Podcasts about Pulitzer

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  • 1,639PODCASTS
  • 2,622EPISODES
  • 48mAVG DURATION
  • 1DAILY NEW EPISODE
  • Dec 7, 2021LATEST

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Best podcasts about Pulitzer

Show all podcasts related to pulitzer

Latest podcast episodes about Pulitzer

Work in Progress with Sophia Bush
Ken Armstrong & Meribah Knight

Work in Progress with Sophia Bush

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2021 104:23


Today Sophia is joined on the podcast by Ken Armstrong and Meribah Knight: two journalists who investigated and broke an eye-opening story about Black children being jailed--for no crime at all. Meribah is a fellow of ProPublica's Local Reporting Network and the host of The Promise, a truly phenomenal podcast about inequality and the people taking it on. Ken is a veteran of the Chicago Tribune and the Seattle Times, where he won his first of two Pulitzer prizes. He's also an author whose book “Scoreboard, Baby” won the Edgar Allan Poe Award and a Nieman Fellow at Harvard University. Sophia talks to them about their lives leading up to working together, what it was like to break this story and how it impacted them, and what people can do in their own communities to enact change. Sponsors:BetterHelp: Get 10% off your first month at betterhelp.com/WIPNoom: Sign up for your trial at Noom.com/WIPExecutive Producers: Sophia Bush & Rabbit Grin ProductionsAssociate Producers: Samantha Skelton & Mica SangiacomoEditor: Josh WindischArtwork by the Hoodzpah SistersThis show is brought to you by Brilliant Anatomy.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

BOWIE VS. DYLAN
Ep 66 : Bowie vs. Dylan, or the Completely Complete Albums Ranking of their ENTIRE CAREERS

BOWIE VS. DYLAN

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2021 94:04


Chaz' Special Secret Diary: August 23rd, 2021: Dear diary, I just want to tell you how special of an ep of BvD we just recorded today!  I was so funny and insightful about Bowie's albums list, and Jake also happened to be there. Chaz' Special Secret Diary: September 15th, 2021: Dear diary, remember that sweet sweet ep of BvD I told you I recorded a few weeks ago, the one where I'll be considered for the Pulitzer?  And Jake was there but just stared at me and drooled the whole time?  Well...it's not been published yet.  Guess I'll have to talk with the boys in the IT department! Chaz' Special Secret Diary: November 1st, 2021: Dear diary, I've become perturbed, because the legendary lost episode of BvD from August still hasn't surfaced, and I hate to rag on the guy, but Jake has REALLY DROPPED THE BALL ON THIS ONE.  He's the one who's responsible for putting them up and he JUST HASN'T, and here it is nearly Webbys season.  Chaz' Special Diary: December 6th, 2021: It's so cold, diary.  I fear this will be my last entry.  I can't tell where I am or what's around me.  I keep calling out for help, but no one answers.  There will be no Bowie vs Dylan podcast episode #66.  I am utterly alone.   Goodbye, cruel world, on this very special albums ranking countdown episode of Bowie vs. Dylan.

LOI Weekly
LOI Central 2021 Ep 38 with David Sneyd & Brendan Clarke

LOI Weekly

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 66:32


After perhaps the craziest ten days in the history of the League of Ireland, Shels keeper Brendan Clarke and Pulitzer candidate David Sneyd join the lads to talk a crazy managerial merry-go-round, the FAI Cup final, Marc Bircham's Waterford demise, and UCD's playoff win. Our penultimate podcast of the year had to be recorded on Zoom because as Dan was breaking stories, Johnny was breaking his ankle. What did the lads make of the FAI Cup final, and how did it all end like this for the winning team and their manager?

The Chase Jarvis LIVE Show
Mel Robbins: Powerful Habits to Ease Anxiety & Boost Productivity

The Chase Jarvis LIVE Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 77:26


How's your nervous system doing as we enter the final month of 2021? It's been one heck of a ride for most of us, and tensions are at an all-time high with the ongoing pandemic, the “great resignation,” and skyrocketing prices in stores, online, and at gas pumps. If there were ever a time to have a sit down with the great behavior change expert Mel Robbins, it's now. I first interviewed Mel four years ago when her book The 5 Second Rule hit the bestseller's list. She's now celebrating another book, The High 5 Habit, and I had the pleasure of getting her analysis of where this crazy world is heading. If you're in a state of overwhelm with chronic anxiety, stress, and fear, you don't want to miss what she says we should all be doing right now.  Hint: It's not anxiously waiting to see what madness will fall on us next! Mel comes through with some powerful advice on calming our nervous systems and easing anxiety even when there's so much to justify chronic stress. From setting yourself up for greater creativity and productivity with the right morning routine to a simple mantra that could change your mindset, Mel's wisdom is just what we all need to hear as we head into a new year.  Enjoy! Have a question? Text me 1-206-309-5177
 Tweet me @chasejarvis --- Today's episode is brought to you by CreativeLive. CreativeLive is the world's largest hub for online creative education in photo/video, art/design, music/audio, craft/maker and the ability to make a living in any of those disciplines. They are high quality, highly curated classes taught by the world's top experts -- Pulitzer, Oscar, Grammy Award winners, New York Times best selling authors and the best entrepreneurs of our times.

Objections: With Adam Klasfeld
Nearly Two Decades After 'Spotlight' Investigation, Key Lawyer in Clergy Sexual Abuse Litigation Is Still Fighting (Feat. Mitchell Garabedian)

Objections: With Adam Klasfeld

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 18:35


Nearly two decades after the Boston Globe's watershed "Spotlight" investigation blew the lid on sexual abuse inside the Catholic Church, one of the key lawyers who brought that scandal to public light has not relented on his clergy accountability crusade.Attorney Mitchell Garabedian, who was depicted in a film about the "Spotlight" series, discussed the ongoing legal battles, his Hollywood treatment and his continuing fight for disclosure on the Law&Crime podcast "Objections: With Adam Klasfeld.""The investigation had a tremendous impact and helping notify the public that they have to protect children, where those children and adults are in a caring custody of priests," Garabedian said in the interview, referring to the Globe expose. "And it had great impact in helping clergy sexual abuse victims or survivors try to heal and come forward and report the abuse.""With a clergy sexual abuse survivor or victim, it's all about validation," Garabedian added. "The survivor of victim has to know that the abuse was not their fault."In early 2002, the Globe published its Pulitzer-winning series "Spotlight Investigation: Abuse in the Catholic Church," sparking multiple criminal prosecutions and international attention. It also made the already tenacious Garabedian even busier, inspiring other people who said they are survivors to seek legal counsel.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

City Cast Houston
Shouldn't The Woodlands be a city by now?

City Cast Houston

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 13:06


In this episode, political contributor/Pulitzer finalist Evan Mintz discusses with Lisa the possible rationale behind the Woodlands' continued resistance to becoming a city. His ultimate gut feeling? That The Woodlands have an aversion to anything even remotely symbolizing a restrictive government… Plus, some very good news regarding homelessness in Houston - just in time for the holidays. We're live on Twitter! Follow us @CityCastHouston to keep up with Houston news, nature, and other stuff you need to know. Why let your ears have all the fun? Feast your eyes on our free newsletter. You can sign up here.

History Unplugged Podcast
Why the 1619 Project is Dangerous and Should Be Totally Rejected

History Unplugged Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 46:41


The biggest and most controversial historical debate in 2020 is the 1619 Project. Released last year in a special issue of the New York Times Magazine, it is a collection of articles which "aims to reframe the country's history by placing the consequences of slavery and the contributions of black Americans at the very center of [the United States'] national narrative.” More specifically, it claims that the United States is fundamentally and irrevocably racist. Slavery, not the Constitution or 1776, are at the core of American identity. It reviews slavery not as a blemish that the Founders grudgingly tolerated with the understanding that it must soon evaporate, but as the prize that the Constitution went out of its way to secure and protect. Specific claims include the following: the Revolutionary War was fought above all to preserve slavery, that capitalism was birthed on the plantation, and features of American society like traffic jams or affinity for sugar are connected to slavery and segregation.The project was condemned by historians from left to right. Prince historian Allen Guelzo said that “the 1619 Project is not history; it is conspiracy theory. And like all conspiracy theories, the 1619 Project announces with a eureka! that it has acquired the explanation to everything.” Fellow Princeton historian Sean Wilentz has circulated a letter objecting to the project, and the letter acquired signatories like James McPherson, Gordon Wood, Victoria Bynum, and James Oakes, all leading scholars in their field who object to very basic factual inaccuracies in the project.Despite the 1619 Project's numerous historical inaccuracies, the project has spread like wildfire. The creator Nicole Hannah-Jones won a Pulitzer Prize in 2020 for Commentary. Hundreds of newspapers have endorsed it. Most concerning, public schools began incorporating into their curricula early this year. The Pulitzer Center helped turn the 1619 Project into a curriculum that's now taught in more than 4,500 schools across the nation. It threatens to destroy civics education as it has been taught for generations in K-12 education. History teachers will abandon the narrative of the Civil War, emancipation, and the Civil Rights movement. Instead, they will ask students how societal structures perpetuate the enslavement of black people.Today's guest is Dr. Mary Grabar, author of “Debunking The 1619 Project: Exposing the Plan to Divide America.”She provides an extensive look at the divisive and false tactics used to associate America with the exact opposite values of its founding. I.Dr. Mary Grabar reveals the following statistics that alarmingly display how the divisive 1619 Project is uprooting the history and culture of American lifeThis episode is different because I am explicitly endorsing the argument of this author and denouncing the 1619 project. I almost never do this because I don't want to tell you, the listener, how to think. Rather, I let a guest present his or her arguments, make the case as best as possible, play devil's advocate when needed, but ultimately provide the best historical raw material so that you, the audience, and be the judge.I'm making an exception with the 1619 project because I think the arguments are so poorly constructed, juvenile, and political in nature that they don't deserve the dignity of being taken seriously. Normally, I would ignore such poorly crafted arguments, in the same way that I wouldn't have on a guest who says that aliens built the pyramids, or that a German U-Boat sunk the Titanic. At the risk of being political, I think that the 1619 project is at the same intellectual level as UFO conspiracy theories. The problem is that it has elite support. But the effects of 1619 are seeping into public school curricula. The date of 1619 is entering public consciousness. This is only because of politics, because the political claims of the project line up with the political beliefs of certain teachers, Pulitzer committee members and others. In addition to this book, I'm going to list resources in the show notes for this episode that provide good history. They include 1776 Project Pact https://1776projectpac.com/ 1776 United: https://1776unites.com/

Scott Horton Show - Just the Interviews
11/24/21 Aaron Maté on the Award-Winning Lies Still Propping up Russiagate

Scott Horton Show - Just the Interviews

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 31:19


On Antiwar Radio this Sunday, Scott was joined by Aaron Maté to discuss an article he wrote for Real Clear Investigations. Amidst the collapse of the Steele dossier, Maté wrote about five articles that either won the Pulitzer prize or were written by journalists who had won a Pulitzer, all of which were about disproven aspects of Russiagate unrelated to Christopher Steele. They discuss the framing of Michael Flynn, the fictional calls between Trump officials and Russian intelligence, the conflation of bots posting memes with the bombing of Pearl Harbor and more.  Discussed on the show: “Five Trump-Russia 'Collusion' Corrections We Need From the Media Now -- Just for Starters” (Real Clear Investigations) Aaron Maté is an NYC-based journalist and producer. He hosts the news show Pushback for The Grayzone, and writes regularly for The Nation. Subscribe to his Substack and follow him on Twitter @AaronJMate. This episode of the Scott Horton Show is sponsored by: The War State and Why The Vietnam War?, by Mike Swanson; Tom Woods' Liberty Classroom; ExpandDesigns.com/Scott; EasyShip; Free Range Feeder; Thc Hemp Spot; Green Mill Supercritical; Bug-A-Salt; Lorenzotti Coffee and Listen and Think Audio. Shop Libertarian Institute merch or donate to the show through Patreon, PayPal or Bitcoin: 1DZBZNJrxUhQhEzgDh7k8JXHXRjYu5tZiG.

The Libertarian Institute - All Podcasts
11/24/21 Aaron Maté on the Award-Winning Lies Still Propping up Russiagate

The Libertarian Institute - All Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 31:19


On Antiwar Radio this Sunday, Scott was joined by Aaron Maté to discuss an article he wrote for Real Clear Investigations. Amidst the collapse of the Steele dossier, Maté wrote about five articles that either won the Pulitzer prize or were written by journalists who had won a Pulitzer, all of which were about disproven aspects of Russiagate unrelated to Christopher Steele. They discuss the framing of Michael Flynn, the fictional calls between Trump officials and Russian intelligence, the conflation of bots posting memes with the bombing of Pearl Harbor and more.  Discussed on the show: “Five Trump-Russia 'Collusion' Corrections We Need From the Media Now -- Just for Starters” (Real Clear Investigations) Aaron Maté is an NYC-based journalist and producer. He hosts the news show Pushback for The Grayzone, and writes regularly for The Nation. Subscribe to his Substack and follow him on Twitter @AaronJMate. This episode of the Scott Horton Show is sponsored by: The War State and Why The Vietnam War?, by Mike Swanson; Tom Woods' Liberty Classroom; ExpandDesigns.com/Scott; EasyShip; Free Range Feeder; Thc Hemp Spot; Green Mill Supercritical; Bug-A-Salt; Lorenzotti Coffee and Listen and Think Audio. Shop Libertarian Institute merch or donate to the show through Patreon, PayPal or Bitcoin: 1DZBZNJrxUhQhEzgDh7k8JXHXRjYu5tZiG.

The Chase Jarvis LIVE Show
Unleash Your Voice with John Grisham

The Chase Jarvis LIVE Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 33:48


Writing is a skillful art. But it's not as flashy as playing a musical instrument or sand-painting. One reason for this is that we've all been taught how to write in school.  So, when we think about writing a novel — and you have thought about it if you're an avid reader — we expect it to be easy. But it's not. Unlike other art forms, you cannot teach writing.  If you have ever given writing a shot, the first hurdle you bump into it is finding your niche. Who are you writing for? Once you figure that out and write your first draft, a bigger hurdle arises: How are you going to get published? John Grisham jumped both hurdles over 30 years ago. Since then, he's become a household name with 28 consecutive number one fiction bestsellers. But he wasn't a hotshot from the get-go. During his childhood, the world didn't have much in terms of technological entertainment. All John Grisham's household had was a radio they used to tune into the St. Louis Cardinals games. So, he and his family members amused themselves with an ancient form of entertainment: storytelling.  Fast forward to adulthood, after getting sick of criminal defense and personal injury litigation, John polished off his storytelling chops and started writing. During one of the trials at the DeSoto County courthouse, he witnessed a gut-wrenching testimony of a twelve-year-old rape victim. He pondered the thought of what would have happened if the girl's father had murdered her assailants.  And that's how Grisham found his niche with his first book, A Time To Kill; he combined his knowledge of the American legal system and the art of storytelling the novel, and many more since.  To pursue his newly-found purpose, he woke up at 5 am to write before heading off to his 60-to-70-hour-per-week job. It took him three years, the support of his wife, and his desire to say “I wrote a book” to finish his first novel.  Then his second hurdle hit. Rejection letters piled up, which surprisingly, gave him hope. He thought he wasn't good enough, but his wife came up with a solution. And it worked.  Since then, Grisham has written 46 books in total, including his breakout hit The Firm and other movie adaptations such as The Client, The Pelican Brief, and The Chamber. In today's episode, John Grisham joins Kelly Corrigan to talk about his creative writing process, addressing controversial and difficult topics through fiction, and how seeing the work of others can be demotivating. He also gives his own strategy that got his first book published.  Highlights from the conversation: How Grisham learned to craft compelling story plots Why should you always have an adaptable creative process? The role his wife played in his success as a writer Topics and themes Grisham would like to explore further and write books about Enjoy! --- Today's episode is brought to you by CreativeLive. CreativeLive is the world's largest hub for online creative education in photo/video, art/design, music/audio, craft/maker and the ability to make a living in any of those disciplines. They are high quality, highly curated classes taught by the world's top experts -- Pulitzer, Oscar, Grammy Award winners, New York Times best selling authors and the best entrepreneurs of our times.

The Chase Jarvis LIVE Show
Gary Varynerchuk: What's the Big Deal About Emotional Intelligence?

The Chase Jarvis LIVE Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 40:00


How many times have you heard about people going home to cry after a tough day at work? Perhaps you've seen your parents carry home the stress of work life because they couldn't release it in the business world.  We all know that feelings are signs of weakness that have no place in the business world, right?  Today I speak to serial entrepreneur, investor, and author Gary Vaynerchuk about the often undervalued and misunderstood importance of emotional intelligence. After publishing five New York Times bestselling books, scaling his media company to enviable heights, and even pulling in a cool million over at Christies auction, he has a unique understanding of the business world.  In this episode, Gary shares how he's busy taking the “teeth” out of business with “kind candor.” He explains that you don't have to choose between being nice, supportive, and empathetic to others and chasing your dreams with intense ambition.  Gary's new book, Twelve and a Half: Leveraging the Emotional Ingredients Necessary for Business Success, is available right now. Pick up a copy to see how the 12.5 ingredients of emotional intelligence can transform your career and perhaps your personal life as well.  A few more highlights from our conversation:  Emotional intelligence and authenticity are more important in business than most realize.  You don't have to choose between candor and empathy or ambition and patience.  If you leave your feelings out of business, you're missing out on the biggest tool for success.  Enjoy! Have a question? Text me 1-206-309-5177
 Tweet me @chasejarvis --- Today's episode is brought to you by CreativeLive. CreativeLive is the world's largest hub for online creative education in photo/video, art/design, music/audio, craft/maker and the ability to make a living in any of those disciplines. They are high quality, highly curated classes taught by the world's top experts -- Pulitzer, Oscar, Grammy Award winners, New York Times best selling authors and the best entrepreneurs of our times.

Cinco continentes
Cinco Continentes - ¿Cómo se destapa un escándalo periodístico de proporciones mayúsculas?

Cinco continentes

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 20:17


Charlamos con Marcos García Rey, co-ganador de un Pulitzer por destapar los Papeles de Panamá, y Antonio Baquero, Premio Rey de España de Periodismo, sobre el trabajo del periodista de investigación. Escuchar audio

Cinco continentes
Cinco Continentes - Disturbios por las restricciones en Guadalupe y Martinica

Cinco continentes

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 37:58


Hablamos de las nuevas medidas anunciadas por la Comisión Europea contra Bielorrusia. Charlamos con el analista Nicolás de Pedro sobre Rusia y sus intentos por situarse en un nuevo orden internacional. Con Antonio Delgado nos fijamos en los incidentes registrados en dos territorios de ultramar franceses, Guadalupe y Martinica, en protesta por las restricciones por el covid-19, pero también como respuesta a otros problemas sociales y económicos más enquistados. También charlaremos sobre el periodismo de investigación con dos reporteros premiados por su trabajo: Marcos García Rey, co-ganador de un Pulitzer por destapar los Papeles de Panamá, y Antonio Baquero, Premio Rey de España de Periodismo. Escuchar audio

The Chase Jarvis LIVE Show
How to Use Stress to Your Advantage

The Chase Jarvis LIVE Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 22:27


You may well be aware that the classic idea of stress — or at least the popular opinion of it — is that it's restraining. However, stress can also have a positive impact- this is eustress. In today's micro show we're going to explore how to use stress to your advantage. Eustress is what puts you on the spot to tackle necessary situations you would otherwise choose to keep away from. It helps you overcome inhibition, face fear, and leverage opportunities. So if you're someone who is willing to make a move only when you feel "perfectly" ready, a little bit of internal chaos could push you to finally start doing what you want to in life. Stress is more valuable with with consistent self-reflection. Pause, reflect, and take some time to analyze what you learned through pushing your limits- what are those raw ingredients that created your unique life experiences?  According to Dr. Robert Sapolsky, the optimal amount of stress is stimulation. And for you to get to that point requires an honest evaluation of your present. A little bit more pain might really aid in your overall growth. In today's episode, I get into how you can add 25% more discomfort into your life to gradually develop the 'stress' muscle. Quick points to note: You could choose to intentionally add a little bit of stress into your life to avoid being caught off-guard in situations. This way, you're preparing in slow steps and also steering clear of distress. Cultivate relationships in two different vectors -- with people ahead of you and behind you in the journey. Cold exposure (or cold baths) are a good way of training yourself to be comfortable around the uncomfortable. It also strengthens your internal systems. Build up your capacity for stress in small steps. Enjoy! --- Today's episode is brought to you by CreativeLive. CreativeLive is the world's largest hub for online creative education in photo/video, art/design, music/audio, craft/maker and the ability to make a living in any of those disciplines. They are high quality, highly curated classes taught by the world's top experts -- Pulitzer, Oscar, Grammy Award winners, New York Times best selling authors and the best entrepreneurs of our times.

