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Scriptnotes Podcast
527 - Die Hard

Scriptnotes Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 63:17


John and Craig celebrate the holidays by releasing a special premium episode on the 1988 Christmas classic: DIE HARD. Die Hard created a new template for action movies, heroes, and villains, establishing tropes still seen in theaters. They discuss both structure and story to examine what screenwriters can take away from this film and why many have failed to replicate its success. In our super-size bonus segment for premium members, John interviews DIE HARD screenwriter Steven E. de Souza, who shares credit with Jeb Stuart. Steven reveals how he choreographed action scenes using the building's blueprints, why the story switches POV, and how improv added realism to the film's marriage dynamics. It's a great lesson in why a screenwriter's job doesn't stop when turning in the draft. Links: Read the DIE HARD script on Weekend Read or online here. Feminist Analysis of Die Hard Movies That Made Us on Netflix, check out the Die Hard episode on S1! Sign up for premium here. Steven E. de Souza on Twitter John August on Twitter Craig Mazin on Twitter John on Instagram Outro by Andy Roninson (send us yours!) Scriptnotes is produced by Megana Rao and edited by Matthew Chilelli. Email us at ask@johnaugust.com You can download the episode here.

Screaming in the Cloud
Keeping the Chaos Searchable with Thomas Hazel

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 44:43


About ThomasThomas Hazel is Founder, CTO, and Chief Scientist of ChaosSearch. He is a serial entrepreneur at the forefront of communication, virtualization, and database technology and the inventor of ChaosSearch's patented IP. Thomas has also patented several other technologies in the areas of distributed algorithms, virtualization and database science. He holds a Bachelor of Science in Computer Science from University of New Hampshire, Hall of Fame Alumni Inductee, and founded both student & professional chapters of the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM).Links:ChaosSearch: https://www.chaossearch.io TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by my friends at ThinkstCanary. Most companies find out way too late that they've been breached. ThinksCanary changes this and I love how they do it. Deploy canaries and canary tokens in minutes and then forget about them. What's great is the attackers tip their hand by touching them, giving you one alert, when it matters. I use it myself and I only remember this when I get the weekly update with a “we're still here, so you're aware” from them. It's glorious! There is zero admin overhead  to this, there are effectively no false positives unless I do something foolish. Canaries are deployed and loved on all seven continents. You can check out what people are saying at canary.love. And, their Kub config canary token is new and completely free as well. You can do an awful lot without paying them a dime, which is one of the things I love about them. It is useful stuff and not an, “ohh, I wish I had money.” It is speculator! Take a look; that's canary.love because it's genuinely rare to find a security product that people talk about in terms of love. It really is a unique thing to see. Canary.love. Thank you to ThinkstCanary for their support of my ridiculous, ridiculous non-sense.   Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by our friends at Vultr. Spelled V-U-L-T-R because they're all about helping save money, including on things like, you know, vowels. So, what they do is they are a cloud provider that provides surprisingly high performance cloud compute at a price that—while sure they claim its better than AWS pricing—and when they say that they mean it is less money. Sure, I don't dispute that but what I find interesting is that it's predictable. They tell you in advance on a monthly basis what it's going to going to cost. They have a bunch of advanced networking features. They have nineteen global locations and scale things elastically. Not to be confused with openly, because apparently elastic and open can mean the same thing sometimes. They have had over a million users. Deployments take less that sixty seconds across twelve pre-selected operating systems. Or, if you're one of those nutters like me, you can bring your own ISO and install basically any operating system you want. Starting with pricing as low as $2.50 a month for Vultr cloud compute they have plans for developers and businesses of all sizes, except maybe Amazon, who stubbornly insists on having something to scale all on their own. Try Vultr today for free by visiting: vultr.com/screaming, and you'll receive a $100 in credit. Thats v-u-l-t-r.com slash screaming.Corey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud. I'm Corey Quinn. This promoted episode is brought to us by our friends at ChaosSearch.We've been working with them for a long time; they've sponsored a bunch of our nonsense, and it turns out that we've been talking about them to our clients since long before they were a sponsor because it actually does what it says on the tin. Here to talk to us about that in a few minutes is Thomas Hazel, ChaosSearch's CTO and founder. First, Thomas, nice to talk to you again, and as always, thanks for humoring me.Thomas: [laugh]. Hi, Corey. Always great to talk to you. And I enjoy these conversations that sometimes go up and down, left and right, but I look forward to all the fun we're going to have.Corey: So, my understanding of ChaosSearch is probably a few years old because it turns out, I don't spend a whole lot of time meticulously studying your company's roadmap in the same way that you presumably do. When last we checked in with what the service did-slash-does, you are effectively solving the problem of data movement and querying that data. The idea behind data warehouses is generally something that's shoved onto us by cloud providers where, “Hey, this data is going to be valuable to you someday.” Data science teams are big proponents of this because when you're storing that much data, their salaries look relatively reasonable by comparison. And the ChaosSearch vision was, instead of copying all this data out of an object store and storing it on expensive disks, and replicating it, et cetera, what if we queried it in place in a somewhat intelligent manner?So, you take the data and you store it, in this case, in S3 or equivalent, and then just query it there, rather than having to move it around all over the place, which of course, then incurs data transfer fees, you're storing it multiple times, and it's never in quite the format that you want it. That was the breakthrough revelation, you were Elasticsearch—now OpenSearch—API compatible, which was great. And that was, sort of, a state of the art a year or two ago. Is that generally correct?Thomas: No, you nailed our mission statement. No, you're exactly right. You know, the value of cloud object stores, S3, the elasticity, the durability, all these wonderful things, the problem was you couldn't get any value out of it, and you had to move it out to these siloed solutions, as you indicated. So, you know, our mission was exactly that, transformed customers' cloud storage into an analytical database, a multi-model analytical database, where our first use case was search and log analytics, replacing the ELK stack and also replacing the data pipeline, the schema management, et cetera. We automate the entire step, raw data to insights.Corey: It's funny we're having this conversation today. Earlier, today, I was trying to get rid of a relatively paltry 200 gigs or so of small files on an EFS volume—you know, Amazon's version of NFS; it's like an NFS volume except you're paying Amazon for the privilege—great. And it turns out that it's a whole bunch of operations across a network on a whole bunch of tiny files, so I had to spin up other instances that were not getting backed by spot terminations, and just firing up a whole bunch of threads. So, now the load average on that box is approaching 300, but it's plowing through, getting rid of that data finally.And I'm looking at this saying this is a quarter of a terabyte. Data warehouses are in the petabyte range. Oh, I begin to see aspects of the problem. Even searching that kind of data using traditional tooling starts to break down, which is sort of the revelation that Google had 20-some-odd years ago, and other folks have since solved for, but this is the first time I've had significant data that wasn't just easily searched with a grep. For those of you in the Unix world who understand what that means, condolences. We're having a support group meeting at the bar.Thomas: Yeah. And you know, I always thought, what if you could make cloud object storage like S3 high performance and really transform it into a database? And so that warehouse capability, that's great. We like that. However to manage it, to scale it, to configure it, to get the data into that, was the problem.That was the promise of a data lake, right? This simple in, and then this arbitrary schema on read generic out. The problem next came, it became swampy, it was really hard, and that promise was not delivered. And so what we're trying to do is get all the benefits of the data lake: simple in, so many services naturally stream to cloud storage. Shoot, I would say every one of our customers are putting their data in cloud storage because their data pipeline to their warehousing solution or Elasticsearch may go down and they're worried they'll lose the data.So, what we say is what if you just said activate that data lake and get that ELK use case, get that BI use case without that data movement, as you indicated, without that ETL-ing, without that data pipeline that you're worried is going to fall over. So, that vision has been Chaos. Now, we haven't talked in, you know, a few years, but this idea that we're growing beyond what we are just going after logs, we're going into new use cases, new opportunities, and I'm looking forward to discussing with you.Corey: It's a great answer that—though I have to call out that I am right there with you as far as inappropriately using things as databases. I know that someone is going to come back and say, “Oh, S3 is a database. You're dancing around it. Isn't that what Athena is?” Which is named, of course, after the Greek Goddess of spending money on AWS? And that is a fair question, but to my understanding, there's a schema story behind that does not apply to what you're doing.Thomas: Yeah, and that is so crucial is that we like the relational access. The time-cost complexity to get it into that, as you mentioned, scaled access, I mean, it could take weeks, months to test it, to configure it, to provision it, and imagine if you got it wrong; you got to redo it again. And so our unique service removes all that data pipeline schema management. And because of our innovation because of our service, you do all schema definition, on the fly, virtually, what we call views on your index data, that you can publish an elastic index pattern for that consumption, or a relational table for that consumption. And that's kind of leading the witness into things that we're coming out with this quarter into 2022.Corey: I have to deal with a little bit of, I guess, a shame here because yeah, I'm doing exactly what you just described. I'm using Athena to wind up querying our customers' Cost and Usage Reports, and we spend a couple hundred bucks a month on AWS Glue to wind up massaging those into the way that they expect it to be. And it's great. Ish. We hook it up to Tableau and can make those queries from it, and all right, it's great.It just, burrr goes the money printer, and we somehow get access and insight to a lot of valuable data. But even that is knowing exactly what the format is going to look like. Ish. I mean, Cost and Usage Reports from Amazon are sort of aspirational when it comes to schema sometimes, but here we are. And that's been all well and good.But now the idea of log files, even looking at the base case of sending logs from an application, great. Nginx, or Apache, or [unintelligible 00:07:24], or any of the various web servers out there all tend to use different logging formats just to describe the same exact things, start spreading that across custom in-house applications and getting signal from that is almost impossible. “Oh,” people say, “So, we'll use a structured data format.” Now, you're putting log and structuring requirements on application developers who don't care in the first place, and now you have a mess on your hands.Thomas: And it really is a mess. And that challenge is, it's so problematic. And schemas changing. You know, we have customers and one reasons why they go with us is their log data is changing; they didn't expect it. Well, in your data pipeline, and your Athena database, that breaks. That brings the system down.And so our system uniquely detects that and manages that for you and then you can pick and choose how you want to export in these views dynamically. So, you know, it's really not rocket science, but the problem is, a lot of the technology that we're using is designed for static, fixed thinking. And then to scale it is problematic and time-consuming. So, you know, Glue is a great idea, but it has a lot of sharp [pebbles 00:08:26]. Athena is a great idea but also has a lot of problems.And so that data pipeline, you know, it's not for digitally native, active, new use cases, new workloads coming up hourly, daily. You think about this long-term; so a lot of that data prep pipelining is something we address so uniquely, but really where the customer cares is the value of that data, right? And so if you're spending toils trying to get the data into a database, you're not answering the questions, whether it's for security, for performance, for your business needs. That's the problem. And you know, that agility, that time-to-value is where we're very uniquely coming in because we start where your data is raw and we automate the process all the way through.Corey: So, when I look at the things that I have stuffed into S3, they generally fall into a couple of categories. There are a bunch of logs for things I never asked for nor particularly wanted, but AWS is aggressive about that, first routing through CloudTrail so you can get charged 50-cent per gigabyte ingested. Awesome. And of course, large static assets, images I have done something to enter colloquially now known as shitposts, which is great. Other than logs, what could you possibly be storing in S3 that lends itself to, effectively, the type of analysis that you built around this?Thomas: Well, our first use case was the classic log use cases, app logs, web service logs. I mean, CloudTrail, it's famous; we had customers that gave up on elastic, and definitely gave up on relational where you can do a couple changes and your permutation of attributes for CloudTrail is going to put you to your knees. And people just say, “I give up.” Same thing with Kubernetes logs. And so it's the classic—whether it's CSV, where it's JSON, where it's log types, we auto-discover all that.We also allow you, if you want to override that and change the parsing capabilities through a UI wizard, we do discover what's in your buckets. That term data swamp, and not knowing what's in your bucket, we do a facility that will index that data, actually create a report for you for knowing what's in. Now, if you have text data, if you have log data, if you have BI data, we can bring it all together, but the real pain is at the scale. So classically, app logs, system logs, many devices sending IoT-type streams is where we really come in—Kubernetes—where they're dealing with terabytes of data per day, and managing an ELK cluster at that scale. Particularly on a Black Friday.Shoot, some of our customers like—Klarna is one of them; credit card payment—they're ramping up for Black Friday, and one of the reasons why they chose us is our ability to scale when maybe you're doing a terabyte or two a day and then it goes up to twenty, twenty-five. How do you test that scale? How do you manage that scale? And so for us, the data streams are, traditionally with our customers, the well-known log types, at least in the log use cases. And the challenge is scaling it, is getting access to it, and that's where we come in.Corey: I will say the last time you were on the show a couple of years ago, you were talking about the initial logging use case and you were speaking, in many cases aspirationally, about where things were going. What a difference a couple years is made. Instead of talking about what hypothetical customers might want, or what—might be able to do, you're just able to name-drop them off the top of your head, you have scaled to approximately ten times the number of employees you had back then. You've—Thomas: Yep. Yep.Corey: —raised, I think, a total of—what, 50 million?—since then.Thomas: Uh, 60 now. Yeah.Corey: Oh, 60? Fantastic.Thomas: Yeah, yeah.Corey: Congrats. And of course, how do you do it? By sponsoring Last Week in AWS, as everyone should. I'm taking clear credit for that every time someone announces around, that's the game. But no, there is validity to it because telling fun stories and sponsoring exciting things like this only carry you so far. At some point, customers have to say, yeah, this is solving a pain that I have; I'm willing to pay you money to solve it.And you've clearly gotten to a point where you are addressing the needs of those customers at a pretty fascinating clip. It's bittersweet from my perspective because it seems like the majority of your customers have not come from my nonsense anymore. They're finding you through word of mouth, they're finding through more traditional—read as boring—ad campaigns, et cetera, et cetera. But you've built a brand that extends beyond just me. I'm no longer viewed as the de facto ombudsperson for any issue someone might have with ChaosSearch on Twitters. It's kind of, “Aww, the company grew up. What happened there?”Thomas: No, [laugh] listen, this you were great. We reached out to you to tell our story, and I got to be honest. A lot of people came by, said, “I heard something on Corey Quinn's podcasts,” or et cetera. And it came a long way now. Now, we have, you know, companies like Equifax, multi-cloud—Amazon and Google.They love the data lake philosophy, the centralized, where use cases are now available within days, not weeks and months. Whether it's logs and BI. Correlating across all those data streams, it's huge. We mentioned Klarna, [APM Performance 00:13:19], and, you know, we have Armor for SIEM, and Blackboard for [Observers 00:13:24].So, it's funny—yeah, it's funny, when I first was talking to you, I was like, “What if? What if we had this customer, that customer?” And we were building the capabilities, but now that we have it, now that we have customers, yeah, I guess, maybe we've grown up a little bit. But hey, listen to you're always near and dear to our heart because we remember, you know, when you stop[ed by our booth at re:Invent several times. And we're coming to re:Invent this year, and I believe you are as well.Corey: Oh, yeah. But people listening to this, it's if they're listening the day it's released, this will be during re:Invent. So, by all means, come by the ChaosSearch booth, and see what they have to say. For once they have people who aren't me who are going to be telling stories about these things. And it's fun. Like, I joke, it's nothing but positive here.It's interesting from where I sit seeing the parallels here. For example, we have both had—how we say—adult supervision come in. You have a CEO, Ed, who came over from IBM Storage. I have Mike Julian, whose first love language is of course spreadsheets. And it's great, on some level, realizing that, wow, this company has eclipsed my ability to manage these things myself and put my hands-on everything. And eventually, you have to start letting go. It's a weird growth stage, and it's a heck of a transition. But—Thomas: No, I love it. You know, I mean, I think when we were talking, we were maybe 15 employees. Now, we're pushing 100. We brought on Ed Walsh, who's an amazing CEO. It's funny, I told him about this idea, I invented this technology roughly eight years ago, and he's like, “I love it. Let's do it.” And I wasn't ready to do it.So, you know, five, six years ago, I started the company always knowing that, you know, I'd give him a call once we got the plane up in the air. And it's been great to have him here because the next level up, right, of execution and growth and business development and sales and marketing. So, you're exactly right. I mean, we were a young pup several years ago, when we were talking to you and, you know, we're a little bit older, a little bit wiser. But no, it's great to have Ed here. And just the leadership in general; we've grown immensely.Corey: Now, we are recording this in advance of re:Invent, so there's always the question of, “Wow, are we going to look really silly based upon what is being announced when this airs?” Because it's very hard to predict some things that AWS does. And let's be clear, I always stay away from predictions, just because first, I have a bit of a knack for being right. But also, when I'm right, people will think, “Oh, Corey must have known about that and is leaking,” whereas if I get it wrong, I just look like a fool. There's no win for me if I start doing the predictive dance on stuff like that.But I have to level with you, I have been somewhat surprised that, at least as of this recording, AWS has not moved more in your direction because storing data in S3 is kind of their whole thing, and querying that data through something that isn't Athena has been a bit of a reach for them that they're slowly starting to wrap their heads around. But their UltraWarm nonsense—which is just, okay, great naming there—what is the point of continually having a model where oh, yeah, we're going to just age it out, the stuff that isn't actively being used into S3, rather than coming up with a way to query it there. Because you've done exactly that, and please don't take this as anything other than a statement of fact, they have better access to what S3 is doing than you do. You're forced to deal with this thing entirely from a public API standpoint, which is fine. They can theoretically change the behavior of aspects of S3 to unlock these use cases if they chose to do so. And they haven't. Why is it that you're the only folks that are doing this?Thomas: No, it's a great question, and I'll give them props for continuing to push the data lake [unintelligible 00:17:09] to the cloud providers' S3 because it was really where I saw the world. Lakes, I believe in. I love them. They love them. However, they promote the move the data out to get access, and it seems so counterintuitive on why wouldn't you leave it in and put these services, make them more intelligent? So, it's funny, I've trademark ‘Smart Object Storage,' I actually trademarked—I think you [laugh] were a part of this—‘UltraHot,' right? Because why would you want UltraWarm when you can have UltraHot?And the reason, I feel, is that if you're using Parquet for Athena [unintelligible 00:17:40] store, or Lucene for Elasticsearch, these two index technologies were not designed for cloud storage, for real-time streaming off of cloud storage. So, the trick is, you have to build UltraWarm, get it off of what they consider cold S3 into a more warmer memory or SSD type access. What we did, what the invention I created was, that first read is hot. That first read is fast.Snowflake is a good example. They give you a ten terabyte demo example, and if you have a big instance and you do that first query, maybe several orders or groups, it could take an hour to warm up. The second query is fast. Well, what if the first query is in seconds as well? And that's where we really spent the last five, six years building out the tech and the vision behind this because I like to say you go to a doctor and say, “Hey, Doc, every single time I move my arm, it hurts.” And the doctor says, “Well, don't move your arm.”It's things like that, to your point, it's like, why