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Family of flowering plants commonly known as grasses

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  • Nov 27, 2021LATEST
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Latest podcast episodes about grass

KSL Greenhouse
Fertilizing and Tilling In The Cold

KSL Greenhouse

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 27, 2021 14:22


 Even though the weather is getting chilly people still want to fertilize their lawns. Taun goes over the pros and cons of fertilizing in cold weather. Taun also goes over whether it's ok to till the soil in your garden in this weather. Texters ask about electronic gardening tools.  Welcome to The KSL Greenhouse Show! Hosts Maria Shilaos and Taun Beddes tackle your gardening questions, talk plants, and offer tips for an amazing yard. Listen Saturdays 8am to 11am at 1160 AM & 102.7 FM, kslnewsradio.com, or on the KSL Newsradio App. Follow us on Facebook and Instagram at @kslgreenhouse. #KSLGreenhouse  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

KSL Greenhouse
Gardening Gift Ideas

KSL Greenhouse

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 27, 2021 16:31


Looking for some Christmas gift ideas for the gardeners in your life? Over the next few weeks Taun will interview fellow horticulturalists on great gift ideas. This week Taun speaks with Michael Caron. Maria and Taun talk about grow boxes during cold weather and what plants will do well in them.  Welcome to The KSL Greenhouse Show! Hosts Maria Shilaos and Taun Beddes tackle your gardening questions, talk plants, and offer tips for an amazing yard. Listen Saturdays 8am to 11am at 1160 AM & 102.7 FM, kslnewsradio.com, or on the KSL Newsradio App. Follow us on Facebook and Instagram at @kslgreenhouse. #KSLGreenhouse  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

KSL Greenhouse
My Rusty Lawn

KSL Greenhouse

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 27, 2021 15:20


Listeners want to know if leaving a rosemary box outside is ok or will it freeze the roots. Gary wants to know if its ok to inject a certain pesticide into a tree he wants to remove in the Spring. Craig has a question about rust in his lawn. Listeners are wanting to know if poinsettias are poisonous to kids and pets.  Welcome to The KSL Greenhouse Show! Hosts Maria Shilaos and Taun Beddes tackle your gardening questions, talk plants, and offer tips for an amazing yard. Listen Saturdays 8am to 11am at 1160 AM & 102.7 FM, kslnewsradio.com, or on the KSL Newsradio App. Follow us on Facebook and Instagram at @kslgreenhouse. #KSLGreenhouse  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

KSL Greenhouse
Repurposing Pumpkins

KSL Greenhouse

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 27, 2021 15:54


Thinking about throwing out those pumpkins? Taun and Maria discuss repurposing them for composting, decorations, and other uses. To find out more about repurposing pumpkins you can find an article about it on the KSL Greenhouse Facebook page.     Welcome to The KSL Greenhouse Show! Hosts Maria Shilaos and Taun Beddes tackle your gardening questions, talk plants, and offer tips for an amazing yard. Listen Saturdays 8am to 11am at 1160 AM & 102.7 FM, kslnewsradio.com, or on the KSL Newsradio App. Follow us on Facebook and Instagram at @kslgreenhouse. #KSLGreenhouse  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Cory Hotline
Timothy Grass

Cory Hotline

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 27, 2021 3:44


Evan Lachance plays lead guitar here, I didn't know what to do with this, I was ready to delete it, and he gave it a great energy. Rustic Spill https://rusticspill.bandcamp.com/

KSL Greenhouse
Baking Bird Seed

KSL Greenhouse

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 27, 2021 15:55


Texters want to know if they should trim their Lavender closer to the ground for Winter. Taun talks about baking bird seed to keep it from sprouting. Suzanne has a lot of plants she wants to mulch but needs to know when. Ernie wants to know what leaves are good for fertilizer.  Welcome to The KSL Greenhouse Show! Hosts Maria Shilaos and Taun Beddes tackle your gardening questions, talk plants, and offer tips for an amazing yard. Listen Saturdays 8am to 11am at 1160 AM & 102.7 FM, kslnewsradio.com, or on the KSL Newsradio App. Follow us on Facebook and Instagram at @kslgreenhouse. #KSLGreenhouse  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

KSL Greenhouse
Norfolk Pine Tree

KSL Greenhouse

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 27, 2021 16:45


This week's plant of the week is the Norfolk pine tree. This is a great house plant that is very tolerant of cooler weather. To learn more about the Norfolk pine tree you can find an article about it on the KSL Greenhouse Show Facebook page.    Welcome to The KSL Greenhouse Show! Hosts Maria Shilaos and Taun Beddes tackle your gardening questions, talk plants, and offer tips for an amazing yard. Listen Saturdays 8am to 11am at 1160 AM & 102.7 FM, kslnewsradio.com, or on the KSL Newsradio App. Follow us on Facebook and Instagram at @kslgreenhouse. #KSLGreenhouse  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

How To Love Lit Podcast
Walt Whitman - Leaves of Grass - The Moving Elegies For Abraham Lincoln

How To Love Lit Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 27, 2021 42:06


I'm Christy Shriver and we're here to discuss books that have changed the world and have changed us.  And I am Garry Shriver.  This is the How to Love Lit Podcast. This is our second episode discussing the bard of democracy, the great Walt Whitman.  Today we will feature one of his four poems honoring President Abraham Lincoln, but in order to understand why Whitman and many of us admire this great man, we want to revisit the  original 1855 edition of Leaves of Grass and listen to some of Whitman's observations of African Americans and slavery.  Christy, let's start this episode by reading and discussing two extracts from “I sing the Body Electric” , the ones where Whitman describes an African man and then an African woman at auction.    A man's body at auction,  (For before the war I often go to the slave-mart and watch the sale,)  I help the auctioneer, the sloven does not half know his business.    Gentlemen look on this wonder,  Whatever the bids of the bidders they cannot be high enough for it,  For it the globe lay preparing quintillions of years without one animal or plant,  For it the revolving cycles truly and steadily roll'd.  In this head the all-baffling brain,  In it and below it the makings of heroes.  Examine these limbs, red, black, or white, they are cunning in tendon and nerve,  They shall be stript that you may see them.  Exquisite senses, life-lit eyes, pluck, volition,  Flakes of breast-muscle, pliant backbone and neck, flesh not flabby, good-sized arms and legs,  And wonders within there yet.  Within there runs blood,  The same old blood! the same red-running blood!  There swells and jets a heart, there all passions, desires, reachings, aspirations,  (Do you think they are not there because they are not express'd in parlors and lecture-rooms?)  This is not only one man, this the father of those who shall be fathers in their turns,  In him the start of populous states and rich republics,  Of him countless immortal lives with countless embodiments and enjoyments.  How do you know who shall come from the offspring of his offspring through the centuries?  (Who might you find you have come from yourself, if you could trace back through the centuries?)    8    A woman's body at auction,  She too is not only herself, she is the teeming mother of mothers,  She is the bearer of them that shall grow and be mates to the mothers.  Have you ever loved the body of a woman?  Have you ever loved the body of a man?  Do you not see that these are exactly the same to all in all nations and times all over the earth?  If any thing is sacred the human body is sacred,  And the glory and sweet of a man is the token of manhood untainted,  And in man or woman a clean, strong, firm-fibred body, is more beautiful than the most beautiful face.  Have you seen the fool that corrupted his own live body? or the fool that corrupted her own live body?  For they do not conceal themselves, and cannot conceal themselves.  Whitman was raised a New York democrat, but his sympathies were with the Free Soil party that condemned the extension of slavery as a sin against God and a crime against man.  The Republican party would not exist until 1854, and Lincoln would be their presidential candidate in the election of 1860.  Of course, bear in mind, that the issues of those days are different than the issues of today, so the party names shouldn't be taken to represent modern day politics.      For Whitman it was undeniable for anyone with eyeballs that all men are born human and that implies certain things regardless if they are born  free or slave- of any race, creed or gender.  It is obvious to a man so aware of the physical body, that we are of the same atom-  the magnificence of the body proclaims our humanity- and ironically where on earth could this magnificence be most easily seen than at a slave auction like what he witnessed during his New Orleans days. In all of its ruthless degradation it ironically showcased the magnificence of the human body.  It's why Whitman could say, almost sarcastically- I am a better salesman of slaves than the auctioneer-I know and understand the beauty and value of what you are selling and you don't- you fool.   Whitman was the poet of the democratic soul- we are after all leaves of grass, but he was also the poet of the body- that physical form we are all chained to.  For Whitman, to be a human was to understand and be okay with one's physical body- and it is a holy thing. Our souls inhabit a sanctified space on earth- that of the body- be it man or woman- the pigmentation of flesh was just one of many individual and unique features- for Whitman our bodies is the starting point for equality- we are all wedded to one.      It doesn't seem radical to us now, but at that time in history- even talking about the body like that was revolutionary- almost vulgar- Whitman democratically equates the man with the woman with the black with the white.  In 1855, this was not self-evident anywhere else in the United States of America or really anywhere on planet earth.      By 1855, Walt Whitman knew his country was falling apart.  He understood that the ideals on which the great American experiment were founded were being overwhelmed by all kinds of forces, not least of which was plain ordinary corruption.  In his mind, what the world needed was repentance- a total course correction- a return to the original ideals and this was going to happen through conversion to a different set of moral ideals- he wanted to convince America to revisit and embrace all these original self-evident democratic ideals by reading and absorbing Leaves of Grass.  He really truly believed if people would just read his book, they would stop hating each other.    Well, it's a nice thought, however slightly unrealistic…especially in light of the single digit sales of that first edition.  But even if he had gotten everyone to read his book, it was a tall order.  By 1860, any kind of peaceful coming together seemed unrealistic.  America was on the brink of war and violence was springing up.  John Brown is one notable example; in an attempt to free slaves through violence he and a small gang stormed Harper's Ferry.  They were captured, tried and condemned to death, but this event inflamed the country and raised the stakes for the upcoming presidential election.  A few months after Brown was executed, the democratic party, split between pro and- anti- slavery factions, was to confront a new political party- one that had never existed before, the Republican party. It had nominated a Southern born anti-slavery man from Illinois, a lawyer who had never attended school but who was known as honest Abe.  A newspaper in South Carolina put it this way “the irrepressible conflict is about to be vised upon us through the Black Republican nominee and his fanatical diabolical Republican party.”    Walt Whitman did not see Lincoln as an instigator of a conflict.  Whitman saw him almost as an extension of himself- a mediator.  He really believed Lincoln was going to bring healing  and unity through politics something he had tried and failed to do through poetry.      I'm not sure which is the greater challenge= trying to unify  a group of people through poetry or politics!!      Ha! True but Whitman was paying attention to what Lincoln was saying and he identified with him.  He saw himself in Lincoln.  They both came from poor families. Neither had formal education.  One thing that is interesting, Lincoln was from the West, and Whitman believed the hope of America was in the West.  Both men believed in democracy to the core, but also- both believed in unity.  Whitman saw Lincoln as America's hope.    Although, he was likely the most hated man of his age in some corners, but the only hope of America in others.  Lincoln wanted first and foremost to be a unifier.  He had been elected with only around 40% of the popular vote, although he did get a majority of the electoral college votes.  There was no question America was deeply divided.  He wanted not just to save the physical boundaries of America, but he wanted to heal the wounds that were making people hate each other.  Lincoln's father was anti-slavery and raised in an anti-slavery Baptist congregation.   Lincoln But his mother was from a Kentucky slaveholding family.  Lincoln later recalled that the reason his father left Kentucky and the South because of his strong feelings about slavery. Lincoln himself saw many cruel things while visiting his grandparents, not the least of these being once when an African-American family was separated on a boat and sold to different owners.  He later recalled that ‘the sight was a continual torment to me…having the power of making me miserable.”  However, Lincoln's mother's family were people he knew intimately, and somehow he understood how someone could support slavery and not be an evil person.  This sounds crazy to us and difficult to understand, but Lincoln expressed on more than one occasion to men across the North that if they had been born in those circumstances in that place and in that world, they likely would have had those same views.  This way of seeing one's fellow man is more radical than most of us can even comprehend.  It's a strange idea to assert that a person could believe something is morally wrong so strongly that he would be willing to lead a nation to war to end it, but simultaneously judge the perpetrators of this evil redeemable human beings.  95% of humans today can't think like that-       Well, it's something Whitman could do as well.  Whitman didn't fight in the Civil War, but his brother George did.  His brother fought for the Union.  Whitman's significant other fought for the Confederacy at one point.     The first shots of the Civil War were fired by the South on Fort Sumter in Charleston, SC, in April of 1861.  Lincoln had been president for just a few weeks.       In December of 1862, Whitman saw his brother's name on a list of casualities.  He got on a train and headed South to look for him. He ended up in Fredericksburg.  The good news was his brother had only suffered a flesh wound.  But outside the hospital Whitman saw something that struck horror and terror into his being.  Let me read his words after he came to the building being used as a hospital, he saw, “a heap of amputated feet, legs, arms, hands, etc….a full load for a one-horse cart…human fragments, cut bloody, black and blue, swelled and sickening…nearby were several dead bodes each covered with its brown woolen blanket.”  Now you have to remember, think about Leaves of Grass and “I sing the Body Electric”.  This is a man who had been trying to convince America to celebrate our bodies- all of our bodies- we read just the excert about African-Americans, but he celebrated all bodies and wanted us to see ourselves in other people's bodies- to recognize the sanctity in all bodies- and here he's staring at these body parts scattered around, cut off and thrown into piles.  I can't even imagine how things would smell.      Whitman's reaction to what he saw on the battlefields and field hospitals of Frederickburg, led him to a decision that altered the course of his life.  It would lead him to move to Washington DC and honestly, his war actions to me make him something of a saint.  Just in Frederickburg, he stuck around to visit and help bury the dead of the over 18,000 dead soldiers that were just lying on the ground.  But, then he started visiting hospitals.  These visits deeply affected him.  He had planned on going back to New York after he found his brother, but he couldn't do that anymore.  Instead he changed courses and went to Washington DC.  He got a job as a clerk where he would work during the day, but then he would spend the rest of his time in the hospitals.  And he would just sit with soldiers.  He didn't care if they were union of confederate.  He brought  with him bags of candy.  He wrote letters to their parents.  He played twenty questions.  If they wanted him to read the Bible, he read the Bible.  If they wanted a cigarette, he'd scrounge up a cigarette. Many of them were teenagers.  He kissed  and hugged them; he parented them in their final moments of life.  For many, he was the last tender face they would see on this earth.  The numbers range, but documentation reveals he visited and helped anywhere from 80-100,000 soldiers.      Let me interrupt you for a second to highlight how bad it was to be in a hospital during this time period.  No one at this time understood the importance of anticeptics or the need to be clean.  The Union Army lost 300,000 lives in combat.  But, they experienced an estimated 6,400,000 cases of illnesses, wound and injuries.  Hospitals were filthy and dangerous places.      For many of those young men, Whitman was the last touch of kindness they would ever experience on this earth.  He said later that those years of hospital service were and I quote, “the greatest privilege and satisfaction..and, of course, the most profound lesson of my life.”  He usually left the hospital at night and slept in a room he rented but if a soldier needed him or asked him to stay, he would often stay up all night with wounded and dying men and then head from the hospital to the office.  Here are his words "While I was with wounded and sick in thousands of cases from the New England States, and from New York, New Jersey, and Pennsylvania, and from Michigan, Wisconsin, Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, and all the Western States, I was with more or less from all the States, North and South, without exception… "I was with many rebel officers and men among our wounded, and gave them always what I had, and tried to cheer them the same as any. . . . Among the black soldiers, wounded or sick, and in the contraband camps, I also took my way whenever in their neighborhood, and did what I could for them.”        Well, let me also say that Washington DC was a nasty place to be living at that time.  Physically, it was a construction zone, nothing like the beautiful collection of buildings and streets designed by the French architect Pierre L Enfant that we see today.   It was muddy; it noisy; it was full of the noises of building and killing.  It was political.  Abraham Lincoln stated that during those days, “If there is a worse place than Hell, I am in it.”      Dang, because DC, the city, was so bad?    Because being president in the Civil War was so bad.  Lincoln had a different view of his role of leadership than most people today understand.  And we need to go back to when he was elected in 1860.  The country was divided- and even if you didn't believe in slavery, the question of how to get rid of it wasn't something people agreed on.  Many thought it should just be abolished. Others thought you should just keep it from expanding and let it die slowly.   Lincoln was surrounded by people on all sides who all wanted him to have “bold leadership”- do radical things- whatever those were to them- but Lincoln liked to respond to his critics by referencing an entertainer who was known for tight walking over water.  Sometimes, he even would push a wheelbarrow across these ropes; one time he stopped in the middle of the river to eat an omelete on his tightrope, sometimes he'd carry someone on his back- all crazy stunts that didn't seem survivable.  Lincoln had seen him perform walking a tight rope across Niagara falls and he thought it was a perfect metaphor for how he saw himself.  Let me quote Lincoln here- the artist went by the name Blondin. Suppose,” Lincoln said, “that all the material values in this great country of ours, from the Atlantic to the Pacific—its wealth, its prosperity, its achievements in the present and its hopes for the future—could all have been concentrated and given to Blondin to carry over that awful crossing.” Suppose “you had been standing upon the shore as he was going over, as he was carefully feeling his way along and balancing his pole with all his most delicate skill over the thundering cataract. Would you have shouted at him, ‘Blondin, a step to the right!' ‘Blondin, a step to the left!' or would you have stood there speechless and held your breath and prayed to the Almighty to guide and help him safely through the trial?”    Lincoln saw himself on a tight rope and going too far one way or the other would make the entire thing collapse.  He wasn't trying to crush and destroy his fellow man, even his Southern brother,  although he was trying to win the war and emancipate the slaves, which he did do.  He was trying to heal a nation- to bring brother back to brother.  And we must never forget that brothers WERE literally killing their brothers.  Uniting and building a country that was this morally divided was a seemingly impossible task- and he could see from his perch in Washington that this was hell.    Whitman would stop to see him going in and out of the White House.  This was in the days when you could do that.  They didn't even have secret service for the president. Whitman looked at Lincoln and saw sadness in his eyes.  But Whitman always believed Lincoln was the right man.  If anyone could bring America together, it was Lincoln. Lincoln didn't hate his enemy.  He loved his enemy.  Just like Whitman.  This was the attitude where Whitman saw hope and a future as he sat with both confederate and Union soldier, black soldiers and white soldiers, mending their wounds, writing their final farewells.      But make no mistake, Lincoln was committed to emancipation and as the war came to the end and reconstruction was in sight, he was preparing America to grant full citizenship that included voting rights to All American males- including African-American ones.  In one letter he said, “I am naturally anti-slavery.  If slavery is not wrong; nothing is wrong.  I cannot remember when I did not think so, and feel so”.     And yet this is the same man who could say during his second inaugural address, one month before General Lee will surrender at Appomatox and 41 days before he will be murdered…     With malice toward none; with charity for all; with firmness in the right, as God gives us to see the right, let us strive on to finish the work we are in; to bind up the nation's wounds; to care for him who shall have borne the battle, and for his widow, and his orphan -- to achieve and cherish a lasting peace among ourselves and with the world. to do all which may achieve and cherish a just, and a lasting peace, among ourselves, and with the world. all nations.    There was one man in the crowd that day, who was actually so close to Lincoln he shows up in the inauguaration picture.  This man heard those words and was committed to stopping Lincoln from fulfilling this pledge.  John Wilkes Booth was standing not far from Lincoln that day.  On April 11, what we now know was to be his last speech, Lincoln called for black suffrage.  Booth was in the audience that day as well, after hearing Lincoln make that statement Booth is known to have said, “that is the last speech he will ever make.”    On that fateful day, April 15, 1865 Whitman was visiting his family.  However, his significant other, Peter Doyle was in Washington DC and heard that the president was going to Ford's theater to see a performance of the comedy “My American Cousin.”  It was Good Friday, the sacred day where Christians celebrate the crucifixion of Jesus Christ.  This is what Peter Doyle  said later about what happened that evening.     I heard that the President and his wife would be present and made up my mind to go. There was a great crowd in the building. I got into the second gallery. There was nothing extraordinary in the performance. I saw everything on the stage and was in a good position to see the President's box. I heard the pistol shot. I had no idea what it was, what it meant—it was sort of muffled. I really knew nothing of what had occurred until Mrs. Lincoln leaned out of the box and cried, "The President is shot!" I needn't tell you what I felt then, or saw. It is all put down in Walt's piece—that piece is exactly right. I saw Booth on the cushion of the box, saw him jump over, saw him catch his foot, which turned, saw him fall on the stage. He got up on his feet, cried out something which I could not hear for the hub-hub and disappeared. I suppose I lingered almost the last person. A soldier came into the gallery, saw me still there, called to me: "Get out of here! we're going to burn this damned building down!" I said: "If that is so I'll get out!"     Whitman used Doyle's account to help pen the only poem that I know of where Whitman  used traditional poetic forms.  It is an Elegy for the death of Abraham Lincoln, titled “O Captain My Captain”.  He actually wrote two elegies- one speaking for the nation- in the voice of a common sailor- it he wrote in a formal style of poetry acceptable to the people of his day.  The second, in some ways more personal because it is in a style similar to what we see in the rest of Leaves of Grass.  The second poem, When Lilacs …”is often thought be be written after O Captain” Although I'm not sure it is.  It is more epic in its feeling- it uses symbols that are more archetypal and timeless- although that term wasn't invented in his day.  In O Captain my Captain, Whitman takes on the persona of a soldier, a sailor.  In the second, he uses his own voice- that universal “I” like we see in Song of Myself.  We don't have time to read the entirely of “O Lilacs When Lilacs Last in the Dooryard Bloom' , it has over 200 lines, but we can Read a little bit of it.  Instead we will focus on the only poem anthologized during Whitman's lifetime- O Captain my Captain.    The one I know from that famous scene in Dead Poet's Society where the students stand for their fallen teacher, John Keating, immortalized by Robin Williams.     Agreed- I can't read this poem without thinking of Robin Williams, but we should probably try since we spent quite a bit of time setting up the image of Lincoln.       O Captain! my Captain! our fearful trip is done,  The ship has weather'd every rack, the prize we sought is won,  The port is near, the bells I hear, the people all exulting,  While follow eyes the steady keel, the vessel grim and daring;                           But O heart! heart! heart!                              O the bleeding drops of red,                                 Where on the deck my Captain lies,                                    Fallen cold and dead.    O Captain! my Captain! rise up and hear the bells;  Rise up—for you the flag is flung—for you the bugle trills,  For you bouquets and ribbon'd wreaths—for you the shores a-crowding,  For you they call, the swaying mass, their eager faces turning;                           Here Captain! dear father!                              This arm beneath your head!                                 It is some dream that on the deck,                                   You've fallen cold and dead.    My Captain does not answer, his lips are pale and still,  My father does not feel my arm, he has no pulse nor will,  The ship is anchor'd safe and sound, its voyage closed and done,  From fearful trip the victor ship comes in with object won;                           Exult O shores, and ring O bells!                              But I with mournful tread,                                 Walk the deck my Captain lies,                                    Fallen cold and dead.    As we have clearly expressed, Whitman the defender of the common man, does not usually elevate one person over another- but For Lincoln he makes a notable exception.  O Captain my Captain is written from the point of view of an insider. We can imagine a young soldier, a sailor.   He's on the ship- Of course, the captain is President Lincoln- the ship is the country.  The tone is one of exultation then distress.  We had finished- the fearful trip was done!!!  We had made it then….    Christy, and it's important to note that it WAS done.  Lincoln did bring that ship to harbor.  On April 2, right before he died on the 11th The confederacy vacated Richmond.  On April 4, President Lincoln together with his ten year old son Tad walked through the streets and into Jefferson Davis' office.  “Admiral Porter who was with him had this to say, “No electric wire could have carried the news of the President's arrival sooner than it was circulated through Richmond.  As far as the eye could see the streets were alive with negroes and poor whites rushing in our direction, and the crowd increased so fast that I had to surround the President with sailors with fixed bayonets to keep them off.  They all wanted to shake hand with Mr. Lincoln or his coat tail or even to kneel and kiss his boots.”  Later on Admiral Porter said this, “I should have preferred to see the President of the United States entering the subjugated stronghold of the rebel with an escort more befitting his high station, yet that would have looked as if he came as a conqueror to exult over a brave but fallen enemy.  He came instead as a peacemaker, his hand extended to all who desired to take it.”  Christy, at one point, it is said that an older African American gentleman bowed before Lincoln and Lincoln went to the man, took him by the hand and raised him up and told him he didn't need to kneel to anyone, he was a free man.  I cannot imagine the emotion.    And so we try to imagine the emotion – after so much carnage, who could walk the tightright and heal the utter hatred still inherent in the heart of both victor and defeated.  Notice there is meter, each stanza is composed of iambs which may or may not mean anything to you.  It just means there's a beat- like a drum beat, like a heart beat- “The ship has wethered every rack, the prize we sought is won.  The people are exalting.    But then he dies…in the first two stanzas, the boy addresses the captain as someone still alive, but by the third stanza he has accepted the reality.  And of course, this is exactly has grief strikes.  We never accept it initially, at least I have that problem.  I'll share my personal experiences in a different episode, but it's natural.  He says, “Rise up, Father.”  We feel a sense of desperation- the idea- of = no,  no, no, this can't be happening.  It's not possible.  Not now. Not after all of this.   But by the third stanza, the sailor unwillingly switches to the third person.  My captain does not answer, his lips are pale and still.”   There is a sense of intimacy, “MY father does not feel my arm, he has no pulse nor will”.  We also see that that formality of the meter breaks down in that last line, “Fallen cold and dead”.  The sailor has broken down.   America is not just devastated because their leader is dead, but they are now vulnerable- what's going to happen to us.  Who can lead us?  Who can walk the tightrope?    And that of course, is the ultimate tragedy.   We will never know what might have been had he lived to complete his second term, but one statesman grasped fully the tragedy when he predicted that “the development of things will teach us to mourn him doubly.”  And of course he was right, even Jefferson Davis, the leader of the conferederacy, although I point out that Lincoln never one time acknowledged him as preside,  bemoaned Lincoln's death after losing the war and for good reason.  After Lincoln''s death, profiteers, corruption and all kinds of chaos descended on America.  Grant, who was a sincere and an incredible advocate for African Americans, was able to defeat the confederate armies but not able to contain the host of corruption that plagued our nation during reconstruction.    And so we end with Whitman's final poem- his most personal tribute to Lincoln and the one that many consider the better if less famous work, “When Lilacs Last in the Dooryard Bloom”.  In this poem, Whitman reverts to his usual style of free verse and strong metaphors.  It's beautiful and for me, it's where we see the universal truth of lost moral leadership and grief emerge- he expresses loss well beyond the moment of Lincoln.  Let's read just the first little bit.  It's long, and references the journey of Lincoln's casket to its final resting place without ever mentioning Lincoln's name.     When lilacs last in the dooryard bloom'd,  And the great star early droop'd in the western sky in the night,  I mourn'd, and yet shall mourn with ever-returning spring.    Ever-returning spring, trinity sure to me you bring,  Lilac blooming perennial and drooping star in the west,  And thought of him I love.    2  O powerful western fallen star!  O shades of night—O moody, tearful night!  O great star disappear'd—O the black murk that hides the star!  O cruel hands that hold me powerless—O helpless soul of me!  O harsh surrounding cloud that will not free my soul.    There are three big symbols in this poem= the lilacs, the sun and then a bird.  But since we read only the first two stanzas, I want to focus on those.  Lilacs are flowers that have a strong smell and were blooming at the time of Lincoln's death.  They are beautiful, but they also return every spring.  The star is an obvious symbol for Lincoln.  I want to point out that Whitman never really used stars as positive images for leaders because he didn't like the idea of a ruler just hoarding over us- but again, in this case, he made an exception.  Lincoln was the powerful star- and of course, we are left to answer, why would a man, so bent on equality of humans, elevate this one man- the only man he would elevate- it wasn't just because he was the president.  It was because he embodied what a great leader truly was- and this is the nice idea that I think resonates through the ages.      Agreed, average leaders and I will say most leaders give lip service to serving all people, but we can see by their actions, that a lot of that is propaganda.  Most are in it to win it.  It's easy to get to the top and view oneself as better than the rest of us.  It's just natural to do what's best for me or my team, so to speak.  It's natural to want to put enemies in submission- prove own own power and greatness.  But Lincoln was different- his compassion for his enemy, his unwavering commitment to integrity, his ability to see beyond his current moment, is a star- something that outlasts us all.  The South as well as the North mourned deeply Lincoln's loss.  The procession described in this poem where the casket was taken from Washington DC back to Illinois was something that had never happened in the history of the United States and has not happened since.      It is a legacy of leadership that Whitman not only admired but also immortalized.  It's also a legacy that I find inspiring no matter how great or small our little ships are, if we are ever called to be a captain.  It's something to think about when we smell lilacs in the Spring.  For Whitman every time we smelled those flowers, we grieve, but also we remember- because just as lilacs return every Spring, so does a new opportunity- the end of the Lilac poem looks to the future.  In another of Whitman's great poems, “Crossing Brooklyn Ferry” he says this, “We use you, and do not cast you aside-we plant you          permanently within us,       We fathom you not-we love you-there is perfection in          you also,       You furnish your parts toward eternity,       Great or small, you furnish your parts toward the soul.”  It's a nice idea, Lincoln was a man, but for Whitman he embodied an ideal we can all aspire to: integrity, humility, compassion and grace- in defeat and death but also in victory.  Whitman believed in those ideals in leadership- leadership that embraces those things can lead a ship to harbor in scary waters.  Perhaps, when we smell the lilacs, we can be reminded that those ideals are also planted in us.     Thanks for listening.  We hope you enjoyed our discussions of Walt Whitman.  Next episode, we will look farther into the American past to even deeper roots of democracy on the American continent, the Iroquois constitution.  So, thanks for listening, as always please share a link to our podcast to a friend or friends.  Push it out on your social media platforms via twitter, Instagram, facebook or linked in.  Text an episode to a friend, and if you are an educator, visit our website for instructional resources.  Peace out.                 

The Ornstein & Chapman Podcast
Weekend Preview: Ralf Rangnick Surprise, Thiago's Grass-Cutter & Newcastle Entertaining Again

The Ornstein & Chapman Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 51:48


Hosts Dan Bardell and George Elek are joined by bet365's Steve Freeth to reflect on The Athletic's exclusive story, that Ralf Rangnick has agreed a deal to manage Manchester United until the end of the season! Our very own German football expert Raphael Honigstein gives us the low-down on the 'Godfather of Gegenpressing' and the guys discuss what his appointment has done for United's chances at Stamford Bridge on Sunday... Plus, whether Arsenal will be able to bounce back from their annual Anfield humiliation against Eddie Howe's ultra-attacking Newcastle, why there are no more excuses for both Brentford and Everton, why Dan's sceptical of all the recent praise for Graham Potter and why Leeds' teenager Joe Gelhardt is like a young Wayne Rooney.

Grazing Grass Podcast
e40. Low Input Management with Ohio Land and Cattle

Grazing Grass Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 58:28


In this episode of The Grazing Grass Podcast, Cal talks with James Coffelt of Ohio Land and Cattle! We discuss low input management of the ranch's Angus cows, as well as, paddlefish and hunting.  Show notes available at https://grazinggrass.com/episodes/40

Green Living with Tee
Why You Should Stop Using Pesticides and Reimagine Your Lawns with Linda Yin

Green Living with Tee

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 29:18


Linda is a blogger, mother, and activist against toxic lawn applications. For the past five years, she has written about and promoted a sustainable, more mindful lifestyle, and she is the woman behind the “Ban TruGreen” petition, which demands that TruGreen, a nationwide lawn care company, switch to a non-toxic formula. How You Can Help Raise Awareness: Educate yourself on your city's pest control and pesticide use. Pesticides can be found everywhere - in cities, suburbs, and rural areas. Write to your state/municipality/HOA/block about safer pesticide use, banning pesticides altogether, or at the very least, providing a schedule of when pesticides will be used. Here are letter/flyer/brochure templates you can leverage. Sign the petition to demand that TruGreen switch to a non-toxic formula: www.change.org/bantrugreen. Make “pesticide-free” or “ban TruGreen” signs for your lawn to raise awareness with neighbors and to let them know they can walk safely on your grass. The Truth About TruGreen: 53% of TruGreen's products include ingredients that are possible carcinogens. 41% of TruGreen's products include ingredients that are banned or restricted in other countries. 34% of TruGreen's products include ingredients that are known or suspected endocrine disruptors. 28% of TruGreen products include ingredients that are known or suspected reproductive toxins. 100% of TruGreen's products include ingredients that threaten our environment, including our water supplies. 0% of TruGreen's pesticide application signs provide the exact time the lawn was sprayed, putting humans and animals at risk! Follow Linda: Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/lindayin/?hl=en Websites: www.lindayin.com and www.change.org/bantrugreen  __________________________________ Follow Therese "Tee" Forton-Barnes and The Green Living Gurus: The Green Living Gurus Website: https://thegreenlivinggurus.com/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/greenlivinggurus/ Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCW7_phs1GZUPzG21Zgjnqtw Healthy Living Group Facebook Green Living Gurus Page Facebook For further info contact: Therese "Tee" Forton-Barnes Email: Tee@TheGreenLivingGurus.com Cell: 716-868-8868

Let's Get Active
The Grass Isn't Always Greener

Let's Get Active

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2021 86:29


Cameron Posey aka Camo Boomin join us to speak about how being perfect isn't reachable but striving to be is. Understanding that you can't compare your life to others lives that you see on social media. Listen to hear some of the reminiscing and breakdown of other good points we hit on like social media, spiteful hate, etc.

Blue Tiger Podcast
Eternals! And Other Fun Stuff

Blue Tiger Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2021 67:41


From the back of the fridge, pull that old jar of TIGER MILK and chug the chunks as the Revenge crew rip it old school style!a bit late, due to some technical hick-ups, but we still bring that auditory pain as Big Bry breaks down the new Marvel flick, Eternals. Then we take a trip back to the trailer park to see what’s coming our way this holiday season. Later the Milkman lays it down with the publication from the always badass AdHouse, “Grass of Parnassus.” A futuristic Instagram comic that’s now in physical print, from the always inspiring creative duo, Kathryn and Stuart Immonen.Look for us at Emerald City Comic Con 2021, Dec. 4-5; exhibitor hall, Critical Entertainment booth.And remember… revenge is best served BLUE TIGER! Thanks for reading Blue Tiger Revenge! Subscribe for free to receive new posts and support my work. Subscribe at bluetigerrevenge.substack.com

Rivertown Community Church
Never Satisfied :: The Grass Is Always Greeer Pt. 3

Rivertown Community Church

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2021 40:46


Never Satisfied :: The Grass Is Always Greeer Pt. 3 by Rivertown Community Church

KSL Greenhouse
Is It Ok To Give My Lawn A Buzz?

KSL Greenhouse

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2021 14:07


Anthony is wondering how to prevent a bug infestation in the Spring. Is beer good for your yard? Taun puts an end to this myth. Susan has scrub oak growing in her backyard. She wants to know the best way to get rid of them. Ruth has a few leaves on her lawn that she wants to know if they will be harmful to the grass.  Welcome to The KSL Greenhouse Show! Hosts Maria Shilaos and Taun Beddes tackle your gardening questions, talk plants, and offer tips for an amazing yard. Listen Saturdays 8am to 11am at 1160 AM & 102.7 FM, kslnewsradio.com, or on the KSL Newsradio App. Follow us on Facebook and Instagram at @kslgreenhouse. #KSLGreenhouse  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

KSL Greenhouse
From The Garden To The Table For Thanksgiving

KSL Greenhouse

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2021 15:43


Since Thanksgiving is next week Taun talks about sweet potatoes and what it takes to grow them and how to get the best flavors out of your sweet potatoes for your Thanksgiving table.  Welcome to The KSL Greenhouse Show! Hosts Maria Shilaos and Taun Beddes tackle your gardening questions, talk plants, and offer tips for an amazing yard. Listen Saturdays 8am to 11am at 1160 AM & 102.7 FM, kslnewsradio.com, or on the KSL Newsradio App. Follow us on Facebook and Instagram at @kslgreenhouse. #KSLGreenhouse  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

How To Love Lit Podcast
Walt Whitman - Leaves Of Grass - The Poetry Of Young America!

How To Love Lit Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2021 41:53


Walt Whitman - Leaves Of Grass - The Poetry Of Young America!   Hi, I'm Christy Shriver and we're here to discuss books that have changed the world and have changed us.    I'm Garry Shriver and this is the How to Love Lit Podcast.  This episode and next, we tackle one of the most intimidating poets in the American Canon- Walt Whitman.  He is the generally accepted and almost uncontested greatest contribution America has made to the great canon of World Literature- the ones comprised of those that really intimidate- William Shakespeare,  James Joyce, Gustave Flaubert, Vladimir Nabokov, Gabriel Garcia Marquez, Pablo Neruda, Ovid, Goethe, Neitche-, Dante- people like that- there are not too many Americans that make that list.    And he does intimidate me- truly.  And honestly he baffles me.  The things he says seem easy to understand except I don't actually understand them.  They are beautiful and interesting but also uncomfortable.  People love his writing and always have, but he's also very offensive- and he offends all equally- the prude and the religious, but also the secular and intellectual- he offends the socialist as well as the capitalist.  Name an identity- he references it and somewhat dismantles it.  Primarily because he absolutely rejects group identities as we think of them today- even in terms of nations but in every sense.  To use his words, “I am large; I contains multitudes” that's a paraphrase from my favorite selection of his work which we'll read today.      For me he's such a curious person in part because of the time he emerged in what was called then the American experiment- and I honestly think his perspective has a lot to do from this unique time period, of course this is not different than how I feel about all of the writers we discuss.  But being born in 1819, the United States of America is only 36 years older than he is.  His parents were present during the Revolutionary War and have a real respect for what people were trying to do here, and how unusual and fragile democratic government actually was or really is.  We, at least we here in the United States, live with the feeling that this country just always has been- that democracy just happens.  That elections are just things that have always happened.  Most students today in this country don't even think about it. Democracy is the normal order in how things occur; equality and liberty are just virtues that everyone agrees are important- by one definition or another.  But None of this was reality and common understanding in 1819 in almost any part of the planet Earth.  And most of the world looked at the United States with contempt- a bunch of non-educated hillbillies living in some weird schemata that wouldn't stand the test of time.  There was no culture in this country, by international standards.  We had no great art, no history to speak of, we weren't writing great philosophies or composing great music.  We had not produced a Voltaire, or a Jean-Jacques Rousseau.  We had no Catherine the Great or Cosimo De Medici sponsoring great artistic ventures.        And so enters Walt Whitman- to which he would say, and did say- whoopdeedoo Europe- you are correct- we have none of that, and I celebrate that we don't.      I want to begin with this famous poem by Whitman.  Of course, it's from Leaves of Grass which we'll introduce in a second, but if you are reading the Death bed edition which is the one I have- again I'll explain all that later, it's in the beginning, that very first part called “Inscriptions”.  Let me read Whitman's famous words on America.     I hear America singing, the varied carols I hear,  Those of mechanics, each one singing his as it should be blithe and strong,  The carpenter singing his as he measures his plank or beam,  The mason singing his as he makes ready for work, or leaves off work,  The boatman singing what belongs to him in his boat, the deckhand singing on the steamboat deck,  The shoemaker singing as he sits on his bench, the hatter singing as he stands,  The wood-cutter's song, the ploughboy's on his way in the morning, or at noon intermission or at sundown,  The delicious singing of the mother, or of the young wife at work, or of the girl sewing or washing,  Each singing what belongs to him or her and to none else,  The day what belongs to the day—at night the party of young fellows, robust, friendly,  Singing with open mouths their strong melodious songs.      Garry, I want to hear your first thoughts when you read this poem.  Let me start by saying, notice how celebratory it is.  America is singing carols- not dirges- and the song of the American is the song of hard work- not the Vienna Philharmonic- which by the way was founded in 1842.  America was not building art, as commonly understood- we were building lives- free lives- lives where people lived with the choices they made, but they got to make their own choices.  This is very different than anywhere else- places more cultured, more sophisticated, more idealized.  We don't have serfs working for great lords or ladies.  We have no jet-setters so to speak- or people of privilege or high cultural standing- In America we work hard,  but we work for ourselves-and everyone does it- and that is something we're proud of.  There is no shame in labor.  There's a song to that.      Yes, it's very much about homestead.  It's about individualism and taking responsibility to create it- About creating your own little corner of the world.  This is exactly the idea that Alexis DeToqueville referenced in his important work Democracy in America.  As a Frenchman, he was totally surprised and impressed with this very thing that Whitman is talking about.  This poem is a complete refutation of the English feudal system and that's what Northerners loved about it.  In the South, and what was so offensive to Whitman when he spent time in New Orleans was that they were trying to recreate that hierarchal system where some people outrank others to the point of claiming they weren't even human- and that, to Whitman, was the complete opposite of what the entire American Experiment was about.      His parents were clearly on team America- he had one brother named George Washington Whitman, another named Thomas Jefferson Whitman and a third named Andrew Jackson Whitman.       Ha- I guess that IS a statement.  This unique time of history in which he lived allowed Whitman to see such great contrasts in America- he saw democracy and success found in personal effort.  He saw vast amounts of unpolluted natural beauty, but he also saw evil at its most deranged, and pain and loneliness at its most intense.  We have to remember that his parents lived through the glorious revolutionary war, but he lived during the treacherous Civil War- and his perspective and life experience is very different. He admired the expanse of the West. He loved the natural beauty of this continent, but he also was horrified and despised to its core – the. National plague that has defined and still defines so much of the American story- this legacy of slavery- his views on such, btw- got him fired by more than one employer, btw.  At this time, newspapers were owned and operated by political parties, and he was always slipping in views that the political operatives didn't like- so he got fired.       HA!  Well, I guess some things never change.    One thing that baffles and almost offends most academics is Whitman's absolute nothing of an academic background.  His parents were basically illiterate, his family was excessively large and chaotic; today we would say dysfunctional.  He had one sibling that actually had to be committed to an insane asylum.   His formal education was inadequate because his father sent him out to work.  It's so ironic that the greatest American poet had no formal tutelage to except what he scrounged up for himself in his own self-taught way by reading in libraries and attending operas.  He didn't have that option.  His father was also pretty much a financial failure.  He was a carpenter by trade, but had also had a little property.  His father speculated in real estate after moving to Brooklyn, NY, but wasn't all that great at business and ended up losing most of it.      And of course, that's the problem with the land of opportunity- you are kind of out there on your own to make it or break it.  And people were very aware of this.  There was no guarantee, at all, that America would even survive as a country.  It was still an experiment.  No one else was living like this.  Europeans had monarchies; the South American countries were colonies.  Our neighbors to the East were living in empires.  Only this little backward nation in a corner of North America was trying to do this weird thing.    And Whitman loved it.  He really did.  He loved the land.  He loved the cities.  He loved the people.  He spent the first 36 years of his life walking around and observing life, mostly in New York City and Long Island (which was NOT a suburb of New York at that time).    He loved the libraries and spent tons of time there reading.  He loved music, especially opera, which we'll notice has a strong influence on how he writes.  He loved learning, listening and observing, and this is what he wrote about.  I heard one lecturer say that he was the first non-blind poet- which I thought was weird and what made it stand out.  But what the professor meant was that most poets were writing about their inner life, things from their imagination- think Edgar Allan Poe and “The Raven”, but Whitman, in many cases, was transcribing things that he was seeing and hearing in urban life- and this was very different.  He would catalogue it- to use a word that is often used to describe this thing that we just saw him do in the poem we just read, make these long lists of details in these long sentences.         I also want to point out that it was this desire to self-educate that led him, like many of his day, to be influenced and challenged by the great Ralph Waldo Emerson. We'll do an entire episode or more than one of him, but Emerson's non-conventional ideas about nature and the soul and our inter-connectedness, although ideas that were commonly accepted in the far East, were new on this continent.      True- well, In 1855, something happened.  Whitman self-publishes the book Leaves of Grass.  This first version was only 95 pages long- that's compared to the death bed one which has 415 in my copy.   There was no author's name on the cover.  Instead, on the first page there was this image of a man in laborer's clothes.  Whitman only reveals that he's the author through one of the first unnamed poems calling himself, “Walt Whitman, an American, one of the roughs, a kosmos.”    If you look up the word Kosmos in the dictionary it will tell you that that word means- a complex orderly self-inclusive system- which is interesting to think about someone describing themselves as- but it's a Greek word.  It's also a Biblical word- which is how I believe Whitman would know it.  It is used in the New Testament to mean the universe or the creation as a whole- that's how Whitman defines himself in this poem “Song of Myself”  and the context of how he wants us to understand his work and who we are as individuals.  We too are kosmos.      Well, it didn't start out very cosmic- that's for sure.  It's a miracle Leaves of Grass came to be read by anyone.  He self-published it, literally type-setting it himself.  He printed 795 copies and sold almost none of them.     Don't you wish you had one of those originals?    I know right, well, people do.  In case you're in the market, there are 200 that are still around, and in 2014, one sold at Christie's for $305,000.  It's so ironic- Whitman struggled financially until the day he died and celebrated working people in everything he wrote.  What do you think he would think of that, Christy?    I have zero doubt, he would love it.  Totally.  Beyond being the book's publisher, he also was the book's publicist.  He sent copies to the leading poets of the day trying to drum up some good reviews.  Whittier was said to thrown his copy into the fire he was so offended and outraged- the homoerotic imagery was more than he could handle, but Ralph Waldo Emerson saw it for what it was and wrote Whitman back an amazing letter of encouragement.  Let me quote Emerson, “I am not blind to the worth of the wonderful gift of Leaves of Grass. I find it the most extraordinary piece of wit and wisdom that America has yet contributed.”  And of course, to this day, many world class literary scholars still think this about Whitman.       What I find humorous about Whitman is that he wrote glowing reviews of his book himself secretly and published them as if they were written by other people.       Yeah, he was working the influencer thing way back before that was a thing- He also, printed Emerson's actual glowing review when he reprinted the book in 1856, except he didn't get Emerson's permission to do so.  He put Emerson's words, “I greet you at the beginning of a great career” on the spine of the book and he published the entire letter with a long reply andress to Dear Master.”  It was NOT received well by Emerson.      I can see that as being slightly presumptuous.      Of course it was, but I would be tempted as well.  He really admired Emerson, in fact this is what he said about Emerson's influence on his writing.  “I was simmering, simmering, simmering; Emerson brought me to a boil.”    I want us to read the very first part of Song of Myself which was the first poem    I Celebrate myself, and sing myself,  And what I assume you shall assume,  For every atom belonging to me as good belongs to you.  I loafe and invite my soul,  I lean and loafe at my ease observing a spear of summer grass.  My tongue, every atom of my blood, form'd from this soil, this air,  Born here of parents born here from parents the same, and their parents the same,  I, now thirty-seven years old in perfect health begin,  Hoping to cease not till death.  Creeds and schools in abeyance,  Retiring back a while sufficed at what they are, but never forgotten,  I harbor for good or bad, I permit to speak at every hazard,  Nature without check with original energy.  This is what I mean when I say, it seems like it's very simple to understand except I've read this poem hundreds of times and am still slightly confused as to what he means.  The term for this is ambiguous- he makes you, as a reader, put your own interpretation, put yourself into the lines to force the meaning out of it.      True, and if you take it at face value just superficially, it may seem that this is a narcissist celebrating egotism, but it clearly doesn't.  It also could be misunderstood to mean he celebrates idleness and laziness, but that doesn't seem to be right either.    Exactly- I love these first lines.  First of all, they are so iconic.  One thing Whitman is known for besides the cataloguing which I mentioned when we read I Hear America Singing, is this thing that today we call Free Verse. Whitman is often given credit for inventing the concept, although that is debatable.  But what is obvious is that there is no rhyme or meter of any kind at all and there isn't supposed to be.  He doesn't want anything to rhyme.  Instead, he wants to write in these really long sentences.  Every stanza is a single sentence, and he is going to do that through the entire poem.  Whitman felt you couldn't get your idea out in these little short phrases of iambic tetrameter like his Whittier, the guy who threw his book in the fire, was doing.  Whitman wanted, above all else, to create a sense of intimacy between himself and the person reading- and so he wanted to make sure you could follow his idea- from idea to idea.  He got this idea from two places- first he copied the idea from the one book he had been familiar with since his childhood- the King James Version of the Bible.  He copied the style like you see in the Psalms or even the Sermon on the Mount.  He also got the idea from the opera- if you think about opera- you also have these long phrases- that end with things like figaro figaro fiiiigaro-     Is that your impression of the opera?    Well, as you know, I enjoy the opera.  I haven't always, to be honest.  A few years ago, my good friend, I've mentioned her on the podcast before, Millington AP Literature/ Lang teacher Amy Nolette, coerced me to attend with her- and I did.  She is an accomplished musician so she really taught me how to admire what was going on- and we went every year for several years until Covid hit.  But, having said that, I'm fairly sure, that's my best attempt at singing opera.      But back to Whitman, so one of the first things that Whitman is famous for today is this concept of Free Verse- it was innovative then, but now, it doesn't seem that big of a deal.  That was a big deal, but a bigger deal to Whitman were the ideas he was putting out there.    I celebrate myself- not because I'm so important- not because I have all this amazing heritage or skill or anything- I celebrate myself because I have an essence that is 100% unique to me.  Let's read it again.     I Celebrate myself, and sing myself,  And what I assume you shall assume,  For every atom belonging to me as good belongs to you.  It's not accidental that he throws in there that scientific language.  And this is where he will offend the capitalist or competitive side of us.  He makes this bold assertion- in this poetic way- to say- what, do you think you're that much better than me- you are made of the exact same material I am- we're both made of atoms- science teaches us that- and for every atom belonging to me as good belongs to you.      In some sense it's the I'm okay- you're okay attitude, but taking it up a notch- I celebrate myself- you celebrate yourself.      For sure, and something we all give lip-service to today but no one actually really believes.  I have a creative writing assignment that I ask my students to do every year.  We take another Whitman poem called “There was a Child Went Forth” that talks about identity and the physical objects and places that influence who you are- it's a wonderful poem, anyway, I ask my students to write a poem using Whitman's style and technique about THEIR lives.  I tell them we're going to read them in small groups, and if they like what they wrote and feel comfortable,  we are going to print them and put them outside my door in the hallway for everything to read.  At first they are very very resistant to the idea.  They all hate it- first because it's writing, secondly because it's poetry- but mostly because they don't think they want their lives sprawled on the hallway of the school.  I had a sweet darling child, actually a quiet student, raise her hand in protest and literallty say, I don't want to do this.  I can't do this.  All I do is go to school and work- there is nothing interesting at all about my life.      Ha!  She seems to have missed the point.  She didn't want to celebrate herself and she's exactly the kind of person Whitman loved celebrating.    Exactly- and lots of my kids are like that- they work at Sonic, Chick-Fila- the mall- mowing lawns- but in her case, it turns out she is way more interesting and her poem is on the wall right now.  I may take a picture and post it on our website, so you can see them all.  I'm very proud of my kiddos- not just because they produced good poems but because lots of them are hardworking.       I will say, that next phrase leads us to think that Whitman is a lazy person.  He extols the virtue of loafing.  But of course, what I know about his biography which we'll get more into next week when we talk about his experiences in the Civil War and all of that, but Whitman was the very opposite of lazy.  He was an extremely physical hard worker.      True- Let's read the lines you're talking about..    I loafe and invite my soul,  I lean and loafe at my ease observing a spear of summer grass.  When he says I loaf and invite my soul- he's getting into the philosopher side of him that is so complex and we really don't even have time to go there today, but it's that old idea of contemplating- today what we call mindfulness.  And I have to admit, I'm not good at this.        He really believes in mindfulness although he didn't know we renamed his concept for him.  Loafe- meaning chill out- turn off the phone, turn off the tv, turn off the computer and invite your soul into yourself.  Chill out!!!  Stop and observe a spear of grass.  Just look at it- let your mind go there- let it focus on something small- it's the kind of thing the yoga instructors keep telling us to do, that we rarely heed but we all know we should.      Exactly- attention and silence- he things they are indispensable to a sane existence- and two things I'm not all that good at.  And then we get to these last two sentences in this opening little poem-    My tongue, every atom of my blood, form'd from this soil, this air,  Born here of parents born here from parents the same, and their parents the same,  I, now thirty-seven years old in perfect health begin,  Hoping to cease not till death.  Creeds and schools in abeyance,  Retiring back a while sufficed at what they are, but never forgotten,  I harbor for good or bad, I permit to speak at every hazard,  Nature without check with original energy.  There's a lot to say- but he's going to say- I'm proud to be from this place- my parents are from this place.  I'm 37- that is not young.  He is not a child prodigy- he's writing his first book late in life, relatively- he knows that- but he says I'm in good health and I begin- and I'm not going to stop until death- I'm going to live well all the way til the end- I'm not going to give up on myself.  Ever.      I can see why he's inspiring.  And I to get back to this idea of origins.  You know being an American today is something lots of people are proud of (although it is very American to trash our own country) but that's part of our national ethos- but even these same people proudly display their passport.  America is a powerful country and a rich country.  At that time it was a new country- and new countries don't have the safety of heritage and sometimes the people who come from them have trouble taking pride in their heritage.    I totally know what you're talking about.  There was a listener who connected with us through our Instagram page and showed us some beautiful pictures he had taken.  They were truly amazing- not only were the mountains breathtakingly gorgeous in their own right, but his eye for framing was genius.  I messaged him back and told him what I thought of his art.  We went back and forth and I finally asked him.  Where are you from? And he would never tell me.  He said he was from Central Asia and so fort which I eventually gathered he is from one of the new countries formally part of the USSR.   I'm not saying he was ashamed of where he was from, I didn't get that sense, but he seemed intimated that we were from America- a place that seems so far away and idealized from his point of view.  Whitman would tell this young man- you're from that wonderful air,  from wonderful heritage, from atoms just like ours- not just accept it celebrate it.    Because, as I read onward, he seems to imply, this is the attitude that breeds great things that breeds beautiful things but if it doesn't- that's okay as well- keep going all the way til death- compete not with others but with yourself- as he goes to self- publish the same book 8 more times until he does .    Ha!  I guess that's true.      I want to read the last sentence again of that opening because he sets up a lot of the rest of his writings with something of a warning-    Creeds and schools in abeyance,  Retiring back a while sufficed at what they are, but never forgotten,  I harbor for good or bad, I permit to speak at every hazard,  Nature without check with original energy.  Again- that language seems simple but at the same time I have to really work at what he's going to say.  But I have an interpretation- he's going to say this- put away your school learning and your religious training when you read this.  Sit back because I'm going to say some really hard things- that's what he means with that word “hazard”- but they are not mean- they are natural- it's about the energy of being alive.  It's the beauty of being you, of being a physical body, of being an inter-connected spirit with connections to other people and part of this physical space.      And of course, it's that celebration of the physical body that kept getting him censored. Even Ralph Waldo Emerson later when he was reproducing his book begged him to self-censor what was thinly veiled homo-erotic passages, but he just wouldn't.  He didn't see them as erotic- he didn't even see sex like that.  For him sexuality and the physical body had a self-evidence important place in our lives and had to be brought out in the open- be it a hazard or not.  And again, it kind of was a hazard, he lost a really good job in Washington at one point because his boss found a copy of leaves of Grass in his desk and found it obscene.      Poor guy- well, that takes us to the title- Leaves of Grass- and what that even means.  I mentioned that Whitman was famous for his style or innovative literary technique, he has been increasingly praised for his innovative ideas about the body, the self, consciousness- he was one of the first America poets to even write about consciousness- the other one btw is Emily Dickinson.  But probably the thing I like the best about Whitman, and this is me, personally, is his ability to really capture a wonderful metaphor.  He could just say things in an understandable and pretty way- and this is what poetry really is all about- for my money.    This phrase that is the title – Leaves of Grass- it means something.  First let's read the first part of Song of Myself that talks about grass- I'd ask you to read all of it but I think we might get lost. Song of Myself number 6.      A child said What is the grass? fetching it to me with full hands;  How could I answer the child? I do not know what it is any more than he.  I guess it must be the flag of my disposition, out of hopeful green stuff woven.    Or I guess it is the handkerchief of the Lord,  A scented gift and remembrancer designedly dropt,  Bearing the owner's name someway in the corners, that we may see and remark, and say Whose?    Or I guess the grass is itself a child, the produced babe of the vegetation.    Or I guess it is a uniform hieroglyphic,  And it means, Sprouting alike in broad zones and narrow zones,  Growing among black folks as among white,  Kanuck, Tuckahoe, Congressman, Cuff, I give them the same, I receive them the same.  And now it seems to me the beautiful uncut hair of graves.  When Whitman loafs around and stares at grass- he sees a picture of America- or a picture of any democracy any group of people that understand that they are one poeple- of which America was the example he knew, but he's not exclusionary by any means.  He says, look, every single blade of grass is totally different and yet in some sense the same.  He calls it a uniform hieroglyphic- what an interesting turn of phrase.  It's and I use his words here “black folks as among white, kanuck, Tuckahoe, Congreeman, Cuff, I give to me the same, I receive them the same.”    For Whitman, the picture of America was a field of grass.  If we look at it, we see hopeful green woven stuff. The handkerchief of the Lord- but if we look at it closely we're all so different- and both things are truly beautiful.  It's a paradox.   He goes on to say, it's from the land, it's made up of the dust that is made up of the people of the land- I know it gets philosophical- and you can take it as far deep as you want to plunge with him.   But you don't have to get all that deep or esoteric if you don't want to.  You can just lay on the grass, and smell it and enjoy it- loaf on it- to use his words.    You know what I like about that entire image and about Whitman's entire philosophy.  He absolutely spoke of diversity, but he did not celebrate diversity- not like we think of doing that today.  He celebrates unity- and that's why this metaphor is the title.  Whitman had a very refined understanding of how easy we can rip each other apart- there is not more divisive time in American history than the 1850s and of course the 1860s- which are the war years.   He lived through the most divided time in American history and he could see it coming even in 1855.  But during his life time, he would see 2.5% of America's population die killing each other that was 750,000 people- if we would compare it to the population of America today- that would be over 7 million people.  Next week we will see how much he admired Lincoln and what he stood for, but as he understood the American experiment,  he believed in admiring differences and loving them, but identifying as a single group- first and foremost.  The dominant image here is of a single landscape- beautiful and united across time and space respecting the past not judging or condemning it- allowing ourselves to spring from it renewed and refreshed.   And I think that's where the universal appeal comes from.  If Whitman was just about American patriotism, maybe we'd like him in this country, but it would feel propagandistic.  His ideals are universal and apply to any group of people- anywhere.  And he's not afraid to admit-some of thing may be self-contradictory.  The first time I ever read Whitman was in college.  I went to school studying political science, but in my junior year I decided I didn't want to do that anymore and I was going to get an English major, well this meant I had to take almost exclusively classes that demanded intense reading- and all at the same time.  I read so much that they all ran together and my grades were not as good as they could have been had I had a healthier pace.  And in all that reading, not a whole lot stood out- but this little poem by Whitman actually did- I underlined it, and I kept the trade book I purchased at the time.  I actually still have it after all these years and so many moves.  In this little section, Whitman is talking in that intimate way that he talks to his reader- it's personal- it's in the second person- and at that time of my life- it was a very chaotic time to be honest- I had no idea what I was doing in my life, my mother had recently died, I had very little idea what I should do in the future- I had changed directions at the last moment- and these famous words just stood out.  Will you read them?  51  The past and present wilt—I have fill'd them, emptied them.  And proceed to fill my next fold of the future.  Listener up there! what have you to confide to me?  Look in my face while I snuff the sidle of evening,  (Talk honestly, no one else hears you, and I stay only a minute longer.)  Do I contradict myself?  Very well then I contradict myself,  (I am large, I contain multitudes.)  I concentrate toward them that are nigh, I wait on the door-slab.  Who has done his day's work? who will soonest be through with his supper?  Who wishes to walk with me?  Will you speak before I am gone? will you prove already too late?  Christy- what did that mean to you.      I really have no idea.  I think the line that I liked is the line everyone likes, “Do I contradict myself?  Very well then I contradict. Myself.”   It just made me feel better.  I knew I was full of inconsistencies. And Whitman just seemed to be saying- of course you are- everyone is- to understand that is just being honest.  Let it go.  Just concentrate on what is near- what you're doing today, supper- that sort of thing.  If you're successful- that's great- if you're a failure- what difference does it make- we're all the same atoms, we're all just leaves of grass.   He just made me feel okay.    Which I guess that would probably have made him happy- the bard of democracy- known as the good gray poet- speaking across time and space about what it means to be a human- to be a leaf of grass.  Thanks for listeninging- next episode- we will delve a little more into his adult life, read some of his most famous poems – those tributes to Abraham Lincoln- and finish our discussion of this amazing American.  AS always, please share about us with a friend or colleague- push out an episode on your social media feed, text an episode to a friend.  Connect with us on our social media at howtolovelitpodcast on facebook, Instagram, twitter, or Linkedin.  If you are a teacher, visit our website for teaching materials that provide ideas scaffolding for using our podcasts as instructional pieces in your classroom.      Peace out.      

MilkMaids
Grass Fed VS Grain Fed

MilkMaids

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 59:44


Grass fed beef vs grain fed beef, self explanatory, right? Turns out there is way more to this topic than you would think! We are covering everything from flavor and texture of the meat to management practices of the cows. Of course we also discuss labels, what they actually mean, and the future of grass fed beef. Our shout out this week goes to Spider City Brewing of Bend Oregon! This women owned business puts out some amazingly inspired beers. Check them out at https://spidercitybrewing.com/home As always, you can reach us at milkmaidspodcast@gmail.com Weekly Resources: https://extension.psu.edu/grass-fed-vs-grain-fed-beef https://www.mychicagosteak.com/steak-university/grain-fed-vs-grass-fed-steaks https://www.mychicagosteak.com/steak-university/how-the-usda-grades-your-steak https://jetfresh.net/santa-carota-beef-grass-fed/ https://www.discovermagazine.com/health/what-makes-grass-fed-beef-different-and-are-you-buying-the-real-thing https://www.americangrassfed.org/about-us/our-standards/ --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/milkmaids/message

Ben Fordham: Highlights
'Dead in the water': MPs to reject plan to ban grass parking at SCG

Ben Fordham: Highlights

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 5:04


The NSW government is expected to ditch a plan to remove a popular car park at Moore Park and replace it with a synthetic cricket pitch. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Disruptors for GOOD
Creating a Direct Market for Sustainable, Regenerative and Family-Owned Farms - Cliff Pollard // Founder of Cream Co. Meats

Disruptors for GOOD

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 27:47


In episode 119 of the Disruptors for GOOD podcast I speak with Cliff Pollard, Founder of Cream Co. Meats, on creating a direct market for sustainable, regenerative and family-owned farms. If you enjoy this podcast, please rate and review the show. It's a huge help. Thanks!CREAM CO.'S MISSION IS TO REVOLUTIONIZE A HIGHLY COMMODITIZED INDUSTRY BY CREATING NEW OPPORTUNITIES FOR PEOPLE TO ENJOY ANIMAL PROTEINS RESPONSIBLY.Cream Co. is committed to supporting and working alongside independent producers to deliver the highest quality, best-tasting meats we can find. Sometimes that means bringing best-in-class programs to new markets. At others, it's developing a new program from the grass up.At a minimum, all of the Cream Co. programs are hormone and antibiotic free. Most of their partners undergo annual third-party auditing including CCOF Organic, Land to Market™ Regenerative, Certified Humane, Non-GMO Project Verified, and American Grass-fed and Grass-finished.Through a decade working in the Bay Area food industry, Cliff has been constantly inspired by the local food movement. Over time, he began to envision a transparent marketplace that could support sustainable and regenerative ranches through an aggregate and direct marketing model, while providing customers the ease and efficiencies they depended on from large scale distributors.Cream Co. was founded in 2016 to even the playing field between mainstream and farm-direct distribution. The company sources meat and forges partnerships that value quality over quantity, flavor over convenience, and transparency at every step.Cream Co. is an Oakland based business committed to supporting local California ranches wherever possible; over 75% of their partners are small producers in California, Oregon, and Washington.Today, Cream Co. distributes, direct markets and directly invests in over 20 sustainable, regenerative and family-owned farms. They've built a team of industry veterans who care deeply about preserving the Bay's food community, and continually invest in their processing facility to deepen roots in Oakland.Listen to more Causeartist podcasts here.Check out:Partner with us - Learn moreImpactInvestor.io - Discover impact investors from around the world.Podcast Made with TransistorPodcast cover design Made with CanvaBuild amazing web platforms with Webflow

Hack
Young people are suing NSW police

Hack

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 30:00


Splendour in the Grass is the country's biggest music festival, but over the last few years more young people have spoken up about the disturbing ways they were stripsearched by NSW Police at the event. In most cases, no drugs were found. Now they're taking the cops to court. Meet the young Aussie who's created an environmentally friendly and cheap sanitary pad out of bananas. Plus, have you ever thought about the science behind your name? Research shows it could impact our job opportunities and social circles. Live guests: Dr Vicki Sentas, senior lecturer at UNSW's School of Law, Society & Criminology Mursal Azadzoi, student and creator of the Nana Pad

Professional Contestants
ProCo Episode 178: Gas, Grass, or Ham - Would I Lie to You

Professional Contestants

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 59:41


We go to school. We work hard to get a good paying job. We save up our money with the hope of one day never having to work again. And the one thing we all are striving for in life? The thing that will let us know we've made it? Traveling the world and eating good food. Preferably ham. Preferably on someone else's dime. Zach thinks he is in the top 50% of personable humans, Jared's day rate is a BLT, and Adam has a fine dining experience. Talking Points Include: Michelin Star Dining, Sucking Meat From a Shell, Travel the World and Eat Good Food, Lions By Omission, Schrodinger's Penn Jillette, Smoked Meats?, The Shirley Temple of Ham Juice, Hameater Gin

Mandarin Monkey Podcast
#250 - 我們去滑草 | STORY | MANDARIN CHINESE LEARNING PODCAST

Mandarin Monkey Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 36:30


Todays story is based off our weekend activity this past weekend. Grass sledding. We found a big ol hill and took a plastic sled and our three children and attempoted a good old fashioned slide down it. You will learn lots of useful words around travel and sledding. Including how to use 'stuck', 'slide down', 'driving time' in Mandarin Chinese and much more. Website www.mandarinmonkey.com Intensive Course mandarinmonkey.com/intensive-course/ Awesome Blog mandarinmonkey.com/blog/ HIGH FIVE FRIDAYS MAILING LIST mandarinmonkey.com/high-5-fridays/ Get Amazing Mandarin tools www.patreon.com/mandarinmonkey Skritter - Learn to write Chinese skritter.com?ref=mandarinmonkey Use promoCode: MANDARINMONKEY for 10% off everything Discord discord.gg/KHjF7NNq8d The Mandarin Monkey Podcast is a Mandarin Chinese and English Edutainment podcast designed to entertain and educate. Tom (Native English speaker) and Ula (Native Mandarin Chinese speaker from Taiwan) discuss various topics from life to science, from movies to relationships. Also raising three multiracial children they discuss the challenges of raising bilingual children and with learning Mandarin, English and Taiwanese at home. The Mandarin Monkey podcast is a Chinglish (Chinese and English) podcast which also has a Mandarin story and vocabulary review session in every episode. Also, they have guests on the show from different backgrounds, linguists, authors, creators all the way to doctors. Hope you enjoy. #mandarinmonkey #chinglish #Mandarinpodcast #Edutainment

Born to Win Podcast - with Ronald L. Dart

Is it really possible for a man to know God? Can a man understand God, or is it just really too high for us? To be sure, there are things about God that are a little tough for us. How can the finite comprehend the infinite? How can you grapple with a God who can just say the word and, out of nothing, create a universe that is 15 Billion light years in every direction?Men have hung a lot of labels on God that really don’t help very much. They say that God is omnipresent. That is, he is in every tree, every blade of Grass. There is no place where God is not, they tell us. They say he is omnipotent. That there is nothing too great for God. He is powerful beyond anything we can grasp. The say he is omniscient, that is that he knows everything there is to know and maybe some things that aren’t there to know.But there is something that tends to get lost in all of these omnis: while God is infinite, he is also personal. That while God is or can be wherever he wishes to be, there is a place where God is. And it is the idea of a personal God that has gotten lost in some modern theology. Francis Schaeffer calls him the God who is there. And God said something very important to Jeremiah about this subject— something that gives us a lot of hope and encouragement. I don’t where I would personally be without this short passage and what it tells me. We’ll find in Jeremiah, chapter nine.

The Stephen King Podcast
Bonus Ep. 44 - Writer Alex Grass Woken By Dr. Sleep

The Stephen King Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 49:09


Welcome to bonus episode 44 of - The Stephen King Podcast  - Constant and New Listeners! Horror author - Alex Grass - tells how Stephen King's - Doctor Sleep - woke him up and was instrumental in changing his life. This wake up call propelled Alex into writing his first horror novel - Black River Lantern. Have a listen and found out how all this came to be. About The Author: Born in Harrisburg, PA, Alexander Grass lived in Philadelphia, Israel, and a few other places before settling in Brooklyn with his wife and three kids. Check out his website -  Alex Grass - for details. In this podcast: 1) Intro 2) Interview 3) Outro   --------------------------------------------------------------- Intro Music - Don't Fear The Reaper - Blue Oyster Cult Outro Music - Stand by Me by Ben E. King ------------------------------------------------------------------- iTunes - The Stephen King Podcast. ------------------------------------------------------------------- RSS Feed - RSS. ------------------------------------------------------------------- Direct Download Link - The Stephen King Podcast - Bonus Episode 44 ------------------------------------------------------------------- You can find the podcast on the Internet at the following locations:                                          -------------------------------------------------------------------   -------------------------------------------------------------------   Support The Show - Thank You! 

Rivertown Community Church
Measuring Up :: The Grass Is Always Greener Pt. 2

Rivertown Community Church

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2021 40:53


Measuring Up :: The Grass Is Always Greener Pt. 2 by Rivertown Community Church

Down the Road Show
Episode 39: Love Sass & Grass podcast by Laura Hamilton on Cannabis Conversations with KC

Down the Road Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2021 57:55


Laura Hamilton talks about her new podcast Love, Sass, and Grass, menopause, relationships, and her Pussy Puppet. Yep, you read that right. Don't miss this special Cannabis Conversations with KC and follow her Spotify. Thank You BATT, Podcast Shirts and LOGO from at Dark Nyte Studios. https://darknytestudios.com/ Donate to Down the Road Show! https://paypal.me/downtheroadshow https://patreon.com/downtheroadshow --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/downtheroadshow/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/downtheroadshow/support

KSL Greenhouse
Exterminating Weeds

KSL Greenhouse

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 13, 2021 21:43


Kate in North Ogden who doesn't want to use chemicals on her weeds. She's always been anti chemical but now she's had enough of her weeds that keep growing. She asks Taun for recommendations on chemicals. Dee Ann has 40+ year old High Locus tree that she is wondering if she is damaging it by planting Japanese Seed grass around it.    Welcome to The KSL Greenhouse Show! Hosts Maria Shilaos and Taun Beddes tackle your gardening questions, talk plants, and offer tips for an amazing yard. Listen Saturdays 8am to 11am at 1160 AM & 102.7 FM, kslnewsradio.com, or on the KSL Newsradio App. Follow us on Facebook and Instagram at @kslgreenhouse. #KSLGreenhouse  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

KSL Greenhouse
Wrapping Trees and Winterizing Raspberries

KSL Greenhouse

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 13, 2021 16:59


Dave and Taun talk about wrapping trees especially young trees for the winter. We have a couple of videos about ways to wrap your trees on the KSL Greenhouse Show Facebook page. Jerry has raspberry patches that he is looking to winterize and wants to know some ways to go about it. Richard has had a nice green thick lawn in past Summers but lately it's had brown spots that have been infested with bugs. He want to know if he can treat this problem in the Fall.  Welcome to The KSL Greenhouse Show! Hosts Maria Shilaos and Taun Beddes tackle your gardening questions, talk plants, and offer tips for an amazing yard. Listen Saturdays 8am to 11am at 1160 AM & 102.7 FM, kslnewsradio.com, or on the KSL Newsradio App. Follow us on Facebook and Instagram at @kslgreenhouse. #KSLGreenhouse  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

KSL Greenhouse
Benefits Of Leaves

KSL Greenhouse

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 13, 2021 16:39


Dave and Taun talk about leaves and what you can do with them to benefit your lawn and garden rather than bag them up and take them to the landfill. Steve wants to know about overwatering trees and neurotic ring rot. Jen has blackberry bushes that are drying up and are not edible. She wants to know if it's a watering issue.    Welcome to The KSL Greenhouse Show! Hosts Maria Shilaos and Taun Beddes tackle your gardening questions, talk plants, and offer tips for an amazing yard. Listen Saturdays 8am to 11am at 1160 AM & 102.7 FM, kslnewsradio.com, or on the KSL Newsradio App. Follow us on Facebook and Instagram at @kslgreenhouse. #KSLGreenhouse  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

KSL Greenhouse
What Should Our Attitude Be Towards Wasps?

KSL Greenhouse

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 13, 2021 17:02


Stephanie has some dead house plants and is looking for recommendation on new plants that could last longer and what she could do to make that happen. Kent has yellow wasps surrounding the ground around his apple tree. He's looking for solutions to get rid of them. Dave asks Taun where wasps overwinter. This leads into a discussion on the pros about wasps and what our attitude should be towards them.  Welcome to The KSL Greenhouse Show! Hosts Maria Shilaos and Taun Beddes tackle your gardening questions, talk plants, and offer tips for an amazing yard. Listen Saturdays 8am to 11am at 1160 AM & 102.7 FM, kslnewsradio.com, or on the KSL Newsradio App. Follow us on Facebook and Instagram at @kslgreenhouse. #KSLGreenhouse    See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

KSL Greenhouse
Wow! That Tree Is Ancient!

KSL Greenhouse

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 13, 2021 15:21


Taun and Dave answer a texter's question on protecting trees from deer. Shawn has an old tree that's leaves fall earlier than expected. Taun helps with what could be the cause of the leaves falling so early. This leads into a discussion about old and ancient trees.    Welcome to The KSL Greenhouse Show! Hosts Maria Shilaos and Taun Beddes tackle your gardening questions, talk plants, and offer tips for an amazing yard. Listen Saturdays 8am to 11am at 1160 AM & 102.7 FM, kslnewsradio.com, or on the KSL Newsradio App. Follow us on Facebook and Instagram at @kslgreenhouse. #KSLGreenhouse  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

KSL Greenhouse
Elm Trees

KSL Greenhouse

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 13, 2021 16:31


Dave Mecham fills in for Maria this week. It should be that time of year for getting your lawn and garden ready for Winter although the weather hasn't felt like that lately. Dave and Taun talk about caring for plants in unusual weather and what you can do to get your garden ready for Winter. The guys also talk about Elm trees and what makes them the perfect tree for your yard.    Welcome to The KSL Greenhouse Show! Hosts Maria Shilaos and Taun Beddes tackle your gardening questions, talk plants, and offer tips for an amazing yard. Listen Saturdays 8am to 11am at 1160 AM & 102.7 FM, kslnewsradio.com, or on the KSL Newsradio App. Follow us on Facebook and Instagram at @kslgreenhouse. #KSLGreenhouse  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

How To Love Lit Podcast
Shirley Jackson - The Lottery - Her Most Famous Short Story!

How To Love Lit Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 13, 2021 47:25


Shirley Jackson - The Lottery - Her Most Famous Short Story!   Hi, I'm Christy Shriver, and we're here to discuss books that have changed the world and have changed us.    And I'm Garry Shriver and this is the How to love Lit Podcast.  Today we are finishing up our series on Shirley Jackson.  Last week we concluded our discussion of her most famous book, the one that inspired the Netflix series by the same name The Haunting of Hill House.  Today we are going to read the short story that made her a household name, “The Lottery.”    It has had its share of movie inspiration.  Anyone who has seen the opening of The Hunger Games would not be shocked at the plot of “The Lottery.”  It's inspired a bunch of other stories and movies besides that one; I think you mentioned the Stephen King one last week.  I'm sure there are way more than that if we sat here and thought about it.    True, and maybe I shouldn't have been, but I was actually surprised as to how scandalous this story was when it was first published.  If we're talking solely about violence, by today's standards, it's mild.  There is no blood or gore, it's definitely no Squid Games.    I agree- and I believe that is why this story- so deceptively simple and relatively tame- is actually taught in the eight grade in many school systems.  It's disturbing for reasons beyond the fact that someone is killed at the end- kiiling a main character is just par for the course in a standard English curriculum- in fact, that's the big joke among English teachers- we don't teach a story if we don't kill someone at the end.  “The Lottery” reads and feels so simple.  And it is…so why the sensation?        Let's talk about the sensation, it's definitely worth noticing how big a stir it actually created.    For starters, the story generated more negative letters and subscription cancellations than anything the New Yorker had ever published.  Jackson herself received over 300 letters just the summer it was published.  In her own words she said this, “I can count only 13 that spoke kindly to me.”    I want to point out that her mother, the ever-inspiring Geraldine could be counted on for a comment.  She wrote her daughter with this to say, “Dad and I did not care at all for your story…it does seem, dear, that this gloomy kind of story is what all you young people think about these days.  Why don't you write something to cheer people up?”    Dear Ole' Geraldine- at least she's consistent.  But Jackson refused to explain the meaning of the story.  She did once tell a journalist, “I suppose I hoped, by setting a particularly brutal rite in the present and in my own village, to shock the readers with a graphic demonstration of the pointless violence and general inhumanity of their own lives, but I gather that in some cases the mind just rebels.  The number of people who expected Mrs. Hutchinson to win a Bendix washer at the end would amaze you.”      Ha!  Well, I don't know how pointless violence and general inhumanity could have surprised anyone in 1948 when it was published.  That was right after world war 2, especially the United States, had to stare the reality in the face that we had stood by and turned a blind eye for almost a decade to the atrocities committed by Hitler, and there was no one more cultured or sophisticated than the German people.     I guess that's true, but of course…for Americans that was always…over there…we, self-righteously could always claim we were not capable of such things...    we after all were the victorious winners in that struggle between good and evil. And yet, Jackson's simple story does seem to be pointing an accusing finger at someone.    Yes, I totally think it does, and I do want us to take a different direction than many people who read this story.  At first pass, and this is how I've most often heard this story discussed, this is a story that rails against tradition, against not questioning authority, specifically religious authority, against patriarchy…all very easy things to attack and very common in the American canon.     Well, not just in the arena of literature either.  We've been attacking cultural norms in one form or another since American invented baseball as its own American sports ritual over the sport of the British Empire- football or better known here as soccer.     HA!  I guess that's true.  We also have a  way higher tolerance for gore than this story evokes- I mean we were comfortable with the headless horseman and the tell-tale heart.  There was something personal about the Lottery that went beyond attacking traditions or killing an innocent victim.    I also don't think many of us would cancel our subscription to our favorite media streaming service (which would be the modern day equivalent), or take the trouble to dig up someone's personal address and write them a personal letter if we did not feel personally attacked.  “The Lottery” got under people's skins because it was personal.  So, that's the question I want to ask?  If this story is about pointless violence and general inhumanity, and if I'm offended because I feel personally accused, how?      So, let's start- Christy, we talked about if we should read the entire story and then discuss it or if we should stop and start.  We've decided to stop and start, but hopefully we won't stop and start too much to be confusing, but just enough to be helpful- a difficult balance to strike.        True- Garry- we may fail, but let's give it a go.  Let's start with the first three paragraphs and then we'll interrupt.     Paragraphs 1-3    What are your thoughts?    Well, the thing that strikes me here is tone.  Look at the imagery and word choice- it's summer, there is fresh warmth- there are flowers blooming- there's not just grass there's richly green grass- this is the language of birth and beauty.   There is also a deliberate attempt to characterize these people as organized and civilized- the lottery is annual, it takes less than two hours, they eat a noon dinner- the children don't gather, they assemble- assemble is a formal word.  There is a reference to school. They are being instructed and civilized so to speak deliberately – the word “liberty” is thrown around here.  And yet what are they doing, they are stuffing their pockets full of stones- even the very small children.  They assemble as family units, the very bedrock of civilization across time and culture- they stand together- united- and for a purpose that is upsetting to no one.    Let's read the next four paragraphs and learn about the culture and traditions of this place.    Next four paragraphs     One funny thing that Jackson does in this story is play around with names.  The names are all carefully selected- look at who's conducting all of this, a man by the name of Summers- such a happy name associated with youth, strength, growth, life, all of it.  But look at the other guy- Mr. Graves- he also is responsible for making up the slips of paper and putting the names in this black box.  It's a pun- a grave is a place where we put a dead body. It also means serious- like if you are in grave danger.  The black box one time spent a year in Mr. Graves barn, but that's not the only place it lives.  He is not solely responsible for this black box.  It's spent a year in the post office and also in a grocery store owned by Mr. Martin.      Another thing that people have pointed to is all the possible symbolism in this story.  It does seem that this box is a symbol, the three-legged stool is a symbol, the black mark is a symbol, even the stones are symbols.  But for what?  We should always annotate and follow the symbols, but I usually withhold judgement on what they mean until I've had time to think about the story as a whole.      And we've got more names- a lot of names actually.  One that showed up earlier, but we didn't address is name Delacroix- we're even told the correct pronunciation of this name-     Dela-Croix- as in French for of the Cross    Yep- except they mispronounce it- they don't say Delacroix like you're supposed to say it- they say delacroy- a corruption of the original.  And that sets up for me another a pattern that I see as you read through all these traditions.  Traditions are not fixed- like people think they are.      No, They evolve like everything else on planet earth.  We keep what we want and discard what we don't like.  On my wall, I have a poster that says all behavior is goal- directed- and that goes for entire cultures as well.  No matter what we say, our behaviors speak for us- and they are all goal-directed.  This is true for traditions as well- be it religious, ethical, or civic.    Jackson is very ambiguous about her relationship with religion here.  I want to point out that this is not a religious ceremony, and she could have very easily and understandably made it one.  Mr. Summers could have been Pastor Summers or Father Summers or Rabbi Summers, but he's not any of these, he's a businessman.  I want to suggest what I think here about-that three legged stool- I do think it represents what holds up society in general-  three aspects of societal authority or control- religious, civic and commercial- these three legs hold up the black box.  They are working together, but none is running the show exclusively.      Well, if we're going to guess at symbolism, I want to make a suggestion of my own.    Oh-okay- what do you want to suggest?    That black box.  It's power, it's control.  It's black because fear controls.  It's dynamic in that it moves.  It evolves over time, as power does.  It's cloaked in secrecy, it hides behind tradition, but we see that that isn't necessarily true- they went from chips to paper when they wanted to.  What they wanted to uphold was the black box of power.  I also want to point out that somehow Jackson subtly connects her ritual with this black box and three-legged stool to the harvest, which I found to be a particularly interesting connection.  It's a link to survival and it's at the heart of human existence.  The ancient Athenians, the Aztecs, the Incans on this side of the world just to name a few, but many cultures have connected human sacrifice to crop fertility. In fact, and this may be a point of irony, if you just look across human history from the Egyptians to the Chinese, what we see is human sacrifice correlates directly with a rise in a more sophisticated culture and social stratification than the other way around, contrary to what Old Man Warner suggests.      What do you mean by that?    I mean that we can see, historically, as societies got more sophisticated and organized, we saw more and more links to human sacrifice.     Well You're right  That is counter-intuitive- you would think it would be just the opposite.  Of course, closer to home, in the Judeo-Christian tradition, which is what Jackson was most familiar with and what is reflected most obviously in her story, there is a very deep tradition of sacrifice but not human.  This story is not a direct attack on Christianity by the way, but there is a lot of Christian imagery here- not just with the name Delacroix or delacroy.   There is also the connection with publicly sanctioned and even religiously sanctioned public stonings.  This is a ritual we see in the Old Testaman of the Bible, and one we see Jesus referencing directly in the New Testament in the Bible.  There is a particular story, one of the more famous stories in the New Testament from the 8th chapter of Saint John where a group of men want to stone a woman because they caught her in the act of adultery.  They take her outside; they all gather stones and are ready to murder her when Jesus intervenes.  He takes a stick and starts writing something in the sand which we are never told what they are,  but he famously says, “He who is without sin cast the first stone.”  The men slowly but surely as they read whatever he was writing, dropped their stones and went home.  Of course, we don't know what he wrote, I like to think it was the names of their paramours, but that's just me enjoying the irony.  The story ends with Jesus looking at the woman and asking where her accusers had gone because by that point there were none left.    So, you see that story connecting here-     Yep- I do.  There are more Christian references too- Mrs. Adams, that's the name of the first man.  There is an Eva- and then Old man Warner- his name isn't Biblical but there's a biblical connection.  Again, back to Jesus in the New Testament.   These Biblical references, btw, are not obscure- these are super-famous passages that every red-blooded American in 1950 would know.  In the New Testament there's another story where  a follower of Jesus asks Jesus how many times a person was responsible for forgiving another person- the follower offered a suggestion- he said, should we forgive a person seven times- something he finds to be generous- to which Jesus responded- you should forgive a person 70 times 7 – I think what is important about Old Man Warner is not his name but his age- and the link to this archetypal number.      What's the connection- I don't think this story is talking about adultery or forgiveness,  is it?    Not directly, it's talking about values and core values and hypocrisy for sure- and we'll flesh it out when we get to the end, but what I want to point out- is that people have somehow found their value in surviving this tradition.  Mr. Warner brags that he's survived 77 of these without getting picked- his importance comes from this.  Warner also makes a claim that is literally a great example of a post hoc fallacy- an error in logic which you believe that just because something comes before something it means that thing necessarily causes it- he is literally saying that the harvest comes as a direct result of the lottery.  He doesn't invoke any diety for believing this- he just throws it out there.    He's resistant to change because he's validated by this social order.    Well, I can see why lot's people think this story is about accepting things just because they have always been done.  Warner clearly makes that argument.    Of course, that's obvious and there- it's just not the heart of the story.  I want to bring up one more name before we finish and get to the punch line.  The name Tessie Hutchinson- if we look to history there is one Hutchinson woman who stands out- Anne Hutchinson- she showed up in chapter 1 of the Scarlet Letter too- btw- which has a connected theme to this story-     but anyway- tell us who this person is- for those less familiar with early American history.    Anne Hutchinson- we're going way back now- she was born in 1591- she was banished to the  colony of Rhode Island after being excommunicated from Massachusetts bay colony for teaching among other things that women should read and be in leadership but mostly her teachings about the Bible were considered heretical.   She ended up being murdered by Indians in 1643.  It's a sad ending.  She was definitely cast out of the group.      So, let's finish reading the story, and see where we land with all these ideas swirling around in our heads.      Finish the story    Well, Mrs. Hutchinson doesn't win a Bendix washer.  You know  the psychologist Carl Jung, as you know I like his work, stated that even more or less civilized people remain inwardly primitive.  We don't like thinking this, so we can justify with this “mass psyche”.  The group becomes the hypnotic focus of fascination and we can allow ourselves to fall into some sort of spell.- that's the word he used.  The group experience lowers the level of consciousness like the psyche of an animal so we don't have to take responsibility for our actions on an individual level.  It's not a murder if it's a ritual.  How could it be? It's sanctioned by the group.    And yet, it is murder, isn't.  And where I see all of Jackson's ambiguities emerge.  Her story can be interpreted so many different ways. For one thing, no one sees any moral conflict.  Any psychological explanation for that.  I mean they do this every year.    Talk aboou the Milgram experiment       It's a nameless village, full of tradition, likely corruption, so civilized, so warm, the people were so nice to each other…all the way until Mrs. Delacroix picks up the largest stone she could find with which to pelt her good friend Mrs. Hutchinson.      Jackson downplayed her story.  In an essay she wrote about it she had this to say, “I had written the story three weeks before being published.  The idea had come to me while I was pushing my daughter up the hill in her stroller- it was as I say, a warm morning, and the hill was steep, and beside my daughter, the stroller held the day's groceries- and perhaps the effort of that last fifty yards up the hill put an edge to the story, at any rate, I had the idea fairly clearly in my mind when I put my daughter in her playpen and the frozen vegetables in the refrigerator, and writing the story I foud that it went quicly and easily, moving from beginning to end without pause, I'll skip a little to we get to this line….it was just a story I wrote.”    Except it wasn't.  It was her lived experience in Bennington.  Everyone was so nice to each other; centered on civic contribution, religion, family structure- and yet ready to pelt each other with the largest stone they could find, given the psychological pass to do so with impunity.    And that's what made people angry.  We are nice people, but we're not kind people.  We are civilized, but we are not forgiving.  We are religious but our religion has been molded not out of the old sacred texts, but out of the box of power that sits on that three legged stool of our conveniently created social structures remolded over the years as it goes from house to house.  We are not good, we are what we always have been- ready not just to hurl that first stone, but ready to bring out children along, get them to fill up their pockets with stones, all on a beautiful summer day.      Wow!  That hurts.  Well, we hope you enjoyed our discussion of one of America's most famous short stories.  Next week, we will find the anecdote to such raw exposure to humanity through the writings of another American native son- Walt Whitman and selections from his wonderful masterpiece- Leaves of Grass.  We hope you stick around to see what that great American has to say.  As always, please support us by pushing us out on your social media- facebook, instsagram, twitter, tiktok and/or linked in.  Text an episode to a friend.  If you are a teacher, visit our website www.howtolovelitpodcast.com to find listening guides to all of our episodes.      Peace out     

Tips for raising Chicks
Do chickens really need grazing/grass time?

Tips for raising Chicks

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 6:29


In this episode, we are going to be talking about if chickens really need grazing/ or grass time. First we will discuss what grazing time is. Then, we will discuss why it can be helpful for chickens. Also, I want to say sorry for not posting an episode for a while- we are moving and have been busy but I promise I will post more chicken tips! --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

Horror Hill: A Horror Anthology and Scary Stories Series Podcast
S5E07 - "The Grass is Redder on the Other Side" - Horror Hill

Horror Hill: A Horror Anthology and Scary Stories Series Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 54:55


Welcome to Season 05, Episode 07. I'm your host, Erik Peabody, Tonight's featured tales comes to us from author W.B. Stickel. To watch the podcast on YouTube: http://bit.ly/ChillingEntertainmentYT Don't forget to subscribe to the podcast for free wherever you're listening or by using this link: https://bit.ly/HorrorHillPodcast If you like the show, telling a friend about it would be amazing! You can text, email, Tweet, or send this link to a friend Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Will & Woody
FULL SHOW: Cutting my grass and pooing in my toilet

Will & Woody

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 39:43


Courtney Act // Mimi's primary school crush // Phone Alone // Exam horror stories // Did you go out in style?  

The Freedom Audio Show With Aaron Chen
214 - The Grass Is Not Always Greener...

The Freedom Audio Show With Aaron Chen

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 15:28


Suffering from shiny object syndrome? Don't worry it happens to the best of us. Just remember though that opportunities aren't always better on the other side and you'll find that moving comes with a whole host of issues that slows you down and stops you from having success.

Get Lively with Jan
#208: When the Grass always seems Greener

Get Lively with Jan

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 20:41


Okay friends, it's no secret that I've been a bit “up and down” as of late. I think the vast majority of us are going through this in some shape... The post #208: When the Grass always seems Greener appeared first on Get Lively Now.

From The Jingweeds
Episode $75: I Feel Like The Grass Was Jumping Out Of Its Shoes

From The Jingweeds

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 6, 2021 77:15


On Today's Job Board we have Dan Finalizing The Overseed on Quail, Playing Golf at Desert Canyon for the first time since the Summer Project, Veterans Day Themed Stump The Peter, Would you hire someone that is a known Weed Smoker, Beer Reviews, Matt is in major Dog Hunt mode, and Of Course Course Happenings. Follow us on Twitter @FJingweeds and on Instagram @from_the_jingweedsOrder all your Golf Course and Home Course needs from Par West Turf Services at parwest.com.  Enter "Jingweeds" in the Promo Code for FREE SHIPPING on orders of $250 or more. 

Varmints!
NaPodPoMo Spider a Day: The European Grass Spider or Cross Spider

Varmints!

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 6, 2021 5:40


Learn all about spiders in little tidbits each day from Varmints! Podcast cohost Donna Hume.  "A beautiful spider. (Araneus Diadematus ♀/ European Garden Spider)" by fotopamas is licensed under CC BY 2.0

The Withering Effect - Minecraft Podcast
Episode 119: Minecraft, will it blend?

The Withering Effect - Minecraft Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 54:50


In this episode, DuDs and Jimbo discuss snapshot 21W43A for Minecraft 1.18, Caves & Cliffs, which includes better biome blending between new and old chunks in a world, old chunks will have their bedrock removed and filled with Deepslate (worlds upgraded in this snapshot will permanently have Deepslate). Flooded caves near rivers and ocean coastlines have been reduced, aquifer water levels change less often, and Big Dripleaf placement has been restricted to Clay, Grass, Dirt, Farmland, Moss, Rooted Dirt, Podzol and Mycelium. Plus, we have listener comments, the first from S. D. Smith about Goat Horns in Java Edition, Lokkon4 asks about DuDs and Jimbo's most/least favourite thing about the 1.18 and 1.19 updates, and Baked_Baguette asks about their favourite feature about the new (ish) plant blocks. Also, DuDs sets out three new enchantments he would like to see in the game and Jimbo (after reading the topic wrong) gives us the three new potions he would like in Minecraft. Minecraft Snapshot 21W43A: https://minecraft.net/en-us/article/minecraft-snapshot-21w43a Thank you to our Milk level Patrons: aubni, ChiefBigBear, Crock, FragileRock, ohbeep, StoneFigure and viperoustuna. Discord: https://discord.gg/gqnKyeZ Patreon: https://patreon.com/thewitheringeffect Website: http://thewitheringeffect.com/ E-Mail: podcast@thewitheringeffect.com Voice Message: https://anchor.fm/thewitheringeffect/message Twitter: https://twitter.com/WitheringEffect YouTube: https://youtube.com/thewitheringeffect Instagram: https://instagram.com/witheringeffect Show Hosts DuDs YouTube: https://youtube.com/DuDs_vs DuDs Twitter: https://twitter.com/DuDs_vs DuDs Twitch: https://twitch.tv/DuDs_vs Jimbo YouTube: https://youtube.com/JimboSlice23Gaming Jimbo Twitter: https://twitter.com/JimboSlice23_ Jimbo Twitch: https://twitch.tv/JimboSlice23_ Digital Producer CarlRyds YouTube: https://youtube.com/CarlRydsGaming CarlRyds Twitter: https://twitter.com/CarlRyds CarlRyds Twitch: https://twitch.tv/CarlRydsGaming Music Master DiiKoj YouTube: https://youtube.com/DiiKoj DiiKoj Twitter: https://twitter.com/DiiKoj

The Influencer Podcast
What Would It Look Like If It Were Easy?

The Influencer Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 35:48


If your life could be made easier, what would that be worth to you?   This is the question Susie Moore poses to us in today's conversation on The Influencer Podcast.   Susie Moore is a former Silicon Valley Sales Director turned Life Coach and Advice Columnist.   Her work has been featured on the Today show, Oprah, Business Insider, CNN, Forbes, Time Inc, Marie Claire and she's the resident Life Coach Columnist for Greatist.   Susie's work and insights have been shared by celebrities and thought leaders including Arianna Huffington, Paulo Coelho, Kris Jenner and Sara Blakely.   In her new book, Let It Be Easy, she encourages us to embrace a unique “let it be easy” philosophy and offers practical ideas and examples for allowing more ease into their daily lives.   What you'll hear: How can we tell if we aren't letting life be easy? What is the most challenging part about letting things be easy? You encourage us to call their “to-do list” a “get-to-do-list.” Why is this important? “The Grass is Greener Because it is Fake.” - what this means and why this is happening to you How to bring more ease into your love life.   What did you think of today's episode? If you connect with the things I chatted about today, I urge you to apply for my exclusive networking mastermind SHINE at juliesolomon.net/shine To dive deeper into each episode with myself and other podcast listeners, plus receive exclusive bonuses relating to the show, come join The Influencer Podcast Facebook group.  And be sure to snap a screenshot and tag me @julssolomon as you're listening to this week's episode. Remember to hashtag #theinfluencerpodcast, that way I can share your screenshot on my story too!

Weed + Grub
Outside Lands! Grass Lands! Responsible Drug Use!

Weed + Grub

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 64:10


Mike and Mary Jane celebrate life and unpack their incredible experience at Outside Lands, the one-of-a-kind cannabis community inside OSL called Grass Lands, where Mike performed. Highlights include Reggie Watts' set (s/o medicinal ketamine!), molly walks and VIP sits, meeting Chef Roy Choi, and figuring out how to responsibly reconnect with yourself and your loved ones while dancing the night away.   GIVE US 5 ⭐️ / LEAVE A REVIEW / SHOOT A DUMPLING IN MY MOUTH Music by Jesse Case Weed + Grub IG Weed + Grub Patreon Embarc Yky's Soundcloud OCB USA - the finest rolling papers in the world! BOWT: Libby Dolan & Billy Anderson

Online Marketing Strategies Podcast
#192: Natalie Wood: The Mysterious Death Of A Hollywood Icon

Online Marketing Strategies Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 18:58


Around 7:30 a.m. on the 29th November 1981 the body of Hollywood star Natalie Wood was discovered floating face down in the Pacific Ocean near Catalina. She was wearing a flannel nightgown, blue wool socks, and a red down jacket. The rubber dinghy from her yacht Splendour was found washed up on the rocks a little further south.  There are few Hollywood mysteries more enduring or more heartbreaking than the one surrounding Natalie Wood's tragic death. The actress known for starring roles in films like West Side Story, Rebel Without a Cause, and Splendor in the Grass drowned when she was just 43 years old; but the circumstances surrounding the fatality are barely any clearer today than they were when the news first broke. What happened to her? Many years later, the question still stands. Hire Me To Use My Voice InYour Next Video/Project ► https://geni.us/VoiceOverPhilAdair  The "Remember This" Podcast is sponsored by Gift Shop For Guys. Looking for a cool gift for the man in your life? At Gift Shop For Guys we have spent countless hours sourcing and creating high-quality affordable items and accessories. Check out our huge selection of Cool T-Shirts and Fun-T-Shirts for your man. We carry a vast range of products that are ready to ship to you today. Free Shipping within the USA. E: support@giftshopforguys W: https://giftshopforguys.com We're a huge fan of connecting on social media. If you're on these social networks, let's follow each other: Instagram ▶️ https://geni.us/GiftShopForGuysInsta Facebook ▶️ https://geni.us/GiftShopForGuysFBook Podcast    ▶️ https://geni.us/RememberThisPodcast YouTube   ▶️ https://geni.us/RememberThisYouTube Gift Shop For Guys Suite 12, 5th Floor, Dymocks Building 428 George Street, Sydney, NSW 2000 ▶️ E: support@giftshopforguys.com ▶️ W: https://geni.us/GiftShopForGuys

NPS I Love You by Catalyst
The Grass Is Always Greener (with Stacy Schmitz, Enterprise Account Executive at Catalyst Software)

NPS I Love You by Catalyst

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 41:55


Stacy Schmitz is an Enterprise Account Executive at Catalyst Software. In this episode, Ben and Stacy discuss how she has seen incredible success in her career so far, reaching 200% of her quota last quarter. Stacy also shares her unique approach to sales, what motivates her, and how the industry has evolved in recent years.

Deviate with Rolf Potts
Van Life before #VanLife (encore): Revisiting a classic USA road trip

Deviate with Rolf Potts

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 110:36


"I will never have another vagabonding journey that compares to that first one -- even though I have since traveled to far more exotic parts of the world -- in part because there's something special about embarking on a long-term trip for the first time." --Rolf Potts In this encore episode of Deviate, Rolf and his old friend Jeff Nienaber talk about their 8-month van trip across North America back in 1994, how they prepared for it, and how it differed from current-day #VanLife excursions (5:30); how they exercised on the road, and how the conditions and travel-hacks of van journeys were different for two young men in 1994 (23:30); the route they took through North America, what happened along the way, and how they kept daily journals recounting events (36:00); the experience riding with cops in Houston, celebrating Mardi Gras in New Orleans, volunteering at a church in Mississippi, meeting girls in Florida, and seeing New York for the first time (51:00); the experience of staying at a Trappist monastery in Massachusetts for one week (1:14:30); visiting National Parks in the American South, Northeast, and West, and memorable books read along the way (1:28:00); and why the trip was life-changing (1:42:00). Van trip preparation and planning links: Digital nomadism (travel lifestyle) #VanLife (travel lifestyle) Composting toilet Blue Highways, by William Least Heat-Moon (1982 book) On the Road, by Jack Kerouac (1957 book) Travels With Charley, by John Steinbeck (1962 book) Vanagon (Volkswagen van) Volkswagen Westfalia (camper van) Trangia (alcohol-burning camp-stove) A (literal) photo album from my 1994 van vagabonding trip (blog post) Links regarding early months of the 1994 trip: 924 Gilman Street (Berkeley punk club) Northridge earthquake (1994 earthquake) "The Mystical High Church of Luck" (Salon essay about Las Vegas) Lollapalooza (music festival) O. J. Simpson murder case (1994 media incident) USCGC Northwind (Coast Guard icebreaker) Bourbon Street (historic street in New Orleans) The Geto Boys, by Rolf Potts (2016 book) Fifth Ward (Houston neighborhood) Cops (TV show) Canton (town in Mississippi) In His Steps (Mississippi Christian outreach ministry) Waffle House (southern restaurant chain) Savannah State (historically black university) Debbie Does Dallas (1978 pornographic film) Tompkins Square (New York park) Trappist monastery experience links: St. Joseph's Abbey (Massachusetts monastery) Trappists (order of Catholic monks) Thomas Merton (Trappist monk and writer) Memento Mori (existential expression) Chant (1994 Monks of Santo Domingo de Silos album) Compline (end-of-day church service) Links regarding the final months of the 1994 trip: Ocala National Forest (protected area in Florida) Shenandoah National Park (Virginia wilderness area) Mount Washington (tallest mountain the northeast U.S.) Arches National Park (Utah wilderness area) Fisher Towers (photogenic cliffs near Moab, Utah) Desert Solitaire, by Edward Abbey (1968 book) Leaves of Grass, by Walt Whitman (1855 poetry collection) The Razor's Edge, by W. Somerset Maugham (1944 book) Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance, by Robert M Pirsig (1974 book) Uinta National Forest (protected area in Utah) Yellowstone National Park (Wyoming wilderness area) Glacier National Park (Montana wilderness area) Pike National Forest (protected area in Colorado) The Deviate theme music comes from the title track of Cedar Van Tassel's 2017 album Lumber. Note: We don't host a “comments” section, but we're happy to hear your questions and insights via email, at deviate@rolfpotts.com.

Fitness Confidential with Vinnie Tortorich
Good Beef Sources & More - Episode 1964

Fitness Confidential with Vinnie Tortorich

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 69:55


: Episode 1964 - On this Monday show, Anna Vocino and Vinnie Tortorich play some good '60s tunes and talk good beef sources, ketone levels, BS diet plans, and more. Https://www.vinnietortorich.com/2021/11/good-beef-sources-more-episode-1964 PLEASE SUPPORT OUR SPONSORS '60S TUNES Vinnie and Anna both really like music from the '60s. But Vinnie prefers the '70s. They played a lot of good tunes on this show, like some Buffalo Springfield. If you're reading these notes on YouTube, check out this show on another platform so you can hear the good tunes. GOOD BEEF SOURCES As you know, Belcampo is no longer a sponsor. Vinnie always had great service from them -- he loved  Hopefully, they come back under a new name. Vinnie suggests you go look in your community and find a farm form which you can buy beef directly. Or, find a freestanding butcher. Some grocery stores even have high quality meat departments. This is probably the most affordable option, unless you go in on half of a cow with someone, or something like that. You don't need to shop at Whole Foods to find this. Plus, some grocery stores with good beef will have sales -- Harris Teeter in VA does this. Grass-fed or regular can both be good. Buy what you can afford! This is most important. You can do this lifestyle affordably. Anna likes Ancestral Meats, Simple Meats, Carpenter Farms. Or, if you have friends who hunt, see if you can get some deer meat. BS DIET PLANS Don't buy into diet plans. You don't need to spend extra money each week to eat. Vinnie could monetize this and turn it into a full-on diet plan, but he would not do that. Eat clean -- stick to simple tenets -- and your body will begin to heal. WATCH THIS EPISODE ON YOUTUBE FAT DOC 2 IS AVAILABLE ON iTUNES and AMAZON Please also share it with family and friends! Buy it and watch it now on iTunes to get it to the top of the charts. We need it to get big for people to see it. Here's the (BLUERAY, DVD, PRIME) (MAY NOT BE AVAILABLE YET ACROSS THE POND). And the And the https://amzn.to/3rxHuB9 [the_ad id="17480"] PLEASE DON'T FORGET TO REVIEW the film AFTER YOU WATCH!   FAT DOC 1 IS ALSO OUT Go watch it now! We need people to buy and review for it to stay at the top of iTunes pages. Available for both rental and purchase. You can also buy hardcopy or watch online at Amazon. YOU CAN NOW STREAM FOR FREE ON AMAZON PRIME IF YOU HAVE IT! RESOURCES Https://www.vinnietortorich.com Https://www.purevitaminclub.com Https://www.purevitaminclub.co.uk Https://www.purecoffeeclub.com Https://www.nsngfoods.com  

Marriage, Kids and Money
Is the Grass Greener on the Other Side? [Bread & Wine]

Marriage, Kids and Money

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 30, 2021 30:27


A lot of us are working toward something. A financial goal. A personal challenge. Overcoming a difficult career change. Will life be better when you reach your final destination? We discuss if the grass is greener on the other side or ... if it's just another shade of green after Nicole's recent career change.  BREAD & WINE RESOURCES FamZoo:  Prepaid debit cards for kids and financial education all in one! Use promo code “MKMFAMZOO” for an extra month of FamZoo! The Subtle Art of Not Giving a F**k by Mark Manson (book mentioned during the show) Buy Us a Cheap Bottle of Wine:  We'll give you a shoutout during the show - thanks for the idea, Jacob! MKM Instagram MKM Voicemail

High Rollers DnD
High Rollers: Aerois #127 | Lilac Grass and Giant Trees (Part 2)

High Rollers DnD

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 77:17


The team warp themselves to the Feywild and are instantly lost in a magical land of lilac grass and giant trees! We're sponsored by D&D Beyond! The ultimate Dungeons and Dragons toolset. Clean up your dungeon delving life and speed up your games here: http://bit.ly/HRDNDBeyond2021 Grab some High Rollers merch: https://freshmerch.fm/collections/high-rollers Support the High Rollers and get early access to podcast episodes (and more) on our Patreon: www.patreon.com/HighRollers Music courtesy of Epidemic Sound Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices