The Next Picture Show

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A biweekly roundtable by the former editorial team of The Dissolve examining how classic films inspire and inform modern movies. Episodes take a deep dive into a classic film and its legacy in the first half, then compare and contrast that film with a modern successor in the second. Hosted and produ…

Filmspotting Network


    • Sep 27, 2022 LATEST EPISODE
    • every other week NEW EPISODES
    • 1h 2m AVG DURATION
    • 347 EPISODES

    4.6 from 650 ratings Listeners of The Next Picture Show that love the show mention: dissolve, picture show, genevieve, filmspotting, intelligent film, excellent film, old films, love the team, pairings, new films, av club, tasha, film discussion, movie club, film criticism, classic films, new movie, yesteryear, favorite film, film lovers.



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    Latest episodes from The Next Picture Show

    #343: Talkin' Tolkien, Pt. 2: The Lord of the Rings: The Rings of Power

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2022 67:36


    Adapting the appendices of J.R.R. Tolkien's Middle-earth saga for a streaming series slated to run for 40 episodes is a much different exercise than paring down the writer's most celebrated work to feature-length, which is one reason, among many, that Prime Video's new THE LORD OF THE RINGS: THE RINGS OF POWER feels like a different beast than director Peter Jackson's celebrated film trilogy that kicked off with 2001's THE LORD OF THE RINGS: THE FELLOWSHIP OF THE RING. But the two projects are naturally in conversation with each other by virtue of their source material and the expectations that come with it, which we attempt to parse as we share our early reactions to RINGS OF POWER's first three episodes with help from our returning special guest, Vulture critic Roxana Hadadi. Then we bring FELLOWSHIP back into the equation to consider how the two tales converge and diverge around Tolkien's mythology, how each handles this saga's big themes of good vs. evil, friendship, and cooperation, and how well their respective large-scale fantasy worlds function on both a narrative and visual level. Plus, Keith and Roxana dig briefly into the extended cuts of Jackson's films for Your Next Picture Show. Please share your comments, thoughts, and questions about FELLOWSHIP OF THE RING, RINGS OF POWER, or anything else in the world of Tolkien, film, or Tolkien on film, by sending an email to comments@nextpictureshow.net, leaving a short voicemail at 773-234-9730, or commenting on our Patreon (patreon.com/NextPictureShow), where you can also find bonus episodes and more.  Works cited: • “The Rings of Power Looks on the Bright Side” by Roxana Hadadi (vulture.com) • The Lord of the Rings: The Rings of Power episodic recaps by Keith Phipps (vulture.com) Outro music: My Chemical Romance, “Kiss the Ring” Next Pairing: Robert Altman's THE LONG GOODBYE and Greg Mottola's CONFESS, FLETCH Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    #342: Talkin' Tolkien, Pt. 1: The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 56:50


    The new streaming series THE LORD OF THE RINGS: THE RINGS OF POWER is not technically a prequel to Peter Jackson's early-aughts film trilogy, nor is Jackson involved with the series, but it's hard to imagine it existing in a world where Jackson's films hadn't already provided a best-case scenario for large-scale screen adaptations of J.R.R. Tolkien's Middle-earth saga. So before delving into the crown jewel of Prime Video's streaming lineup, we're revisiting 2001's THE FELLOWSHIP OF THE RING, with some help from special guest Roxana Hadadi, to see what it taught us about Tolkien on screen, and how it helped shape a generation of fantasy filmmaking. Plus, we begin digging into the mountain of feedback we received regarding Jordan Peele's NOPE and our discussion thereof. Please share your comments, thoughts, and questions about THE FELLOWSHIP OF THE RING, THE RINGS OF POWER, or anything else in the world of film and/or Tolkien, by sending an email to comments@nextpictureshow.net, or leaving a short voicemail at (773) 234-9730. Outro music: “Frodo, Don't Wear the Ring” by Flight of the Conchords Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    #341: Djinn Expression, Pt. 2 — Three Thousand Years of Longing

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022 66:25


    George Miller's new fantasy-romance THREE THOUSAND YEARS OF LONGING may not have made a splash in theaters, but your Next Picture Show cohort agrees it's the sort of odd-duck movie that tends to age well, in part because it fits nicely into the sturdy category of “stories about storytelling.” Even more so than its central djinn character, that interest in storytelling is what links this film to 1940's THE THIEF OF BAGDAD, and so after unpacking our reactions to Miller's film, we bring THIEF back into the discussion to compare two fantastical tales, one sincere and one self-aware, about how desire and love can shape the nature of beings both mythic and mortal. Please share your comments, thoughts, and questions about THE THIEF OF BAGDAD, THREE THOUSAND YEARS OF LONGING, or anything else in the world of film, by sending an email to comments@nextpictureshow.net, leaving a short voicemail at 773-234-9730, or commenting on our Patreon (patreon.com/NextPictureShow), where you can also find bonus episodes and more.  Works cited: • “Every George Miller Movie is a Mad Max movie,” by Joshua Rivera (polygon.com) Outro music: Sophie B. Hawkins, “Damn, I Wish I Was Your Lover” Next Pairing: LORD OF THE RINGS: THE FELLOWSHIP OF THE RING and LORD OF THE RINGS: THE RINGS OF POWER Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    #340: Djinn Expression, Pt. 1 — The Thief of Bagdad (1940)

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2022 66:23


    George Miller's new 3000 YEARS OF LONGING is a story about storytelling that's full of color and pageantry, which makes it a nice match for producer Alexander Korda's 1940 fantasy THE THIEF OF BAGDAD — and that's before the films' respective djinns even enter the equation. One of the most technically ambitious films ever made, THE THIEF OF BAGDAD's influence is all over cinema, but this week we're imagining what it would have been like to experience it in 1940, before considering how its effects, acting styles, fairy-tale love story, and Western-centric understanding of the East holds up to modern standards. Plus, we respond to some feedback on our interpretation of perhaps the pivotal scene in Werner Herzog's GRIZZLY MAN. Please share your comments, thoughts, and questions about THE THIEF OF BAGDAD, 3000 YEARS OF LONGING, or anything else in the world of film, by sending an email to comments@nextpictureshow.net, or leaving a short voicemail at (773) 234-9730. Outro music: “The Gin Song,” The Men That Will Not Be Blamed For Nothing Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    NPS: The Return (Our Next Pairing)

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2022 1:48


    Tasha announces plans for the next pairing: 'Three Thousand Years Of Longing" and 1940's "Thief of Bagdad." Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    #339: Close Encounters, Pt. 2 — Nope

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022 78:27


    In terms of narrative, there's not that much connecting NOPE's flying-saucer story with that of THE WAR OF THE WORLDS, but Jordan Peele's latest is as likely to someday serve as a document of this particular moment as its 1953 predecessor. A thematically dense and bracingly cinematic film, NOPE is uninterested in providing its viewers with neat answers, but we do our best to (begin to) untangle Peele's web of ideas before bringing his film into conversation with THE WAR OF THE WORLDS, to consider the alien motivations and human responses that connect these two invasions across the decades. Please share your comments, thoughts, and questions about WAR OF THE WORLDS, NOPE, or anything else in the world of film, by sending an email to comments@nextpictureshow.net, leaving a short voicemail at 773-234-9730, or commenting on our Patreon (patreon.com/NextPictureShow), where you can also find bonus episodes and more.  Outro music: Michael Wincott, “Flying Purple People Eater” Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    #338: Close Encounters, Pt. 1 — The War of the Worlds (1953)

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2022 65:48


    Jordan Peele's latest film, NOPE, tells a flying saucer story decades removed from the Atomic Age concerns of Byron Haskin's 1953 adaptation of H.G. Wells' WAR OF THE WORLDS, but both operate from a similar understanding that an encounter with hostile aliens is never just an encounter with hostile aliens. There are other forces at work in both films, and this week we're digging into WAR and its effects on science-fiction stories to come, from its reflection of contemporary anxieties to the unexpected bleakness of its supposed happy ending. Plus, a bevy of new feedback prompts some lightning-round responses about IP hypocrisy, alternate Baz Luhrmann timelines, and candid vs. scripted monologues.  Please share your comments, thoughts, and questions about WAR OF THE WORLDS, NOPE, or anything else in the world of film, by sending an email to comments@nextpictureshow.net, or leaving a short voicemail at (773) 234-9730. Outro music: “Two Little Men In a Flying Saucer” by Ella Fitzgerald Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    #337: Human/Nature, Pt. 2 — Fire of Love

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2022 69:17


    Sara Dosa's new documentary FIRE OF LOVE is more stylized than Werner Herzog's GRIZZLY MAN, but it's a remarkably close companion piece, with its interest in themes of obsession and fatalism, and in people who felt the most important thing in the world was bringing their passion to others, even if they had to die doing it — and in both cases, did. We talk over what we got from FIRE OF LOVE, and what was denied to us by the filmmaker's choices, before bringing GRIZZLY MAN back in to compare the quixotic quest of “freelance” volcanologists Katia and Maurice Krafft to that of amateur naturalist Timothy Treadwell.  Please share your comments, thoughts, and questions about GRIZZLY MAN, FIRE OF LOVE, or anything else in the world of film, by sending an email to comments@nextpictureshow.net, leaving a short voicemail at 773-234-9730, or commenting on our Patreon (patreon.com/NextPictureShow), where you can also find bonus episodes and more.  Outro music: The B-52's, “Lava” Next Pairing: Byron Haskin's THE WAR OF THE WORLDS and Jordan Peele's NOPE Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    #336: Human/Nature, Pt. 1 — Grizzly Man

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 12, 2022 63:08


    The festival hit FIRE OF LOVE follows a pair of volcanologists who yearned to get up close and personal with nature at its most dangerous, eventually paying for their obsession with their lives, a tragic arc that naturally calls to mind Timothy Treadwell, whose doomed self-directed study of wild bears was immortalized in Werner Herzog's GRIZZLY MAN. The 2005 film is a fascinating artifact and one of the most perfect matings of documentarian and subject imaginable, revealing almost as much about Herzog as a filmmaker as it does Treadwell as a self-proclaimed protector of the grizzlies. This week we dig into some of the philosophical contradictions between subject and documentarian, as well as how the film toes the line between humor and condescension.  Please share your comments, thoughts, and questions about GRIZZLY MAN, FIRE OF LOVE, or anything else in the world of film, by sending an email to comments@nextpictureshow.net, or leaving a short voicemail at (773) 234-9730. Outro music: “(Let Me Be Your) Teddy Bear” by Elvis Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    #335: In Baz Taste, Pt. 2 — Elvis

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 5, 2022 63:34


    In covering the entire scope of Elvis Presley's career, ELVIS defies certain biopic conventions while embracing others, but it's as distinctively a film by Baz Lurhmann as MOULIN ROUGE. Like that 2001 musical, ELVIS expands the frame of history in an attempt to recreate the earth-shattering effects of a moment in culture, while also poking at some of the uncomfortable questions raised by Presley's popularity. It offers much to discuss, which we do before bringing MOULIN ROUGE into the conversation to compare the two films' shared interest in the tension between art and commerce, to what effect anachronisms are used in each, and how each attempts to toe the line between appropriation and homage. Plus, some recommendations from Keith for supplementary Elvis viewing and reading.  Please share your comments, thoughts, and questions about MOULIN ROUGE, ELVIS, or anything else in the world of film, by sending an email to comments@nextpictureshow.net, leaving a short voicemail at 773-234-9730, or commenting on our Patreon (patreon.com/NextPictureShow), where you can also find bonus episodes and more.  Show Notes Works cited:  • “Can Elvis Rise Again” by David Browne (rollingstone.com) • “Nobody Cares About Elvis Anymore” by Will Leitch (williamflietch.medium.com) Outro music: Elvis Presley, “Unchained Melody” Next Pairing: Werner Herzog's GRIZZLY MAN and Sara Dosa's FIRE OF LOVE Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    #334: In Baz Taste, Pt. 1 — Moulin Rouge!

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 65:43


    Would the feverishly stylized, irreverently ahistorical spectacle of Baz Luhrmann's MOULIN ROUGE! resonate with audiences today the way it did in 2001? We may be about to find out with the director's latest, ELVIS, which takes a very similar approach to a very different story. Before getting into the parallels between the two musicals next week, we're revisiting a movie that was either an “apocalyptic moment” for film or a canny predictor of the next two decades of pop culture — or maybe both? — to consider what it gains and loses in its expansive, fluid relationship to music, history, and musical history. Please share your comments, thoughts, and questions about MOULIN ROUGE, ELVIS, or anything else in the world of film, by sending an email to comments@nextpictureshow.net, or leaving a short voicemail at (773) 234-9730. Outro music: “Lady Marmalade” by Christina Aguilera, Lil' Kim, Mya, and Pink Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    #333: Life Finds a Way, Pt. 2 — Jurassic World Dominion

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 77:38


    The new JURASSIC WORLD DOMINION is in constant, open communication with 1993's JURASSIC PARK, from its nostalgic casting to its egregious callbacks. But there's more going on in Colin Trevorrow's second sequel to JURASSIC WORLD — perhaps too much, thanks in part to the layers of new mythology that the 2015 film added to the original JURASSIC PARK formula. Is this merging of the two JURASSIC eras to be derided or commended for its ambition in stretching beyond the “dinosaurs on an island” conceit? We argue it out in our discussion of DOMINION, before placing it side-by-side with its source material to consider how the franchise has evolved, and not, in its anthropomorphizing of dinosaurs, its thematic interest in parenthood and reproduction, and its attitudes toward science, heroism, and corporate evil. Plus, the return of Your Next Picture Show, with a recommendation from Keith of Phil Tippett's MAD GOD. Please share your comments, thoughts, and questions about JURASSIC PARK, JURASSIC WORLD DOMINION , or anything else in the world of film, by sending an email to comments@nextpictureshow.net. We may respond to it on our Patreon (patreon.com/NextPictureShow), where you can also find bonus episodes and more.  Show Notes Works cited:  • “The ‘Jurassic World' Movies Were Only About Chris Pratt Holding Out His Arms” by Miles Klee (melmagazine.com) • “Star Wars effects legend Phil Tippett explains his 30-year nightmare project Mad God” by Tasha Robinson (polygon.com) Outro music: George Clinton & the Goombas, ‘Walk the Dinosaur' Next Pairing: Baz Luhrmann's MOULIN ROUGE and ELVIS Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    #332: Life Finds a Way, Pt. 1 — Jurassic Park

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 14, 2022 60:18


    Let's get this out of the way: Yes, we were so preoccupied with whether we could do a JURASSIC PARK pairing, we didn't stop to think if we should. But if not on the occasion of JURASSIC WORLD DOMINION, the new sixth film in the two-trilogy series kicked off by Steven Spielberg in 1994, then when? So we're traveling back to where it began to examine what made JURASSIC PARK a high-water mark for both the franchise and '90s blockbuster filmmaking, whether its cutting-edge blend of practical and CG effects holds up to modern-day scrutiny, and how it balances theme-park spectacle with big ideas about scientific progress and the philosophical quandaries surrounding it. Please share your comments, thoughts, and questions about JURASSIC PARK, its JURASSIC successors, or anything else in the world of film, by sending an email to comments@nextpictureshow.net, or leaving a short voicemail at (773) 234-9730. Works Cited: • “‘Everything new will kill you' is the worst trope in horror” by Tasha Robinson (polygon.com) Outro music: Jurassic Park Theme Song (Melodica Cover) by Patrick T. Lo Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    #331: Once Upon a Toon In Hollywood, Pt. 2 – Chip 'n' Dale: Rescue Rangers

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 7, 2022 77:16


    Despite its box-office success in 1988, Robert Zemeckis' WHO FRAMED ROGER RABBIT never received a direct sequel, but the new CHIP 'N' DALE: RESCUE RANGERS works as a spiritual sequel in more ways than one. Recognizing that this direct-to-streaming feature based on a short-lived Disney cartoon from the ‘90s has some extremely large, squeaky shoes to fill when compared to its groundbreaking predecessor, we unpack the two films' shared cartoon DNA through their villains, their human allies, and their common Hollywood setting, and try to parse some of the specifics of how toons in this shared universe function in both the entertainment industry and society at large. Please share your comments, thoughts, and questions about WHO FRAMED ROGER RABBIT, CHIP 'N' DALE: RESCUE RANGERS, or anything else in the world of film, by sending an email to comments@nextpictureshow.net. We may respond to it on our Patreon (patreon.com/NextPictureShow), where you can also find bonus episodes, recommendations, and more.  Next Pairing: Steven Spielberg's JURASSIC PARK and Colin Trevorrow's JURASSIC WORLD: DOMINION  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    #330: Once Upon a Toon in Hollywood Pt. 1 — Who Framed Roger Rabbit?

    Play Episode Listen Later May 31, 2022 70:32


    From its Hollywood setting to its central missing-toons mystery, the new Disney+ streaming exclusive CHIP 'N' DALE: RESCUE RANGERS is openly and carefully patterned after 1988's WHO FRAMED ROGER RABBIT. Robert Zemeckis' groundbreaking hit set a high bar for cameo-packed, self-aware stories that try to redefine the relationships between animated characters and the physical world, packing in layers of setup and reference and payoff that continue to reveal themselves on rewatch after rewatch. We attempt to unpack some of those layers in our revisit of this group favorite, as well as how it uses our familiarity with noir and cartoons alike to its narrative advantage. Please share your comments, thoughts, and questions about WHO FRAMED ROGER RABBIT, CHIP 'N' DALE: RESCUE RANGERS, or anything else in the world of film, by sending an email to comments@nextpictureshow.net. We may respond to it on our Patreon (patreon.com/NextPictureShow), where you can also find bonus episodes, recommendations, and more.  Works Cited: “Book Vs. Film: Who Framed Roger Rabbit?” by Tasha Robinson (avclub.com) Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    #329: Into the Raimiverse, Pt. 2: Doctor Strange in the Multiverse of Madness

    Play Episode Listen Later May 24, 2022 77:26


    DOCTOR STRANGE IN THE MULTIVERSE OF MADNESS carries its director's fingerprints more clearly than most films in the Marvel Cinematic Universe, but is it ultimately more of a Sam Raimi movie or an MCU installment? We hash out that question this week with the continued assistance of our friend Matt Singer, before bringing back in what is unquestionably a Sam Raimi film, 1993's ARMY OF DARKNESS, to compare how the two movies operate as vehicles for the director's filmmaking sensibility, as sequels, and as Bruce Campbell showcases. Please share your comments, thoughts, and questions about ARMY OF DARKNESS, DOCTOR STRANGE IN THE MULTIVERSE OF MADNESS, or anything else in the world of film, by sending an email to comments@nextpictureshow.net. We may respond to it on our Patreon (patreon.com/NextPictureShow), where you can also find bonus episodes, recommendations, and more.  Outro music: The Lovin Spoonful, “Do You Believe In Magic?” Next pairing: Robert Zemeckis' WHO FRAMED ROGER RABBIT and Akiva Schaffer's CHIP 'N' DALE: RESCUE RANGERS A CHIARA opens exclusively in theaters Friday, May 27. More info at CinemaMadeinItaly.com. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    #328: Into the Raimiverse, Pt. 1: Army of Darkness

    Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 63:15


    Unlike so much of the Marvel Cinematic Universe, the newest Doctor Strange entry carries the unmistakable stamp of its director, Sam Raimi, so we're preparing to enter the Multiverse of Madness next week with a film that's an undiluted hit of Raimi: the third entry in the Evil Dead trilogy, 1993's ARMY OF DARKNESS. We're joined by our longtime friend and colleague Matt Singer to revisit a film he calls the “pure essence” of Raimi, which makes up for its lack of deeper themes and nuanced character work with a commitment to fun, cartoonish excess that could be looked at as a deconstruction of heroism — or perhaps fun, cartoonish excess for its own sake is the point.  Please share your comments, thoughts, and questions about ARMY OF DARKNESS, DOCTOR STRANGE IN THE MULTIVERSE OF MADNESS, or anything else in the world of film, by sending an email to comments@nextpictureshow.net. We may respond to it on our Patreon (patreon.com/NextPictureShow), where you can also find bonus episodes, recommendations, and more.  Show Notes Works Cited: • “Every Sam Raimi Movie, Ranked From Worst To Best” by Matt Singer (screencrush.com) • “Stop Telling Me to Turn My Brain Off During Movies” by Matt Singer (screencrush.com) Outro music: Sufjan Stevens, “Sugar” Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    Bonus: Our Favorite Films of 2022 (So Far)

    Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 44:02


    Due to some unavoidable scheduling conflicts, your regularly scheduled Next Picture Show pairing is delayed a week, but in its place, Genevieve, Keith, and Tasha are sharing some of their favorite films of the year so far. Some of these got an in-depth discussion on the regular podcast, some showed up as subjects of a bonus episode on our Patreon, and some are completely new to the podcast, but all of them have stuck with us. Will these films make it to our final lists of 2022's best films? It's too soon to say for certain, but at the moment, the odds look good.  Please share your own standouts from this year, or anything else in the world of film, by sending an email to comments@nextpictureshow.net. We may respond to it on our Patreon (patreon.com/NextPictureShow), where you can also find bonus episodes, recommendations, and more.  Next pairing (revised): Sam Raimi's ARMY OF DARKNESS and DOCTOR STRANGE IN THE MULTIVERSE OF MADNESS Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    #327: Cage Match, Pt. 2 — The Unbearable Weight of Massive Talent

    Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2022 63:45


    The new THE UNBEARABLE WEIGHT OF MASSIVE TALENT contains a lot of the same DNA as ADAPTATION, but instead of screenwriter Charlie Kaufman, the film's meta energy is focused on star Nicolas Cage, once again playing two competing sides of the same tortured talent. This week we get into how the confluence of actor, persona, and screenplay works differently in each film, but first we process UNBEARABLE WEIGHT's lighthearted excavation of its central talent, and consider whether we may have already moved past the stage of Cage's career that the film is commenting on. Please share your comments, thoughts, and questions about ADAPTATION, THE UNBEARABLE WEIGHT OF MASSIVE TALENT, Nicolas Cage, or anything else in the world of film, by sending an email to comments@nextpictureshow.net. We may respond to it on our Patreon (patreon.com/NextPictureShow), where you can also find bonus episodes, recommendations, and more.  Outro music: Kesha, “Nicolas Cage” Next pairing: Sam Raimi's DARKMAN and DOCTOR STRANGE IN THE MULTIVERSE OF MADNESS Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    #326: Cage Match, Pt. 1 — Adaptation

    Play Episode Listen Later Apr 26, 2022 67:23


    We're offering four Nicolas Cages for the price of two with this week's pairing, inspired by Cage's latest, THE UNBEARABLE WEIGHT OF MASSIVE TALENT, which finds the actor playing two connected versions of himself. But before entering that hall of mirrors, we're heading back to 2002's ADAPTATION for a different strain of meta exercise centered on another set of Nicolas Cages, this one playing the film's screenwriter, Charlie Kaufman, as well as his twin brother/personification of his own self-loathing, Donald. The exact nature of Donald's character and how it shapes the film's third act is a big point of discussion this week, as is how literally we are meant to take the film's title when it comes to its literary source material. Please share your comments, thoughts, and questions about ADAPTATION, THE UNBEARABLE WEIGHT OF MASSIVE TALENT, or anything else in the world of film, by sending an email to comments@nextpictureshow.net. We may respond to it on our Patreon (patreon.com/NextPictureShow), where you can also find bonus episodes, recommendations, and more.  Outro music: The Turtles, “Happy Together” Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    #325: Multiple Choice, Pt. 2 — Everything Everywhere All At Once

    Play Episode Listen Later Apr 19, 2022 69:20


    Despite its clear thematic and philosophical connections to the other film in this pairing, Krzysztof Kieślowski's BLIND CHANCE, Daniel Schienert and Daniel Kwan's new EVERYTHING EVERYWHERE ALL AT ONCE is a unique experience, a bold, humanistic film full of big messages and also butt jokes. It's a film that's built to surprise and delight on first viewing, but what does it offer in terms of rewatch value? That's one of the things we debate in our discussion of the Daniels' film, before bringing Kieślowski's back into the picture to talk through some of those thematic and philosophical connections. Please share your comments, thoughts, and questions about BLIND CHANCE, EVERYTHING EVERYWHERE ALL AT ONCE, or anything else in the world of film, by sending an email to comments@nextpictureshow.net. We may respond to it on our Patreon (patreon.com/NextPictureShow), where you can also find bonus episodes, recommendations, and more.  Show Notes Works Cited: • Everything Everywhere All at Once review by Walter Chaw (filmfreakcentral.net) • Blind Chance: The Conditional Mood, by Dennis Lim (criterion.com) Outro music: Son Lux w/ Randy Newman, “Now We're Cookin'" Next pairing: Spike Jonze's ADAPTATION and Tom Gormican's THE UNBEARABLE WEIGHT OF MASSIVE TALENT Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    #324: Multiple Choice, Pt. 1 — Blind Chance

    Play Episode Listen Later Apr 12, 2022 57:18


    In addition to being an examination of how much chance determines the person we become, as well as something of a Rosetta Stone for the work of Krzysztof Kieslowski, BLIND CHANCE also plays like the 1980s version of a multiverse story, making it a clear precursor to Daniels Kwan and Scheinert's new EVERYTHING EVERYWHERE ALL AT ONCE. But Kieslowski's film has different ideas about fate, determination, and the invisible forces that shape our lives as much as the choices we make, all of which we attempt to unpack in our conversation, along with what connects BLIND CHANCE's three timelines, what about the politically minded film invited resistance upon its release, and the significance of that opening scream. Please share your comments, thoughts, and questions about BLIND CHANCE, EVERYTHING EVERYWHERE ALL AT ONCE, or anything else in the world of film, by sending an email to comments@nextpictureshow.net. We may respond to it on our Patreon (patreon.com/NextPictureShow), where you can also find bonus episodes, a weekly newsletter, recommendations, and more.  Outro music: Talking Heads, “Once In a Lifetime” The Tale of King Crab opens April 15th at New York City's Film at Lincoln Center before expanding to cities across the country. Find theater, tickets, and more at kingcrab.oscilloscope.net Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    #323: Tex-Mess, Pt. 2 — X (2022)

    Play Episode Listen Later Apr 5, 2022 73:34


    Ti West's new X is very much inspired by Tobe Hooper's 1974 shocker THE TEXAS CHAINSAW MASSACRE (and to an extent, Hooper's lesser-known EATEN ALIVE), following another bunch of ill-fated van passengers, this one a group filming a low-budget porno, who wind up on the wrong side of the owners of a remote Texas farmhouse. The film's late-'70s setting invites all sorts of analysis and interpretation about sex, death, and their intersection with cultural and religious conservatism at the dawn of the 1980s, which we dig into, once again with the help of film writer and horror aficionado Katie Rife, before turning our focus to some of the specific echoes between X and TEXAS CHAINSAW MASSACRE. Please share your comments, thoughts, and questions about THE TEXAS CHAINSAW MASSACRE, X, or anything else in the world of film, by sending an email to comments@nextpictureshow.net. We may respond to it on our Patreon (patreon.com/NextPictureShow), where you can also find bonus episodes, a weekly newsletter, recommendations, and more.  Outro music: Blue Oyster Cult, “Don't Fear the Reaper” Next pairing: The Daniels' EVERYTHING EVERYWHERE ALL AT ONCE and Krzysztof Kieslowski's BLIND CHANCE Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    #322: Tex-Mess, Pt. 1 — The Texas Chainsaw Massacre (1974)

    Play Episode Listen Later Mar 29, 2022 60:30


    Ti West's new horror film X is very openly inspired by THE TEXAS CHAINSAW MASSACRE, carrying through the spirit of Tobe Hooper's 1974 shocker more capably than most of the subsequent films in what would become a nine-film franchise (in particular this year's dreadful remake). Before getting into how it does that next week, this week we're revisiting Hooper's film with the help of film critic and series expert Katie Rife, to consider what made this film hit the way it did at the time, why it so often gets lumped in with the slasher genre it preceded, and whether it's a film that gets more brutal — or, perhaps, more comforting — with time. Please share your comments, thoughts, and questions about THE TEXAS CHAINSAW MASSACRE, X, or anything else in the world of film, by sending an email to comments@nextpictureshow.net. We may respond to it on our Patreon (patreon.com/NextPictureShow), where you can also find bonus episodes, a weekly newsletter, recommendations, and more.  Works Cited  • “For nearly 50 years, the Texas Chainsaw Massacre movies have made a meal out of raw panic,” by Katie Rife (avclub.com) • “Every Texas Chainsaw Massacre movie psychoanalyzes the original,” by Daniel Dockery (polygon.com) Outro music: Kesha, “Cannibal” Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    #321: Bye, Robot Pt. 2 — After Yang

    Play Episode Listen Later Mar 22, 2022 72:13


    Kogonada's new AFTER YANG plays in many ways like a mirror to Steven Spielberg's misunderstood android epic A.I. ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE as it explores ideas about human nature through the experiences of an artificial being. It's also an unusually warm, thematically rich science-fiction film that opens up countless avenues of discussion, a few of which we travel down before bringing AFTER YANG into conversation with Spielberg's earlier model to consider these stories' shared features: a disrupted family unit, a journey of discovery, adoption ethics, and rumination on what it means to be human. Please share your comments, thoughts, and questions about A.I. ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE, AFTER YANG, or anything else in the world of film, by sending an email to comments@nextpictureshow.net. We may respond to it on our Patreon (patreon.com/NextPictureShow), where you can also find bonus episodes, a weekly newsletter, recommendations, and more.  Works Cited: • ”What the Year's Best Sci-Fi Movie Has to Say About Asian Identity and Adoption” by Sam Adams (slate.com) • “After Yang intentionally subverts sci-fi's fetishistic ‘hollow Asian' trope” by Leo Kim (polygon.com) • “After Yang Is a Gorgeous Movie About the Life and Death of a Robot” by Alison Willmore (vulture.com) Outro music: Mitski, “Glide” Next pairing: Tobe Hooper's THE TEXAS CHAINSAW MASSACRE and Ti West's X Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    #320: Bye, Robot Pt. 1 — A.I. Artificial Intelligence

    Play Episode Listen Later Mar 15, 2022 71:11


    Kogonada's new science-fiction film AFTER YANG wrestles with the humanity of artificial beings, and their relationship to humanity, in a way that feels distinctly reminiscent of Steven Spielberg's 2001 feature A.I. ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE. Both films are highly sympathetic toward the android companions on which they center, but Spielberg's film, which began life as a Stanley Kubrick endeavor, has a more sour view of humanity… or does it? That's one of the main questions up for discussion this week as we delve into the complexities and contradictions of A.I., a film with no shortage of discussion points, many of which coalesce around the film's still-divisive ending.  Please share your comments, thoughts, and questions about A.I., AFTER YANG, or anything else in the world of film, by sending an email to comments@nextpictureshow.net. We may respond to it on our Patreon (patreon.com/NextPictureShow), where you can also find bonus episodes, a weekly newsletter, recommendations, and more.  Outro music: Cliff Edwards and Dickie Jones, “Give a Little Whistle”  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    #319: No Time to Dye, Pt. 2 — Kimi

    Play Episode Listen Later Mar 8, 2022 81:09


    Steven Soderbergh's new thriller KIMI is as brisk, stylish, and sure-footed in its approach as Tom Tykwer's 1998 arthouse hit RUN LOLA RUN, but with a much different set of cinematic goals and references in play. Does KIMI's spare, simple, stylish approach alchemize into what one of our panelists calls “pure entertainment” that's “easy as breathing,” or does it leave too many unfilled spaces and narrative holes to trip over? We hash it out before bringing LOLA in to compare the two films' commitment to brevity and adrenalized filmmaking, how that commitment plays out via their respective soundtracks, and the ways in which each tackles conflict and codependency in relationships.  Please share your comments, thoughts, and questions about KIMI, RUN LOLA RUN, or anything else in the world of film, by sending an email to comments@nextpictureshow.net. We may respond to it on our Patreon (patreon.com/NextPictureShow), where you can also find bonus episodes, a weekly newsletter, recommendations, and more.  Outro music: Elastica, “Connection” Thanks Raycon!. For a limited time, go To buyraycon.com/NEXTPICTURE for 15% off your entire Raycon order.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    #318: No Time to Dye, Pt. 1 — Run Lola Run

    Play Episode Listen Later Mar 1, 2022 66:21


    Steven Soderbergh's new straight-to-streaming movie KIMI wears its many influences on its sleeve, but we saw our inspiration for this week's pairing in its protagonist's colorful dyed hair, reminiscent of one of the many eye-popping elements of Tom Tykwer's 1998 international breakout RUN LOLA RUN. But what really links the two films is the breakneck pace they share as they chase after women trying to achieve an urgent goal on a short deadline. This week we home in on RUN LOLA RUN to parse its interplay of style and substance, and debate how and to what extent this fleet film stumbles over its weighty themes of time, choice, and fate.  Please share your comments, thoughts, and questions about RUN LOLA RUN, KIMI, or anything else in the world of film, by sending an email to comments@nextpictureshow.net. We may respond to it on our Patreon (patreon.com/NextPictureShow), where you can also find bonus episodes, a weekly newsletter, recommendations, and more.  Outro music: Franka Potente, “Believe” (Run Lola Run) Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    #317: Star Crossed Pt. 2 — Marry Me

    Play Episode Listen Later Feb 22, 2022 68:00


    Kat Coiro's new MARRY ME is a rarity in 2022: a major-studio romcom released to theaters (okay, and Peacock), that features recognizable stars and tries to honor the genre without apologies or winky self-awareness. It's a modern yet old-fashioned romcom that relies on audiences' affection for its genre, and in particular its incandescent star, Jennifer Lopez, to smooth over its rough patches, which we poke at — affectionately — in the second half of our star-crossed romcom pairing. We're joined once again by special guest Scott Meslow, author of the new book FROM HOLLYWOOD WITH LOVE, to discuss how MARRY ME works through the romcom formula, and where it stumbles, before bringing Roger Michell's NOTTING HILL back in to consider how both films fit their respective ideas about celebrity, infidelity, and humility into the genre's well-established storytelling structure. Please share your comments, thoughts, and questions about NOTTING HILL, MARRY ME, or anything else in the world of film, by sending an email to comments@nextpictureshow.net. We may respond to it on our Patreon (patreon.com/NextPictureShow), where you can also find bonus episodes, a weekly newsletter, recommendations, and more.  Next pairing: RUN LOLA RUN and KIMI Outro Music: “On My Way (Marry Me)” by Jennifer Lopez Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    #316: Star Crossed, Pt. 1 — Notting Hill

    Play Episode Listen Later Feb 15, 2022 58:39


    Despite a very 2022 premise, the new MARRY ME acts in many ways like a romantic comedy from the genre's late-20th-century heyday, from its star-driven nature to its central fantasy of a romance between a world-famous celebrity and an everyday schlub. That particular combination pointed us in the direction of one of the era's romcom highlights, 1999's NOTTING HILL, starring Julia Roberts and Hugh Grant as characters with deep ties to their actors' respective personas. This week we look back at the film that cemented Richard Curtis as a romcom auteur, with an assist from someone who literally wrote the book on the genre — Scott Meslow, author of the new “From Hollywood with Love: The Rise and Fall (and Rise Again) of the Romantic Comedy” — to consider how NOTTING HILL figures into the careers of both its screenwriter and its stars, what director Roger Michell brings to the equation, and the film's mixed-blessing view of stardom. Please share your comments, thoughts, and questions about NOTTING HILL, MARRY ME, or anything else in the world of film, romcom or otherwise, by sending an email to comments@nextpictureshow.net. We may respond to it on our Patreon (patreon.com/NextPictureShow), where you can also find bonus episodes, a weekly newsletter, recommendations, and more.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    #315: Toil and Trouble Pt. 2 — The Tragedy of Macbeth (2022)

    Play Episode Listen Later Feb 8, 2022 75:37


    Is Joel Coen's new THE TRAGEDY OF MACBETH the most by-the-letter, scrupulous adaptation of Shakespeare's play ever put to screen, or a series of subtle but surprising decisions applied to an extremely familiar text? We're a little divided on that question this week, as we're joined once again by David Chen, host of the Culturally Relevant podcast (among many other projects), to parse what distinguishes this approach to The Scottish Play, how it plays within the Coen filmography, and whether every other Coen film is also, in fact, Macbeth. Then we bring Akira Kurosawa's THRONE OF BLOOD back into the conversation to compare the two films' chicken-or-the-egg prophecies, their minimalist/maximalist styles, and the shared motivation to adapt this story in the first place. Please share your comments, thoughts, and questions about THRONE OF BLOOD, THE TRAGEDY OF MACBETH, or anything else in the world of film, by sending an email to comments@nextpictureshow.net. We may respond to it on our Patreon (patreon.com/NextPictureShow), where you can also find bonus episodes, a weekly newsletter, recommendations, and more.  Works Cited: • “In the Coen brothers' punishing world, morals are everything,” by Tasha Robinson (thedissolve.com) • “The Tragedy of Macbeth Is Pretty Much Just One Phenomenal Denzel Washington Performance,” by Alison Willmore (vulture.com) • “Dialogue: Macbeth and the Movies,” by Scott Tobias and Keith Phipps (thereveal.substack.com) Next pairing: NOTTING HILL and MARRY ME Outro Music: “Fair Is Foul & Foul Is Fair” by Babes In Toyland Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    #314: Toil and Trouble Pt. 1 — Throne of Blood

    Play Episode Listen Later Feb 1, 2022 58:39


    There are no shortage of adaptations we could pair with Joel Coen's new THE TRAGEDY OF MACBETH, but for our purposes the choice was always clear: Akira Kurosawa's 1957 classic THRONE OF BLOOD is an ideal Next Picture Show companion piece for the way in which it takes what it needs from the original Shakespeare while changing the language, setting, and performance style, and cherry-picking elements of the plot. We're joined this week by super-podcaster and super-fan David Chen to talk through some of those elements, including a Lady Macbeth who is both more and less passive than her play counterpart, as well as the film's unexpected jolts of humor, and a deliberate sense of pacing that toes the line between building tension and repetition.  Please share your comments, thoughts, and questions about THRONE OF BLOOD, THE TRAGEDY OF MACBETH, or anything else in the world of film, by sending an email to comments@nextpictureshow.net. We may respond to it on our Patreon (patreon.com/NextPictureShow), where you can also find bonus episodes, a weekly newsletter, recommendations, and more.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    #313: Tales as Old as Time, Pt. 2 — Belle (2021)

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 25, 2022 79:40


    Mamoru Hosoda's new anime feature BELLE moves the classic fable of Beauty and the Beast into a futuristic VR world, but that's not the film's only major departure from its original source material. Although it contains some direct visual references and corollary characters to Disney's BEAUTY AND THE BEAST, it's ultimately concerned with different, more unruly emotions, which drives the story in unexpected directions. This week we hash out our responses to BELLE and debate how much worldbuilding is necessary and/or desired in Hosada's approach, before bringing in its Disney counterpart to consider side-by-side our isolated protagonists, childlike beasts, and backgrounded fathers, as well as how the two films function differently as musicals.  Please share your comments, thoughts, and questions about BEAUTY AND THE BEAST, BELLE, or anything else in the world of film, by sending an email to comments@nextpictureshow.net, or leaving a short voicemail at (773) 234-9730.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    #312: Tales as Old as Time, Pt. 1 — Beauty and the Beast (1991)

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 69:36


    Mamoru Hosada's new anime BELLE is the latest take on a certain tale as old as time, one that was previously enshrined in the animated feature canon with 1991's BEAUTY AND THE BEAST, one of the touchstones of Disney's storied late-20th-century renaissance. This week we crack open the clamshell VHS case on Disney's version, in particular its labored-even-by-Disney-standards development process, its unforgettable Ashman/Menken music, what made it stand out in the animation landscape back then, and how those same elements look compared to the film's modern-day successors.  Please share your comments, thoughts, and questions about either version of BEAUTY AND THE BEAST, BELLE, or anything else in the world of film, by sending an email to comments@nextpictureshow.net, or leaving a short voicemail at (773) 234-9730.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    #311: Our 2021 Top 10s, Part 2

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2022 72:24


    Our look back at 2021 in film concludes with Tasha, Keith, and Scott's picks for films number five through one on their respective top 10 lists—or at least their top 10s as they stood at the tail end of December. All three acknowledge that the year offered several quality releases that on any other given day might have made their way onto one of these lists, but for the overlapping factors of time, availability, and the inherently mercurial nature of annual list-making. And so they also dig into the films they weren't able to see in time for this episode, as well as the honorable mentions that just missed the cut. If you have thoughts you'd like to share on our picks, your picks, or anything else about the past year in film, you can send an email to comments@nextpictureshow.net or leave a short voicemail at (773) 234-9730.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    #310: Our 2021 Top 10s, Part 1

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 58:10


    We're kicking off 2022 by setting aside our usual format for a look back at 2021 in film, via that tried and true structure, the Top 10 list. Keith, Scott, and Tasha have each come to this two-part episode bearing their individual top 10 lists, as well as broader thoughts on a year in which established moviegoing models seem to be shifting more rapidly than ever. This week covers the films at the 10 through 6 slots on their lists, as well as an abbreviated discussion of the film that's number one on the list of films we wish we could have covered on the main show. If you have thoughts you'd like to share on our picks, your picks, or anything else about the past year in film, you can send an email to comments@nextpictureshow.net or leave a short voicemail at (773) 234-9730.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    #309: Carnival Games, Pt. 2 — Nightmare Alley (2021)

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021 84:36


    Guillermo del Toro's new NIGHTMARE ALLEY is a first for the director, a film with no supernatural or fantasy elements at all, and yet it is still arguably more recognizable as a del Toro film than as a remake of the 1947 Edmund Goulding noir of the same name. Why this project, for this director, and with these actors? We're joined once again by our friend and critic Noel Murray to hash out our varied reactions to del Toro's project, before bringing Goulding's version of NIGHTMARE ALLEY back into the discussion to examine what makes each version of this story distinct. Plus Your Next Picture Show, where we share recent viewing experiences in hopes of putting something new on your radar. Please share your comments, thoughts, and questions about either version of NIGHTMARE ALLEY, both versions, or anything else in the world of film, by sending an email to comments@nextpictureshow.net, or leaving a short voicemail at (773) 234-9730.  Show Notes Works Cited: • “The Theme That Ties All of Guillermo del Toro's Movies Together” by Tasha Robinson (gizmodo.com/io9) Your Next Picture Show: • Noel: VOIR on Netflix • Tasha: Jasmila Žbanić's QUO VADIS, AIDA? • Scott: Maggie Gyllenhaal's THE LOST DAUGHTER Outro Music: “Spookshow Baby” by Rob Zombie Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    #308: Carnival Games, Pt. 1 — Nightmare Alley (1947)

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021 61:01


    Guillermo del Toro has emphasized that his new NIGHTMARE ALLEY is not a remake of Edmund Goulding's 1947 noir of the same name, but rather an attempt to more faithfully adapt the 1946 novel by author William Lindsay Gresham, about a carnival con artist who expands his hustle into spiritualism and subsequently opens himself up to disaster. Nonetheless, this week in preparation of our discussion of del Toro's NIGHTMARE we're taking a deeper look at Goulding's, with an assist from our friend and critic Noel Murray, to see how it follows and diverts from the noir tradition, particularly in its trio of distinctive female characters and performances, and how the morality of its tacked-on ending undercuts its deeper themes. Plus, our recent episode on THE POWER OF THE DOG has inspired a lot of feedback, which we begin digging into with some thoughts on its Hitchcockian and literary connections. Please share your comments, thoughts, and questions about either version of NIGHTMARE ALLEY, or anything else in the world of film, by sending an email to comments@nextpictureshow.net, or leaving a short voicemail at (773) 234-9730.  Outro music: “Carnival Games” by Nelly Furtado Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    #307: Model Males, Pt. 2 — The Power of the Dog

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021 79:11


    With less of a narrative focus on survival than DELIVERANCE, Jane Campion's new POWER OF THE DOG takes a comparatively subtle approach to unpacking the nuances of toxic masculinity and the myriad ways in which it can poison relationships — but there's nothing subtle about that ending and the way it makes everything leading up to it click into place. We dig into the power of POWER's storytelling, performances, and late-Western vibe before bringing it into conversation with DELIVERANCE as complementary studies in performative masculinity and its relationship to the natural world, encroaching civilization, and sexual threat. Plus Your Next Picture Show, where we share recent viewing experiences in hopes of putting something new on your radar. Please share your comments, thoughts, and questions about DELIVERANCE, THE POWER OF THE DOG, or anything else in the world of film, by sending an email to comments@nextpictureshow.net, or leaving a short voicemail at (773) 234-9730.  Your Next Picture Show: • Genevieve: STATION ELEVEN on HBO Max • Keith: The Hughes Brothers' MENACE II SOCIETY • Scott: Ryûsuke Hamaguchi's WHEEL OF FORTUNE AND FANTASY and DRIVE MY CAR Outro music: “Ugly Duet” from POWER OF THE DOG Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    #306: Model Males, Pt. 1 — Deliverance

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2021 61:56


    Jane Campion's new POWER OF THE DOG includes a tense passage involving a banjo that plays as a nod to the 1972 John Boorman classic DELIVERANCE, but the two films' shared thematic concerns go much deeper than banjo duels. Chief among those is the theme of toxic masculinity and its myriad manifestations, which we explore this week via DELIVERANCE's four male archetypes and their misbegotten river adventure. Plus, we're still getting feedback about LAST NIGHT IN SOHO, which means we're still talking about that third-act twist. Please share your comments, thoughts, and questions about DELIVERANCE, POWER OF THE DOG, or anything else in the world of film, by sending an email to comments@nextpictureshow.net, or leaving a short voicemail at (773) 234-9730.  Outro music: “Dueling Banjos” performed by Eric Weissberg and Steve Mandel Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    #305: White Lies, Pt. 2 — Passing

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 85:27


    Rebecca Hall's new PASSING takes a more restrained, internal approach to its story about racial identity and the rejection thereof than Douglas Sirk's 1959 classic IMITATION OF LIFE, but the two films share an awareness of how style and subject matter can work hand in hand. We're joined again this week by critic Odie Henderson to discuss how each film balances its messaging, storytelling, and style, after digging into PASSING's black-and-white cinematography, literary source material, and ambiguous ending. Plus Your Next Picture Show, where we share recent viewing experiences in hopes of putting something new on your radar. Please share your comments, thoughts, and questions about IMITATION OF LIFE, PASSING, or anything else in the world of film, by sending an email to comments@nextpictureshow.net, or leaving a short voicemail at (773) 234-9730.  Show Notes: Works Cited: • “One Last Bit of Black History” by Odie Henderson (Big Media Vandalism) • “Angels of Death: A Prairie Home Companion and All That Jazz” by Odie Henderson (Slant Magazine) Your Next Picture Show: • Odie: Douglas Sirk's LURED; Lewis Seiler's WOMEN'S PRISON; Mamoru Hosada's BELLE • Tasha: Hayao Miyazaki's FUTURE BOY CONAN • Genevieve: Penny Lane's LISTENING TO KENNY G • Keith: Todd Haynes' FAR FROM HEAVEN; Mike Mills' C'MON C'MON Outro music: “Irene and Claire” by Devonté Hynes Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    #304: White Lies, Pt. 1 — Imitation of Life

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 71:54


    Rebecca Hall's new film PASSING centers on a complicated female friendship defined in part by semi-porous racial boundaries, a thematic throughline that pointed us directly to Douglas Sirk's IMITATION OF LIFE — with an assist from RogerEbert.com critic Odie Henderson, who in his recent review of Hall's film invoked Sirk's 1959 melodrama, citing it as his #3 film of all time. We're joined this week by Henderson to discuss how IMITATION OF LIFE's wrenching storyline about a Black woman's ongoing rejection by her white-passing daughter operates within the whole of a film that has several other plot concerns, primarily those of a white woman played by the film's lone movie star, and how the film's performances and overall heightened style mesh with its messaging about race and class. Plus, we respond to some feedback regarding one of our major problems with LAST NIGHT IN SOHO, and how it plays across the pond. Please share your comments, thoughts, and questions about IMITATION OF LIFE, PASSING, or anything else in the world of film, by sending an email to comments@nextpictureshow.net, or leaving a short voicemail at (773) 234-9730.  Outro music: “Trouble of the World” by Mahalia Jackson Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    #303: Dual Duels Pt. 2 — Last Night In Soho

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 80:46


    LAST NIGHT IN SOHO director and co-writer Edgar Wright is never shy about sharing and celebrating his influences for each new project, which in this case includes the other film in this pairing, Ingmar Bergman's famously inscrutable PERSONA. We get into the connections between those two, including their portrayals of relationships between two women and their allusive tendencies, after digging into what makes Wright's newest film so intoxicating… for its first half, at least. Plus Your Next Picture Show, where we share recent viewing experiences in hopes of putting something new on your radar. Please share your comments, thoughts, and questions about PERSONA, LAST NIGHT IN SOHO, or anything else in the world of film, by sending an email to comments@nextpictureshow.net, or leaving a short voicemail at (773) 234-9730.  Show Notes: Works Cited: • “Last Night in Soho's Edgar Wright doesn't want to give you homework… but he will” by Tasha Robinson (Polygon.com) • “Inside Last Night in Soho's breathtaking trick dance with Matt Smith and Edgar Wright” by Tasha Robinson (Polygn.com) • Edgar Wright Breaks Down 25 Films from the 1960s That Inspired ‘Last Night in Soho'” by Zack Sharf (indiewire.com) • Edgar Wright's Adventures in Moviegoing (criterionchannel.org) Your Next Picture Show: Keith: Mario Bava's BLOOD AND BLACK LACE Genevieve: SCENES FROM A MARRIAGE (2021) on HBO Scott: Pablo Larrain's SPENCER Tasha: Philip Gelatt and Morgan Galen King's THE SPINE OF NIGHT Outro music: “(There's) Always Something There To Remind Me” by Sandie Shaw Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    #302: Dual Duels Pt. 1 — Persona

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 60:29


    In familiar Edgar Wright fashion, the director's new LAST NIGHT IN SOHO is brimming with cinematic allusion, but that self-reflexivity combined with a focus on a pair of similar-looking women whose identities begin to merge in uncanny ways brought us immediately to one of film's most mysterious and scrutinized movies: Ingmar Bergman's PERSONA. Broadly concerned with two women's power struggle and eventual convergence, Bergman's film is open to countless, sometimes overlapping interpretations, many of them concerning the nature of cinema itself, leading to its reputation as the “Mount Everest of cinematic analysis.” We consider that reputation, and what about the film invites it, in part one of this double double-feature. Plus, we respond to a multi-part question about DUNE that we only mostly disagree with. Please share your comments, thoughts, and questions about PERSONA, LAST NIGHT IN SOHO, or anything else in the world of film, by sending an email to comments@nextpictureshow.net, or leaving a short voicemail at (773) 234-9730.  Outro music: “Personality Crisis” by New York Dolls Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    #301: Just Deserts Pt. 2 — Dune (2021)

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 91:07


    Denis Villeneuve's new DUNE (or, more accurately, DUNE PART ONE) begins the process of adapting Frank Herbert's 1965 novel of the same name, which itself drew from the biography of T.E. Lawrence, the inspiration for another film concerned with “desert power” and messiah mythmaking: 1962's LAWRENCE OF ARABIA. While the two films each slot into different genres — science-fiction and historical war story, respectively — their narratives are remarkably similar, particularly when it comes to the white-savior overtones of their protagonists and their reverence for the desert as a visual and symbolic force. They also stand as complementary representatives of large-scale filmmaking produced some six decades apart, which we dig into in our comparison of the two films, as well as our reactions to DUNE PART ONE, and how they're informed by our knowledge that this is only half the story. Plus Your Next Picture Show, where we share recent viewing experiences in hopes of putting something new on your radar. Please share your comments, thoughts, and questions about LAWRENCE OF ARABIA, DUNE, or anything else in the world of film, by sending an email to comments@nextpictureshow.net, or leaving a short voicemail at (773) 234-9730.  Your Next Picture Show: Genevieve: RESERVATION DOGS on FX on Hulu Tasha: MAYA AND THE THREE on Netflix Scott: Mia Hansen-Løve's BERGMAN ISLAND Keith: Scott Z. Burns' THE REPORT Outro music: “Weapon of Choice” by Fatboy Slim ft. Bootsy Collins Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    #300: Just Deserts Pt. 1 — Lawrence of Arabia

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 77:29


    The 1965 Frank Herbert novel that gave rise to Denis Villenueve's new adaptation DUNE drew direct inspiration from the life of T.E. Lawrence, the subject of one of cinema's towering classics: LAWRENCE OF ARABIA. David Lean's 1965 film is a celebrated, Oscar-winning classic that's become shorthand for “big screen epic,” but for every major set piece where Peter O'Toole's Lawrence seems to consider himself immortal, there's an accompanying intimate moment where he gives in to his self-doubt. It's a complexity we see again in DUNE, and which we dig into this week in a conversation about LAWRENCE's rich and complicated legacy. Plus, our recent episode on REMINISCENCE prompts a listener question about other, better uses of water as a symbolic force. Please share your comments, thoughts, and questions about LAWRENCE OF ARABIA, DUNE, or anything else in the world of film, by sending an email to comments@nextpictureshow.net, or leaving a short voicemail at (773) 234-9730.  Outro music: “Desert Song” by Edward Sharpe and the Magnetic Zeros Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    #299: Family History, Pt. 2 – The Many Saints of Newark

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 63:00


    When it comes to the cultural obsession with origin stories that's led to the underwhelming Sopranos prequel film THE MANY SAINTS OF NEWARK, how much credit/blame should be placed at the feet of THE GODFATHER PART II as an originator of this storytelling fixation? That's among the questions we consider as we parse our mixed-to-negative reactions to the newer film, and bring it into conversation with Francis Ford Coppola's classic to compare the films' respective entwining of crime, American history, and father-son dynamics. Plus Your Next Picture Show, where we share recent filmgoing experiences in hopes of putting something new on your radar. Please share your comments, thoughts, and questions about THE GODFATHER PART II, THE MANY SAINTS OF NEWARK , or anything else in the world of film, by sending an email to comments@nextpictureshow.net, or leaving a short voicemail at (773) 234-9730.  Your Next Picture Show: Jason: “Prime Time Panic” Fun City Edition box set (featuring FREEDOM, DREAMS DON'T DIE, and DEATH RIDE TO OSAKA) Keith: Barry Shear's ACROSS 110TH STREET Scott: Florian Zeller's THE FATHER Outro music: “Core 'ngrato” performed by Dominic Chianese Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    #298: Family History, Pt. 1 – The Godfather, Part II

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 67:54


    The new Sopranos-inspired film THE MANY SAINTS OF NEWARK is both a prequel and a follow-up to one of the most acclaimed and influential mafia stories ever told, a description that also applies to Francis Ford Coppola's 1974 film THE GODFATHER: PART II. Coppola's follow-up to his 1972 smash has a prequel embedded within its flashback structure, but its dual narrative makes it much more than just an origin story — it's a very different film than its predecessor, but does that make it, as the conventional wisdom goes, the superior GODFATHER? We're joined this week by special guest and New York City cinema expert Jason Bailey to parse that argument, as well as what distinguishes PART II  within both the larger GODFATHER story and the work of Coppola during that period. Plus, we respond to some feedback inspired by our recent episode on STRANGE DAYS and other unavailable movies.  Please share your comments, thoughts, and questions about THE GODFATHER: PART II, THE MANY SAINTS OF NEWARK, or anything else in the world of film, by sending an email to comments@nextpictureshow.net, or leaving a short voicemail at (773) 234-9730.  Outro music: “Family Reunion” by The O'Jays Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    #297: Bet Your Life Pt. 2: The Card Counter

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 84:55


    Like HARD EIGHT, the new Paul Schrader film THE CARD COUNTER puts a professional gambler on the road to redemption via his relationship with a confused and volatile young man, in the latest iteration of Schrader's “God's Lonely Man” character. We unpack that character, along with CARD COUNTER's view of him and his sins, with the help once again of critic and Schrader expert Vikram Murthi, before putting these two films side by side to discuss their respective approach to father-son relationships, casinos and gambling, and lives lived in limbo. Plus Your Next Picture Show, where we share recent filmgoing experiences in hopes of putting something new on your radar. Please share your comments, thoughts, and questions about HARD EIGHT, THE CARD COUNTER, or anything else in the world of film, by sending an email to comments@nextpictureshow.net, or leaving a short voicemail at (773) 234-9730.  Show Notes Works Cited: • “Every Paul Schrader Movie, Ranked” by Vikram Murthi (vulture.com) • “Cogs in the Machine: American Despair in Paul Schrader's ‘Blue Collar'” by Vikram Murthi (musings.oscilloscope.net) • “'The Card Counter' Is a Tense Second Act to Paul Schrader's Doomsday Period” by Charles Bramesco (insidehook.com) Your Next Picture Show: Vikram: James Foley's AFTER DARK, MY SWEET Scott: Michael Mohan's THE VOYEURS Keith: Jean-Pierre Melville's BOB LE FLAMBEUR Tasha: James Wan's MALIGNANT Outro music: “Rambling Gambling Willie” by Bob Dylan Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    #296: Bet Your Life Pt. 1: Hard Eight

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 73:40


    The uneasy pact between a professional gambler and a young man from his past in Paul Schrader's THE CARD COUNTER recalls the surrogate father and son at the center of Paul Thomas Anderson's debut feature HARD EIGHT. Both films follow solitary men into dark casino halls, but on very different paths to redemption. For this week's focus on HARD EIGHT, we're joined by freelance critic and longtime friend of the pod Vikram Murthi to debate Anderson's approach to withholding and revealing character motivation, which of the standout performances stands out the most, and PTA's enduring wish that the film be called by his preferred title, “Sydney.” Plus, we respond to a listener prompt about minor characters we can't get out of our heads. Please share your comments, thoughts, and questions about HARD EIGHT, THE CARD COUNTER, or anything else in the world of film, by sending an email to comments@nextpictureshow.net, or leaving a short voicemail at (773) 234-9730.  Outro music: “Go Down Gamblin'” by Blood, Sweat & Tears Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    #295: Missing Movies + Strange Days (1995)

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 84:52


    Our recent pairing of Michel Gondry's ETERNAL SUNSHINE OF THE SPOTLESS MINDS with Lisa Joy's REMINISCENCE was actually a second-choice selection forced by the ongoing unavailability of the film we initially thought of as a slam-dunk companion to Joy's new film: Kathryn Bigelow's 1995 thriller STRANGE DAYS, another noir-inflected science-fiction story concerned with the intersection of technology and memory. But that film is nearly impossible to find these days (at least through official channels), which prompted this off-format discussion in which we spend some time digging into why STRANGE DAYS feels like a “missing piece” in our modern-day discussion of both Bigelow's career and cinema overall, particularly its daring racial and sexual politics and visceral violence. Then we widen the lens a bit to consider the overall phenomenon of impossible-to-find movies in the streaming era, and what it says about our past and present attitudes toward film preservation. Please share your comments, thoughts, and questions about disappearing movies, STRANGE DAYS, or anything else in the world of film, by sending an email to comments@nextpictureshow.net, or leaving a short voicemail at (773) 234-9730.  Show Notes Works cited: • “The convenience trap: What the changes at Netflix reveal about an insidious trend,” by Sam Adams (avclub.com) • “Film preservation 2.0,” by Matthew Dessem (thedissolve.com) • “Song of the South: the difficult legacy of Disney's most shocking movie,” by Scott Tobias (theguardian.com) Outro music: “I Still Haven't Found What I'm Looking For” by U2 Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

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