Podcast appearances and mentions of Jane Austen

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English novelist

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Jane Austen

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Best podcasts about Jane Austen

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Latest podcast episodes about Jane Austen

The Baby-Sitters Club Club
SB 013 - "Northanger Abbey," by Jane Austen

The Baby-Sitters Club Club

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2021 72:37


A credulous horror fan and a sarcastic sophisticate trade gentle barbs and sentimental observations as they engage in a penetrating analysis of this literary masterpiece by Jane Austen. Music credits: "In a Dubstep," by FAS Sounds “Typewriter Blues,” by AllenGrey Special thanks to Baby Bee Carys for the theme music! Subscribe to our Patreon at Patreon.com/BSCCPodcast and support the show at Bit.ly/RattlesnakeJake! Advertise on The Baby-Sitters Club Club via Gumball.fm --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/jack-shepherd8/support

Hollow + Substantial

Hollow has been to see some improvised Jane Austen, and Substantial is embarking on another winter reading project. Meanwhile, we don't know much about art, but we certainly like talking about it - maybe there should be a warning to any art lovers that we are NOT experts! There's a Lost and Found about rediscovering child-like pleasures, and some wisdom on good housekeeping. Hollow+SubstantialAustentatiousThe Four QuartetsSupport the show (https://www.buymeacoffee.com/hollowsubstance)Support the show (https://www.buymeacoffee.com/hollowsubstance)

The Cordial Catholic
138: The Grace of Catholic Conversion (w/ Haley Stewart)

The Cordial Catholic

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 81:41


In this episode of The Cordial Catholic, I'm joined by author, podcaster, and Catholic convert Haley Stewart to talk about her experience converting to Catholicism. On a search for a liturgically minded church, and through reading the Early Church Fathers, Haley and her husband Daniel, became interested and then deeply immersed in the Catholic Church. Their story is one of starting a family, finding a new faith, and the challenges and graces that come as a result of trusting in Christ, and the journey!For more from Haley check out her website and follow her on Twitter and Instagram.For more, visit The Cordial Catholic. Send your feedback to cordialcatholic@gmail.com. Sign up for our newsletter for my reflections on  episodes, behind-the-scenes content, and exclusive contests! To watch this and other episodes please visit (and subscribe to!) our YouTube channel.Please consider financially supporting this show! For more information visit the Patreon page.  All patrons receive access to exclusive content and if you can give $5/mo or more you'll also be entered into monthly draws for fantastic books hand-picked by me.If you'd like to give a one-time donation to The Cordial Catholic, you can visit the PayPal page.Thank you to those already supporting the show!My wife is going on a pilgrimage – maybe you should too! She's joining Haley Stewart and Christy Isinger from the Fountain of Carrots Podcast on the Writer's & Relics pilgrimage – a bookish tour of England featuring places connected to Jane Austen, C.S. Lewis, J.R.R. Tolkien, G.K. Chesterton and the English martyrs. Use the code "cordial" at checkout for $100 off. Thanks to this week's co-producers, part of our Patreon Producers community: Stephen, Eli, Tom, Kelvin, Susan, Eyram, and Jon.Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/cordialcatholic)

Time Sensitive Podcast
Siri Hustvedt on the Value in Embracing Ambiguity

Time Sensitive Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 83:30


When Siri Hustvedt was 12 years old, she began reading 19th-century novels by Jane Austen, the Brontë sisters, Charles Dickens, and Mark Twain that were given to her by her Norwegian mother, and soon developed a passion for literature. She found great satisfaction in how these stories expanded her mind with new ideas and realms beyond. At 13, precociously enough, she decided she wanted to become a writer. Her interest in developing what she calls a “flexibility of mind” led her to eventually reading and studying works in a wide range of disciplines, including art history, philosophy, psychoanalysis, and neuroscience. Through her essays, poems, fiction, and nonfiction over the past five decades, Hustvedt's aim has become clear: to bring together perspectives that might help her—and those who read her work—see the world differently.Hustvedt's efforts to break down barriers and build a diversity of knowledge have steered her toward an array of topics. Upon moving from her hometown of Northfield, Minnesota, to New York City in 1978 to attend Columbia University, from which she earned her Ph.D. in English literature, she worked as a waitress, a researcher for a medical historian, a model, and an artist's assistant. She went on to write seven novels, including the international bestseller What I Loved (2004) and The Blazing World (2014), the latter of which won the Los Angeles Times Book Prize for Fiction in 2014. Since 1995, Hustvedt has written extensively about art and what comes from looking deeply at it, unpacking works ranging from Johannes Vermeer's “Woman with a Pearl Necklace” (1662–1664) to the photorealistic paintings of Gerhard Richter​​. Often, Hustvedt's subject matter comes to her because it hits close to home. In her 2010 book The Shaking Woman or a History of My Nerves, she investigated the violent tremors that she first experienced in 2006 while delivering her father's eulogy. Hustvedt (who with her husband, the novelist Paul Auster, has a daughter, the singer-songwriter Sophie Auster) has also long been interested in the peculiarities of motherhood, and more recently, the placenta, a subject she plans to explore at length in a future book. On this episode, Hustvedt talks with Spencer about the mysteries and misunderstandings around gestation, maternity, and being a mother; books as friends; and the problems with putting up walls between disciplines. Show notes:Full Transcriptsirihustvedt.net[05:01] Mothers, Fathers, and Others (2021)[47:53] A Plea for Eros (2005)[53:24] “The Future of Literature: The Anatomy of the Novel” (2017)[01:03:31] The Shaking Woman or a History of My Nerves (2010)

The Literary Life Podcast
Episode 115: In Search of the Austen Adaptation – Pride and Prejudice

The Literary Life Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 131:03


This week on The Literary Life podcast we have a fun episode for you to kick off a fun series of episodes that will come up from time to time, “In Search of the Austen Adaptation.” This week our hosts Angelina, Cindy and Thomas are joined by Atlee Northmore, and together they are debating which film version of Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice is the best. Atlee shares some of the history of the Pride and Prejudice adaptations that were made for TV and film. Angelina highlights different ideas of what makes a good film adaptation of a book. Cindy brings up the importance of the casting, and Angelina talks about why she still feels like no film has gotten Mr. Darcy right. She also talks about the difficulty of embodying the virtues that Jane Austen gives her characters. Our hosts critique each major movies from over the decades, sharing what they like and dislike about each one. Click here to download the PDF Atlee created for all the Pride and Prejudice film adaptations. Commonplace Quotes: If we cannot get the better of life, at any rate, we can be so free as to laugh at it. Desmond MacCarthy Jane Austen is thus a mistress of much deeper emotion than appears upon the surface. She stimulates us to supply what is not there. What she offers is, apparently a trifle, yet is composed of something that expands in the reader's mind and endows with the most enduring form of life scenes which are outwardly trivial. Virginia Woolf The most extraordinary thing in the world is an ordinary man and an ordinary woman and their ordinary children. G. K. Chesterton Never judge a book by its movie. Anonymous False Though She Be by William Congreve FALSE though she be to me and love, I'll ne'er pursue revenge; For still the charmer I approve, Though I deplore her change. In hours of bliss we oft have met: They could not always last; And though the present I regret, I'm grateful for the past. Book List: The Common Reader by Virginia Woolf Support The Literary Life: Become a patron of The Literary Life podcast as part of the “Friends and Fellows Community” on Patreon, and get some amazing bonus content! Thanks for your support! Connect with Us: You can find Angelina and Thomas at HouseofHumaneLetters.com, on Instagram @angelinastanford, and on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/ANGStanford/ Find Cindy at morningtimeformoms.com, on Instagram @cindyordoamoris and on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/cindyrollins.net/. Check out Cindy's own Patreon page also! Follow The Literary Life on Instagram, and jump into our private Facebook group, The Literary Life Discussion Group, and let's get the book talk going! http://bit.ly/literarylifeFB

BOOKIN' IT
56. Pride and Prejudice, Part 2

BOOKIN' IT

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 30:13


Matthew and Cooper talk about the main characters in Jane Austen's masterpiece as well as discuss other things. SUPPORT US HERE: https://patreon.com/bookinit(we really do want more of you)

New Books in Literature
Andrea Penrose, "Murder at the Royal Botanic Gardens" (Kensington, 2021)

New Books in Literature

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 41:14


Great Britain's Regency Era (1811–1820) has long been wildly popular as a subject of historical fiction yet overly focused on the romance genre. The towering figures of Jane Austen and Georgette Heyer have tended to dominate the field to the point where even novels that are not primarily romances exist within Austen's world. But as we can see from Andrea Penrose's Wrexford & Sloane mystery series, far more was going on during the Regency than parties and marriage politics. Penrose's London is a gritty place filled with canny urchins, men and women of science, engineers and international businessmen, gamblers and disgraced lords and satirists who make their living off the foibles and follies of the well-to-do. One such satirist is Charlotte Sloane—a young artist who writes under the pen name A.J. Quill. Her network of contacts—including the two urchins who live with her, known as Raven and Hawk—proves invaluable in untangling a series of murders, the first of which Bow Street is all too eager to blame on the Earl of Wrexford. She and Wrexford become reluctant partners, then friends, and by the time we reach book 5, Murder at the Royal Botanic Gardens, they are planning their wedding. Wrexford is an acclaimed amateur chemist, an interest that brings him into contact with most of London's scientific elite and accounts for his and Charlotte's attendance at a symposium being held the Royal Botanic Gardens in Kew. The death of a prominent botanist, visiting from the United States (then at war with Britain), is first written off as the result of a weak heart. But certain clues point to murder, and Wrexford and Sloane's friends and family urge them to investigate. They soon realize this crime may have international implications, and the hunt for the killer is on. As with the Lady Sherlock mysteries, it's best to read this series from beginning to end, as each book develops Charlotte's and Wrexford's relationship, revealing new insights into their past. The characters are fascinating, the plots fast-paced and complex, and the settings richly described. If you've been avoiding novels set in the Regency because you associate the era with pale and predictable romances, this series will open your eyes. Andrea Penrose is the bestselling author of Regency-era historical fiction, including the acclaimed Wrexford & Sloane mystery series. C. P. Lesley is the author of two historical fiction series set during the childhood of Ivan the Terrible and three other novels. Her next book, Song of the Sinner, will appear in January 2022. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/literature

New Books Network
Andrea Penrose, "Murder at the Royal Botanic Gardens" (Kensington, 2021)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 41:14


Great Britain's Regency Era (1811–1820) has long been wildly popular as a subject of historical fiction yet overly focused on the romance genre. The towering figures of Jane Austen and Georgette Heyer have tended to dominate the field to the point where even novels that are not primarily romances exist within Austen's world. But as we can see from Andrea Penrose's Wrexford & Sloane mystery series, far more was going on during the Regency than parties and marriage politics. Penrose's London is a gritty place filled with canny urchins, men and women of science, engineers and international businessmen, gamblers and disgraced lords and satirists who make their living off the foibles and follies of the well-to-do. One such satirist is Charlotte Sloane—a young artist who writes under the pen name A.J. Quill. Her network of contacts—including the two urchins who live with her, known as Raven and Hawk—proves invaluable in untangling a series of murders, the first of which Bow Street is all too eager to blame on the Earl of Wrexford. She and Wrexford become reluctant partners, then friends, and by the time we reach book 5, Murder at the Royal Botanic Gardens, they are planning their wedding. Wrexford is an acclaimed amateur chemist, an interest that brings him into contact with most of London's scientific elite and accounts for his and Charlotte's attendance at a symposium being held the Royal Botanic Gardens in Kew. The death of a prominent botanist, visiting from the United States (then at war with Britain), is first written off as the result of a weak heart. But certain clues point to murder, and Wrexford and Sloane's friends and family urge them to investigate. They soon realize this crime may have international implications, and the hunt for the killer is on. As with the Lady Sherlock mysteries, it's best to read this series from beginning to end, as each book develops Charlotte's and Wrexford's relationship, revealing new insights into their past. The characters are fascinating, the plots fast-paced and complex, and the settings richly described. If you've been avoiding novels set in the Regency because you associate the era with pale and predictable romances, this series will open your eyes. Andrea Penrose is the bestselling author of Regency-era historical fiction, including the acclaimed Wrexford & Sloane mystery series. C. P. Lesley is the author of two historical fiction series set during the childhood of Ivan the Terrible and three other novels. Her next book, Song of the Sinner, will appear in January 2022. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

Wit Beyond Measure
2007 Northanger Abbey

Wit Beyond Measure

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 69:31


Review of the 2007 Northanger Abbey film starring Felicity Jones, Carrey Mulligan, and JJ Feild.This week Catrina and Elle talk about the only film adaptation they will be watching of Northanger Abbey. How did this film compare to the book? What was changed? What stayed true to the story? How did this adaptation compare to other films? With a few deviations from the book, this adaptation actually improves upon the original story. Catherine indulges in a few book fantasies. Isabella feels the repercussions of her actions. But, most importantly, we see how the story ends for General Tilney. Most importantly - *swoon* Mr. Tilney! Wit Beyond Measure is part of the Frolic Podcast Network. You can find more outstanding podcasts to subscribe to atFrolic.media/podcasts   

Security Nation
Chris John Riley on Minimum Viable Secure Product (MVSP)

Security Nation

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 48:48


Interview LinksListen to Chris's podcast, First Impressions.Check out the other, Jane Austen-themed First Impressions podcast.Learn more about MVSP at the official site and in this blog post from Google.Read up on the ETSI standard Jen mentioned.Revisit our previous episode on Disclose.io with Casey Ellis.Rapid Rundown LinksRead about the Sky router vulnerability.If you just can't wait till January to hear from us again, revisit Season 4.

