florida State University's Women's Basketball team and co-founder of Moms In Coaching, Brooke understands a thing or two about being a mom who wants to have it all!Tune in to hear Nikki and Brooke's fun and honest conversation about navigating mom life while pursuing your audacious goals and dreams. 

Eiryu-ji Zen Center Dharma Talks
Shoyoroku Case 42, "Nanyang's water pitcher"

Eiryu-ji Zen Center Dharma Talks

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 13, 2021 50:30


Dharma talk by Eran Junryu Vardi Roshi of Eiryu-ji Zen Center in Wyckoff, NJ, USA on 4/11/21

The Zac Cupples Show
Core Training

The Zac Cupples Show

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 12, 2021 45:21


Core training...it's not what you think it is. Core training is often recommended for getting those pesky rib flares to go away, and MOS DEF going to eliminate that anterior pelvic tilt… Right? RIGHT??!!? Uh, no fam. There are tons of misconceptions surrounding core training, the stack, and all that mess. Believe it or not: Rib flares and anterior pelvic tilt have NOTHING to do with a weak core A posterior tilt doesn't always equate with a counternutated sacrum You don't have to maintain a particular “core” position with every activity ever!!!!!! So then what does core training entail? Check out Movement Debrief Episode 150 here to find out! If you want to watch these live, add me on Instagram. Show notes Check out Human Matrix promo video here.   Here are some testimonials for the class.  Want to sign up? Click on the following locations below: May 29th-30th, 2021 Boston, MA (Early bird ends April 25th at 11:55 pm!) August 14th-15th, 2021, Ann Arbor, MI (Early bird ends July 18th at 11:55 pm!) September 25th-26th, 2021, Wyckoff, NJ (Early bird ends August 22nd at 11:55 pm) October 23rd-24th, Philadelphia, PA (Early bird ends September 26th at 11:55pm) November 6th-7th, 2021, Charlotte, NC (Early bird ends October 3rd at 11:55 pm) Montreal, Canada (POSTPONED DUE TO COVID-19) [6 CEUs approved for Athletic Therapists by CATA!] Or check out this little teaser for Human Matrix home study. Best part is if you attend the live course you'll get this bad boy for free!    Here's a signup for my newsletter to get nearly 5 hours and 50 pages of content, access to my free breathing and body mechanics course, a free acute:chronic workload calculator, basketball conditioning program, podcasts, and weekend learning goodies.  The movements of the sacroiliac joint - A great study outlining what positions the sacrum is in within various postures.  Elevate Sports Performance and Healthcare - The spot that I work at in Las Vegas.  The Difference Between Spinal and Pelvic Motion - A great debrief that will help you refine and get the most out of your posterior pelvic tilt.   Bill Hartman - Daddy-O Pops. He has been my biggest mentor.  Is Spinal Flexion Bad? - Here, I debunk the supposed unsafe spinal flexion that we do.  InstantPot - An absolute must in your cooking repertoire. Does a rib flare mean my core is weak?  Question: I have anterior pelvic tilt as well, and one thing that I often hear about treating anterior pelvic tilt and rib flare is to strengthen your core. I guess I'm wondering how to go about core exercises with my narrow ISA. Often times when I exercise my core, my upper obliques want to do all the work, which squeezes my ribs together and makes my ISA narrower. Do you think that as of right now, I should just stop doing all core exercises to prevent this, or should I continue to do the more standard types of core exercises like planks and dead-bugs? Watch the answer here. Answer: Before we go through what to do for my main man Bob, we need to clear the air on a few different pieces: Anterior pelvic tilt is normal to see when you are standing upright. According to this study, the sacrum is nutated during standing.  The key is to restore any loss of movement that may be occurring versus static posture. Anterior pelvic tilt and rib flare does not occur because of a lack of core strength. We don't have any evidence to point to a specific or series of causes for the body assuming the aforementioned positions. If I had to hedge my bets, my thought would be these orientations occur because of one's genetic structure and attempting to manage internal anatomy to maintain being upright against gravity.  This position doesn't weaken the abdominal muscles but eccentrically orients the abdominal wall, more so the lower portions. This orientation would reduce force production at the abs to alter the position. A similar situation to the abs would be trying to do a bicep curl from an extended elbow as opposed to 90 degrees of elbow flexion. We can all agree that it's much harder to perform the bicep curl when the arm is fully straight compared to when the elbow is bent 90 degrees.  [caption id="attachment_13955" align="alignnone" width="785"] Trust me, I've done extensive research on bicep curls, how else would these gains exist???).[/caption] However, we don't say that it's harder because the bicep is weak. The curl is more difficult because of the starting position. So too with the abs when you see a rib flare and anterior pelvic tilt. In this orientation, the diaphragm is descended far (concentric), which places the lower abs in an eccentric orientation, as these muscles act in opposing fashion during respiration.  This position is especially the case with a narrow infrasternal angle, as the diaphragm is descended further in comparison to a wide infrasternal angle. This narrower angle will give the upper abs a bit more leverage than the lower, hence why when Bob does his core exercises it's all upper obliques all...day...every...day.  The "fix" isn't to stop all core training, but to perform activities that act in opposition to this current movement behavior.  The first step is to stack Watch how to stack here. What the stack aims to do is the exact opposite movement strategy that our caller refers to: Posteriorly tilt the pelvis instead of anteriorly tilt Restore relative sacral motion by breathing Fully exhale to reduce rib flare and make infrasternal angle dynamic You might start with a move that helps drive each of these positions without compensatory strategies. The hooklying tilt with a one-arm reach might be a great starting point.  From here, it's just a matter of being able to demonstrate a wide variety of movements without falling into these compensatory strategies. That would include lower body work like squats, split squats, hinges; and upper body stuff like pushes and pulls. This training could even extend to higher-speed activities or other terminal tasks. All traditional "core training" serves for in my opinion is a lower level drill to teach your body to move while expressing desirable movement options. Take a half-kneeling cable chop for example. Instead of thinking this move is great for them oblique gains. Think that I am teaching my body to rotate in a split stance position. I can use these activities to aid in shifting into the downside hip, which is important to loading a cut if we related this to a terminal task. If you think of core exercises as a build-up to a greater purpose or task, then NO ONE will mess with you :)  Why do we drive a posterior tilt?  Question: I am very confused about core training. Why do we maintain posterior tilt throughout the range, when in real life the sacrum would nutate with hip extension? Watch the answer here. Answer: The reason is that most of us wonderful fam have a bias towards anterior pelvic tilt that we struggle to overcome. We would know that this orientation would be struggle bus because of the range of motion loss in the hip joint. What the posterior tilt does is it helps teach the individual to be able to move the pelvis in the opposite direction of their current bias. The hope would be that this helps restore some movement loss in the lower extremities. Now, Mohamed is correct. The sacrum ought to relatively nutate when in hip extension, and counternutate with the hip flexed. However, there is an important nuance to know that we are leaving out of the equation: The tuck does NOT counternutate the sacrum There is only about 2 degrees of available motion in the sacroiliac joint. So to think that we can isolate nutation and counternutation by a posterior tilt is highly unlikely. We aren't that precise of movers. Yet restoring these motions is important when creating a dynamic pelvis.  So how in the heck do we nutate and counternutate like bosses? What drives these sacroiliac movements? The answer: breathing. Nutation and counternutation occur by tension changes in the pelvic floor. The relative tension and shape of the pelvic floor os determined by the natural visceral movement that occurs with breathing. That's why you cannot tuck alone and hope for the best. Ensuring you have the breathing portion down pat, the top part of the stack, is key to driving this motion. That said, I don't expect peeps to make sure that the pelvis is just so and the ribcage must be in the perfect position before doing any movement or else they'll die! That's unrealistic, unnecessary, and counterproductive when it comes to dynamic and explosive movements. [caption id="attachment_13956" align="alignnone" width="810"] Just ain't gonna cut it! (Image by Alexandra Voicu from Pixabay)[/caption] What's important is the body is moving in the directions necessary to maximize force production for a given task. If you are trying to jump as high as possible with little ground contact, you want vertical pelvis displacement, not bending over at the waist and knocking the knees together.  