wouldn't they? I would argue, one, you have to believe it's possible—we're proving that it is—and two, you have to have the technology to do it. Not just the index, but the architecture. So, I believe they will go this direction. You know, little birdies always say that all these companies understand this need.Shoot, Snowflake is trying to be lake-y; Databricks is trying to really bring this warehouse lake concept. But you still do all the pipelining; you still have to do all the data management the way that you don't want to do. It's not a lake. And so my argument is that it's innovation on why. Now, they have money; they have time, but, you know, we have a big head start.Corey: I remembered last year at re:Invent they released a, shall we say, significant change to S3 that it enabled read after write consistency, which is awesome, for again, those of us in the business of misusing things as databases. But for some folks, the majority of folks I would say, it was a, “I don't know what that means and therefore I don't care.” And that's fine. I have no issue with that. There are other folks, some of my customers for example, who are suddenly, “Wait a minute. This means I can sunset this entire janky sidecar metadata system that is designed to make sure that we are consistent in our use of S3 because it now does it automatically under the hood?” And that's awesome. Does that change mean anything for ChaosSearch?Thomas: It doesn't because of our architecture. We're append-only, write-once scenario, so a lot of update-in-place viewpoints. My viewpoint is that if you're seeing S3 as the database and you need that type of consistency, it make sense of why you'd want it, but because of our distributive fabric, our stateless architecture, our append-only nature, it really doesn't affect us.Now, I talked to the S3 team, I said, “Please if you're coming up with this feature, it better not be slower.” I want S3 to be fast, right? And they said, “No, no. It won't affect performance.” I'm like, “Okay. Let's keep that up.”And so to us, any type of S3 capability, we'll take advantage of it if benefits us, whether it's consistency as you indicated, performance, functionality. But we really keep the constructs of S3 access to really limited features: list, put, get. [roll-on 00:20:49] policies to give us read-only access to your data, and a location to write our indices into your account, and then are distributed fabric, our service, acts as those indices and query them or searches them to resolve whatever analytics you need. So, we made it pretty simple, and that is allowed us to make it high performance.Corey: I'll take it a step further because you want to talk about changes since the last time we spoke, it used to be that this was on top of S3, you can store your data anywhere you want, as long as it's S3 in the customer's account. Now, you're also supporting one-click integration with Google Cloud's object storage, which, great. That does mean though, that you're not dependent upon provider-specific implementations of things like a consistency model for how you've built things. It really does use the lowest common denominator—to my understanding—of object stores. Is that something that you're seeing broad adoption of, or is this one of those areas where, well, you have one customer on a different provider, but almost everything lives on the primary? I'm curious what you're seeing for adoption models across multiple providers?Thomas: It's a great question. We built an architecture purposely to be cloud-agnostic. I mean, we use compute in a containerized way, we use object storage in a very simple construct—put, get, list—and we went over to Google because that made sense, right? We have customers on both sides. I would say Amazon is the gorilla, but Google's trying to get there and growing.We had a big customer, Equifax, that's on both Amazon and Google, but we offer the same service. To be frank, it looks like the exact same product. And it should, right? Whether it's Amazon Cloud, or Google Cloud, multi-select and I want to choose either one and get the other one. I would say that different business types are using each one, but our bulk of the business isn't Amazon, but we just this summer released our SaaS offerings, so it's growing.And you know, it's funny, you never know where it comes from. So, we have one customer—actually DigitalRiver—as one of our customers on Amazon for logs, but we're growing in working together to do a BI on GCP or on Google. And so it's kind of funny; they have two departments on two different clouds with two different use cases. And so do they want unification? I'm not sure, but they definitely have their BI on Google and their operations in Amazon. It's interesting.Corey: You know its important to me that people learn how to use the cloud effectively. Thats why I'm so glad that Cloud Academy is sponsoring my ridiculous non-sense. They're a great way to build in demand tech skills the way that, well personally, I learn best which I learn by doing not by reading. They have live cloud labs that you can run in real environments that aren't going to blow up your own bill—I can't stress how important that is. Visit cloudacademy.com/corey. Thats C-O-R-E-Y, don't drop the “E.” Use Corey as a promo-code as well. You're going to get a bunch of discounts on it with a lifetime deal—the price will not go up. It is limited time, they assured me this is not one of those things that is going to wind up being a rug pull scenario, oh no no. Talk to them, tell me what you think. Visit: cloudacademy.com/corey,  C-O-R-E-Y and tell them that I sent you!Corey: I know that I'm going to get letters for this. So, let me just call it out right now. Because I've been a big advocate of pick a provider—I care not which one—and go all-in on it. And I'm sitting here congratulating you on extending to another provider, and people are going to say, “Ah, you're being inconsistent.”No. I'm suggesting that you as a provider have to meet your customers where they are because if someone is sitting in GCP and your entire approach is, “Step one, migrate those four petabytes of data right on over here to AWS,” they're going to call you that jackhole that you would be by making that suggestion and go immediately for option B, which is literally anything that is not ChaosSearch, just based upon that core misunderstanding of their business constraints. That is the way to think about these things. For a vendor position that you are in as an ISV—Independent Software Vendor for those not up on the lingo of this ridiculous industry—you have to meet customers where they are. And it's the right move.Thomas: Well, you just said it. Imagine moving terabytes and petabytes of data.Corey: It sounds terrific if I'm a salesperson for one of these companies working on commission, but for the rest of us, it sounds awful.Thomas: We really are a data fabric across clouds, within clouds. We're going to go where the data is and we're going to provide access to where that data lives. Our whole philosophy is the no-movement movement, right? Don't move your data. Leave it where it is and provide access at scale.And so you may have services in Google that naturally stream to GCS; let's do it there. Imagine moving that amount of data over to Amazon to analyze it, and vice versa. 2020, we're going to be in Azure. They're a totally different type of business, users, and personas, but you're getting asked, “Can you support Azure?” And the answer is, “Yes,” and, “We will in 2022.”So, to us, if you have cloud storage, if you have compute, and it's a big enough business opportunity in the market, we're there. We're going there. When we first started, we were talking to MinIO—remember that open-source, object storage platform?—We've run on our laptops, we run—this [unintelligible 00:25:04] Dr. Seuss thing—“We run over here; we run over there; we run everywhere.”But the honest truth is, you're going to go with the big cloud providers where the business opportunity is, and offer the same solution because the same solution is valued everywhere: simple in; value out; cost-effective; long retention; flexibility. That sounds so basic, but you mentioned this all the time with our Rube Goldberg, Amazon diagrams we see time and time again. It's like, if you looked at that and you were from an alien planet, you'd be like, “These people don't know what they're doing. Why is it so complicated?” And the simple answer is, I don't know why people think it's complicated.To your point about Amazon, why won't they do it? I don't know, but if they did, things would be different. And being honest, I think people are catching on. We do talk to Amazon and others. They see the need, but they also have to build it; they have to invent technology to address it. And using Parquet and Lucene are not the answer.Corey: Yeah, it's too much of a demand on the producers of that data rather than the consumer. And yeah, I would love to be able to go upstream to application developers and demand they do things in certain ways. It turns out as a consultant, you have zero authority to do that. As a DevOps team member, you have limited ability to influence it, but it turns out that being the ‘department of no' quickly turns into being the ‘department of unemployment insurance' because no one wants to work with you. And collaboration—contrary to what people wish to believe—is a key part of working in a modern workplace.Thomas: Absolutely. And it's funny, the demands of IT are getting harder; the actual getting the employees to build out the solutions are getting harder. And so a lot of that time is in the pipeline, is the prep, is the schema, the sharding, and et cetera, et cetera, et cetera. My viewpoint is that should be automated away. More and more databases are being autotune, right?This whole knobs and this and that, to me, Glue is a means to an end. I mean, let's get rid of it. Why can't Athena know what to do? Why can't object storage be Athena and vice versa? I mean, to me, it seems like all this moving through all these services, the classic Amazon viewpoint, even their diagrams of having this centralized repository of S3, move it all out to your services, get results, put it back in, then take it back out again, move it around, it just doesn't make much sense. And so to us, I love S3, love the service. I think it's brilliant—Amazon's first service, right?—but from there get a little smarter. That's where ChaosSearch comes in.Corey: I would argue that S3 is in fact, a modern miracle. And one of those companies saying, “Oh, we have an object store; it's S3 compatible.” It's like, “Yeah. We have S3 at home.” Look at S3 at home, and it's just basically a series of failing Raspberry Pis.But you have this whole ecosystem of things that have built up and sprung up around S3. It is wildly understated just how scalable and massive it is. There was an academic paper recently that won an award on how they use automated reasoning to validate what is going on in the S3 environment, and they talked about hundreds of petabytes in some cases. And folks are saying, ah, S3 is hundreds of petabytes. Yeah, I have clients storing hundreds of petabytes.There are larger companies out there. Steve Schmidt, Amazon's CISO, was recently at a Splunk keynote where he mentioned that in security info alone, AWS itself generates 500 petabytes a day that then gets reduced down to a bunch of stuff, and some of it gets loaded into Splunk. I think. I couldn't really hear the second half of that sentence because of the sound of all of the Splunk salespeople in that room becoming excited so quickly you could hear it.Thomas: [laugh]. I love it. If I could be so bold, those S3 team, they're gods. They are amazing. They created such an amazing service, and when I started playing with S3 now, I guess, 2006 or 7, I mean, we were using for a repository, URL access to get images, I was doing a virtualization [unintelligible 00:29:05] at the time—Corey: Oh, the first time I played with it, “This seems ridiculous and kind of dumb. Why would anyone use this?” Yeah, yeah. It turns out I'm really bad at predicting the future. Another reason I don't do the prediction thing.Thomas: Yeah. And when I started this company officially, five, six years ago, I was thinking about S3 and I was thinking about HDFS not being a good answer. And I said, “I think S3 will actually achieve the goals and performance we need.” It's a distributed file system. You can run parallel puts and parallel gets. And the performance that I was seeing when the data was a certain way, certain size, “Wait, you can get high performance.”And you know, when I first turned on the engine, now four or five years ago, I was like, “Wow. This is going to work. We're off to the races.” And now obviously, we're more than just an idea when we first talked to you. We're a service.We deliver benefits to our customers both in logs. And shoot, this quarter alone we're coming out with new features not just in the logs, which I'll talk about second, but in a direct SQL access. But you know, one thing that you hear time and time again, we talked about it—JSON, CloudTrail, and Kubernetes; this is a real nightmare, and so one thing that we've come out with this quarter is the ability to virtually flatten. Now, you heard time and time again, where, “Okay. I'm going to pick and choose my data because my database can't handle whether it's elastic, or say, relational.” And all of a sudden, “Shoot, I don't have that. I got to reindex that.”And so what we've done is we've created a index technology that we're always planning to come out with that indexes the JSON raw blob, but in the data refinery have, post-index you can select how to unflatten it. Why is that important? Because all that tooling, whether it's elastic or SQL, is now available. You don't have to change anything. Why is Snowflake and BigQuery has these proprietary JSON APIs that none of these tools know how to use to get access to the data?Or you pick and choose. And so when you have a CloudTrail, and you need to know what's going on, if you picked wrong, you're in trouble. So, this new feature we're calling ‘Virtual Flattening'—or I don't know what we're—we have to work with the marketing team on it. And we're also bringing—this is where I get kind of excited where the elastic world, the ELK world, we're bringing correlations into Elasticsearch. And like, how do you do that? They don't have the APIs?Well, our data refinery, again, has the ability to correlate index patterns into one view. A view is an index pattern, so all those same constructs that you had in Kibana, or Grafana, or Elastic API still work. And so, no more denormalizing, no more trying to hodgepodge query over here, query over there. You're actually going to have correlations in Elastic, natively. And we're excited about that.And one more push on the future, Q4 into 2022; we have been given early access to S3 SQL access. And, you know, as I mentioned, correlations in Elastic, but we're going full in on publishing our [TPCH 00:31:56] report, we're excited about publishing those numbers, as well as not just giving early access, but going GA in the first of the year, next year.Corey: I look forward to it. This is also, I guess, it's impossible to have a conversation with you, even now, where you're not still forward-looking about what comes next. Which is natural; that is how we get excited about the things that we're building. But so much less of what you're doing now in our conversations have focused around what's coming, as opposed to the neat stuff you're already doing. I had to double-check when we were talking just now about oh, yeah, is that Google cloud object store support still something that is roadmapped, or is that out in the real world?No, it's very much here in the real world, available today. You can use it. Go click the button, have fun. It's neat to see at least some evidence that not all roadmaps are wishes and pixie dust. The things that you were talking to me about years ago are established parts of ChaosSearch now. It hasn't been just, sort of, frozen in amber for years, or months, or these giant periods of time. Because, again, there's—yeah, don't sell me vaporware; I know how this works. The things you have promised have come to fruition. It's nice to see that.Thomas: No, I appreciate it. We talked a little while ago, now a few years ago, and it was a bit of aspirational, right? We had a lot to do, we had more to do. But now when we have big customers using our product, solving their problems, whether it's security, performance, operation, again—at scale, right? The real pain is, sure you have a small ELK cluster or small Athena use case, but when you're dealing with terabytes to petabytes, trillions of rows, right—billions—when you were dealing trillions, billions are now small. Millions don't even exist, right?And you're graduating from computer science in college and you say the word, “Trillion,” they're like, “Nah. No one does that.” And like you were saying, people do petabytes and exabytes. That's the world we're living in, and that's something that we really went hard at because these are challenging data problems and this is where we feel we uniquely sit. And again, we don't have to break the bank while doing it.Corey: Oh, yeah. Or at least as of this recording, there's a meme going around, again, from an old internal Google Video, of, “I just want to serve five terabytes of traffic,” and it's an internal Google discussion of, “I don't know how to count that low.” And, yeah.Thomas: [laugh].Corey: But there's also value in being able to address things at much larger volume. I would love to see better responsiveness options around things like Deep Archive because the idea of being able to query that—even if you can wait a day or two—becomes really interesting just from the perspective of, at that point, current cost for one petabyte of data in Glacier Deep Archive is 1000 bucks a month. That is ‘why would I ever delete data again?' Pricing.Thomas: Yeah. You said it. And what's interesting about our technology is unlike, let's say Lucene, when you index it, it could be 3, 4, or 5x the raw size, our representation is smaller than gzip. So, it is a full representation, so why don't you store it efficiently long-term in S3? Oh, by the way, with the Glacier; we support Glacier too.And so, I mean, it's amazing the cost of data with cloud storage is dramatic, and if you can make it hot and activated, that's the real promise of a data lake. And, you know, it's funny, we use our own service to run our SaaS—we log our own data, we monitor, we alert, have dashboards—and I can't tell you how cheap our service is to ourselves, right? Because it's so cost-effective for long-tail, not just, oh, a few weeks; we store a whole year's worth of our operational data so we can go back in time to debug something or figure something out. And a lot of that's savings. Actually, huge savings is cloud storage with a distributed elastic compute fabric that is serverless. These are things that seem so obvious now, but if you have SSDs, and you're moving things around, you know, a team of IT professionals trying to manage it, it's not cheap.Corey: Oh, yeah, that's the story. It's like, “Step one, start paying for using things in cloud.” “Okay, great. When do I stop paying?” “That's the neat part. You don't.” And it continues to grow and build.And again, this is the thing I learned running a business that focuses on this, the people working on this, in almost every case, are more expensive than the infrastructure they're working on. And that's fine. I'd rather pay people than technologies. And it does help reaffirm, on some level, that—people don't like this reminder—but you have to generate more value than you cost. So, when you're sitting there spending all your time trying to avoid saving money on, “Oh, I've listened to ChaosSearch talk about what they do a few times. I can probably build my own and roll it at home.”It's, I've seen the kind of work that you folks have put into this—again, you have something like 100 employees now; it is not just you building this—my belief has always been that if you can buy something that gets you 90, 95% of where you are, great. Buy it, and then yell at whoever selling it to you for the rest of it, and that'll get you a lot further than, “We're going to do this ourselves from first principles.” Which is great for a weekend project for just something that you have a passion for, but in production mistakes show. I've always been a big proponent of buying wherever you can. It's cheaper, which sounds weird, but it's true.Thomas: And we do the same thing. We have single-sign-on support; we didn't build that ourselves, we use a service now. Auth0 is one of our providers now that owns that [crosstalk 00:37:12]—Corey: Oh, you didn't roll your own authentication layer? Why ever not? Next, you're going to tell me that you didn't roll your own payment gateway when you wound up charging people on your website to sign up?Thomas: You got it. And so, I mean, do what you do well. Focus on what you do well. If you're repeating what everyone seems to do over and over again, time, costs, complexity, and… service, it makes sense. You know, I'm not trying to build storage; I'm using storage. I'm using a great, wonderful service, cloud object storage.Use whats works, whats works well, and do what you do well. And what we do well is make cloud object storage analytical and fast. So, call us up and we'll take away that 2 a.m. call you have when your cluster falls down, or you have a new workload that you are going to go to the—I don't know, the beach house, and now the weekend shot, right? Spin it up, stream it in. We'll take over.Corey: Yeah. So, if you're listening to this and you happen to be at re:Invent, which is sort of an open question: why would you be at re:Invent while listening to a podcast? And then I remember how long the shuttle lines are likely to be, and yeah. So, if you're at re:Invent, make it on down to the show floor, visit the ChaosSearch booth, tell them I sent you, watch for the wince, that's always worth doing. Thomas, if people have better decision-making capability than the two of us do, where can they find you if they're not in Las Vegas this week?Thomas: So, you find us online chaossearch.io. We have so much material, videos, use cases, testimonials. You can reach out to us, get a free trial. We have a self-service experience where connect to your S3 bucket and you're up and running within five minutes.So, definitely chaossearch.io. Reach out if you want a hand-held, white-glove experience POV. If you have those type of needs, we can do that with you as well. But we booth on re:Invent and I don't know the booth number, but I'm sure either we've assigned it or we'll find it out.Corey: Don't worry. This year, it is a low enough attendance rate that I'm projecting that you will not be as hard to find in recent years. For example, there's only one expo hall this year. What a concept. If only it hadn't taken a deadly pandemic to get us here.Thomas: Yeah. But you know, we'll have the ability to demonstrate Chaos at the booth, and really, within a few minutes, you'll say, “Wow. How come I never heard of doing it this way?” Because it just makes so much sense on why you do it this way versus the merry-go-round of data movement, and transformation, and schema management, let alone all the sharding that I know is a nightmare, more often than not.Corey: And we'll, of course, put links to that in the [show notes 00:39:40]. Thomas, thank you so much for taking the time to speak with me today. As always, it's appreciated.Thomas: Corey, thank you. Let's do this again.Corey: We absolutely will. Thomas Hazel, CTO and Founder of ChaosSearch. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn, and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast episode, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, whereas if you've hated this episode, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice along with an angry comment because I have dared to besmirch the honor of your homebrewed object store, running on top of some trusty and reliable Raspberries Pie.Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

Trend Lightly
Amazon Crime

Trend Lightly

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 127:13


TikTok detectives were hell bent on ruining the life of a crossdressing house flipper, celebrities' Amazon accounts are compromised, Kim Jong Un is gatekeeping cheap leather trench coats and killing a guy for watching Squid Game, and GRIMES IS BACK ONLINE, BABY! CHECK OUT OUR MERCH, BABY!!! Links: Grimes Grimes is back on TikTok and she has PTSD Grimes wants to explain radical wealth redistribution through gaming The penalty for watching Squid Game in North Korea is 5 years hard labour ‘Squid Game' Smuggler Sentenced to Death in North Korea After Students Caught Watching Netflix Show  Kim Jong Un bans leather jackets so no one can steal his drip Mr. Beast "$460,000 Squid Game In Real Life!" Amazon spying  Amazon lets staff spy on the shopping histories of CELEBRITIES including Kanye West and the stars from the Avengers, report claims This Is Amazing Amy Pascal's Cheap, Crotch-Intensive Beauty Regimen Amy Pascal and Jezebel - zandyhartig.com Sabrina  Mariannenafsu's TikTok about Sabrina Prater (duet) Someones_hot_mom thinks Sabrina Prater is involved in a woman's disappearance Jennalynn468 finds Sabrina's backstory  NoahGlennCarter says Sabrina Prater case is “solved” Trashley_anonymous tells followers to back off of Sabrina from the POV of an addict Lehtallex shuts down cop who is suspicious of Sabrina Prater  Mercury Stardust on the harmful history of Buffalo Bill  RevCorndog speaks on Sabrina's TikToks' Get bonus content for Trend Lightly by the Solid Listen Network on Patreon. Follow our new YouTube page. Memes, trending TikTok compilations and more.

The John Batchelor Show
S4 Ep1835: #UkraineCrisis: NATO's POV; & What is to be done? H. J. Mackinder #FriendsofHistoryDebatingSociety

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 10:04


Photo:  Masłowski Jarema's opinion. @Batchelorshow #UkraineCrisis: NATO's POV & What is to be done? H.J. Mackinder #FriendsofHistoryDebatingSociety https://www.cbsnews.com/news/nato-chief-russia-ukraine-military-buildup/

The John Batchelor Show
S4 Ep1835: #UkraineCrisis: Kiev's POV; & What is to be done? H. J. Mackinder #FriendsofHistoryDebatingSociety

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 11:44


Photo: Mishchanska Church, Odessa. @Batchelorshow #UkraineCrisis: Kiev's POV & What is to be done? H.J. Mackinder #FriendsofHistoryDebatingSociety https://www.washingtonpost.com/world/europe/ukraine-zelensky-russia-coup/2021/11/26/16e51c80-4e0d-11ec-a7b8-9ed28bf23929_story.html

The John Batchelor Show
S4 Ep1835: #UkraineCrisis: The Kremlin's POV & What is to be done? H.J. Mackinder #FriendsofHistoryDebatingSociety

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 13:38


Photo: Medal of the Russian Defense Ministry "For the return of Crimea" (Russian: За возвращение Крыма), 20 February – 18 March 2014. @Batchelorshow #UkraineCrisis: The Kremlin's POV & What is to be done? H.J. Mackinder #FriendsofHistoryDebatingSociety https://news.yahoo.com/putin-deadly-serious-neutralizing-ukraine-203843482.html

Booyah 90s Now
Die Hard (1988)

Booyah 90s Now

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 75:29


Bruce Willis and Reginald VelJohnson team up to take down Alan Rickman at the world famous Nakatomi Plaza. Bare feet, machine guns, and bodies flying out of windows. Plus some of the most iconic moments in action movie history. Plus: Ho ho ho now we have a Patreon! You can help support the show and get exclusive content each month by joining our $5 Patreon tier.  At low-effort content—where okay is okay—we make stuff and share it with you to celebrate life with curiosity, creativity, and compassion...kind of...sometimes. You can contact us & buy our coffee mugs and things. And you can listen to our shows:  Make Mine a Double Feature, where Rob & Ellen have a few drinks and tell each other movie stories in all kinds of ways—like backwards or in the form of letters or from the POV of a side character. Kid. Dad. Songs. Yeah!, where Rob & Felix talk about music. Trivial Television, where Ellen & Rob recap TV episodes while sprinkling in facts, fictions, and trivia questions. Booyah 90s Now, where Rob & Joe break down what it's been like to live under the influence of 90s media. Trading Up!, where Rob barely tries to learn how to trade stocks. Thanks for hanging out.  Take care.  

Mommying While Muslim
I Don't “Look Muslim.” I'm Latina.

Mommying While Muslim

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 46:44


Monica Traverzo talks to us about being a Puerto Rican Muslimah, and how her intersectional kids are being raised in their PaliRico (@mon.del.tra is trademarking it) Arab Latino household. Her points on ethnic, cultural and religious pride should be listened to on repeat because they're so simple, yet so many Muslim Americans miss the mark on these. What is the point of parenting Muslim children in America anyway? Let's revisit that, too. Common interactions with Muslims, though, is what breaks our hearts more when we hear it from a convert's POV. We can do SO MUCH BETTER! Take aways include “convertible names” (@zaibathasan is trademarking that one), the secret ingredient to mommying all the kids while doing all the things, and how NOT to act or what NOT to say when someone looks visibly Muslim and has a “non-Muslim sounding name.” Spoiler alert: There's no such thing as a non-Muslim sounding name! C'mon y'all! Tune in at 6pm EST on Apple podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher, Amazon Music, ask Alexa, or click the link in our bio to land on our website directly onto our “Listen” button. Tell your friends! Links:For more information about the Salam Girl! Podcast: https://www.salamgirl.com/Find Monica on IG: @mon.del.traFind Salam Girl on IG: @salamgirlpodcastWeb: www.mommyingwhilemuslim.comEmail: mommyingwhilemuslim@gmail.comFB: Mommying While Muslim page and Mommyingwhilemuslim groupIG: @mommyingwhilemuslimpodcastYouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCrrdKxpBdBO4ZLwB1kTmz1w  Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/mommyingwhilemuslimpodcast)

The Shit No One Tells You About Writing
Trusting Your Gut in the Face of Rejection - PJ Vernon

The Shit No One Tells You About Writing

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 64:46


In today's Books with Hooks segment, we have Emmy Nordstrom Higdon from Westwood Creative Artists join us as a guest agent to review submissions not directed at Carly or CeCe. In this episode, Bianca and Emmy discuss authorial voice; jumping right into where the action is; how using appropriate comps can help cut down on a query's word count; including sample pages for more than one POV; and carefully choosing your story's timeline/setting.After which, Bianca chats with PJ Vernon, author of Bath Haus about the value of art; changing publishers in between books; trusting your gut when it comes to writing a story you want to write; differentiating POV voices; playing around with interesting structures; starting your book with high stakes; and book club conversations you'll be having once you're published.Find us on our socials: Twitter: @SNOTYAW @BiancaM_author Instagram: @biancamarais_author @ the_shit_about_writingFacebook: @tsnotyawWebsite: www.biancamarais.comEmmy Nordstrom Higdon on Twitter: @emmy_of_spinesPJ Vernon on Twitter and Instagram: @pjvernonbooks

Seaweed Brain: A Percy Jackson Podcast
The House of Hades Part 8: Low-Budget Iron Man

Seaweed Brain: A Percy Jackson Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 54:34


Ch. 49-56. Back on Ogygia, Leo Edition!!! We dig deep into our personal feelings about the return of Calypso and thoroughly examine the beginnings of #Caleo, then turn to Annabeth's POV for a quirky little interlude in the Mansion of Night. Ft. returning guest Elizabeth (@swords.and.sweets on Instagram!) What Happened to Hello? RHOA: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K4BHHVEbdTM Jane Coaston on Weeds: "Incels and Bullshitters": https://open.spotify.com/episode/7kaW1VdQXw4ZtACRJCpWqT?si=50CK56HHQgSIR76JNAmWuQ Let's rethink "crazy": https://www.npr.org/2019/07/08/739643765/why-people-are-arguing-to-stop-using-the-words-crazy-and-insane Kat Chow's NPR piece on 'Almond-Shaped' eyes: https://www.npr.org/sections/codeswitch/2013/09/16/219402847/-almond-shaped-eyes-remarkably-exotic-yet-too-foreign Kat Chow's memoir lol: https://www.katchow.com/ Some more on the Giving Tree: https://www.nytimes.com/2014/10/05/books/review/the-giving-tree-tender-story-of-unconditional-love-or-disturbing-tale-of-selfishness.html https://www.nytimes.com/2020/04/15/parenting/we-need-to-talk-about-the-giving-tree.html

A2D Radio
PHILADELPHIA FLYERS VS. TAMPA BAY LIGHTNING LIVE REACTIONS | NHL ON TNT PREVIEW | Hockey Happy Hour

A2D Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 121:27


The Philadelphia Flyers have taken two rough losses since last week's Calgary Flames OT thriller. They battled back to tie the Stanley Cup Champion Tampa Bay Lightning and engaged in a tumultuous overtime period before going down in a shootout (can we get rid of those already?). The club then hosted the Boston Bruins and took a beating. The worst loss was in the Calgary game when Flyers forward Kevin Hayes suffered a reinjury and is now considered week-to-week per Jordan Hall of NBCSports Philadelphia. Tonight, however, the Flyers hit the road to take on the same Tampa Bay Lightning from less than a week ago! Will the Flyers be able to bounce back and have their revenge? Or will the team suffer a third-straight loss minus their second-line center and let us not forget, Ryan Ellis, who also went down to reinjury. We have the entire Injury Report.Also on tap for tonight, a look around the league with an NHL on TNT preview. This week the Toronto Maple Leafs travel to the city of angels for a Thanksgiving Eve matchup against the Los Angeles Kings. And speaking of the Pacific Division, we take a look at the Anaheim Ducks surprising start! Join Brian and Pov as they give their live reactions and takes.

Creativity and Execution
We're in Los Angeles Pt.1

Creativity and Execution

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 5:51


POV: you're the trashcan at a breakfast burrito shop in sunny California, listening to jony and jo talk about an art exhibit they are about to attend and how they are going to approach it.

Lochhead on Marketing
134 The Problem With Most Marketing Plans

Lochhead on Marketing

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 11:17


In this episode, let's talk about the problem with most marketing plans, and what you can do about it. Welcome to Lochhead on Marketing. The number one charting marketing podcast for marketers, category designers, and entrepreneurs with a different mind. Planning Based on the Past Let's talk about the problem with most marketing plans: mainly, most of them start with last year's template. The big problem with most marketing plans is they take last year's marketing plan and they extend it forward. In category design, one of our favorite expressions is to reject the premise. In the end, we challenge ourselves to push and poke and stretch our thinking. Also, just because it worked in 2020 or 2021, it is not evidence that it will work in 2022. More importantly, when you start your planning by rejecting the premise, you create a blank sheet of paper. Crowding Out Innovation It is also difficult to create a different future when the past is your lens. So if a prior marketing plan is the start point for a plan for the future, by definition you're taking the past and figuring out how to re-implement it going forward. That might be feasible for maintaining certain market margins and the like, but it risks crowding out innovation in your marketing plan. We're also not telling you to reject the past and just YOLO your future. Going forward, you should have a dialogue on what worked and not worked based on the data from the past, find a way to highlight those points, but at the same time look for things that have not been explored in the market. That way, you can produce a breakthrough in a new field or even create a new category out if it, without having to go for broke. Three Pillars of a Great Marketing Plan Once you have rejected the premise and open yourself up to thoughtful data-centric analysis of what works and doesn't, it's time to think about going forward. How do you design a marketing plan that creates the future of your choosing? To do so, try to anchor it around these three pillars. Information Wars: This is what sets the strategic context. It's the combination of ways in which you educate the world about the category you're designing, and learning from your Superconsumers to accelerate your effectiveness both in the air and on the ground. This is more focused on POV marketing / word of mouth than anything else. Air Wars: In many ways, marketing is “Sales at scale.” Air Wars are the high-level strategic marketing you do in service of the new and different category you are creating in the world. All the while positioning yourself as the leader. These efforts are more focused on demand creation. Ground Wars: This is tactical marketing (often at the point-of-sale and heavily integrated with sales) that supports your strategic efforts marketing the category and driving near-term revenue. These efforts are more focused on demand capture and lead generation. If you want to learn more about these three pillars, check out this Category Pirates article about it. Conclusion So in closing, what would I leave you with? Don't use the past as a template for creating the future. Allow yourself to think in unconstrained, super creative, super innovative ways around “what is the strategic context?” “What's the POV that you are using to drive your category and your brand and ultimately, the success of the company?” How are you scaling through air wars, so that you begin to make your strategic point of view move from being a new thing to an of course. And the ground Wars is all about how you make the cash register sing and drive near-term revenue. And guess what? To succeed, you got to get all three right. Bio Christopher Lochhead is a #1 Apple podcaster and #1 Amazon bestselling co-author of books: Niche Down and Play Bigger. He has been an advisor to over 50 venture-backed startups; a former three-time Silicon Valley public company CMO and an entrepreneur. Furthermore, he has been called “one of the best minds in marketi...

Spoil Me
King Of Scars, Chapters 20-22

Spoil Me

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 64:24


Thank you so much to Joanna for commissioning this episode!These were really great chapters, and I'm so interested in what's going on with each character that I'm having the rare experience of NEVER being sad when we start a new chapter from a different POV. Unlike SOME books I could name. *coughasoiafcough*These chapters are the ones in which Isaak has his first test as King, Nikolai has his first test as the Beast, and Nina has a confrontation with both her companions and with Hanne. Thanks so much to you all for listening, and I will see you soon with a new episode!

Blame It On the Stars
EXPLORE: Sagittarius Szn ft. Alexstrology

Blame It On the Stars

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 55:20


If you can't be tamed, I don't blame you because it's officially SAGITTARIUS SZN. Your favorite astrology podcast is back and here to explain what to expect this November/December. Jade and Kara break down eclipse szn, why you might have the desire to travel, why people might get into fights, taking breaks from romance and more. PLUS, Sagittarius guest ALEX, founder of Alexstrology LLC, gives the inside scoop from the POV of a Sag on how to survive the upcoming chaos, embrace change, and have fun. Alex discusses what it's really like to be a Sagittarius and how we can all learn from the energy. Tune in for your survival guide ;) Alex's links: alexstrology.com twitter.com/acoleex BOOK ASTROLOGY READINGS: ✩Kara: intro.co/karanicole ✩Jade: intro.co/jadesalzano WEBSITE: ✩ blameitonthestars.co FOLLOW US ON TWITTER: ✩ www.twitter.com/blmethestars ✩ www.twitter.com/astr0kara ✩ www.twitter.com/astr0jade FOLLOW US INSTAGRAM: ✩ www.instagram.com/blmethestars Sending you good vibes! Xoxo, Jade & Kara --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/blameitonthestars/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/blameitonthestars/support

Boobies & Noobies: A Romance Review Podcast
Steamy Spotlight: Interview with Vanessa Vale

Boobies & Noobies: A Romance Review Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2021 55:07


Summary:USA Today bestselling author Vanessa Vale joins Kelly to discuss her latest release (Book #3 in the Two Marks series, co-authored with Renee Rose), branding herself as the "Queen of Steamy Cowboy books" and of course, hypothetical threesomes with fictional characters. They also make plans to write a mafia romantic comedy (or at least manifest one into existence). Guest:Vanessa ValeIG: @vanessa_vale_authorTwitter: @IamVanessaVale Show Notes:- NaNoWriMo in November, 12 Days of Boobsmas in December- Introducing today's Vanessa Vale, bestselling author of “steamy cowboy romance”- Instant pot vs. pressure cooker vs. crockpot - Launching your romance writing career on a “dare” (00:05:52)- How the pandemic changed our reading interests - Where are all the comedic mafia and MC romances?- Misconceptions about the romance genre… from a romance author (00:12:28)- Writing historical vs. contemporary cowboys- The “honorable” cowboy hero (00:26:04)- Romance in the time of... dysentery - The process of co-writing a book/series (00:29:26)- The appeal of reading and writing ménage romances - The benefits and challenges of writing a single-POV vs. multiple POVs- A ménage relationship with your characters? (00:41:10)- Vanessa's latest release - Desired (Book #3 in the Two Marks series)- What's up next for Vanessa - Creating a world that other authors can write in (00:48:30)Other work, podcasts, etc. mentioned:The Bridgewater series (Vanessa's historical cowboy series)Vanessa's interview with No Shelf Control Podcast Strong and Steady (More than a Cowboy #1)Rough and Ready (More than a Cowboy #2)Teach Me the Ropes (Bachelor Auction #1)*Use the promo code BOOBIES10 for 10% off your first Steam Box order* Follow Boobies & Noobies on Twitter, Instagram, & Facebook @boobiespodcast and check out our blog, merch, and more on our brand new Boobies & Noobies website.*Boobies & Noobies is part of the Frolic Podcast Network. You can find more outstanding podcasts to subscribe to at Frolic.media/podcasts*

Booyah 90s Now
Fishing with John, "Tom Waits"

Booyah 90s Now

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 51:59


Our old friends Sam said we should watch Fishing with John, so we did. It's unusual. You can track it down on YouTube to see why we're over here talking about tackle boxes, eggs chasing bacon around a frying pan, how paying attention is an act of love, and surprise apple orchards. At low-effort content—where okay is okay—we make stuff and share it with you to celebrate life with curiosity, creativity, and compassion...kind of...sometimes. You can contact us & buy our coffee mugs and things. And you can listen to our shows:  Make Mine a Double Feature, where Rob & Ellen have a few drinks and tell each other movie stories in all kinds of ways—like backwards or in the form of letters or from the POV of a side character. Kid. Dad. Songs. Yeah!, where Rob & Felix talk about music. Trivial Television, where Ellen & Rob recap TV episodes while sprinkling in facts, fictions, and trivia questions. Booyah 90s Now, where Rob & Joe break down what it's been like to live under the influence of 90s media. Thanks for hanging out.  Take care.

ASIAN AMERICA: THE KEN FONG PODCAST
The Two Ken's Collaborative Podcast #7

ASIAN AMERICA: THE KEN FONG PODCAST

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 37:30


Conservative columnist Jennifer Rubin recently wrote an Op Ed in WaPo with a similar provocative title, which prompted us to take a deep dive into this fascinating and relevant POV.

Sweeter the Juice
Re-Release 12: Dating Dynamics: Female POV (Sn.1 Ep.6)

Sweeter the Juice

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 30:27


The hosts discuss commitment and marriage from a female POV.

Therapy Roulette
The New Approach to Therapy w/ Eddie Carrillo (MA, LPC)

Therapy Roulette

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 67:49


Michele (@michelebaci) is celebrating her birthday, BUT ALSO scheduling time to rest. This week's guest is Eddie Carrillo, licensed therapist and co-host of the Millenium Mental Health Channel. Eddie and Michele discuss how representation leads to normalization, how gen Z is the most empathetic generation yet, the old school (and white) POV in academia, and the drive to improve inclusivity. Eddie opens up about the difficulties of trying to stay true to yourself as a POC in a predominantly white field, having a mission to be better, and how going to therapy has helped his life and career thus far.Write a review! - ratethispodcast.com/therapySend us an email! - therapyroulette@gmail.com Follow Michele Baci!IG: @michelebacicomedyTwitter: @michelebaciListen to the Millennial Mental Health Channel Podcast! https://linktr.ee/MillennialMentalHealthChannelFollow Eddie Carrillo!IG: @millennialmhcTwitter: @millennialmhcTikTok: @millennialmhcFollow Therapy Roulette!IG: @therapyroulettepodTwitter: @TherapyRouletteYouTube channel: Therapy Roulette  Theme music by Hannah FairchildSpotify: Hannah Vs. The Manyhttps://open.spotify.com/artist/5rlyuj1AOlLdLCV5MRFc9P?si=muDK4Rr3RXWMGhBCP0fQawSupport the show (https://ko-fi.com/therapyroulette)

RevOps Podcast
Ep. 20 - How To Enter an Organization and Build Ops (ft. Rachel Nazhand)

RevOps Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 51:27


Today we are excited to have an awesome guest on the show with us, Rachel Nazhand (Head of Business Operations at Lunchbox). Jordan and Rachel have been bouncing ideas around for almost a year in the DMs. He wouldn't admit it, but it's probably why he's so good at his job. Rachel's POV provides a TON of value. She's been working with startups for a while. Lunchbox is her fourth. And they're growing fast, from 60 to 235 employees since the start of the year. So on this episode we're focusing on what happens when you enter an organization and need to build out ops. Referenced articles: Business operations: when you'll need it and why, eventually, you won't What is BizOps? And why every founder should hire a BizOps pro, early Guest: Connect with Rachel Nazhand on Linkedin Follow the Hosts on LinkedIn: Jordan Henderson (Director of Revenue Operations) Brandon Redlinger (Sr. Director of Product Marketing) Jonathan Stevens (Sr. Marketing Operations & Automation Manager) Sponsored by: Revenue.io | Powering high-performing revenue teams with real-time guidance Explore the Revenue.io Podcast Universe: Sales Enablement Podcast Selling with Purpose Podcast RevOps Podcast

Marvel Movie Minute
Thor 032: Does Darcy Feel Bad About Tasering Thor?

Marvel Movie Minute

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 37:26


Minute Thirty-Two: From Tasers to Triage Back with us to discuss Darcy's Taser and Kat Dennings' awesomeness, plus a sweet but ditsy admissions nurse, is ‘Jovial' Jay Shepard from MCU: Location Scout. In the thirty-second minute of Kenneth Branagh's 2011 film Thor... Thor tries to figure out what Realm he's in, but he goes with Alfheim and Nornheim first, neither of which is populated with human-looking beings. Why start with those? This raises an interesting question for us – are we meant to believe that this is Thor's first time to Midgard? Based on conversations he has in later films, it's clear he's been to other Realms but perhaps not here? Is this how myths perpetuate? The Asgardians came down in 965 A.D. and then not since, leaving the stories to get passed down to create those myths? And it certainly seems more logical now for them to have cut the representatives from the Nine Realms from Thor's coronation scene. That would have raised so many more questions. Darcy pulls out her taser and she's not afraid to use it. It makes total sense to us that Darcy carries a taser. Which kind of taser is this? There are a good number of them, and the kind with the wires that hit the victim like this? They're not just for police. Thor's reaction to Darcy's taser shows that he still has no idea he has no powers anymore. This is something he'll have to learn the hard way over the next few minutes. Darcy's reaction to Erik and Jane after she's tased Thor is classic. “What? He was freaking me out!” Such classic Darcy. Jane's complete and utter shock leaves her with her jaw practically on the ground. It's a great moment if you catch it. Jane decides to join them. But not until they've loaded the post-tasered Thor into her Pinzgauer. It's a bit odd because in the last scene, she told them to go and that she would stay. There's a scripted line that Erik has telling Jane that he won't leave her behind in the desert at night. Which is smart. Did they need that? Maybe not. But it does seem a bit like a change of heart on Jane's part. What's funny is that she doesn't help them at all get the post-tasered Thor into the Pinzgauer. It's Hammer Time! As they drive away, we see Mjølnir fall from the sky. But the Bifrost doesn't act the same way as it comes down. Why is that? Perhaps Mjølnir fell out of the Bifrost on its way down? Another reason it ends up in a different spot? It's hard to be sure. We debate about why they don't turn when it comes through the sky because it's quite the site. Maybe it's because they're looking forward, not back, as they drive. To that end, we describe Mjølnir as a gutter ball. Odin didn't get quite the right spin on it as he sent it into the Bifrost and so as it got close to Midgard, it landed in the gutter. Off to the County Hospital! Having shot Thor with the taser, they decide to take him to the hospital. As it turns out, this location is one that Jay found for his site and was the first person to pinpoint it online. It's actually a government building called the Toney Anaya Building in Santa Fe, New Mexico. This hospital looks particularly great with Branagh's and his cinematographer's dutch angles. It has a great comic book look but also allows for more of the location to show up. We see the hosed-down parking lot as they pull in with their Pinzgauer. We talked about this filmmaking technique the last few seasons and see they're still using it here. Let's talk about Dawn the Admissions Nurse. Before we get to Dawn, just another note about how much we love Darcy. Her “Yes I did,” line about having shot Thor with the taser is so perfect here, and it still allows her to have a unique character. We really want the Wu and Darcy show now. And all of this really started with Agent Coulson back in Iron Man. Juliet Lopez plays Dawn the Admissions Nurse. No fault of hers, but why did they go this ditzy angle? It makes so much sense why they cut the scene down so drastically. Perhaps they wanted to show this hospital dealing with so many people from rural New Mexico to be a place populated by employees who weren't that smart? We do play the IMDb game with Juliet to see what they list as what she's known for. One of them is Breaking Bad. Makes sense for New Mexico. We end with Nurse Terry preparing to draw blood from Thor. We don't see much here. Just a hint, but we find it intriguing that Branagh chose to film this from Thor's POV as he comes to and finds himself in the hospital. Thor gets tasered and taken to a hospital. it's a busy minute and ‘Jovial' Jay Shepard is here to chat about all of it with us. Tune in! Join the conversation with movie lovers from around the world on The Next Reel's Discord channel! Film Sundries Watch this film: iTunes • Amazon • Netflix • YouTube • Disney+ Join the conversation on Discord Script Transcript Trailer #1 Trailer #2 Poster artwork Original Material ‘Jovial' Jay Shepard at MCU:Location Scout and Retrozap

The Groupchat Golf Podcast
Dontrelle Willis

The Groupchat Golf Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 59:52


Today, we sit down with World Series champion, 2x MLB All-Star, 2003 NL Rookie of the Year, 2005 NL Wins leader, all-around great guy, and golf aficionado Dontrelle Willis. We briefly touch on his time in the major leagues, including the time he struck out home run king Barry Bonds as Barry was tied for the single-season record. We touch on all things golf, what's in the bag, favorite club to hit, etc. He gives us his first-person POV on the Steve Bartman incident and how the momentum of that series changed in the blink of an eye. This is a conversation you do not want to miss and we look forward to linking with Dontrelle out on the course soon! -- Instagram: @groupchat_golf_memes @officiallysonny @chubbawatson Twitter: @groupchat_golf_memes @chubbawatson -- Sponsors: Tempy's Tees -- Tunes: Spanish Harlem by Mattijs Muller

Across The Bar Podcast
Finally..... Some Sports

Across The Bar Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 13, 2021 90:28


Yo Bar Hoppers!! Welcome to another spirited episode of Across The Bar Podcast! This week you guys are in for treat! We actually get to hear D Worlds and Cash's POV on some of the biggest sports topics out right now. Aaron Rodgers and Kyrie, Our top picks for the best teams in the league to date and much more. So pull up and pour up and lets sit at the bar and talk some sports!

I'm A Muslim (And That's Okay!)
Gift of the Gab: Talking About the Mental Health Crisis in LGBTQ+ Youth With Sobia Saleem and Sadie Hernandez

I'm A Muslim (And That's Okay!)

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 37:36


In this episode of GOG I have with me therapists in training, Sobia Saleem and Sadie Hernandez and we talk about the mental health risks faced by members of the Queer. We discuss the stigma that Queer youth face, especially if they are from Faith-based backgrounds, and for the need for empathy and inclusion for Queer youth.You can also Watch this episode on YouTube here: https://youtu.be/Je9qyJz6gQsSadie and Sobia are therapists in training and you can find them on Instagram at: https://www.instagram.com/sadieandsobiatherapy/They also provide counseling services (open to everyone, including members of the LGBTQ+ community) at the LGBTQ Center Orange County. To find out more about the OC LGBTQ center follow the links below:https://www.lgbtqcenteroc.org/https://www.lgbtqcenteroc.org/services/therapy/https://www.lgbtqcenteroc.org/services/youth-programs-2/If you are Queer and are from a Faith-based background the following document provides resources for support:https://docs.google.com/document/d/1rpzagD6lKXF17DvhwHYzAOFes8V8V7t5iUNeH4IMQGY/edit?usp=sharingSupport the show (https://paypal.me/creativecookiejar?locale.x=en_US)

Jen, Gabe & Chewy
8AM: Working With Homer Is Exhausting

Jen, Gabe & Chewy

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 45:34


Are the Packers still atop Chewy's tiers in the NFL? He runs through the list and also gets Homer's POV. Gabe makes the mistake of using a Chewy thought as a philosophical talking point regarding friendship. And, are the Rams actually the team to beat now?

Booyah 90s Now
The Love Boat, "Cindy/Play by Play/What's a Brother For"

Booyah 90s Now

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 98:55


Rob tries to embrace his TV fandom. Joe's uncle has all the blu-rays. A cruise is a great place to find love or get killed. Frank Sinatra Jr. plays an off-brand version of his father. Rebecca thinks Gopher is dreamy. Non-athletic actors are bad at seeming athletic, especially when they've smoked infinity cigarettes. At low-effort content—where okay is okay—we make stuff and share it with you to celebrate life with curiosity, creativity, and compassion...kind of...sometimes. You can contact us & buy our coffee mugs and things. And you can listen to our shows:  Make Mine a Double Feature, where Rob & Ellen have a few drinks and tell each other movie stories in all kinds of ways—like backwards or in the form of letters or from the POV of a side character. Kid. Dad. Songs. Yeah!, where Rob & Felix talk about music. Trivial Television, where Ellen & Rob recap TV episodes while sprinkling in facts, fictions, and trivia questions. Booyah 90s Now, where Rob & Joe break down what it's been like to live under the influence of 90s media. Thanks for hanging out.  Take care.

Pop Dat Personality
After 6 Months

Pop Dat Personality

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 101:08


The sayin goes, "Here for a good time, not a long time", but don't trip if it comes to an end. NOTHIN stands a chance against time. (@d_wg of @kollagreenkitchen) tapped in for the urban POV. Topics include promoting, laying the smack down, uncomfortable confessions, good vs not so good black tv shows and more. To: Follow Dre and/or get some good eats: @d_wg / @kollagreenkitchen Social media: pdatp_pod Inquiries/ Talk to Me Nice segment: popdatpersonality@gmail.com Like, subscribe, share... ALLAT!

The Breadwinners
Getting Smart About Money — with Chelsea Brennan EP 155

The Breadwinners

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 26:25


Chelsea Brennan founded Smart Money Mamas to help women build thriving relationships with money — and teach their children the money lessons most of us never got. Today, her company is helping thousands of women create lasting financial change for themselves and their families. On this episode, Chelsea shares her tips for changing your POV around money with an eye towards building generational wealth. Episode Links  Smart Money Mamas  Rate, review and subscribe to us — and visit The Breadwinners store today!  Our music is “Run for your Money,” by Devil and Perfects.    Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Breakthrough Builders
Inclusive Inventor: Jenny Fleiss @ Volition Capital

Breakthrough Builders

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 41:09


Jenny Fleiss is co-founder of category creator Rent The Runway, but in some ways, that's an understatement of the time and energy she put in to revolutionize the designer fashion industry—and forever change old ideas of Who Gets to Wear What. In her talk with Jesse, Jenny recounts the detailed logistics work and core insights it took to drive growth at Rent The Runway, with lessons learned for aspiring founders. She describes how she now brings her entrepreneurial experience to bear as an investor, emphasizing inclusivity and the growing importance of shared wins. Jenny outlines a format that digital commerce businesses can follow to create personalized experiences at scale. And she offers advice for parents on how to inspire entrepreneurship from an early age. All told, Jenny's story highlights the transformational power of building in oneself – and others – the confidence to excel.(3:13) How Jenny's experience as an entrepreneur led her to join Volition Capital this year(8:32) Assessing the state of digital commerce—global challenges & innovations(11:47) Jenny's POV on the three pillars of personalization-at-scale(16:56) Launching Rent The Runway with an unprecedented dive into logistics and a crucial market insight(23:29) How Jenny linked up with RTR co-founder Jenn Hyman, along with her tips for finding co-founders(29:23) Changing the VC funding landscape and increasing opportunities for women-run businesses(31:23) Lessons for parents on teaching and encouraging entrepreneurshipGuest BioJenny Fleiss joined Volition Capital in 2021 as the company's first Venture Partner, where she focuses on next-generation consumer brands. She is an entrepreneur and intrapreneur, founding two scaled digitally native businesses from scratch: Rent the Runway and Jetblack. During her time at Rent the Runway, Jenny wore many different hats, serving as President, Head of Logistics, and Head of Business Development.Jenny has been honored with numerous recognitions including Inc. Magazine's “30 Under 30”; Fortune Magazine's “40 Under 40” and “Most Powerful Women Entrepreneurs”; and Fast Company's “Most Influential Women in Technology.”Helpful LinksRent the RunwayVolition CapitalFast Company: Inside Rent The Runway's Secret Dry-Cleaning EmpireHarvard Business Review: Women-Led Startups Received Just 2.3% of VC FundingJenny on LinkedIn and Twitter

Where is This Going?
Episode 52:Devante Barnes

Where is This Going?

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 59:11


Been a second, but ‘Where is This Going?” returns with the great, Devante Barnes! Devante is a Grand Rapids based artist. If you live in the GR area, you've probably seen a couple murals he's worked on. One on the Four Star Theatre and the other in Grandville. Devante started creating art at a young age and recalls stealing Sharpie markers from the art classroom in middle school. He explains that much of his early work consisted of cars and that evolved to drawing people, more specifically people's nudes. “It beats asking for ‘em”, he jokes. Devante describes his style as cartoonish and incorporates a lot of hands and flowers into his work. He enjoys drawing hands because, “They're difficult and from your own POV, they're what you see in constant motion”. Devante and Hunter also reminisce about attending middle school together in Zealand and relate to pain being the authentic black experience. Keep your eyes peeled for future murals in town and be sure to like and follow Devante's work on social media @devadidit. Enjoy the episode! Our sponsors! : Off The Gr1d @offthegr1dd 2863 West Shore Dr. Apt. 114 Holland, MI MON-SAT 10AM-8PM SUN: Noon-5PM Produced by: Jackie Kalmink(@further.closer) and Preston Locklear (@bear_nubs) Description by: Ben Bradshaw (@thebradbenshaw) --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/hunter-miles/support

POV
New Segment, Motivational Nuggets to Love By Episode 1 Love: Boundaries and Healthy Spaces

POV

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2021 15:05


I've got a new segment that I'm excited to share with you. It's called Motivational Nuggets to Love By. This was created from FB live videos I used to do while in transition.  Well, now it's made it's way to POV! Welcome to Episode 1: Love: Boundaries and Healthy SpacesJoin me as I talk about life's journey in different spaces and growth from many places. This week, I'm discussing a healthy love that's self centered. I hope it motivates you to regularly reassess your boundaries and check in on your levels of joy and peace. 

Booyah 90s Now
Free Willy (1993)

Booyah 90s Now

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 61:56


Michael Madsen goes on a dead-eyed kamikaze mission. A little boy teaches a robotic whale to do tricks. Michael Jackson or R Kelly sings “You Are Not Alone” while the credits roll. Joe repeats himself a lot and for that he is sorry. At low-effort content—where okay is okay—we make stuff and share it with you to celebrate life with curiosity, creativity, and compassion...kind of...sometimes. You can contact us & buy our coffee mugs and things. And you can listen to our shows:  Make Mine a Double Feature, where Rob & Ellen have a few drinks and tell each other movie stories in all kinds of ways—like backwards or in the form of letters or from the POV of a side character. Kid. Dad. Songs. Yeah!, where Rob & Felix talk about music. Trivial Television, where Ellen & Rob recap TV episodes while sprinkling in facts, fictions, and trivia questions. Booyah 90s Now, where Rob & Joe break down what it's been like to live under the influence of 90s media. Thanks for hanging out.  Take care.

Rattle & Pedal: B2B Marketing Podcast
From Value-Based Pricing to Value-Based Selling with Blair Enns – Part 2

Rattle & Pedal: B2B Marketing Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 16:31


In part 2, Blair Enns shares how expertise, positioning, and value-based selling are inextricably linked. Learn why you should narrow your expertise and develop a differentiated POV that connects with buyers who value the value you provide. The post From Value-Based Pricing to Value-Based Selling with Blair Enns – Part 2 appeared first on Rattle and Pedal.

Girls Gone Canon Cast
ASOIAF Episode 143 — AFFC Brienne I featuring Shiloh Carroll

Girls Gone Canon Cast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 134:17


Saddle your horses: We're going on a new journey across Westeros in search of a maid that is definitely-not-Sansa-Stark-but-sounds-exactly-like-her with the truest not-a-knight of them all—Brienne of Tarth. Often mistaken for a POV where nothing happens, Shiloh Carroll, author of Medievalism in A Song of Ice and Fire and Game of Thrones, joins us to set the record straight with insights about chivalric romance literature and the knight errant character. Where to find Shiloh Carroll: Shiloh's Wordpress: Musings on medievalism in pop culture: https://shilohcarroll.wordpress.com/ Books: Medievalism in A Song of Ice and Fire and Game of Thrones: Boydell & Brewer | Amazon | Barnes & Noble Medievalism in Gaiman: Upcoming Essays on Jaime and Brienne, Chivalric Romances, and Arthuriana Part 1 Part 2 Part 3 Shiloh's Twitter https://twitter.com/medievalismish   Link mentioned: Lo the Lynx's essay on Brienne and Arya as gender outlaws https://lothelynx.wordpress.com/2020/08/27/brienne-and-arya-gender-outlaws/ --- Eliana's twitter: https://twitter.com/arhythmetric Eliana's reddit account: https://www.reddit.com/user/glass_table_girl] Eliana's blog: https://themanyfacedblog.wordpress.com/ Chloe's twitter: https://twitter.com/liesandarbor Chloe's blog: www.liesandarborgold.com Intro by Anton Langhage    

Marvel Movie Minute
Thor 025: Does Thor Realize Just How Much Damage His Lightning Will Cause?

Marvel Movie Minute

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 24:48


Minute Twenty-Five: From Screaming Volstagg to Collapsing Utgard This week, we're joined by Cass Fredrickson from Lord of the Rings Minute at Dueling Genre Productions. We've got Mjølnir bringing the lightning, a collapsing city, and a run from a Jotun Beast to chat about and Cass is with us every step of the way! In the twenty-fifth minute of Kenneth Branagh's 2011 film Thor... Volstagg's scream sure would've sent us running too, but then so would a giant Jotun Beast appearing from an ice shell directly behind us. How the hell do they always stay so far ahead of it? It's perpetually catching up to them as they race toward the Bifrost point. Where are they running to? The Bifrost landing point? Didn't Heimdall say Bifrost will remain closed if there's the chance they'd bring something back that could threaten Asgard? Wouldn't a charging Jotun Beast count? So are they... just running? Speaking of the Bifrost landing point, why does Heimdall have to pick them up at that one particular spot? Couldn't he get them from anywhere? This really makes no sense. Thor keeps the Frost Giants busy and presumably Laufey is seeing what Thor can do. Not quite lightning... but we're moments away. Why do they keep running straight at him? His Mjølnir spins are flicking ice shards at them and keeping them at bay, but is this for the benefit of his friends? The Frost Giants seem to be nothing more than lemmings. Just bring the lightning already! Is this Laufey's plan? To keep Thor separated from his group? There are, in fact, lots of Frost Giants running after them as well as the Jotun Beast. Is he hoping to capture everyone or is he trying to kill them all before Odin shows up? Or maybe Laufey wants to know what Thor can do and is testing his limits. Meanwhile, Loki, the Warriors Three, and Lady Sif continue their run from the Jotun Beast and the Jotuns. Now that he's injured, Fandral becomes our eyes as we see his POV over Volstagg's shoulder, watching the Jotun Beast grow closer over and over again. Sif manages to avoid getting hit. Hogun does as well. Seriously, how do they run so fast? Josh Dallas as Fandral works really well. We speculate why perhaps Dallas opted to stick with his TV show instead of returning for the sequels. Considering how the Warriors Three are treated, it makes sense. We get to see Mjølnir's power to bring the lightning down finally. This is such an iconic part of Thor and this film. It's so smart of them to hold it back until minute 25. It's neat to see that Thor actually strikes the ground with the end of the handle, not the head of the hammer, to control the lightning. The CG here holds up surprisingly well. The damage caused by Thor's lightning, however, might call into question just how much Thor can control the damage it would cause. To that end, we know Thor didn't realize Jotunheim was in such bad shape. But is he able to control this at all to make sure he doesn't destroy the entire planet? It's really Thor's dumb luck everything works. So many Frost Giants fall to their supposed deaths here because of Thor's actions. More of the planet falls to pieces. Even one of the towers of Utgardhall collapses. It's sad to lose Cass this week because we had great conversations with her about the Battle on Jotunheim, but we're glad to know she'll be back later this season for more conversation. Tune in! Join the conversation with movie lovers from around the world on TruStory FM's Discord channel! Film Sundries Watch this film: iTunes • Amazon • Netflix • YouTube • Disney+ Join the conversation on Discord Script Transcript Trailer #1 Trailer #2 Poster artwork Source Material Cass on Twitter Lord of the Rings Minute Geek by Night Dueling Genre Productions

Lori & Julia
11/4 Thurs Hr 3: The Beloved Moon from "Moon and Staci" Joins Us!

Lori & Julia

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 36:14


We sat down with Moon from, "Moon and Staci" to talk about his experience with Courage Kenny. Also a top bodyguard in Hollywood is shopping a tell-all book from is POV?!

Ya, We're Basic.
the one where shooter’s back!

Ya, We're Basic.

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 75:07


the man, the myth, the big friendly giant legend: my friend stephen is back giving us all the dating advice, talking dating app hygiene and answering your questions from instagram. it's always fun having a guest and even better when we're answering your Q's so thanks for sending them in! we also do a mini celeb roundup ft who else but kimberly and peter, discuss how out of control halloween was for our celebesties this year and cw: we go there with yolanda, zayn and gigi. somewhere in the middle i do a little POV me, dating storytime of my own so ya it's a big ep! please enjoy and if you do be sure to subscribe, rate us five stars and leave a review on apple or heart us on spotify podcasts so a new episode shows up in your homefeed each and every week. so that's all for today but probably not, ok bye! The post the one where shooter's back! appeared first on ya, we're basic..

DIY MFA Radio
382: Character, Setting, and Cinematic Storytelling in Short Stories - Interview with Khanh Ha

DIY MFA Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 46:49


Today, I have the pleasure of interviewing Khanh Ha. Khanh is the author of Flesh and The Demon Who Peddled Longing.  He is a seven-time Pushcart nominee, finalist for the Mary McCarthy Prize, Many Voices Project, Prairie Schooner Book Prize, and The University of New Orleans Press Lab Prize.  He is the recipient of the Sand Hills Prize for Best Fiction, the Robert Watson Literary Prize in Fiction, The Orison Anthology Award for Fiction, and The C&R Press Fiction Prize.  His new novel, Mrs. Rossi's Dream, was named Best New Book by Booklist and a 2019 Foreword Reviews INDIES Silver Winner and Bronze Winner   In this episode Khanh Ha and I discuss: How he writes death scenes in a way that is comfortable for him and powerful for the reader. The difference between style and voice and how writers can make both unique. Why writers need to stay faithful to their character when creating the POV of the narrative.   Plus, his #1 tip for writers. For more info and show notes: diymfa.com/382

Future Commerce  - A Retail Strategy Podcast
Introducing Infinite Shelf: Can We Stop Being So Binary?!?

Future Commerce - A Retail Strategy Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 40:24


Having Conversations That Don't Exist in Other PlacesWelcome to Infinite Shelf, a human-centric show designed to help explore what it takes to make brands, products and services hit the right recipe of connection, relevance, emotional attachment, and, of course, profitability.Phillip and Brian of Future Commerce join Ingrid to welcome Infinite Shelf to the networkThe three play a game of “Get off my Lawn,” where INgrid has the guys guess what different TikTok lingo means.“When we talk about Infinite Shelf, the stuff gets onto the shelf somehow and the stuff gets taken off the shelf by someone. And the shelf is just the table that's being set for the meal that is being prepared. The shelf brings us together, but it's not about the shelf, it's about the people.” -PhillipThe Pendulum...better known as The Big Three (Amazon, Target, Walmart) are taking over our mindshare, wallet share, and going full force on the economy. But what happens when a smaller brand disrupts the industry?“How do we set ourselves up to be a part of what is currently going on with these big retailers but also be future focused on when the pendulum swings back the other way that we're ready and that we aren't blindsided by what the needs of the future consumer mindset is going to be?” -IngridWe have some exciting topics planned for Infinite Shelf, all revolving around open conversations from different POV's, including: In-Store Tech, Influncers- Dead or Alive and Well?, how to organize and hire teams, and SO MUCH MORE!Stay in the loop with Infinite Shelf!  Let us know your thoughts on Futurecommerce.fm, or reach out to us on Twitter, Instagram, LinkedIn or Facebook. We love hearing from our listeners!

Player's Own Voice
Legends of Long Track

Player's Own Voice

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 30:22


There's a buzz on about the Canadian Speed skating team, heading toward the Beijing Olympics. The recent national trials revealed surprising strengths and plunging race times from veterans and newer hopefuls alike. Before the cheering echos from the trials had a chance to dwindle away at Calgary's Olympic Oval, Player's Own Voice podcast host Anastasia Bucsis convened a 'state of the skate' meeting with three champions of the sport. It's a raucous sit down chat about Speed Skating then and now. Chef du mission for the Canadian team, Catriona Le May Doane, Assistant team Coach Shannon Rempel, and multi medallist and commentator Kristina Groves all piled around the table to talk through the challenging pursuit of crazy speed on dime-thin skate blades. None of these women care much for clichés, but they all agree- this is living proof that if you build it, they will come. Canada's most successful winter Olympic sport got to be that way, because decisions were made, back in 1988, to keep the Olympic skating Oval and institution, and coaching, training and expertise firmly in place. There are Olympic medal hopefuls right now, who got to be that way because they could see and skate alongside the best of the best, when they were first trying it out. Legends of Long track- this week on POV podcast.

The Rich Eisen Show
REShow: Ryan Leaf & Cam Heyward - Hour 3 (11-01-21)

The Rich Eisen Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 46:46


ESPN Analyst and former NFL QB Ryan Leaf tells Rich why he applauds Falcons WR Calvin Ridley stepping away from football to deal with mental health issues, and how tough it is for the likes of Jets QB Mike White and Saints QB Trevor Siemian coming off the bench to lead their teams to victory.    Steelers' All-Pro Defensive Tackle Cameron Heyward tells Rich how Pittsburgh has turned things around the last month after stumbling out of the gate to start the season, reveals that Steelers LB TJ Watt boasts he could go back to college and lead a team to a national championship…as a QB, how the team trolled head coach Mike Tomlin after the USC hullabaloo last week, and his POV as an Ohio State alum on Michigan's loss to Michigan State.    Rich recaps the Patriots 27-24 win over the Chargers and says why he thinks Bill Belichick will be leading New England back to the playoffs this season with rookie QB Mac Jones. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Conversations with Kenzie
Masculinity and sexual trauma with Zack Alexander

Conversations with Kenzie

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 40:57


We sit down with my amazing friend Zack to talk about sexual trauma from a male POV. We discuss all about masculinity the way it impacted him and how his healing journey went. I am in awe by Zack's ability to be vulnerable and open with such a sensitive topic. Let Zack know how you felt about this episode and connect with him on instagram! https://www.instagram.com/zackalexander___/ Produced by Brett Kibbler

Booyah 90s Now
Varsity Blues

Booyah 90s Now

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 75:37


James Van Der Beek's head is so long. MTV's focus groups revealed that naked ladies and dumb humor make for a good time. Watching a football movie causes Joe to share a million football memories. That whip cream bikini would've been such an absurd mess. Rob eats food out of Joe's braces. At low-effort content—where okay is okay—we make stuff and share it with you to celebrate life with curiosity, creativity, and compassion...kind of...sometimes. You can contact us & buy our coffee mugs and things. And you can listen to our shows:  Make Mine a Double Feature, where Rob & Ellen have a few drinks and tell each other movie stories in all kinds of ways—like backwards or in the form of letters or from the POV of a side character. Kid. Dad. Songs. Yeah!, where Rob & Felix talk about music. Trivial Television, where Ellen & Rob recap TV episodes while sprinkling in facts, fictions, and trivia questions. Booyah 90s Now, where Rob & Joe break down what it's been like to live under the influence of 90s media. Thanks for hanging out.  Take care.

Dev Game Club
DGC Ep 281: Resident Evil 4 (part one)

Dev Game Club

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 73:15


Welcome to Dev Game Club, where this week we start a new series on 2005's Capcom horror classic, Resident Evil 4. We place it in its time and then talk immediately about how it really kicked the third-person action-adventure game into higher gear. Dev Game Club looks at classic video games and plays through them over several episodes, providing commentary. Sections played: Up to the second typewriter Issues covered: the Capcom 5, having some trouble getting the game off the ground, success of the remake, a really different feel, relying on establishing POV shots from slashers, horror movie touchpoints, moving away from straight-up zombie games, differences between Chris and Leon, meeting Hunnigan via the Codec, popularizing the third-person shooter, hold-overs from the older controls, fighting the controls, embodying the character, disempowerment, pick a spot and stand your ground, jerky enemies, shooting a weapon out of the air, opening up the level design to multiple paths, the gun-and-run, Leon's better tactics, "various awesome actions," moving saves away from being a resource, a more revealed map, having people coming at you with pitchforks and torches, can you get the chainsaw guy?, disconnects with marketing, getting lucky to have marketing departments who got it, moral choices and the morally objectionable, motivating the character choices for evil, coloring the tone of dialog to reflect your choices, what weapons we chose with BioShock, talking about the wrench kill, loving crossbows, style over substance in Control. Games, people, and influences mentioned or discussed: God of War, Shadow of the Colossus, SW: Republic Commando, Psychonauts, Guild Wars, Civ IV, FEAR, The Undying, Splinter Cell: Chaos Theory, AC: Wild World, Guitar Hero, Mercenaries, Battlefront II, KotOR II, Lego Star Wars, Xbox 360, Capcom, GameCube, PN 03, Vanquish, Viewtiful Joe, Suda51, Killer 7, Clover Studio, Hideki Kamiya, Dead Phoenix, Panzer Dragoon, PlayStation 2, Devil May Cry, PT, Game Developer Magazine, Friday the 13th, Halloween, A Nightmare on Elm Street, Evil Dead, Army of Darkness, Godzilla, Classic Monsters, The Hills Have Eyes, 'Salem's Lot, The Omen, The Exorcist, Texas Chainsaw Massacre, Living Dead, Shawn Cassidy, Silent Hill, Gears of War, Metal Gear Solid, Frankenstein, Deathloop, Sam Thomas, BioShock, The Green Knight, David S. Lowery, Ghost Story, Jarkko S, Dishonored, Metro, Hitman, Control, Aki Kaurismaki, The Last of Us Part II, Ryan, Deus Ex, No More Heroes, Kirk Hamilton, Aaron Evers, Mark Garcia. Next time: Check Twitter! Twitch: brettdouville or timlongojr, instagram:timlongojr, Twitter: @timlongojr and @devgameclub DevGameClub@gmail.com

The Marketing Secrets Show
A Sneak Peek from Within the Category King's Mastermind

The Marketing Secrets Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 19:49


One of my biggest "ah-ha's" and "takeaways" from day 1 of our highest level mastermind. Hit me up on IG! @russellbrunson Text Me! 208-231-3797 Join my newsletter at marketingsecrets.com ClubHouseWithRussell.com ---Transcript--- What's up everybody, this is Russell Brunson. Welcome back to the Marketing Seekers podcast. I'm in a good mood today. I'm in a really good mood today. I hope you are as well. We relaunched my Inner Circle. We opened a new level called the Category Kings. We had a chance to meet with him yesterday, and actually I'm driving to downtown Boise, because I'm going to be hanging out with that group again for the next two days and then my Inner Circle for the next two days after that. And so this is like a week of hanging out with my favorite people in the world, and so I'm excited. I've got some long car rides back and forth this week, so you'll probably get some episodes of me talking about what we're talking about, what's happening. And I'm doing this for a couple reasons, number one is I want you to learn from some lessons and the key takeaways that I'm getting from these events. And number two, hopefully it will inspire you to want to set as a goal someday to be in my Inner Circle, and eventually to send up with the Category Kings and things like that. So there you go with that said I'm going to cue the theme song, when we come back I'm going to share with you guys some of the cool aha I had from our meeting yesterday. All right everybody. So yeah I'm driving downtown Boise here, about to go hang out with my Category Kings, which is a small group mastermind I have with some of the Category Kings here inside of the Click Funnels universe, which is fun. When I decided, as some of you guys know I've run my Inner Circle mastermind program for seven or eight years, and then two years ago, about six months before the COVID lockdowns I decided I needed a break. And so I paused Inner Circle. I shut it down, whatever you want to call it, and decided to take a two year hiatus, actually I didn't know how long it was going to be at the time. So decided to take a hiatus and maybe it was going to be forever. But over the last two years, I missed it. For me there're different ways to learn, like you can learn from a book, you can learn from a course, you can learn from a seminar, and for me I've done all those things. I'm a voracious reader. I go through everybody's courses. I love going to seminars, but eventually for me it gets harder and harder to like mine the gold out right? Because you just are more aware of things. And I've been doing this game now for almost 20 years. And so I've been to more seminars than most of you guys probably even knew existed in our industry. So for me it gets harder and harder to find like that gold nugget. And I was in, I remember my very first mastermind group I ever joined was Dan Kennedy and Bill Glazier's, which some you guys heard we recently acquired their company, which is such a cool thing. But in those groups it was interesting because it wasn't like I was learning, it wasn't like here's course curriculum. It was like the mastermind group, we get together, we all get share and talk, and ideas. And like that's where I started getting these nuggets of things that were just like, oh wow, I can apply that. Oh I can apply that. It was a different type of learning I never experienced before, but I fell in love with it. And I was in Bill's mastermind group for six years. And then when he retired and sold his company I wanted to go see if I could find another mastermind group to join. And I ended up joining all of them. Like all the ones I could find in my world in similar markets, I would join them all. And I never got the same experience. I didn't know why. And that was about the time I decided to launch my Inner Circle. And I think the reason why most of the masterminds I tried to join was like you join them, and there were a whole bunch of internet marketers in the group. And so everyone, I don't know, it was just, it never felt awesome. But what was cool about the Inner Circle I launched it, because we have ClickFunnels we didn't just have internet marketers who are using the platform, we had people in every market you can dream of. We have 100 and something 1000 active members now. And again, there's people that are chiropractors, dentists, doctors, people in curing cancer, wellness, health filled, people in marriage, family, counseling, relationships, dating, every market you can dream of are using ClickFunnels. And so when we opened the Inner Circle, it was crazy, because it wasn't just like, oh a whole bunch of internet marketers joined to talk about internet marketing stuff. It was like the best people in each industry joined it. And it was so cool, because now in this mastermind I was learning like what's working now in the relationship market? What's working over here in the supplement market? What's working here, because we had such a such wide variety of people. And man for me it lit up. And if you've read, specifically the Expert Secrets book, the Expert Secrets book was written in the middle of when the Inner Circle was at its peak. When people like Brandon and Calum Poland and Alex Hormozi and I could list all, the most of the names you guys know in the ClickFunnels community today were in the Inner Circle during that time. And it was fun, because I was writing that book, I would like test ideas and then I would test it on my business, have some success, I'd share it with the entire Inner Circle and within hours it was being tested in 40 different industries. And we got feedback and course correction, and tweaks back and forth and back and forth. And really the Expert Secrets book was born from that testing process inside the Inner Circle. It was so cool. Anyway, I digress. So for me after two years of having it closed down I reopened it, specifically because I missed learning. Like I've been in a weird spot where we've been growing, we've been acquiring companies, we're doing things, but I don't feel like I've been personally growing and you know growth is a big value for me. That's why I have so many books that I study so much, is I'm looking for ways to grow all the time. And so I reopened it with the excitement to start regrowing again with a small group of really cool people. So the Category Kings have 15 people in it. Each of them spend $150,000 a year to be part of it. And then the Inner Circle is $50,000 a year, and there's a 100 people in that one. And so those are the two groups, the Category Kings one was funny, I thought that was going to, I was like there's no way people are going to spend that much money. That one sold out in two days and Inner Circle, man we ended up from Funnel Hacking Live, we only presented it to people at Two Comma Club. We had a special luncheon. And from that I think we had 60 or 70 people join during the luncheon. And so anyway, so there's some context to what it is, why it is, why it's exciting, why I'm so passionate about it. So with the Category Kings, to kick off kind of this new group some of you guys have read the book Play Bigger, which teaches you how to become a category king. And I thought, how cool, and it's funny, because half of our, the Category King group are actually women. So as of yesterday I'm calling it the Category King and Queens, because there's as many Queens in the group as there are Kings. But anyway I digress, I thought it'd be really cool to have one of the authors of that book come and actually present. And so Dave Peterson came and he presented on how to like design your category. And it was interesting, because I've read the book multiple times, I've referred it to, I think he told me I was probably the top refer of his book, because I told everybody about it. And so it was interesting, because as we were preparing for this I had it in my head what he was going to do. He was going to use the principles in the book. We're going to map it out. We're going to category design. Like I thought, I really thought that was the direction we were going to go. It was interesting, because he told me, he's like, you know everything I've learned about category design for the most part happened after I wrote the book, we wrote the book based on these principles and he's like, we've been coaching for the last decade now. And he's actually now doing it in a company again. And he's like you know most of what I've learned about category design, I have learned since the book. And so there's a lot of things that are different. And so anyway, we had a four hour workshop with him and what was fascinating to me was we didn't cover most of the things in the book. In fact the first hour was all spent on something that seemed so simple. I'm almost nervous to tell you guys this, because you'd be like, oh that's so simple Russell. But me and 15 other people in this room of arguably Category Kings in their industries, none of us were able to really answer it. And that's what I want to share with you guys today. So the question and it's interesting, because like the way that I, the lens that I view the world at typically for me is like, okay I'm going to go find, who's my dream customer? And then I'm going to create an offer for them. That's like for me, like ground zero, that's where I begin this process. And then if you've read Extra Secrets, you know it's like, hey do we make an improvement offer? Or a new opportunity? Create a new opportunity. There's this whole thing around like down that rabbit hole. And that's where I begin. That's where I kind of start running with. And I always knew that when we're creating offers and creating products, and services and things like that, where like our goal to solve a problem. But what was interesting is that Dave asked us, he's like, what is the problem that you solve? And he showed a bunch of the big companies you're aware of. Like the billion dollar brands and most of them have like a really simple, less than 10 word statement on the problem that they solve for the market. Like for example the wetsuit guy, I don't know who it was, but like his problem he's trying to solve is I want to swim in cold water longer, but that was it. I want to swim in cold water longer, eight words right. And like, what is a wetsuit? Oh it helps people swim in cold water longer. What was the problem you try to solve? Boom this is a solution and billion dollar brand. And every company had something like that. And then he was interesting, he said that he would go to, or he was talking about some of his friends that have big companies. And he said that he started doing this exercise with them, when he'd get in the car with them, and he'd be like, Hey how's it going? How's business? Real quickly, what do you think the problem is you guys as a company solve? His friend would tell him the answer and he'd write it down, and next time they hung out three or four days later he'd be talking, he's like, wait real quick, what was the question? What is the main problem you solve again? And the guy would be like, oh, he'd tell him again, and then he'd do it again, he'd do it five or six times over the next month and a half or so. And eventually the guy came back and said, you know the seventh or eighth time he asked him, he's like, dude you got to quit asking me this. Like you keep asking and I keep telling you the problem we solve. And then Dave came back and said, actually what's interesting is I've been writing them down. He's like every single time I've asked you that question, you've given me a different answer. And the guy was like, oh my gosh. And he started looking at him and he was disagreeing with himself, not knowing it. But if you look at like, he's like I solve this problem, I solve this problem. And I solve this problem. And they kept changing around. And he said a lot of times he'll do consulting with people and they're in category design, and he'll ask everybody in the executive team, what is the problem you solve? And everybody's answers different. And then he'll ask the employees and everyone's answers different. And he's like, this is the foundation. Business is all about solving a core problem for an industry. Like what is the core problem? And what's interesting he said that if you figure out the problem correctly, he said, the category will take care of itself. Like you don't have to go and figure out the category and design, all kind of stuff. He's like it all relies on this one thing, is what is the problem you solve? And it was interesting, because as he said that, instant I'm like oh sweet I can answer this. And then I was like, wait a minute. I could answer this seven years ago when ClickFunnels first came out. That was the problem we were solving seven years ago? It was that entrepreneurs couldn't code. And so we had to make this easy drag and drop builder, oh sorry this is the solution. The problem is that entrepreneurs aren't coders, that's the problem right? And so we built ClickFunnels, because someone like me who's an entrepreneur who needs funnels, I can't code. And so it was like this simple thing. And so that was the problem we solved. Now fast forward seven years later, that's not the market problem anymore. There's a million ways that entrepreneurs can code something. There's a million Wix's and WYSIWYG editors, and WordPress and Shopify, and Etsy and Amazon, like there's a million ways to do it. So, that's no longer the core problem. Although, that's the problem that we solved initially. And so it got me thinking, what is the problem we solve today? Like the problems change in a market and an industry over time. In fact, I asked someone, I was like, does the core problem stay the same forever? And he's like, no, no. He's like there's a core problem, and you got to figure out and identify that, because that'll define the category and everything else. But he's like markets shift, markets change. And he showed this graph of the CRM industry over the last 50 years or 60 years, initially he was it was business cards. And then it was some dude figured out you could take a business card and type it into a data processor. Now you had a digital business card, and then the next wave was like... Sorry, we can come back to the problem. So the first problem is like I needed contacts. So business cards became the thing. That was the problem. And then next thing I have all these business cards, I don't know how to manage them or track them. And so someone made a program where you could type it in. It's like, oh I have a digital version, I can look at it. And if my book of business cards burns up I don't lose my business. So problem solution, and then a little while later it's like, okay this is tough I hate typing in these things. And so the next wave of that industry was card scanners, where you take a business card, you scan it and boom it's in your computer now, you've got it there. And that solved the next set of problems in the industry. And then later it was I don't just want a business card. I want a business card, but to be able to take notes. And if I talk to somebody and things like that, and it was like the first version of CRM, and he showed, was it Seabolt and showed how they became the Category Kings and they dominated. But then eventually it was like well, first Seabolt was really hard to install and all these kind of things. And that's when Mark Benioff came out with Salesforce, which was not software, it was hard and confusing and you had to have people come install it and set up. It was just web based software. And he was the very first to do SAS based software. And so like that became the next thing. And he kept showing them the industry shifting, because the problem shifts over time. And it was interesting, because in your market if you're not shifting your problem over time, someone else is going to solve the problem and that's when you lose the category. That's when the person passes you, which is so fascinating. And so the question came down to, what is the problem you solve? And so that's the thing I want to identify for you guys. And the problem that us entrepreneurs have is like, oh we solve a ton of problems. We do this and this and this, and this and this, and this and this, this and that is the wrong answer. You don't solve a whole bunch of problems. You've got to solve one problem for the category. And by doing that, by creating that, by understanding and identifying and framing that problem from there the category is built. And then we got deeper and talked about POV statements and things like that, it got deeper from there. But that was the core foundation, that again, if I was teaching, I'd be like step one find a problem, step two, what is the offer? And then like you know, and I'd go directly into that, but it's like, no, no, we got to step back to the foundation, which is really what is the problem that you're solving for the industry? When you figure that out the category will take care of itself, which was so fascinating. And again, he said, try to keep your problem statement to under 10 words. And that's hard to do. I spent 45 minutes talking about, 15 minutes work shopping it, and then I spent the next four hours like noodling on it, like try to figure this out, like what in the world, especially as I know some of you guys know we're launching ClickFunnels 2.0 soon, so like with this whole new launch, this new thing, what is the problem we're trying to solve? How do I identify? How do I structure? How do I make it so simple that it keeps us as the Category King? So anyway I hope that's helpful. Obviously there was a lot of stuff yesterday that was really, really cool, but that was the one that was like the biggest insight. It was funny, because we came back from the first workshop, I raised my hand initially, I was like, all right I don't know if it's just me, but that was really, really hard. And I looked around at everybody else, every other Category King and Queen in the room looked back and said, oh, then Kevin's like, we're so grateful it was hard for you Russ, that was really, really hard for us and we thought we were the only ones. I'm like, no, I'm going to be vulnerable here too. That was really hard. And then it was fun, because it opened the dialogue with us all trying to figure it out and work with each other. And Annie Grace, a lot of you guys know her, she spoke at Funnel Hacking Live two years ago, she actually wrote out mine and my POV statement and all these things for me, it was like I think this is what yours is. And like, anyway it was magical. So anyway that was the first half day of Category Kings and Queens. And so I'm heading into the event room now, I'm getting close actually. And I'm excited because I was up till two o'clock last night working on my presentation, because I'm going to, based off of what we learned yesterday with the problem I'm going to take that as the foundation point and then show everybody over the last seven years how ClickFunnels has built to the place it is. We've got over half a billion dollars in sales, well over that now, we built the category, we've done these things. So I'm going to kind of show the next phases for me to the group. I'll probably spend two or three hours going deep into that, which I'm so excited for. And this is like Russell raw, like if you guys see me live, I'm Russell polished where I'm, I've got slides, I've got things. Russell raw you get me and a black marker and that's about it. So I'm excited for these guys they're going to, for those who haven't been with Russell raw this will be my first hardcore doodle session with them going through the principles of how we build ClickFunnels into the category king it is. Things I've learned along the way, the pros, the cons, the ups the downs, and yeah stuff I don't get to talk about typically. So, that's the cool thing about these groups, if you look at our coaching programs we have all the base level stuff. And then if you come in one funnel way and courses and all that kind of stuff, but when you decide to ascend up and get into coaching with us, the first is our Two Comma Club X coaching program. The goal of that is to get somebody from where they are today to Two Comma Club. After you get done with Two Comma Club and you've made a million dollars inside of a funnel, that's when you get invited into the Inner Circle and then from there into category Kings. But it's interesting because the reason why we break it up like that, we used to always have it all together and everyone would be dumped in one coaching program. And it was tough because, or one mastermind group, but it was tough, because there're different conversations that happen at different levels. Like the conversations I'm having with people that spend $150,000 to be in a group, they have to make a minimum of five million a year, and have had to sold over 10 million. They had to have won at Two Comma Club X award. The conversations they have in that room are different than the conversation that happen in a room with people who just passed the million dollar mark. And they're different than the conversation I've going to have with somebody who is in a startup mode trying to get into Two Comma Club. So it's just fun, because again these are things I don't get to talk about, or share ever. And so the place it gets to happen is here inside Category King. So for you guys who are looking to say, okay this is the path, I'm going to hit Two Comma Club X. And then from there Inner Circle, then Category Kings, just know we do record these things and there's a private members there. So when you get to Category King some day, come in here and watch Dave Peterson's talk on Category Kings and watch my presentations from the next day. And you'll have a chance to kind of see where I went from there. So with that said, thanks for listening. This is a long episode because I got a long ride. Hopefully you guys enjoyed it. I miss doing stuff like this, I'm going to try to... We have some fun updates to the podcast coming that I'm doing a few things more long form, I'm going to have someone come and interview me on some topics, because I think those make fun episodes and yeah it's going to be anyway... I'm going to be spending more time with you guys here, is my plan and my goal. So with that said, thanks so much for everything and we'll talk to you guys all again soon.

The John Batchelor Show
1783: Taking Tehran's "No" for a "No." @RichGoldberg and Behnam ben Taleblu, @FDD

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 11:35


Photo: Nuclear Iran, a POV. . CBS Eye on the World with John Batchelor CBS Audio Network @Batchelorshow Taking Tehran's "No" for a "No."  @RichGoldberg and Behnam ben Taleblu, @FDD https://www.fdd.org/analysis/2021/10/14/its-decision-time-on-iran/ The Islamic Republic is advancing both the enrichment and weaponization tracks needed to build a bomb. .

WoT Spoilers Podcast
Wheel of Time Spoilers 391 - POD - Ch 1&2 - To Keep the Bargain & Unweaving

WoT Spoilers Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 98:47


A wind rises, and we begin to walk the Path of Recap with a protracted exodus from Ebou Dar by Elayne, Aviendha, Nyneave, and company. We get a rare section from Aviendha's POV, but all she's seeing is the Sea Folk, Aes Sedai, and Kin not getting along. Shifting to Elayne, we consider the minutia of Sea Folk appearance and power, and begin to examine the cache of angreal acquired along with the Bowl of the Winds. Avi calmly unweaves her gateway, and the Aes Sedai respond by becoming extremely agitated. Moridin and the gholam have different responses to the flight of the channelers. Did you miss Spoilercon 2021? Do you want to revisit your favorite events? Rewatch the stream at  https://youtube.com/playlist?list=PLMos4E4aIwdVPalobyjlPlhjpEj4RYsP3 CALL TO ACTION! If you would like to see SpoilerCon continue in the future and you have the energy to help with the Planning Committee, please shoot us an email at wotspoilers@gmail.com or spoilercon@gmail.com Join the conversation on Discord: https://discord.gg/YtWvCnS  Contribute on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/wotspoilers  Email us: wotspoilers@gmail.com   Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/  Twitter: https://twitter.com/wotspoilers  Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/wot_spoilers/   Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/WOTSpoilers/

Respectful Parenting: Janet Lansbury Unruffled
How to Stop Feeling Frustrated by Your Child's Behavior - A Family Success Story

Respectful Parenting: Janet Lansbury Unruffled

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 22:32


Janet shares a family's inspiring success story about dealing with their 3.5-year-old's repeated, seemingly wanton problem behavior. The parent admits that both she and her husband were frustrated and “triggered” by the behavior, and they reacted with anger and scolding. The situation came to a head when their boy started lying about his actions, which was particularly hurtful to his dad. After reading some of Janet's advice, they were able to consider their child's POV with empathy and realize how their reactions may have “made the truth feel unsafe or uncomfortable.” They changed their approach completely and now feel confident their relationship with their child can survive any future storms. Thanks again to Ritual Vitamins for supporting this podcast. Start your ritual today and get 10% off your first 3 months by visiting www.ritual/respect. For more advice on common parenting issues, please check out Janet's best-selling books on Audible, FREE with a 30-day trial membership if you use this link: adbl.co/2OBVztZ. Paperbacks and e-books are also available at Amazon, Google Play, Barnes & Noble and Apple Books. Janet's exclusive audio series "Sessions" is available for download. This is a collection of recorded one-on-one consultations with parents discussing their most immediate and pressing concerns (www.SessionsAudio.com).

The Bald and the Beautiful with Trixie Mattel and Katya Zamo
Revisiting the Making of Jiz & the Filming of Jiz with Jeff Maccubbin

The Bald and the Beautiful with Trixie Mattel and Katya Zamo

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 58:48


As the Bald & the Beautiful creative team engages in To-The-Death team-building exercises in a volcano off the shores of North Africa, we'd like to revisit one of our favorite episodes with editor, producer, & creator of the legendary internet phenomenon Jiz, Jeff Maccubbin! Extraordinarily erudite topics are discussed, such as POV porn, inserting birds into UNHhhh, and the shortcomings of our public school system. Also cum. Lots and lots of talk about cum. Follow Jeff: @EvilJeff Follow Trixie: @TrixieMattel Follow Katya: @Katya_Zamo To listen to our podcast on YouTube: http://bit.ly/TrixieKatyaYT Don't forget to subscribe to the podcast for free wherever you're listening or by using this link: http://bit.ly/baldandthebeautifulpodcast If you want to support the show, and get all the episodes ad-free go to https://thebaldandthebeautiful.supercast.com/ If you like the show, telling a friend about it would be helpful! You can text, email, Tweet, or send this link to a friend: http://bit.ly/baldandthebeautifulpodcast Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices