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Best podcasts about Master

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Latest podcast episodes about Master

Rob, Anybody & Dawn
Master of Movies 1-19-22

Rob, Anybody & Dawn

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 30:41


full Audacy 2784f6de-552e-442a-92d3-ae22012d495a 2784f6de-552e-442a-92d3-ae22012d495a Wed, 19 Jan 2022 18:17:00 +0000 1841 https://omny.fm/s

Northwest Jeepcast
Interview with Master Pull

Northwest Jeepcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 102:37


In this episode, Gary and  Gary bring on Victor Bjornsson to talk all about MasterPull products. Hear about the SuperLine winch rope, Super Yanker kinetic ropes, soft shackles, and more. Victor gives us the history of his small family owned business which has become the leader in recovery gear. Tune in to hear a fresh new episode of the Northwest Jeepcast. The Total Approach to Getting Unstuck Off Road by Bob Wohlers --Visit Northridge4x4.com for all your Jeep needs and listen for a special coupon code. And follow us @nwjeepcast on Instagram, Twitter, YouTube and Facebook.

Par Jupiter !
La Master Classe d'Aïssa Maïga : Moi, Tonya

Par Jupiter !

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 4:20


durée : 00:04:20 - La Master Classe de Par Jupiter ! - Aïssa Maïga vient nous parler d'un film qui l'a marquée : Moi, Tonya de Craig Gillespie.

Peak Performance Selling
Master Your Own Mind with Gerhard Gschwandter

Peak Performance Selling

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 41:36


HIGHLIGHTSThe diversity of people in sales has made it more humaneNothing is that original under the sunPeople should be encouraged to pursue their ideas Self-Talk vs Listening to other people talkPractice doing mind resetsChanging your language can change the mindsetYour brain needs to catch up with the reality of what's possibleParallels between chess and the selling process You have to believe in yourself first  The habits that peak performers makeEvery moment is a surprise We need fantasy to keep reality in perspectiveQUOTESGerhard: "We cannot really claim that we are very smart, we are just the recipients of the kindness of other people. I think we have an obligation to share it with others because everything that's in our brain has been fed to us through the minds of other people. "Gerhard: "It's the thought that created the feeling, not the other way around. So when you write your thoughts down and let's say, you make a cold call and somebody slams the phone on you, and you say, I'm an idiot, I'm worthless, I feel bad, selling sucks, cold calling is dead and all those things, then you divide a piece of paper in two parts. On the left side, all the automatic negative thoughts. And then you force yourself to come up with the positive and realistic equivalent. And what happens when you complete the exercise, when you complete the right-hand side, you're back to your normal self. you have a mindset reset." Gerhard: "By observing your thoughts, you observe the pattern, you recognize the pattern. Then the next time a negative thought comes in, you can transform it." Gerhard: "You are operating right now only at about 40 or 50% of your capacities. You have a lot more in the tank and what's holding you back is the belief system."Gerhard: "As a salesperson, you got to believe in yourself. You got to believe in your product. You got to believe in your capacity and your skills to make it happen, to make quota. And you got to believe that the customer has the desire to buy otherwise you're cooked. If you negatively predict the outcome of a sales conversation, you're cooked. You're not gonna be able to sell.”Gerhard: "I think that peak performers don't get in a jam. They reframe experiences in a positive way. They start their day with a good morning routine. Some people actually spend 5 or 10 minutes writing down what my ideal day would look like if I could control everything."You can learn more about Gerhard in the link below.Website: https://www.sellingpower.com/Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/gerhard20/Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/user/gerhardpspTwitter: https://twitter.com/gerhard20If you're listening to the Peak Performance Selling Podcast, please subscribe, share, and send us your feedback.LinkedIn - https://www.linkedin.com/in/jordanbenjamin/Website - http://mycoreos.com/Podcast - https://www.mycoreos.com/podcastEmail - Jordan@MyCoreOS.comTwitter - https://twitter.com/jbenj09

Owning It
Emotional Lock-Picking and Truly Understanding Sales with John Williamson

Owning It

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 51:19


My bud, John Williamson, joins The Business Growth Advantage this week!   John is a MASTER at emotional lock-picking. He's cultivated the outstanding skill of understanding customers on such deep levels that the entire selling process becomes almost obsolete. He refined these skills through recognizing that people want their needs to be HEARD and ACKNOWLEDGED in real ways with real solutions, and that once they are, your product or service will be a no brainer! I've always enjoyed talking with John and I'm excited for him to share his experience and biz wisdom on the show!

Marveling at Marvel's Marvels
Episode 204: Shang-Chi and the Legend of the Ten Rings

Marveling at Marvel's Marvels

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 73:56


Join us for a discussion on the big screen debut of Marvel's Master of Kung-Fu, Shang-Chi! Needless to say, spoilers abound

Greater Than Code
267: Handling Consulting Businesses and Client Loads

Greater Than Code

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 62:06


00:36 - Panelist Consulting Experience and Backgrounds * Debugging Your Brain by Casey Watts (https://www.debuggingyourbrain.com/) * Happy and Effective (https://www.happyandeffective.com/) 10:00 - Marketing, Charging, and Setting Prices * Patreon (https://www.patreon.com/) * Chelsea's Blog (https://chelseatroy.com/) * Self-Worth by Salary 28:34 - GeePawHill Twitter Thread (https://twitter.com/GeePawHill/status/1478950180904972293) - Impact Consulting * Casey's Spreadsheet - “Matrix-Based Prioritization For Choosing a Job” (https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1qVrWOKPe3ElXJhOBS8egGIyGqpm6Fk9kjrFWvB92Fpk/edit#gid=1724142346) * Interdependence (https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/interdependence) 38:43 - Management & Mentorship * Detangling the Manager: Supervisor, Team Lead, Mentor (https://dev.to/endangeredmassa/detangling-the-manager-supervisor-team-lead-mentor-gha) * Adrienne Maree Brown (https://adriennemareebrown.net/) 52:15 - Explaining Value and Offerings * The Pumpkin Plan: A Simple Strategy to Grow a Remarkable Business in Any Field by Mike Michalowicz (https://www.amazon.com/Pumpkin-Plan-Strategy-Remarkable-Business/dp/1591844886) * User Research * SPIN Selling: Situation Problem Implication Need-payoff by Neil Rackham (https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/833015.SPIN_Selling) 55:08 - Ideal Clients Reflections: Mae: The phrase “indie”. Casey: Having a Patreon to help inspire yourself. Chelsea: Tallying up all of the different things that a given position contributes to in terms of a person's needs. This episode was brought to you by @therubyrep (https://twitter.com/therubyrep) of DevReps, LLC (http://www.devreps.com/). To pledge your support and to join our awesome Slack community, visit patreon.com/greaterthancode (https://www.patreon.com/greaterthancode) To make a one-time donation so that we can continue to bring you more content and transcripts like this, please do so at paypal.me/devreps (https://www.paypal.me/devreps). You will also get an invitation to our Slack community this way as well. Transcript: CHELSEA: Welcome to Greater Than Code, Episode 267. I'm Chelsea Troy, and I'm here with my co-host, Mae. MAE: And also with us is Casey. CASEY: Hi, I'm Casey. And today's episode, we are our own guests. We're going to be talking to you about our experiences in consulting. To get this one started, how about we share what got us into consulting and what we like, don't like about it, just high-level? Chelsea, would you mind going first? CHELSEA: Sure. So I started in consulting, really in a full-time job. So for early in my programming career, I worked for several years for a company called Pivotal Labs and Pivotal Labs is chiefly, or was chiefly at the time, a software engineering consulting organization. My job was to pair program with folks from client teams, various types of clients, a lot of health insurance companies. At the time, there was a restaurant loyalty app that we did some work for. We did some work for General Motors, various clients, a major airline was also a client, and I would switch projects every three to six months. During that time employed by Labs, I would work for this client, pair programming with other pivots, and also with client developers. So that was my introduction to consulting and I think that it made the transition to consulting later, a little bit easier because I already had some consulting experience from under the Labs' umbrella. After I worked for Labs, I moved on to working at a product company for about 2 years and my experience at that product company burned me out on full-time programming for a little while. So in my last couple of months at that job, I realized that I was either going to have to take some time off, or I was going to have to find an arrangement that worked better for me for work, at least for the next little while. And for that next little while, what I decided I wanted to try to do was work part-time because I was uncomfortable with the idea of taking time off from programming completely. I felt that I was too early in my career and the skill loss would be too great if I took time off completely, but I knew I needed some space and so, I quit my full-time job. After I quit the full time—I probably should have done this before I quit the job, but I didn't—I called an organization that I had previously done some volunteer work with, with whom I discussed a job a couple of years prior, but for a couple of different reasons, it didn't work out. I said to them, “I know that you're a grant-funded organization and you rarely have the funding and capacity to bring somebody on, but just so you're aware, I like working with you. I love your product. I love the stuff that you work on. All our time working together, I've really enjoyed. So if you have an opening, I'm going to have some time available.” The director there emailed me that same day and said, “Our mobile developer put in his two weeks' notice this morning. So if you have time this afternoon, I'd really like to talk to you,” [chuckles] and that was my first client and they were a part-time client. I still work with them. I love working with them. I would consider them kind of my flagship client. But then from there, I started to kind of pick up more clients and it took off from there after that summer. I spent that summer generally working 3 days a week for that client and then spending 4 days a week lying face down in a park in the sun. That helped me recover a little bit from burnout. And then after that, I consulted full-time for about 2 years and I still consult on the side of a full-time job. So that's my story. Is anyone feeling a penchant for going next? MAE: I can go. I've been trying to think how am I going to say this succinctly. I've had at least two jobs and several club, or organization memberships, or founding, or positions since I was 16. So wherever I go, I've always been saying, “Well, I've done it these 47 ways already [laughs] even since I was a teenager.” So I've sort of always had a consulting orientation to take a broader view and figure out ways in which we can systematize whatever it is that's happening around me. Specifically for programming, I had been an administrator, like an executive leader, for many years. I just got tired of trying to explain what we as administrators needed and I just wanted to be able to build the things. I was already a really big Microsoft access person and anybody who just got a little [laughs] snarky in there knows I love Microsoft Access. It really allowed me to be able to offer all kinds of things to, for example, I was on the board of directors of my Kiwanis Club and I made a member directory and attendance tracker and all these things. Anyway, when I quit my executive job and went to code school in 2014, I did it because I knew that I could build something a lot better than this crazy Access database [laughs] that I had, this very involved ETL things going on in. I had a nonprofit that I had been involved with for 15 years at that point and I had also taken a database class where I modeled this large database that I was envisioning. So I had a bunch of things in order. I quit my full-time job and went to an income of $6,500 my first year and I hung with that flagship customer for a while and tailored my software. So I sort of have this straddling of a SaaS situation and a consulting situation. I embed into whoever I'm working with and help them in many ways. Often, people need lots of different levels of coaching, training, and skills development mixed with just a place to put things that makes sense to them. I think that's the brief version [laughs] that I can come up with and that is how I got where I am and I've gone in and out of also having a full-time job. Before I quit that I referenced the first year I worked a full-time job plus at least 40 to a 100 hours on my software to get it ready for prime time. So a lot of, a lot of work. CASEY: Good story. I don't think I ever heard these fuller stories from either of you, even though I know roughly the shape of your past. It's so cool to hear it. Thanks for sharing them. All right, I'll share about me now. So I've been a developer, a PM, and I've done a lot of design work. I've done all the roles over my time in tech. I started doing programming 10, 15 years ago, and I'm always getting burnt out everywhere I go because I care so much and we get asked to do things that seem dumb. I'm sure anyone listening can relate to this in some organization and when I say dumb, I don't use that word myself directly. I'm quoting a lot of people who would use that word, but I say either we're being asked to do things that don't make sense, aren't good ideas, or there are things that are we're being asked to do that would make sense if we knew why and it's not being communicated really well. It's poor communication. Either one, the other, or both. So after a lot of jobs, I end up taking a 3-month sabbatical and I'm like, “Whatever, I got to go. I can't deal with caring so much anymore, and I'm not willing to care less either.” So most recently, I took a sabbatical and I finished my book, Debugging Your Brain, which takes together psychology ideas, like cognitive behavioral therapy and programming ideas and that, I'm so proud of. If you haven't read it yet, please check it out. Then I went back to my job and I gave them another month where I was like, “All right, look, these are things need to change for me to be happy to work here.” Nothing changed, then I left. Maybe it's changing very slowly, but too slowly for me to be happy there, or most of these past companies. [laughs] After I left, this last sabbatical, I spent three to six months working on a board game version of my book. That's a lot of fun. And then I decided I needed more income, I needed to pay the bills, and I can totally be a tech consultant if I just deal with learning marketing and sales. That's been my… probably six months now, I've been working on the marketing in sales part, thinking a lot about it. I have a lot of support from a lot of friends. Now I consult on ways to make teams happier and more effective and that's my company name, Happy and Effective. I found it really easy to sell workshops, like diversity, equity, and inclusion workshops to HR departments. They're pretty hungry for those kinds of workshops and it's hard to find good, effective facilitators. It's a little bit harder to get companies to pay for coaching for their employees, even though a new EM would love coaching and how to be a good leader. Companies don't always have the budget for that set aside and I wish they would. I'm working with a lot of companies. I have a couple, but not as many as I'd like. And then the hardest, my favorite kind of client is when I get to embed with the team and really work on seeing what's going on me on the ground with them, and help understand what's going on to tell the executives what's happening and what needs to change and really make a big change. I've done that once, or twice and I'd love to do that more, but it's the hardest. So I'm thinking about easy, medium, hard difficulty of selling things to clients. I would actually make plenty of money is doing workshops, honestly, but I want the impact of embedding. That's my bigger goal is the impact. MAE: Yeah. I basically have used my software as a Trojan horse for [laughs] offering the consulting and change management services to help them get there because that is something that people already expect to spend some money on. That, though has been a little problematic because a few years in, they start to think that the line item in the budget is only for software and then it looks very expensive to them. Whereas, if they were looking at it as a consultant gig, it's incredibly inexpensive to them. CASEY: Yeah. It's maybe so inexpensive that it must not be a quality product that they're buying. MAE: Yes. CASEY: Put it that way implicitly. MAE: Definitely, there's also that. CASEY: When setting prices, this is a good general rule of thumb. It could be too low it looks like it'll be junk, like a dollar store purchase, or it can be too high and they just can't afford it, and then there's the middle sweet spot where it seems very valuable. They barely can afford it, but they know it'll be worth it, and that's a really good range to be in. MAE: Yeah. Honestly, for the work that I do, it's more of a passion project. I would do it totally for free, but that doesn't work for this reason you're talking about. CASEY: Yeah. MAE: Like, it needs to hurt a little bit because it's definitely going to be lots and lots of my time and it's going to be some of their time and it needs to be an investment that not hurt bad [laughs] but just be noticeable as opposed to here's a Kenny's Candy, or something. CASEY: I found that works on another scale, on another level. I do career coaching for friends, and friends of friends, and I'm willing to career coach my friends anyway. I've always been. For 10 years, I've reviewed hundreds, thousands of resumes. I've done so many interviews. I'm down to be a career coach, but no one was taking me up on it until I started charging and now friends are coming to me to pay me money to coach them. I think on their side, it feels more equitable. They're more willing to do it now that I'm willing to take money in exchange for it. I felt really bad charging friends until I had the sliding skill. So people who make less, I charge less for, for this personal service. It's kind of weird having a personal service like that, but it works out really well. I'm so happy for so many friends that have gotten jobs they're happy with now from the support. So even charging friends, like charging them nothing means they're not going to sign up for it. MAE: Yes, and often, there is a bias of like, “Oh, well, that's my friend.” [laughs] so they must not be a BFD.” CASEY: Yeah. But we are all BFDs. MAE: Exactly! How about you Chelsea? How did you start to get to the do the pricing thing? CHELSEA: Yeah, I think it's interesting to hear y'all's approaches to the marketing and the pricing because mine has been pretty different from that. But before I get off on that, one thing I do want to mention around getting started with offering personal services at price is that if it seems too large a step to offer a personal service to one person for an amount of money, one thing that I have witnessed folks have success with in starting out in this vein is to set up a Patreon and then have office hours for patrons wherein they spend 2 hours on a Sunday afternoon, or something like that and anyone who is a patron is welcome to join. What often ends up happening for folks in that situation is that people who are friends of theirs support their Patreon and then the friends can show up. So effectively, folks are paying a monthly fee for access to this office hours, which they might attend, or they might not attend. But there are two nice things about it. The first thing about it is that you're not – from a psychological perspective, it doesn't feel like charging your friends for your time with them. It feels more indirect than that in a way that can be helpful for folks who are very new to charging for things and uncomfortable with the idea. The second thing is that the friends are often much more willing to pay than somebody who's new to charging is willing to charge. So the friends are putting this money into this Patreon, usually not because they're trying to get access to your office hours, but because they want to support you and one of the nice things about Patreon is that it is a monthly amount. So having a monthly email from Patreon that's like, “Hey, you we're sending you—” it doesn't even have to be a lot. “We're sending you 40 bucks this month.” It is a helpful conditioning exercise for folks who are not used to charging because they are getting this regular monthly income and the amount is not as important as receiving the regular income, which is helpful psychological preparation for charging for things on your own, I think. That's not the way that I did it, but I have seen people be effective that way. So there's that. For me, marketing was something that I was very worried about having to do when I started my business. In fact, it was one of those things where my conviction, when I started my consulting business, was I do not want to have to sell my services. I will coast on what clients I can find and when it is no longer easy, I will just get a full-time job because selling traditionally conceptualized is not something that I enjoyed. I had a head start on the marketing element of things, that is sort of the brand awareness element of things, my reputation and the reason for that is that first of all, I had consulted at Labs for several years, which meant that every client team that I had ever worked with there, the director remembered me, the product owner remember me. So a lot of people who had been clients of Labs – I didn't actually get anybody to be a client of mine who was a client of Labs, but the individuals I had worked with on those projects who had then changed jobs to go to different companies, reached out to me on some occasions. So that was one place that I got clients from. The other place that I gotten clients from has been my blog. Before I started my business, I had already been writing a tech blog for like 4, or 5 years and my goal with the tech blog has never actually been to get clientele, or make money. My goals for the blog when I started it were to write down what I was learning so that I would remember it and then after that, it was to figure out how to communicate my ideas so that I would have an easier time communicating them in the workplace. After that, it became an external validation source so that I would no longer depend on my individual manager's opinion of me to decide how good I was at programming. Only very recently has it changed to something like, okay, now I'm good enough at communicating and good enough at tech that I actually have something to teach anybody else. So honestly, for many years, I would see the viewership on my blog and I would be like, “Who are all these people? Why are they in my house?” Like, this is weird, but I would get some credibility from that. CASEY: They don't expect any tea from me. CHELSEA: Yeah. I really hope. I don't have enough to go around, [laughs] but it did help and that's where a lot of folks have kind of come from. Such that when I posted on my blog a post about how I'm going to be going indie. I've quit my job. I didn't really expect that to go anywhere, but a few people did reach out from that and I've been lucky insofar is that that has helped me sustain a client load in a way that I didn't really expect to. There's also, I would be remiss not to mention that what I do is I sling code for money for the majority of my consulting business, at least historically and especially in the beginning was exclusively that, and there's enough of a demand to have somebody come in and write code that that helped. It also helped that as I was taking on clients, I started to niche down specifically what I wanted to work on to a specific type of client and to a specific type problem. So I quickly got to the point where I had enough of a client load that I was going to have to make a choice about which clients to accept, or I was going to have to work over time. Now, the conventional wisdom in this circumstance is to raise your rates. Vast majority of business development resources will tell you that that's what you're supposed to do in this situation. But part of my goal in creating my consulting business had been to get out of burnout and part of the reason for the burnout was that I did not feel that the work that I was doing was contributing to a cause that made me feel good about what I was doing. It wasn't morally reprehensible, but I just didn't feel like I was contributing to a better future in the way that my self-identity sort of mandated that I did. It was making me irritable and all these kinds of things. MAE: I had the same thing, yeah. CHELSEA: Yeah. So it's interesting to hear that that's a common experience, but if I were to raise my rates, the companies that were still going to be able to afford me were going to be companies whose products were not morally reprehensible, but not things that coincided with what I was trying to get out of my consulting business. So what I did instead was I said, “I'm specifically looking to work with organizations that are contributing to basic scientific research, improving access for underserved communities, and combating the effects of climate change,” and kept my rates effectively the same, but niche down the clientele to that. That ended up being kind of how I did it. I find that rates vary from client to client in part, because of what you were talking about, Casey, wherein you have to hit the right price in order to even get clients board in certain circumstances. CASEY: Right. CHELSEA: I don't know a good way to guess it. My technique for this, which I don't know if this is kosher to say, but my technique for this has been whoever reached out to me, interested in bringing me on as a consultant for that organization, I ask that person to do some research and figure out what rate I'm supposed to pitch. That has helped a lot because a lot of times my expectations have been wildly off in those circumstances. One time I had somebody say to me, this was for a custom workshop they wanted. I was like, “What should I charge?” And they were like, “I don't know, a few thousand.” I was like, “Is that $1,200? Is that $9,000? I don't know how much money that is,” and so they went back and then they came back and they were able to tell me more specifically a band. There was absolutely no way I would've hit that number accurately without that information. CASEY: Yeah, and different clients have different numbers. You setting your price standard flat across all customers is not a good strategy either. That's why prices aren't on websites so often. CHELSEA: Yeah. I find that it does depend a lot. There's similarly, like I said, a lot of my clients are clients who are contributing to basic scientific research are very often grant funded and grants funding is a very particular kind of funding. It can be intermittent. There has to be a skillset on the team for getting the grant funding. A lot of times, to be frank, it doesn't support the kinds of rates that somebody could charge hourly in a for-profit institution. So for me, it was worth it to make the choice that this is who I want to work with. I know that my rate is effectively capped at this, if I'm going to do that and that was fine by me. Although, I'm lying to say it was completely fine by me. I had to take a long, hard look in the mirror, while I was still in that last full-time job, and realize that I had become a person who gauged her self-worth by the salary that she commanded more than I was comfortable with. More than I wanted to. I had to figure out how to weaken that dependency before I was really able to go off and do my own thing. That was my experience with it. I'm curious whether y'all, well, in particular, Casey, did you find the same thing? CASEY: The self-worth by salary? CHELSEA: Yeah. CASEY: I felt that over time, yeah. Like I went from private sector big tech to government and I got a pay cut and I was like, “Ugh.” It kind of hurt a little and it wasn't even as much as I was promised. Once I got through the hiring process, it was lower than that and now I'm making way less. When I do my favorite impact thing, the board game, like if I made a board game about mental health for middle schoolers, which is something I really want to do, that makes less than anything else I could with my time. I'll be lucky to make money on that at all. So it's actually inverse. My salary is inversely proportional to how much impact I can have if I'm working anyway. So my dream is to have enough corporate clients that I can do half-time, or game impact, whatever other impact things I'm thinking about doing. I think of my impact a lot. Impact is my biggest goal, but the thing is salary hurts. If I don't have the salary and I want to live where I'm living and the lifestyle I have, I don't want to cut back on that and I don't need to, hopefully. CHELSEA: Right. CASEY: I'm hoping eventually, I'll have a steady stream of clients, I don't need to do the marketing and sales outreach as much and all those hours I kind of recoup. I can invest those in the impact things. I've heard people can do that. I think I'll get there. CHELSEA: No, I think you absolutely will. Mae, I'm curious as to your experience, because I know that you have a lot of experience with a similar calculation of determining which things are going to provide more income, which things are probably going to provide less income, and then balancing across a bunch of factors like money, but also impact, time spent, emotional drain, and all that stuff. MAE: Well, Chelsea. [laughter] I am a real merry go round in this arena. So before I became a programmer, I had a state job, I was well paid, and I was pretty set. Then I was a programmer and I took huge pay cut because I quit. I became a programmer when I was 37 years old. So I already had a whole career and to start at the beginning and be parallel with 20-year-old so it's not just like my salary, but also my level and my level of impact on my – and level of the amount of people who wanted to ask me for my advice [laughs] was significantly different. So like the ego's joking stopped and so when you mentioned the thing about identity. Doing any kind of consulting in your own deal is a major identity reorganization and having the money, the title, the clout, and the engagement. Like a couple years, I have spent largely alone and that is very different than working at a place where I have colleagues, or when I live somewhere and have roommates. But I have found signing up for lots and lots of different social justice and passion project things, and supporting nonprofits that I believe in. So from my perspective, I'm really offering a capacity building grant out of my own pocket, my own time, and my own heart and that has been deeply rewarding and maybe not feel much about my identity around salary. Except it does make me question myself as an adult. Like these aren't the best financial decisions to be making, [chuckles] but I get enough out of having made them that it's worth it to me. One of the things probably you were thinking of, Chelsea, we worked together a little bit on this mutual aid project that I took on when the pandemic started and I didn't get paid any dollars for that and I was working 18 hours a day on it, [chuckles] or something. So I like to really jump in a wholeheartedly and then once I really, really do need some dollars, then I figure something else out. That is kind of how I've ebbed and flowed with it. But mostly, I've done it by reducing my personal overhead so that I'm not wigged about the money and lowering whatever my quality-of-life spending goals [chuckles] are. But that also has had to happen because I have not wanted to and I couldn't get myself to get excited about marketing of myself and my whole deal. Like I legit still don't have a website and I've been in operation now since 2014 so that's a while. I meet people and I can demonstrate what it is and I get clients and for me, having only a few clients, there's dozens of people that work for each one. So it's more of an organization client than a bunch of individuals and I can't actually handle a ton. I was in a YCombinator thing that wanted me to really be reporting on income, growth rates, and all of these number of new acquisition things, and it just wasn't for me. Those are not my goals. I want to make sure that this nonprofit can help more people this year and that they can get more grant money because they know how many people they helped and that those people are more efficient at their job every day. So those are harder to measure. It's not quite an answer to your question, [laughs] but I took it and ran a little. CHELSEA: No, I appreciate that. There is a software engineer and a teacher that I follow on Twitter. His name is GeePawHill. Are y'all familiar with GeePawHill? MAE: No. CHELSEA: And he did a thread a couple of days ago that this conversation reminds me of and I found it. Is that all right if I read like a piece of it and paraphrase part of it? MAE: Yes, please. CHELSEA: Okay. So this is what he says. He says, “The weirdest thing about being a teacher for young geek minds: I am teaching them things…that their actual first jobs will most likely forbid them to do. The young'uns I work with are actually nearly all hire-able as is, after 18 months of instruction, without any intervention from me. The problem they're going to face when they get to The Show isn't technical, or intellectual at all. No language, or framework, or OS, or library, or algorithm is going to daunt them, not for long. No, the problem they're going to face is how to sustain their connection to the well of geek joy, in a trade that is systematically bent on simultaneously exploiting that connection while denying it exists and refusing any and all access to it. It is possible, to stick it out, to acquire enough space and power, to re-assert one's path to