Midrats
Episode 609: The Fat Leonard Podcast with Tom Wright

Midrats

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 66:02


If you are even remotely connected to the US Navy you have directly or indirectly been impacted by the "Fat Leonard" scandal. A husbanding agent who used every tool in a very old book - greed, sex, power, influence, and envy - managed to have have naval officers and high ranking law enforcement officers become party to his drive for wealth and influence.One of the best places to find the details of the scandal and to hear from Leonard Glenn Frances himself, is in "The Fat Leonard Podcast."Our guest today will be the podcast's creator, Tom Wright, the coauthor of Billion Dollar Whale and the cofounder of Project Brazen, a journalism-focused production studio. Tom worked for the Wall Street Journal for over twenty years. He's a Pulitzer finalist and has won numerous journalism awards, including the Gerald Loeb award for international reporting. In 2020, Stanford University honored Tom with its Shorenstein award in recognition of his services to journalism in Asia.

DeScripted
Ep 19 - August: Osage County by Tracy Letts [2008 Winner]

DeScripted

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2021 29:31


Note: This episode contains explicit language.In this episode, Randy and Tyler discuss the 2008 Pulitzer Prizewinning Play, August: Osage County, by Tracy LettsSynopsis from StageAgent.com: August: Osage County centers around the Weston family, brought together after their patriarch, world-class poet and alcoholic Beverly Weston, disappears. The matriarch, Violet, depressed and addicted to pain pills and “truth-telling,” is joined by her three daughters and their problematic lovers, who harbor their own deep secrets, her sister Mattie Fae and her family, well-trained in the Weston family art of cruelty, and finally, the observer of the chaos, the young Cheyenne housekeeper Johnna, who was hired by Beverly just before his disappearance. Holed up in the large family estate in Osage County, Oklahoma, tensions heat up and boil over in the ruthless August heat. Bursting with humor, vivacity, and intelligence, August: Osage County is both dense and funny, vicious and compassionate, enormous and unstoppable.Photos of Penobscot Theatre Company's production of August: Osage County: https://www.facebook.com/penobscotthea trecompany/posts/10153305557141202This episode uses these sounds from freesound.org: "Cartoony Clangs (hit with spade)_2.wav" by Timbre licensed under CCBYNC 3.0******* IN OUR NEXT EPISODE *******Join us as we discuss the 1929 winner of the Pulitzer Prize for Drama, Street Scene by Elmer L. Rice.From Stageagent.com: The claustrophobic reality of living in a six-story walk-up in the Lower East Side of Manhattan is the focus of Elmer Rice's Street Scene. With the neighbors all knowing everyone's business, and constantly passing judgement on everyone's behavior, it is easy to see how this melting pot can quickly become dangerous.On two scorching hot days in June 1929, the pot finally boils over for Frank Maurrant. The rumors about his wife having an affair have become too loud and too persistent for him to ignore. How many times does he have to lay down the law in his own home before it is followed? To make matters worse, that guy keeps turning up and talking to his wife in full view of everyone. It's enough to turn anyone to drinking. When he returns home to find the curtains drawn mid-morning, he knows exactly what is going on. In a fit of fury and emotion, Frank carries out his threat and kills them both.Street Scene is a huge piece with themes of immigration, racism, domestic violence, sexual assault, murder, social status, youth culture, and poverty, which won the Pulitzer prize for Drama in 1929.DeScriptedFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/DeScriptedPodTwitter: @DeScriptedPod - www.twitter.com/DeScriptedPodInstagram: @DeScriptedPod - www.instagram.com/DeScriptedPod

Sunday Sitdown with Willie Geist
Lin-Manuel Miranda

Sunday Sitdown with Willie Geist

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2021 56:55


In 2008, Lin-Manuel Miranda read Ron Chernow's biography of Alexander Hamilton while on vacation and began envisioning something no one else could have seen – a hip-hop musical about America's Founding Fathers. In this week's Sunday Sitdown, Willie Geist gets together with the Tony, Emmy and Pulitzer-winning star to talk about creating the Broadway phenomenon Hamilton and his latest act as a film director. 

The Chase Jarvis LIVE Show
Malcolm Gladwell: The Art of Self-Reinvention

The Chase Jarvis LIVE Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 63:44


Longevity and mastery over any creative profession require relentless passion, conscious steps to continually reinvent your swing, and a seriousness of purpose, which results from profound self-reflection and introspection.  World-renowned journalist and writer Malcolm Gladwell joins me to dig deep into building an everlasting career as a creative and what it takes to pursue it.  Malcolm is the author of five New York Times bestsellers — The Tipping Point, Blink, Outliers, What the Dog Saw, and David and Goliath: Underdogs, Misfits and the Art of Battling Giants and the Founder of Pushkin Industries, which explore all forms of audio art. He also hosts the Revisionist History podcast, which re-examines events, ideas, people, and objects from our past—and explains how they create our present. In his upcoming intimate audio biography titled Miracle and Wonder, Malcolm collaborates with the legendary songwriter Paul Simon to explore lessons from the artist's life and career. Recorded over a series of 30 hours of conversation with Simon and the Broken Record podcast co-host Bruce Headlam, the audiobook reflects Simon's inimitably gifted artistic bent and what it took for him to tap into it.  Here are some things you'll discover in this episode: How to build the confidence to construct your intellectual life the way you want to  How to overcome the “professed” to make way for the “practical.” Why creativity and craft knows no physical or geographical boundaries Why you need to be constantly evolving to build an evergreen career Why relentless perfectionism is key to creating intentional content Why you need to archive your experiences and lessons from the past to be inimitable at your craft The timeless worth of self-reflection: how to develop the willingness to be reflective about your life experiences  Why you need to connect with your work on a more-than-objective level Enjoy! Have a question? Text me 1-206-309-5177
 Tweet me @chasejarvis --- Today's episode is brought to you by CreativeLive. CreativeLive is the world's largest hub for online creative education in photo/video, art/design, music/audio, craft/maker and the ability to make a living in any of those disciplines. They are high quality, highly curated classes taught by the world's top experts -- Pulitzer, Oscar, Grammy Award winners, New York Times best selling authors and the best entrepreneurs of our times.

THE PETA PODCAST
Ep. 198: Wash. Post Rides-Along To Watch PETA Save Animals

THE PETA PODCAST

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 35:56


The Washington Post sent two Pulitzer winners, writer Gene Weingarten, and photographer Michael Williamson, to PETA's Virginia headquarters to find out why people are so cruel to their dogs. The pair shadowed Daphna Nachminovich, PETA Sr. VP, on her rounds saving chained or abandoned animals around the Norfolk tri-state area. A conversation on how the story evolved between Nachminovich and Guillermo.

Boston Public Radio Podcast
BPR Full Show: Michelle Wu is ready to get to work

Boston Public Radio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 170:02


Today on Boston Public Radio: We begin the show by asking listeners their reactions to the latest slew of racist incidents at local schools. Trenni Kusnierek discusses New York Marathon runners coming to the aid of a competitor who had a heart attack during the race, and family members meddling in the lives of professional athletes. Kusnierek is an anchor and reporter for NBC Sports Boston, as well as a Boston Public Radio contributor. Then, we broadcast the live swearing in of Boston's newest mayor Michelle Wu, and ask listeners for their reactions to history in the making, as Wu becomes the first woman and first person of color elected as mayor of the city. Farah Stockman talks about how class divides manifest themselves culturally and politically in the United States, and why higher class, well educated communities struggle to understand and represent the majority of Americans. Farah Stockman is a member of the New York Times editorial board, and a Pulitzer prize winning reporter. Her latest book is “American Made: What Happens to People When Work Disappears.” John King updates listeners on the latest political headlines, including why Republicans have an advantage moving into midterm elections following the latest wave of gerrymandering, and what it means for Democrats. King is CNN's chief national correspondent and anchor of “Inside Politics,” which airs weekdays at noon and Sundays at 8 a.m. We end the show by continuing our conversation about Wu and what her election means for Boston.

The Chase Jarvis LIVE Show
Dealing with Impostor Syndrome

The Chase Jarvis LIVE Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 17:39


Operating at the edge of your ability means at times you will inevitably feel like an impostor. It's a universal experience that complete beginners to seasoned experts share. To take it one step further, I would argue that impostor syndrome is a critical ingredient to the formula of mastery; self-awareness and an accurate understanding of one's skills foster growth, while too much self-doubt can be restraining and counter-productive. In today's episode I field two audience questions on the Daily Creative YouTube show. In the first question we get into dealing with impostor syndrome. I share some tactics and mindset tricks that will help cope with this. Second, we talk about leveraging unique opportunities into professional growth. What should you do once you have a foot in the door? Especially in a competitive space like the music industry, it's important to think strategically and creatively about how to parlay the opportunity into the next steps in your career. If you have questions or comments, the best way to get a hold of me is by text: (206)-309-5177. I'm looking forward to taking more of these in the future. If this episode provided value or helped you unlock something that's been holding you back, shout me out on the socials. Until then, have a great day and keep creating. Have a question? Shoot me a text at 1-206-309-5177. Enjoy! --- Today's episode is brought to you by CreativeLive. CreativeLive is the world's largest hub for online creative education in photo/video, art/design, music/audio, craft/maker and the ability to make a living in any of those disciplines. They are high quality, highly curated classes taught by the world's top experts -- Pulitzer, Oscar, Grammy Award winners, New York Times best selling authors and the best entrepreneurs of our times.

... Just To Be Nominated
New Release Picks: Red Notice, tick, tick...BOOM!, and Pulitzer Prize winning journalist Art Cullen!

... Just To Be Nominated

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 68:23


This week saw the release of a handful of interesting movies, including tick tick boom!, the new Jonathan Larsen biopic starring Andrew Garfield directed by Lin Manuel Miranda, which is in theaters for a week before coming to Netflix late next week, Red Notice, a big budget action heist type thing starring the Rock, Ryan Reynolds, and Gal Gadot, which premiered on Netflix today, and Home Sweet Home Alone which does exactly what it says on the tin and can be found on Disney Plus. For our Staff Picks we decided to highlight movies set in newsrooms that were about print media. Why? Well, there's a new documentary premiering on PBS this coming Monday, called Storm Lake, about small-town Iowa newspaper the Storm Lake Times, and we're pretty excited to share an interview our own Bruce Miller did recently with Storm Lake's Pulitzer Prize winning editor Art Cullen. Storm Lake, directed by Jerry Risius and Beth Levison, premieres Monday Nov. 15 on PBS at 10/9c. Check your local listings. More information here: https://www.pbs.org/independentlens/documentaries/storm-lake/ Below is our roundup of the movies we talk about, along with links to where you can stream them. All the President's Men Between the Lines Bruised His Girl Friday Home Sweet Home Alone The Post Red Notice tick, tick...BOOM! Zodiac Just to be Nominated is hosted and produced by Chris Lay, the podcast operations manager for Lee, along with Bruce Miller, the editor of the Sioux City Journal, and Jared McNett, a reporter for the Sioux City Journal. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Maid of Steel: A Supergirl Podcast
MOS 159 - S6E19 & S6E20 - The Last Gauntlet & Kara, Part 1

Maid of Steel: A Supergirl Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 127:03


The fight for the totems has taken a desperate turn.  Supergirl and her team have five totems however Lex and Nyxly have stolen the most precious of them all.  The love totem has fused itself with Alex and Kelly's young daughter Esme.  In true Lex fashion, he gives the Superfriends an ultimatum. They must give him the five totems they possess and the destiny totem then he will return Esme. The love totem is different from the others.   Not only did it fuse with a living being, but each time it is activated some of the petals from the flower tattoo on the little girl's neck fall. Nyxly predicts that if all petals are allowed to fall then the totem will find a new host and will be lost to them. Lex and Nyxly disagree on how to separate the totem from Esme. Lex does not care if the little girl is hurt in the process. Lex thinks he is so clever, but we are shown a different side of Nyxly. She wants to possess the totem, but she doesn't want Esme to come to any harm. Nyxly also wants to obtain the totem honestly by passing the love gauntlet. In making this choice the gauntlet is achieved and the love totem judges Nyxly worthy of possessing it. Meanwhile Alex and Kara are disagreeing on how to rescue Esme and keep the world safe. Alex wants to meet the ransom demands and take out Lex with her bare hands. Kara is worried about surrendering that much power to the enemy.   If Nyxly and Lex can unite the totems to create the All Stone, Supergirl is concerned they will be unstoppable.  She heads to Prague in pursuit of the destiny totem.  This magical item shows Kara a possible destiny that she cannot allow to happen.   If Nyxly and Lex wield the power of all the totems combined into the All Stone then they will destroy this planet and enslave its people. They must make a plan, so this future does not become a reality. Brainy has an idea to use a satellite to concentrate sunlight to super charge Supergirl. Alex just wants to take the totems and exchange them for her daughter. The sisters go their separate ways to try to achieve victory. In the final moments of absorbing the extra sunlight Kara has second thoughts.  The people she wants to help are scared and running away. This can't be the right decision. Through the power of Brainy's legion crown and a little magic from Lena, Supergirl is able to deliver one last hope speech to everyone all at once. This mobilizes the citizens of National City to be the heroes in their own life. As a result of that speech there are many people to back up our Superfriends.  The heroes won the day and evil has been defeated.  Now it is time for the happily ever after. However, our paragon of hope is still conflicted. In the quiet moments following Alex and Kelly's wedding Kara gets an unexpected phone call. Cat Grant has bought Catco back and wants Kara to be her Editor in Chief.  Can she find the balance in her life? Can she be both?  After some encouragement from Alex and prodding that only Ms. Grant could provide Kara has made a decision. She does have the courage to do both and she will tell the world. She is Kara Danvers, Pulitzer winning reporter and Supergirl.  Kara reveals to the world she is our beloved Maid of Steel.

Midday
Fighting the Blight: Nneka N'namdi on reclaiming city neighborhoods

Midday

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 23:27


Today on Midday, a few different takes on the subject of housing. A little later, WYPR's Aaron Henkin, the host of WYPR's new podcast The Maryland Curiosity Bureau, will join me to talk about his reporting on the Baltimore dollar house program.Then, our theater critic, J Wynn Rousuck, will review a production of Rent, the Tony Award and Pulitzer prize-winning musical that opened on Broadway 25 years ago. But we begin with Nneka N'namdi, an activist who is working to eliminate blighted housing in our city. The Dollar House program in the 1970s was seen as a big step forward. The Vacants to Value initiative in the administration of Mayor Stephanie Rawlings Blake made some progress, but the number of vacant properties, about 16,000, hasn't changed significantly over the last decade. Nneka N'namdi describes herself as a “technoartivist,” who is applying her tech and creative skills to the cause of restoring neighborhoods that are ravaged by blight. She is the founder of the non-profit, Fight Blight BMore. Nneka N'namdi joins us on Zoom… See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

This Is the Author
S6 E79: Farah Stockman, Mark Oppenheimer, and Nigel Poor and Earlonne Woods

This Is the Author

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 15:29


S6 E79: In this episode, meet journalist Farah Stockman, journalist Mark Oppenheimer, and co-hosts of the This Is Ear Hustle podcast, Nigel Poor and Earlonne Woods. Listen in as these authors share insights into their writing and audiobook recording processes: Farah Stockman on the role work plays in our sense of identity and belonging, Mark Oppenheimer on how one of America's renowned Jewish neighborhoods responded in the wake of unspeakable tragedy, and Nigel Poor and Earlonne Woods on creating a book about their Peabody- and Pulitzer-nominated podcast featuring currently and formerly incarcerated people, This Is Ear Hustle. American Made by Farah Stockman: https://www.penguinrandomhouseaudio.com/book/591675/american-made/ Squirrel Hill by Mark Oppenheimer: https://www.penguinrandomhouseaudio.com/book/611023/squirrel-hill/ This Is Ear Hustle by Nigel Poor and Earlonne Woods: https://www.penguinrandomhouseaudio.com/book/669134/this-is-ear-hustle/

The Chase Jarvis LIVE Show
Truth Telling and Self-Mercy with Elizabeth Gilbert

The Chase Jarvis LIVE Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 61:59


“How many people do you know who are truly free?” Elizabeth Gilbert posed this question to me 2 years ago during our conversation to promote her book, City of Girls. The question, and the episode, have stayed with me.  I know very few truth tellers like Liz. Tied to anxiety and fear, work and stress, we put on faces to hide our true selves, people-please and value others' priorities above our own. Liz talks openly about how she is breaking this mold and focusing on taking care of her mental health before beginning to help others. As we take this time to reflect on the year, now is the time to ask yourself if you are living truthfully. Are you honest with yourself? Are you vulnerable? Do you have mercy for yourself? How do you take these aspirations into 2022 with you and learn to live truly free? Enjoy! Have a question? Text me 1-206-309-5177
 Tweet me @chasejarvis --- Today's episode is brought to you by CreativeLive. CreativeLive is the world's largest hub for online creative education in photo/video, art/design, music/audio, craft/maker and the ability to make a living in any of those disciplines. They are high quality, highly curated classes taught by the world's top experts -- Pulitzer, Oscar, Grammy Award winners, New York Times best selling authors and the best entrepreneurs of our times.

Zeitsprung
GAG320: In 72 Tagen um die Welt – Journalistin Nellie Bly

Zeitsprung

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 46:32


Am 14. November 1889 bricht Nellie Bly zu einer außergewöhnlichen Reise auf: Die Starreporterin der „New York World“, einer der wichtigsten Zeitungen in den USA, versucht in weniger als 80 Tagen um die Welt zu reisen. Wir sprechen darüber, wie ihr das gelingt und wie sie durch einen Leserbrief zur Journalistin geworden ist. Durch ihre investigativen Recherchen ist Nellie Bly heute eine Ikone des Enthüllungsjournalismus, die später auch als Kriegsreporterin vom Ersten Weltkrieg berichtet hat. **AUS UNSERER WERBUNG** Du möchtest mehr über unsere Werbepartner erfahren? [**Hier findest du alle Infos & Rabatte!**](https://linktr.ee/GeschichtenausderGeschichte) **NEU: Wer unsere Folgen lieber ohne Werbung anhören will, kann das über eine kleine Unterstützung auf [Steady](https://steadyhq.com/geschichtefm) tun.** **Wir freuen uns, wenn ihr den Podcast bei [Apple Podcasts](https://podcasts.apple.com/de/podcast/geschichten-aus-der-geschichte/id1044844618) rezensiert oder bewertet. Für alle jene, die kein iTunes verwenden, gibt's die Podcastplattform [Panoptikum](http://panoptikum.io/), auch dort könnt ihr [uns](https://panoptikum.io/podcasts/84) empfehlen, bewerten aber auch euer ganz eigenes PodcasthörerInnenprofil erstellen.** **Wir freuen uns auch immer, wenn ihr euren Freundinnen und Freunden, Kolleginnen und Kollegen oder sogar Nachbarinnen und Nachbarn von uns erzählt!**

Now What? With Carole Zimmer
A Conversation With Lawrence Wright

Now What? With Carole Zimmer

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 45:21


He's a staff writer for the New Yorker and a Pulitzer-prize winner for his book The Looming Tower. Lawrence Wright also wrote an expose of Scientology called Going Clear. His latest book, The Plague Year, looks at pandemics and how long we all may have to live with Covid-19. But when Wright isn't thinking about big subjects, he sings and plays keyboard in a band called WhoDo in his hometown of Austin, Texas.  “Now What?” is produced with the help of Steve Zimmer, Annika Hoiem and Alex Wolfe. Audio production is by Nick CIavatta.  

Thresholds
Gregory Pardlo

Thresholds

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 38:00


Jordan is joined by Pulitzer-winning poet and memoirist Gregory Pardlo — currently teaching at NYU in Abu Dhabi — to talk about sobriety, understanding the stories of one's life, and answering the self-imposed question “What god are you serving, Pardlo, when you write X?” Gregory Pardlo was born in Philadelphia in 1968. He is the author of Air Traffic (Knopf, 2018), a memoir in essays, and the poetry collections Digest (Four Way Books, 2014), which received the 2015 Pulitzer Prize in Poetry and was shortlisted for the 2015 NAACP Image Award, and Totem (American Poetry Review), which was selected by Brenda Hillman for the American Poetry Review/Honickman Prize in 2007. He is the recipient of fellowships from the Guggenheim Foundation, the National Endowment for the Arts, and the New York Foundation for the Arts, among others. He is the poetry editor of Virginia Quarterly Review and is currently teaching at NYU in Abu Dhabi. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Intelligence Squared
How Power Changes Us, with Brian Klaas

Intelligence Squared

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 47:51


Does power corrupt, or are corrupt people drawn to power? It's a question that runs through the heart of the work of Brian Klaas, professor of global politics at University College London and Washington Post columnist. His latest book is 'Corruptible: Who Gets Power and How It Changes Us', which looks at the psychology behind those who seek power. Pulitzer-prize winning historian and journalist Anne Applebaum speaks with Brian about what the book reveals. Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/intelligencesquared. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Singularity University Radio
FBL33 - Elizabeth Kolbert: Navigating the Impacts of Climate Change

Singularity University Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 32:54


This week our guest is journalist and author Elizabeth Kolbert whose work focuses heavily on climate change. Her books on the subject include Field Notes From A Catastrophe, The 6th Extinction (which won a Pulitzer prize), and her most recent 2021 book: Under A White Sky. In this episode, we explore the content and ideas that Elizabeth puts forth in these books, with a particular focus on what kind of changes climate change is causing to the world and the ways in which humanity has been responding--for better or worse. Find out more about Elizabeth on her website (ElizabethKolbert.com) or on Twitter at twitter.com/elizkolbert ** Host: Steven Parton - LinkedIn / Twitter Music by: Amine el Filali

The Chase Jarvis LIVE Show
So, You're a Weirdo

The Chase Jarvis LIVE Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 17:56


We're part of a society that constantly pulls us down into the collective no matter how high we want to fly -- only so that we cultivate a more agreeable (or amenable) behavior, mend our "weird" ways, and reduce ourselves to the average of the majority. But as I would ask (and I'm sure you would, too), is it really possible to average out things that we cannot even measure? Do you think we're programmed to be part of a randomly picked "data set"? That's why in this episode, I get into the importance of being authentically YOU. As the legendary novelist, poet, and literary critic James Joyce once said, "In the particular is contained the universal." YOU matter, and so do your opinions, thoughts, values, and aspirations. So if you're a "weirdo" or think you don't fit in the lot, then know that it's a gift you and I share in common. Learn to use it to your advantage. Design your world to your taste and be willing to be misunderstood. A few points to note from the episode: [14:18] You must actively take a role in being unapologetically you. [16:37] Be willing to be misunderstood [19:04] Be true to yourself [19:12] Know your unique gifts AND your weakness to know where you are and how you could get to where you want to be. Have a question? Shoot me a text at 1-206-309-5177. Enjoy! --- Today's episode is brought to you by CreativeLive. CreativeLive is the world's largest hub for online creative education in photo/video, art/design, music/audio, craft/maker and the ability to make a living in any of those disciplines. They are high quality, highly curated classes taught by the world's top experts -- Pulitzer, Oscar, Grammy Award winners, New York Times best selling authors and the best entrepreneurs of our times.

Monocle 24: Meet the Writers

Georgina Godwin meets Richard Powers, an acclaimed writer with an array of awards under his belt – including a Pulitzer prize for fiction. While at university, he switched from majoring in physics to English literature but science has remained a central part of his writing. His new novel ‘Bewilderment' was shortlisted for this year's Booker Prize. It uses fiction to explore urgent questions of how we treat the environment and just how close we might be to the edge.

Reality Life with Kate Casey
Ep. - 408 - ERIKA GIRARDI REUNION FINALE WITH LOS ANGELES TIMES REPORTERS FORMER POLYGAMIST WIFE DISCUSSES SISTER WIVES DIVORCE

Reality Life with Kate Casey

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 68:17


Pulitzer prize winning Los Angeles Times journalists Harriet Ryan and Matt Hamilton have been covering the case of the unraveling of Tom Girardi's legal career, his firm, and his marriage to Real Housewives of Beverly Hills star Erika Girardi. They discuss the last part of the Real Housewives of Beverly Hills reunion, what they wished the show covered, and becoming central to the plot of this season. Author Kristyn Decker discusses Christine Brown from TLC's Sister Wives announcement this week that she is leaving husband Kody. Kristyn is Author of Fifty Years in Polygamy: Big Secrets and Little White Lies.Reality Life with Kate CaseyPatreon: http://www.patreon.com/katecaseyCameo: https://cameo.com/katecaseyTwitter: https://twitter.com/katecaseyInstagram: http://www.instagram.com/katecaseycaTik Tok: http://www.tiktok.com/itskatecaseyClubhouse: @katecasey Facebook Group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/113157919338245Amazon.com: www.amazon.com/shop/katecaseySee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Conflict Radio
Episode 140 Philosophy of the Paranormal with Dr. Terje Simonsen

Conflict Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 101:55


Terje G. Simonsen is a Norwegian Historian of Ideas and non-fiction author, specializing in the esoteric and occult. He is educated at the University of Oslo, where he also has taught introductory courses on philosophical and literary works. His dissertation on the anthroposophical journal Janus received much acclaim and was released as a book in 2001. In the prestigious series The Cultural Library and The World's Holy Scriptures, Simonsen has published essays on I and Thou, the mystically inspired main work by the dialogue philosopher Martin Buber, and The First Book of Enoch, an esoteric text from antiquity. Simonsen has received several grants, and is a full member of ESSWE, the European Society for the Study of Western Esotericism.In addition, Simonsen is educated in gestalt therapy and psychosynthesis, and his varied career has also included stints in psychiatry, kindergarten, museums, security, catering etc. Today he works as a freelance writer. Simonsen is also a café aficionado, salsa dancer, amateur pianist and chess player.Since childhood Simonsen has been fascinated by ‘magical' phenomena as telepathy, clairvoyance, precognition, and healing—an interest based on some peculiar experiences of his own as well as strange stories told by friends and family. Later, this fascination led to extensive forays into esoteric and occult traditions, where such phenomena are not seen as chimera but as part of an expanded consciousness, and also into the science about such phenomena, i.e. parapsychology. The result is the present book, an entertaining, colorful and multifaceted good read, endorsed by several of the world's foremost experts in the field – Dean Radin, Stanley Krippner, Jeffrey Mishlove, Jeffrey Kripal etc. - as well as a number of other authors and critics, as e.g. the Pulitzer-prize winner Teresa Carpenter and the New York Times bestselling fantasy-author Herbie Brennan.The book on the paranormal, endorsed by consciousness experts as the best introduction to psychic phenomena, offering the latest scientific research as well as highly compelling anecdotes.A Short History of (Nearly) Everything Paranormal: Our Secret Powers: Telepathy, Clairvoyance and Precognitionhttps://www.amazon.com/Terje-Simonsen/e/B079K5RJPPhttps://www.facebook.com/terje.simonsen.9Join this channel to get access to perks:https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCHzWqM_Xm-EgRfwt2cbBAHQ/joinConflict Radio - Discord Linkhttps://discord.com/invite/MykTtkvDRMConflict Radio - Episode 140 Philosophy of the Paranormal with Dr. Terje Simonsenhttps://conflictradio.net/

The Chip Franklin Show
November 3, 2021: Chip Franklin - David Cay Johnston on the races for governor

The Chip Franklin Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 19:45


Pulitzer prize winning journalist David Cay Johnston joins the program to give his thoughts on January 6th and the incredible races playing out for governor in Virginia and New Jersey See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Chase Jarvis LIVE Show
Tim Ferriss: Seriousness is Kryptonite to Creativity

The Chase Jarvis LIVE Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 100:43


This week, I'm revisiting one of my favorite conversations with my good friend Tim Ferriss. For those of you who don't already know, Tim is an entrepreneur, angel investor, author of 3 New York Times Best Sellers, and host of “The Tim Ferriss Show,” a podcast that receives millions of downloads each week. Tim is widely considered a human guinea pig and has self-experimented his way through unfamiliar territory time and time again. He has a keen ability to simplify complicated systems into tangible, actionable steps showing us we truly can learn and do anything. In this week's episode, Tim and I discuss the importance of rigging the game of life in your favor. The feeling of winning is a precursor to winning on a large scale. So how can we give ourselves more of that feeling?  We also get into: The compound effect of positive actions Setting realistic goals. Tim's rule for writing is 2 crappy pages a day. Viewing that negative, nagging voice as an annoying roommate, one that you definitely do not have to listen to. Transcendental meditation, and how a medication practice can quiet that negative internal dialogue Positive constraints; learning to do more with less, so you'll know how to do more with more. And much more. Enjoy! Have a question? Text me 1-206-309-5177
 Tweet me @chasejarvis --- Today's episode is brought to you by CreativeLive. CreativeLive is the world's largest hub for online creative education in photo/video, art/design, music/audio, craft/maker and the ability to make a living in any of those disciplines. They are high quality, highly curated classes taught by the world's top experts -- Pulitzer, Oscar, Grammy Award winners, New York Times best selling authors and the best entrepreneurs of our times.

I Survived Theatre School
Chisa Hutchinson

I Survived Theatre School

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 93:21


Intro: Boz is in the clear!Let Me Run This By You: secrets, scorched earthInterview: We talk to Chisa Hutchinson about her new film The Subject, Vassar, being a high school English teacher, NYU Tisch,  The Lark Play Development Center, New Dramatists, having a sleepover with Tina Howe, She Like Girls, Amerikin at the Alley Theatre, NYT reviews, 101 Reasons Not to Breed, Bad Art Friend, Haagen-Dazs, The Evansville Regional Airport, Three Women on Showtime, Lisa Taddeo, Playwrights as Screenwriters, Marsha Norman, Lynn Nottage, Tony Gerber, Richard Wesley, Stephanie Allain, Di Glazer, having an intentional career.COMPLETE TRANSCRIPT:Jen Bosworth-Ramirez (8s):And Jen BosworthGina Pulice (10s):and I'm Gina .Jen Bosworth-Ramirez (11s):We went to theater school together. We survived it, but we didn't quite understand it.Gina Pulice (15s):20 years later, we're digging deep talking to our guests about their experiences and trying to make sense of it all.Jen Bosworth-Ramirez (21s):We survived theater school and you will too. Are we famous yet?Gina Pulice (33s):You don't have cancer.Jen Bosworth-Ramirez (35s):No, I do not have cancer right now. Do not have cancer at this moment. Who knows the next week. Yeah, no, it was, it's been quite a thing. Like I, I, you know, right. My cousin Dalia, who is what become one of my best friends in our adult lives, which is amazing. I never had any family that like, I truly liked as people know, that sounds so terrible, but I know exactly like good friends. And she says, you know, the brain is a problem making machine and it is that's, you know, it's also solves them, but it also creates them.Jen Bosworth-Ramirez (1m 17s):And look, I'm not saying that that the ch that it wasn't possible that I had cancer, but like all the evidence pointed oh, right. The emotional evidence pointed to I had cancer. Like I made an emotional face based on my past and my parent, my mom's past and my dad's path. And I made a really strong case that I had cancer in my head and look, it's possible. So that's the other thing that is so, so compelling about the human condition. Is that like, and what Dr. Oltman used to say to me, it was like, look, you're not, you're not delusional. You're not psychotic. You're not, so you're not making up things that are like, aliens are going to come down and take you, your fears are based in, in things that have happened to you and other people and people you love.Jen Bosworth-Ramirez (2m 6s):So it's not as though this idea, this idea of like, you know, right. It can't happen. You know, like it, I know in my body of, you know, my body of work that I've done in my life, that people die all the time of cancer and get cancer all the time, as we all do, I have a more intimate knowledge is because I lost my mom from it and saw the actual process. But I'm here to say, like, if you're freaking out about things, most of the time they're things that have happened to you or other people. So they're valid freak freakouts. It's just that they don't actually happen to be true all the time.Jen Bosworth-Ramirez (2m 47s):So like weird.Gina Pulice (2m 49s):It's almost like you want to say, Thank you brain for protecting me because you know, you you've correctly picked up on the fact that when things are Sort of looking like this, it's, it means something bad, but you can relax now. Right. Because it's not that right.Jen Bosworth-Ramirez (3m 7s):And it's actually not while I appreciate you brain, you're not always dealing with, with, with what's the reality, the truth. You don't, you don't. Yeah. You don't get an unfortunately brain. You don't get to, you're not a psychic, like you're just not, you have evidence. And then, so, so I had, you know, for, for our listeners, you know, like I had, I've had pain and history of weirdness on my left ovary. And it's really interesting. The cyst that is most, this is so crazy. This is how, this is what the brain does. So I'm like, okay, left side. I'm sure I have cancer on my leftover.Jen Bosworth-Ramirez (3m 48s):Like, that's, what's going on. It turns out the right one, the cyst is bigger. I have one on my right. They didn't see me yesterday or two days. And the, and the, the right one is bigger and actually contains more blood and fluid. I feel nothing on my right side. So that is also to goes to show that even if you do have cancer, it could be in a place that I don't. But like, you don't know where it's coming from. So like, even your feelings are wrong, your pain body is wrong. So like, you really don't know. So it was so funny. She was like, yeah, your left side, even though it's more active, there are a lot of simple cysts. So, you know, for this is like a women's health thing. Like people don't do any Reese. I shouldn't say that there's not a ton of research done because it's a woman's issue.Jen Bosworth-Ramirez (4m 32s):So it's not like, unless it's breast cancer, like nobody gives a shit about like women's cancers usually. So, cause that that's what, you know, got all the funding. So, so, so cysts grow all the time, all the time and women, they come and they go, those are simple cysts. If you have endometrial cysts or complexes, that is not, they don't come and go. They just stay. So I have several on my left side that come and go one that stays. And one that stays on the right. They don't know what's actually causing the amount of pain, but they think it's probably the left one leaking. The other thing is like, I would have sworn I had a cyst, the size of a grapefruit. If you would've asked me, I would say, it's probably grapefruit size.Jen Bosworth-Ramirez (5m 15s):It's that? It's an inch on one of them. That's nothing. Well, I mean, it's not nothing cause the ovaries two inches, but like w it, you just can't always trust what your, what your feelings are. Like, it's valid, you're in pain. But like, you don't know what it looks like until, you know what it looks like. And I think that that's the whole thing I'm coming around to, which is just go to the freaking doctor, please, if you have the resource, even if you don't like find them create, I don't know, like ask somebody, but like, you know, and I've gone to plenty of free clinics and they're not glamorous and they're not exciting, but they, they, they still have an ultrasound machine, you know?Jen Bosworth-Ramirez (5m 56s):So like, get, get it, get shit checked out. If you can easier said than done. But if it's an emotional fear based response, that's stopping you and not a resource-based response, you got to work through it and go, even if it is resource-based, there are, you know, there are ways around that. But like, especially if it's, you have all the resources, but there is something internally in you that is going, I don't want to know, believe me, I get it. But you want to know, you really want to know it's the only way through anything is getting the data. It's so annoying, but it's true.Gina Pulice (6m 35s):I agree. 100% with what you're saying, and this is why people love to join cults because the fantasy, the thing that's being promised in a cult is there is a finite number of answers. I, the cult leader have, there is a clear path to the number of steps that you have to take to get, you know, it's, it's everything we wish life would be predictable or seemingly predictable controlled, highly structured, you know, without a concern like to be in a cult is to not be in a process of discovering what happens next.Jen Bosworth-Ramirez (7m 24s):Exactly, Exactly. And it's so compelling. It is so comforting to think, oh my gosh, this person and this entity knows everything. I never have to worry again. That's really what we're saying is I never have to worry about anything. Again, the problem is it's just make believe. And you actually do have to worry because the person is usually a sociopath or psychopath and it doesn't actually do the trick. They think, you think it's going to do the trick. And it usually does the trick for a while for people like our guests, Noel was talking about like, it serves a purpose until you start questioning and then you're in real trouble because then it's like, how the fuck do I get out?Gina Pulice (8m 10s):Yeah, exactly. Well, I am very happy that you, I mean, I'm sorry that you're been in pain, but I'm happy. It's not for some worse reasons.Jen Bosworth-Ramirez (8m 19s):The other thing I have to say that is so interesting that I just wanted to, to, to me anyway, that I wanted to bring up was like, okay, I may not have in the Hollywood right now in the Hollywood industry, a team of people that are like on my side, but I'm S I swear to God, my medical team has, is filling that hole. So I just got an email from my cardiologists. Who said, your, your gynecologist thought you were amazing, loves you. How did it go? Like, that's the kind of messages I get from my, of medical experts. And so I read and I like started crying and I realized like, oh, I'm not getting it from my career team.Jen Bosworth-Ramirez (9m 3s):Like, I've talked about getting nasty emails from potential managers and stuff like that, but I am getting it from the medical team. They're like, amazing. They're like, you are the best. We love you. And I like,Gina Pulice (9m 17s):What if they gave awards for being a great patient?Jen Bosworth-Ramirez (9m 19s):I would Get something for Shot.Gina Pulice (9m 21s):You would get like a gynie award. I'mJen Bosworth-Ramirez (9m 23s):Like the best guy, knee, patient,Gina Pulice (9m 26s):And the, and the, and the statue is just like, you know, the uterus.Jen Bosworth-Ramirez (9m 31s):Yeah. I mean, anyway, so that was really interesting to me. Cause I was really touched this morning when she wrote me. I'm like, who, what doctor, what? It's, she's a, she thought you were amazing. I was like, Hey, that's cool. Well, at least somewhat, you know what I mean? Like, I'll take this. It's so funny.Gina Pulice (9m 46s):Well, the truth is you are amazing. And the difference is with between people who know you and people who don't know you, I mean, that's just what it is. Like when people get to know you, not 10 out of 10 people who know Foz agree. She's amazing. It's just, you know, you have to convince people to get in the door. That'sJen Bosworth-Ramirez (10m 6s):It?Gina Pulice (10m 7s):Yeah. All right.Jen Bosworth-Ramirez (10m 9s):I'm with you, my friend. How do you feel about all the post?Gina Pulice (10m 14s):It's just, it goes on. It's done. It's just a saga. Yes, we should.Jen Bosworth-Ramirez (10m 22s):We don't have to be explicit, but like you, you,Gina Pulice (10m 24s):I can be explicit because fuck those people,Jen Bosworth-Ramirez (10m 27s):Will you left an organizationGina Pulice (10m 28s):It's called Theatre Artists workshop. And I left them because aside from a handful of members and everybody that was on the board, it was one of the more toxic environments I've ever been a part of. And I quit. And I'm the only one who quit effective immediately. Everybody else is staying. Two people are staying on and then everybody else is staying through through 2021. But when I tell you the way that people are responding, we couldn't have crafted it better ourselves. If we said, let's, let's create, like, if we were making this movie and this whole conflict happened, we'd say now what's a way that people could respond.Gina Pulice (11m 17s):That would exactly prove the point of what they were saying toxic in the first place. And two, that the fact that most people are doing that and have zero awareness. So essentially what's happening is that people are reacting to our letter. That goes step-by-step and explains the ways in which we've been abused, right? People are responding to this with a combination of don't take things. So personallyJen Bosworth-Ramirez (11m 46s):Sure. Of course, that's the number one abuser thing to do,Gina Pulice (11m 49s):And just completely invalidating ignoring what we've said about the abuse. They, everybody finds something that's in the letter to take issue with and makes their whole thing about that or, and says nothing of, and by the way, I'm sorry, you were abused. Or, and by the way, you know, and people are saying, thanks, but I'm into this thing recently. I hollow gratitude. Miss me with your hollow gratitude. I don't care. I do not care. I could wallpaper my bathroom with your thank you is right. It's not what I need. I need you to change your behavior.Jen Bosworth-Ramirez (12m 28s):Absolutely.Gina Pulice (12m 29s):Forgive me if I said this to you already, but I'm likening it to, you know, when COVID happened and everybody puts a sign in their front yard saying, thank you, frontline workers. Yeah. And they're banging pots and pans at 5:00 PM in New York city. Like, and the frontline workers are going, I don't think I don't need your sign, like get vaccinated and wear your mask. Right. And everybody's like, I know, I know the,Jen Bosworth-Ramirez (12m 54s):Without a mask on and like at their concert. Right.Gina Pulice (12m 58s):That's exactly it. That's exactly right. And, and, and I shouldn't be surprised. We all myself included are kind of in a way, programmed to not see our own bad behavior and to not want to take responsibility, but it just goes on anyway. So, but it goes on in a way that I can choose how much I want to engage with.Jen Bosworth-Ramirez (13m 18s):And also it's like it to me from the outside. It's so clear that you made the right choice. If this is the response, like they just proved, like you said, they proved the exact point there that's insane. And, and too, and you made the right choice. Like why would you stick around and be beaten down after you've made a stand? And then they continue to try to beat down that doesn't, that's insane if you stayed like that's insane.Gina Pulice (13m 44s):Yeah. Yeah. To give one just chef's kiss example. In our letter, we, we, one of the things that we said was when we tried to introduce our DEI policy, the very first thing we decided to introduce was content warnings. And we did it in the most careful way, like to, to hear about a content warning about something you're going to see presented at the workshop. You have to click down the email. Like you can choose not to see the content warning, right. Because everybody was complaining, it's art and we need to slap people in the face with it, whatever you can choose, whether or not.Gina Pulice (14m 25s):So it's literally like if I, if I'm allergic to peanuts, I'm going to read every nutrition label. Cause I want you to make sure that if I'm not allergic to peanuts, which I'm not, then I don't really need that information. It's no different than that. Right. That alone caused our first member to quit saying if he couldn't use, if he could, he could, if he could. I mean, it wasn't even related really to the content or if he couldn't use the N word, he couldn't theater and in that same evening.Jen Bosworth-Ramirez (14m 57s):Bye, bye. See you later. You're not going to make theater. We're all not here. You're not gonna do it here. Thank you.Gina Pulice (15m 4s):Oh yeah. Two of our members who are from marginalized, societal groups got stood up or, you know, spoke that night and said the ways in which they've been marginalized at TAW. And that, I mean, it was crickets, not one single person gave any support. And we had listed that in our, in our letter. So this email we received from one of our members last night opened with I'm a board member of a condo complex. And we recently oversaw a renovation that made our building double in value.Gina Pulice (15m 44s):We, as a board, had to sit and listen to a tenant or what resident, whatever. Talk about the color of the paint in the laundry room for 30 minutes. And he bolds and underlines 30 all caps, 30 minutes. Okay. It goes, it goes along with being on the board and I thought, okay, so you're comparing you pace. Exactly. You're comparing.Jen Bosworth-Ramirez (16m 15s):Bye bye, byeGina Pulice (16m 34s):Name and saying it all is because the thing I wanted to run by you this week is about secrets. I am. I'm all the way done with secrets. I'm sorry. I mean, I'm not saying like, if you tell me something in confidence, I'm not saying I'm not going to keep that a secret seat. That's not the kind of secret I'm talking about. I'm talking about the kind of secrets where, you know, you know, so I, I have written personal essays that reference my family as personal essays do. And you know, and I'm sure a lot of it has rubbed people the wrong way. I in particular wrote an essay in which I compared somebody in my family to Scott Peterson and, and that person let me know in the creepiest possible way, which is to say this person that, yes, we just happened.Gina Pulice (17m 32s):We are not friends on Facebook. He's not even to my knowledge, this guy has zero social media presence. I receive, I open my phone. There's a notification. So-and-so liked your post. My heart skipped a beat. I mean, it was like my blood turned cold. I went, you had to scroll pretty far down on my timeline to find that post. And it's the only one he liked. Are you kidding me? Your face is exactly your face of surprise. That exactly. Thank you.Gina Pulice (18m 13s):Oh, I really appreciate you validating that. Okay.Jen Bosworth-Ramirez (18m 15s):That's so it's because two things you're super intelligent and also we like crime weirdness, but also it's fucking creepy.Gina Pulice (18m 26s):It's fucking creepy. That's weird by the way, about any post, if anybody who I'm not friends with on Facebook likes a post that's way down the feed.Jen Bosworth-Ramirez (18m 38s):Well, if that's something you're not friends with on,Gina Pulice (18m 42s):Yeah. The whole thing is creepy. The whole thing is 1000% creepy. So part of the thing that I struggle with in writing personal things is airing the dirty laundry, you know, telling the secrets. And I really do try to tell only the secrets that are mine. I really try not to tell anybody else's secrets, but in general, it's so exhausting to be in this perpetual state of protecting a bunch of people who would never protect.Jen Bosworth-Ramirez (19m 16s):There's the key. I mean, like, I think that's the kicker, right? It's like, and I think it speaks to a bigger issue. Like we're all protecting this in these institutional institutions and, and companies and things that are destroying us and we've been projecting them for years. And I think it speaks to why we started the podcast unknowingly is that to protect, we wanted to stop in our way and stop protecting institutions that harmed us whether some are assholes right out some aren't some are, but like institutions harm people. Like I just think that that's the way, right? That's just how it is. It's capitalism, it's democracy, whatever it is, they harm people.Jen Bosworth-Ramirez (19m 58s):So I think we're trying to shed some light on that and say, no, we're going to heal from that. And I don't think you can heal from it unless you really process it. And some of that is bringing the secrets into the light and no, and people don't like that.Gina Pulice (20m 12s):People don't like it. And you and I have had many conversations following interviews where we said, do we bleep this person's name? Do we cut this thing out? And with the exception of one person who we interviewed, who then said that they didn't want us to air the interview. Nobody has said, I regret saying that. Can you, and, and when they're here talking, I mean, we've encountered people feel such a freedom and a relief and they have no problem naming names. Right. And so it's been our thing of like, do we protect this person's identity? But the other thing is, here's the, here's the part in the whole dynamic that I'm trying to own for what I do in this, in this situation about the secrets and everything.Gina Pulice (21m 1s):I wrote something personal, I published it on our website. I promoted it on social media. Theoretically. I want everybody in the world to read it, except this one guy. Right? Like that's, that's my logic. There is, it's really flawed, right? Like if you're going to be brave, then you have to be brave. Right. You can't be brave only when it's convenient.Jen Bosworth-Ramirez (21m 31s):Right. I totally agree. I mean, I think that, and I think it's really great to have the conversations about like, okay, like who are we bleeping and why? And someone on, you know, on this podcast who we, I don't think we've bleeped, but she gets a lot of bad press as Susan Leigh.Gina Pulice (21m 50s):She really does get a lot of bad press.Jen Bosworth-Ramirez (21m 52s):I mean, and, and, and, you know, I'm like, man, should we have been bleeping or out, but,Gina Pulice (21m 59s):But she did it. I mean, it's her, she is the person who should be carrying around the shame for her behavior. Not the people who she harmed the, you know, it's not there. And that's the other thing that we have usually all the way backwards is that we make the people who experienced the pain, shut up about it. Yeah. It to, to protect us. And who did the pain. Yeah. Right.Jen Bosworth-Ramirez (22m 25s):Yeah. Just, yeah, it's, it's all backwards. And again, it's like, you know, she works for, she worked for an institution and they, they, you know, they should, she grew upGina Pulice (22m 34s):And a time and she's, and she's probably the victim of a lot of sexism. Like it's only, it's all of a piece, but the fact remains that at, at that time, maybe she's a completely different person now, but the fact remains that at that time, she did and said a lot of really racist thingsJen Bosworth-Ramirez (22m 51s):And hurtful and other ways, like, just, I mean, I think racism is hurtful, but like other types of hurtful besides racism, just like weird shit, you know, that hurt people. And I, I mean, it's just their truth. And I think it's actually up to, yeah. I mean, yeah, it's a co it's a, it's kind of a complicated issue and yet it's not complicated. It's like, you're right. We're just protecting the people that hurt us all the time. That's like when I got, when I got that very nasty email from, from that manager, my first response was in, this is interesting. My first response was to drag him through Twitter.Jen Bosworth-Ramirez (23m 31s):Like I was going to put his name and say, I got this. It was so hurtful. And I feel like as a woman, as a Latina, that to get this email about fucking formatting, when I'm trying to break into the business is the condescending. I wanted to drag him. And then I thought, okay, there's a difference between speaking your truth and dragging someone. I don't know the difference exactly. Like, I don't know where the nuances lie that make them different, but dragging someone in Twitter versus, and I don't blame people for dragging people on Twitter, either like that. I'm not saying like dragging people is wrong.Jen Bosworth-Ramirez (24m 12s):I think some people need to be dragged. I mean, we've talked about Louis C K's of the world and the Weinsteins do, who deserves to be dragged, who does it. And that's really what I wrote my pilot about, but like, I just didn't feel, I think every person has to decide if they're going to keep secrets, why, or if they're going to drag someone why, or like put it in on social media, straight up, this person did this. You have to be, I have to be prepared to deal with the full consequences if I do that. And I'm just not willing to deal with the full consequences of dragging this guy on Twitter. I'm just not, I'm just not, I don't feel certain.Jen Bosworth-Ramirez (24m 51s):Now there are people where if something happened, I would work it out and I might feel certain to drag their ass. But it was interesting. I think everyone has to decide for themselves where the line is of when I'm going to expose someone to the fullest, et cetera, or an institution to the fullest extent and leave the individual out of it. I don't know.Gina Pulice (25m 12s):Right. Well, and you, and you don't want to do anything. That's gonna harm you. I mean, if you, if you were in a certain place in your life and you did like people dragging that guy would never have hurt you, then you could've, you could've made that decision. Yeah. And I'll also just say for anybody listening, who knows me in real life and, and who've, I've hurt and misbehaved, I invite you not to keep that secret. You know, I, I invite you to drag me if it's something that, I mean, for the thing, for my, for the sins of my past, if anybody is, you know, holding on to that and never has told me, or whatever, like I'd rather hear about it, I'd rather know, and try to make amends and to party so that I I'll feel that I have the right to participate in this, keeping those secrets, telling the truth culture that I really try to, you know, I really try to stay within.Jen Bosworth-Ramirez (26m 16s):Right, right. So, wow. I forgot. I was going to say something else about That's a lot like that. I just feel like, yeah, this whole, this whole notion of keeping, keeping it, you know, and they say in program, like you're only as sick as your secrets. And I think it's really true. And I think there's a way of, of working through the secret that won't bring further harm to yourself versus versus versus doing something that exposes you further. You know what I mean? And brings, and bring, could bring more abuse or you have to look at, I mean, you know, like it's like, except when to do so would injure yourself for others.Jen Bosworth-Ramirez (27m 3s):But, but, but, but, but dragging is about sort of injuring others in a way. I don't know. It's like really interesting. I don't know,Gina Pulice (27m 11s):You know, that saying, or I think, I don't know if you call it, call it a saying, is it kind, is it truthful? Is it necessary? Well, I know you're supposed to aim for all three. Yeah. To my way of thinking, you really just need two out of a three. It can be truthful and necessary, like talking about Harvey Weinstein. It's not kind, but that's okay. It didn't need to be constant. So yeah. So that's, that's, that's that tends to be my barometer is if it can't be kind, at least it has to be truthful in this. Yes.Jen Bosworth-Ramirez (27m 43s):Agreed. Agreed. And I think that's, I think for me the necessary part, it's like, okay, well, can I, can I proceed to function as a, you know, trying healthy human being without doing this? Or do I need to do something about this to proceed and live my life and feel like I'm living in integrity and that I'm, I'm doing the right thing by, by me. And sometimes you just, and, and also also, right. Sometimes people, people get, they get hurt. Yeah. But they also didn't think about that when they were abusing others. SoGina Pulice (28m 21s):Yes. Oh yeah. That's the other thing that came out with this board thing, you know, when we were writing the letter, somebody said, okay, so this is, we acknowledge, this is scorched earth. You know, this is a scorched earth thing, which I'm very, that is how I think about things a lot. I, I tend to think about scorched earth, but I, it occurred to me when she said this, how come nobody's ever worried about skirts, scorching the earth with me, right? How come no one's ever worried about burning a bridge with me? You know, like, yeah. Maybe it is scorched earth. But if you, if your takeaway from what I've said to you is that I'm the asshole.Gina Pulice (29m 4s):That's fine. I don't care. That's completely fine. Go. I wish you well on your journey, right? It wasn't for you. I guess for this letter, it was for me to say to you, I mean, if you didn't want to receive it, that's your business. Right?Jen Bosworth-Ramirez (29m 22s):Well, Today on the podcast we're talking with CISA Hutchinson. She says a graduate from Vassar and NYU, and she's a teacher, she's a playwright. She writes for television and we found our conversation with her extremely focusing and motivating. So please enjoy our conversation with CISA Hutchinson. Hi, good morning. Good. Where are you? Which coast are you on? Are you on the east coast?Jen Bosworth-Ramirez (30m 2s):Okay.Gina Pulice (30m 3s):I guess what, I just had to pause, watching to come talk to you, your movie, your amazing movie. Yes. Oh my God. I'm in the scene with the mother right now and it's so good. It's so good.Chisa Hutchinson (30m 23s):Yeah. That's that? Yeah. You know, it's so funny because when I wrote, I wrote it as a play initially, and I was, when I was writing that part, I was like, this is why people don't like theater, just two people talking like whatever, we're going to be full board. But like, I don't know. Everybody seems to like really be engaged by that part. So,Gina Pulice (30m 51s):Oh no. Yeah. There's nothing boring about this movie. It's called the subject. Everybody go check it out. But before I forget, she's the Hutchinson. Congratulations. You survived hotter school. You survived theater school to fancy theater school.Chisa Hutchinson (31m 7s):Well, yeah, sort of. Okay. So I went to Vassar college for undergrad. Yeah. Which was interesting because I knew it was a good theater program, but I didn't know that it was mostly geared toward writers and directors. Because when I, when I sent him down, there was like literally one dramatic writing class taught by a screenwriter who was like, oh yeah, I guess you can write plays if you want. Really like, learned much about the craft of playwriting while I was there.Chisa Hutchinson (31m 46s):But, but I had a good time and I did a lot of independent studies in the English department and the Africana studies department, just to like, you know, learn about plays theater, you know, scripts plays that weren't, you know, Shakespeare or insulin or checkoff or whatever. Right. So that was undergrad. And then I worked for a few years as a high school English teacher.Jen Bosworth-Ramirez (32m 21s):My mom was a high school English teacher and it was, it was intense. Where did you teach?Chisa Hutchinson (32m 28s):I taught at Westtown school, which is a Quaker boarding school in Pennsylvania, like 45 minutes Southwest of Philadelphia. And then I taught at Sage hill school in Southern California, orange county, California, which was like a whole other planet. Okay. Like I felt like a whole ass in orange county, California and teaching there. Yeah.Gina Pulice (32m 60s):I feel like the, the cultural translation from the east coast to orange county might be one of the biggest riffs chasms that there is there. It's quiet.Jen Bosworth-Ramirez (33m 13s):I was just going to say, you're the first guests that we've had on. And we've had many that I've been like really sort of, no, not that I'm not excited to talk to everybody else, but your, your, I was telling Gina before this, that your bio is the greatest written bio I've ever read in my life. So I told her I'm the queen of queries. Like I write a bad-ass query letter, like, but you are the baddest ass of bios. Like, I, I love that stuff because for me they're usually so down boring, but you're, and same with queries.Jen Bosworth-Ramirez (33m 54s):Like, I, I love to write a good query cause it's kind of a challenge how that bio is. You write it like in a second. I mean, I know it's a little thing, but it's a really important thing to me becauseChisa Hutchinson (34m 7s):So long ago I don't even remember, but I just wanted to, I was like, oh, well, you know, there's going to be plenty of chance to send the short, dry, you know, you know, like formal bio. So I was like, I want my website to be, you know, I went to bio on my website to be, you know, to give a sense of like who I am as a person.Jen Bosworth-Ramirez (34m 30s):I feel like I, I was like, I with, and it's an, it's the words are economic. It's not like, it's like this long thing, but it's really short. And it's also so compelling. Anyway, I just, I just that's like my just, just, yeah, I have from zoneGina Pulice (34m 50s):It's on her website, everybody, chisahutchinson.com. You can check it out for yourself. It's veryJen Bosworth-Ramirez (34m 54s):Funny. Very good.Gina Pulice (34m 56s):Okay. So by the time you got to T I mean, so what I understand your grad school choice was rather intentional to be about play writing and you picked maybe probably the, one of the best schools did that. Oh. Or maybe you disagree,Chisa Hutchinson (35m 16s):Funny story about the no, no, I loved it. I knew I absolutely loved NYU. I'd probably learn more in one semester there than I did four years. That I'm sorry. I feel like I'm talking smack about vets. I'm really not trying to like smack talk Vassar. It's just, it's really, I think they're doing better now. They've hired a playwright that I really loved to teach playwriting there. So that's, I think progressJen Bosworth-Ramirez (35m 47s):We've had the thing where it's like, I I'm coming to the, the sort of realization that a lot of undergrads are kind of like, well, we'll give it a shot. We don't have a awesome, we're going to really do something good luck. And then you'll go to grad school and really learn. I mean, that's how I kind of feel. So I know you're not talkingChisa Hutchinson (36m 8s):Because I really had a wonderful time at the ribs of great, the great place. And I learned through experience, just not so much through the cracks. And then NYU, it was literally the only grad school I applied to. And that was because I had, I had a workshop production. It was my very first workshop production of a play ever at a professional theater company or not really the Lark play development center, which has since Closed.Chisa Hutchinson (36m 49s):And it makes me so sad because that police was like American idol for playwrights. And like, it was the place people knew to like go to the Lark, the Lark and new dramas are like the two places that everybody knows like, okay, you want to find the next half play. Right. And go to this place. Right. So I had my very first production of a, of a full length play at the Lark and they hooked me up. Oh, hardcore. I w at me, it was so many different people who I still work with to this day. Like, I, I love the LARC. Like everyone I met at the Lark, I have kept and I keep working with them. But the game changer was they set me up with Tina Howe as a mentor.Gina Pulice (37m 33s):Yeah, I did. I did one of her plays and theater school.Chisa Hutchinson (37m 38s):That woman is a genius as a wacky genius. Okay. First of all, she's like, I think back then she had to be in her late sixties, early seventies. I don't even know. Nobody knows how old you, how so? No. She is like this waspy, like proper wasp of a woman of a certain age, you know, who apparently responded like exuberantly to my, to my plate. She liked girls, which, which is about like, again, you know, teenage inner city lesbians, you know, like, so it was really weird to have her be like this, but what she responded to was like, I have like surreal elements in that play.Chisa Hutchinson (38m 25s):And she was, she knows what she's all about. That surreal stuff. So they sent me up with her. They were like, you should have dinner with her after, you know, your, your presentation. And I was like, yeah, yeah, cool. So I had dinner with Tina, how well we just like talked and talked and talked to this little gas so late that I was like, oh shit. Like, I'm about to miss my last train back to New Jersey. And she was like, oh, oh no, you will do no such thing. You will not, you are not taking the train back this late. You are coming home with me. And I was like, oh, okay. So you know how so I had a Latina, how, when we woke up and she made me breakfast and she's just talking, she's had you, do you have an MFA?Chisa Hutchinson (39m 11s):You need any of that say, and I was like, no. She was like, well, you have to not have to apply to grad programs. If you're going to apply, you should apply to some people at NYU. My best friend works at NYU and used to reply. And I'm going to write you a letter of recommendation and you're going to go to LA. So literally I put together like a found out that the down deadline for the application was literally the next day. So I application together in a day and like hand delivered it to the department of dramatic writing and I, and cross my fingers and was just like, all right, well, I'll tell me to apply.Chisa Hutchinson (39m 55s):So I applied and I got in, I got in with a full, a full ride and yeah, I had just an amazing, I love my professors there. They were so dope. And what they do is they make you write. So I concentrated in playwriting, which was a really smart move apparently, because playwrights are like the hot shit in Hollywood right now. But yeah, I concentrated and play writing, but they make you write in other mediums also, as you know, it's mandatory. You have to also take TV writing. You have to also take screenwriting. Yeah. And that is, turns out is a very smart way to structure your Germany.Chisa Hutchinson (40m 39s):We're all working everywhere now. You know, like if there's no, there's so much, you know, cross fertilization happening.Gina Pulice (40m 50s):Yeah. That's fantastic. So we only know about the playwriting program at, I think one other school. So at Tisch, did you, did you write stuff? They then got produced there by the students? I mean, like acting playsChisa Hutchinson (41m 6s):Is the only thing that they don't, because they're not what they try to do. They do have like one collaboration class where they bring in, they try to bring in as many professionals as possible because they want like the one sort of student variable, like the one factor, you know, to be student and everything else to be professionals. So they would bring in professional directors and professional actors for it. Wasn't yeah, it was, it was a little bizarre because it felt like you were just siloed from these people that you should be probably, you know, it'd be making connections with.Chisa Hutchinson (41m 49s):So it was a little ad in that respect, but I see, I get the philosophy behind it. Like I get that. They're like, we want to minimize the minimize or maximize the professionalism.Jen Bosworth-Ramirez (42m 4s):Right. I mean, it's, it's, it's just sounds like a really like super bad-ass program that I have a friend, a playwright friend named Michael Allen Harris. I don't know. He just graduated from loved it, loved it, loved it. And now, and I have this thing of going to a lot of grad schools now I'm like, I have a master's in counseling psych. I started a screenwriting program then dropped out because they were assholes. And then I'm like, now I'm like NYU grad school. I, you know, but anyway, I, I love this idea that you okay. Cause I'm, I'm in LA right now. And there's a lot of people that are like, and playwrights are hot shit in Hollywood.Jen Bosworth-Ramirez (42m 47s):Right. But I love the idea that you didn't go into playwriting to try to be a hot shit in Hollywood, unless you did. And I'm just making thatChisa Hutchinson (42m 57s):Like live theater, it just fits a medium that just affords you so much nuance. And like, there's just so many idiosyncrasies, you know, like you can do things. And I literally teach a class at the university of Delaware. I call it writing in 3d. It's just a playwriting class. But what I do is I make them do small, you know, short writing assignments. And each assignment is focused on some aspect. Some, some topics, some themes, some something, right. Some element that just takes on a whole other texture when it's live.Chisa Hutchinson (43m 40s):So like the first assignment that they get is like nudity. Right. Which c'mon, you know, like it's D you know, we see cities all day long on the screen, like, and it's no, no big. Right. But like in a live theater, that's a whole other thing. Right? Like nudity, you suddenly, you're like forced to really think about the significance of the nudity when it's like right there in your face. Right. So nudity, silence, silence in a theater is different from silence anywhere else, you know, like you can't really do silence and I'm novel, you know, it's like, well, it's a blank page. Right.Chisa Hutchinson (44m 19s):So with audience participation, like you literally can't do that anywhere else. You know? So yeah. Each assignment, I really try to get my students thinking the possibilities that, you know, they can take advantage of those in, in theater that they can't really get anywhere else.Gina Pulice (44m 41s):You're just making me think of something that makes me so sad, which is that a lot of us do approach just anything performance-related through theater, because it is so singularly special. And then as you have this line in your bio, you write these plays that have more than five characters and deal with themes of race. So they're probably never going to get produced. And actually the way, the way I met you was at the national new play network in Sacramento. I mean, I met you like passing hello, where they did a staged reading of your play America, which looks amazing. Has that ever been produced?Chisa Hutchinson (45m 19s):That is literally, it has been postponed twice pandemic postpartum, but it's where I'm going to start rehearsing for that in January, at alley theater in Houston.Gina Pulice (45m 30s):Fantastic. I'm really happy to hear that. So, you know, so theater gives us all of these things that we can't find elsewhere, and then there's zero money spent on it so that people like you only end up getting to do, you know, bring their brilliance, not only, but you get paid by bringing your brilliance to film and television, it's just kind of sad. You know, that there's, it's not a viable option to really make your living as a playwright.Chisa Hutchinson (46m 0s):It is. It is. I I'm not, if I knew how to fix it. Right. I, I would, but you know, I think we just need to just do the best we can. And every day I wake up feeling great. I mean, even on a, even on a shitty day, and I've had some pretty shitty days, especially like this past week or so, where, I mean just where you just feel gutted and, you know, come out and, or whatever. And you're like, just want to crawl into a cave. But then I'm like, literally like sitting in a house that you bought with, wow, you're doing, you're doing will pay.Chisa Hutchinson (46m 49s):And the fact that I get to do what I like in whatever capacity really, right. Like, okay, theater doesn't pay me enough to live on, but please screen, you know, screen writing or I get to teach. Like I get to talk to sit around every week, just telling young people, like I hear is why words are cool. And then they get all excited. And then they like present their work in class and then they get all, like, they get attached to each other's characters and things know like when they're reading over beating and workshop and it just, it just like tickles my soul.Chisa Hutchinson (47m 35s):So like, why, you know, why, why would I be sad about really anything?Jen Bosworth-Ramirez (47m 43s):Can I ask you a question about the gutted nearness of, so did you say I, you sort of brushed over it, but like the governess of, did you say reviews like of your films? Okay. Okay. So here's my question. Here's my question. Because you're someone that's working in an industry that I am like, oh my God. You know, because I'm me, I'm like, they've got it made, you know, whatever it's garbage. I know. But when a review, cause we talk a lot about, on this podcast about resilience or, and I'm obsessed with the idea of resilience or bouncing back, whatever you want to call it. What happens inside you that you're able to say, bitch, keep going. Like, what is that moment for you?Jen Bosworth-Ramirez (48m 24s):Because I'm, I had a week where a asshole said some asshole you things as they do. And then I had to like regroup and keep on with my, my situation. So what did for you, how do you do that as someone, you know, how do you do it?Chisa Hutchinson (48m 40s):Okay. So this is a thing that comes with time. This writing shit, like it's a war of attrition is, is really, really only the people who stick around are the ones who get to succeed on any level really. Right. So if you stick around long enough, right. If you just don't let, when someone kicks you in the face, right. You just kind of have to be like, get up and keep walking. What, what, what did it for me? I think it was like the third or fourth, like mixed review that I got in the times for a play prediction.Chisa Hutchinson (49m 28s):And, and then I thought, bitch, this is, this is your fourth review. And the TA, one of them was like really good, you know, like of all the reviews that I've gotten and I'm picking on the times, because of course that's the one that everybody sees. Right. But like whenever, you know, the reviews come out and some of them are like really fuses and wonderful and that's like fuel and it's, it's awesome. They're usually on the, like really rinky-dink like platforms with like 300 followers. Right. But, but you're like, oh, somebody gets it.Chisa Hutchinson (50m 8s):You know, like somebody, somebody out there, guess what I'm trying to do too bad. Those somebodies they're not the ones with the giant platforms, but it's okay. And so you read those and you absorb them, but then like if you just sort of take a step back and like, I, you know, like I didn't realize, you know, these reviews aren't actually keeping me from getting work. I mean, it would certainly help to have a great review right. In some, you know, in the, whatever the Washington post, whatever, right. Like whatever, big, whatever big platform, it would certainly help to have a great review, but I'm still working.Chisa Hutchinson (50m 49s):Like I still get work, even if, you know, I haven't been anointed by the New York times. Right. Like, so it really is just a matter of like hanging in there. Like, I, I hate to sayJen Bosworth-Ramirez (51m 2s):I love that because, because that is something that I, and we have control over is hanging in there versus having control over whether, whoever at whatever paper or whatever, whatever loves me. I have no control over that, but I can control whether I hang in there or whether it's worth it to hang in there or not. So that's actually something you can actually do. So I like that. It's like, I can do thatChisa Hutchinson (51m 26s):And I'll work on the next thing. Just be working on the next, keep writing happens that when I find that I like get over bad routes, the fastest when I'm already in the middle of the next project. Sure. So like right now I'm working at, so you mentioned the subject just got released this past week, last, last week. Oh my God. How's that week. We just had our premiere party a week ago already, but yeah. And the reviews have been mixed, you know, some people like really get it. And some people I'm like, you are completely missing the point. Like you're completely missing the point and it's very frustrating, but I don't even really have time to be too concerned about it because I'm like, I'm literally in a writer's room for a Hulu show right now.Chisa Hutchinson (52m 16s):So I'm really, I'm, I'm my revision actually is due today after like, I'm going to have to like, you know, I was right in that. I have like 10 more pages that I need to trim, but yeah, I, I can't, I don't, I don't have time to while I can just, you just gotta be like all up in the next thing, all that.Gina Pulice (52m 35s):And it does make sense that review, I mean, reviews are, people have feel all kinds of artists have feelings about reviews, but it really makes sense that a writer would have a hard time, you know, just for example, ignoring reviews because your life is about words and that's what that's, what's happening in a review is the people are assembling words to, to decide, you know, pass judgment on whether or not you have something interesting to say,Chisa Hutchinson (53m 3s):When you write about something personal or when you write about something about which you're passionate, that it feels, so it feels like they just took a knife to your heart, you know? Like it feels so like, yeah, let me just swallow my pride with a chaser of napalm, you know, just like BR like, it just burns you on the inside and you, you just, it feels like you're never going to get over it, but you will. You do, you do the next thing and yeah,Jen Bosworth-Ramirez (53m 35s):Really. I mean, ultimately it's like, you know, fuck you and goodbye and good luck and onward, but I love the idea of moving. I always be, cause people used to tell me like, just keep writing and I'd be like, go fuck yourself because I don't want to keep writing. I want someone to like my last project not, but it's true. Like if I can shut up and, and, and stop feeling, sorry for myself, I, I look, it feels good to feel sorry for myself for a little bit. But I feel like if I can actually do something rather than ruminate and create more work, then the steam comes out of it. Just because simply there's not enough space in my brain to keep thinking about what Joe Schmo said in his last email.Jen Bosworth-Ramirez (54m 21s):So it is that it's just like focus on the writing, you know, sounds so easy to do, but it's actually, for me, a self preservation thing to keep writing, instead of ruminating on all the things that went wrong with the last, the last project or whatever, you know?Chisa Hutchinson (54m 38s):Yeah. And I'm very lucky also to be doing this in a time where there's Instagram and TikTok because I have like, literally I have like a little collection of videos specifically that I just, that no matter what the hell is going on, like they always make me,Jen Bosworth-Ramirez (54m 59s):I love that made me laugh minus the stone guy shoveling. Have you seen, okay, so this is an old one, but it, if anyone out there has, there's a guy who's trying to shovel snow and he cannot get it together. And he keeps falling and it's sort of a metaphor for my life and he just keeps it at the end. He just goes, fuck it. And show that shovel. And there's someone filming his neighbors filming, cracking up, but quietly not trying to make fun, but like in a way that like, man, we have all been there. The dude cannot shovel to save his life. And I was like that. I relate to that shit because it's just like, you're just shoveling and falling in your own shit and falling and someone's bike going way to go.Jen Bosworth-Ramirez (55m 44s):I feel you. So with the Tik-toks, I, I, that's a really good thing to do. You keep them for when you feel bad, you watch them or just whenever.Chisa Hutchinson (55m 52s):And then when I'm just like to set for words, you know, I just need to watch a video of big fluffy dogs ripping down the stairs. No, with the voiceover that's like curse. It just, oh my God. It gets everyJen Bosworth-Ramirez (56m 7s):Time,Chisa Hutchinson (56m 9s):Every timeJen Bosworth-Ramirez (56m 11s):I love it, I want to see it. I'm gonna look it up. It's a dog cursing like a voiceover.Chisa Hutchinson (56m 16s):I really wish. Yeah. And he's like this, there are three, three big fluffy fucking dog. You just want to like squeeze them. They're so fucking big and fluffy, you know? And they're like, there are these concrete cores outdoors right there, like three or four stairs. And they're running along the top, the top stair, I'm about to make their way down. But because the coloring and the, you know, how shallow, because of the way the stairs are built on the color, you don't, if you have no depth perception, right. Which those dogs clear would be not.Chisa Hutchinson (56m 57s):It's hard to know that it's not just like grown, we'll go running along the stairs. And one of them that one in the front is like, oh, I can't wait to the, and then I can't wait to get to the, and then he goes Like tumbles down the,Gina Pulice (57m 18s):Okay, we're going to have to try to link to that in our show notes. So people can check it out.Chisa Hutchinson (57m 23s):I will, we send that to you because it cracks me up.Jen Bosworth-Ramirez (57m 29s):I'm obsessed. And you're making me see why fails are so important. Like, I love fail videos. I watch news bloopers all day long because what it is is people trying their best to be sincere and be like, I take themselves so serious. I'm going to do my job. And then all of a sudden, the chair falls out and they're like still trying to do their goddamn job. And they're like, and anyway, I'm the news. And you're like, I love it because I feel like that 90% of my fucking life, I feel like I'm like, I could still do this while my legs are being taken out from under me. So anyway, Tik Toks and fails. Yes. They're worth something. They're really good.Jen Bosworth-Ramirez (58m 10s):I'm sorry.Gina Pulice (58m 12s):No, no, no. That's okay. No, but that's how it was. No, but it's, I mean, it's germane it's on the topic of survival is we all have ways of surviving the everyday banalities and everyday horrors of life. So you, right before we talked, started talking to you for the podcast, we always do another section of just us talking before. And we were talking about secrets and we were talking about, you know, especially as it pertains to your profession and personal writing, the dangerous territory that you start navigating when it gets into the territory of like family secrets. And I don't mean, you know, so-and-so whatever cheated on his wife.Gina Pulice (58m 57s):I just mean maybe more like a thematic secret where we're protecting this abusive behavior. We're protecting this abusive personality. And I recently in my life made a decision to stop doing that in, in, in multiple arenas, but specifically in one and my awakening about it is all about, I'm not holding anybody else's secrets anymore. It's not me. If you don't want me, if you don't like that about me, then you probably need to reevaluate your relationship with me. I'm done holding on to other people's secrets and actually your movie touches on that a lot.Gina Pulice (59m 42s):And I'm just curious about your own relationship professionally speaking to secrets and how you navigate that test, the difference between say or the potential chasm between saying something that's really true for you and saying something that could somehow hurt you in the future.Chisa Hutchinson (1h 0m 7s):Wow. That's that sounds serious. That's a serious question. I'm kind of with you as far as like, like my husband, for example, he knows he has known from year one when we first started dating that. Like, if it's happening to you while I know you, like, if it's happening between us, like that should it's part like, like that's like, that's, that's fatter. Like I'm gonna, I will use that. Like as an I don't care if it really sort of is a little unschooled, do you?Chisa Hutchinson (1h 0m 47s):Oh, okay. So for example, I wrote, I wrote a book called 101 reasons to not breed. Yes. Lemon. One of the reasons is like kids, if you miss me, like, they're just messy. It's shit. Right. So what I did was I don't have kids. I don't want kids. I'm very clear on this. Right. But I do have a husband who just doesn't even see mess anymore. Doesn't realize when he's like leaving stuff for, so I literally just spent a good few months just taking pictures and text messages that he left around her.Chisa Hutchinson (1h 1m 33s):I mean, ridiculous fucking message. Like socks on the kitchen, counter, dirty socks on the kitchen. I'm like, fuck. Okay. Yeah, yeah, yeah. I will take a picture of the toilet that you did not cross blew it up. Right. You know what I'm saying? Like, I will put, I will literally put your shit on. I will put your shit out there for the world. See if you don't start cleaning up after yourself. Right. Like, so that's okay. Like that's a kind of a funny, you know, version of, of, of that. Right. But there are some other things, there are other things, I mean, in the same book, I actually talk about my mother and my biological mother who gave me away when I was three.Chisa Hutchinson (1h 2m 19s):But like before that, I mean, some of my earliest memories are of her like beating the shit out of me, you know, her and my stepdad beating the crap out of me at three, you know? So yeah. I don't, I don't, I have never had qualms about putting I'm like, you didn't have qualms about putting your fist to my, my little face. Right. So I'm not going to have qualms about like, putting that out there and trying to turn it into a positive, in case there's someone else out there who is feeling some type of way about the fact that their mother abandoned them or whatever, you know, like, I just want to let you know, like, I'm connecting with you, right. You are not alone.Chisa Hutchinson (1h 2m 59s):Right. And you know, you find your family where you can and that's sort of the message of the book is that you don't actually have to like grow grass root, right. Or, or even honor the fact that someone grew you right. In order to, to have family into it and to feel that that familial love. So that's what the book is, is supposed to doGina Pulice (1h 3m 28s):Truett fruit. Oh crap. Okay.Chisa Hutchinson (1h 3m 32s):I love it. So yeah, I, I will, I don't, there's really no such thing as a secret withGina Pulice (1h 3m 40s):You don't have a, a quandary about it. You just go straight .Chisa Hutchinson (1h 3m 47s):I do. I will let people know though, because I don't want to, you don't want to be bad art friend. Right? LikeGina Pulice (1h 3m 56s):Our friends on this podcast,Chisa Hutchinson (1h 3m 58s):I will let you know. I'm like, Hey look, because I left my husband and I'm like, look, I'm putting, do you see these pictures? You know, you see all these shit, you left around the house. Yeah. I took pictures of all of it and it's going in the book. Right. Like he knows, you know, his step, I just, or I'll ask if there's something like, I'm like, ah, hi, how do you feel about me too? Because here's why I'm thinking it will serve the story really well. Or here's why I think it'll help other people connect with it. Or, you know what I mean? Like, I I'm, I'm very clear on like, why I need a particular thing why I need to expose dirty laundry. Right, right, right.Chisa Hutchinson (1h 4m 39s):So, and as long as I can voice that, like most folks are okay with it. Well, what really cracks me up is when the people don't even recognize themselves in yourGina Pulice (1h 4m 49s):Oh, right. They'll or they'll, they'll tell, they'll tell you the character that they know you meant to be them. And it's not, it's like an admirable character and that's not who you areChisa Hutchinson (1h 4m 60s):Now that ain't too.Jen Bosworth-Ramirez (1h 5m 2s):I have a question as it relates to like, and I told you to, before this, I was going to ask you this. So I sent him a letter to someone, a query, and I said like, I'm a Latina, I'm a middle aged woman. I'm getting into television bubble. Anyway, I got a horrific, crazy response. And my initial response was to drag the motherfucker on Twitter, but I didn't do it. What, what do you think about, I don't even know if drags the right word out, whatever it is. It was a terrible situation that I felt. And my first response was, I'm going to get this motherfucker. I did not do it. I did not do it. But what do you feel about people that are go, go on social media or groups or whatever.Jen Bosworth-Ramirez (1h 5m 44s):I just, what are your thoughts on saying on, on, on doing that? Cause people are doing it a lot, you know? And, and I don't, I don't necessarily Gina and I talked about like, I'm not sure it's a terrible thing. I just, it wasn't right for me to do in that moment also, becauseChisa Hutchinson (1h 6m 1s):It's not a terrible thing, but it's not a great, I mean, it's not very everyone. Like, I, I don't really do it so much because I feel like it's giving them too much power or it's, it's that thing of like, okay, yeah. Dwell, dwell on it for five minutes and then move on like that, because that's, that's really how you can get back at those motherfuckers, right. Is to just like go on with your life and be happy and, you know, find joy elsewhere. Right? Like that's and, you know, to, to dignify their, their fuckery was, you know, you are strongly worded Facebook posts.Chisa Hutchinson (1h 6m 47s):Right. Is what is it doing? You know? I mean, would you feel better? It might make you feel better just to kind of like, get it out there. It also might help you connect with, you know, other people who have experienced a similar thing. Right. And, you know, maybe they were feeling isolated or alone and they're in their failure or in their, whatever it is. Right. So, I mean, I'm not gonna say it doesn't have its uses. Right. But as far as like, is it getting back at that personJen Bosworth-Ramirez (1h 7m 18s):And also, right.Chisa Hutchinson (1h 7m 22s):I really I'm just, so this is a lesson that I'm really just now getting around to like learning in a, in a sort of visceral way. Is that like nobody cares? No, I literally just today was, well that's right. Post, because I saw on IMD be the subject. There are a couple of, and it's really just a couple, like, there are a couple of really awful, I mean, Pete, just users who were just like, you know, clearly expecting it to be a comedy because Jason business owner or something, Make movies fun again, you know? And I was just like, oh dude.Chisa Hutchinson (1h 8m 3s):And they're the ones who, who will take the time to like post over review or post it's their, I can't even call them props because they would have to be thinking I would have to have brain. Right. But I did, like, I went on Facebook, like the closest I'll come is like, I went on Facebook and was like, Hey, y'all alert if you enjoy the movie, like, please rate it. Please post a review because these guys like their opinions, shouldn't be the stand in for everybody. Else's right. And that's, that's really about as close as I'll come. But even that I'm like, I was torn about doing that because I'm like, doesn't even, does it even matter?Chisa Hutchinson (1h 8m 47s):Like,Gina Pulice (1h 8m 48s):And it gets back to this whole thing about reviews because I saw your post and it's specifically men over 45 or something like that. And I thought, yeah, but who else is writing these things, but men over 45, like I'm guilty of loving something and then not writing it down anywhere that I love it because it's, so it's such an, it has become such an important part of art making, like how are people receiving it? And is it getting enough views? And is it getting enough, you know, clicks. And to me it's always just like the person who ha, who wants to take their time when it's not positive to tell you that you put your heart and soul into something and they didn't care for it.Gina Pulice (1h 9m 31s):And I don't understand the impulse, actually.Jen Bosworth-Ramirez (1h 9m 34s):This is the biggest demographic of voters, by the way. I think too, like I I'm just saying like, these are people that like really when they feel something, they feel really entitled to just like trash it. Or I think the, the, maybe the rest of us are so busy surviving. We don't write nice reviews. I don't know. But I started to write good reviews because I realized that for people, for people in that are trying to make projects, whether it's in the arts or not that it actually matters that the rest of us speak up because those voices, like you're saying don't need to be the loudest. Cause they're not, they're not the only voices out there. There's this is people that take the time to click away. Same with the guy who ran the time to use his time to write me a nasty,Chisa Hutchinson (1h 10m 17s):You know, like they're, they, they have a sense of self-importance that I think the rest of us not. And I'm just like, ah,Jen Bosworth-Ramirez (1h 10m 27s):Right, right. So I think the way to counter it is for the rest of us to start for me anyway. Cause I'm, I'm guilty too, of like not when something is great, not saying like, Hey, I love this product. Even if it's a candle, like we have a friend that makes candles, you know, and Gina, you posted about it. That matters. That's that? It's like, I got to take time out of my day, even though I'm busy hustling and all this stuff to like support the things that I do, like so that the loud, loud ass, old white dudes, don't just get to have the whole market cornered on reviews, like come on or whatever. So I think,Chisa Hutchinson (1h 11m 7s):You know, to bark the thing that I like out of existence, right? Like, because that is a thing that can happen too, when there's a perception that like, oh, well nobody wants this. Right. But the only people who have been, you know, it'sJen Bosworth-Ramirez (1h 11m 22s):And it's like, oh, this movie, this movie, or this project or whatever didn't do well, no, no, it actually did fine. It was just that the people that were screaming the loudest and felt entitled to scream, you know, people, we think that we give them importance. So it's like, we have to take back the, the importance of like, you know, the other voices it's just goes about like other voices in the room that aren't, aren't being heard.Chisa Hutchinson (1h 11m 45s):People kno

The Chase Jarvis LIVE Show
The Stories That Connect Us with Gretchen Rubin

The Chase Jarvis LIVE Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 37:19


Today's episode features one of my favorite thinkers, Gretchen Rubin. Gretchen Rubin is one of today's most influential and thought-provoking observers of happiness and human nature. She's known for her ability to distill and convey complex ideas with humor and clarity. In fact, when we sat down previously as part of the 30 Days of Genius series, her concept of sprinters vs marathoners was a bit unlock for my team (I'm a sprinter). Gretchen is the author of many books including the blockbuster New York Times bestsellers Outer Order, Inner Calm, The Four Tendencies, Better Than Before, and The Happiness Project. She also hosts the award-winning podcast Happier with Gretchen Rubin, is a speaker, columnist, and even been an answer on the game show Jeopardy. In this episode, I share an interview that is a part of CreativeLive's Between The Line series with the incredible Kelly Corrigan. Behind the Lines is an interview series focused on the stories behind the stories, tapping into authors' wealth of knowledge and experience to give you insight into improving your craft. Gretchen's life work has led not only to her ability to live her dream life, but she's also supported millions of others on their paths to happier, more fulfilled lives. A few highlights from the show: How to battle procrastination: one simple key (outer accountability) Why writing about embarrassing things can be a great way to connect with people The shifting role of writers- it used to be just writers write (now there different expectations about marketing yourself, having an audience etc.) Enjoy! Have a question? Text me 1-206-309-5177
 Tweet me @chasejarvis --- Today's episode is brought to you by CreativeLive. CreativeLive is the world's largest hub for online creative education in photo/video, art/design, music/audio, craft/maker and the ability to make a living in any of those disciplines. They are high quality, highly curated classes taught by the world's top experts -- Pulitzer, Oscar, Grammy Award winners, New York Times best selling authors and the best entrepreneurs of our times.

The Modern Therapist's Survival Guide with Curt Widhalm and Katie Vernoy

Therapists Shaming Therapists An interview with Katie Read about therapists shaming each other when they raise their fees or start playing bigger. Curt and Katie talk with Katie about the puritanical culture within the therapist community that leads to group think, public shaming, and milquetoast messaging to mitigate their fear that anything different will be attacked. We look at reasons behind this (jealousy, guilt, shame, and moralism) as well as what therapists can do to step outside of this culture to create more success.   It's time to reimagine therapy and what it means to be a therapist. To support you as a whole person and a therapist, your hosts, Curt Widhalm and Katie Vernoy talk about how to approach the role of therapist in the modern age. Interview with Katie Read, LMFT, Six Figure Flagship Katie takes lessons from her nearly-20 successful years in the field to help clinicians grow...then OUTgrow...their practices. Immediately upon licensure, Katie was made Director of a large Transitional Aged Youth program in Oakland, CA. Later, she was recruited to Direct one of Sacramento's largest Wraparound Programs, and from there she moved into the role of Director of Clinical Supervision, personally supervising 40+ interns towards licensure. Concurrently, Katie had private practices in multiple cities, taught graduate psychology students, and wrote and created therapist training materials. Katie is also a special needs mom and loves helping other moms tune into their own intuition and lead their best-possible lives by taking the sometimes-scary leap into following what's best for them, deep down. She is the creator of: The Clinician to Coach® Academy, The Clini-Coach® Certification, and the Six-Figure Flagship™ Program. She's a little bit obsessed with helping therapists get profitable doing the creative, out-of-the-box, authentic work you're called to do! In this episode we talk about: How therapists are treating each other The concept of trolling, piling on, shame The Article in the Atlantic – New Puritans – and the concept of the illiberal left How identity plays a role and the group dynamics within therapist Facebook groups The shaming related to increasing your fees Katie Read's origin story as an on the street social work The value placed on sacrifice and avoiding guilt for the difference in privilege when working with clients who are impoverished Socially-prescribed perfectionism, self-imposed perfectionism The fine line about what is acceptable to charge or make as a therapist Cancel culture and the lack of allowance for errors Echo chambers, factions, and exclusion The fear of dissenting opinions The low context of the internet paired with the high context nature of a therapist's job Milquetoast messaging to avoid getting attacked Dialing down authenticity to fit into what is acceptable Challenging our financial mindset Cultural and societal factors that frame us as cheap labor The seeming requirement for therapists to suffer in order to understand our clients The reality of therapists as business owners Therapist guilt for “earning money” Feminized professions and the expectation of doing things out the goodness of our hearts Rapidly changing social rules versus entrenchment in what has been How this identity shift is spilling over into real life Jealousy, guilt, and shame, and moralism The best therapists have the worst impostor syndrome How to navigate when you're a therapist going against the grain The importance of every therapist doing their own money mindset work Our Generous Sponsor: Trauma Therapist Network Trauma is highly prevalent in mental health client populations and people are looking for therapists with specialized training and experience in trauma, but they often don't know where to start. If you've ever looked for a trauma therapist, you know it can be hard to discern who knows what and whether or not they're the right fit for you. There are so many types of trauma and so many different ways to heal. That's why Laura Reagan, LCSW-C created Trauma Therapist Network.  Trauma Therapist Network is a new resource for anyone who wants to learn about trauma and how it shows up in our lives. This new site has articles, resources and podcasts for learning about trauma and its effects, as well as a directory exclusively for trauma therapists to let people know how they work and what they specialize in, so potential clients can find them. Trauma Therapist Network therapist profiles include the types of trauma specialized in, populations served and therapy methods used, making it easier for potential clients to find the right therapist who can help them.  The Network is more than a directory, though. It's a community. All members are invited to attend community meetings to connect, consult and network with colleagues around the country. Join our growing community of trauma therapists and get 20% off your first month using the promo code:  MTSG20 at www.traumatherapistnetwork.com.   Resources mentioned: We've pulled together resources mentioned in this episode and put together some handy-dandy links. Please note that some of the links below may be affiliate links, so if you purchase after clicking below, we may get a little bit of cash in our pockets. We thank you in advance! Katie Read's program: Six Figure Flagship Article in the Atlantic – The New Puritans by Anne Applebaum   Relevant Episodes: Therapist Haters and Trolls Advocacy in the Wake of Looming Mental Healthcare Workforce Shortages In it for the Money? Overcoming Your Poverty Mindset (with Tiffany McLain) Not Your Typical Psychotherapist (with Ernesto Segismundo) How to Overcome Impostor Syndrome to leave your Agency Job (with Patrick Casale)   Connect with us! Our Facebook Group – The Modern Therapists Group  Our consultation services: The Fifty-Minute Hour Who we are: Curt Widhalm is in private practice in the Los Angeles area. He is the cofounder of the Therapy Reimagined conference, an Adjunct Professor at Pepperdine University and CSUN, a former Subject Matter Expert for the California Board of Behavioral Sciences, former CFO of the California Association of Marriage and Family Therapists, and a loving husband and father. He is 1/2 great person, 1/2 provocateur, and 1/2 geek, in that order. He dabbles in the dark art of making "dad jokes" and usually has a half-empty cup of coffee somewhere nearby. Learn more at: www.curtwidhalm.com Katie Vernoy is a Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist, coach, and consultant supporting leaders, visionaries, executives, and helping professionals to create sustainable careers. Katie, with Curt, has developed workshops and a conference, Therapy Reimagined, to support therapists navigating through the modern challenges of this profession. Katie is also a former President of the California Association of Marriage and Family Therapists. In her spare time, Katie is secretly siphoning off Curt's youthful energy, so that she can take over the world. Learn more at: www.katievernoy.com A Quick Note: Our opinions are our own. We are only speaking for ourselves – except when we speak for each other, or over each other. We're working on it. Our guests are also only speaking for themselves and have their own opinions. We aren't trying to take their voice, and no one speaks for us either. Mostly because they don't want to, but hey.   Stay in Touch: www.mtsgpodcast.com www.therapyreimagined.com Our Facebook Group – The Modern Therapist's Group https://www.facebook.com/therapyreimagined/ https://twitter.com/therapymovement https://www.instagram.com/therapyreimagined/   Credits: Voice Over by DW McCann https://www.facebook.com/McCannDW/ Music by Crystal Grooms Mangano http://www.crystalmangano.com/   Transcript (Autogenerated) Curt Widhalm  00:00 This episode is sponsored by Trauma Therapist Network.   Katie Vernoy  00:04 Trauma therapist network is a new resource for anyone who wants to learn about trauma and how it shows up in our lives. This new site has articles, resources and podcasts for learning about trauma and its effects, as well as a directory exclusively for trauma therapists to let people know how they work, and what they specialize in so potential clients can find them. Visit trauma therapist network.com To learn more,   Curt Widhalm  00:27 Listen at the end of the episode for more about the trauma therapist network.   Announcer  00:31 You're listening to the modern therapist Survival Guide, where therapists live, breed and practice as human beings to support you as a whole person and a therapist. Here are your hosts, Kurt Wilhelm and Katie Vernoy.   Curt Widhalm  00:47 Welcome back modern therapists, this is modern therapist Survival Guide. I'm Curt Widhalm with Katie Vernoy. BLEEP you! This is the podcast where we talk about all things therapists, therapy related, therapist communities. And we are talking about the ways that we treat each other and a lot of this happens in the online groups. You know who you are. And   Katie Read  01:20 But do they?   Curt Widhalm  01:22 I think they do. Well, helping us here in this conversation today coming back to the show. Our good friend Katie Read. So before we before we start shaming the shamers.   Katie Vernoy  01:37 For shame!   Curt Widhalm  01:39 Tell us a little bit about yourself and what you're bringing into the world.   Katie Read  01:44 Hi, I'm Katie Read. Thank you for having me back. I missed you guys. We haven't been around here for a while.   Katie Vernoy  01:50 I know!   Katie Read  01:51 Good to be back. Although I did get to see you in person at the conference recently, which was amazing. So anyway, you can find me over at six figure flagship dot com. I do. One of the things that plenty of therapists like to shame, which is encouraging therapists who are creative who had that little spark that maybe someday they want to outgrow the therapist office, I... whispering under my hand here, I help them do that. Lest all the shamers jumped out at us. That's what I do. But I have like you been very active in therapists groups over the last couple years, and been often just shocked by the level of shaming that can happen in these groups. And it's so funny, I don't know about you guys. I've told this to other people, non therapists, like neighbors, friends just being like, Yeah, it's amazing. Those groups, people are astounded to hear that therapists would shame one another like it would never occur to them that therapists would be because they think of us all as being nice and wonderful and accepting and loving and caring and empathic, and all of these things. And I know we all three have had conversations in the background, like why does that fall apart on the internet, and I really do think it's just on the internet. It's not in person. It's just on the internet, but on the internet and therapists group. So not that I have any grand answers for this. But I'm super interested in this conversation today.   Katie Vernoy  03:18 We've talked about this in some ways before, and we'll link to those episodes in the show notes that we've got a therapist, haters and trolls. And there's a couple others, I'll look at them when I'm getting ready to put this together. But to me, I think the biggest thing that I see that that has always been shocking to me is the the piling on, that happens at someone put something out there, it becomes given that that is wrong and bad. And somebody has an opinion that this is wrong and bad. And then there's the defenders, but then there are the piler on-ers, is that is that a word? The people that then cosign on this negative information. And then all of a sudden, it's like the snowball effect. And there's like, hundreds of comments, and you are horrible and all of this stuff. And I think that there is an element of this that I think we do want to call people out when they're doing things that are harmful. I think the the criteria for what is harmful sometimes feels a little bit wiggly to me   Curt Widhalm  04:26 I kind of started looking at this more from just kind of a an academic approach. And what sparked this, for me was an article in The Atlantic called the new Puritans by Anne Applebaum. And it's an incredible article, we'll link to it in the show notes. But it starts to talk about the illiberal left, which many therapists politically identify in kind of this political compass of the left side. And what happens in echo chambers like there pice groups is that it becomes many people coming with a desire for positive social change and social mores are changing that. We've seen this happen not only in society, but in our field over the last 20 years. But what happens seemingly is, we're developing this this collective identity in these groups that becomes part of our own identities and seeing other people acting even slightly different than how we would act ends up becoming almost there's harm to our own self identity that needs to be processed and spoken out against when it comes to things like, hey, I want to raise my fees on my clients by $5 per session.   Katie Read  05:51 I find this one absolutely fascinating because I, I don't think I've ever seen a post go by in a group where a therapist has said, Hey, I'm thinking about raising my fees, and have not gotten at least some very heavy negativity thrown their way. Which is so fascinating to me. Because if you step back and you look at any career on Earth, we assume about every human being in the world, that you will always be on a quest to kind of step up to the next level in your career step up to the next level in your income. This is understood if anyone tells you they've gotten a raise, they've gotten a promotion, you say congrats, that's great. When therapists who are self employed, who have only themselves to answer to they are their own bosses, and when they say it's time for my yearly raise, and I have earned my yearly raise this year, and they attempt to give it to themselves, what do the therapist communities often do? Jump in with really crazy stuff really crazy? Oh, I don't know, I didn't get into this career to make money. I couldn't imagine putting my clients under that kind of strange, just really, really deeply shaming words coming at them. And I find it fascinating. You know, and I'm not exactly sure where it comes from. But it's interesting, because in prepping for this podcast, I was thinking about my early days as an intern and, and I do wonder, probably, at least for me, this was part of it. I spent many years even before I went to grad school, I was doing social work type roles in very, very, very impoverished areas. And then during grad school, I was working with foster kids. And then after grad school, I was an on the street social worker in inner city, Oakland, with teenagers and young adults, most of whom were homeless, or they were sex workers or drug addicts, gang members, like Oh, terrible, really difficult lives, right, like really terrible life situations. And I was dead broke, that job paid next to nothing, it was an internship job. And in a way, coming home to my crappy apartment, where people got mugged right outside in broad daylight and eating my ramen noodles, because that was all I could afford. I didn't have to feel so guilty going into work the next day, because my life was certainly better than my clients lives were at that time. But it was still rough, like things were still rough at my end. And I wonder if I remember at the time, I would say to people, I would say, this is the hardest work you can imagine doing. But if you can do it, you just have to do it. Because these people just need the help. And they need the support. And they need people on the street. And I had this very grand idea of what it was to be an on the street social worker doing that kind of work, and, and staying poor for it. And oh, it took me a long, long time to realize that I had to put the air mask on myself first, you know, like on the plane, like it took me a very long time to come to that change. But I wonder if some part of that for a lot of us does start because I think many of us do start in those types of jobs, those types of internships where you're seeing such poverty, you're seeing such difficult lives and you do feel a guilt around that.   Curt Widhalm  08:57 Even in your story here. Part of what I'm hearing is you lead that off with this is unique to therapists. So you're already framing this as part of therapist identity means that you have to do these certain things. Look at the shame that we put on people who go straight from grad school into private practice, like they are bypassing part of that identity. And, you know, the echoes of the criticisms is, well, that's such a privileged place to come from that you didn't have to go through this with all of these other clients. And a big part of that is in this identity becomes this thing called socially prescribed perfectionism that you must do this because what you're doing reflects on me and in combination with socially prescribed perfectionism comes this self imposed perfectionism that I must act this way. Yeah. And if other people whose identities reflects on the same way as mine And that's not how I see myself doing, I have to deal with that internal conflict, and it's much easier to tear you down than it is for me to wrestle with. All right, you do you and I'll do me and we'll both potentially help out the people that we're best suited to help out with.   Katie Read  10:19 That's so interesting. And it's so true. And I wonder. So like, I'm thinking about the people who I did know from grad school who came from different backgrounds who did go straight into private practice and whatnot. And you do wonder, do they feel any of that guilt? Do they carry any of that with them? Does that bounce off of them that they're like, what I was doing exactly what you just said, Curt, like what I was meant to do, I was helping the people I was meant to help. This is where I'm well suited. It's just interesting.   Katie Vernoy  10:45 And it's, it's something where this idea of perfectionism what what resonated for me was this, it's very thinly defined. And not only have I heard the, the negative backlash around charging a high fee, and and I don't know, necessarily that I've seen a lot of the negative feedback with I'm raising my fee by $5 Next year, but it's anybody that has a premium fee gets roasted. And anyone that talks about charging very little or being on insurance panels, also gets roasted, because you're undervaluing the profession, you're, you're making it harder for me to make money. And so there's this really fine line of what's acceptable,   Katie Read  11:27 Acceptable, huh.   Katie Vernoy  11:28 And so this this perfectionism around, I can't, I can't make too much, but I also can't charge too little. It just it feels very crazy making. And I think this, this notion of we're trying to validate our own identity through making everyone else be like us, or like, what the collective has decided is okay, feels kind of scary.   Curt Widhalm  11:57 And the extension of this goes beyond just, you know, the parent comments in some of these, these groups, that there becomes almost this effort to cancel people across multiple posts, that there seems to be so little room for error, and especially in late, like I said, social mores changing of, you know, a lot of the things that I see is, you know, not doing the emotional work or not doing the education work for other therapists who are potentially asking questions around things like critical race theory and involving, you know, wonderment about communities that they might not have experience with that. While there is validity on both sides is I've seen some of this extension go across, you know, bringing up these kinds of arguments across separate posts across separate days, weeks, even months, that his efforts towards this cancel culture esque type thing that serves to only make this problem even worse, by creating even stronger echo chambers of we're only going to listen to people who think exactly like us. And what ends up happening is we get these factions of, you know, well, here's the group of like minded people who sit over here. And here's the group of like minded people who sit over here, and here's the people who are okay with microwaving fish in the office, and they're okay in their own corner. But then it just makes it to where it's uninviting for anybody to have any kind of a dissenting opinion. Because and this is particular to the internet groups that you brought up. Here at the beginning, Katie, internet culture is very, very low context. And therapists are very, very high context people. This is a sociological phenomenon, that high context is understanding people where they're coming from, you know, we spend years studying how to get the high context of our clients. And we're used to communicating with people in this very, very high context sort of way. And then you get like one paragraph on a Facebook post to be able to try and explain something to somebody else. And it's just this very, really low context like fast moving group of people who kind of opt in and opt out but aren't consistently there. That makes it really enticing to pick on well, you're missing all of these high context things that just it's critical, and it's something that because of internet culture, therapists aren't used to having to receive information in that low context sort of way in embracing how we communicate online. Mind. In other words, we think that we're really smart in some areas of our life, and therefore all areas of our life should be really smart. But the internet is not that place.   Katie Read  15:11 And the internet dumbs us down. Well, it's interesting. And a moment ago, I just lost my train of thought you had said something a moment ago that   Curt Widhalm  15:18 I do that to people.   Katie Vernoy  15:20 Just keep talking, it's   Katie Read  15:22 10 minutes back. There was something I just lost it   Katie Vernoy  15:27 Well, keep thinking because I had something you know, a few minutes back when you were talking about your, your experience as kind of an on the on the streets, social worker and having to overcome that self imposed identity around if I am not so privileged, I don't feel guilty going to work. How did you work to overcome that? Because I think we're looking at being shamed for it. And and you did it within that culture, like I know, that I would imagine you have probably been shamed for for what you do, as you know, a six figure flagship even having that is so money title. So right, having the right so and so actually, how do you how have you gotten through it, I guess.   Katie Read  16:12 Yeah. And I can tell my story, but it's interesting, because you just reminded me of what Curt had said that I had wanted to comment on. Because it's all related. You had to Curt the end. And even Katie had said previously, there's this very narrow band of what kind of therapists are willing to accept as appropriate. And because the echo chambers are loud, and because the pile on culture is intense, within therapists groups, what happens is people are terrified to speak. And so we end up with very very milquetoast messaging. That doesn't challenge that doesn't potentially disagree, we end up with people who only want a message in ways that they will not be attacked for because as we all know, it's very painful and scary. If someone's coming at you online, some stranger online and other people are piling on and everyone would love to avoid ever having that situation. So we dial down what is true, what is authentic, what is important, we dial it down into what we hope will fit this narrow little brass band of appropriateness. And it's interesting like us, for me, it took me years and years. I mean, I eventually went from we eventually moved my husband and I to a different town, I opened up a small private practice. And it's funny, I was one of those therapists, and I was in California, where therapy rates are high. But I was the person where I was charging $90 an hour. And I was the person who set it like this, when a new client came in or called me and said, What's your fee? I went? Well, it's 90. But I can slide I can slide. What do you need, I mean, I can do whatever you need, I can really I get whatever you need, whatever you need, like that was me all the time. Because again, I was still carrying this guilt, about even charging that much and feeling like well, I couldn't even afford to go see me for therapy. So how can I think somebody else's, I was very much in my clients pockets. And what was really interesting was, I had been in this office for a while, you know, I rented my time other people came in and out. And there were several interns in the office, all supervised by this one supervisor. And I was speaking with one of the interns when we were crossing paths one day, and at this point, I had been a licensed therapist. For years, I had worked my way through community mental health up to being a program director, I had taught grad school, I had done all these things. And I was still charging this low rate because of my own internal money issues. And this intern, I don't know how we got on the subject. But she said, Oh, yeah, our supervisor now she was still in grad school. There's a person in her first year of grad school, an intern seeing clients. And she said, Well, our supervisor won't let us start any lower than 125 as our hourly rate, we're not allowed to slide under that they were private pay 125 for the interns. And my mind was blown. That here I was with years of experience behind me years of training behind me. And I it really in that moment hit me I was like I am doing this wrong. I am absolutely doing this wrong. And I need to start working on this. And some of it was working on my money mindset, honestly, for me, doing what I eventually did and wanting to outgrow the office that was motivated by different things like we moved states and then I wasn't licensed for a year while I went through the licensure process in a new state. So my path out of the office and outgrowing the office was sort of organic. It wasn't a pre plan type of thing. It just happened that I moved into coaching and ended up loving it. But within the coaching world, you really really get challenged very quickly on your financial mindset. And you really actually learn very quickly that the norm in the rest of the world is if you bring great value into someone's life, you are well paid for it. And we therapists continually underestimate the great, great, transformative, wildly important value that we bring into people lives. And whether you choose to continue to do it in the context of therapy or to write a book, or to go on a speaking tour to do any of the number of things that therapists can go out in the world, and do, we do by virtue of our passion, our education, all of these things, we bring great value we bring about great transformation in people's lives, and in most of the rest of the world, that would be naturally richly rewarded. But because of sort of the culture, and I honestly think part of it is just the culture of how government even is set up that we need to be able to have cheap labor to go out and work with the people who need help the most. And so many of us, like we said, started off in community mental health in some form, or in schools, which are very underfunded just, we start off as sort of cheap labor. And it's hard to get out of that mindset that we should always remain just cheap labor, or that what we do is not that highly valued in society where, of course, I don't know about you, I remember, every therapist I've had, and I remember them dearly. And they were hugely impactful at those times in my life, and every one of your clients and everybody out there listening. It's the exact same way, you're hugely impactful.   Curt Widhalm  21:14 You know, as I'm listening to this, and going back to that piece by Anne Applebaum, she makes mention of The Scarlet Letter as kind of this this parallel of what's going on with the liberal left. And the thing about this is one of that one of the major themes from the scarlet letter is the the priest who impregnates Hester, I'm forgetting his name right offhand. But he is seen as more virtuous because his sermons have so much empathy, from his own sins that there's almost this parallel what's going on with the groups here that we're seeing of like, we have suffered this injustice. And therefore we're better at what we do in relating to our clients, because we've done this. And especially when it comes to things like privilege and fees in this kind of stuff. It's like, you're, you're not able to relate to your clients as well. Because you haven't done this suffering, and you haven't done this, and therefore, you must suffer in order to be able to be a better therapist.   Katie Read  22:21 Yeah, yeah. Yeah, that's so interesting, isn't it. And so as some of that just coming down, is that just back to that therapist skills, we were talking just today, I had my meeting with my folks in my clinic coach, six figure flagship, and we were talking, there's one therapist, she's putting an unbelievable amount of work into an event that she's producing just probably hundreds of hours of her labor is going into this work. It's a passion project. She's so excited about it. And she came to the group and she said, I'm donating all the proceeds to charity. And I was like,   Katie Vernoy  22:56 Oh, wow.   Katie Read  22:59 And so we really, we took it apart a lot, like we coach through it a lot in the group. And today in our meeting, and I was, like, you know, like part of this here is that we are also business owners. And when you put in hundreds of hours of unpaid labor on something, you actually need to retain at least the majority of your profits, so that you can reinvest them into your own business, so that you can stay afloat, have savings of money for like all the things that we need to do. But really, to me, what I was hearing was therapist skill was I don't want it to look to anyone, like I'm trying to actually make any money. I want it to look like out of the goodness of my heart, I'm putting on this big event for all my fellow therapists to learn and grow. But God forbid someone think I might earn money from doing this. Yeah. And so it's just it was fascinating, because I don't think there's any other profession, where they would even consider for a minute giving every single bit of all this labor, all this unpaid labor straight to charity, without a second thought, maybe with many second thoughts, but feeling like this is what I should do.   Katie Vernoy  24:05 Yeah, yeah, I just I think about teachers, I think about oftentimes nurses, part of it is kind of feminized professions do have this this impact where the majority of the folks in those professions are non male. And so there is an expectation, this is something we should be doing out of the goodness of our hearts. And it seems very mercenary if we would ask for money for it. You know, there are, you know, during the pandemic, these poor teachers, were finally getting recognition for what they actually do for folks' kids. But as soon as you know, even even well into the pandemic I started to get because I work with some teachers. I was started hearing that people were complaining that the teachers weren't doing enough and we're paying their salaries and why aren't they doing enough? And it's like, whoa, you know, or if they go on strike that is just heartless. So it's heartless. And it's kind of like would you work for the salary that they work for? And then we've seen the same with the Kaiser therapists. That was one of the things that happened. We see the same with nurses.   Curt Widhalm  25:11 I mean, our episode, recently where we talked about, you know, let's just throw more Subway sandwiches at therapists,   Katie Vernoy  25:19 workforce shortage at episode that we just put up.   Curt Widhalm  25:21 Yeah, it's just it's throwing more Subway sandwiches at therapists because, you know, how dare you ask for money. And part of this is as a field that our median age is higher than many other fields. And that anytime that we have a field that has rapidly changing social rules to it, it makes it to where, especially with fields that are older, like ours, the entrenchment becomes a lot more rigid. And so I think that that's contributing to part of this, too, is that there's, there's this almost cultural battle that we're facing within our field that is leading to a new identity. And if we're honest about it, we contribute to that a lot here in the podcast, we do call out things that we don't like, including calling out other therapists calling out other therapists. So we do encourage you to let us know your thoughts and feelings on this publicly in any of the therapist groups. But this happens, systemically it happens individually as well. And, you know, I do see this happening outside of the therapist groups, and actually it is spilling over into in real life as well. To hearing this, you know, from some of the practices, hiring people, where I think rightfully, employees entering into the workforce are asking for living wages. And it is a power balance shifts that is leading to things like some of the workforce shortages that we talked about in the other episode.   Katie Read  27:14 Let me ask you, Curt, because as you were talking about sort of the field being a little bit older, in terms of median age and whatnot, I wonder, and I'm curious, just either of your thoughts on this. Do you feel like so let's say you are out there, whatever age you are, really, but you're a therapist, you've kind of become acclimated to the 50k a year therapist average median income, you've kind of surrendered yourself to the fact that you have a very hard job that you can't talk to anyone about, that you are bound by ethics and confidentiality, that you don't get to come home and vent about your day, you have to keep a lot of things bottled up. And at the same time, you know, you're probably worried every month, if you have a $400 car bill this month, it's gonna throw you over the edge, you're not going to have a cushion for that. And then you go into a therapist group, and you see somebody who says, I charge 200 an hour in my area, and I'm doing great and everything's fine. Do you think part of this backlash is just that feeling of threat, that you can't do that or that you haven't chosen that or that you haven't gone to do whatever it is you need to do internally, whatever that sort of money work is that you need to do to actually start charging closer to your worth as an experienced person in the field?   Curt Widhalm  28:30 Absolutely. 100% think that a lot of where we socially prescribe other therapists to be comes from our own anecdotal histories. And our inability is to deal with our own crap when it comes to our relationships to money, our relationships to our professional identities, that and, you know, this even happens in things that I see like in law ethics workshops, that I teach that it's not even just about money thing, but just how much we distance ourselves from other people who make mistakes. You know, if somebody's name shows up in the spider pages, the disciplinary actions, how quickly are to just like, unfriend them or take them off of our LinkedIn connections? Even if it's something that might points closer to us, you know, you see this and things like people who admit to not being caught up on their notes and just kind of the furthering away, you know, these are ethical and legal responsibilities that we have in our profession. And as compassionate people we tend to have very little compassion for the other people in our profession. When they don't do the same kinds of steps that we think that we should be doing or have been doing all along ourselves.   Katie Vernoy  29:52 You're really saying jealousy, guilt and shame.   Curt Widhalm  29:54 Yes!   Katie Vernoy  29:56 Because I think of like the especially I think with the environment around you, Katie, which is like the six figure flagship, it's people outgrowing the office, it's that kind of notion of very successful, you know, I'm going to make a lot of money, I'm going to, I'm going to live a life. And and you don't argue that that comes easily. I saw your post on kind of hustle seasons. And so I appreciate that. But I think that there's this notion that you can work really hard, create something that's more sustainable and make a lot of money. And I think there's a jealousy there, either of the energy that you personally have. I know I'm jealous of your energy. And then there's also the success that people have, I think there's a jealousy there. And so then it's that kind of like, well, I didn't want it anyway, like that. That's wrong, because I don't think I can get it. I'm jealous that you have it. And so I don't really want it. And this, there's all of these moral reasons and moralizing around why I don't want it. I think what you're talking about Curt is kind of this guilt and shame over, I've been doing things wrong. I can't do that, because it goes against these self imposed values and morals that I've put around being a hard worker, that is one of the people and I am not going to I'm not in this for the money. And I'm doing this because it's so valuable. And even thinking about money is so mercenary and wrong. And so there's that guilt and shame of wanting more, but feeling like it goes against either the collective morals or the personal morals. And so to me, it's like if we think about guilt, shame, and jealousy, I mean, the fact that there is so many of those emotions that come out in these public shreddings, in these social media groups or on pages or whatever, like it just it seems strange to me, that therapist would would have those in such huge, huge, impactful ways.   Katie Read  31:54 It's interesting, too, because I was just putting together a workshop where we talked about how typically the best therapists tend to have the worst imposter syndrome. And I think imposter syndrome falls into what you're talking about, and the fact that because we all tend to be pretty intellectual, pretty academic, you know, even those of us who are super heart led, we all still have like our little academic streak. And I think that we all walk around with this belief that if I am not the top researcher in a particular field, I have nothing to say it's very black and white. If I am not the absolute most published person in this particular theory, I should just sit down and shut up, I know nothing, as opposed to being able to see all the gradients, being able to see all of the expertise that everyone has and that you can bring in that could benefit so many more people. If you were brave enough to kind of fight your own imposter syndrome. Stand up, talk about what you know, help even more people that way.   Katie Vernoy  32:55 Yeah.   Katie Read  32:56 But we get very caught in that. Because this will not win a Pulitzer, I might as well not even write it. I might as well not even try it. And I just want what's the point? What's   Katie Vernoy  33:06 and and how dare you, other person that is doing this? How dare you do that? Because I've decided, even though I may have more knowledge than you   Katie Read  33:17 Yes,   Katie Vernoy  33:17 that I'm not good enough to speak on it. So how dare you!   Katie Read  33:20 How dare you? Exactly. Oh, isn't that so true. And I do think this is what we see play out in therapists groups. And I do think it's terribly sad, because at the end of the day, to me, I always think the lay public are the only losers here. Because when you choose to not speak out, when you choose to not share what you know, when you choose to not be open and vulnerable, and who you are, and say, I know I might not be the world renowned expert on XYZ. But let me tell you a little bit about what I do know, because you might think it's interesting. And I think the thing a lot of therapists don't realize because we're sort of taught to write dissertation style for everything is that the average person doesn't want that. They do want the little tidbit. They do want the little micro snippet that you pulled from an interesting article you read that you couldn't get out of your mind yesterday, share that that's what they want to because it'll get into their head too and it'll help them in their life just like it helps you they don't need your full scope dissertation on anything.   Katie Vernoy  34:19 Yeah.   Curt Widhalm  34:20 So is the answer and stop hanging out with other therapists?   Katie Read  34:29 I don't know let's vote should we go around and vote? I you know it's interesting though, you I definitely think it's something that we talk about in our group is that we talked about how when you even when I when I first started doing the most basic stuff, offering like copywriting for therapists offering basic marketing for therapists in this tiny little way like putting a post on Facebook Hey, need help with your copywriting? You know, these tiny little ways? I had rude people I had predicted people I know going well that's never gonna go anywhere. What are you even doing? Why are you doing that? And so I just want all my students like any time, you are going against the grain a little bit breaking the mold a little bit of what it means to be a helping professional, because what I believe at the end of the day is what you call it doesn't matter as much as what you're actually doing. Are you out there helping people in some form? Is your internal calling to be out there helping people in some form? Great, are you doing it? If you are, and if you feel good and authentic, and you know that you are living out your calling that you are truly helping people in some form? Does it matter if you call it therapy today, and maybe tomorrow, it's consulting, and you have consulting clients, and maybe the next day you build an online course where you help people and maybe you go speak at a school the next day, doesn't matter what form it's in, that you're helping people as long as you are authentically helping people what you were called to do, does the name matter? So you can hang out with a therapist like that. Kurt,   Katie Vernoy  36:00 I hear you saying that hanging out with therapists who have that broader perspective that aren't so tied into the Puritan culture is probably helpful for folks that are really coming, that are pushing against the grain in some way. And and I really resonate with that, because I think that's, that's why we found each other and   Katie Read  36:18 That's what you've done   Katie Vernoy  36:22 We've been trying, you know, we don't we don't avoid the purity culture, we just try to push back against it. But I think it's, it's something where when you're really trying to step out and help people in a bigger way, it is, it is important that you find the right people to spend time with because you can get tamped down by purity culture,   Katie Read  36:40 You can. Well, and I should say this, like for a lot of us, I know for me, when I was I think it is important for therapists to do money work on ourselves, go read the self help books, go, you know, sign up with Tiffany...   Curt Widhalm  36:53 GO DO YOUR OWN RESEARCH!   Katie Read  36:58 I think it's important to do that. And I think it's important to hang out with people who get it and have done it. And I think for all of us to, there is a way that you can feel good about what you charge and feel good about what you give back. And that that is going to be different for everyone, whether it's that you do a couple free or cheap sessions every single week, or you give a certain amount to charity every year, like whatever that looks like for you. You can still set this up in a way where you're not going to feel like a greedy bastard, for earning a good living where you still know that you are I mean, for me, when I started outgrowing the office, honestly, my entire motivation was security. My husband worked at a large multinational corporation that was doing layoffs, rolling layoffs every single month. And every single month, it felt like we were going to be any minute we were going to be homeless because he was going to get laid off. And that was the bread and butter of the family. And what then and all I really wanted was some security. And so that drove me and I was like I said we had moved states. And so I didn't have a license in my new state. I couldn't just go open a therapy office, it drove me to get creative and do something else. But I think when your motivation comes from that, like there's, I don't know, a lot of therapists who are like, I'm gonna go get rich so that I can have seven maaser body it's like, it's just not who we are, you know, like, that's just not what we're doing here.   Katie Vernoy  38:16 Well, we do have to end here, but but I think we also if there is a therapist that wants to get ready to get seven Montserrado for months, seven months. Go for it do. So before we close up, where can people find you?   Katie Read  38:30 Six Figure flagship.com is the main program that we run right now it's an application only program for mental health therapists who do want to outgrow the office, that is the best place to find me. And otherwise, I'll just be kind of hanging out with you guys.   Katie Vernoy  38:44 I love it. Always again, it   Curt Widhalm  38:47 We will include a link to Katie's websites in our show notes. You can find those over at MTS g podcast.com. And follow us on our social media join our Facebook groups modern therapists group and   Katie Read  39:01 Or we will shame you.    Curt Widhalm  39:03 we actually have a really good group that seems to   Katie Read  39:08 No I said we will shame them for not joining it, we find them.   Curt Widhalm  39:14 Some we will post those links and until next time, I'm Curt Widhalm with Katie Vernoy And Katie Read.   Katie Vernoy  39:20 Thanks again to our sponsor, Trauma Therapist Network.   Curt Widhalm  39:24 If you've ever looked for a trauma therapist, you can know it can be hard to discern who knows what and whether or not they're the right fit for you. There's so many types of trauma and so many different ways to heal. That's why Laura Reagan LCSW WC created trauma therapist network. Trauma therapist network therapist profiles include the types of trauma specialized in population served therapy methods used, making it easier for potential clients to find the right therapist who can help them. Network is more than a directory though it's a community. All members are invited to attend community meetings to connect consults and network with colleagues around the country.   Katie Vernoy  40:01 Join the growing community of trauma therapists and get 20% off your first month using the promo code MTSG20. At trauma therapist network.com Once again that's capital MTSG, the number 20 at Trauma therapist network.com   Announcer  40:17 Thank you for listening to the modern therapist Survival Guide. Learn more about who we are and what we do at MTS g podcast.com. You can also join us on Facebook and Twitter. And please don't forget to subscribe so you don't miss any of our episodes.

Rock N Roll Pantheon
Who Cares About The Rock Hall?: What to Expect at the 2021 Induction Ceremony w/ Craig Jenkins

Rock N Roll Pantheon

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 30, 2021 80:22


Pulitzer-nominated music and culture writer Craig Jenkins (Vulture) joins Joe & Kristen for a discussion on what to expect at this year's Rock Hall induction ceremony. What songs will be played? What could be the jam? How will they handle fitting in the induction of thirteen different artists? This show is part of Pantheon Podcasts. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Red, Blue, and Brady
154: Blood in the Water: Gun Violence, Policing, Media Representations, and Truth

Red, Blue, and Brady

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 44:24


In the final episode of season two, Brady's VP of Policy, Christian Heyne, joins host JJ, to discuss how policies either prevent gun violence and reduce racial inequities— or exacerbate both—that is why we must reckon with racism's role in gun violence as we craft solutions today. Then, JJ is joined by co-host Kelly Sampson and the Pulitzer-prize winning historian Heather Ann Thompson, to discuss Dr. Thompson's book Blood in the Water: The Attica Uprising of 1971 and its Legacy .  Listen as Dr. Thompson breaks down the ways in which the Attica prison riot of 1971 (and the resulting massacre) had on prisons and policing in the United States. In particular, it changed how people thought about the rights of currently and formerly incarcerated and firearms.  Mentioned in this podcast:Blood in the Water (Heather Ann Thompson)Why Mass Incarceration Matters to our Cities, Economy, and Democracy (Ash Center)The Ugly History of Racist Policing in America: Interview with Heather Ann Thompson (Vox)How Prisons Change the Balance of Power in America (Atlantic)Inner-City Violence in the Age of Mass Incarceration (Atlantic)A version of this podcast initially ran as "Prisons, Punishment, Policing--and Guns."For more information on Brady, follow us on social media @Bradybuzz or visit our website at bradyunited.org.Full transcripts and bibliographies of this episode are available at bradyunited.org/podcast.National Suicide Prevention Lifeline: 1-800-273-8255.Music provided by: David “Drumcrazie” CurbySpecial thanks to Hogan Lovells for their long-standing legal support℗&©2019 Red, Blue, and BradySupport the show (https://www.bradyunited.org/donate)

Qanon FAQ
Stopping The Steal with Flynn, Pulitzer, Clements, and Byrne

Qanon FAQ

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 64:06


In this episode of “Making Sense of the Madness” Sean Morgan interviews four superstar leaders of the “Stop The Steal” movement. They each give their unique perspective on where we've been and where we're going along with practical tactics and strategies for saving our republic.Dr. Patrick Byrne:https://americaproject.com/Professor David Clements:https://www.theprofessorsrecord.com/Jovan Hutton Pulitzer: https://jovanhuttonpulitzer.locals.com/Joseph Flynn: https://americaproject.com/Get Breaking News Updates: https://SeanMorganReport.comGet a Free Gold Consultation:Call Dr. Kirk Elliott at +1 720-605-3900https://sovereignadvisors.net/pages/seanmorgan/Nearly 60% of Americans are concerned about running out of money.RECEIVE A FREE CONSULTATION & A FREE E-BOOK ABOUT ANNUITIEShttps://www.americanmediaperiscope.net/clevelandFREE OR PREMIUM MEMBERSHIP: https://bit.ly/3reDC7CBUY GOLD: https://bit.ly/37HjsdRBUY A SAT PHONE: https://bit.ly/3B1SviMwww.AmericanMediaPeriscope.netFACEBOOKTWITTERSupport the show (https://donorbox.org/seanmorganreport)

Unorthodox
Returning to Pittsburgh: Ep 292

Unorthodox

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 43:38


Three years after the Tree of Life synagogue shooting that killed 11 Jews, we return to Pittsburgh with a special episode based on Mark Oppenheimer's reporting for his new book, Squirrel Hill: The Tree of Life Synagogue Shooting and the Soul of a Neighborhood. You'll hear from the local high schoolers who planned the Saturday night vigil that drew thousands of people, from the Pulitzer-winning editor of the Pittsburgh Post Gazette explaining how he conceived the paper's famous Hebrew-language front page headline, and from the archivist responsible for cataloging the thousands of pieces of mail received by the synagogue from around the world. Listeners will learn about the evangelical Christian carpenter who drove nine hours to place handmade crosses, to which he affixed Stars of David, outside the synagogue, and the member of the Jewish burial society who was shot in the attack and who then helped prepare the bodies of fellow members for burial. Listen to our 2018 episode, recorded from Pittsburgh in the hours following the shooting, here. Unorthodox is produced by Tablet Studios. Please consider making a tax-deductible donation at bit.ly/givetounorthodox. Send comments and questions to unorthodox@tabletmag.com, or leave us a voicemail at (914) 570-4869. You can also record a voice memo on your smartphone and email it to us. Subscribe to our weekly newsletter to get new episodes, photos, and more. Join our Facebook group, and follow Unorthodox on Twitter and Instagram. Get a behind-the-scenes look at our recording sessions on our YouTube channel! Get your Unorthodox T-shirts, mugs, and baby onesies at bit.ly/unorthoshirt. Want to book us for a live show? Email producer Josh Kross at jkross@tabletmag.com. Check out all of Tablet's podcasts at tabletmag.com/podcasts. Sponsors: The 15th annual Other Israel Film Festival is taking place November 4–11 at the Marlene Meyerson JCC Manhattan. This festival provides an in-depth look into Israeli and Palestinian societies, and this year features both in-person and virtual screenings. For more info and tickets, visit otherisrael.org. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Who Cares About the Rock Hall?
What to Expect at the 2021 Induction Ceremony w/ Craig Jenkins

Who Cares About the Rock Hall?

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 80:52


Pulitzer-nominated music and culture writer Craig Jenkins (Vulture) joins Joe & Kristen for a discussion on what to expect at this year's Rock Hall induction ceremony. What songs will be played? What could be the jam? How will they handle fitting in the induction of thirteen different artists? This show is part of Pantheon Podcasts. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Chase Jarvis LIVE Show
The Meaning of Freedom with Sebastian Junger

The Chase Jarvis LIVE Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 74:30


Freedom is a hot topic in 2021 as the pandemic continues to challenge everything we thought we knew. Author Sebastian Junger digs deep into the concept of freedom and how all of human history has contributed to the value of freedom today. Sebastian Junger is an award-winning journalist and New York Times bestselling author. His books include: A Death in Belmont, Fire, The Perfect Storm, Tribe, and War. After reporting on the war in eastern Afghanistan, Sebastian shifted to making documentaries about American soldiers and their stories. His debut film, Restrepo received an Academy Award nomination, and he won the Grand Jury Prize for the film at Sundance. After spending years traveling across the country and around the world, Sebastian started a family, and he began to see many of the things he'd experienced in life through a different lens. The mundane nature of family life, in contrast to the drive and ambition of a young person gives him a unique perspective on the question of freedom and what it means to live a full life. Pieces of life that once made less sense suddenly come into focus. In our interview, he explains that the comfort of his family “allows for me to love in the most profound, powerful, beautiful way possible. I didn't know there were feelings like this.” He reflects on his time in Africa during the Liberian civil war how he witnessed parents' terror about what might happen to their children. He experienced a similar moment of clarity in his life when he almost died due to an aneurysm that burst, causing him to lose 90% of his blood. He talks about the vulnerability of life and compares it to the vulnerability of freedom. What does freedom mean to you? Is it amassing enough money that you don't have to worry about financial hardships? Or is it having no money so that you're not tied to the rat race of modern society? Or most likely, somewhere in between.  Sebastian's words and anecdotes show how we are all connected throughout the human experience as he dives deep into the human condition. His book Freedom does a beautiful job of drawing lines between relationships, community and freedom. Highlights from our conversation: Hardship and love pair together to make a very meaningful life. Hardship challenges us to come together, and love gives us a sense of purpose. An important part of a community is the idea that giving is more powerful than receiving. When any given group strives to give more than they take, there is an increase in success. Our modern society is highly segmented and challenges the idea of community – children sleeping in separate bedrooms to homes and neighborhoods being segmented. Many people feel a disconnect from their family or community. They don't feel like active members in the groups they associate with because of segmentation. Enjoy! Have a question? Text me 1-206-309-5177
 Tweet me @chasejarvis --- Today's episode is brought to you by CreativeLive. CreativeLive is the world's largest hub for online creative education in photo/video, art/design, music/audio, craft/maker and the ability to make a living in any of those disciplines. They are high quality, highly curated classes taught by the world's top experts -- Pulitzer, Oscar, Grammy Award winners, New York Times best selling authors and the best entrepreneurs of our times.

The Chase Jarvis LIVE Show
How to Differentiate Your Work

The Chase Jarvis LIVE Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 13:50


On today's episode I take two questions. The first is regarding a popular topic many businesses are asking about how to work with influencers - striking the balance between paying them enough to make it worth their while without paying too much that impacts your business negatively. While Cory is knowledgeable about the hair industry, and clearly has an understanding of Netflix and Spotify's business models, it's always worthwhile to re-evaluate your strategies. Is subscription really the best way to go? Or can you have a hybrid model that allows you to scale? If you are going to go the subscription route, understanding the unit economics of your business is the only way to know how much you can afford to pay them. So how many users, over what churn rate, over what length of time? And what's the LTV (lifetime value) of a customer on your platform? I've learned a lot about this stuff over the course of the last 12 years and I love to hear specific business problems, so if you are at a crossroads or want some perspective on how you can navigate your own business challenges shoot me a text at 206-309-5177. Question two is another zinger. With everyone on the internet- putting out so much incredible art and creativity, standing out from the crowd is one of the most difficult things you can do. I've said it before, personal style is everything. It is the most important thing creatives can do because that's how you get hired. The way you do that is by putting more of yourself into the work. So what have you done, experienced, learned about or worked on that you can you consistently put into your work to differentiate you from other creators? It's okay to take bits and pieces of others' creativity, filter it through your lens, and share that. That's not stealing, that's called research and application. But hang on, there is a critical first step. And it's simple, but it won't happen overnight. You need to put in the reps. Make enough stuff to get to the point where creating becomes intuitive. That's when you know you've developed your own personal style. Enjoy this episode as I dig into these topics and most importantly, get those creatives reps in early and often. Enjoy! Have a question? Text me 1-206-309-5177
 Tweet me @chasejarvis --- Today's episode is brought to you by CreativeLive. CreativeLive is the world's largest hub for online creative education in photo/video, art/design, music/audio, craft/maker and the ability to make a living in any of those disciplines. They are high quality, highly curated classes taught by the world's top experts -- Pulitzer, Oscar, Grammy Award winners, New York Times best selling authors and the best entrepreneurs of our times.

The Chase Jarvis LIVE Show
Creative Acts for Curious People with Sarah Stein Greenberg

The Chase Jarvis LIVE Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 73:34


Self-evidently, design and creativity are everywhere -- literally in every man-made thing we make, use, or celebrate.  According to today's guest, the act of design and creativity can benefit everyone, whether they see themselves as creative or not. Sarah Stein Greenberg is Executive Director of the d.school at Stanford (aka the Hasso Plattner Institute of Design), which explores what great design can bring to global industries.  She's the author of the book Creative Acts for Curious People: How to Think, Create and Lead in Unconventional Ways. Sarah cites the freedom of Lego construction, and her father's carpentry, as twin inspirations for her own creativity.  We talked about design as a language and creativity extending beyond the narrow realms of “art”. Among the highlights: How navigating uncertainty requires an open attitude to creativity. The importance of “meta-learning.” The value of recognizing one's own bias. Strategies for exploring serendipitous discovery. The difference between divergent and convergent ideation. How to solicit and use constructive criticism. Struggle as a sign that productive learning is occurring. How to overcome creative blockages. Enjoy! Have a question? Text me 1-206-309-5177
 Tweet me @chasejarvis --- Today's episode is brought to you by CreativeLive. CreativeLive is the world's largest hub for online creative education in photo/video, art/design, music/audio, craft/maker and the ability to make a living in any of those disciplines. They are high quality, highly curated classes taught by the world's top experts -- Pulitzer, Oscar, Grammy Award winners, New York Times best selling authors and the best entrepreneurs of our times.

The Chase Jarvis LIVE Show
How Hard Should You Work?

The Chase Jarvis LIVE Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 19:17


“Working too hard is one of the top regrets of the dying.”  Yet, when faced with the fear of not having lived the life we truly desire, we seek answers: how hard should we really work? The answer depends on what you want to make out of your life -- your purpose, your calling. It also depends on your definition of 'balance'. How much time do you want to spend working? Would you happily allow your craft to consume most of your days, or would you rather work less and spend the rest of the time in nature, with those you love? Today's episode is to help you set yourself up for the path you truly desire. Remember, there's no formula of success that doesn't have hard work in it, but there's also a risk of working too hard and forgoing the things that matter to you most.  Enjoy! Have a question? Text me 1-206-309-5177
 Tweet me @chasejarvis --- Today's episode is brought to you by CreativeLive. CreativeLive is the world's largest hub for online creative education in photo/video, art/design, music/audio, craft/maker and the ability to make a living in any of those disciplines. They are high quality, highly curated classes taught by the world's top experts -- Pulitzer, Oscar, Grammy Award winners, New York Times best selling authors and the best entrepreneurs of our times.

The Katie Halper Show
Military Sexual Assault WhistleBlowers with Amy Franck, Amber Fitzwater & Rich McHugh

The Katie Halper Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 83:01


Amy Franck and Amber Fitzwater were hired by the pentagon to help the military combat sexual assault. Instead they've become whistleblowers who have been retaliated against and sexually assaulted. Amy (https://twitter.com/Neveraloneadvo1), Amber and investigative journalist Rich McHugh (https://twitter.com/RichMcHugh) join the show to share their stories and talk about the way the US Military deals, or doesn't deal, with the its endemic sexual assault problem. Amy Braley Franck began her career as a Department of the Army Civilian in July of 2013 as a Victim Advocate and has held the position of Sexual Assault Response Coordinator and Sexual Assault Program Manager for a 2- and 3-star Army Service Component Commands. Ms. Braley Franck has been identified on two separate occasions as a whistleblower for her actions to protect her clients. Ms. Braley Franck holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Psychology and Business from the University of Maryland. Ms. Braley Franck is credentialed through NOVA D-SCAAP as Level IV Military Advocate. She is a certified Child Abuse Investigator and Nationally certified Forensic Interviewer, conducting interviews for local law enforcement, Army CID, FBI and Homeland Security and has been tendered an expert witness in Child Molestation and Abuse hearings. She has been recognized for her contributions and service to President Biden's Independent Review Commission to implement the change needed to shift to a proactive prevention model throughout the DoD. She is the founder of non-profit Never Alone Advocacy (http://www.neveraloneadvocacy.org/). Amber Fitzwater is a sexual assault response coordinator with the Army and has worked in the SHARP program since 2013. She is a level IV advocate, a certified clinical trauma intervention specialist, and is currently enrolled at the Chicago School of Professional Psychology working on her PhD in international psychology. She has over 16,000 hours of advocacy and has provided training to law enforcement and prosecutors about the neurobiological effects of trauma and the impacts on victim's memory to assist them in working with victims of sexual assault when it comes to interviewing and questioning them at trial. Ms. Fitzwater is also a survivor of sexual assault while working with the Army, and is a member of Ms. Braley Franck's non profit "Never Alone advocacy." Rich McHugh is an investigative reporter and serves as a correspondent for NewsNation. Over the past year, McHugh has reported extensively on the issue of sexual assault in our military. Prior to NewsNation, McHugh spent over twenty years as a producer in network television news. He served as a Supervising Producer in the NBC News Investigative Unit, where he and correspondent Ronan Farrow spent a year investigating sexual misconduct allegations against the Hollywood producer Harvey Weinstein. After their investigation was shut down at NBC, it was was published in The New Yorker magazine and won the Pulitzer prize, and has been widely credited as a catalyst for the #MeToo movement. As a contributor to Vanity Fair, McHugh published "You are to Stand Down," his personal account of how NBC killed it's Weinstein story, and "An Oral History Of A Predator" -- interviews with 30 Weinstein accusers. Prior to NBC, McHugh spent nearly a decade at ABC News, producing for Good Morning America. He has won an Edward R. Murrow award and five Emmy awards for his work. Born and raised in the Chicago area, he graduated from Columbia University in New York City. He lives in the New York City area with his wife, Danie, and their four young daughters.