If you are cutting and changing direction, your body needs to change levels and lower in position, again, not drastically anteriorly tilt the pelvis and staying too high into the cut.  If you are explosively rotating as in a golf swing, dumping the pelvis forward restricts range at the hips and will limit your ability to rotate fully.  All of these examples can be improved with technical coaching and appropriate drill selection that produces the desired outcome. This could be using resistance to assist to slow down people in specific directions. limiting motion with boxes, and many other things. Slow speed exercises, however, are the prime time to focus on stacking and breathing, as technique can be better emphasized. The hope would be that this strategy increases movement options and helps build context to be used in terminal tasks.  Personally, I've found by emphasizing stacking and such in slow speed and with appropriate fast speed drill selection, you can marry both worlds effectively.  Ab contractions during gait Question: Thoughts on abdominal activity during gait.  Answer: The abs should be active during the gait cycle, as your obliques are your big trunk rotators. HOWEVER! Gait should be a fairly automatic activity, so you shouldn't have to actively tense them during gait. This may impact your movement capabilities. The most that I'll do is encourage someone to swing their arms or develop awareness of heel contact when they step.  Breathing exercises with hypertension? Question: Are the breathing exercises I do safe for people with high blood pressure? Watch the answer here. Answer: HELL TO THE YES. The breathing activity that we have to be most careful of is the valsalva maneuver, where you take a big breath of air in and exhale against a closed glottis. Essentially, this strategy creates a high pressure environment in the body, which is useful when lifting heavy ass weights. The problem, however, is that this action increases blood pressure considerably. So for those with hypertension and heart disease, it is often avoided. The easy breathing exercises that I encourage, whether gentle nasal breathing (which can reduce blood pressure), or even exhaling with a controlled pause, are safe. And the reason why they are safe is because you are not creating a high pressure environment within the body during these activities, and blood pressure doesn't raise up (#joshgroban).  Are crunches and situps useful? Question: Do crunches even have a purpose? Is it better to do planks, glute-focused core training, and dead bugs? Watch the answer here. Answer: First off, spinal flexion is totally safe. The in vivo evidence seems to suggest very much so. Though safety is there, are crunches, situps, and the like useful? In certain instances, yes. What a crunch or a situp can do is encourage segmental flexion within the spine; aka posterior expansion. This maneuver, however, can be quite difficult for someone who has TONS of anterior expansion. They may not be able to push their stuff posteriorly, which can limit situp efficacy. In a similar vein, they may end up just bending at the sternum to complete the action. No bueno. I start first with things that would drive posterior expansion a bit more easily. Moves like reverse crunches are a good starting point. Propulsion arc and core training? Question: Is using the propulsion arc a great way to choose core exercises? Answer: Absolutely. You can select exercises to drive particular movements depending on how you place the body within these arcs. If you have someone who needs external rotation to improve, you may choose exercises that involve: hip flexion at 0-60 or 100+ degrees Shoulder flexion at 0-60 or 120-180 degrees A low sit cable chop fits really well here. If you need internal rotation, you could go with: hip flexion at 60-100 or at 0 degrees Shoulder flexion at 60-120 degrees A diagonal might be an option for this.  And if you are feeling REAL frisky and need frontside and backside expansion, then any rotational activity can be useful. To get rotation through the sacrum and thorax, the high split chop is a wonderful choice.  Sum up Though we don't know why compensations occur, we want to select activities that place one in the exact opposite orientation; restoring the full spectrum of movement options Tucking doesn't driver counternutation, but places the pelvis in an orientation to drive sacral dynamics We don't assume the stack in explosive activities. Coach position during slow-speed work, then choose drills with constraints that force desired positions.  Breathwork is safe for those with hypertension as long as the valsava maneuver is minimized Situps, where there is some posterior expansion available, can be useful for further driving this adaptation. Image by Keifit from Pixabay  Song Credit: Bensoun

The Zac Cupples Show
Foot Compensation Patterns

The Zac Cupples Show

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 5, 2021 47:36


A deep dive into possible foot compensations They say when the foot hits the ground, everything changes, but what if your feet hit the ground in all types of wonky ways? There seems like a bazillion different foot presentations: Flat feet High arches Bunions Plantarflexed first rays Oh my! We haven't even talked about how the rest of the body can influence these strategies. YIKES. Is there a way to make the feet ridiculously simple? I think so! Really, all you have to do is restore the two “normal” strategies of the feet, and that can lead to profound effects on any weird foot stuff you may see. What are they? Check out Movement Debrief Episode 149 below to find out! Watch the video here for your viewing pleasure. If you want to watch these live, add me on Instagram. Show notes Check out Human Matrix promo video here Here are some testimonials for the class Want to sign up? Click on the following locations below: May 29th-30th, 2021 Boston, MA (Early bird ends April 25th at 11:55 pm!) August 14th-15th, 2021, Ann Arbor, MI (Early bird ends July 18th at 11:55 pm!) September 25th-26th, 2021, Wyckoff, NJ (Early bird ends August 22nd at 11:55 pm) October 23rd-24th, Philadelphia, PA (Early bird ends September 26th at 11:55pm) November 6th-7th, 2021, Charlotte, NC (Early bird ends October 3rd at 11:55 pm) Montreal, Canada (POSTPONED DUE TO COVID-19) [6 CEUs approved for Athletic Therapists by CATA!] Or check out this little teaser for Human Matrix home study. Best part is if you attend the live course you'll get this bad boy for free! (Release date not known yet :( Here is a signup for my newsletter to get nearly 5 hours and 50 pages of content, access to my free breathing and body mechanics course, a free acute:chronic workload calculator, basketball conditioning program, podcasts, and weekend learning goodies.   Bill Hartman - Daddy-O Pops, my mentor and one of the top people I go to for all things biomechanics Lateral wedges from Foot MGMT - These are the wedges I'll put in shoes to drive calcaneal position Ipsilateral Hip Abductor Weakness After Inversion Ankle Sprain - A great study that shows the link between the ankle and the hip  Which Limitations to Treat First? - This post goes into how to attack movement compensations in the most efficient manner possible.  Pathogenesis of Hallux Valgus - This article outlines the biomechanics involved with bunions Belly Breathing, Cramping, and Exhales – Movement Debrief Episode 77 - Here is where I talk about cramping and some potential reasons Foot compensatory strategies  Question: Can you talk about different foot presentations as compensatory strategies? Watch the answer here. Answer: Well before we talk about foot compensations, why don't we first talk about foot...normalsations? Ooh, I like that. Could be the word of 2021! There are three different foot orientations that correspond with the three different phases of gait: Initial contact Midstance Propulsion Here are the characteristics of each foot position in each phase: Joint Initial Contact Midstance Propulsion Talocrural Plantarflexing Dorsiflexing Dorsiflexed Subtalar Inversion Eversion Inversion Midtarsal Supinated Pronated Supinated First Ray Slight plantarflexed Dorsiflexed Plantarflexed Big Toe Dorsiflexed Plantarflexed Dorsiflexed What we want to ensure is that our fellow fam can express all of these available movement options both passively and with their desired terminal task. On the low end, this could be walking. On the high end, this could be a cut.  How would you know what to look for?...Wait for it.... I'M GLAD YOU ASKED!!!! We'd simply first test to see what range of motions are available.  You'll want to peep the following areas: Ankle range of motion Big toe range of motion Midfoot flexibility standing posture Dynamic activities (gait and relevant activities)  Although I'm typically not the biggest fan of using static postures as an assessment piece, feet are the one exception to the rule. Seeing how the foot can organize on the ground can be quite telling as to what compensatory strategies one may be biased to. However, they cannot tell the whole story, and that's why range of motion testing is so useful. For example, it's not uncommon for the calcaneus to appear as though it's everted in the standing position. However, there have been many times that I've tested these fine fam on the table, only to find out their eversion range of motion is LOL status. In fact, I would argue that this compensatory strategy is one of the most commonly seen (and missed). More on that later ;)  If you only looked at standing foot posture, you wouldn't be able to appreciate the subtle difference, and your fam would trick the snot outta you. Those pesky supreme clientele :)  Common foot compensations Most foot compensations basically involve a person having a bias towards one extreme of a given range, and a subsequent inability to hit the opposing range.  Although there are many foot compensations that we can see, I'll go into the three most common variations that I run into: The supinated foot [caption id="attachment_13903" align="alignnone" width="810"] Notice the high arch, the space between the toes, and how "centered" the heel is.[/caption] This is a situation where the foot is in that initial contact position/propulsion phase, so you'll see the following things: Inverted calcaneus (with a loss of passive eversion) Supinated midtarsal joint (high arch) plantarflexed first ray (there is often a space between the first and second toe) In terms of differences between initial contact and propulsive feet positions, Daddy-O Pops Bill Hartman does a great job explaining the difference here. the pronated foot [caption id="attachment_13904" align="alignnone" width="810"] Look at the everted calcaneus, flatness of the arch, and how close together the toes are.[/caption] This is essentially a foot in midstance orientation, with the following findings: Everted calcaneus Pronated midtarsal joint (low arch/flat feet) Dorsiflexed first ray (first and second to are often bunched together) Secondary foot compensations In the previous two compensatory strategies, you basically have the same general movement happening throughout the foot complex: either pronation or supination. Any other compensatory strategy typically involves a counterrotation in the opposing direction. So if the calcaneus is inverted, you may see pronation-based compensations in the remaining parts of the foot: mid-tarsal joint, first ray, big toe, etc. Vice versa with the everted calcaneus: supinatory-based movements. These actions could occur at one joint or multiple.  