Dragon at the Movies
Episode 65 - Melancholia

Dragon at the Movies

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 86:55


Dragon on the Couch: The Dragon visited the art-doc corner and watched The Lost Leonardo (Rent), which she thought was an interesting look at the financial side of high-end art. She also watched a double feature, programmed by friend of the show Andrew, showing of Tim Burton's 1994 film Ed Wood (Rent) and Ed Wood's 1957 film Plan 9 from Outer Space (Tubi). She highly recommends watching this particular double feature and in that order, this is Tim Burton at his best and the film by Ed Wood is an amazing movie to watch from a film history perspective. Finally, she watched Joseph Gordon-Levitt's directorial debut Don Jon (Netflix), which she thinks is well acted, but finds baffling and does not recommend.   Berto on the Bed: Berto saw the new William's sisters' biopic starring Will Smith, King Richard (HBO/Theatres), and was surprised by how much he liked it. On the Dragon's recommendation, he watched Willy's Wonderland (Hulu), a Nic Cage film with a weird premise and even weirder performance that he really liked. In Berto's flicks for chicks' corner, he saw Emma (HBO), the Jane Austen adaptation that he thought was very colorful, and Edge of Seventeen (Netflix), a coming-of-age movie about a teenage girl he really enjoyed. Finally, Berto watched Highlander 2 (Prime) so we don't have to.   Dragon at the Movies: This week's deep dive is the 2011 Lars Von Trier movie Melancholia, currently streaming on Hulu.

The Greatest Moments in the History of Forever

A beautiful, popular and rich high school student learns to be not quite so shallow and superficial while she befriends a new student, plays matchmaker and finds an unlikely love of her own. Written and directed by Amy Heckerling. Loosely based on the novel Emma by Jane Austen. Starring Alicia Silverstone, Stacey Dash, Brittany Murphy and Paul Rudd. FOLLOW US ON LETTERBOXD - Zach1983 & MattCrosby Thank you so much for listening! Please follow the show on Twitter: @GreatestPod Subscribe on Apple Podcasts / Podbean This week's recommendations: Spencer (Now in theaters)

The Innovative Mindset
What Movies and Shows That Bomb Teach Us About the Culture of Innovation

The Innovative Mindset

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 29:23


What We Can Learn About Success From Movies and Shows That Bomb and Hit We can learn many lessons about how a movie production is run. It is often a well-oiled machine? But what happens when it isn't? Or worse, what happens when the powers that be lose their vision? What should leaders do to course-correct? What should people lower in the hierarchy do? This week's innovation-focused episode explores the answers to these questions. This episode is brought to you by Brain.fm. I love and use brain.fm every day! It combines music and neuroscience to help me focus, meditate, and even sleep! Because you listen to this show, you can get a free trial.* URL: https://brain.fm/innovativemindset If you love it as much as I do, you can get 20% off with this exclusive coupon code: innovativemindset It's also brought to you by Gloria Chou's PR Starter Pack. If you want to get featured in the media, this is your best first step. I've used these techniques to get featured in magazines, newspapers, and podcasts. They work! https://izoldat.krtra.com/t/so6Aw0yCuva4 Books, Movies, and Shows I mention in the episode Dune (the 1980s movie), Dune (the books) The Expanse (the TV series), The Expanse (the book series) League of Extraordinary Gentlemen (movie) and the Graphic Novel Bonfire of the Vanities by Tom Wolfe (book), (movie) Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen (book), BBC Series Daniel Coyle, The Culture Code * I am a Brain.fm affiliate. If you purchase it through the above links and take the 20% off, I'll get a small commission. I'm also a PR Starter Pack Affiliate. I use Gloria's methods to get featured in the media often. And please remember, I'll never recommend a product or service I don't absolutely love! ** I'm also an Amazon affiliate so if you purchase a book or other product through the links on this page, I might get a small commission.  

Film & Whiskey
Pride and Prejudice / Knob Creek 12

Film & Whiskey

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 55:27


This week, we pick a movie from Brad's Season Five list, the 2005 Joe Wright adaptation of the classic Jane Austen novel Pride and Prejudice. Brad's surprised to hear the Bob has never seen this movie, especially since it's been so warmly reviewed. Will the charms of Austen's prose and the famous romance at the center of the story win Bob over? Meanwhile, our hosts return to the world of bourbon to try Knob Creek 12 Year, their first in the Knob Creek brand since Season One. Will this 100-proof whiskey hit their sweet spot, or does the extra aging in the barrel change things for the worse? Film & Whiskey Podcast. New episodes every Monday. Film & Whiskey Instagram Film & Whiskey Facebook Film & Whiskey Twitter Call-in Line: (216) 800-5923 Email us! Join our Discord server! Theme music: "New Shoes" by Blue Wednesday --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/filmwhiskey/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/filmwhiskey/support

BewilderBeasts
Ep 52: Five Deer

BewilderBeasts

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 40:46


Trigger warning: Today's episode discusses genocide, the dark truth behind America's most gluttonous holiday.  Why you should be eating eel and deer instead of turkey and potatoes on Thursday,  and how writers of the 1800's completely SQUAWKED up how we learn about Thanksgiving today.  And we learn what they didn't teach you in school about the first feast. Buckle in, it's a rollercoaster. Resources: https://www.smithsonianmag.com/history/what-was-on-the-menu-at-the-first-thanksgiving-511554/https://www.onthisday.com/events/date/1621https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thanksgiving_dinnerhttps://time.com/4577425/thanksgiving-2016-true-story/https://www.britannica.com/biography/Sarah-Josepha-Halehttps://www.nationalreview.com/2021/08/book-review-lady-editor-literary-lady-complicated-proto-feminist/https://americanindian.si.edu/nk360/informational/rethinking-thanksgivinghttps://news.harvard.edu/gazette/story/2020/05/the-impact-of-covid-19-on-native-american-communities/https://www.cdc.gov/media/releases/2020/p0819-covid-19-impact-american-indian-alaska-native.htmlhttps://ktla.com/news/nationworld/thousands-of-homicides-disappearances-of-indigenous-women-remain-unsolved-many-in-same-state-where-gabby-petitos-body-was-found/https://mashpeewampanoagtribe-nsn.gov/ https://native-land.ca/https://www.wbur.org/hereandnow/2020/11/25/native-americans-thanksgiving-mourningLinks as always are in the description of today's episodeIntro Music is “Tiptoe out the back” by Dan Lebowicz and Interstitial music is by MK2. Additional music provided by Pixabay and Freesound.org Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/BewilderBeastsPod)

Woman's Hour
Weekend Woman's Hour: Stonewall, Pride & Prejudice (Sort Of), Parcopresis

Woman's Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2021 56:12


Nancy Kelley is CEO of Stonewall, the largest LGBT rights charity in Europe. She speaks about her organisation's work and gives her reaction to recent high-profile withdrawals from Stonewall's Diversity Champions workplace inclusion scheme, including the BBC. This week the cricketer Azeem Rafiq candidly described the racism he's suffered. We talk to the MP Naz Shah and Halima Khan who works in grassroots cricket about the impact of his testimony. For millions of families, the past 18 months have been defined by grief. A growing online community, mainly fronted by young women, is helping others to find support through loss. We're joined by Amber Jeffrey, founder of The Grief Gang podcast, and Helen Smith who has an Instagram page called Lockdown Grief. Parcopresis is the inability to defecate or go for a poo without a certain level of privacy. The condition is also known as shy bowel and it can stop people from feeling comfortable about going at work, while out and about or even while sharing a toilet with a new partner. What causes this anxiety and why do more women suffer than men? We ask Eleanor Morgan, author of Hormonal: A Conversation About Women's Bodies, Mental Health and Why We Need to be Heard and Professor Siwan Thomas-Gibson, a consultant gastroenterologist. Pride and Prejudice (sort of) is a sweary, anarchic reboot of the classic Jane Austen novel by Scottish writer Isobel McArthur, in which an all-female cast of five play all of the characters. We're joined by Isobel and her co-performer Tori Burgess. Presenter: Anita Rani Producer: Lucy Wai Editor: Lucinda Montefiore

Woman's Hour
Cast of Pride & Prejudice (sort of); Nancy Kelley, CEO of Stonewall; Frida Kahlo

Woman's Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 57:53


Nancy Kelley is CEO of Stonewall, the largest LGBT rights charity in Europe. She speaks to Emma about her organisation's work and gives her reaction to recent high-profile withdrawals from Stonewall's Diversity Champions workplace inclusion scheme, including the BBC. Pride and Prejudice (sort of) is a sweary, anarchic reboot of the classic Jane Austen novel by Scottish writer Isobel McArthur, in which an all-female cast of five play all of the characters. Originally written for a summer season in Glasgow's Tron theatre, after a 6 month regional tour the all-singing and dancing reinterpretation has landed in London's West End to much applause. Isobel and her co-performer, Tori Burgess, are live in the studio. Frida Kahlo: the famous Mexican artist whose images go far beyond galleries, is being described as having the last laugh this week. Reproductions of her work are everywhere and her face and style adorn merchandise wherever you go. But this week in New York she broke a record. A self-portrait featuring her husband, Diego Rivera, who it's widely acknowledged treated her badly but also whom she adored, sold for a whopping 34.9 million dollars. It's the highest price ever paid, at auction, for a Latin American artwork. And - here's the twist - it's more than Diego ever got for his work. Ruth Millington, an art historian and critic discusses. Presenter: Emma Barnett Producer: Kirsty Starkey Interviewed Guest: Nancy Kelley Interviewed Guest: Isobel McArthur Interviewed Guest: Tori Burgess Interviewed Guest: Ruth Millington

Wit Beyond Measure
Our Final Thoughs on Northanger Abbey

Wit Beyond Measure

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 58:16


This week Catrina and Elle talk about everything Northanger Abbey.  Specifically, we talk about what we liked and didn't like in this novel. How does it compare to the other Austen novels we have read so far? And what we thought about the heroine and hero versus our previous heroines and heroes.Catrina also leads a discussion about gothic novels and how Austen used certain tropes. This is a parody of a traditional gothic novel, but how did Austen turn tropes on their heads? Of course, we can't forget our superlatives! See who is most likely to survive a horror movie and who we think is secretly a serial killer.  Wit Beyond Measure is part of the Frolic Podcast Network. You can find more outstanding podcasts to subscribe to atFrolic.media/podcasts  

Strong Women
80. The Scandal of Flannery O'Connor and the Power of Stories with Jessica Hooten Wilson

Strong Women

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 49:02


Jessica Hooten Wilson is an author, speaker, and professor at the University of Dallas and joined us on the podcast to discuss one of her favorite authors, Flannery O'Connor. Jessica gives us insight on the depth and rich theology of O'Connor's stories - stories that can often be misunderstood as dark and confusing. Jessica explains the power and beauty in O'Connor's writing and how fiction is uniquely able to point us to deeper truths about God and life. After listening to this interview, you are going to want to run to the nearest bookstore and look for Flannery O'Connor's books!    Jessica Hooten Wilson Show Notes:  Jessica Hooten Wilson's Website: https://jessicahootenwilson.com/  The Scandal of Holiness by Jessica Hooten Wilson: https://jessicahootenwilson.com/books/the-scandal-of-holiness/  The Life You Save Will Be Your Own by Flannery O'Connor: https://www.pf.jcu.cz/stru/katedry/aj/doc/sukdolova/Flannery_O'Connor.pdf  The Complete Stories by Flannery O'Connor: https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/complete-stories-flannery-oconnor/1103271862?ean=9780374515362  The River by Flannery O'Connor: http://www.doxaweb.com/assets/The_River.pdf  A Good Man is Hard to Find by Flannery O'Conner: https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/good-man-is-hard-to-find-and-other-stories-flannery-oconnor/1101173187?ean=9780358139560  Novelist and Believer by Flannery O'Connor: https://www.catholicculture.org/culture/library/view.cfm?recnum=9114  Books by Flannery O'Connor: https://www.barnesandnoble.com/s/flannery%20o'connor  Les Miserables by Victor Hugo: https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/les-miserables-victor-hugo/1116706580?ean=9781435163690  The Colson Fellows: https://colsonfellows.org/  The Golden Egg Book by Margaret Wise Brown: https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/golden-egg-book-margaret-wise-brown/1100060288?ean=9780385384766  Books by Homer: https://www.barnesandnoble.com/s/homer  Books by John Milton: https://www.barnesandnoble.com/s/john%20milton  Books by Jane Austen: https://www.barnesandnoble.com/s/jane%20austen  Books by William Shakespeare: https://www.barnesandnoble.com/s/william%20shakespeare/_/N-0  Books by Earnest Hemingway: https://www.barnesandnoble.com/s/earnest%20hemingway  Books by John Steinbeck: https://www.barnesandnoble.com/s/john%20steinbeck  Books by Louisa May Alcott: https://www.barnesandnoble.com/s/louisa%20may%20alcott  Books by Thomas Aquinas: https://www.barnesandnoble.com/s/thomas%20aquinas Breaking Bread with the Dead by Alan Jacobs: https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/breaking-bread-with-the-dead-alan-jacobs/1136624568?ean=9781984878427   Books by Aristotle: https://www.barnesandnoble.com/s/aristotle  Books by Dante: https://www.barnesandnoble.com/s/dante  Books by Geoffrey Chaucer: https://www.barnesandnoble.com/s/geoffrey%20chaucer  The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky: https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/the-brothers-karamazov-fyodor-dostoevsky/1116803563?ean=9781593080457 A Burning in My Bones by Winn Collier: https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/a-burning-in-my-bones-winn-collier/1137529160?ean=9780735291621  Books by Dorothy Sayers: https://www.barnesandnoble.com/s/dorothy%20sayers  Join Strong Women on Social Media: https://linktr.ee/strongwomencc  Erin and her husband, Brett, run Maven which “exists to help the next generation know truth, pursue goodness, and create beauty, all for the cause of Christ.” Check out more about Maven here: https://maventruth.com/   The Strong Women Podcast is a product of the Colson Center which equips Christians to live out their faith with clarity, confidence, and courage in this cultural moment. Through commentaries, podcasts, videos, and more, we help Christians better understand what's happening in the world, and champion what is true and good wherever God has called them.  Learn more about the Colson Center here: https://www.colsoncenter.org/   Visit our website and sign up for our email list so that you can stay up to date on what we are doing here and also receive our monthly book list: https://www.colsoncenter.org/strong-women 

Ash Said It® Daily
Andrea Kayne Talks Kicking Ass In A Corset

Ash Said It® Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 12:15


In the wake of the pandemic, women's job satisfaction has dropped significantly, women have opted out of the workforce troublingly large numbers, and women's optimism about their careers has declined. Fortunately, women's leadership expert Andrea Kayne can help. Kayne, author of the forthcoming book KICKING ASS IN A CORSET (University of Iowa Press/September 2021), has taught women — from police officers in Chicago to educators in Beijing — how to thrive in any workplace environment. Would you like an advance copy of the book, or to speak with Kayne? Suggested interview questions appear beneath my signature below. Kayne argues that the answer to the challenges women in the workplace face — from pressure to be likeable, lack of mentors and sponsors, and gender discrimination, to financial inequity, gendered career paths, and disproportionate family responsibility — is “internally referenced leadership.” That is: drawing from an internal locus of control rather than external forces. Moreover, Kayne has found examples of women who have done this well in a very unexpected place — the novels of Jane Austen, written more than 200 years ago. Web: www.andreakayne.com Follow: @andreaKayne About this author: Throughout her career, Andrea Kayne has grappled with a critical question: How can we, as women, realize our own internal power both personally and professionally, no matter the constraints in the external world? Andrea has pursued this and other questions as Director of the Leadership Program at DePaul University College of Education where she has taught for the last twenty years. Andrea has taught, written, spoken, and consulted worldwide on topics of empowered leadership, feminist leadership, emotionally intelligent leadership, constructive culture and conflict resolution, data-informed professional learning communities, and the area she has developed — Internally Referenced Leadership™. Andrea grew up in California and then received her Bachelor of Arts degree from Vassar College, her Masters of Education degree from Harvard Graduate School of Education, and her Juris Doctorate degree from the University of Pennsylvania. About the show: ► Website: http://www.ashsaidit.com ► Got Goli Gummies? https://go.goli.com/1loveash5 ► For $5 in ride credit, download the Lyft app using my referral link: https://www.lyft.com/ici/ASH584216 ► Want the ‘coldest' water? https://thecoldestwater.com/?ref=ashleybrown12 ► Become A Podcast Legend: http://ashsaidit.podcastersmastery.zaxaa.com/s/6543767021305 ► Review Us: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/ash-said-it/id1144197789 ► SUBSCRIBE HERE: http://www.youtube.com/c/AshSaidItSuwanee ► Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/1loveash ► Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ashsaidit ► Twitter: https://twitter.com/1loveAsh ► Blog: http://www.ashsaidit.com/blog ► Pinterest: https://www.pinterest.com/1LoveAsh/ #atlanta #ashsaidit #ashsaidthat #ashblogsit #ashsaidit® Ash Brown is a gifted American producer, blogger, speaker, media personality and event emcee. The blog on AshSaidit.com showcases exclusive event invites, product reviews and so much more. Her motivational podcast "Ash Said It Daily" is available on major media platforms such as iTunes, Spotify, iHeart Radio & Google Podcasts. This program has over half a million streams worldwide. She uses these mediums to motivate & encourage her audience in the most powerful way. She keeps it real!

The Literary Life Podcast
Episode 113: “Mansfield Park” by Jane Austen, Vol. 3, Ch. 9-17

The Literary Life Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 95:08


Welcome to the final episode in our series covering Mansfield Park by Jane Austen here on The Literary Life podcast. Angelina, Cindy and Thomas dive right into the book chat today in order to cover as much as possible as they wrap up Fanny Price's story. Angelina brings out the parallels to Edmund Spenser's Faerie Queene. Cindy talks about how Julia and Maria's upbringing is instructive for parents. Another topic is how, in a way, the characters continue their roles from “Lover's Vows” in real life unless they repent. Our hosts also highlight Fanny's journey toward finding a home throughout this story. Get in on the Western Films and Fiction webinar on November 22nd with Thomas and James Banks! Register here to join in! Also, check out the House of Humane Letters newsletter to get in on the read-a-long of Shakespeare's The Tempest. To view the schedule for upcoming episodes, see our Upcoming Events page. Also, if you want to join our members-only forum off Facebook, check out our Patreon page to learn more! Commonplace Quotes: To educate means to help the human soul enter into the totality of the real. Luigi Giussani, from the forward to Beauty for Truth's Sake The man who is endowed with logical astuteness is very apt to keep himself in practice by taking up indefensible positions for the fun of defending them. G. M. Young Information can thrill, but only once. Wendell Berry Amoretti Sonnet XXII by Edmund Spenser This holy season, fit to fast and pray, Men to devotion ought to be inclin'd: Therefore I likewise on so holy day, For my sweet saint some service fit will find. Her temple fair is built within my mind, In which her glorious image placed is, On which my thoughts do day and night attend, Like sacred priests that never think amiss. There I to her as th' author of my bliss, Will build an altar to appease her ire: And on the same my heart will sacrifice, Burning in flames of pure and chaste desire: The which vouchsafe, O goddess, to accept, Amongst thy dearest relics to be kept. Book List: Hallelujah: Cultivating Advent Traditions with Handel's Messiah by Cindy Rollins The Risk of Education by Luigi Giussani Beauty for Truth's Sake by Stratford Caldecott Daylight and Champaign by G. M. Young A Preface to the Faerie Queene by Graham Hough Ourselves by Charlotte Mason Surprised by Oxford by Carolyn Weber Support The Literary Life: Become a patron of The Literary Life podcast as part of the “Friends and Fellows Community” on Patreon, and get some amazing bonus content! Thanks for your support! Connect with Us: You can find Angelina and Thomas at HouseofHumaneLetters.com, on Instagram @angelinastanford, and on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/ANGStanford/ Find Cindy at morningtimeformoms.com, on Instagram @cindyordoamoris and on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/cindyrollins.net/. Check out Cindy's own Patreon page also! Follow The Literary Life on Instagram, and jump into our private Facebook group, The Literary Life Discussion Group, and let's get the book talk going! http://bit.ly/literarylifeFB

Jane Austen Bedtime Stories
Pride and Prejudice, Chapters 27-28

Jane Austen Bedtime Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 38:40


Elizabeth is on the move! First stop London, next stop Hunsford. So many sights to see and people to meet. And, is that Lady Catherine de Bourgh in the lane? No, it's just Mrs. Jenkinson. Let the tale of Elizabeth's travels help you travel into a state of deep, restful sleep. ----- Welcome to the Jane Austen Bedtime Stories podcast! Each episode is a section of a classic Jane Austen novel, read in soothing tones and set to calming music to help you fall asleep. With everything that is going on in the world, we find comfort in the familiar. For so many of us, Jane Austen's works are like a warm hug. So snuggle up under the covers and let the comforting words of Jane Austen lull you into sleep. ----- Music ["Reverie"] by Scott Buckley – www.scottbuckley.com.au --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/jabedtimepod/support

Podlander Drunkcast: an Outlander Podcast
Sick Burn, Jane: Emma, Solved!

Podlander Drunkcast: an Outlander Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 68:20


Hi, y'all -    In the (not so) grand tradition of Julie's other podcast Maria, Solved!, we put Janine in the hot seat and treat him as an expert in Jane Austen's Emma. Come for the Regency comedy of manners, stay for the treatise on slaughterhouse conditions.   Lots of love - Julie, Allison, and Janine

Gafcon's Lift Up Your Hearts Devotional

The title of this series of devotionals is "A great love story." It is for this reason that we will begin this devotional with a quote from another great love story, Pride and Prejudice, by Jane Austen: "It is a truth universally acknowledged, that a single man in possession of a good fortune, must be in want of a wife." In just a few words, Jane Austen gives us the great plot of the entire novel. Ruth has a similar beginning. In verse 1, with less than 40 words, the author of Ruth has described the context of the entire book to us: During the time of the judges (where each one did what he thought best), there was a famine in the land of Israel. And a man from Israel decides to take his family out of the Promised Land to live among the pagans.

The Literary Life Podcast
Episode 112: “Mansfield Park” by Jane Austen, Vol. 3, Ch. 1-8

The Literary Life Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 82:45


Welcome back for another installment in our series covering Mansfield Park by Jane Austen. Angelina, Cindy and Thomas share their commonplace quotes which leads them into discussing Fanny's character in contrast to the heroine of a gothic novel. They talk about what makes a good marriage in the Regency period and Jane Austen's own personal life, as well as the contrast between the household of Sir Thomas compared to Fanny's own family home. Get in on the Western Films and Fiction webinar on November 22nd with Thomas and James Banks! Register here to join in! Also, check out the House of Humane Letters newsletter to stay in the know about our upcoming read-a-long of Shakespeare's The Tempest. To view the schedule for the episodes in this series, see our Upcoming Events page. Also, if you want to join our members-only forum off Facebook, check out our Patreon page to learn more! Commonplace Quotes: Fear the man who says he knows how things should be. He doesn't Alexander Galich Things were easier for us. We were brought up on stories with happy endings and on the Prayer Book. C. S. Lewis One of the most dangerous of literary ventures is the little, shy, unimportant heroine whom none of the other characters value. The danger is that your readers may agree with the other characters. Something must be put into the heroine to make us feel that the other characters are wrong, that she contains the depths they never dreamed of. That is why Charlotte Brontë would have succeeded better with Fanny Price. To be sure, she would have ruined everything else in the book; Sir Thomas and Lady Bertram and Mrs. Norris would have been distorted from credible types of pompous dullness, lazy vapidity and vulgar egoism into fiends complete with horns, tails and rhetoric. But through Fanny there would have blown a storm of passion which made sure that we at least would never think her insignificant. C. S. Lewis Something Nasty in the Bookshop by Kingsley Amis Between the Gardening and the Cookery Comes the brief Poetry shelf; By the Nonesuch Donne, a thin anthology Offers itself. Critical, and with nothing else to do, I scan the Contents page, Relieved to find the names are mostly new; No one my age. Like all strangers, they divide by sex: Landscape Near Parma Interests a man, so does The Double Vortex, So does Rilke and Buddha. “I travel, you see”, “I think” and “I can read” These titles seem to say; But I Remember You, Love is my Creed, Poem for J., The ladies' choice, discountenance my patter For several seconds; From somewhere in this (as in any) matter A moral beckons. Should poets bicycle-pump the human heart Or squash it flat? Man's love is of man's life a thing apart; Girls aren't like that. We men have got love well weighed up; our stuff Can get by without it. Women don't seem to think that's good enough; They write about it. And the awful way their poems lay them open Just doesn't strike them. Women are really much nicer than men: No wonder we like them. Deciding this, we can forget those times We stayed up half the night Chock-full of love, crammed with bright thoughts, names, rhymes, And couldn't write. Book List: Hallelujah: Cultivating Advent Traditions with Handel's Messiah by Cindy Rollins That Hideous Strength by C. S. Lewis Pamela by Samuel Richardson David Copperfield by Charles Dickens Jane Austen by Peter Leithart Support The Literary Life: Become a patron of The Literary Life podcast as part of the “Friends and Fellows Community” on Patreon, and get some amazing bonus content! Thanks for your support! Connect with Us: You can find Angelina and Thomas at HouseofHumaneLetters.com, on Instagram @angelinastanford, and on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/ANGStanford/ Find Cindy at morningtimeformoms.com, on Instagram @cindyordoamoris and on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/cindyrollins.net/. Check out Cindy's own Patreon page also! Follow The Literary Life on Instagram, and jump into our private Facebook group, The Literary Life Discussion Group, and let's get the book talk going! http://bit.ly/literarylifeFB

Snoozecast: Stories for Sleep
Pride and Prejudice pt. 16

Snoozecast: Stories for Sleep

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 30:51


Tonight, we shall read the next part of “Pride and Prejudice”, written by Jane Austen. If you'd like to listen to this series easily in order, please go to snoozecast.com/series.In the last episode, Mr. Collins finally moves on from asking for Lizzy's hand in marriage, but he hasn't moved on from his visit at the Bennet's home. Jane receives a disturbing letter from Caroline Bingley and reads it to Lizzy. The sisters have opposite interpretations. Jane believes Caroline that her brother Charles has moved on to a new love interest in Georgiana Darcy. Lizzy guesses that Caroline is scheming to marry Mr. Darcy, and as part of her devious plan, that she is trying to break up the love between Jane and Charles.— read by 'V' — See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Wit Beyond Measure
Mysteries Unravled in the Abbey

Wit Beyond Measure

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 54:00


Northanger Abbey Chapters 24 - 27This week Elle and Catrina get very confused about what chapters they are talking about. But after they get it all settled, they discuss everything from Mrs. Tilney's death, Captian Tilney's potential marriage, and Isabella's betrayal. Catherine finally discovers the truth about Mrs. Tilney's death after being caught snooping around the house by none other than Henry Tilney. Will this ruin her chances at a happily ever after with our hero? No, actually, he found it kinda cute. Just further proof that Tilney really is the best Austen hero.While there might not be a scandal between Catherine and Henry, there is certainly trouble afoot. Catherine soon receives a letter from her brother James about his engagement to Isabella. Everything has fallen apart and who could be to blame? Isabella? James? Perhaps, Captian Tilney?Wit Beyond Measure is part of the Frolic Podcast Network. You can find more outstanding podcasts to subscribe to atFrolic.media/podcasts  

Sips & Sensibility
Pride, Prejudice, & Bridget Jones

Sips & Sensibility

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 51:02


In this episode, the sips ladies discuss the 2000s Oscar nominated romantic comedy, Bridget Jones's Diary. Does Colin Firth's portrayal of Mark Darcy redeem his lackluster performance in the 1995 adaptation? Are there any parallels to Jane Austen's Pride & Prejudice? Does Hugh Grant's character have literally ANY redeeming qualities? Tune in to find out!

The Literary Life Podcast
Episode 111: “Mansfield Park” by Jane Austen, Vol. 2, Ch. 6-13

The Literary Life Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 76:07


On The Literary Life Podcast this week, Angelina, Cindy and Thomas are back to discuss the next several chapters of Mansfield Park by Jane Austen. They pick back up with the continuation of the Cinderella theme in these chapters, and much of the conversation centers around the Crawfords and their ambitions and schemes. Once again, Fanny is demonstrated to be the embodiment of temperance. Get in on the Western Films and Fiction webinar on November 22nd with Thomas and James Banks! Register here to join in! To view the schedule for the episodes in this series, see our Upcoming Events page. Also, if you want to join our members-only forum off Facebook, check out our Patreon page to learn more! Commonplace Quotes: Lewis learnt that focusing on the state of his own mind was precisely the wrong way to obtain the imaginative pleasures that he had been seeking for ten years and more. Michael Ward Through seas of knowledge we our course advance, Discov'ring still new worlds of ignorance; And these discov'ries make us all confess That sublunary science is but guess; Matters of fact to man are only known, And what seems more is mere opinion; The standers-by see clearly this event; All parties say they're sure, yet all dissent; With their new light our bold inspectors press, Like Ham, to show their fathers' nakedness, By who example after ages may Discover we more naked are than they. Sir John Denham, “The Progress of Learning” The Inklings is now really very well provided, with Fox as chaplain, you as army, Barfield as lawyer, Havard as doctor–almost all the estates, except of course, anyone who could actually produce a single necessity of life: a loaf, a boot, or a hut. C. S. Lewis Sly Thoughts by Coventry Patmore “I saw him kiss your cheek!”—“T'is true.” “O Modesty!”—“'T was strictly kept: He thought me asleep; at least, I knew He thought I thought he thought I slept.” Book List: Hallelujah: Cultivating Advent Traditions with Handel's Messiah by Cindy Rollins After Humanity: A Guide to C.S. Lewis's The Abolition of Man by Michael Ward That Hideous Strength by C. S. Lewis Experiment in Criticism by C. S. Lewis Support The Literary Life: Become a patron of The Literary Life podcast as part of the “Friends and Fellows Community” on Patreon, and get some amazing bonus content! Thanks for your support! Connect with Us: You can find Angelina and Thomas at HouseofHumaneLetters.com, on Instagram @angelinastanford, and on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/ANGStanford/ Find Cindy at morningtimeformoms.com, on Instagram @cindyordoamoris and on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/cindyrollins.net/. Check out Cindy's own Patreon page also! Follow The Literary Life on Instagram, and jump into our private Facebook group, The Literary Life Discussion Group, and let's get the book talk going! http://bit.ly/literarylifeFB

Jane Austen Bedtime Stories
Pride and Prejudice, Chapters 25-26

Jane Austen Bedtime Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 45:30


It's Christmas, and the Gardiners are visiting from London. Mrs. Gardiner's words of wisdom are a balm to Elizabeth, and Jane leaves Hertfordshire with them for some time away in London. Visiting London means seeing Jane's old friend Caroline Bingley too, and everything is not what it seems with her. Let her journey soothe you into a deep and refreshing sleep. ----- Welcome to the Jane Austen Bedtime Stories podcast! Each episode is a section of a classic Jane Austen novel, read in soothing tones and set to calming music to help you fall asleep. With everything that is going on in the world, we find comfort in the familiar. For so many of us, Jane Austen's works are like a warm hug. So snuggle up under the covers and let the comforting words of Jane Austen lull you into sleep. ----- Music ["Reverie"] by Scott Buckley – www.scottbuckley.com.au --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/jabedtimepod/support

Book Chat at North Shore Library
Classic Retellings | Episode 43

Book Chat at North Shore Library

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 64:21


Melody, Alyssa, and Hannah share their favorite retold classics, covering modern Jane Austen retellings, Hamlet retold on TikTok, and mixing fairy tales with science fiction. BOOKS WE TALKED ABOUT: If I'm Being Honest by Emily Wibberley and Austin Siegemund-Broka. Ham Fam Shenanigans by @princessgumby on TikTok. Cinder by Marissa Meyer. Pride by Ibi Zoboi. The Lizzie Bennet Diaries series on YouTube. Where the Rhythm Takes You by Sarah Dass. Meg and Jo by Virginia Kantra. Pemberley Digital channel on YouTube. I Killed Zoe Spanos by Kit Frick. CHECK OUT BOOKS: https://www.countycat.mcfls.org/. https://wplc.overdrive.com/. https://www.hoopladigital.com/. FOLLOW US: #northshorebookchat. www.facebook.com/northshorelibrary/. www.instagram.com/northshorelibrary/. E-newsletter: eepurl.com/c_TXMD. Recording equipment provided by the River Hills Foundation. Special thanks for their generous donation!

ShelfLogic
Long Story Short: Jane Austen

ShelfLogic

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 16:42


Follow along with Mikel and Lesilee as they take "The Ultimate Jane Austen Survey."

Coffee with Heather
Emma vs. Emma

Coffee with Heather

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 27:59


Today I'm sitting down to share with you all of my thoughts on the recent 2020 adaption of Emma directed by Autumn de Wilde and compare it with the infamous Jane Austen novel. From what I thought of how the adoption played with the 1995 adaption, Cluessles, what I found most hilarious about Mr. Knitghtly to the small hints of Austen's novel hidden throughout, we're diving into Austen's world. • Please note that all rights of each of the books mentioned in this episode stay with their authors and respectable publishing houses. All opinions are my own. By purchasing a book from these, or any other links on my podcast episodes or show notes, I will be making a small affiliate profit which helps me continue to make each week's episode. --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/heather-s-woolery/support

Ramble by the River
No Biscuits in Bangkok with Annika Wolters

Ramble by the River

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 30, 2021 126:12


From humble beginnings, born and raised in the Pacific Northwest, Annika Wolters has made her mark on the world as a journalist, academic, and world-traveler. She is currently living in Bangkok, Thailand and working as a video editor for the Associated Press. But as we know, nothing worth having comes easy, and the last few years have provided countless challenges for this ambitious young woman. Join her and Jeff as they ramble their way through growing up on the West coast, attending Western Washington University (where Annika was President of the A.S.), traveling to Thailand, and navigating a pandemic while living abroad. Annika is a warm, thoughtful, and funny person and this is a really enjoyable conversation. It was great to catch up with an old friend and to discover that she has been out there accomplishing her goals and conquering her demons. Annika has accumulated some impressive achievements, but she remains humble and down to earth. She is out there making waves across the planet, and I'm proud to claim her as one of ours. After all, she started out as just another beach kid with a dream. Thank you for listening. I hope you enjoy! Please Subscribe, Share, Rate, and Review! #keepramblin Topics/Keywords: Travel; living-abroad; Thailand; Bangkok; The Hangover II; Religion; cultural contrast; Education; Communications; Journalism; censorship; Western Washington University; Associated Press; Cronkite School; Arizona State University; employment; student loans; student loan forgiveness; HGTV; Beach house Bargain Hunt; real estate; cars; Anxiety; Covid-19 pandemic; vaccination; immunization; buried treasure; relationships; Americorps; The Depot Restaurant; investing; cryptocurrency; NFTs; Ilwaco High School; manic candy-making; chocolate truffle recipe; Depression; Bellingham, WA; Karate Church; dorm-living; forgetting potatoes in a drawer; cleaning toilets at the state fair; Old Country Buffet; rowing; kayaking; air quality; Denzel Washington; American Gangster; Angkor Wat; LIDAR; Phimai Historical Park; Wat Mahatat; Buddhist religious sculpture; deity fashion; iconoclasm; religious tolerance; Ebony Ex-Pats; Thanksgiving in Thailand; salads; Thai salad; anchovies; magnesium eye twitch; seafood; Deep River; Our Only May Amelia; Naselle; Free Willy; The Goonies; clarinet; high school band; journalism; Romancing Mr. Bridgerton; Shonda Rhymes; Jane Austen; reading; plastic surgery; breast reduction; medical tourism; breast cancer; parenthood; motherhood; opportunity cost Links: Join the Patreon for exclusive access https://my.captivate.fm/Patreon.com/Ramblebytheriver (Patreon.com/Ramblebytheriver) Social Media Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/jeff.nesbitt.9619 (https://www.facebook.com/jeff.nesbitt.9619) Instagram: https://instagram.com/ramblebytheriver?r=nametag (@ramblebytheriver) Twitter: @RambleRiverPod Youtube: https://youtube.com/channel/UCNiZ9OBYRxF3fJ4XcsDxLeg (https://youtube.com/channel/UCNiZ9OBYRxF3fJ4XcsDxLeg) Business inquiries/guest booking: Ramblebytheriver@gmail.com Website: (For episode catalogue): https://my.captivate.fm/Ramblebytheriver.captivate.fm (Ramblebytheriver.captivate.fm) (Podcast main website): https://my.captivate.fm/RamblebytheRiver.com (RamblebytheRiver.com) Music Credit(s): Still Fly, Revel Day. Shining, shining, Coco. Hallelujah chorus (From Handel's Messiah), performed by Royal Choral Society at Royal Albert Hall. Support this podcast

Act YA Age
THE QUEEN OF NOTHING by Holly Black

Act YA Age

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 97:27


We are joined by returning guest Jessie to discuss book 3 in Holly Black's FOLK OF THE AIR series: THE QUEEN OF NOTHING! We talk personal and political power, relationship dynamics, redemption, giant snakes, and so much more! Once again, we tried to be chill about our Jurdan feelings, but honestly...it gets a little unhinged. What else did you expect? We're covering each book in this series spoiler-free, so even though this book marks the end of the main trilogy we do not spoil what happens in the Cardan novella - that's for next week. Join us next week to wrap up this series, and stay tuned for some scheduling news! We're also planning a mailbag episode for the end of the year, so if you have any book questions or topics you want us to talk about, just shoot us an email or a DM - and don't forget to rate and review us on iTunes! We'd love to read your emails on the show. As always, thanks to Martha Riley for our art and Djempirical for our music. And a big thanks to Jessie for joining us for another great episode! Find us on the internet if you like: www.actyaage.com actyaagepod@gmail.com instagram.com/actyaage twitter.com/actyaage Find Corinne at instagram.com/rinne_reads Find Tasia at instagram.com/rageycakes Find Jessie at instagram.com/bookjessieisbetter Find Jessie's Jane Austen podcast at www.thedailyknightley.com Mentions: Window Shopping by Tessa Bailey

RomCom Love
57 - Austenland (2013)

RomCom Love

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 50:52


This one will sneak up on you.  Come for the Jane Austen premise, Keri Russell's charm, and the Jennifer Coolidge of it all.  But stay for the sweet story, the hijinks, and a tale that these remarkable actors clearly had a ball with.  It's getting hot in here.  Thank you to Sarah for joining Bonnie in this discussion!

The Retrospectors
On This Day: Jane Austen and the Profligate Prince

The Retrospectors

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 9:19


George IV's impressive Library included all the novels of Jane Austen, for whom he had a particular fondness. But what was not known (until a receipt was discovered in the Royal Archives in 2018) was that the Prince Regent had almost certainly been Austen's very first customer - buying a copy of ‘Sense and Sensibility' for 15 shillings on 28th October, 1811.His admiration for the anonymous 35 year-old author's work lead to an awkward moment later in her career, when she felt obligated to dedicate ‘Emma' to His Royal Highness - a task she clearly wished to avoid.In this episode, Arion, Olly and Rebecca explain why Austen detested her royal patron; reveal the dry first draft of her dedication to him; and consider how the famously promiscuous, indulgent monarch could have so badly misread Austen's manifesto for moderation…Further Reading• ‘One of Jane Austen's earliest buyers revealed as Prince Regent – who she 'hated'' (The Guardian, 2018): https://www.theguardian.com/books/2018/jul/25/jane-austen-buyer-hated-prince-regent-sense-and-sensibility• ‘Jane Austen's First Buyer? Probably a Prince She Hated' (The New York Times, 2018):https://www.nytimes.com/2018/07/24/books/jane-austen-prince-regent.html• ‘JANE AUSTEN, PRINCE REGENT & SANDITON' - excerpt from “Elegance and Decadence: The Age of the Regency” (BBC, 2011): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FzrlpIjwKv0For bonus material and to support the show, visit Patreon.com/RetrospectorsWe'll be back tomorrow! Follow us wherever you get your podcasts: podfollow.com/RetrospectorsThe Retrospectors are Olly Mann, Rebecca Messina & Arion McNicoll, with Matt Hill.Theme Music: Pass The Peas. Announcer: Bob Ravelli. Graphic Design: Terry Saunders. Edit Producer: Emma Corsham.Copyright: Rethink Audio / Olly Mann 2021. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Wine, Women and Words
Contemporary & Classics with Eden Appiah-Kubi

Wine, Women and Words

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 26:51


Author Eden Appiah-Kubi joins the show to discuss her debut novel, "The Bennett Women" -- a contemporary take on Jane Austen's "Pride & Prejudice." We discuss the inspiration behind the novel, building a new world within the framework of Austen's classic and much more!  Be sure to check out our shop on Bookshop.org to be able to help support independent bookstores and this podcast. You can find "The Bennett Women" under "Featured Books;" our book of the month, "Feral Creatures" in our 'Book of the Month' shop.  

Wit Beyond Measure
Arriving at Northanger Abbey

Wit Beyond Measure

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 61:29


Northanger Abbey - Chapters: 20-23Elle and Catrina finally make it to Northanger Abbey... I mean... Catherine Morland finally makes it to Northanger Abbey!Catherine heads to the Abbey with the Tilney's. She is extremely excited because she gets to spend time with her new friend Elenor and her love interest Henry. Most importantly, she gets to go and stay in an abbey! Her little gothic novel fangirl heart might just explode. Of course, she can't visit an abbey without finding all the spooky stuff. Henry tells her about all the mysterious things she is likely to find in his old house and Catherine certainly finds them. What's more, she believes she has uncovered a secret that even Henry and Elenor are unaware of. Who needs a secret wife in the attic, when you have a secret wife in the basement?Wit Beyond Measure is part of the Frolic Podcast Network. You can find more outstanding podcasts to subscribe to atFrolic.media/podcasts        

Best Book Ever
072 Robin Whitten on "The Golden Compass" by Phillip Pullman

Best Book Ever

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 35:54


What a thrill it was to chat with Robin Whitten, founder and editor of AudioFile Magazine. I rely on their reviews for all of the audiobooks I check out at my library (yes! You can check out audiobooks at your library). Today, Robin and I chatted about how a narrator can bring you deeper into a story or drag you further out of it, how a good narrator can redeem an average book (and vice versa) and why the movie version of The Golden Compass didn't work. If you have never read The Golden Compass, I highly recommend you take Robin's advice and experience it on audio. It's a full cast production and it is truly something special. Support the Best Book Ever Podcast on Patreon   Follow the Best Book Ever Podcast on Instagram or on the Best Book Ever Website   Host: Julie Strauss Website/Instagram     Guest: Robin Whitten Website/Twitter/Behind the Mic with AudioFile Podcast/Audiobook Break Podcast   Discussed in this episode: The Golden Compass by Phillip Pullman His Dark Materials Series by Phillip Pullman Call for the Dead: A George Smiley Novel by John LeCarré   Kate Winslet narrated audiobooks: The Twits, The Minpins, and The Magic Finger by Roald Dahl Matilda by Roald Dahl You're a Bad Man, Mr. Gum by Andy Stanton Thérèse Raquin by Émile Zola Sense and Sensibility by Jane Austen   The Golden Compass movie His Dark Materials television series Other audiobooks narrated by Sean Barrett (voice of lorick Byrnison) Neil Gaiman self-narrated audiobooks Always by Morris Gleitzman Always is the final book in the story of Felix, the hero of Morris Gleitzman's Once, Then, Now, After, Soon, and Maybe The Madness of Crowds by Louise Penny The Murder on the Links by Agatha Christie, read by Alfred Molina and a Full Cast The Iliad, narrated by Anton Lesser David Copperfield by Charles Dickens   Discussed in our Patreon Segment The AudioFile Magazine Golden Voices Simon Jones George Guidall Gerard Doyle Laura Lippman Linda Emond Robert Bathurst Jason Culp   (Note: Some of the above links are affiliate links, meaning I get a few bucks off your purchase at no extra expense to you. Anytime you shop for books, you can use my affiliate link on Bookshop, which also supports Indie Bookstores around the country. If you're shopping for everything else – clothes, office supplies, gluten-free pasta, couches – you can use my affiliate link for Amazon. Thank you for helping to keep the Best Book Ever Podcast in business!)

How To Love Lit Podcast
Shirley Jackson - The Haunting Of Hill House - Episode 1 - MeetThe Author And The Personal Issues That Created One Of The Best Horror Genre Books Of All Time!

How To Love Lit Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 23, 2021 48:20


Shirley Jackson - The Haunting Of Hill House - Episode 1 - MeetThe Author And The Personal Issues That Created One Of The Best Horror Genre Books Of All Time!   `Hi, I'm Christy Shriver and we're here to discuss books that have changed the world and have changed us.    And I'm Garry Shriver and this is the How to Love Lit Podcast.  If you are listening to this in real time, we are well into the month of October and in the United States, the month of October means Halloween.  Halloween, as we've discussed before, is not Christy's favorite holiday.  Christy, why is that?    Because it's horrifying.  It's about death.  It's about being scared.  It's about demons.  I don't understand why we're celebrating these things.      And yet, I have seen you dress up as Wilma Flintstone; answer a door bell to a slew of terrifyingly dressed children, hand out candy and enjoy every minute of it.  For those of you who live in other parts of the world- that is what we do here in the United States on October 31st.  My son, Ben, and his wife Rachel live in a part of Memphis which is particularly serious about Halloween, so we, if we can, love to go down there on Halloween and get in on the party.      That's true- and it is wild. They have a neighbor whose yard literally looks like the set of a horror movie with graves, and ghosts and witches and everything.  It spooks me, but on the other hand,  I do love dressing up, and I love seeing all the kids dress up.  That part I'm cool with.    And yet, here we are reading a classic work described as Female Gothic or horror fiction- the work of the celebrated Shirley Jackson, perhaps her most famous novel The Haunting of Hill House.      True.  But I will say that Literary Horror is slightly different than Nightmare on Elm street.  Here's a little story about myself, so I had never watched a horror movie growing up.  My mother didn't allow it in our home, and back then these movies were rated R and the people at movie theaters really policed that sort of thing- so if you were a young child, obviously you could watch a rated R movie, but they didn't make it easy for you.  Well, anyway, when I was a sophomore in high school, this little school that I attended at the time took an overnight trip out of town to hike up this mountain, Pico da Bandeira.   After the hike, somebody pulled out the VHS of this move and we were going to watch it (I'm pretty sure it was a bootleg).  Anyway, I was so excited- most everyone in Brazil loves horror movies and Nightmare on Elmstreet was one of the most populat at the time.       Well, how did that go for you?    Not well, I'm not sure I got through 15 minutes.  I spent the rest of the night under the covers and with my hands in my ears.  I didn't even want to hear it.      HA!!  Well, what I find fascinating about Literary fiction is that it's scary for all kinds of different reasons, not the idea of someone jumping out and stabbing an unsuspecting girl.      Exactly. It's not some obvious caricature of a gore covered mummy walking around with a hatchet that defines it.  It's metaphorical; it's about the cost of seduction; it's about psychological disorders and it's very much about anxiety.      Well, you know I love it when we get psychological.  One thing I found interesting, and this is coming from the perspective that we just did an entire series kind of around women's issue with A Doll's House, but I expected Shirley Jackson's work to be more feminist than it is.  Also, the book has all this mother/daughter stuff in it.  I wasn't expecting that.    Yes- it very much has everything to do with mother/daughter relationships.  That motif starts on the first page and never lets up.  I got tired of counting mother references, and I never found an article that did the math, but there are reference to mothers endlessly- and something that drew my immediate attention- especially the first time Eleanor wakes up terrified in the middle the night yelling for her mother.  But that is just one way of looking at the book- although that's a great place to start and where we will start our discussion today as we attempt to make it all the way through chapter 1 of the book.    But in a more general sense, what Jackson was looking at was this imbalance of power that can exist in relationships between any two people.  She wants to express the seduction and betrayal of the powerless by the powerful. She expresses how one person uses the power in the relationship basically to crush another person.  And unfortunately, she understood this problem so well because it was her entire life story.  She had that experience with her mother, and then she turned around and had it again with her husband, and really she had it within the community at large of the 1950s.      And, of course, being written in the 1950s, many women of her generation quickly related to it.  In fact, in some ways, it reminds me a little bit of that very famous work by Betty Friedan, The Feminine Mystique, that became so important in American history but wasn't even going to be written for another ten years.    Yeah, I've heard of that book, but honestly, I don't know much about it.  What is the premise and why does it connect, in your mind to Shirley Jackson.    Well, I'll be upfront and tell you I have never read the book, so I'm speaking from second hand knowledge.  But, what I know about it from teaching and studying history is the impact it had on American culture because of the power of the argument Friedan makes in the book.     First of all I would like to point out she's interviewing women that attended Smith College, which is a very well to do private school in Massachusetts.  survey sample was not very scientific     Friedan, at her 15th college reunion, took a survey from her fellow colleagues, about how they felt about their lives.  The basic premise of her book is that society had created a myth that women were most fulfilled if they were taking care of children, staying at home,  supporting their husbands, and staying away from politics and business.  In the book, she claims that entire worldview for women is a myth- at least for many women.  I will never assume to speak for women and I certainly won't speak for all women.  But Friedan will, and she went after the 1950s stereotypical Leave it To Beaver kind of mom that had been the socially accepted lifestyle.  She said many women were absolutely miserable.  She claimed that society's pressure on women for women to succumb to what amounted to in many cases mindnumbing non-stimulating existences was causing depression.  She famously said it was a “problem that has no name”.   And whether you want to challenge her or agree with her, you have to respect that her idea absolutely resonated across America and really the entire world.  Her book was a best seller, selling over 3 million in her lifetime and has been translated into at least a dozen major languages around the world.  Many textbooks credit Friedan for sparking the second wave of feminism that was a key feature of the 60s, the kind of thing we see portrayed in movies like Forrest Gump in the character of Jenny.  This women's rights movement was not interested in voting rights; it was moving forward to the next level.  It was pushing for workplace equality, birth control, abortion rights, breaking the glass ceiling in academia and business.  Where I see it aligning with Jackson, who came much earlier, is that this book, The Haunting of Hill House is a metaphorical expression of everything Friedan wanted to say about women in the 1960s- the house is haunted, so to speak.  The house was crushing women.  It was making women crazy.     Well, you're starting to steal a little bit of my thunder –next week we are going to spend almost the entire episode discussing the house itself, but you are dead on about what Jackson is doing in her work…pardon the pun.  But, I want to say before all the men moan and groan and say, I'm turning this off if this is going to be another one of those feminist books- the book really is much more than a political commentary- in fact that's just one way of relating to it.  The metaphor most definitely can be read exactly as you have connected to the femininist movement of the 1960s, and many many people have read it just that way, but I'm not sure Jackson herself really did, although there's no doubt she was an advocate for many of the things you just enumerated. She, like Ibsen, would say her work is art and not a piece of political propaganda.  She would also likely claim, and I know I'm being presumptuous to speak for her, but I do think she would claim, that would be a very small way to understand her body of work, if that's all you thought it was. She was writing the emotions and then the reader found themselves in them.     I was also interested to see that Jackson, very much like Elizabeth Barrett Browning struggled fighting critics over the years.  Stanley Hyman, her husband and literary critic during their lives, in the preface for a book he published of her yet unpublished work after her death famously wrote, “For all her popularity, Shirley Jackson won surprisingly little recognition.  She received no awards or prizes, grants or fellowships; her name was often omitted from lists on which it clearly belonged, or which it should have led.  She saw these honors go to inferior writers.”    True, and Hyman, although I have trouble giving him credit for anything because of his and Shirley's relationship which we'll talk about in a different episode, but he predicted that Jackson's “powerful visions of suffering and inhumanity” and would be found “increasingly significant and meaningful.”  He truly always understood that her long form or serious work was more than pop fiction, or gory horror, and yet that was not the majority view of that time.    And part of that is somewhat understandable.  One thing I didn't know about her until we started reading up on her for this podcast series was that her acclaim during her day really came from two places- one was for the short story, “The Lottery”, but the other and this is what I didn't know- was her best-selling essay collection on domestic life titled Life Among the Savages.  I haven't read much of that, to be honest, but what I did read is really truly funny stuff stuff.  She was Erma Bombeck before Erma Bombeck.    Yes- and she was funny, and she was writing about her kids, house cleaning, being a mom, a member of a local community and all the craziness of middle-class life.  It was the stuff that people were living in their world, and she made it funny.  People didn't take seriously the psychological insights into issues of emotional isolation, rage, paranoia, and the fragmentation of the human mind- from a person who was a regular contributor to magazines like Good Housekeeping, Mademoiselle, McCall's and Ladies Home Journal.    No, it was just too different, and of course, you can't discount the condescension from the serious art community- I mean here was a woman writing in a genre that nobody took seriously about female protagonists- which was often not taken seriously- and was famous for cute anecdotes about the comedy of errors which is life as a house-mom raising four children in a small town.We must remember also, as a general rule, the 1950s are not that far removed from the time period where women didn't read literature at all- there was a thing called “ladies reading material” That's what women read.  Men read literature, but women writing for women was not elevated enough to actually be called “literature”- it was simply reading material for women.       Oh- well – I guess we shall make that distinction- although I will say, as a woman writing “ladies reading material” for money she did fairly well for herself.  Shirley Jackson made serious cash off of these stories- in fact, she outearned her husband- and it was the essays that were funding their lifestyles, not her novels. Her biographer Ruth Franklin, commented in an interview that she could make  over $2000 per essay which at the time was enough to fun to fund her Morris Minor collection.    Nice- well British Sports cars are always a fun thing to keep around the house.     I'll say.  But back to her legacy for a second, Jackson is like Elizabeth Barrett Browning in that her work, well after her death, found it's way into the canon and today is very much taken seriously.  In fact, we're teaching her right now to all the 11th graders at Bartlett High School, and almost all American students will at some point read  her short story “The Lottery”, the  famous short story that triggered more public outrage  in 1948 than anything published before or since by the magazine the New Yorker.  Hundreds of people cancelled their subscriptions and even more wrote the magazine totally exasperated.      Well, it's political and psychological and really even religious as well.  But back to the 11th graders at Bartlett, do you think your kids will be able to appreciate or enjoy the depth of the psychological analysis in her novel that today is the central hallmark of her work?    Yeah, I think many of them will get it.  I look forward to how they understand what she's talking about.  You know, students today live in such a different world and the ghosts and houses that haunt them look so differently than the ghosts and houses that haunted our generation or much less Shirley Jackson's.     I look forward to discussing some of these issues with them and see what fascinates them the most.      One of the things that fascinates me the most and I'm expecting to come out is Jackson's multiple direct and indirect references to the relationship between mothers and daughters.  It's clear in this book that whatever is going wrong in Eleanor's mind has something to do with her dead mother.  I have two daughters, and I really pray, I am not the kind of mother Shirley Jackson had or that my daughters ever express any of the feelings she expresses about mother/daughter relationships- nothing that would haunt and torment my children after I'm dead.      No, I'm sure none of us want to have that kind of legacy with our children.      And yet, there are women like Geraldine Jackson, Shirley's mother.  Geraldine was truly relentless in her cruelty towards her daughter.  She was cruel to her as a child and her passive aggressive disapproval was something she perpetuated all throughout Shirley's life right to her untimely death at age 48.      Yes and I think understanding Geraldine' cruelty really helps me see some of the things in Jackson's writing that I may have overlooked before.  And I know that an author's life cannot be used uncritically to explain an artist's work; obviously art speaks for itself, but maybe more than any other writer we've read together, Jackson uses her writings to express pain in artistic ways that were personal to her, but universal to many of us.  Geraldine's ruthless subtle and sometimes not so subtle demoralizing was something Jackson could not get out of her mind.  .  Geraldine's own personality disorder took a heavy toll on Shirley.    And it was always expressed with all the best of intentions- she was always so concerned.    Let's tell a little about their story and then people will know what you're talking about.     Okay, well the story starts when  Jackson was born in 1916 (although she lied about her age and claimed to have been born in 1919- which I think is funny), but anyway, she was born into an affluent family and up until she was 16 they lived in Burlingame, California.     Let me interrupt, just for context, Burlingame, to this day is one of the most expensive cities in the United States.  The median house in Burlingame costs over 2 million dollars- and I'm not talking mansions- this is the price range for what would be an average home that would cost a tenth of that in other parts of the US.  Every review on bestplaces.com talks about how unaffordable it is for most people to live in this Burlingame.     Yep, and Geraldine, Shirley's mom and her father Leslie, cultivated that cliché'd vision of the upper class  country club lifestyle.  They were into the production of this very sophisticated appearance of success and wealth, what was important was the appearance of things.   They were into competitive living, and that,  of course, still includes having perfect children.  Shirley's brother, I might add, was beautiful and competitive and made them proud, but unfortunately for Shirley, she was not- and this was just a huge disappointment for Geraldine.  She could not nor did she want to fit the mold.  Shirley was heavier than the other girls.  She didn't enjoy the same kinds of things as the other girls.  She didn't have that “All-American” barbie doll look like the other girls.  She wasn't into the deputante thing, and if she had been wasn't cute enough.    Yes, I read a couple of articles that called Jackson morbidly obese, so I googled images of her, it was true that she was heavier , but, in my mind, she falls way short of the criteria for morbidly obese by today's definition, especially in her youth. And I want to say something else about this 1950's lifestyle we've been discussing. After WW 2 there was a huge economic boom that doubled family incomes in the decade. It was the first decade of widespread middle class wealth. And one sign of that new middle class wealth was the ability to live on one income. Wives staying at home were a sign of wealth and prestige.     Maybe not, but she certainly wasn't the daughter Geraldine wanted nor could be proud of at a deputant ball.  In fact, truth be told, Geraldine was actually disappointed when she found out she was pregnant because she didn't want a child at that time.  But Geraldine's largest problem and obsession was with Shirley's weight- and her obsession with Shirley's weight never ended.  She made comments about her weight- all of the time.  They were gratuitous, just dropped in to remind her that she was fat.   Here are some quotes from a couple of Geraldine's letters to her daughter just to show you what I'm talking about. “Glad you're dieting.” “Excess weight is hard on the heart.” “You should get down to normal weight. Try non-fat milk.”  Even after the publication of what would be Jackson's final novel, Geraldine could be relied on to bring up her weight, “Why oh why do you allow the magazines to print such awful pictures of you?...I have been so sad all morning about what you have allowed yourself to look like.”      Yes, let me read the full quote for context.     If you don't care what you look like or care about your appearance why don't you do something about it for your children's sake— and your husband's. . . . I have been so sad all morning about what you have allowed yourself to look like. . . . You were and I guess still are a very wilful child and one who insisted on her own way in everything— good or bad.    This is a straight up narcissistic rant.     There was always the subtext that was no matter what Shirley did with her life, she could never live up to her mother's expectations- even if she was famous- Jackson wanted acceptance of who she was- but she wanted it on her terms, and she and wanted to prove to her mom that the way she was was a good way, and she could be good at life just by being herself- but that was never going to happen.  In fact, at one low moment, Geraldine actually told her daughter that she was a failed abortion.      Wow.  That is just hateful.  Geraldine wanted a girl in the image of what she wanted, and she was never going to compromise.  This is classically what people call today a “toxic mother”,  And this plays a terrible toll on girls who have toxic mothers.  These behaviors can destroy women's images of themselves.   And this is what seems to have happened with Jackson and her mother.        Let me just back  up and say, it's absolutely natural and healthy for a girl to look up to her mother; a mom is the original ideal of what a woman should be.  That's how we all learn to navigate in this world, and likely a mom and a daughter will have a lot in common for obvious reasons.  There is a lot of joy in that.  There is a special bond in that.  Over the years, though, as a little girl develops into a teenager, although at first she wants to be exactly like her mom, that desire kind of separates out.  In a normal relationship, as a girl transitions into a woman, she individuates.   She becomes her own person.  Some things of her mother she will keep; others she'll discard.  And healthy moms respect and encourage their daughters individuality.  A normal mom will do whatever she can to equip her daughter, make her bolder and stronger.  But as painful as it may be from a mom's perspective, healthy mom's accept daughter's choices- even the ones they think are mistakes.  That's just what they do, and if they end up being mistakes, it's okay.  We all get to live our own lives.  But in Geraldine's life, what Shirley did was a reflection on her, so she couldn't let the fact that her daughter was overweight go.      Well, how do you think she took it when Shirley told her mom she was marrying a Jew in 1940- or I should say that she had already married a Jew, she didn't even tell them she got married until several months later because they were anti-Semitic people,  I can imagine that didn't go well?        No, I'd say it probably didn't, but I really don't know.   I do want to say one other thing, Christy, don't get me wrong, I think it's pretty well-established that motherhood is by definition a lose/lose proposition- moms just can't win.  It's impossible to raise a perfect child, just like it's impossible to be a perfect person, so of course we can't raise a person in the most perfect of emotional environments.      Mom's will unrealistically be blamed for things that may or may not be their fault- the reality is no one can be perfect, we will hurt each other and there will insecurities that spring up because of the way we are raised, and that's kind of normal too- it's normal for dads; it's normal for moms.  But, that is not the same as being a toxic mom.  Geraldine was toxic.  Nothing was ever going to be good enough for Geraldine.  She was perpetually disapproving, and Shirley was never going to meet her standards.  Geraldine was also always very controlling- I read somewhere she made Shirley wear garters and high heels as a little girl.  She was constantly guilt-tripping Shirley.  She constantly made negative comments; she manipulated her emotions, and most of the time she did it passive-aggressively.  She did it under the guise of love.      And that seems to be in one sense what Jackson expresses in her writing- it's at least what lots of people have identified with in Hill House.   There is this sense that Shirley could never get her mom out of her head, and of course, she's not the only one who struggles with these kinds of things.  In Hill House,  the main character is a 32 year old young woman named Eleanor Vance. I want to add that 32 is not a young age.  She's not telling the story of a child and the abuses of a mother on a small child.  Eleanor is a fully grown adult who should be living her own independent life for quite some time.  But she hasn't.  She hasn't even had an opportunity to do so.  Eleanor has no friends and is alone. That's what we're told at the beginning and we will see all the way through to the end of the book when she tells Theo she has never been wanted, it's been how she's felt always.  We're also told Eleanor's mother is dead right here at the beginning, and that Eleanor has been taking care of her relentlessly since she was twenty years old.   Eleanor's mom is a constant presence in Eleanor's psyche, even beyond the grave.  She even buys clothes that she knows her mother hates- pants- just because her mom is dead and can't do anything about it.   Eleanor is being haunted before she ever gets to Hill House.    True, and this lack of self-esteem and then loneliness is what has resonated with so many women and men who read Jackson's stories.  It also is what directly led to a lot of the suffering Jackson experienced in her marriage to Stanley.      Stanley Hyman, there's a character.  Before I smear him, I guess I will say right off that bat that he, in many ways, was very supportive of Shirley professionally and admired her intellectually.  My problem with him is that he degraded her sexually- and that is the cruelest and most intimate and demeaning forms of degradation that there is.    For one thing he absolutely did not respect the sexual boundaries Shirley wanted in their marriage.  Besides having so many affairs with students at the school he taught but also really just anyone—he seemed to enjoy telling Jackson all about these trysts.  I've read a few of the letters he wrote about women he was sleeping with on various business trips, and I got the feeling it's almost like he was bragging a little bit.  I'd read a few quotes, but they're vulgar.  He talked about groping girls- giving details about what he had done. It's gross never mind hurtful.  And Shirley would get upset.  Although she was a free spirit and Bohemian in some ways, this was not okay with her.  She didn't want a open marriage where everyone just slept with whoever they wanted.  There are letters where she writes him and expresses how this behavior made her feel, but she never mailed these letters.  I don't even know why.  Maybe she didn't have the nerve.  Maybe she knew it made no difference.  Maybe she wanted her family and that was a price she was willing to pay.  I'm speculating.  We only know that  she just took it.  She wouldn't confront him, at least that there isa record of.  She just forced herself to accept it and moved on with her life.      And that is an indication of low self-esteem, obviously.  Jackson wouldn't have put up with that sort of thing like she did, if she didn't think, at some level, it was her fault or that she didn't deserve to be treated any better than that.  This is the legacy of a toxic parent.  Allowing people to treat you in a way that is lesser and that is not how you treat them is a direct result of low self-esteem, but I want to add that future abusive relationships is not the only symptom of low self-esteem and it isn't the only symptom of low-esteem we see in Jackson's life.   Behaviors that provoke self-harm  like over-eating, over-drinking, and pill-popping- all things Jackson did- are also a result of low esteem and indicate high levels of anxiety.  Feelings of sadness, depression, anxiety, anger, shame and guilt- are also things we see in Jackson's life.  She seems to have truly struggled emotionally.     True, but before we get too dark, Shirley was all of that, but she wasn't ONLY that.  She had a happy side too- an apparently tremendously happy side.  I say that from interviews I read that people did with her children.  When her kids write or talk about their homelife, the reports are glowing.  Her home was a happy place.  It was chaotic and topsy turvey at times, the kind of crazy that people love.  They didn't even see any tension between their parents.  For one thing, Stanley didn't have a whole lot to do with the family- lots of men didn't in the 50s, that was the mother's domain, but from the perspective of her children, her marriage to Stanley was a happy one, as was their home.  So, we see all of that going on.  Back to her biographer, Ruth Franklin, Franklin titled her biography about Jackson, “A Rather Haunted Life” kind of to reflect that idea- that she was haunted, but not entirely, just rather haunted.      Yes, and it was that dichotomy that leads to all kinds of cognitive dissonance.  I read in another article by a different biographer that Shirley, as a mother was deeply involved but also emotionally erratic.  “Her moods and anxieties colored her children's days.  No one could be more loving; no one could be meaner.”      Which brings me back to her as a writer.  One critic observed that out of over 110 different stories that Jackson wrote in her lifetime, most of them are about imperiled, divided or anxious women- and that is including both her scary and her funny stories.  And when we get to her final three novels- they are gothic completely about anxiety, entrapment and in the case of Hill House, a deeply troubled female with an inability to differentiate well between illusion and reality.      Understanding that really makes the famous first paragraph of The Haunting of Hill House  meaningful in a deeper way, at least it does to me. And I do want to emphasize this first paragraph is one of the most famous paragraphs in all of Jackson's writings:    No live organism can continue for long to exist sanely under conditions of absolute reality; even larks and katydids are supposed, by some, to dream.  Hill House, not sane, stood by itself against its hills, holding darkness within; it had stood so for 80 years and might stand for eighty more.  Within, walls continued upright, bricks met neatly, floors were firm, and doors were sensibly shut; silence lay steadily against the wood and stone of Hill House, and whatever walked there, walked alone.”    And what do you always say, when we start these books, that great writers will give their story away in the first sentence or two.    They almost always do.  This one in particular invites us to think about so much.  First of all, it starts with a negation- “no” but there are a lot of negative words here.  It's hard to understand, but something is telling us no- and when we get to the end of the book, that prophecy is fulfilled, although I won't spoil that just yet and tell you how.  But there's so much more.      Listen to the ideas she introduces-  there is the idea of being alive- of being sane- or not sane- another negative word- of standing in the darkness-in the silence- of being alone.  Of being in a house, but yet…being alone.   The alliteration highlights and brings together her key ideas- within walls- drawing attention to the idea of claustrophobia- sensibly shut; silence lay steadily I might add brings the silence and the claustrophobia together.  Then of course- whatever walked- walked alone- the w sound kind of swoshes in her head and haunts the end of that sentence.      All of her personal demons in one sentence.    Yes- and all of her personal demons getting ready to flesh themselves out metaphorically for all of us to understand and experience with her.      This assertion that she makes about absolute reality, of course is a religious or philosophical statement.  This idea that we absolutely just cannot know what is real, and if we did know what is real we would go crazy.  She's going to say that even little bird or crickets (a katydid is a cricket if you haven't heard that word yet, it's not very common)- Not even the simpliest organisms can handle a world without illusions.  We need them to protect our own sanity.    Yes- and the subtext here suggests because reality is dark; and the reality is you are alone in this world.  You can live – but perhaps you must accept a dream, perhaps an illusion that people have your back, people love you and will support you, but in reality- you are alone.  Perhaps you have to even create an entire fairyland- something to give you an escape from what you know to be true- the betrayal which is coming.  I'm speculating, obviously because I'm fleshing out what is implied with the subtext, at least implied to me-  but there is a sense that that is the direction she's leading us, and it certainly seems to be something we find in her personal story.     It's also kind of a religious statement because it speaks to the nature of reality and that is the essence of faith and walking through life not-alone.  Christy, what was her religious background.      Well, that's a very interesting question.  She was raised by members of the the Christian Science church, but later on she developed a real fascination with the occult and was even accused of being a witch.  Garry, what makes Christian scientists different from main stream Christianity?    Christian scientists, for those who are not familiar with Christianity, adopt many tenents of traditional Christianity but they break from it in a couple of ways that are obvious.  For one,  they do not accept the diety of Jesus Christ in the way traditional versions of Christianity do.  But the second is What most people know and that is the tension is the between The teachings of the Christian science church and their complicated relationship with the medical community.  They  encourage their members to pray for divine healings often perhaps instead of going to doctors.  And this has been controversial in some cases especially for family members outside of the faith.     That was certainly true for Jackson.  One time she and her brother were horsing around and her brother broke his arm, instead of going to the doctor Geraldine and her mother stayed up all night and prayed for his broken arm.  Her grandmother was a faith healer in the church and Jackson did not approve of this. So, she had this side of her, that would seem more secular- but then Jackson had her own sense of the spiritual.  She carried around tarot cards, tried to communicate with spirits later in her life, and flirted with all kinds of spiritual practices, like I said before, many accusing her of actually practicing witchcraft, ahtough I never found anything that really verified how serious she was about that.      So I can see why she might say something about absolute reality being somewhat unknowable or even a dark and lonely thing.      True, and at least in this book what we see in the the relationships that populate the lives  of the characters is that they are contrived.  In chapter 1 of The Haunting of Hill House, Dr. Montague, a title that is somewhat meant to mislead since he's really a ghost hunter, assembles a very select group of people to live with him for three months in a house that he thinks is probably haunted.  There are only four people that will be in this house- Dr. Montague himself, Luke, who is a member of the family who will own the house, Theodora who is selected because she may have extra-sensesory perspection abilities and Eleanor who as a child appeared to bring down a shower of rocks.      We will follow what happens to them from the point of view of Eleanor.  This story is written in the third person omniscient style, but it's way more akin to the free indirect discourse we saw Jane Austen create in Emma.  Laura Miller in the introduction to the book put it this way, readers "experience the novel from within Eleanor's consciousness, and however unreliable we know her to be, we are wedded to her".  And of course the farther into the novel you get, the more you understand how true this statement really is.  Most of the first chapter is really kind of a way to introduce us to Eleanor, and what we find out about her first is that she is 32, she genuinely and for good reason hated her mother until she died and now genuinely hates her sister.  Let's read this part…    Page 3    She's clearly alone and exploited by people who are supposed to be protect her.  This is further developed through the anecdote about her sister and their car.  Apparently they bought a car together but her sister never lets her drive it.  So, when Dr. Montague invites her to come to Hill House, she just takes the car and goes.  And while she's driving to Hill House, she imagines all sorts of things.  She imagines things that could never be real, like the road being an intimate friend or living in a house with a pair of stone lions and people bowing to her on the street because of these lions.  It's gives you kind of this crazy feeling- like how you would feel if you finally had escaped.    Yes, and that crazy feeling is going to intensify as the book progresses.  She's escaped her mother only to land sleeping on a cot in the nursery of a terrible sister.  She's not escaped her sister, but to go where.  At one point on her drive to Hill House she stops to admire a quarter of a mile of Oleanders.  Oleanders are beautiful flowers but they are also poisonous flowers.  She fantasizes about them about a castle with oleanders …then she gets back in her car and drives to a diner where she's going to watch a mother try to coax her daughter into drinking a cup of milk- and let me tell you know- these very same images that she sees on her drive in come back towards the end of the book as we, as readers, feel we are losing our grasp of reality.      But here in chapter 1, when she finally gets to the mansion, the care taker, Mr. Dudley flat out tells her, “You won't like it.  You'll be sorry I ever opened that gate.”    She looks at him and asks him to get away from her car…then she proceeds forward.  At the end of the chapter, we see her looking at this house and this is what she says, “The house was vile.  She shivered and thought, the words coming freely into her mind, Hill House is vile, it is diseases, get away from here at once.”      But of course she doesn't.    No, she doesn't.  That's the thing about haunting houses- they are dangerously tantalizing.  She was invited here by Mr. Montague and for better or for worse, she wants to be here.   I don't know if the Haunting of Hill House is the best example of this, but Jackson was absolutely fascinated with this- Jackson was fascinated with man's obsession with what Poe called the “imp of the perverse.”    Oh yes,  the urge to do something awful to someone and have pleasure in it.  I've seen this in kids, a kid just trips a stranger in the hall just because he can.  Paul Salkovskis, a psychology professor, suggests that it's evolutionary to have these kinds of intrusive thoughts as part of our way of problem solving for future problems.  But this idea that people have impulses to do mean things  or at least things we know we shouldn't and get joy from them.  Jackson was very interested in this idea.  So, are you saying that Dr. Montague is deliberately doing something mean.  Or that Dudley is?  Or Eleanor is?    Not really, in other stories she really demonstrates this much more poignantly, but the reason it comes to mind, besides the fact that I've been told to look for it in her writings, is that we are setting up relationships where we really can't trust each other to be there for each other.  Hill House looks like a place where you are really going to feel alone and exposed and that's where the terror comes from, but we will also see that it's soft and motherly and the people here at the beginning seem kind of exciting- it's seductive.      And I guess it does and has for many readers.  Let me just add one thing I didn't know until we started studying this book.  Horrornovelreviews.com claims that The Haunting of Hill House is the 8th scariest novel of all time.  And Paste magazine puts it into the unsorted top 30.      And so we open the gates to this terrifying place- Hill House- next episode we will look at the house itself, we'll look at the places where biographers think she got her inspiration for the house, we'll meet the other residents, explore the history of the house and begin to experience the ghosts- if that's what they are- as they manifest themselves to us through the eyes of Eleanor.                        

Wit Beyond Measure
Isabella Thorpe is a Flirt

Wit Beyond Measure

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 54:43


Northanger Abbey: Chapters 16 to 19This week Catrina and Elle finally enter the spooky part of this novel. These first chapters of volume two set the stage for our eventual trip to the titular house. What's more, we get a bit of insight into Isabella and James' relationship.Catherine starts off this section by spending time with our new favorite hero, Henry Tilney. More importantly, we get to meet Henry's older brother, Captain Tilney. He is handsome, charming, and flirting like crazy with the recently engaged Isabella. Our innocent and naive heroine doesn't quite understand why her friend is flirting with Captian Tilney. We get it, they are both young, hot, and James clearly doesn't make enough money to keep Isabella happy, so she is going to flirt a bit... right? Wit Beyond Measure is part of the Frolic Podcast Network. You can find more outstanding podcasts to subscribe to atFrolic.media/podcasts       

Reclaiming Jane
Pride & Prejudice 46-50: "Make the Sacrifice"

Reclaiming Jane

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 57:12


Things are heating up for the Bennets... In this episode, Lauren and Emily break down what's going on with Lydia and how sacrifice plays into it (or doesn't). Caution is thrown to the wind, tables are turning, and yes we made Squid Game relevant to Jane Austen. Links to topics discussed in this episode: Eloping to Gretna Green What is 'Squid Game' Really About? (show spoilers) For show notes and a full transcript of this episode, visit our website: reclaimingjanepod.com Connect with us: Twitter: @reclaimingjane Facebook: @ReclaimingJanePod Instagram: @reclaimingjane Patreon: @reclaimingjanepod Email: reclaimingjanepod@gmail.com Music by LaTasha Bundy. Show art by Emily Davis-Hale.

The Literary Life Podcast
Episode 109: “Mansfield Park” by Jane Austen, Vol. 2, Ch. 1-5

The Literary Life Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 97:43


On The Literary Life Podcast this week, Angelina, Cindy and Thomas are continuing their series on Jane Austen's Mansfield Park. This is the third episode in the series. They open their discussion talking about the virtue of temperance and how Fanny Price embodies temperance. In looking at the plot and the reaction of various characters to Sir Thomas' return, they bring out more of Fanny's virtues in contrast to the vices of other players in this section. Other themes highlighted in this section are the harp as a symbol of harmony, the problem of self-focus, the qualities of nature, and the Cinderella story parallels Austen is playing with. Get in on the Western Films and Fiction webinar on November 22nd with Thomas and James Banks! Register here to join in! To view the schedule for the episodes in this series, see our Upcoming Events page. Also, if you want to join our members-only forum off Facebook, check out our Patreon page to learn more! Commonplace Quotes: He had a head to contrive, a tongue to persuade, and a hand to execute any mischief. Edward Hyde Here, again, I would urge that appreciation is not a voluntary offering, but a debt we owe, and a debt we must acquire the means to pay by patient and humble study. In this, as in all the labours of the conscience seeking for instruction, we are enriched by our efforts; but self-culture should not be our object. Let us approach Art with the modest intention to pay a debt that we owe in learning to appreciate. So shall we escape the irritating ways of the connoisseur! Charlotte Mason The temperate man is so well-ordered that he does not feel the temptations of passion or desire. There is a difficulty about temperance, too, since it is a virtue that consists chiefly of not doing things. The liveliness of action and imagery must occur chiefly among its opponents, and we know what is liable to happen in this situation, even when there is no doubt about where our moral sympathy should lie. We have seen it in many works of fiction. But Guyon remains a colorless hero, and there is neither a heroic trial nor a radiant climax to his quest. Graham Hough To the Virgins, to Make Much of Time by Robert Herrick Gather ye rose-buds while ye may,  Old Time is still a-flying;  And this same flower that smiles today  Tomorrow will be dying.  The glorious lamp of heaven, the sun,  The higher he's a-getting,  The sooner will his race be run,  And nearer he's to setting.  That age is best which is the first,  When youth and blood are warmer;  But being spent, the worse, and worst  Times still succeed the former.  Then be not coy, but use your time,  And while ye may, go marry;  For having lost but once your prime,  You may forever tarry. Book List: Lord Clarendon's History of the Great Rebellion by Edward Hyde Ourselves by Charlotte Mason A Preface to the Faerie Queene by Graham Hough “Tintern Abbey” by William Wordsworth Masque of the Red Death by Edgar Allan Poe Support The Literary Life: Become a patron of The Literary Life podcast as part of the “Friends and Fellows Community” on Patreon, and get some amazing bonus content! Thanks for your support! Connect with Us: You can find Angelina and Thomas at HouseofHumaneLetters.com, on Instagram @angelinastanford, and on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/ANGStanford/ Find Cindy at morningtimeformoms.com, on Instagram @cindyordoamoris and on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/cindyrollins.net/. Check out Cindy's own Patreon page also! Follow The Literary Life on Instagram, and jump into our private Facebook group, The Literary Life Discussion Group, and let's get the book talk going! http://bit.ly/literarylifeFB

Brown Girls Read
Author Interview: Soniah Kamal (Unmarriageable)

Brown Girls Read

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 28:13


In this episode, we are in conversation with Soniah Kamal, a Pakistani-American writer who is the author of two novels: An Isolated Incident and Unmarriageable. We talk about Jane Austen's classic, the South Asian culture, and the many parallels between the book and real-life, writing life, and much more! --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/browngirlsread/message

The Bible for Kids Podcast
S3Ep39: Bedtime with Mommy from Nancy Sanders

The Bible for Kids Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 27:09


This week Amy and Mike talk with author Nancy Sanders about her new book Bedtime with Mommy. All around the world, it's bedtime, and Mommies are tucking little ones into bed. From the elephants on the grasslands to the camels in the desert to the polar bears in the Arctic, it's time for snuggles, prayers, and bedtime kisses. This adorable boardbook features a Mommy and baby animal in 8 different habitats getting ready for bed. And the final spread is when Mommy tucks a child into bed. “I love bedtime with Mommy When we turn off the light. Her kisses, snuggles, prayers, and hugs Are special every night!” Bedtime with Mommy is perfect for babies and toddlers ages 1-4 years of age and is sure to be a cherished, favorite bedtime routine. Children will not only be soothed to sleep, but they will also learn about the unique characteristics of God's creation in the world around them as they are reminded of just how loved they are. Nancy I. Sanders is a multi-award-winning children's author of over 100 books. She is the co-winner of the ECPA's 2018 Young People's Literature Award for the best in MG/YA nonfiction in the Christian market, and some of her favorite topics to write about are God, Bible stories, educational subjects, African American history and Jane Austen. While Nancy loves to spend her time writing books and working on various manuscript projects, she also enjoys sewing patchwork quilts, gardening and capturing the beauty of God's beautiful creation on film. Nancy and her husband, Jeff, live in southern California and attend Calvary Chapel Chino Hills Church.

The Literary Life Podcast
Episode 108: “Mansfield Park” by Jane Austen, Vol. 1, Ch. 10-18

The Literary Life Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 86:06


Today on The Literary Life, we continue our conversation on Jane Austen's Mansfield Park. Angelina, Cindy and Thomas share their commonplace quotes, then dive into the book chat, beginning with some commentary on Fanny's education in contrast to that of the Bertram sisters. They also talk about the concepts of restraint, temptation, and boundaries and how we see these ideas play out in the various characters. Angelina points out how Fanny is the fixed moral center throughout this whole section. She also talks about the play within the novel and how Austen's use of this form reflects Shakespeare. We hope that the discussion opens up new levels of understanding for you as you read this novel along with us! To view the schedule for the episodes in this series, see our Upcoming Events page. Also, if you want to join our members-only forum off Facebook, check out our Patreon page to learn more! Listen to The Literary Life: Commonplace Quotes: I entirely agree that it's no good trying to coerce or argue artists into giving what they haven't got. Either they burst into tears, or go sullen, or–if they are hearty extraverts–they cheerfully turn out fifteen new versions, each worse than the last. Actors too. They're the most kittle cattle of the lot. Dorothy Sayers, in a letter to C. S. Lewis While affording some secrets of the way of the will to young people, we should perhaps beware of presenting the ideas of self-knowledge, self-reverence, and self-control. All adequate education must be outward bound, and the mind which is concentrated on self-emolument, even though it be the emolument of all the virtues, misses the higher and the simpler secrets of life. Duty and service are the sufficient motives for the arduous training of the will that the child goes through with little consciousness. Charlotte Mason She is almost a Jane Austen heroine condemned to a Charlotte Brontë situation. We do not even believe in what Jane Austen tells us of her good looks; whenever we are looking at the action through Fanny's eyes, we feel ourselves sharing the consciousness of a plain woman. C. S. Lewis, “A Note on Jane Austen” Sonnet 23 by William Shakespeare As an unperfect actor on the stage Who with his fear is put beside his part, Or some fierce thing replete with too much rage, Whose strength's abundance weakens his own heart; So I for fear of trust forget to say The perfect ceremony of love's rite, And in mine own love's strength seem to decay, O'ercharged with burden of mine own love's might. O, let my books be then the eloquence And dumb presagers of my speaking breast, Who plead for love and look for recompense More than that tongue that more hath more expressed. O, learn to read what silent love hath writ. To hear with eyes belongs to love's fine wit. Book List: Towards a Philosophy of Education by Charlotte Mason Support The Literary Life: Become a patron of The Literary Life podcast as part of the “Friends and Fellows Community” on Patreon, and get some amazing bonus content! Thanks for your support! Connect with Us: You can find Angelina and Thomas at HouseofHumaneLetters.com, on Instagram @angelinastanford, and on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/ANGStanford/ Find Cindy at morningtimeformoms.com, on Instagram @cindyordoamoris and on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/cindyrollins.net/. Check out Cindy's own Patreon page also! Follow The Literary Life on Instagram, and jump into our private Facebook group, The Literary Life Discussion Group, and let's get the book talk going! http://bit.ly/literarylifeFB

Duchess
Lady Cara Willoughby of Birdsall House

Duchess

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 36:54


Episode Description:  In this week's episode, the Duchess journeys to the beautiful Birdsall House to meet Lady Cara Willoughby. In the show, Lady Cara tells the Duchess about the incredible, swashbuckling life story of Britain's most reckless naval officer, Lady Cara reveals how Jane Austen was influenced by Birdsall in her novels, and the ladies explore more ghostly-goings-on in heritage.  Top Quotes: "Living in heritage you become extremely aware through portraits on the wall, and the history of the family, that you are a very small link in the chain and, therefore, you inherit it, you do what you feel is right in your generation, and you hand it on." - Lady Cara "As custodians, we are guardians of the house." - Lady Cara "In heritage you always seem to be planning your life for your death." - Duchess "The magic of Downton Abbey and The Crown is that they show these houses to be full of riches and staff but, of course, now they are not at all. We as custodians are juggling all the time to keep the reality and the magic." - Duchess About the Guest and Stately Home: Lady Cara Boyle was born in 1976 and is the daughter of John Richard Boyle, 15th Earl of Cork and Hon. Rebecca Juliet Noble. Her father is a hereditary peer with the house of lords. Lady Cara married her husband, James Willoughby, 13th Baron of Middleton, in 2005. The couple have three young children together. Lady Cara is a graphic designer having attended the Glasgow School of Art. The decision to end the family's 478 years of exclusive use was made by Lady Cara Willoughby, and her husband.  Birdsall House has been the home of the Willoughby family since 1729. The Willoughby family have had a long line of MPs, public officials, and military personnel providing service to the crown. Birdsall was built on the ruins of a 12th century monastery, some of which are still visible at the front of the house. Birdsall is a grade II* listed structure. The Jacobean building was enlarged and owes its stunning looks to the Georgians and to Victorian architect Anthony Salvin who designed the North wing. The Oval Room's width was built to equal the jump of Henry Willoughby's horse in 1790. The walls of the home are also lined with an unbroken line of family portraits dating from 1588 to the present Lord Middleton and to Lady Cara herself. About the Host: Emma Rutland, The Duchess of Rutland, did not always stride the halls of stately homes. Born Emma Watkins, the Duchess grew up the daughter of a Quaker farmer, in the Welsh marsh countryside. She trained as an opera singer in the Guildhall School of Music, and worked as a successful interior designer before meeting her future husband David Manners, the 11th Duke of Rutland, at a dinner party. Their marriage in 1992 would transform Emma Watkins into the 11th Duchess of Rutland, thrusting her into the world of aristocracy, and handing her the responsibility of one of the nation's great treasures: Belvoir Castle. While simultaneously running the day to day operations of the castle, and raising five children, The Duchess became fascinated with the history and importance of the other stately homes of the UK. Join The Duchess as she embarks on a wonderful journey through time, to learn more about the incredible homes that have defined Great Britain and, most importantly, meet the other extraordinary women who work tirelessly behind their doors to preserve their history and magic for future generations.  Resources: To find out more about our Sponsor CircleDNA, visit their website https://circledna.com/en-us/ (here) https://www.onefineplay.com/ (https://www.onefineplay.com/) https://www.belvoircastle.com/ (https://www.belvoircastle.com/) https://www.emmaduchessrutland.com/ (https://www.emmaduchessrutland.com/) https://birdsallestates.co.uk/weddings/ (https://birdsallestates.co.uk/weddings/)

The Literary Life Podcast
Episode 107: “Mansfield Park” by Jane Austen, Vol. 1, Ch. 1-9

The Literary Life Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 88:44


Welcome back to The Literary Life podcast with Angelina Stanford, Cindy Rollins and Thomas Banks. Today our hosts embark on a new series of discussions as we read through Jane Austen's Mansfield Park together. To view the schedule for the episodes in this series, see our Upcoming Events page. Our hosts open the conversation with their first experience with this book and some thoughts on why people may struggle with Mansfield Park more than any other Austen novel. Angelina highlights the similarities some people note between Austen and Shakespeare and how this book illustrates that point. Thomas responds to criticisms that Fanny is a “prig.” Cindy brings up the importance of place in this book thematically. Other ideas they discuss in this episode are moving from blindness to sight, the importance of triangles in this book, and appearances versus reality. Commonplace Quotes: Many come to wish their tower a well… W. H. Auden, from “The Quest” Sadly, we do not have a Christian culture today that easily discriminates between a person of spiritual depth and a person of raw talent. Like the wheat and the tares of Jesus' parable, they can be difficult to distinguish. The result is that more than a few people can be fooled into thinking they are being influenced by a spiritual giant when, in fact, they are being manipulated by a dwarf. Gordon MacDonald Would you think I was joking if I said that you can put a clock back, and that if the clock is wrong it is often a very sensible thing to do? But I would rather get away from that whole idea of clocks. We all want to progress. But progress mean getting nearer to the place where you want to be. And if you have taken a wrong turning, then to go forward does not get you any nearer. If you are on the wrong road, progress means doing an about-turn and walking back to the right road; and in that case the man who turns back soonest is the most progressive man… If you look at the present state of the big mistake. We are on the wrong road. And if that is so, we must go back. Going back is the quickest way on. C. S. Lewis Fairy-tale Logic by A. E. Stallings Fairy tales are full of impossible tasks: Gather the chin hairs of a man-eating goat, Or cross a sulphuric lake in a leaky boat, Select the prince from a row of identical masks, Tiptoe up to a dragon where it basks And snatch its bone; count dust specks, mote by mote, Or learn the phone directory by rote. Always it's impossible what someone asks— You have to fight magic with magic. You have to believe That you have something impossible up your sleeve, The language of snakes, perhaps, an invisible cloak, An army of ants at your beck, or a lethal joke, The will to do whatever must be done: Marry a monster. Hand over your firstborn son. As printed in Poetry Magazine, March 2010 Book List: Ordering Your Private World by Gordon MacDonald Voyage of the Dawn Treader by C. S. Lewis Mere Christianity by C. S. Lewis Support The Literary Life: Become a patron of The Literary Life podcast as part of the “Friends and Fellows Community” on Patreon, and get some amazing bonus content! Thanks for your support! Connect with Us: You can find Angelina and Thomas at HouseofHumaneLetters.com, on Instagram @angelinastanford, and on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/ANGStanford/ Find Cindy at morningtimeformoms.com, on Instagram @cindyordoamoris and on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/cindyrollins.net/. Check out Cindy's own Patreon page also! Follow The Literary Life on Instagram, and jump into our private Facebook group, The Literary Life Discussion Group, and let's get the book talk going! http://bit.ly/literarylifeFB