the well. Many have done it; many are doing it today. But it is very hard. Very hard. Far harder than learning the Visitor pattern, or docker, or, dart, or SQL, or even Haskell. How do you tell people you've watched “become” as they bathed in the cool clear water that, for some long time, 5 years or more, they must…navigate the horrors of extractive capitalist software development? The best answer I have, so far, is to try and teach them how and where to find water outside of work. It is a lousy answer. I feel horrible giving it. But I'd feel even more horrible if I didn't tell them the truth.” CASEY: I just saw this thread and I really liked it, too. I'm glad you found it. MAE: Oh, yeah. I find it honestly pretty inspiring, like people generally who get involved in the kinds of consulting gigs that we three are talking about, which is a little different than just any random consulting, or any random freelancing. CASEY: Like impact consulting, I might call that. MAE: Yeah. It's awesome if the money comes, but it's almost irrelevant [chuckles] provided that basic needs are meant. So that's kind of been my angle. We'll see how – talk to me in 20 more years when I'm [chuckles] trying to retire and made a lot of choices that I was happy with at the time. CASEY: This reminds me of a conversation I had with a friend who's an executive director of an orchestra in the nonprofit space and he was telling me that so many nonprofits shoot themselves in the foot by not doing enough fundraising, by not raising money, and that comes from not wanting to make money in a way because they're a nonprofit, money is not a motive, and everybody's very clear about that. That's noble and all, but it ends up hurting them because they don't have the money to do the impactful things they would as a nonprofit. Money is a necessary evil here and a lot of people are uncomfortable with it. Including me a lot of the time. Honestly, I have to tell myself not to. What would I tell a friend? “No, charge more money.” Okay, I guess I'll tell myself to do that now. I have this conversation with myself a lot. MAE: Yeah. I've been very aware that when I become anti-money, the well dries up. The money well. [laughs] CASEY: Yeah. MAE: And when I am respectful of and appreciative of money in the world, more comes my way. There is an internal dousing, I think that happens that one needs to be very careful about for sure. CASEY: One of the techniques I use with myself and with clients is a matrix where I write out for this approach, this thing that I'm thinking about how much money will it make, how much impact will it have on this goal, and all the different heuristics I would use to make the decision, or columns and all the options arose. I put numbers in it and I might weight my columns because money is less important than impact, but it's still important. It's there. I do all this math. In the end, the summary column with the averages roughly matches what's in my head, which is the things that are similar in my head are similar on paper, but I can see why and that's very clarifying for me. I really like being able to see it in this matrix form and being able to see that you have to focus on the money some amount. If you just did the high impact one, it wouldn't be on the top of the list. It's like, it's hard to think about so many variables at once, but seeing it helps me. CHELSEA: It is. GeePaw speaks to that some later in the thread. He says, “You've got to feed your family. You've got to. That's not negotiable. But you don't got to forget the well. To be any good at all, you have to keep finding the well, keep reaching it, keep noticing it. Doesn't matter whether it's office hours, or after hours. Matters whether you get to it. The thing you've got to watch, when you become a professional geek, isn't the newest tech, and it sure as hell isn't the org's process. You've got to watch whether, or how you're getting to the well. If you're getting to the well, in whatever way, you'll stay alive and change the world.” I think I'm curious as to y'all's thoughts on this, but like I mentioned earlier, I have a full-time job and I also do this consulting on the side. I also teach. I teach at the Master's program in computer science at University of Chicago. I do some mentoring with an organization called Emergent Works, which trains formerly incarcerated technologists. The work situation that I have pieced together for myself, I think manages to get me the income I need and also, the impact that I'm looking for and the ability to work with people and those kinds of things. I think my perspective at this point is that it's probably difficult, if it's realistic at all, to expect any one position to be able to meet all of those needs simultaneously. Maybe they exist, but I suspect that they're relatively few and far between and I think that we probably do ourselves a disservice by propagating this idea that what you need to do is just make yourself so supremely interview-able that everybody wants to hire you and then you get to pick the one position where you get to do that because there's only one in the entirety of tech, it's that rare. Sure, maybe that's an individualist way to look at it. But when we step back and look more closely, or when we step back and look more broadly at that, it's like, all right, so we have to become hypercompetitive in order to be able to get the position where we can make enough while helping people. Like, the means there seem kind of cutthroat for the ends, right? [laughs] CASEY: This reminds me of relationships, too and I think there's a lot of great parallels here. Like you shouldn't expect your partner to meet all of your needs, all of them. MAE: I was thinking the same thing! CASEY: Uh huh. Social, emotional, spiritual, physical, all your needs cannot possibly by one person and that is so much pressure to put on that person, CHELSEA: Right. CASEY: It's like not healthy. CHELSEA: Right. CASEY: You can choose some to prioritize over others for your partner, but you're not going to get a 100% of it and you shouldn't. CHELSEA: Well, and I find that being a conversation fairly regularly in monogamous versus polyamorous circles as well. Like, how much is it appropriate to expect of a partner? But I think it is a valid conversation to have in those circles. But I think that even in the context of a monogamous relationship, a person has other relationships—familial relationships, friend relationships—outside of that single romantic relationship. CASEY: Co-workers, community people, yeah. CHELSEA: Right. But even within that monogamous context, it's most realistic and I would argue, the most healthy to not expect any one person to provide for all of your needs and rather to rely on a community. That's what we're supposed to be able to do. CASEY: Yeah. MAE: Interdependence, not independence. CHELSEA: Right. CASEY: It's more resilient in the face of catastrophe, or change in general, mild, more mild change and you want to be that kind of resilient person for yourself, too. Just like you would do a computer system, or an organization. They should be resilient, too. MAE: Yes. CASEY: Your relationship with your job is another one. MAE: Totally. CHELSEA: Right. And I think that part of the reason the burnout is so quick – like the amount of time, the median amount of time that somebody spends at a company in tech is 2.2 years. MAE: I know, it's so weird. CHELSEA: Very few companies in tech have a large number of lifers, for example, or something like that. There are a number of reasons for that. We don't necessarily have to get into all of them, although, we can if you want. But I think one of them is definitely that we expect to get so much out of a full-time position. Tech is prone. due to circumstances of its origin, to an amount of idealism. We are saving the world. We, as technologists, are saving the world and also, we, as technologists, can expect this salary and we, as technologists, are a family and we play ping pong, and all of these things – [laughter] That contribute to an unrealistic expectation of a work environment, which if that is the only place that we are getting fulfillment as programmers, then people become unsatisfied very quickly because how could an organization that's simultaneously trying to accomplish a goal, meet all of these expect for everybody? I think it's rare at best. CASEY: I want to bring up another example of this kind of thing. Imagine you're an engineer and you have an engineering manager. What's their main job? Is it to get the organization's priorities to be done by the team, like top-down kind of thing? We do need that to happen. Or is it to mentor each individual and coach them and help them grow as an engineer? We need that somewhere, too, yeah. Or is it to make the team – like the team to come together as a team and be very effective together and to represent their needs to the org? That, too, but we don't need one person to do all three of those necessarily. If the person's not technical, you can get someone else in the company to do technical mentorship, like an architect, or just a more senior person on, or off the team somewhere else. But we put a lot of pressure on the engineering managers to do that and this applies to so many roles. That's just one I know that I can define pretty well. There's an article that explains that pretty well. We'll put in the show notes. MAE: Yes! So what I am currently doing is I have a not 40 hours a week job as an engineering manager and especially when I took the gig, I was still doing all of these pandemic charity things and I'm like, “These are more important to me right now and I only have so many hours in the day. So do you need me to code at this place? I can, but do you need me to because all those hours are hours I can go code for all these other things that I'm doing,” and [laughs] it worked. I have been able to do all three of the things that you're talking about, Casey, but certainly able to defer in different places and it's made me – this whole thing of not working full-time makes you optimize in very different ways. So I sprinkle my Slack check-ins all day, but I didn't have to work all day to be present all day. There's a lot that has been awesome. It's not for everyone, but I also have leaned heavily on technical mentorship happening from tech leads as well. CASEY: Sounds good. MAE: But I'm still involved. But this thing about management, especially in tech being whichever programmer seems like the most dominant programmer is probably going to be a good needs to be promoted into management. Just P.S. management is its own discipline, has its own trajectory and when I talk to hiring managers and they only care about my management experience in tech, which is 6 years, right? 8, but I have 25 years of experience in managing. So there's a preciousness of what it is that we are asking for the employees and what the employees are asking of the employer, like you were talking about Chelsea, that is very interesting. It's very privileged, and does lead a lot of people to burnout and disappointment because their ideas got so lofty. I just want to tie this back a little bit too, something you read in that quote about – I forget the last quote, but it was something about having enough to be able to change the world and it reminded me of Adrienne Maree Brown, pleasure activism, emergent strategy, and all of her work, and largely, generations of Black women have been saying, “Yo, you've got to take care [chuckles] of yourself to be able to affect change.” Those people have been the most effective and powerful change makers. So definitely, if you're curious about this topic, I urge you to go listen to some brilliant Black women about it. CASEY: We'll link that in the show notes, too. I think a lot about engineering managers and one way that doesn't come up a lot is you can get training for engineering managers to be stronger managers and for some reason, that is not usually an option people reach for. It could happen through HR, or it could happen if you have a training budget and you're a new EM, you could use your training budget to hire coaching from someone. I'm an example. But there's a ton of people out there that offer this kind of thing. If you don't learn the leadership skills when you switch roles, if you don't take time to learn those skills that are totally learnable, you're not going to have them and it's hard to apply them. There's a lot of pressure to magically know them now that you've switched hats. MAE: And how I don't understand why everyone in life doesn't have a therapist, [laughs] I don't understand why everyone in life doesn't have multiple job coaches at any time. Like why are we not sourcing more ideas and problem-solving strategies, and thinking we need to be the repository of how to handle X, Y, Z situation? CASEY: For some reason, a lot of people I've talked to think their manager is supposed to do that for them. Their manager is supposed to be their everything; their boss. They think the boss that if they're bad, you quit your job. If they're good, you'll stay. That boss ends up being their career coach for people, unless they're a bad career coach and then you're just stuck. Because we expect it so strongly and that is an assumption I want everyone listening to question. Do you need your manager at work to be that person for you? If they are, that's great. You're very fortunate. If not, how can you find someone? Someone in the community, a friend, family member, a professional coach, there's other options, other mentors in the company. You don't have to depend on that manager who doesn't have time for you to give you that kind of support. CHELSEA: So to that end, my thinking around management and mentorship changed about the time I hit – hmm. It was a while ago now, I don't know, maybe 6 years as a programmer, or something like that. Because before that, I was very bought into this idea that your manager is your mentor and all these types of things. There was something that I realized. There were two things that I realized. The first one was that, for me, most of my managers were not well set up to be mentors to me and this is why. Well, the truth is I level up quickly and for many people who are managers in a tech organization, they were technologists for 3 to 5 years before they became managers. They were often early enough in their career that they didn't necessarily know what management entailed, or whether they should say no based on what they were interested in. Many managers in tech figure out what the job is and then try to find as many surreptitious ways as possible to get back into the code. MAE: Yeah. CHELSEA: Additionally, many of those managers feel somewhat insecure about their weakening connection to the code base of the company that they manage. MAE: Yeah. CHELSEA: And so it can be an emotionally fraught experience for them to be mentor to someone whose knowledge of the code base that they are no longer in makes them feel insecure. So I learned that the most effective mentors for me – well, I learned something about the most effective mentors for me and I learned something of the most effective managers for me. I learned that the most effective managers for me either got way out ahead of me experience wise before they became managers, I mean 10 years, 15 years, 20 years, because those are not people who got promoted to management because they didn't know to say no. Those are people who got promoted to management after they got tired of writing code and they no longer staked their self-image on whether they're better coders than the people that they manage. That's very, very important. The other type of person who was a good manager for me was somebody who had never been a software engineer and there are two reasons for that. First of all, they trended higher on raw management experience. Second of all, they were not comparing their technical skillset to my technical skillset in a competitive capacity and that made them better managers for me, honestly. It made things much, much easier. And then in terms of mentors, I found that I had a lot more luck going outside of the organization I was working for mentors and that's again, for two reasons. The first one is that a lot of people, as they gain experience, go indie. Just a lot of people, like all kinds. Some of my sort of most trusted mentors. Avdi Grimm is somebody I've learned a lot from, indie effectively at this point. GeePawHill, like I mentioned, indie effectively at this point. Kenneth Mayer, indie effectively at this point. And these are all people who had decades of experience and the particular style of programming that I was doing very early in my career for many years. So that's the first reason. And then the second reason is that at your job, it is in your interest to succeed at everything you try—at most jobs. And jobs will tell you it's okay to fail. Jobs will tell you it's okay to like whatever, not be good at things and to be learning. But because if I'm drawing a paycheck from an organization, I do not feel comfortable not being good at the thing that I am drawing the paycheck for. MAE: Same. CHELSEA: And honestly, even if they say that that's the case, when the push comes to shove and there's a deadline, they don't actually want you to be bad at things. Come on! That doesn't make any sense. But I've been able to find ambitious projects that I can contribute to not for pay and in those situations, I'm much more comfortable failing because I can be like, “You know what, if they don't like my work, they can have all their money back.” And I work on a couple projects like that right now where I get to work with very experienced programmers on projects that are interesting and challenging, and a lot of times, I just absolutely eat dirt. My first PR doesn't work and I don't know what's wrong and the whole description is like somebody please help and I don't feel comfortable doing that on – if I had to do it at work, I would do it, but I'm not comfortable doing it. I firmly believe that for people to accelerate their learning to their full capacity for accelerating their learning, they must place themselves in situations where they not only might fail, but it's pretty likely. Because that's what's stretching your capacity to the degree that you need to get better and that's just not a comfortable situation for somewhere that you depend on to make a living. And that ended up being, I ended up approaching my management and my mentorship as effectively mutually exclusive things and it ended up working out really well for me. At this particular point in time, I happened to have a manager who happened to get way out ahead of me technically, and is willing to review PRs and so, that's very nice. But it's a nice-to-have. It's not something that I expect of a manager and it's ended up making me much more happy and manage relationships. MAE: I agree with all of that. So well said, Chelsea. CHELSEA: I try, I try. [laughs] Casey, are there things that you look for specifically in a manager? CASEY: Hmm. I guess for that question, I want to take the perspective inward, into myself. What do I need support on and who can I get that from? And this is true as also an independent worker as a consultant freelancer, too. I need support for when things are hard and I can be validated from people who have similar experiences, that kind of like emotional support. I need technical support and skills, like the sales I don't have yet and I have support for that, thank goodness. Individuals, I need ideally communities and individuals, both. They're both really important to me and some of these could be in a manager, but lately, I'm my own manager and I can be none of those things, really. I'm myself. I can't do this external support for myself. Even when I'm typing into a spreadsheet and the computer's trying to be a mirror, it's not as good as talking to another person. Another perspective that I need support on is how do I know what I'm doing is important and so, I do use spreadsheets as a mirror for that a lot of the time for myself. Like this impact is having this kind of magnitude of impact on this many people and then that calculates to this thing, maybe. Does that match my gut? That's literally what I want to know, too. The numbers aren't telling me, but talking to other people about impact on their projects really kind of solidifies that for me. And it's not always the client directly. It could be someone else who sees the impact I'm having on a client. Kind of like the manager, I don't want to expect clients to tell me the impact I'm having. In fact, for business reasons, I should know what the impact is myself, to tell them, to upsell them and continue it going anyway. So it really helps me to have peers to talk through about impact. Like that, too types of support. What other kinds of support do you need as consultants that I didn't just cover? MAE: I still need – and I have [laughs] hired Casey to help me. I still need a way to explain what it is that I am offering and what the value of that really is in a way that is clear and succinct. Every time I've gone to make a website, or a list of what it is that I offer, I end up in the hundreds of bullet points [laughs] and I just don't – [overtalk] CASEY: Yeah, yeah. MAE: Have a way to capture it yet. So often when people go indie, they do have a unique idea, a unique offering so finding a way to summarize what that is can be really challenging. I loved hearing you two when you were talking about knowing what kinds of work you want to do and who your ideal customer is. Those are things I have a clearer sense of, but how to make that connection is still a little bit of a gap for me. But you reminded me in that and I just want to mention here this book, The Pumpkin Plan, like a very bro business book situation, [chuckles] but what is in there is so good. I don't want to give it away and also, open up another topic [laughs] that I'll talk too long about. So I won't go into it right now, but definitely recommend it. One of the things is how to call your client list and figure out what is the most optimal situation that's going to lead toward the most impact for everybody. CASEY: One of the things I think back to a lot is user research and how can we apply that this business discovery process. I basically used the same techniques that were in my human computer interaction class I took 10, or 15 years ago. Like asking open ended questions, trying to get them to say what their problems are, remembering how they said it in their own words and saying it back to them—that's a big, big step. But then there's a whole lot of techniques I didn't learn from human computer interaction, that are sales techniques, and my favorite resource for that so far is called SPIN selling where SPIN is an acronym and it sounds like a wonky technique that wouldn't work because it's just like a random technique to pull out. I don't know, but it's not. This book is based on studies and it shows what you need to do to make big ticket sales go through, which is very different than selling those plastic things with the poppy bubbles in the mall stand in the middle of the hallway. Those low-key things they can manipulate people into buying and people aren't going to return it probably. But big-ticket things need a different approach than traditional sales and marketing knowledge and I really like the ideas in SPIN selling. I don't want to go into them today. We'll talk about it later. But those are two of the perspectives I bring to this kind of problem, user research and the SPIN selling techniques. I want to share what my ideal client would be. I think that's interesting, too. So I really want to help companies be happier and more effective. I want to help the employees be happier and more effective, and that has the impact on the users of the company, or whoever their clients are. It definitely impacts that, which makes it a thing I can sell, thankfully. So an organization usually knows when they're not the most happy, or the most effective. They know it, but my ideal client isn't just one that knows that, but they also have leadership buy-in; they have some leader who really cares and can advocate for making it better and they just don't know how. They don't have enough resources to make it happen in their org. Maybe they have, or don't have experience with it, but they need support. That's where I come in and then my impact really is on the employees. I want to help the employees be happier and more effective. That's the direct impact I want, and then it has the really strong, indirect impact on the business outcomes. So in that vein, I'm willing to help even large tech companies because if I can help their employees be happier, that is a positive impact. Even if I don't care about large tech companies' [chuckles] business outcomes, I'm okay with that because my focus is specifically on the employees. That's different than a lot of people I talk to; they really just want to support like nonprofit type, stronger impact of the mission and that totally makes sense to me, too. MAE: Also, it is possible to have a large and ever growing equitably run company. It is possible. I do want to contribute toward that existing in the world and as much as there's focus on what the ultimate looking out impact is, I care about the experience of employees and individuals on the way to get there. I'm not a utilitarian thinker. CASEY: Yeah, but we can even frame it in a utilitarian way if we need to. If we're like a stakeholder presentation, if someone leaves the company and it takes six months to replace them and their work is in the meantime off board to other people, what's the financial impact of all that. I saw a paper about it. Maybe I can dig it up and I'll link to it. It's like to replace a person in tech it costs a $100K. So if they can hire a consultant for less than a $100K to save one person from leaving, it pays for itself. If that number is right, or whatever. Maybe it was ten employees for that number. The paper will say much better than I will. CHELSEA: I think that in mentioning that Casey, you bring up something that businesses I think sometimes don't think about, which is some of the hidden costs that can easily be difficult to predict, or difficult to measure those kinds of things. One of the hidden costs is the turnover costs is the churn cost because there's how much it takes to hire another person and then there's the amount of ramp time before that person gets to where the person who left was. CASEY: Right, right, right. CHELSEA: And that's also a thing. There's all the time that developers are spending on forensic software analysis in order to find out all of the context that got dropped when a person left. CASEY: Yeah. The one person who knew that part of the code base, the last one is gone, uh oh. CHELSEA: Right. CASEY: It's a huge trust. And then engineering team is often really interested in conveying that risk. But if they're not empowered enough and don't have enough bandwidth time and energy to make the case, the executive team, or whoever will never hear it and they won't be able to safeguard against it. MAE: Or using the right language to communicate it. CASEY: Right, right. And that's its own skill. That's trainable, too thankfully. But we don't usually train engineers in that, traditionally. Engineers don't receive that training unless they go out of their way for it. PMs and designers, too, honestly. Like the stakeholder communication, everybody can work on. MAE: Yeah. CASEY: That's true. MAE: Communication. Everyone can, or not. Yes. [laughs] I learned the phrase indie today. I have never heard it and I really like it! It makes me feel cool inside and so love and – [overtalk] CASEY: Yeah, I have no record label, or I am my own record label, perhaps. MAE: Yo! CASEY: I've got one. I like the idea of having a Patreon, not to make money, but to have to help inspire yourself and I know a lot of friends have had Patreons with low income from it and they were actually upset about it. So I want to go back to those friends and say, “Look, this prove some people find value in what you're doing.” Like the social impact. I might make my own even. Thank you. MAE: I know I might do it too. It's good. That's good. CHELSEA: Absolutely. Highly recommended. One thing that I want to take away is the exercise, Casey, that you were talking about of tallying up all of the different things that a given position contributes in terms of a person's needs. Because I think that an exercise like that would be extremely helpful for, for example, some of my students who are getting their very first tech jobs. Students receive a very one-dimensional message about the way that tech employment goes. It tends to put set of five companies that show remain unnamed front and center, which whatever, but I would like them to be aware of the other options. And there is a very particular way of gauging the value of a tech position that I believe includes fewer dimensions than people should probably consider for the health of their career long-term and not only the health of their career, but also their health in their career. CASEY: One more parting thought I want to share for anyone is you need support for your career growth, for your happiness. If you're going to be a consultant, you need support for that. Find support in individuals and communities, you deserve that support and you can be that support for the people who are supporting you! It can be mutual. They need that, too.

The Shameless Mom Academy
Ep 617: Uzma Jafri and Zaiba Hasan: Mommying While Muslim

The Shameless Mom Academy

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 62:05


Uzma Jafri grew up in Houston, the daughter of Muslim immigrants from Pakistan and India. Coming from a traditional Muslim family and being unapologetically Muslim, while still identifying with American culture, made Uzma hyperaware of the dangers that arise when people conflate culture and religion. Today, Uzma is a physician running her own practice in Phoenix, medical director of an assisted living and hospice agency, and clinical faculty to future physicians. Uzma's most important full-time job is that of mom to her 4 kids.    Zaiba Hasan is an American Muslim who grew up biracial and bicultural. Born and raised in Chicago, Zaiba's Irish/Pakistani heritage and interfaith upbringing gave her a head start on navigating between identities. She is frequently invited to speak at interfaith events since her background makes her a natural at bridging gaps between Muslims and non-Muslims in the United States. When she isn't busy with podcasting, public speaking, fostering an interfaith community, or working on her Master's Degree & Parent Coaching Certification, Zaiba can be found with her husband and their four children at one of their sporting events. I am so honored to have Uzma and Zaiba on the show, as this is a critically important conversation for those who want to be true allies to our Muslim friends, neighbors, and community members. Listen in to hear Uzma and Zaiba share: The story of how two Muslim friends who hadn't seen each other in 20 years decided to launch a podcast together How Zaiba's son being stopped at an airport as a 14-year old Muslim boy inspired their show, Mommying While Muslim How creating a community and resource for Muslim moms ended up attracting a lot of white moms and evangelical men and the value of creating a space where listeners feel like they can be a fly on the wall with two Muslim moms The significance of being in the last pre 911 generation of Muslims in America The racial and religious profiling that happened and continues to happen post 911 How we expand our capacity to connect as humans when we listen in to the stories of people who are unlike us Links mentioned: Join Momentum Mamas: shamelessmom.com/momentum Subscribe to the Podcast: Mommying While Muslim Learn more about Uzma and Zaiba: mommyingwhilemuslim.com Reach out to Uzma and Zaiba: salam@mommyingwhilemuslim.com Uzma and Zaiba on IG

Let's Talk About Water
From Toilet to Tap, with Mike Markus

Let's Talk About Water

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 30:11


With climate change threatening freshwater sources, water demand across the globe is likely to increase by 20 - 30% between now and 2050. In this episode, we're looking at two promising solutions to create clean drinking water from surprising places: our sewers and our oceans. We speak with General Manager of the Orange County Water District, Mike Markus, about debunking the “toilet to tap” fear and how turning our wastewater into clean drinking water can be a closed-loop solution to mounting water scarcity. We also hear from Dr. William Tarpeh about new research at Stanford University that could make desalination a more viable solution; one that's less costly and better for the environment. Biographical Notes: Michael (Mike) R. Markus is the general manager of the Orange County Water District (OCWD; the District), which manages the Orange County Groundwater Basin that supplies water to more than 2.5 million people in north and central Orange County, Calif. With more than 40 years of experience, Mike is well known for his expertise in large project implementation and water resource management. In September 2007, he became only the sixth general manager in the District's history.During his 33-year career at the District, Mike was responsible for managing the implementation of the $480 million Groundwater Replenishment System (GWRS) program. This project is the largest potable reuse project in the world and has won many awards including the 2008 Stockholm Industry Water Award, 2009 ASCE Outstanding Civil Engineering Achievement Award, 2014 U.S. Water Prize and the 2014 Lee Kuan Yew Prize. In 2015, Mike oversaw the completion of the 30 MGD GWRS Initial Expansion. The expansion brought the total production capacity of the GWRS to 100 MGD of high-quality water, which is enough to serve 850,000 people annually. Mike was named the 2017 Pioneer in Groundwater by the Environmental & Water Resources Institute, one of the Top 25 Industry Leaders of 2014 by Water & Wastewater International, he received the international 2009 Säid Khoury Award for Engineering Construction Excellence, the 2007 American Society of Civil Engineers' Government Engineer of the Year award, and he was one of the Top 25 Newsmakers of 2007 by the Engineering News-Record.Mike currently serves on the board of directors of the Water Research Foundation, the National Water Research Institute, American Water Works Association and the California Section of the WateReuse Association. He obtained a Bachelor of Science degree in civil engineering from California State Polytechnic University, Pomona and a Master of Science degree in civil engineering from the University of Southern California. He is also a registered civil engineer in the state of California.Dr. William Tarpeh Dr. William Tarpeh is an assistant professor of chemical engineering at Stanford University. The Tarpeh Lab develops and evaluates novel approaches to resource recovery from “waste” waters at several synergistic scales: molecular mechanisms of chemical transport and transformation; novel unit processes that increase resource efficiency; and systems-level assessments that identify optimization opportunities. Will completed his B.S. in chemical engineering at Stanford and his M.S. and Ph.D. in environmental engineering at UC Berkeley, supported by an NSF Graduate Research Fellowship, Ford Foundation Predoctoral Fellowship, and a UC Berkeley Chancellor's Fellowship. He conducted postdoctoral training at University of Michigan in environmental engineering. Will is a member of the Bouchet Honor Society, NBCBLK's "28 Under 28" African-American Innovators, and Forbes' "30 Under 30" 2019 Science List. Tarpeh's CV is available here.

Legal Grounds | Conversations on Life, Leadership & Law

Hot Sports Opinion: Radical honesty is the coin of the realm when it comes to growing any relationship - business or otherwise. I've learned that when you screw up - and trust me, I've done it plenty - the best thing to do is just come out and say it. Next, have a plan for how you want to fix it. And finally move forward with the experience gained. But now imagine not just doing this work internally, but sharing it with the world in damn-near real time. That's what my guest this week, Steven English, has chosen to do. A  20 year veteran of the semiconductor industry, Steven earned his degree in Physics from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute and a Master's in Material Sciences & Engineering from North Carolina State. Steven has worked for major corporations you've probably heard of or interact with everyday including Honeywell and Samsung. And on paper, his life has been a never ending series of opportunities and advancement. In reality, Steven - like so many of us - has been to hell and back and lived to tell the tale. A TedX speaker and certified life coach, he founded Steven English Coaching in 2018 and specializes in helping people on every rung of the corporate ladder communicate their ideas with competency and confidence. It was a fantastic conversation on vulnerability, loss of friendships, the need to admit when we need help, and so much more. Enjoy the show. 

Earn Your Leisure
EYL #168 How to Master Content Creation

Earn Your Leisure

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 72:53


In episode 168 of Earn Your Leisure we spoke with Eric Thomas's head of content and social media master Nicky Saunders. Nicky provided the blueprint on content creation.  She spoke about making content for different social media apps, common mistakes made by content creators, how to monetize social media, steps to build a brand, and more. #contentcreation #marketing #socialmedia  EYL University: https://www.eyluniversity.com Guest IG: https://instagram.com/thisisnickys?utm_medium=copy_link Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

Daily Radio Bible Podcast
Daily Radio Bible - January 19th, 22

Daily Radio Bible Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 25:54


Week Two Reflections with Hunter  https://youtu.be/LnEfwjAyYzA Do You See It? Genesis 47-48; Psalms 10 and Luke 19. We are reading through the New Living Translation. Do you see it?  Two of the three servants described in this parable saw it.  They saw a gift and an opportunity.  They were chosen by the king to steward his riches.  They had no riches of their own. They had the opportunity to be made wealthy by someone else's wealth. They would be honored by the king and that honor would be multiplied, simply by investing money that wasn't even theirs.  They harvested riches where they did not plant. They were given cities that they had no hand in building or growing. That is the kind of king we serve.  He is a generous and loving.  So much so, that he blesses us with things that we haven't earned and don't deserve. He has chosen us to invest his riches and then he multiplies our honor even beyond that.  What a good generous kind and loving king.  Two of the three servants saw it.  Zaccheus, the disciples, and some notorious sinners saw it.     But one servant of the king, saw the complete opposite.  He got it completely wrong. His response to the generous king was: “‘Master, I hid your money and kept it safe.  I was afraid because you are a hard man to deal with, taking what isn't yours and harvesting crops you didn't plant.'” (Luke 19:21) This guy is deceived about who the master is, what the Master's heart is like, and who he himself is.  He has forgotten that he is a servant, that he has nothing, and that he has a responsibility to the king.  That's his role, that's who he is.  He has forgotten his identity.  Apart from the king, he has no riches or honor.  He has forgotten this,  and missed the loving, generous heart of the king. Our King wants to reward, honor, and multiply his blessing upon us, his people, who have nothing apart from him.  May we invest your loving king's riches, and see the honor in doing it. May we find our identity in Him.

The Dispassionate Observer Podcast Series
What It Means to Opt Out, Pt. 2 by Master Zi and Vindesh

The Dispassionate Observer Podcast Series

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 59:31


This week Zi and Vindesh continue the conversation about the opt out philosophy and how it can be applied in daily life.  Zi elaborates on why self ownership is crucial for overall health and wellbeing.  Does the "faceless committee" have your best interests in mind? Zi and Vindesh explore ways to navigate cancel culture and the importance of choosing relationships that already support you.

Here’s The Deal with Kylie
Your Relationship With Food and Yourself with Stephanie Mara Fox

Here’s The Deal with Kylie

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 50:35


Today on Here's the Deal, I‘m talking with Stephanie Mara Fox. She is a Somatic Nutritional Counselor, which is a body oriented, sensation approach to eating. You learn to listen and observe your body's eating. A lot of times what your body is missing is safety, we aren't feeling safe and regulated in our own bodies. We talk about trauma, healing, your internal dialogue, and how to shift your energy. We talk about intuitive eating and why it may not be working for you, the internal dialogue that you have with yourself and how that dialogue started and how being preoccupied with your weight is protecting you and why it may feel safer than processing what else may need your attention. Stephanie Mara Fox, MA, CMBEC, CHC, CYT, is a Somatic Nutritional Counselor and Mentor with a Master's Degree in Somatic Psychotherapy. She is the creator of Somatic Eating™, a body-oriented, sensation focused therapeutic approach to eating. She's supported women, coaches, and wellness professionals all over the world, helping them to heal from disordered eating patterns, emotional eating, chronic dieting, and digestive and body image concerns. She has been working for the past decade to guide women in feeling empowered in their relationship with their food, body, and business, to step into their innate confidence, and go after what they want in life. Stephanie is published in the International Body Psychotherapy Journal, featured in Somatic Psychotherapy Today, VoyageDenver, Elephant Journal, Authority Magazine, and Your Recovery Revealed Summit. She is a teacher at the Institute for the Psychology of Eating and has supervised thousands of Mind Body Eating Coaches. You can learn more about Stephanie Mara Fox at https://www.stephaniemara.com/ You can take her What Is Your Relationship Status With Food? Quiz here: https://www.stephaniemara.com/foodrelationshipquiz Book a free 20 minute Connect Call here: https://www.stephaniemara.com/lets-chat Follow Stephanie Mara on social media: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/stephaniemarafox Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/_stephaniemara/ Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/stephmara/ Satiated Podcast: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/satiated-podcast/id1494607245 --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/heresthedealwithkylie/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/heresthedealwithkylie/support

RAD Radio
01.18.22 RAD 08 Master of Movies

RAD Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 6:59


Master of MoviesSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Rob, Anybody & Dawn
Master of Movies 1-18-22

Rob, Anybody & Dawn

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 6:38


full Audacy 02528f12-119e-4446-9bb8-ae21012686f3 02528f12-119e-4446-9bb8-ae21012686f3 Tue, 18 Jan 2022 17:52:41 +0000 398 https://omny.fm/

I Am Refocused Podcast Show
Former Delta Force veteran and Lieutenant Colonel (Ret.) BRAD TAYLOR, author of END OF DAYS

I Am Refocused Podcast Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 4:49


ABOUT BRAD TAYLOR AND END OF DAYS Brad Taylor was born on Okinawa, Japan, but grew up on 40-acres in rural Texas. Graduating from the University of Texas, he was commissioned as a second lieutenant in the U.S. Army Infantry.. Taylor, Lieutenant Colonel (Ret.), is a 21-year veteran of the U.S. Army Infantry and Special Forces, including eight years with the 1st Special Forces Operational Detachment - Delta, popularly known as Delta Force, where he commanded multiple troops and a squadron. Taylor retired in 2010 after serving more than two decades and participating in Operation Enduring Freedom and Operation Iraqi Freedom, as well as classified operations in Afghanistan and around the globe. His final military post was as Assistant Professor of Military Science at The Citadel. He holds a Master's in Defense Analysis from the Naval Postgraduate School, with a concentration in Irregular Warfare. In 2011, Taylor published his debut novel, One Rough Man, which was an immediate success and launched the Pike Logan series. Now with 16 installments and more than 3 million copies sold, the series has consistently hit the New York Times bestseller list. When not writing, Taylor serves as a security consultant on asymmetric threats for various agencies. He lives in Charleston, South Carolina, with his wife and two daughters. In his latest novel End of Days, Pike Logan and Jennifer Cahill have been quarantined in Charleston, sidelined for months because of Covid, they finally can tie the knot.The Israelis-Aaron and Shoshana- deliver a surprise wedding gift: a request to help with an unsanctioned surveillance mission to track down an assassin of a high-ranking Mossad official. On the mission, the Taskforce and the Israelis uncover a group of rogue operators within the Knights of Malta, a centuries-old charitable organization. And a mad zealot is trying to fulfill an ancient biblical prophecy hoping to put the Temple Mount under full control of Israel.https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0929275KP/ref=dbs_a_def_rwt_bibl_vppi_i0

d4: D&D Deep Dive
The Street Fighter - D&D:Optimized #75

d4: D&D Deep Dive

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 50:32


For our D&D 5e character build this week we are building an unarmed, unarmored character who is *not* a Monk. They are a strength-based brawler, and they don't play nice.I'd appreciate it if you'd consider supporting the channel by becoming a member!https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC9jQ2IsZj_CAS0bZgA6O2pA/joinMerch Store! https://www.etsy.com/shop/d4DnDDeepDiveAlso: if you'd like to purchase D&D content through my Amazon affiliate link, it would be another way to help support the channel :) - https://www.amazon.com/shop/d4dddeepdive?listId=MFEYK9W51D9K&ref=idea_share_infFollow us here:https://www.reddit.com/r/DnDoptimized/https://www.facebook.com/dnddeepdivehttps://twitter.com/ColbyPoulsonCheck out Randall Hampton here:Twitter: https://twitter.com/Randall_HamptonInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/randallhampton/Twitch: https://www.twitch.tv/g33kslikeusCharacter Concept:(0:00)Level 1:(8:45)Levels 2-6:(13:21)Levels 7-9:(32:13)Levels 10-13:(34:05)Levels 14-17:(40:51)Final Thoughts:(45:31)Outtakes:(49:03)Math/Graph for this episode: https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1ln3t8jmSy8vmu4sqHGuCJwVnSfZLF1G05MS5lnhwL98/edit?usp=sharingSustained DPR Comparisons (3 Tabs): https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1HPMg7cDqOC-0-vNFgEV9E5WQLDdCOdI64Vbnu60pC78/edit?usp=sharingThanks to LudicSavant for the amazing DPR calculator! https://forums.giantitp.com/showthread.php?582779-Comprehensive-DPR-Calculator-(v2-0))Music Credits:Achaidh Cheide - Celtic by Kevin MacLeod is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 license. https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/Source: http://incompetech.com/music/royalty-free/index.html?isrc=USUAN1100340Artist: http://incompetech.com/Angevin 120 loop by Kevin MacLeod is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 license. https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/Source: http://incompetech.com/music/royalty-free/index.html?isrc=USUAN1200111Artist: http://incompetech.com/Celtic Impulse - Celtic by Kevin MacLeod is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 license. https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/Source: http://incompetech.com/music/royalty-free/index.html?isrc=USUAN1100297Artist: http://incompetech.com/Fiddles McGinty by Kevin MacLeod is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 license. https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/Source: http://incompetech.com/music/royalty-free/index.html?isrc=USUAN1400051Artist: http://incompetech.com/Lord of the Land by Kevin MacLeod is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 license. https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/Source: http://incompetech.com/music/royalty-free/index.html?isrc=USUAN1400022Artist: http://incompetech.com/Master of the Feast by Kevin MacLeod is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 license. https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/Source: http://incompetech.com/music/royalty-free/index.html?isrc=USUAN1400019Artist: http://incompetech.com/

Plan B Success
Making Money - Easier Said Than Done or Easier Done Than Said!

Plan B Success

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 8:16


Making money has different connotations for different people. For some, it involves investment of money and for others, your skills and just your brain power. For some, its easier said than done and for others, vice versa. Let's delve a little deeper and find out what it means to you...

TRIVIALITY - A Trivia Game Show Podcast
246: Game of Death XIV- Professor of Pedantics

TRIVIALITY - A Trivia Game Show Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 62:20


Oakland 5 patron Colin Meldrum hosts this week's dangerous Game of Death! Rules Guy Impersonator Benji Davis takes on Ken, Matt, Neal, and Jeff to see if he has what it takes. Video game questions delight along side some serious mythology in this one. Will Benji survive or Team Triviality thrive?   Being Patrick Swayze: Essential Teachings from the Master of the Mullet 30% OFF www.trivialitypodcast.com/swayze Supporters: https://www.trivialitypodcast.com/the-cream-of-the-crop/ Support us Directly: www.Patreon.com/TrivialityPodcast   Please RATE, REVIEW, and SUBSCRIBE on iTunes or your preferred podcast app! Follow us on social media, and support the show on Patreon for great perks! www.TrivialityPodcast.com www.Facebook.com/TrivialityPod www.Twitter.com/TrivialityPod Want to hear your trivia question during an episode? Send us question to the email: TrivialityPodcast@Gmail.com with the subject QUESTION 5 and a host's name (Ken, Matt, Neal, or Jeff). We will read one listener submitted question per round. [New Episodes Every Tuesday] © Triviality – 2022

Tea With Jainé
How to Master the Dreaded Sales Call with Carrissa Woo - Ep. 104

Tea With Jainé

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 30:34


We are chatting with Carrissa Woo all about how to master the dreaded sales call. Carissa and I talk about her unique style to approach the sales call in a more informal way to disarm the clients and couples and get to what's important to them right from the very beginning. How by approaching your sales to call with high energy and being the first to reply will help you master your next sales call. A little bit about Carissa, she is an award-winning wedding photographer turned business coaching. With over a decade of experience, Carissa has built a thriving business, and she is ready to share her recipe for success with other passionate photographers. And for you extroverts out there, I think you are going to love Carissa's approach to sales calls. Podcast Sponsor: Systems to Six-Figure Success Mastermind: https://carissa-woo.mykajabi.com/systems-for-six-figure-success Visit Website: https://www.carissawoophotography.com/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/carissawoo/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/carissawoophotography Love the podcast? Please leave a 5 ⭐️ review on Apple Podcasts. Our Investment Guide Template for Wedding Photographers is available in our online shop. Need help submitting your wedding to publications? We offer 1:1 and Done for You Wedding Curations + Submission Services - click here to book your spot today! Get our Wedding Submissions E-Mail Templates to help make your next online or print submission easier! Stay Connected: Follow @teawithjaine & @jainekershner on Instagram We are looking for Sponsors just like you! Visit Our Website to Apply: www.teawithjaine.com

Leaders Create Leaders
Episode 86: 9 Secrets To Master Your Time In 2022

Leaders Create Leaders

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 28:11


In this new episode, I dive into the secrets of what it truly takes to take your life and business to a new level this year. If you're done playing small and ready to step into your greatness, this episode is for you. What are you willing to do to create the life you've always dreamed of? LFG!SHOW NOTES:0:00 Podcast Intro2:24 The Untold Power of Saying NO4:55 The Importance of Re-evaluating Your Values7:00 Write Out Your Big Vision 7:56 Why To Work From Your Calendar9:15 The Power of Virtual Assistants & Support12:07 How To Figure Out Your Zone of Genius15:59 How To Set Boundaries In Your Life19:55 Why Leaders Live In Integrity With Boundaries24:51 You Are Worthy of Support & Receiving 27:02 Podcast Outro

Perpetual Chess Podcast
EP 262- IM Kostya Kavutskiy returns

Perpetual Chess Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 69:54


This week Perpetual Chess welcomes back IM Kostya Kavutskiy. Kostya is a respected trainer, a founder of the ChessDojo training platform, a YouTube creator, and a Chessable author. I caught up with Kostya shortly after he returned from the North American Open, so we got the rundown on his own strengths and weaknesses, as well as the U.S. tournament landscape. Since Kostya is a popular online presenter, he received a bunch of listener questions soliciting chess improvement tips.  Lastly we checked in on Kostya's content- creation plans, and the “state of the Dojo,” as Kostya discussed visions for the teaching platform that he heads, along with GM Jesse Kraai and IM David Pruess. It is always insightful to talk chess with Kosta! Please read on for timestamps and show notes.  Prior Interviews: Perpetual Chess Episode 4 with IM Kostya Kavutskiy   Perpetual Chess Episode 89 with IM Kostya Kavutskiy  How to Chess #20 with IM Kostya Kavutskiy  0:00- Kostya shares lessons learned from his recent tournament in the North American Open about improving game preparation and execution. You can watch video recaps of all of his rounds here.  Mentioned: Continental Chess, The Secret Ingredient by GM Jan Markos, GM Andrew Tang, IM Levy Rozman  19:45- Perpetual Chess is brought to you in part by Chessable.com. Check out their latest offerings here:  21:00- Patreon mailbag question:  “What are the chances a Class A player over the age of 50 can earn the Master title?”  Mentioned: IM Levy Rozman's Tweet  30:00- Patreon mailbag question: “Where can older players find a coach?” Mentioned: Lichess coaches page, Chess.com coaches page  34:00- Patreon mailbag question: “What might the subject of Kostya's next Chessable course be?”  Mentioned: How to Chess #20 with IM Kostya Kavutskiy  37:00-  What is discord? What is Chess Dojo? What is new with Chessdojo? Mentioned: IM David Pruess, GM Jesse Kraai,   41:00- Perpetual Chess is brought to you in part by AImchess.com.  Aimchess analyzes your online games and provides actionable improvement insights. Check out their updated website, and if you decide to subscribe please use the code “Perpetual30” to save 30%.  42:00- Patreon mailbag question: “How does Kostya balance his time between ChessDojo and his own chess goals?”  46:00- Patreon mailbag question “With the growth of the Dojo, what content would you like to see it offer that is currently missing?”  Mentioned: Link for ChessDoJo Discord here 53:00- What chess advice does Kostya repeat the most often?  55:00- What chess books does Kostya recommend? List of his recs here, Top 4 Most Overrated Chess Books Video, Bobby Fischer Teaches Chess, My System, How to Reassess Your Chess, Dvoretsky's Endgame Manual  1:05:00- Kostya's has other interests outside of chess. We talk about them here.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

The Land of Israel Network
Rejuvenation: The Power of Symbolism

The Land of Israel Network

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 33:27


It's been 2 years of little to no tourism to Israel and Eve Harow is anticipating a return to her beloved profession in the near future. In this podcast she gives a new perspective on Masada and its connection to Judean Balsam; this, and more, was the subject of her last seminar research paper. With her new Master's Degree in Land of Israel Studies and Archaeology, she's got so much to share and this is a glimpse of a deeper understanding of historical events and perhaps how - and why - they were interpreted in certain ways. And, oh, if your ears hurt (not from the podcast but really hurt) check if you have omicron. Yup, that's what kept her out of Egypt. Next year in…. Elephantine Island. Photo Caption: Eve Harow on Masada at sunrise.

Stories from the Field: Demystifying Wilderness Therapy
150: How is the Wilderness Therapy Field Changing?

Stories from the Field: Demystifying Wilderness Therapy

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 42:55


How is the field of wilderness therapy changing, and is it changing faster than ever before? In this special 150th episode, we will explore these questions by looking at the impact of the controversies related to the field and how the pandemic is changing many aspects of providing services. This episode will dive into different episodes from the podcast to reveal which interviews and topics were the most downloaded in the series and how those conversations may reflect changes related to wilderness therapy.   About the host:  Will White is a nationally recognized practitioner, researcher, and speaker on the history of adventure and wilderness therapy.  He received his Master of Social Work degree from the University of Denver and his Doctorate in Leadership from Franklin Pierce University. His dissertation is the first in-depth chronicle of the history of wilderness and adventure therapy.  He contributed a history chapter to the book Adventure Therapy: Theory, Research, and Practice.  He is the author of the book, Stories from the Field: A History of Wilderness Therapy.  He is also the host of the podcast, Stories from the Field: Demystifying Wilderness Therapy. He has been profiled in Outside Online, the Today Show as well as Beautiful News. Will recently founded White Mountain Adventure Institute that provides adventure therapy training, consultation, and therapy. In 1986 he co-founded Summit Achievement, a hybrid wilderness therapy program in Maine that continues to operate in its original location. He is a passionate advocate for the use of wilderness/ adventure therapy as a catalyst for change. He has taught Adventure and Wilderness Therapy classes at Plymouth State University for almost two decades. Will lives in Northern New Hampshire with his lifelong partner and sons.

Parenting In The Thick Of It with Louise Clarke
580: Every Parent Needs to Master This + Become A C.I.P!

Parenting In The Thick Of It with Louise Clarke

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 23:52


We all know our kids “should” do this and “should” do that but shoulding on them invariably just falls on deaf ears! More than this, it damages the relationship we have with them. So how do we get them to do what we advise without telling them what they should do? We need to be really good CIP's!! What is a CIP? Tune in and I'll spill the beans! If you are interested in getting the details about the new 1-Year long Group Parent Coaching Program I mentioned on the show today, then please use the link below to access all the information you will need. https://go.yourparentingpartner.com/1-year-group-coaching-a You can also email me at louise@yourparentingpartner.com if you have any other questions. FOLLOW ME ONLINE HERE: Website: https://yourparentingpartner.com/ Book: Parenting The Modern Teen: https://go.yourparentingpartner.com/parenting-the-modern-teen Parenting In The Thick Of It Family Organizer: https://parentinginthethickofit.com/ Instagram: https://instagram.com/louiseclarke.ypp Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/yourparentingpartner/ YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCqdQ1_fC72bKutwr5EfavQA Twitter: https://twitter.com/YPPartner Pinterest: https://www.pinterest.ca/louiseclarkeyourparentingpartn/ Medium: https://medium.com/@mlouiseclarke iTunes: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/parenting-in-the-thick-of-it-with-louise-clarke/id1358492950 Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/3pZfkJuOlQNohr4EqA0ivR

15 Point Plan
Master the Influences In Your World

15 Point Plan

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 18:09


Win Make Give co-host Bob Stewart steals Jillene's seat in the studio and talks with Chad about the positive and negative influences in his world and how anyone can easily make positive changes for growth. ---------- Join our Facebook group at www.facebook.com/groups/winmakegive   Part of the Win Make Give Podcast Network

Real Relationship Talk
7 Reasons Married Sex is the Best Sex (Shameless Sex Series)

Real Relationship Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 26:13


7 Reasons Married Sex is the Best Sex (Shameless Sex Series) Sex outside of marriage is touted as the norm or ideal sex, but today's episode covers reasons why married sex is actually the best sex. The Bible has a lot to say about sex, and some people don't understand why. Some wonder does God really care what people do behind closed doors. Well, my friends, the answer is yes. One of the best explanations of this can be found in I Corinthians 6:18-20. I love how the Message translation puts it: There's more to sex than mere skin on skin. Sex is as much spiritual mystery as physical fact. As written in Scripture, “The two become one.” Since we want to become spiritually one with the Master, we must not pursue the kind of sex that avoids commitment and intimacy, leaving us more lonely than ever—the kind of sex that can never “become one.” There is a sense in which sexual sins are different from all others. In sexual sin we violate the sacredness of our own bodies, these bodies that were made for God-given and God-modeled love, for “becoming one” with another. Or didn't you realize that your body is a sacred place, the place of the Holy Spirit? Don't you see that you can't live however you please, squandering what God paid such a high price for? The physical part of you is not some piece of property belonging to the spiritual part of you. God owns the whole works. So let people see God in and through your body. IMO (in my opinion), that's all the reason we need. Still, there are some who don't esteem God's words in the same way that I do, so I give six (well, actually there's an additional bonus reason included) ways why married sex is the best sex.   Maybe you have additional reasons you'd like to add to our list. If so, feel free to email info at danache.com and share your nuggets of wisdom!     SUBSCRIBE | SHARE | RATE | COMMENT To ensure you never miss an episode, be sure to subscribe on Apple Podcasts, Google Play, Spotify, Stitcher, iHeart Radio, or wherever you listen to podcasts. Remember, sharing is caring! So, share these episodes with your friends and family via email or social media.  

Flavor of Leadership
Helping Our Teams to Discover, Master, and Exploit their Superpowers

Flavor of Leadership

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 19:26


Our primary role as leaders is to help people become their best version, grow and evolve, become the best at what they do, to the point that they may leave our company for a job that represents a bigger, more fulfilling challenge. In other words, we want to inspire them, help them discover their superpowers. In this episode, we talk about inspiring our teams not by showing them our abilities and skills but by helping them discover their own. We discuss the difference between being a multiplier and a diminisher and the outcomes we get from being one or the other. We also talk about Dr. Hardy's three steps to take ownership of our future self, how we can use one-on-one meetings to inspire and develop our teams, how we can be inspiring leaders at home, and more. In This Episode, You Will Learn:What is the difference between multipliers and diminishers, and how can we become genius makers (2:02)About Dr. Benjamin Hardy's idea of the future self (3:45)The three steps to take ownership of our future self (5:45)How do we show people their superpowers, and how can we inspire them to be who they want to be (10:05)The right people, in the right place, with the right support (14:04)Resources:Quote: Alexander den Heijer - "To inspire people, don't show them your superpowers. Show them theirs." Book: Liz Wiseman - Multipliers, Revised and Updated: How the Best Leaders Make Everyone SmarterDr. Benjamin Hardy: "Take Ownership of Your Future Self"Download my free One-on-One Transformation toolFor Coaching from ClintLet's Connect!WebsiteLinkedInInstagram FacebookEmail: clint@flavorofleadership.com See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Social Media Mindset
Storytelling Master & Ted Talk Giver!

The Social Media Mindset

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 51:04


Rain Bennett is a world class storyteller, author, and film maker! The value he brings to how you tell your story is outstanding! This episode is one of my favorites. Can't wait for y'all to hear it! Connect w/ Rain: Instagram: https://instagram.com/rainbennett (https://instagram.com/rainbennett) Would You Like to Learn How to Turn Four Videos Into a Month's Worth of Content? https://www.kyledraper.com/content-compounding (https://www.kyledraper.com/content-compounding) Connect with Coach Kyle: Website:https://kyledraper.com/ ( )https://kyledraper.comfacebook/ (https://kyledraper.com) Facebook, Instagram, & Tiktok: @coachkyledraper Everything Else:https://linktr.ee/coachkyledraper ( https://linktr.ee/coachkyledraper) Want FREE Social Media Advice? http://bit.ly/topofmindsellingfbgroup (http://bit.ly/topofmindsellingfbgroup) Need a Dynamic Speaker for an Event or Group? Duh...Me! http://bit.ly/coachkylespeakerkit (http://bit.ly/coachkylespeakerkit)

The Healthcare QualityCast
Uncovering Ethos, Pathos, and Logos in a Leader with Shalisha Grace Maddela, MPH, CPH

The Healthcare QualityCast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 37:39


Introducing our guest today, Shalisha Grace Maddela, a Performance Improvement Consultant at Stanford Health Care. Wanting to have an impact in healthcare, Shalisha got a Bachelor's Degree in Psychology at UC, Davis, and later on, a Master's Degree. In this episode, Shalisha shares her strong drive for quality and performance improvement work as a key factor in her successful journey in the healthcare industry. Top Takeaways [00:44] Oftentimes, the first step can be the most daunting, but if we don't try, we're never going to learn. For the mindset of a Process Improvement professional, there's no such thing as failing, either you find success or you find a lot of points to learn. [06:52] Shalisha also has a strong motivation for volunteering and taking part in different foundations. These experiences have helped her make great connections and give back to society. [09:03] Lessons from moments of failure: It is important to speak to customers and get a good understanding of the root cause of a problem before jumping into solutions. [12:16] Tips for building intimate team connections: "Ethos, Logos, and Pathos". Ethos refers to the ethical appeal and proper alignment with authority. Logos is the logic behind decisions, especially consideration given to data. Pathos is the emotional appeal; this helps with motivation and drive for people to get the work done. Combining these with Performance Improvement was not an easy feat as it took learning through trial and error. [17:23] Best 'Aha' moment: When Shalisha was activated for the Covid-19 response, she realized she could take advantage of her Lean Six Sigma training to improve performance, effect change, and reduce the chaos. [21:03] Current changes across the healthcare industry: With more technological awareness following the pandemic, the pivotal role of people skills and change management will continue to be needed. [22:55] How can the healthcare industry become a more attractive place for ambitious PI professionals? It would involve creating inclusive spaces for diverse talent and working more towards retaining people by showing their passion for retention. This helps people feel desired and valued. Healthcare leaders need to discuss with staff and figure out what they want; even if it can't be done yet, just the process of talking goes a long way. [27:15] The environment at Stanford where people are constantly striving to be better inspires Shalisha to do the same. [28:10] Best career advice: Don't let the fires of the past burn you. Keep moving forward and don't be defined by your errors. [29:24] A successful habit that contributes to success is Feedback. Always getting feedback from her team members, her manager, and even internally with herself promotes growth immensely. [29:50] Website or Application recommendation: Smartsheet [31:00] Professional society or conference recommendation: California Association of Healthcare Leaders (C.A.H.L) [32:34] Book recommendation: "Humble Enquiry" by Edgar H. Schein [32:10] Shalisha's message to herself in the past would be "don't be so hard on yourself, it's going to be okay, and don't be too attached to the idea of what success looks like, you're going to end up in the places you need to be". As for the message to herself in the future, she hopes she is happy and does not forget her roots. [35:04] Final comments from Shalisha: Lead with your humanity. Key Quotes: "Fail early, fail fast, but always fail forward" "If you go out and make an impact or give value, it's going to come back" Connect: Find | Shalisha Grace Maddela LinkedIn – Shalisha Grace Maddela --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/healthcarequalitycast/message

Text Talk
Matthew 20: Laboring in the Vineyard

Text Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 16:00


Matthew 20: 1-16Andrew and Edwin take a second look at the gracious vineyard owner parable. What unified each of the laborers in the vineyard even though they came at different hours and accomplished different amounts of labor? The Master in whose vineyard they decided to work. There's the key to discuss.Read the written devo that goes along with this episode by clicking here.    Let us know what you are learning or any questions you have. Email us at TextTalk@ChristiansMeetHere.org.    Join the Facebook community and join the conversation by clicking here. We'd love to meet you. Be a guest among the Christians who meet on Livingston Avenue. Click here to find out more. Michael Eldridge sang all four parts of our theme song. Find more from him by clicking here.   Thanks for talking about the text with us today.________________________________________________If the hyperlinks do not work, copy the following addresses and paste them into the URL bar of your web browser: Daily Written Devo: https://readthebiblemakedisciples.wordpress.com/?p=8588The Christians Who Meet on Livingston Avenue: http://www.christiansmeethere.org/Facebook Page: https://www.facebook.com/TalkAboutTheTextFacebook Group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/texttalkMichael Eldridge: https://acapeldridge.com/ 

Bootsy Greencast
Mystic Mix 1: "Who is the Master Who Makes the Grass Green?"

Bootsy Greencast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 15:13


This first mystic mix is supplemental to episode one: Roadmap to Reality.  Enjoy this hand crafted collage of audio clips and sounds designed specifically to empower your heart and please your noggin.  Come hang out with us tonight on Rokfin, we are LIVE there Tuesdays at 9pm -- https://rokfin.com/bluecollarmysticsFor more in-depth analysis of the material in the episode, check out these links:Earl Nightingales' the Strangest Secret:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qOY_2nVozLARobert Anton Wilson's 8 Circuit Model of Consciousness Overview: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5XGWmD98mZUFull Playlist:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dy5tYVU5mFk&list=PL8F393A80E80263B3Bill Hicks, the GOAT:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BkmbIAhoWrQSubscribe to the AUDIO on your podcast provider of choice: https://bluecollarmystics.buzzsprout.comFollow us on IG: https://www.instagram.com/bluecollarmysticsGet a free guide to finding your life's purpose:https://bootsygreenwood.com/Join our free facebook group here:https://www.facebook.com/groups/760024584443824Get on a Discovery call to #getcoached here: https://calendly.com/bootsygreenwood/discovery-callCheck out all the contributors to Alt Media United HERE:https://altmediaunited.com/all-podcasts/Find us on all the platforms thanks to our partners at https://contentsafe.coLBRYhttps://lbry.tv/@bootsygreenwood:bGab:https://tv.gab.com/channel/bootsygreenwoodBitchute:https://www.bitchute.com/channel/ncbw05e5xA5b/Flote:https://flote.app/bootsygreenwoodRumble:https://rumble.com/c/c-398895Minds:https://www.minds.com/bootsygreenwood/Odysseehttps://odysee.com/@bootsygreenwood:bSupport the show (https://paypal.me/OwenHunt173)

Flow Research Collective Radio
The Difference Between Shame & Guilt, Creating Whitespace & Avoiding Insomnia Forever | Flow Research Collective Radio

Flow Research Collective Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 54:09


TODAY´S EPISODE IS BROUGHT TO YOU BY THE FLOW RESEARCH COLLECTIVE Are you an entrepreneur, a leader, or a knowledge worker, who wants to harness the power of flow so you can get more done in less time with greater ease and accomplish your boldest professional goals faster? If you´ve answered this question with “hell yes” then our peak-performance training Zero to Dangerous may be a good fit for you. If this sounds of interest to you all you need to do is go to getmoreflow.com right now, pop in your application and one of our team members will be in touch with you very soon.  --- "Unintentionally we get in our own way…  It's all about getting out of your own way and letting your body do what it's perfectly capable of doing already." ~ Nick Wignall  ABOUT THE GUEST:  Nick is a clinical psychologist, writer, teacher, and podcaster. Everything he write about comes down to one big principle: Emotional health comes from good habits, not just nice ideas. In the same way that the body relies on healthy habits and exercise to stay fit and strong, emotional health depends on good habits of mind. It's popular to talk about emotional intelligence but what Nick is really interested in is emotional fitness. Nick did his doctoral training in clinical psychology at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas. Prior to that, Nick earned his Master's in Social Sciences from the University of Chicago and a Bachelor's in English Literature from the University of Dallas. He is board certified by the American Board of Professional Psychology, a Diplomate of the Academy of Cognitive Therapy, as well as a member of the Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies. --- If you order Steven's new book, The Art of Impossible, right now, you'll get $1,500 of free bonuses immediately dropped into your inbox.  They include secret chapters he has never released, masterclasses on key skills to help you jack up motivation, heighten creativity, and accelerate learning. You'll also get an entirely free training to help you fight distraction and spend more time in flow.  So click the link here, snag yourself a copy of The Art of Impossible, and let's get after it.

Millennial Momentum
271: Be A Master In Time Manipulation (Solo)

Millennial Momentum

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 12:15


If we all have 24 hours, why do some people get SO MUCH stuff done? The most successful people don't "manage" their time, they manipulate it to their advantage. First, they ruthlessly prioritize their lives. If you want to bend time, you can't be wasting an hour on Instagram everyday or on a dozen meaningless meetings per week that don't serve you. They know where they want to go and create time to accomplish those things. Second, they take action.

Master Mind, Body and Spirit
Paul Davis: Finding and Living Your Life's Purpose

Master Mind, Body and Spirit

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 87:07


Paul William Davis is an intuitive advisor, an entrepreneur, a best-selling author and an award-winning business growth consultant and speaker.    Help us fight censorship! Get immediate access to exclusive and censorship free content by donation or free by becoming a member here    

Raising Christian Kids
How Children Can Embody Grateful Hearts Using Gratitude Prompts and God’s Word

Raising Christian Kids

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 8:42


How can establishing gratitude prompts help to instill grateful hearts in our children? Kathy Howard is a treasure hunter! She hunts for the creamiest chocolate, richest coffee, and cherished stories of faith. She also digs deep into Scripture, mining God's eternal truths. Kathy is the author of eleven books and has a Master's in Christian […] The post How Children Can Embody Grateful Hearts Using Gratitude Prompts and God's Word appeared first on Lee Ann Mancini, Author, Producer, Podcaster.

The Chewjitsu Podcast
Episode 190 - Become A Master of Your Disasters With This Mindset

The Chewjitsu Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 56:07


The idea of the episode is to not focus on what happens, but more importantly how you respond to the things that happen. We discuss dealing with difficult situations in Jiu-Jitsu, Chewy shares a story of an unsuccessful marketing idea for his gym, and how he responded and adjusted tactics. We also share a story about one of Chewy's black belts, who was a an aggressive grappler and sustained an injury, and was forced to change change and adjust his approach to training. We also chat about complacency, the conditions that create a positive outcome are many times not ideal, how a “defect” can become a blessing, if you should ever “sulk” when something doesn't go your way, developing athleticism for your specific sport, and how to use your body type for your Jiu-Jitsu. Thanks to the podcast sponsors: Charlotte's Web CBD. Head over to charlottesweb.com/chewjitsu and pick up some high quality CBD to help with all of your recovery needs. Epic Roll BJJ. Check out https://www.epicrollbjj.com and use the promo code Chewjitsu to get 15% off of your total purchase. Manscaped. Check out https://www.manscaped.com/ and use the promo code Chewjitsu20 to get 20% off and free shipping! Check out podcast exclusives including conversations with guests, Q&A sessions, and tons more at https://patreon.com/thechewjitsupodcast

The Unexplained With Howard Hughes
Edition 604 - Avi Loeb And Sean Cahill

The Unexplained With Howard Hughes

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022


*Slightly shorter edition* An update from Harvard astrophysicist Professor Avi Loeb on his growing Galileo Project searching for UFO prof and truth. And Sean Cahill - UFO campaigner and former Master at Arms on the USS Princeton when the "tic tac" UFOs were sighted...

Voices from The Bench
199: Never Stop Learnin' with Beth Brown

Voices from The Bench

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 57:53


It's no secret that a lot of guests recently have been found because of the amazing dental technician community found on Instagram. If you are on there you definitely know of @thepartyenamel (https://www.instagram.com/thepartyenamel/). It's hard not to know of her because she is great at creating content and bringing the dental lab community even closer. But the person behind the account is Beth Brown. Beth comes on the podcast to talk about getting into the industry, going to a dental university in a hospital, using her Instagram to find her new home at Mango Dental Lab (https://www.facebook.com/mangodental/), and taking the challenge to get her Master's degree in Dental Technology. She's a dental party enamel for sure when it comes to education! Elvis and Barb were right! Schottlander (https://www.schottlander.com/) teeth are not in the US. If you want to save, and also grow, Gro3X (https://www.gro3x.com/) is, where you should go! Resins (https://www.gro3x.com/collections/print) to print night guards, for high-impact and flex, look no further, because we have them at Gro3X. Burs (https://www.gro3x.com/collections/mill) for your mills, Zirconia (https://www.gro3x.com/collections/aidite) for your crowns, with Gro3X you will be the hottest lab in town! And last but not least, if you seriously want to grow, add Gro3X Aligners (https://www.gro3x.com/pages/aligners), and your doctors will say Wowww! Whip Mix (https://www.whipmix.com/), known today for its digital equipment and materials, has been known for decades as a leader in occlusion products with its Whip Mix, Hanau, and Denar articulators and facebows (https://www.whipmix.com/product-overview/?product-cat=occlusion). The most popular of these is the Denar Mark 300 Series articulator. These popular semi-adjustable instruments are engineered for superior performance and tested thoroughly based on proven methodology. They bring a new standard of interchangeability with factory set accuracy within 20 microns. With their sleek, ergonomic design and powder-coated finish, these articulators have a contemporary look that's as durable as it is aesthetically pleasing. The Denmat Mark 320 articulator (https://www.whipmix.com/products/denar-mark-320-dental-articulator/) features Adjustable condylar inclination with 0 to 60,° and Progressive side shift fixed at 15°. The Denar Mark 300 comes complete with: Dust cover, 10 magnetic mounting plates, instructions and standard black carrying case. Head over to Whipmix.com to order one today. Special Guest: Beth Brown.

Starve the Ego Feed the Soul
Psychedelic-Assisted Psychotherapy: A Paradigm Shift with Natalie Lyla Ginsberg, MSW

Starve the Ego Feed the Soul

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 85:43


Interested in working with me one on one? I work with individuals, couples, and athletes of all ages. Head over to www.nicobarraza.com for more information and to book a session with me.Follow along via Instagram and TikTok @ThatBarrazaBoyThis week's guest is Natalie Lyla Ginsberg, MSW. Natalie is the Global Impact Officer at the Multidisciplinary Association for Psychedelic Studies (MAPS) https://maps.org/ where Natalie works with her inspiration around the potential role of psychedelics' in healing intergenerational trauma and conflict, and for inspiring innovative community-drive solutions. Natalie founded the Policy & Advocacy department at MAPS, and served as its director for 5 years. She also initiated and helped developed MAPS' Health Equity Program. MAPS Mission statement from their website is: Founded in 1986, the Multidisciplinary Association for Psychedelic Studies (MAPS) is a 501(c)(3) non-profit research and educational organization that develops medical, legal, and cultural contexts for people to benefit from the careful uses of psychedelics and marijuana.Many of you have probably heard of MAPS through its founder Rick Doblin. Rick Doblin, Ph.D., is the founder and executive director of the Multidisciplinary Association for Psychedelic Studies (MAPS). He received his doctorate in Public Policy from Harvard's Kennedy School of Government, where he wrote his dissertation on the regulation of the medical uses of psychedelics and marijuana and his Master's thesis on a survey of oncologists about smoked marijuana vs. the oral THC pill in nausea control for cancer patients. His undergraduate thesis at New College of Florida was a 25-year follow-up to the classic Good Friday Experiment, which evaluated the potential of psychedelic drugs to catalyze religious experiences. He also conducted a thirty-four year follow-up study to Timothy Leary's Concord Prison Experiment. Rick studied with Dr. Stanislav Grof and was among the first to be certified as a Holotropic Breathwork practitioner. His professional goal is to help develop legal contexts for the beneficial uses of psychedelics and marijuana, primarily as prescription medicines but also for personal growth for otherwise healthy people, and eventually to become a legally licensed psychedelic therapist. He founded MAPS in 1986.Natalie and I dive into so many things around psychedelic research, policy, and legality. From MDMA, psilocybin , LSD, DMT, Ayahuasca, Mescaline, Ketamine, and Eboga, we discuss what the current research is showing in terms of the various plant medicines and some of the developing legislation and licensure around being able to use these plant medicines in a legal and clinical/therapeutic setting within the United States.We also touch on cultural appropriation of shamanism in the USA and the pros and cons of some spiritual plant medicine retreats.  

Take the Upgrade
183. Finally understand and work with your hormones with Dr. Carrie Jones

Take the Upgrade

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 36:34


Carrie Jones, ND, FABNE, MPH is an internationally recognized speaker, consultant, and educator on the topic of women's health and hormones. Dr. Jones graduated from the National University of Natural Medicine in Portland, Oregon where she also completed a 2-year residency in women's health, hormones, and endocrinology. Later, she graduated from Grand Canyon University's Master of Public Health program.  Recently, Dr. Jones became board certified through the American Board of Naturopathic Endocrinology.  She was adjunct faculty for many years, teaching gynecology and advanced endocrinology/fertility.  While in practice, Dr. Jones served as Medical Director for 2 large integrative clinics in Portland.  Most recently, she joined Lifestyle Matrix Resource Center as the Clinical Expert serving the SOS Stress Recovery Program and is the Medical Director for Precision Analytical Inc. This episode kicks off with Kari and Dr. Carrie Jones discussing some of the myths about hormones.  They move into the importance of tracking your cycle to see the effects it has on your health throughout the month.   Hormones take a lot of blame for unpleasant behaviors/feelings we experience during the month.  There is definitely some truth to that blame but it's not completely out of our control.  Kari and Dr. Carrie talk about the importance of sleep, stress management, eliminating toxins from our environment, and limiting alcohol intake.   This episode wraps with a discussion about the DUTCH test and how it is used to get a comprehensive picture of your hormone makeup.   Connect with Dr. Carrie→

The Jason Cavness Experience
Miguel Ayala - CEO/Director at Aphelion Aerospace

The Jason Cavness Experience

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 96:26


On this episode of the Jason Cavness Experience I talk to Miguel Ayala - CEO & Director at Aphelion Aerospace We talk about the following Aphelion Aerospace Their equity based crowdfunding campaign Lots of space related items Doing engineering at a startup vs a corporation Advice on various subjects. Miguel's Bio Miguel has more than 20 years of experience in engineering, leadership, and management of multidisciplinary engineering teams developing aircraft, launch vehicles, spacecraft, and associated ground support equipment in high-profile government and commercial space programs. Miguel is passionate about contributing to groundbreaking innovations in space exploration and aerospace transportation. With the intent of becoming an effective well-rounded leader, he has devoted his entire career to gaining a broad background in engineering and leadership, encompassing: small startups and large corporations; design, analysis, test, and manufacturing; propulsion, structures, mechanisms, and thermofluid systems; technical leadership; project and people management. Previous programs include ULA Vulcan rocket at Belcan, Orion spacecraft and A2100 satellites at Lockheed Martin, Falcon 9 and Falcon Heavy rockets at SpaceX, aircraft GNC at L3Harris, Joint Strike Fighter (JSF) F-35 aircraft engines and ISS habitat module at Honeywell, and NASA Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Booster processing at Northrop Grumman. Miguel holds a Master's degree in Mechanical Engineering from UCLA. He also holds Bachelor's degrees in both Mechanical Engineering and Aerospace Engineering from Arizona State University. Miguel's Social Media Miguel's LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/miguel-ayala-1a11aa54/ Miguel's Twitter: https://twitter.com/Migsy78 Miguel's Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/miguelaayala78/ Company LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/aphelionaerospace/ Company FB: https://www.facebook.com/aphelionaerosp Company Twitter: https://twitter.com/aphelionaerosp Company Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/aphelionaerospace/ Company YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCSPGHQnTmGr1wI3kNwKqlww Miguel's Gift Miguel is inviting followers of The Jason Cavness Experience to invest in their equity crowdfunding campaign. You can find the details at the link below. https://www.startengine.com/aphelion-aerospace Miguel's Advice I know there's a lot of hype about young entrepreneurs starting businesses. It's really, really hard. The probability of somebody fresh out of college running a successful company. It's really hard. Then as you get older, and at the later part of your life, it's also hard. From the research that I've seen, you have a higher probability of success. If you start a company, mid career, meaning in your late 30s, 40s, early 50s in that 20 Year 30 year span from like 30 to 60.

Lois Koffi's Healthy N Wealthy N Wise Podcast
Creating Leverage Thru Certifiying Your Method or Process With Ann Ljungberg

Lois Koffi's Healthy N Wealthy N Wise Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 32:35


My guest today is the ultimate example of Healthy N Wealthy N Wise!   I have never talked about this topic on my show yet - in almost 200 episodes!   Would you like to make more money in less time and still help many more people?   Would you like time freedom and be anywhere in the world you want to be at anytime?   Ann Ljungberg has that!   After a long career in IT, Ann Ljungberg moved onboard a sailboat in 2002 and turned her hobby - writing - into a job. She developed an expert method to develop manuscripts for publishing. After teaching the method to other entrepreneurs in her Literary Consultancy Academy she decided to help other experts to monetize their methods - by licensing, certification, and other tribe building strategies.   She still lives on the sailboat, is currently in Spain, and works globally online.   Get your FREE ticket to Ann's Monetize Your Method Chummit https://expertcoalition.krtra.com/t/4XgvJDrNhja4   Join Ann's facebook group also when you sign up for her Chummit or go here:     This will be an actionable CHUMMIT - a challenge and a summit - where you will meet amazing speakers and work on monetizing YOUR method.      Join The Expert Method Bootcamp where you will structure your work so that your expertise can scale!    I will be speaking on it on Jan 28th   During this 5-day chummit you will take action on important business building items like:     1. Master your Method       2. Magnetize your Method       3. Materialize your Method       4. Multipy your Method       5. Market your Method     All in all - Monetize your Method!      I can't wait to see what happens for your business after we go through this chummit together.     FOR YOUR OWN SUCCESS IN 2022 - HERE IS WHAT IS HAPPENING WITH COACH LOIS:         Sign up for Coach Lois' High Performance Sales Masterclass With Jenny Harkleroad   February 3rd   https://balancedyou.org/performance/     Pour octane on your sales performance this year by attending this one time only FREE offered class!   This could be the 90 minutes that change your LIFE in 2022

The Mindvalley Podcast with Vishen Lakhiani
The Truth About Self-Love - Shadé Zahrai

The Mindvalley Podcast with Vishen Lakhiani

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 6:56


You'd be surprised how many people believe that self-love is the authority to be selfish. But what if you decided to define it differently instead? In this short episode, self-mastery expert Shadé Zahrai shares a better definition of self-love and her version is the antidote to imposter syndrome, the secret culprit that holds many people back. Get ready to become the Master of your confidence.      Listen out for: - The definition of self-efficacy. - The difference between self-love and self-esteem. - The true definition of imposter syndrome.  - How to overcome imposter syndrome.   ABOUT SHADÉ ZAHRAI Shadé Zahrai is a leadership ‘alchemist' known for her ability to translate the latest in neuroscience and psychology research into practical and actionable strategies that drive mindset shifts and behavioral change in a systematic way. She is a bestselling author, Harvard-trained leadership coach, TEDx speaker, and was recently recognized as Adweek's Careers Creator of the Year. Along with her Ph.D. research in leadership and career performance, Shadé has spent hours with hundreds of teams from startups to Fortune 500s, observing clear behavioral trends behind the happiest and most successful people.      Bonus:                                                                          - Find Vishen's notes on this episode here

Think Yourself Healthy
Accelerating Ascension with Plant Medicine, Crystals & Detoxification with Miguel Escobar

Think Yourself Healthy

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 79:21


Miguel Escobar is a Texas born Father, Leader, God loving, Animal loving, and Earth loving Physician Assistant (PA) that currently lives in South Texas. He studied Biology at Texas A&M University and finished his Master's degree in PA studies at UT Rio Grande Valley University. He has 15 years of experience working in many areas of the Healthcare system and brings forth immense energy, passion, empathy and forward thinking practices to his community. Miguel is now fighting back against the tyrannical ideologies and misinformation that is spreading all over the world. His intentions are to help spread the TRUTH about Spirituality, Health and Knowledge. He believes it is imperative that we all unite and collaborate together now, not just in the United States of America but also all around the world, to educate and empower ourselves to be the Sovereign Natural Beings that God intended us to live as. Resources: Visit Miguel's website for resources and information here: https://www.txlightguardians.com Get in touch with Miguel through email at Freedom@txlightguardians.com Take the free toxicity quiz here: https://heatherderanja.typeform.com/toxicity-quiz 21 Days to Conscious Eating Program: https://heatherderanja.podia.com/21-conscious-eating Thanks for joining us on the Think Yourself Healthy Podcast! Don't forget to leave a review and make sure you share that you're listening to this episode on the gram and tag myself @heatherderanja and @thinkyourselfhealthy_ so we can share! --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/heather-deranja/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/heather-deranja/support

Wharton FinTech Podcast
Basil Darwish, Managing Director at Wells Fargo Strategic Capital-Promoting Fintech Growth Via CVC

Wharton FinTech Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 26:10


In today's episode, Anirudh Singh sits down with Basil Darwish, Managing Director and Fintech & Enterprise Tech lead at Wells Fargo Strategic Capital. Basil joined as the team's first hire in March 2016, coming over from Citi Ventures. In this episode, they discuss a range of topics, including Basil's winding path towards venture investing, the pros and cons of different corporate venture capital models, a deep dive into three of Wells Fargo's investments: Trovata, H20.ai, and Arkose Labs, and much more! Basil Darwish: Basil Darwish is a Managing Director at Wells Fargo Strategic Capital and leads the group's focus on Fintech and Enterprise Software. His investments range from early-stage to growth capital investments in companies that are strategically aligned with Wells Fargo. One of his goals is to bring technology-based innovation into the Bank. Basil's investment focus areas include B2B/B2C Fintech, RegTech, AI & Machine Learning, Big Data Analytics, and Cyber Security. Basil has been in the domain of venture investing for the past 12 years, across Silicon Valley, New York, and Southeast Asia. Prior to joining Wells Fargo in 2016, Basil was with Citi for 8 years most recently as Senior Vice President at Citi's growth ventures and innovation group (Citi Ventures), where he focused on venture investments and innovation initiatives across the US and Asia, in the domains of Payments, Big Data Analytics, and Information Security. Prior to moving into financial services, Basil spent several years in the technology industry in various roles across the value chain, from semiconductor product engineering and system-level product development at Analog Devices Inc, as well as digital design engineering at Chinook Communications, a technology startup that emerged out of MIT in 1999 developing spectrum enhancement technologies. Basil currently serves as a board director of Trovata, H2O.ai, OpenFin, and Droit. He also serves as a board observer of Arkose Labs, Socure, Volante Technologies, Elliptic and Atscale. Basil holds an MBA from the Wharton School of Business with a double major in finance and entrepreneurial management, a Master of Science Degree in Electrical Engineering from Tufts University with a focus on semiconductor design, and a B.Sc. in Electrical Engineering from the University of Jordan. Basil lives in the San Francisco Bay Area with his wife and two daughters.

The Practical Stoic with Simon J. E. Drew
Joshua Bertolotti | Paths to Wisdom

The Practical Stoic with Simon J. E. Drew

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 66:52


About Our Guest: Joshua is a retired veteran, avid reader, and lifelong learner. He hosts In Search of Wisdom to engage in meaningful conversations on how to live in a complex world. He enjoys exploring the integration of timeless principles and practices with everyday life. Joshua is an ICF-trained Leadership Coach with a passion for collaborative partnerships. Joshua is currently pursuing a doctorate degree in strategic leadership and holds a Master of Science in management. He has executive certificates in the Psychology of Leadership, Organizational Consulting and Change Leadership, Brain-Based Coaching, and Leadership Coaching for Organizational Well-Being. You can find out more about Joshua's work at www.perennialleader.com. To register for this week's Walled Garden Meetups, go to thewalledgarden.com/events and register via the links available.

Grifthorse
Episode 131: Grifters in the Mist

Grifthorse

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 52:36


Master and pupil discuss Resale Shop Arbi,, Poppin Case, Dialysis Roomate Soap, Crypto Corner, eBay Message Live, Josh's JAQs and Estate Sale Tales.

Education On Fire - Sharing creative and inspiring learning in our schools

Scott L. Steward is the Founder and CEO of Genius Lab. Genius Lab has an exemplary mission of exposing the youth to the possibilities of learning and exploring their inner greatness to think boldly in achieving accomplishments. Scott Steward encompasses over 30 years of business experience working with Fortune 500 companies and has taught business and entrepreneurship at the collegiate level. He aims to empower the next generation of business leaders to create an impact globally. Scott L. Steward is an 18-time award-winning teacher of entrepreneurship, whose expertise is frequently sought after by various publications. A former contributing writer for Chicago's N'DIGO Magapaper and former Chicago Public School teacher, and now Professor of Small Business Management and Entrepreneurship at Chicago State University, Scott provides tips on entrepreneurial ventures and suggestions for emerging entrepreneurs. In addition, Scott authored an easy-to-use business plan that is featured in the book, "Make $1,000 in 35 Days", and is a contributor to the globally used classroom textbook, "Entrepreneurship: Owning Your FUTURE 11th Edition", (Pearson, Prentice-Hall). Scott is also the author of "31 Ways to Improve Your Life: a Book of Stewism's" and "From the Block to the Boardroom: a Book of Stewism's". Scott is a true inspiration. His passion and determination enable him to create an unprecedented connection with his students, whom more than 80% have turned into business owners under his direction. Scott earned a Bachelor of Arts in Communications from Columbia College Chicago and a Master's of Science in Integrated Marketing Communications from Roosevelt University. Website https://www.geniuslabchicago.com/ (www.geniuslabchicago.com/) Social Media Information IG @geniuslabchi www.facebook.com/580470378700056/ Show Sponsor The National Association for Primary Education speaks for young children and all who live and work with them. Find out more about their online CPD events at https://nape.org.uk/online-events (nape.org.uk/online-events) https://frstre.com/go/?a=100059-6a3612&s=1971853-ecdb80&p_affiliate.referral_code=marktaylor12 (Listen to Mark's audio course ) https://frstre.com/go/?a=100059-6a3612&s=1971853-ecdb80&p_affiliate.referral_code=marktaylor12 (10 Pieces of Advice You'd Like to Have as a Child) Support this podcast