The most common compensation that I see/worry about:  The inverted calcaneus with a pronated mid-tarsal joint [caption id="attachment_13905" align="alignnone" width="810"] You can see how the calcaneus looks everted, and the toes are a bit closer together compared to our supinated foot model.[/caption] This one will trick the F out of you, fam. Because it will appear that the calcaneus is everted, but it's not.  What's happening instead is the midfoot pronates, which drags the calcaneus towards eversion, but it never really gets there. How do I know this? This foot type has a loss of passive calcaneal eversion. If I can't evert the calcaneus, then the calcaneus cannot be everted. Instead, it gets dragged towards eversion, creating a twist between the subtalar joint and midtarsal joint; problems potentially ensue. Here are the common findings with this presentation: Externally rotated tibia Internally rotated femur at the knee joint Decreased calcaneal eversion Loss of big toe extension The most important component of restoring foot dynamics So there can be several different compensatory strategies that happen at the feet that can make assessment be TOTALLY HARD. But you know me, fam, I want to make the foot RIDICULULOSULY SIMPLE for you. What is the most important foot movement to address when it comes to restoring movement options? Priority #1: Restore calcaneus dynamics Yes folks. Getting the calcaneus to invert and evert can restore most of the foot/ankle movement options you see limited. If you see an inverted calcaneus, drive calcaneal eversion. You do this by cueing inside heel contact. The supine cross-connect is a great starting point for this movement if you are working with a narrow infrasternal angle.  If you have someone with a wide infrasternal angle, you can use the supine hip extension with overhead reach. If you see an everted calcaneus, drive calcaneal inversion. You do this by cueing outside heel contact. One of my go-to moves is to either perform high-depth squats to drive this position. Or a posterior hip stretch. How to increase foot and ankle range of motion   Question: I would like to know what drives more supination, pronation, dorsiflexion, and plantarflexion of the ankles? because I have high arches but externally rotated feet, and more exhalation seems to increase even more the height of the arches so that the bones and veins protrude at the top side.  Watch the answer here. Answer: Alright alright. Your foot and ankle dynamics are whack, how do I make that better, Zac? Well fam, we need to dive into what corresponding lower extremity movement occur with each of the respective foot and ankle actions discussed. Because if you move your foot into various positions, and you keep going...and going...and going...a relative motion will occur at the femur, pelvis, etc. Conversely, you can drive particular motions up the chain to place the foot where you need it. Let's make life easy for you. Here is a super simple table that illustrates what movements are associated with various foot actions (like the store, but better prices ;) Foot/ankle movement Corresponding relative hip motion Dorsiflexion Flexion Plantarflexion Extension Inversion/supination adduction Eversion/pronation abduction **This table assumes primary compensations, no secondary compensations. More on that later Now that you've seen my table, let's apply the F out of it and look at some moves that apply this concept: Dorsiflexion Squats are my de facto move to increase ankle dorsiflexion. Plantarflexion Although plantarflexion restrictions are a bit rare, getting hip extension is the major key to increasing this. You want to try and get towards end-range hip extension while keeping the stack if you can. The supine cross-connect mentioned above is actually a great choice for this, but if you aren't there yet, start with the wall stride. Supination Adduction for the win. Doing a copenhagen side plank can be money for this. Pronation Driving abduction with lateral squat variations are my go-to. I'd start with the table side stride. Then work toward a lateral squat variation. Untwisting the legs Question: So midstance favors internal rotation, pronation, hamstrings, and anterior gluteus medius. However, it's common that the left foot is already pronated, so why do we often focus on driving internal rotation on the left side?  Watch the answer here. Answer: The reason for this is because we are a bunch of twisted sisters (80's hair included). AND WE AREN'T GONNA TAKE IT! What I mean by that is it's quite common to have a “twist” occurring between the femur and the tibia. That means that the femur will be rotating in one direction, and the tibial will rotate in the opposite direction. This situation causes a mismatch in the common rotational action that this fam is referring to. The most common compensatory pattern in this sense is: Left femoral external rotation with tibial internal rotation and foot pronation Right femoral internal rotation with tibial external rotation and foot supination This presentation will usually see a loss of left internal rotation measures and right external rotation measures. It's this specific presentation where you work on “untwisting” the lower extremities. Basically, you reverse the aforementioned positions: Left: Drive slight foot supination and femoral internal rotation Right: Drive slight foot pronation and femoral external rotation My go-to move, if you can build up to it, is the bottoms-up shifty split squat series. It'll humble you if you get it right. Big toe contraction Question: Should the big toe dig into the ground with any exercise? Answer: Big toe flexion occurs during first ray dorsiflexion, which is a part of midstance. Thus, if you need pronation, you might need a spot of big toe flexion.  Foot and ankle movement tests Question: What movement tests do you use to test feet for compensations?  Answer: Basically, you want to look at all the physiological motions of the foot-ankle complex, which include: Ankle dorsiflexion Ankle plantarflexion Ankle inversion Ankle eversion Big toe extension Big toe extension in dorsiflexion Midtarsal pronation and supination Static foot posture Dynamic foot posture Sum up Loss of foot and ankle dynamics occurs when an individual cannot place the body into a “phase of gait” position. Restoring calcaneal dynamics is the most important factor in restoring foot and ankle movement options.  Relative motions at the hips can be used to drive ankle position If there are twists present in the legs, you must drive counterrotation to restore lower extremity dynamics

Gramlich and Mac Lain
Episode 62: Florida State's Brooke Wyckoff + UNC's Courtney Banghart

Gramlich and Mac Lain

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 19, 2021 36:44


Mac and Kelly welcome Florida State Women's Basketball Interim Head Coach Brooke Wyckoff and North Carolina Women's Basketball Head Coach Courtney Banghart into the latest edition of the coaches roundtable as both teams are preparing for the NCAA tournament! Sponsored by: Traeger Grills. Produced by: Richmond Weaver.

WNBA Weekly
3/15/21 - 30 Minutes w/ Brooke Wyckoff

WNBA Weekly

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 15, 2021 26:13


Brooke Wyckoff, FSU Interim Head Coach, talks with Logan about everything from selection Monday, her time in the WNBA, and moms coaching. Follow us on Twitter, Facebook, and YouTube Follow & Subscribe to us on Twitch to see the show live Get Merch

W-insidr Show
Winsidr Show - Brooke Wyckoff

W-insidr Show

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 12, 2021 46:26


Continuing to share the stories of current and Past WNBA players. Today our guest Brooke Wyckoff former WNBA player and current Florida State university interim head coach.

Wake Up Warchant
(2/12/21): "Renegade Express": Brady/Milton, over/under. Wyckoff interview

Wake Up Warchant

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 12, 2021 75:49


(4:00) A week from Opening Day (11:00) Betting on yourself to break the law and profiting off of it (17:00): Over/under: 20 sacks, Milton 3,000 passing yds and 30 TDs? (21:00) Best FSU starting 5 using players from last 15 years (25:00) What's the reasonable hope of MIlton doing at FSU what Tom Brady did in Tampa? (37;00) Single best individual performance during Dynasty, Jimbo Era (42:00) How to become Osceola, some history on the FSU symbol (52:00) Managing editor Ira Schoffel interviews WBB interim head coach Brooke Wyckoff Music - NoMBe - Wait Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Wake Up Warchant
(2/12/21): "Renegade Express": Brady/Milton, over/under. Wyckoff interview

Wake Up Warchant

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 12, 2021 75:49


(4:00) A week from Opening Day (11:00) Betting on yourself to break the law and profiting off of it (17:00): Over/under: 20 sacks, Milton 3,000 passing yds and 30 TDs? (21:00) Best FSU starting 5 using players from last 15 years (25:00) What's the reasonable hope of MIlton doing at FSU what Tom Brady did in Tampa? (37;00) Single best individual performance during Dynasty, Jimbo Era (42:00) How to become Osceola, some history on the FSU symbol (52:00) Managing editor Ira Schoffel interviews WBB interim head coach Brooke Wyckoff Music - NoMBe - Wait Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices