Podcasts about comparing

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  • 4,839PODCASTS
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  • Dec 6, 2021LATEST
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Best podcasts about comparing

Show all podcasts related to comparing

Latest podcast episodes about comparing

The Word For Today (Daily)
Comparing Scripture with Scripture

The Word For Today (Daily)

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2021 25:00


The Chris Miles Money Show
The Most Affordable Health Insurance with Keaton Patey | 562

The Chris Miles Money Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2021 23:00


Here's the thing - many people don't realize that there are other options for health insurance aside from what the government and their advisors are giving them, and that's what our guest, Keaton Patey is talking about in this video.  Keaton Patey is in the space of health insurance and he has helped me, along with many other people, get the most affordable insurance they can. Watch this video to learn more about health insurance, why you need it, and why you don't need to pay thousands for it!  Key Talking Points of the Episode [00:00] Introduction [01:32] Health insurance [02:30] Getting a real insurance plan [03:49] How did Keaton get involved in health insurance? [07:43] Healthy looks differently for everyone [08:17] Flexibility of health care plans [09:23] Paying thousands for Obamacare [16:05] Is it too good to be true? [17:06] Comparing it to car insurance [18:29] Where health care for everybody fails [20:10] Why you should get in touch with Keaton Quotables “They dumb it down and say “Hey, if you're healthy, you should pay less. If you're a business owner, we can give you tax benefits and other ways to innovatively offer this in your company.” “The biggest thing is, healthy looks different in people.” “The person who's telling you to keep that plan has incentive to do so.” “The place that I see where most people miss out on is the holes in your bucket where that money is draining out.” “Why spend more money on something that doesn't give you any benefit?” Links Contact Keaton: https://calendly.com/keaton-patey/health-money-ripples

Recovering Evangelicals
#60 – COVID’s in disguise

Recovering Evangelicals

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2021 61:44


Comparing the R&D programs of humans (vaccines; drugs) and of COVID (variants) . This is our third update on COVID (also see #28 and #36), pulled together right around the time that COVID rolled out its latest disguise: the omicron variant. Here, we look at some of the scientific advances, including the large number of […]

The David McWilliams Podcast
193 - Comparing innovation between the US and Europe with Michael Fertik

The David McWilliams Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 51:26


As we begin to take stock of the year we're looking at how the pandemic has changed the working landscape through the lens of innovations and entrepreneurship. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Jason Hartman In the Hot Seat
92: Rich Dad's Robert and Kim Kiyosaki, Market Crash, Inflation and Real Estate Investing in 2021, Hartman Comparison Index™

Jason Hartman In the Hot Seat

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 32:54


Jason Hartman, Robert Kiyosaki, and Kim Kiyosaki discuss home values, gold, real estate markets and other commodities in the Hartman Comparison Index (HCI). [1:05] What is the Hartman Comparison Index? [6:44] Are the prices of homes actually high? [9:43] We compare things to value them [10:52] It's cheaper to buy a house now if it's priced in gold [12:23] Three kinds of markets: linear, hybrid and cyclical [13:10] Comparing home values to other commodities [16:42] Jason compares home prices to oil [22:20] Inflation and deflation in 2021  [26:02] Jason's crystal ball The WEALTH TRANSFER is happening FAST! Protect your financial future now! Did you know that 25% to 40% of all dollars ever created were dumped into the economy last year???  This will be devastating to some and an opportunity to others, be sure you're on the right side of this massive wealth transfer. Learn from our experiences, maximize your ROI and avoid regrets. Free Mini-Book on Pandemic Investing: https://www.PandemicInvesting.com Jason's TV Clips: https://vimeo.com/549444172  Asset Protection, Tax Savings & Estate Planning: http://JasonHartman.com/Protect What do Jason's clients say? http://JasonHartmanTestimonials.com Easily get up to $250,000 in funding for real estate, business or anything else  http://JasonHartman.com/Fund  Call our Investment Counselors at: 1-800-HARTMAN (US) or visit https://www.jasonhartman.com/ Guided Visualization for Investors: http://jasonhartman.com/visualization

Gray Beard Chronicles Podcast
GBC Episode #126 - The Downsides of Comparing Yourself to Others

Gray Beard Chronicles Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 23:55


With all the social media platforms available today, the opportunity to get caught up in the "Comparison Trap" is a greater threat than ever before. Join the Gray Beards as they discuss this, how to avoid it by focusing on what really matters, YOU and what YOU want! Enjoy!!!

Sounding History
Soundtracks of Imperial Power in Europe and Africa

Sounding History

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 39:06


Comparing cultural expressions is a risky enterprise:  especially, in our case, because too many  still perceive Western “classical” art music to be somehow superior to other  musics because of its alleged and “universal” values. But we think the challenge can be worthwhile, especially at a deeper level, because it can help us  tease out complementary ways rulers use sound to literally underscore their political power. In today's episode we investigate music and power in the Black Atlantic, where European and African musics collided in history.Our first example is that of the Italo-French composer Jean-Baptiste Lully (1632-1687), who often features as the father of French opera. We focus on his role as composer of lavish multimedia productions known more formally as tragédies en musique, tragedies set to music and celebrating his patron Louis XIV. These fusions of music, drama, and dance were pure political spectacle, and in Louis's younger years even involved the king himself as a dancer. The king was dancing because the purpose of a tragédie en musique was to place the king's body (which itself represented France, to contemporary ways of thinking) at the center of a complex piece of theatre. The point was not so much to entertain the audience, which often consisted of France's political elite, but to remind them of the king's absolute power. Lully made a career of creating works like these. Tom unpacks Lully's work, his dismissal by Louis after a sexual scandal (with a digression to the composer's subsequent death of gangrene as the result of a self-inflicted wound sustained while directing music) and turns, finally, to Louis's global political ambitions. Had those ambitions  been fully realized, the cultural world of the Black Atlantic (and thus our music history) would have been much more French.Chris's postcard takes us to the soundworlds of the great empires of sub-Saharan West Africa in the pre-colonial era. He starts with the Empire of Mali, whose first emperor, Sundiata Keita (ruling  in the thirteenth century CE) is memorialized in magnificent musical-epic poetry that has been passed down by oral and aural tradition. The bearers of this memory are called jeliat in the languages of West Africa (in French: griot). Chris explains how rulers of empires such as Mali depended on the jeliat, whose memorized epics were key sources of historical, genealogical, and legal knowledge, to tell their stories and legitimize their power.We then attempt one of those challenging cross-cultural comparisons. Did Lully serve as a kind of praise-singerto Louis XIV? On the face of it certainly. Yet  historical comparisons are never simple or neutral. Just look at where we would be likely to encounter Lully's music today: in “classical” opera houses or in other formats popular with elites in the “global north,” who are often culturally conditioned to value “timeless classics,” not political messages. In contrast the musical aesthetics and outputs  of the oral-aural epics of West Africa, which are still performed by musicians who claim direct lineage to their predecessors at the court of Sundiata, are more likely to pop up on playlists of “traditional” or “world” music. Both are “old” music, so why is one “classical” and the other “traditional”?The answer is the Western colonization of Africa, the flows of labor, energy, and data that made it possible, and--in turn--the influence of the jelat tradition on the vernacular musics of the Black Atlantic, which underpin nearly so many pop music genres today, from the Delta Blues to hip-hop. Music, it seems to us, is never unmoored from political and economic realities.Key PointsIn different ways around the world, political power and music mix.The prestigious genre of French “tragedy in music” formed in the late seventeenth century in lavish spectacles that told stories about the political power of Louis XIV, the “Sun King”The great poetic epics of the West African Empires, such as the Sundiata Epic from the court of the Empire of Mali, functioned similarly.Lully's operas live on, often stripped of their political meaning, in Western “classical” music. The West African epics live on too, as African “traditional music.” Some of their ethos informs the popular genres today that stem from the collision of European and African cultures in the era of the Black Atlantic, with its trade in goods and enslaved people.ResourcesWe are fans of Gérard Corbiau's 2000 film costume drama Le roi danse (even if it's somewhat over the top!). Excerpts are available widely on YouTube and other platforms. The soundtrack is available on CD or download from Deutsche Grammophon, and the streaming services Apple Music and Spotify.Timothy Blanning's book The Culture of Power and the Power of Culture: Old Regime Europe 1660-1789 is an excellent introduction to the use of cultural spectacle to underpin political power.Eric Charry's Mande Music: Traditional and Modern Music of the Maninka and Mandinka of Western Africa is a masterful situation of “traditional” music as part of contemporary West Africa aesthetics and politics.Christopher Waterman's Juju: A Social History and Ethnography of an African Popular Music places the proverb-rich Yoruba contemporary vocal/instrumental music juju in contemporary West African context.All of the books mentioned in the episode can be found in our Sounding History Goodreads discussion group. Join the conversation!

The Disney Story Origins Podcast
CSO 03a The Princess Bride Part 1

The Disney Story Origins Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 148:55


Comparing and contrasting Act III Communications' “The Princess Bride” with “The Princess Bride: S. Morgenstern's Classic Tale of True Love and High Adventure” by William Goldman   This podcast contains certain copyrighted works that were not specifically authorized to be used by the copyright holder(s), but which we believe in good faith are protected by […] The post CSO 03a The Princess Bride Part 1 first appeared on Cinema Story Origins Podcast.

Locked On Red Wings - Daily Podcast On The Detroit Red Wings
Is Comparing Raymond to an All-Time Great Fair? & Previewing the Bruins

Locked On Red Wings - Daily Podcast On The Detroit Red Wings

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 35:25


Since the moment he was drafted Raymond has been drawing comparisons to an all-time Red Wings great. Are these comparisons fair? And do they run the risk of overhyping an already amazing rookie? We also preview the matchup against the Bruins, and what the Wings need to start doing to become legitimate threats. Support Us By Supporting Our Sponsors! BetOnline AG There is only 1 place that has you covered and 1 place we trust. Betonline.ag! Sign up today for a free account at betonline.ag and use that promocode: LOCKEDON for your 50% welcome bonus. Built Bar Built Bar is a protein bar that tastes like a candy bar. Go to builtbar.com and use promo code “LOCKED15,” and you'll get 15% off your next order. StatHero StatHero is the first of its kind Daily Fantasy Sports platform where it's YOU vs. the HOUSE in head to head fantasy matchups - winner take all. Sign up for FREE - RIGHT NOW - at StatHero.com/HOCKEY and use promo code HOCKEY for a One Hundred Percent Deposit Match. Omaha Steaks The holidays are around the corner and finding the perfect gift is tricky. Omaha Steaks makes it easy to send friends and family an unforgettable gift guaranteed to be loved. Go to Omaha Steaks dot com and enter “NHL” into the search bar to order The Perfect Gift Package. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Talking Taiwan
Ep 159 | Tim Chng Documents the Overseas Taiwan Independence Movement on Wikipedia

Talking Taiwan

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 63:13


A note from Talking Taiwan host Felicia Lin:   Tim Chng is one of the founders of ITASA (Intercollegiate Taiwanese American Students Association), and we've known each other since those college days. He is currently documenting the overseas Taiwan Independence Movement on Wikipedia.   I thought I'd invite him onto Talking Taiwan to talk about some of the media attention that Taiwan's been getting lately, and the project he's started to document the contributions of WUFI (World United Formosans for Independence) and overseas Taiwanese to the fight for Taiwan's freedom and democracy.   After a non-Taiwanese friend of mine texted me asking about who Enes Kanter was and why he was speaking up about Taiwan, I realized that it would be a good idea to do an episode about this and other celebrities who have shed light on Taiwan- for good and bad.   Enes Kanter, a basketball player for the NBA's Boston Celtics, has called for boycotting the Beijing 2022 Winter Olympics and caused quite a stir by tweeting and speaking out about Taiwan being a free and democratic country, and not a part of China. Twitter was all abuzz over this.   I had seen Tim weighing in on the Twitter discussion about Enes, so I thought it would be fun to invite him on to Talking Taiwan to share his thoughts on all of this.   I knew that we'd have an interesting conversation. We talked about Enes, John Oliver, John Cena and even Peng Shui, the Chinese women's tennis player whose safety and whereabouts have been in question ever since her post on a Chinese social media platform (Weibo) about being sexually assaulted by a retired Chinese Communist party leader was deleted.   Tim also talked about what motivated him to start documenting the Taiwan independence movement on Wikipedia, and how in a broader sense it is about recognizing the role of Taiwan's diaspora in the fight for Taiwan's freedom and democracy during the White Terror era.   If you're interested in helping Tim with this project you can do so simply by creating a login on Wikipedia, which as Tim said is really quite easy to do, and you can start editing and adding to the Wikipedia pages about WUFI or the Taiwan independence movement.     Here's a little preview of what we talked about in this podcast episode:   The background of Enes Kanter NBA's Celtics team, has spoken up for Taiwan How Enes Kanter and his family has been blacklisted by the Turkish government How Enes' father went to prison for speaking up against Turkey's president, Recep Tayyip Erdoğan Taiwan's blacklist Comparing the struggles and conflict that the Uyghers, and people of Hong Kong, Tibet and Taiwan's have with China Badiucao, the artist who created the art and designs for Enes Kanter's sneakers that called for a boycott of the Beijing 2022 Winter Olympics and the Stand With Taiwan sneakers The perception that Taiwan's democracy was a direct result of Chiang Ching-kuo lifting martial law in Taiwan How the father (Dr. Kang-lu Wang) of one of ITASA's founders (Alvin Wang) was assassinated by the Kuomintang (KMT) What led Tim to start his project to document the Taiwan independence movement, especially the resistance movement amongst overseas Taiwanese How the resistance movement of overseas Taiwanese in the 1950s-1980s is not taught in history books and hasn't been well documented Documenting WUFI (World United Formosans for Independence) on Wikipedia How difficult it was to get media coverage on Taiwan in the 1950s-1980s How New Bloom was contacted and consulted by John Oliver's team for his segment about Taiwan How Taiwan needs allies and support as it stands up to China What is problematic about what Enes Kanter is saying about China Tsai Ing-wen's public statement thanking Enes Kanter for his support Whether or not the U.S. really cares about Taiwan's self-determination or freedom The KMT's network of overseas student spies during the martial law era How organizers of the first ITASA conference at Yale University received an anonymous intimidating letter How no one from Yale University was able to attend the Love Boat program in the year following the Yale ITASA conference How Tim and his family were blacklisted and not allowed to return to Taiwan What inspired many WUFI members and overseas Taiwan independence activists to stand up for Taiwan and to attempt to free Taiwan from authoritarian rule How Peter Huang who attempted to assassinate Chiang Ching-kuo was a WUFI member How many overseas Taiwanese students were inspired by the Cuban revolution How within WUFI there were members who were KMT spies The founding of WUFI in 1971 and how it united organizations in Japan, Europe, the United States, and Canada How WUFI members were responsible much of the U.S. media coverage on Taiwan The Taiwanese American Association of America (TAA), the grassroots arm of WUFI Fundraising efforts for the Taiwanese political drama Island Nation 2 What motivated Chiang Ching-kuo to lift martial law in Taiwan Tim's criticism of John Oliver's segment on Taiwan John Oliver's criticism of John Cena, the pro wrestler and actor who apologized to China after calling Taiwan a country What happened to Chinese tennis player Peng Shuai and what may have motivated her to speak about how she was sexually assaulted by Zhang Gaoli, a former high-ranking government official and member of the Chinese Communist Party The support that Peng Shuai has gotten from other professional tennis players The Women's Tennis Association's (WTA) reaction to Peng Shuai's statement about being sexually assaulted and her subsequent disappearance The pressure by the WTA and countries like Finland to cancel on the Beijing 2022 Winter Olympics Myanmar and the Free Burma movement China's Belt and Road Initiative Lithuania's support of Taiwan Tim's call for others to help contribute his Wikipedia project documenting the contributions of overseas Taiwanese (from all over the globe) to Taiwan's democratization and independence movement WUFI's 2021 paper calendar commemorating WUFI's 50thanniversary How Professor Chen Wen-chen was part of the WUFI network The Taiwan History Facebook group The importance of documenting the stories of Taiwan's diaspora who fought for Taiwan's freedom and democracy     Related Links: To view all related links for this article, click link below: https://talkingtaiwan.com/tim-chng-documents-the-overseas-taiwan-independence-movement-on-wikipedia-ep-159/

Positivity and Success
Comparing Yourself

Positivity and Success

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 7:42


The general word of advice is that you should not compare yourself to other people. That is bad advice and let's talk about why. ~ ~ ~ Buy Me a Coffee https://www.buymeacoffee.com/norlund Visit on YouTube https://www.youtube.com/c/chrisnorlundchannel/join Support the show on Patreon @norlund Follow on Twitter @chris_norlund Follow on Instagram @norlund Stay positive and thank you so much for listening! Support us!

Mental Maintenance
Comparing Past + Present Selves & Tarot Card Readings with Keary Quintanilla

Mental Maintenance

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 63:41


This episode features the first RETURNING guest to Mental Maintenance. Denise and Jordan chat with Keary Quintanilla, Denise's childhood friend who spoke about addiction on episode 9 of the first season(?) of the show.  The girls have fun catching up with each other and learn that Keary is now a fulltime tarot card reader! Keary talks about how she's learned to be alone and allow herself to sit with her feelings and work through those times rather than distracting herself by packing her schedule full. Jordan shares that in high school she allowed other people to influence her actions and now, as an adult, she's grown to love who she is and embraces her curiosity for life. Denise reflects on her adolescence when she felt like a people pleaser and talks about the turning point in her life when she decided to stop avoiding confrontation and put herself first. After the discussion Keary does a few quick tarot readings for listeners and the hosts. During the readings it becomes quite clear why Keary is referred to as a Tarot Therapist! Social Media: Keary's Tarot Reading Business IG - @casuallyascending Keary's Personal IG - @itskeary MM Podcast IG & FB - @mentalmpodcast  Jordan IG - @torresjaaymrs Denise IG - @deniseserino  

Come Let Us Reason Podcast
Understanding the Evolution Debate (Part 1)

Come Let Us Reason Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2021


Understanding the Evolution Debate (Part 1) Ever since Charles Darwin offered his Origin of Species in 1859, evolution has proven to be one of the more contentious issues in the science and faith discussion. In this set of talks, Lenny explains what the nature of the debate over evolution entails, the three main competing ideas on the origin and diversity of life, and a few of the problems of modern evolutionary theory. This class is part of a full series of lectures entitled "Christianity and Science: Tackling the Issues of the 21st Century." To find out more, visit the comereason.org web site. Part 1 of 4

FFL U.S.A.
Comparing Industries: Real Estate Vs Life Insurance

FFL U.S.A.

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 27, 2021 41:42


Andrew Taylor interviews Angie Coder, Vanessa Powell and Josh Williams to dive into the similarities and differences between the real estate and life insurance industries.Both Angie and Vanessa came from the real estate industry. Angie has known Vanessa and her family for years. She was burnt out after being in real estate and learned about FFL through Vanessa's Instagram posts, so she decided to make the switch.Angie's biggest month so far has been $14K while working part-time and continuing to sell real estate. Her goal for next month is $40K. Vanessa's biggest month was $25K and she has only been with Family First Life for 4 months. Her goal for next month is to write $40K on her own pen and get her logo. Both Angie and Vanessa are on Josh's team, Family First Life Knockout, which is currently the fastest growing agency in the company.

The Rebel Capitalist Show
News: Emil Kalinowski LIVE! Comparing Inflation 1940's to 1970's (We Take Calls)

The Rebel Capitalist Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 44:37


Check out the Rebel Capitalist Live event Jan 7th - 9th!! https://rebelcapitalistlive.com

Virtual Ball Boys
Comparing Corn

Virtual Ball Boys

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 79:23


After spending some time comparing corn and talking Thanksgiving meals, we dive into recapping Week 11 and picking games for Week 12. Plus, we talk about what we have been thankful for, which turned into a much more serious discussion than anticipated! To contribute to the Black Lives Matter movement in any way you can, visit https://blacklivesmatters.carrd.co/ The Virtual Ball Boys podcast is uploaded once or twice every week through February, hosted by Chris (@FluffyCloudGmr) and Matt (@Avana_Music). Follow us on Twitter at @VirtualBallBoys and follow our other work at @TeamChaosPods. Virtual Ball Boy Football League episodes will also be streamed at https://twitch.tv/teamchaosproductions. For inquiries, email us: virtualballboys@gmail.com. The Virtual Ball Boys podcast is a Team Chaos Production. #VirtualBallBoys #VBB #VBBFL --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

Joe Giglio Show
Comparing Jalen Hurts to NBA players

Joe Giglio Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 23:15


The Jalen Hurts talk continues with a clip from Good Morning Football where the hosts compare the Eagles quarterbacks to some former Sixers.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Above Par
Finding the Peace In Golf and Holidays

Above Par

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 16:21


Comparing golf with every day life experiences helps put the game in a new perspective. How you experience Thanksgiving and how you experience golf have a lot in common. Changing the way you look at each creates less angst and more peace around each.In this podcast I share with you the similarities between golf and the holidays and how you can you enjoy each a bit more.Join Master Your Golf Brain HERE a self-paced step by step program to managing your mind around the game.KathyHartWood.com

20-Minute Health Talk
Surprising COVID-19 symptoms in older adults

20-Minute Health Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 20:29


Common COVID-19 symptoms include fever, chills, cough and shortness of breath. But research has revealed that a surprising number of older adults experience some atypical signs of the virus. This is according to a study published in the Journal of Gerontology. The principal investigator of that paper, Allison Marzilliano, PhD, discusses her findings and their implications for older adults and clinicians.  Dr. Marziliano is assistant professor in the Center for Health Innovations and Outcomes Research for the Feinstein Institutes for Medical Research. Chapters: 00:29 - What are atypical COVID-19 symptoms? 01:24 - About the study 02:33 - Key takeaways 04:40 - What is functional decline?  05:43 - Testing older adults for COVID-19 07:34 - Comparing outcomes in typical, atypical patients 09:21 - Explaining atypical COVID-19 symptoms 11:07 - Dementia and COVID-19 11:25 - Northwell Health older adult workgroup 13:21 - Future COVID-19 research 15:24 - Isolation during COVID-19 16:00 - Ageism in healthcare research 18:14 - Role of COVID-19 vaccines 18:54 - On a positive note Watch episodes of 20-Minute Health Talk on YouTube. 

The Ecommerce Influence Podcast
331: Where Are Your Customers Really Coming From? Using Post-Purchase Surveys to Reveal True Attribution

The Ecommerce Influence Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 29:58


Was Facebook ever really performing as well as we thought - or was our attribution model just wrong? A post-purchase survey will tell you where people are actually hearing about your brand.  If you're spending money on Facebook you know it's incredibly hard to figure out where your customers are coming from. Matt Bahr, CEO of Enquire Labs, has a way to help you better track attribution with a post-purchase survey.  I stumbled across Enquire a couple of years ago and thought they were super interesting because their simple survey really helped us figure out what was effective marketing and what was not. In this episode, we talk all about what they're doing and how they've helped brands figure out attribution in the midst of the chaos of iOS changes.  It's an excellent episode and you'll get a lot of interesting tips for running successful marketing.  Episode Highlights: 3:58 Matt's timing of building a post-purchase survey app  6:31 How Enquire came to be  10:22 Where brand's think sales are coming from vs where the sales are actually coming from 12:50 The power of word of mouth  14:51 Thinking about attribution using post-purchase surveys  18:00 A better way to get questions answered by customers  21:10 Comparing quantitative and qualitative data  21:38 What smaller brands can learn from the bigger brands  24:57 Higher AOV: is it harder to track?  Resources: Enquire Labs @mattrbahr on Twitter Enquire Post Purchase Survey App on Shopify  Brand Growth Membership  @a_brawn on Twitter Review or subscribe on iTunes

The Onside Zone with Big O
Podcast Monday BigO Omar Kelly - Comparing Keenan Allen And Jarvis Landry 11 22 2021

The Onside Zone with Big O

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 4:51


Big O & Omar look at Keenan Allen & Jarvis Landry

The Landscape Photography Show
Comparing International Styles With Benjamin Maze

The Landscape Photography Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 48:18


Benjamin Maze joins The Landscape Photography Show to discuss his journey in landscape photography, the unique Australian style of capturing landscapes, and how a split-second decision to walk out of orientation put him on the photography path.

Pitcher List Fantasy Baseball Podcast
WAF 36: The SP2 Rundown with Adam Howe

Pitcher List Fantasy Baseball Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 78:16


Wins Above Fantasy - Van Burnett (@Van_Verified) welcomes guest Adam Howe (@EightyGrade) to talk top SP2s looking ahead to 2022. Comparing the PitcherList mock draft with some of Adam's early real drafts, they run through overall SP draft strategy and player breakdowns in the SP2 range. 6:45 Hot Stove: Jose Berrios & Noah Syndegaard Fantasy Impact 17:30 Adam's Overall SP Approach 26:45 Lance Lynn - Risky or Glue SP2? 32:30 Carlos Rodon - Fading in Mocks 38:30 Julio Urias - Hinging on Innings 43:50 Freddy Peralta - Worth the Upside? 48:45 Kevin Gaussian - Solid If He Stays SF… 54:20 Lucas Giolito - A Lot to Still Like 59:25 Jack Flaherty - Van's Homer “Case for Jack Flaherty” 1:05:15 Max Fried - “Meh” or Money? 1:10:30 Luis Castillo - The Warm-Weather SP2 Pitcher List Mock Draft Board Subscribe: iTunes | Stitcher | Spotify | RSS | Twitter: | @winsabovepod | @Van_Verified | @stav8818 | Email:winsabovefantasy@gmail.com Get PL+ and join our Discord! Get PL+ and join our Discord: https://pitcherlist.com/plus

The Modern Therapist's Survival Guide with Curt Widhalm and Katie Vernoy

Peer Support Specialists An interview with Kemisha Fields, MSW, Amparo Ostojic, MPA, and Jeff Kashou, LMFT on what peer support specialists are and the value they bring to treatment teams, as well as the challenges and best practices in implementing these roles into clinical programs. Curt and Katie talk with Kemisha and Amparo about their experiences in these positions, exploring how their lived experiences created the successful integration of a more holistic approach to support clients. We also talked with Jeff about his journey in implementing one of these programs from scratch.   It's time to reimagine therapy and what it means to be a therapist. To support you as a whole person and a therapist, your hosts, Curt Widhalm and Katie Vernoy talk about how to approach the role of therapist in the modern age. Interview with Kemisha Fields, MSW, Amparo Ostojic, MPA, and Jeff Kashou, LMFT Kemisha Fields, MSW: Kemisha Fields was born and raised in South Los Angeles, CA. As a former foster youth, she has taken a professional interest in the commitment to serving the needs of children and families as a Children's Social Worker working in Dependency Investigations. She has studied many modalities to bring healing to those in need. Kemisha is a life, long learner inspired by the abundance of opportunities available to enrich the lives of the people she serves. She earned her Bachelor of Science Degree in Psychology from the University of Phoenix. She received her Master of Social Work degree from the University of Southern California. Currently, Kemisha is a Doctoral Student of Business Administration with an emphasis in organizational leadership. She has extensive experience working with children, families, and individuals as an agent of support and guidance. Kemisha has a strong background in case management for an array of populations inclusive to at-risk youth, individuals with intellectual disabilities, commercially sexual exploited children, victims of trauma, and families within the dependency system. As a lead Dependency Investigator with Los Angeles County Child and Family Services, she has direct practice with assessing for child abuse and neglect in hostile environments. Kemisha works directly with County Counsel to investigate and sustain infractions of the Child Welfare and Institutions Codes. Jeff Kashou, LMFT: Jeff Kashou, LMFT is a manager of clinical product and service design for a mental health tech company that provides telemedicine to those with serious mental illness. Previously, he ran a county mental health program where he helped develop the role fo peers for adolescent programs county-wide and collaborated with peers to create management practices to support their professional development. In this position, Jeff developed a practice guideline for the utilization of peers in behavioral health settings for the County of Orange. Jeff has also served on the Board of Directors for the California Association of Marriage and Family Therapists, where he helped lead the association to support the field of Marriage and Family Therapy and those with mental health issues. He consults as experts in mental health for television productions, to ensure the accurate and helpful portrayal of mental illness and treatment in the media. Most recently, Jeff and his wife Sheila wrote a children's book, The Proudest Color, that helps children of color cope with racism that will be on shelves this Fall. Amparo Ostojic, MPA: Amparo Ostojic is a mental health advocate with personal lived experience. After working for the federal government for ten years, she decided to pursue her passion in working as an advocate to help promote recovery in mental health.  She has worked as a peer specialist for a mental health clinic as well as volunteered leading peer support groups. Amparo has a close connection with the Latino Community and feels it is her duty to do everything possible to prevent and reduce the suffering of individuals living with a mental health condition. Amparo created a Spanish speaking support group in East Los Angeles to offer free peer support to members of her community. Amparo has a bachelor's in business administration and a Master of Public administration. Amparo is a certified personal medicine coach and is working on becoming a National Certified Peer Specialist (NCPS). In this episode we talk about: What a peer support specialist is, how they work What peers can uniquely bring The hiring process, qualifications, and what that means for individuals seeking these jobs The difference in perspective that peer and parent partners can bring to treatment teams The importance of lived experience Comparing holistic versus medical model treatment The medical model and the recovery model complement each other The importance of advocacy for individuals (with the support of the peer support specialist) How peer support specialists are best integrated into treatment teams and programs The potential problems when the peer support specialist role is not understood How someone can become a Peer Support Specialist Certification and standardization of the peer support specialist role SB803 – CA certification for Peer Support Specialists Legislation Ideal training for these professionals How best to collaborate with a peer support specialist What it is like to implement one of these programs The challenges of hiring a peer support specialist Exploring whether there are systems in place to support peer support specialists with their unique needs The recommendation for a tool kit and a consultant to support programs in implementing best practices The Recovery Model and peer support specialists in practice Multidisciplinary teams may have pre-existing bias and prejudice against folks with lived experience, the role of stigma in the interactions The shift that happens when peers become part of the team (specifically related to gallows humor and the separation of “patients” and “providers”) Demonstrating the value of this role and the use of the recovery model Prevention and Early Intervention How to be successful with peer support programs and the benefits at many different levels Our Generous Sponsor: Trauma Therapist Network Trauma is highly prevalent in mental health client populations and people are looking for therapists with specialized training and experience in trauma, but they often don't know where to start. If you've ever looked for a trauma therapist, you know it can be hard to discern who knows what and whether or not they're the right fit for you. There are so many types of trauma and so many different ways to heal. That's why Laura Reagan, LCSW-C created Trauma Therapist Network.  Trauma Therapist Network is a new resource for anyone who wants to learn about trauma and how it shows up in our lives. This new site has articles, resources and podcasts for learning about trauma and its effects, as well as a directory exclusively for trauma therapists to let people know how they work and what they specialize in, so potential clients can find them. Trauma Therapist Network therapist profiles include the types of trauma specialized in, populations served and therapy methods used, making it easier for potential clients to find the right therapist who can help them.  The Network is more than a directory, though. It's a community. All members are invited to attend community meetings to connect, consult and network with colleagues around the country. Join our growing community of trauma therapists and get 20% off your first month using the promo code:  MTSG20 at www.traumatherapistnetwork.com.   Resources mentioned: We've pulled together resources mentioned in this episode and put together some handy-dandy links. Please note that some of the links below may be affiliate links, so if you purchase after clicking below, we may get a little bit of cash in our pockets. We thank you in advance! RAND Report: How to Transform the US Mental Health System Los Angeles Times Op-Ed: Our mental health laws are failing Wise U Training for Peers Advocacy through Cal Voices ACCESS Program SB-803 National Certified Peer Specialist NCPS Excellent guides and toolkits on how to integrate peers in clinics: Association of Home Social Rehabilitation Agencies Meaningful Roles for Peer Providers in Integrated Healthcare Toolkit Philadelphia Peer Support Tool Kit   Relevant Episodes: Fixing Mental Healthcare in America Serious Mental Illness and Homelessness Psychiatric Crises in the Emergency Room Advocacy in the Wake of Looming Mental Healthcare Work Force Shortages   Connect with us! Our Facebook Group – The Modern Therapists Group  Our consultation services: The Fifty-Minute Hour Who we are: Curt Widhalm is in private practice in the Los Angeles area. He is the cofounder of the Therapy Reimagined conference, an Adjunct Professor at Pepperdine University and CSUN, a former Subject Matter Expert for the California Board of Behavioral Sciences, former CFO of the California Association of Marriage and Family Therapists, and a loving husband and father. He is 1/2 great person, 1/2 provocateur, and 1/2 geek, in that order. He dabbles in the dark art of making "dad jokes" and usually has a half-empty cup of coffee somewhere nearby. Learn more at: www.curtwidhalm.com Katie Vernoy is a Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist, coach, and consultant supporting leaders, visionaries, executives, and helping professionals to create sustainable careers. Katie, with Curt, has developed workshops and a conference, Therapy Reimagined, to support therapists navigating through the modern challenges of this profession. Katie is also a former President of the California Association of Marriage and Family Therapists. In her spare time, Katie is secretly siphoning off Curt's youthful energy, so that she can take over the world. Learn more at: www.katievernoy.com A Quick Note: Our opinions are our own. We are only speaking for ourselves – except when we speak for each other, or over each other. We're working on it. Our guests are also only speaking for themselves and have their own opinions. We aren't trying to take their voice, and no one speaks for us either. Mostly because they don't want to, but hey.   Stay in Touch: www.mtsgpodcast.com www.therapyreimagined.com Our Facebook Group – The Modern Therapist's Group https://www.facebook.com/therapyreimagined/ https://twitter.com/therapymovement https://www.instagram.com/therapyreimagined/   Credits: Voice Over by DW McCann https://www.facebook.com/McCannDW/ Music by Crystal Grooms Mangano http://www.crystalmangano.com/   Transcript (Autogenerated)   Curt Widhalm  00:00 This episode is sponsored by Trauma Therapist Network.   Katie Vernoy  00:04 Trauma therapist network is a new resource for anyone who wants to learn about trauma and how it shows up in our lives. This new site has articles, resources and podcasts for learning about trauma and its effects, as well as a directory exclusively for trauma therapists to let people know how they work, and what they specialize in so potential clients can find them. Visit traumatherapistnetwork.com To learn more,   Curt Widhalm  00:27 listen at the end of the episode for more about the trauma therapist network.   Announcer  00:31 You're listening to the Modern Therapist Survival Guide, where therapists live, breathe and practice as human beings to support you as a whole person and a therapist. Here are your hosts, Curt Widhalm and Katie Vernoy.   Curt Widhalm  00:47 Welcome back modern therapists. This is the modern therapist Survival Guide. I'm Curt Widhalm with Katie Vernoy. And this is part four of our special series of fixing mental health care in America. And today, we are shining a spotlight on peer support specialists and the role that they have in our behavioral health care system. And a lot of the advantages that these kinds of roles bring in, as well as some of the difficulties of getting peer support implemented despite a lot of very positive evidence in their role in treating mental and emotional disorders that happen in our world.   Katie Vernoy  01:27 I'm really excited about this particular episode, we've got two sections. The first one is we're joined by two folks who've worked in the peer support specialist role who are both still in social work and in advocacy. First off, we've got Kemisha Fields, who's a Master of Social Work who is was actually somebody I worked with, and she did a great job in one of the programs I was running. And then also person I was introduced to by one of our amazing friends of the show on Amparo Ostojic, who is an MPA and also someone who works in advocacy specifically about peer support specialists. So I'm really, really looking forward for all of you to listen to that and learn about what that role is. And we recognized also and I, I had a little bit of this, but Jeff Kashou LMFT is someone who has in the past actually implemented one of these programs, and he was able to talk with us about what it was like as a director, putting those things together. So take a listen.   Kemisha Fields  02:30 So my name is Kemisha Fields. I enter social services call for like 17 years ago, I took a entry level position at a homeless shelter. So that was my entry into social services. And from there, I've just kind of progress and work my way up. And I've worked with different populations. So I've worked with the homeless population. I've worked with individuals who are struggling with substance abuse. I worked in recidivism. I've worked in community mental health, and now I'm working in the child welfare system.   Amparo Ostojic  03:10 So my name is Amparo Ostojic. And I've been in mental health advocacy and peer support. For the last four years, I have worked to increase awareness about mental health, especially in the Latino community. And I worked as a peer support specialist for a mental health clinic for about seven months, I currently still do advocacy in the mental health space. And I work with individuals that want to know more about how to live, a quote unquote, normal life, even with my severe mental health condition.   Curt Widhalm  03:50 A lot of mental health clinicians, they may have heard of a peer specialist. I have found that a lot of my travels and talks in therapist communities that many people don't know what a peer specialist does, can you help us understand what a peer specialist does what their role is in the bigger part of the treatment systems.   Amparo Ostojic  04:13 So a peer specialist is basically a role model of positive recovery behaviors. So it's meant to give hope to someone living with a mental health condition and help them not feel as alone in this recovery process. So, in essence, a pure specialist will share their personal lived experience of mental health and oftentimes offer examples of what it's like to deal with a condition. And you know, what they've done to get better, such as tips or a really useful tool is, for example, the living successfully plan or the wrap plans, where you go over with a client what it is like to be in a healthy space, what it's like to see warning signs, and when it's time to call your psychiatrist or go to the hospital. So kind of teach them about themselves and guide them in their self determination of managing their their health condition.   Katie Vernoy  05:17 So you're really talking about from a place of your own experience and knowledge helping someone to plan for themselves,   Amparo Ostojic  05:26 right. And a lot of it is teaching them to self advocate for themselves, and put themselves in the driver's seat of their health condition. So for example, a lot of times, it's kind of directed from the top as if the psychiatrist or therapist is telling them what to do, or kind of teaching them what they should do. Whereas if your specialist is on the same level, and there's no sort of hierarchy of who knows more, there's a relationship of learning from each other, and really sharing what it's like to live through this. I was given the example where it's like, Is it someone that you want to work with, like someone that's like a biologist that knows about like the forest or something or someone that lives in the forest, because that personal lived experience is really key to understanding things that someone else that hasn't experienced them wouldn't really know, or perhaps hasn't dealt with.   Curt Widhalm  06:26 When you started in this, you started as a parent partner, how was that process of getting hired?   Kemisha Fields  06:34 So the qualification for a peer partner or parent partner would be a life experience in one of the systems of DCFS, Department of Children and Family Services, probation, and I believe education, like do individual education plan. And so my entry into being a parent partner was through my son's IEP, Individual Education Plan. And, you know, it just kind of happened by chance, a friend of mine recommended me for the position and I follow through with it, the interview process, or the application process, they I was asked what my qualification to being a parent partner, so I did have to disclose some important information regarding my own experiences with my son. And we just, I remember asking, like, anybody could have kind of said, like, oh, yeah, I have this child that has a special needs, like, how did they confirm that information? So I was looking for them to kind of want some sort of documentation from me, and they didn't. And so, at the time, the executive director says, usually confirmed based on the series of questions they asked me during the interview about different programs that may have been introduced to, to my son, which I found quite interesting, like, Okay,   Katie Vernoy  08:07 how was it for you to disclose personal things to get a job, because that seems like that would be a pretty vulnerable way to enter into a position.   Kemisha Fields  08:19 Very much so and because it's the opposite of what we've always been told, typically, in interviewing process, you don't share too much personal information, just your professional history. So it was a little different. But I always been transparent with my struggles with my son. So it was it was just a little different in I didn't know this person, but it was okay. I you know, I feel comfortable through the process. And I didn't, it was okay for me to, you know, share my experiences. Being a parent of a special needs child.   Curt Widhalm  09:01 I have to imagine, and this is prior to being hired in this position. Did you have somebody serving in that kind of a role for you, somebody that you relied on while you were going through your child's IEP process and all of the struggles that that usually entails?   Kemisha Fields  09:19 That is... I love that question. I absolutely love that question and Yes, but very informal. So I did not have a formal being like, Whoa, this is your parent partner, and she or he's going to help you through this process. What I have was professionals who kind of just stepped up I had one of the very first school psychologists who helped me through the process of my son's assessment, what to look for what questions that I should ask and she helped me not on a professional level but a personal level. She kind of walked me through that process. So I was grateful for that. So I've had a lot of support with my son, just from individuals who cared enough to show me what this looks like and what questions I should be asking. So I appreciate that.   Curt Widhalm  10:20 I have to imagine that working with the mental health systems, the people in those roles, there has to be some difficulties in getting integrated into the more professional sides of the organizations, what kinds of challenges to peer specialists end up having, trying to help clients be able to advocate for themselves and fit into this professional system as well.   Amparo Ostojic  10:45 The professionals, such a psychiatrist, therapist, they usually operate from the medical model, which is very top down, like I mentioned, and it kind of has this perspective that I no more in teaching the patient how to, you know, work with medications, or live with this condition, where as peer specialists work from the recovery model, that look at everything, the main four points are home, community health, and purpose, that's really important, like your reason to get up in the morning, right? That sometimes the recovery model is not taking us seriously, it's a more kind of holistic approach, looking at the person. And in the medical model, you're looking at the condition like it's a problem to be solved. And I'm looking at the person as the whole and how their whole life could be better. So my focus may be different than a psychiatrist, their focus may be to reduce the symptoms, and let's say get rid of hearing voices, things like that, or as my role is really to make that person as a whole better. So for example, I usually medications is a big thing must take medications, or as my role may not necessarily say that I typically never tell the client, you know, don't take medications, but I really allow the client to the side that and some other parts of the medical team may not like that. But also, my role may not be taken as seriously because, for example, in my experience working with a mental health clinic, they worked with people that were homeless, and I would say extreme cases. So as someone with bipolar disorder, they kind of put me in this category that, you know, I probably couldn't offer as much. And my perspective wasn't as valuable. So it was really hard. Working with therapists or psychiatrist that saw me as someone that was in the space of like, part of the problem. I don't know how to describe it. But it was really hard, because at the beginning, I definitely felt like I wasn't taking seriously. And it took a while to gain trust, and get there super for me clients. And those were one of the challenges,   Curt Widhalm  13:01 I have to imagine some of the providers are like, you're just completely undermining all of the treatment by using trust, none of this professional experience that we've learned. How did those conversations go? Because it seems like so much of a treatment plan would be developed from, you know, the scientific and medical model sorts of approaches. And then for somebody to come in with lived experience to be able to be like, maybe the medication thing is something that you want to talk to your doctor about.   Amparo Ostojic  13:33 Well, I take medication, and there was five years that I didn't from when I was 20 to 26. And I was fine. I think, you know, I used to run marathons, I was super fit. And there was a time that I didn't think I needed medication. But then having more episodes, I realized that it does benefit me. So I never really tell a client, don't take medication. But I'm not as I guess pushy into that they may need I needed something to happen for me to sort of learn my lesson and realize, you know, it's it's easier, my life is a little easier with medication. And that may not be the case for everybody. So I definitely don't think they see it as me undermining them. But the recovery model and the medical model are supposed to complement each other. And I think that's the hesitation at the beginning. There's no better treatment or a they say they're supposed to complement each other and offer a level of understanding and acceptance and validation that sometimes the professionals can't offer because they haven't lived through that. So for the most part, I'm never, you know, moving them away from medication or therapy and validating their experience but perhaps they may tell me, you know, I didn't like my psychiatrist. And this is what happened. And I will be honest and say I've had psychiatrist that didn't work with me and didn't work for me. And I had to find a different one. Or I had to advocate for myself and say, you know, this side effect is, is not working for me, you know, maybe this is working, like, the symptoms are, you know, improving. But, you know, it's, it's making me sleepy, and then I can't get to work on time, things that are important that sometimes I think clients are afraid to say, because, you know, like, the main symptom that they're after is maybe under control. But other aspects of your life have completely lost balance now.   Katie Vernoy  15:42 Yeah, I think for me, and I was that person at one point. So   Kemisha Fields  15:46 You were!   Katie Vernoy  15:48 But I think the thing that felt very powerful when I entered into that program, and saw how it was set up was that the team had set up this structure to make sure that each member at the table was heard that each person was allowed to share ideas. I had been in other programs where folks were subjected to that hierarchy, where the therapist or the psychiatrist got the most air time, they're the ones that were making the decisions. And to me, I think, whether it was making sure that the parent partners were supervised by the director, and or really having a culture of, we are all here supporting the family. And we all equally bring important things to the table, I think it was really effective. I think we just get worried because I did see even with programs that were and maybe it was because it was intense now that I'm thinking about it, because like less intense programs, sometimes folks were using either parent partners or bachelor level providers to do like, copying and filing. And it's like, no, no, these are mental health providers, these are people who are at the table. And so to me, I think when when people are able to integrate into the team, it can be really good.   Kemisha Fields  17:05 My personality type wouldn't have allow for that, if I'm honest. Like no. And I think when you come in and you kind of demand a level of respect, you get that level of respect. So I've never had a problem, I think, in my whole career of value, my experience as a parent partner, it laid the foundation for so much of the work that I do now. So I'm still connected to a lot of those colleagues, who at the time were clinicians and I, at that time, I wasn't even I had not completed my undergrad studies yet. And we're like the best of friends. So my experience as a parent partner is one that is really great. And had you know, a lot of good things have come out of that for me,   Curt Widhalm  17:59 I want to change the conversation here a little bit to talking about how people can become peer specialists and what the certification process is like. And I understand that that's quite different in many different parts of the country.   Amparo Ostojic  18:15 Yeah, and even within California, each county has different guidelines. So first of all, California just passed SB 803, which is going to allow pure support specialists to have a certification, which will hopefully increase the use of peer specialists in mental health clinics. So 48 states now have peer certification, including California. And the, the principles are pretty much the same. But how a peer support is used in different parts of a state or country is going to vary. So it's difficult if someone moves to another state or another county, and they try to use the same principles. It may not work as effectively. And it's basically it's not standardized right now. So it's hard for someone working in that field to have many options of going to different places, and even like a client that's moving from another county and experiencing pure services in a different way.   Katie Vernoy  19:26 So if someone were to want to jump into this, where it sounds like it's starting to become more regulated, there's certification in 48 states, that's great. What does it look like? How does someone become a peer support specialist?   Amparo Ostojic  19:39 There's a few organizations that are considered certified to train for peer support. And, for example, the training that I took was an 11 day course, where, you know, like 40 hours a week, and you learn the principles of peer support. And then To become a certified peer specialist, you need 3000 hours of supervised work or volunteer experience providing direct peer support. And you need a letter of recommendation from a professional and from supervisor that has overseen your peer support. And then there's an exam that you would take and pass. And that's how you would become national certified peer specialist. And on top of that, like I said, California is still in the process of creating their peer support guidelines. So in addition to that, you know, whatever guidelines that they'll come up with will be the California guidelines for certification in California,   Curt Widhalm  20:45 a lot of research gives you more credit than being a middleman, that when we look at outcomes for treatments, when we look at treatment, we see that peer counselors, we see that parent partners are more effective towards client outcomes than even just working directly with licensed professionals. And a lot of it is due to a lot of the problems that therapists just kind of face and being approachable themselves for the mental health system themselves that there is a down to earth Ness that having that lived experience really does embody that, yes, you can get through this. And I've got some experience to be able to say that not only do I actually demonstrate that I know what you're going through, but that you can get through it, there's a way through this, that there is a light at the end of the tunnel. How do you think that peer partners, peer counselors can be trained should be trained to best exemplify that part of treatment,   Kemisha Fields  21:51 I would say they should be trained the same way that any other team members trained in I know, from a clinical perspective, there's a different type of training that comes into play. But for our child and family team specialists that you know, we have trainings, usually agencies are sending you out to different trainings, and I I believe that parent partners should be a part of those trainings, if they are not already a part of those trainings. And that should and will help them in their role as a parent partner with the life experience on top of that,   Katie Vernoy  22:32 how can therapists psychiatrists, other people in mental health clinics, support peer specialists?   Amparo Ostojic  22:38 one of the most important parts is understanding and learning to see how we can be used. I think, once you collaborate with a peer specialist, and notice the different perspective that they offer, I think both psychiatrists and peers, and mental health professionals, other mental health professionals can learn from each other. And I really appreciated that with one of the psychiatrist that he like, I could see that he really learned from me, and that gave me a lot of confidence. And I learned a lot from him. And it didn't feel like a top down relationship. And it really felt like he valued my perspective as a professional. And that helped a lot because basically just have faith in in something even if you don't understand how it works. You want to try and see how you can work with this person and encourage them to do actual peer support. If at first you don't know what to do as far as how to work with them. There's really good guides. There's one that I really recommend, that is put out by Castro. And they are basically recovery organization. And they have it's called the meaningful roles for providers in an integrative healthcare. And they really break down the different positions that peer specialists could do the different roles so like a peer navigator peer advocate, wellbeing coach is sometimes what they call it. And it really spells out things that a peer specialists can do. And it helps both the pure and the professional because they will say, you know, they could serve as a bridge between the community based organization, they could help clients in enrolling with health insurance programs, they it really spells out things that a client can do with a pure specialist, and that helps both the pier and the clinic.   Katie Vernoy  24:53 How about letting us know a little bit about if someone's interested in this I think from many different angles I wanting to advocate for better utilization of peer support specialists within mental health programs advocating for swift implementation of SB 803. For California, you know, or even this advocacy for individuals who are navigating mental health concerns themselves or with their family members, and how they can advocate like, it seems like there's a lot of lot of potential calls to action for our listeners here. What resources would you recommend that they look into, and we'll put all of those in our show notes.   Amparo Ostojic  25:33 So definitely the I would guess, I guess, I would say, one of my favorite organizations that I worked with for the past two and a half years is Cal voices. And they have different programs, the advocacy space, is access. So access stands for advancing client and community empowerment through sustainable solutions. So they're kind of a systems change perspective. And they have really great e learning toolkits that give you tools on how you would advocate for yourself and for systems change within your community. One of the great resources that Cal voices has is their Ys program, which stands for workforce integration, support and education. And they have what they call the YZ University. And it's created by peers, it's taught by peers. And this is where I got my training for becoming a peer support specialist. And they basically provide a lot of support in what a peer does. And like they have wise Wednesdays, where they provide information about something related to peer support and learning about how to, you know, either be a peer specialist or work with a peer specialist. And that's everyone's they. And so, it's a great program, because like I said, it's peers that are teaching and creating the curriculum. And I think that's just wonderful because receiving that information for someone with the lived experience is very powerful.   Curt Widhalm  27:21 Switching gears here and talking about the implementation of peer support specialists, here's our interview with Jeff Kashou. We are joined by Jeff Kashou, a licensed Marriage and Family Therapist. He's a former Service chief who oversaw collaborative behavioral health program in Orange County, and had opportunities to oversee the implementations of peer counselors into some of the programs.   Jeff Kashou  27:51 Yeah, well, first off, thank you for having me on. And I'm very much appreciated that you guys have this podcast and give the opportunity for topics like this to be covered.   Katie Vernoy  27:59 The thing that I find very interesting about these roles that I know you and I both have hired these roles, but people have to claim lived experience in order to get these roles. And so it's it's a very interesting line to walk. There's there's very interesting things there. But what do you see as the difficulties that are associated with hiring peer counselors?   Jeff Kashou  28:20 Yeah, so I think, very specifically, what makes the role unique and special also makes it kind of a unique challenge in the interviewing process? How do you ask about one's lived experience as a direct, you know, in theory qualification to have that job is what makes it a unique role to a to an organization or an agency. So I would, you know, really encourage anybody who is looking to start a peer program to bring on a consultant who can really help you think the process all the way through and how to have those conversations without inadvertently walking into equal opportunity ramifications or accidently discriminating against someone while also being very mindful that you're bringing into the room into the interview room and process someone's vulnerabilities. And so being able to manage that very tactfully and professionally, while also ensuring that this person, you know, feels comfortable to share that as well. That's your first introduction to somebody and they're interviewing you in that, that process and they want to ensure that your program has really thought through how they're going to be not just added to their system of care, but how your entire system of care embraces and is made better by having peers on board. Oftentimes peers are looked at as very client facing but really in the best situations for them are those for the entire service model is made better by their presence.   Curt Widhalm  29:48 A lot of the talk that we've had on this show about how programs barely take care of their mental health professionals within the work systems. Is there any management that is actually being put towards looking after peer counselors in this way without infantilizing them. I mean, if we're not doing this with the brunt of the behavioral health health workforce, are there other implementation problems when it comes to ensuring this kind of stuff or incorporating them into treatment teams,   Jeff Kashou  30:19 when I created a practice guidelines of like best practices for the entire Orange County systems, and not just County, but the entire behavioral health system for how to conduct supervision with peers, I leaned very heavily on a toolkit that I found from the city of Philadelphia, that there Department of Behavioral Health and intellectual disability services put together on how to create a peer support system, from the first moment you decide you want to all the way through to supervising them to managing disciplinary things to supporting their growth. And looking at it even from you know, how is the entire system set up to support them, even the interactions that they have within the multidisciplinary team, you know, they face an additional layer of potentially of scrutiny or challenges by constantly having to explain who they are, why they have any authority to work with patients or clients. So there's, there's added stress to the question or the systems in place to actually take care of them. You know, I would really look at that toolkit that the city of Philadelphia put together as sort of a way to evaluate if your system is there, I'd say, it's certainly lacking just to be completely blunt, the county that I worked for, from the children's behavioral health side was not equipped at the time to take them on effectively. And it required a lot of having to build the plane while you fly it, which I think for some roles, it's okay. I think for peers, it can add additional stress. And it means, you know, workplace ambiguity is stressful enough. But when it comes to all the other challenges of integrating them and supporting them and explaining their role, and giving them the right training, and so on, and so on. There's just another level that needs to be thought all the way through.   Curt Widhalm  32:11 How are pure counselors implemented into treatment teams, and how are their voices in actual practice, kind of placed into the role where there's a bunch of other potential licensed professionals across a wide variety of interdisciplinary systems?   Jeff Kashou  32:30 Yeah, so I can speak to my experience, and then also kind of broadly to and the research that I've done on the topic. So it's often implemented as a top down approach, it's, you know, people in leadership, saying, we're gonna add this program to our larger organization, without ever really embracing maybe the full scope of what it means to engage in a recovery service model, which is really antithetical to the principles of the peer program, you know, which is meeting people where they're at. So a system of care, really understanding from the bottom up what's happening on the ground level, that's really where the entire program began with. But the ways that they're being implemented, we have that additive approach that systems of care will take. And from a very top down perspective, oftentimes, systems need a way to recoup revenue by bringing on this workforce and, you know, supporting the work that they do. And so when it comes to Medicaid, for example, it's involving them in the billing system. So it requires choosing a diagnosis for the person from the list that the other providers have diagnosed the individual with, which is sometimes very new and a bit challenging. I think, sometimes for peers who don't want to necessarily see someone as a diagnosis. But you know, our current system of billing practices and documentation practices requires that also, multidisciplinary teams really don't know about peers, and can have a lot of prejudice as they go in. So systems need to really be thoughtful and do a self assessment before they decide to bring on this very important role, you know, on are this system set up? Or what are the prejudices or preconceived notions that other providers on the team have of people that come in with lived experience? Right, you know, oftentimes, we have that sort of gallows humor as providers when we talk about our patients or whatever. But, you know, now you have to be very mindful of that, not just because you don't want to upset somebody, but due to having that internal shift of like, you know, I actually really maybe need to check myself when it comes to that, and why I engaged in something like that in the first place. So really thinking about decreasing the stigma and helping the rest of the team even before peers come on, understand what it is that they do, the value that they add, and how they're going to be just as important of a member of a treatment team. So really leading with the why through this process. They're often brought a board you know without much structure I Which, you know, leads to them being assigned a lot of admin tasks as well. One of the things that I learned a lot when working with pure forums was that peers are often assigned, you know, a lot of filing tasks or, you know, paperwork kind of tasks, because the program wasn't really trained or made to be aware of what appear is going to do. And so managers will get, you know, assigned X amount of peers and hire them on but not really know what to do or may not have the bandwidth to train them and think through that whole job requirement. Similarly, what I experienced was, sadly, even partway through the interview process, we found out that we were actually interviewing for peers, but the program was set up, they had to find a job title or job classification that they could fit these folks within, so that we can hire them in a timely manner. And so when we were hiring mental health workers were actually supposed to be hiring peers. And so we found out midway, that we were hiring peers, which meant as managers, then we had to shift and reevaluate what we were doing which we put a lot of emphasis and fervor and figuring out and making it a smooth process as much as we could. But it was by no means ideal. And the cohort that we hired, certainly struggled with a lot of the ambiguity and sometimes just having to sit around and wait while we figured things out for them.   Katie Vernoy  36:16 You've mentioned a couple of times the the money element of it, that oftentimes these are folks who are hired to do an important service that isn't always reimbursable. And it makes me think about the value. And this speaks to the prejudice as well. But it makes me think of the value that people hold for this role. You know, they're not generating revenue, typically, or not generating a lot of revenue. They're not seen as experts, although they're oftentimes more expert than the folks in the room that are doing the treatment planning. And so what are the ways that you have found whether it's best practices or what you were able to accomplish in your program, of integrating these folks more successfully into, you know, kind of explaining the role? Like, why is it so important? What is the value of this? Because I feel like, and maybe you've already said this, and maybe this isn't needed, but it does feel like there's a case for this role. There's an importance to this role. And I just feel like maybe we need to be more direct and saying it, I don't know.   Jeff Kashou  37:25 So yeah, so there's really two directions to think of when it comes to how do you demonstrate the value, there's two those who would be, you know, deciding to bring on this role, which would be those key stakeholders. And then you also have the provider teams as well. And then I guess, there might even be a third group, which are the patients or clientele that you would be serving. So when it comes to demonstrating the value, I think the message needs to be pretty clear all the way through, which is when you're working with, you know, with individuals with serious mental illness, or those with CO occurring disorders, some of these more serious conditions, we know we preach about prevention and early intervention. And this is the rule that really helps with that. And this is the rule that allows us to make that big shift towards a recovery model, and not just pay lip service to saying that, you know, we meet our patients where they're at, and, you know, we want to, you know, improve the quality of their lives and help them reach their full potential. Now, that's, you know, a bit more idealistic and trying to sell it maybe to those that population level into the stakeholder level, but to the provider team, it's also a matter of, you know, recognizing that they will complement the services that, say, a therapist or psychologist or psychiatrist provides as well. And so it's more of like a meshing of gears versus like, people running off into separate directions, you know, where we know that metod here, it's a very important thing. Medications is a very important aspect of treatment. And if individuals, you know, go to their psychiatrist and they prescribe them an antidepressant, we oftentimes know that adherence drops off very quickly, either because the person has some sort of side effects, or because they start to feel better, and they decide they don't want to take the medication anymore. What you know, for multitude of reasons, here, the peer can actually meet with that person, you know, right after they meet with a psychiatrist, or maybe even be in the room with them when they meet with a psychiatrist. And help them ask the questions that are there might be uncomfortable asking, or ensure that they're asking the questions they didn't think to ask, creating that plan afterwards with them for how they're going to fill the prescription, how they're going to, you know, lay out their medications for the week, how they're going to make sure they maintain their motivation to take it or communicate changes that they need with their medications. When it comes to treatment adherence, you know, we assign individuals journaling to do for example, but I don't know about you guys and how often we assign tasks to to patients to do in between sessions, it's extremely hit or miss. And then you end up spending your next session processing, why they didn't do it when you'd rather be processing what they did. And so it's not to say it's 100%. But a specialist can really help with complementing services in those ways. I think ideally, we know that there's attrition, oftentimes with this population. So here's how we keep people engaged in care. I think the other thing is we think about completing goals or completing treatment plans. But that's not really the case. Again, it's not like that broken leg where your leg gets mended, and you don't have to really do anything afterwards, you have to maintain those gains for the long term to allow you then to get to those next levels of functioning, or satisfaction or fulfillment, whatever they might be. And that's where the period specialists can help somebody in the sort of aftercare discharge planning or even long, long term support through their maintenance of their goals.   Katie Vernoy  40:56 I think another element for the treatment team, and this is something where, you know, we had the conversation with Kemisha about this, but they're also an expert on the lived experience. I mean, obviously, each person's experience is different. But there's so much that I think my treatment teams anyway, we're learning from our peers, because they just hadn't been in the situation themselves. And so I think there's, there's also incorporating in that way, like here is another member of the team who has really valuable and valid feedback that you need provider. Because I think it's I think it's hard, I think it's hard to understand this. And I think that we've hidden behind a hierarchy that clearly doesn't work, we need to have, we need to have a whole bunch of human beings working on this on a level playing field.   Jeff Kashou  41:47 Yeah, I'm really glad you brought that point up, Katie, I remember, and you guys probably had to do this in your grad programs as well, where we were assigned the task of attending a 12 step meeting to understand what the recovery community is like. And we can see what these you know, non therapeutic support systems are like, and it's a way to get that experience. But we were only assigned that at one point in time, and there is so much value that appear can add in terms of to use your your point expertise in these areas, you know, the approach, I think a lot of us take in the recovery systems, you know, I will get asked oftentimes, you know, well, are you in recovery yourself? And I think as a therapist, you make your own call in terms of self disclosure. And I would say the while I can tell you yes or no, it's more important for you to tell me what your experience is like, rather than me telling you all about what your experience is like. But I think there's a way we can sort of fast track that by having peer specialists add that level of detail to us upfront so that we're not always taxing individuals to have to educate us each and every time if that's not something that supports their care in the short term.   Katie Vernoy  42:52 Exactly.   Curt Widhalm  42:54 There seems to be a lot of mixed evidence on the effectiveness of pure counselor type programs, with the United States in particular lagging behind a lot of other countries when it comes to the implementation of this, some of which is highlighted by some of the funding stuff that you're talking about within things like Medicaid, and we even see some of this going on and private insurance type programs where this stuff can't be implemented. What do you see is the difference between a successful incorporation of pure counsellors versus the ones that kind of fizzle out,   Jeff Kashou  43:32 it's going about it with a systematic approach. And that's I'd really emphasize either, you know, utilizing one of those toolkits, like I mentioned, the city of Philadelphia created, which is extremely comprehensive, and very much focused on the existing org and not necessarily on what peers need to be doing. But I think in the absence of that, it's really identifying just like with any big change that you want to make for a business, it's identifying, you know, what, you know, doing your SWOT analysis, and then looking at what is your measure? What's your success metric going to be? And how will you know you got there and then be flexible, to iterate and improve upon things as you move forward? Again, to that authenticity point, it's just like how we work with our, you know, our clientele, it's, you know, we don't expect perfect, but, you know, let's talk about what didn't go well, and let's improve upon it, we need to be able to do that authentically, as well. I think, unfortunately, in healthcare, and especially behavioral health care systems, where we're kind of the afterthought in terms of funding and attention and resources, you know, we just have always learned to make do and stay the course. And then on top of it, you have folks in power, who don't necessarily understand what we do, and they just kind of keep adding more and more stipulations and regulations and so on. And so it's also a matter of like, can you cut through some of that maybe sometimes even through the side door, like in California, we have our mhsaa funding that peer programs are oftentimes Funded there, which is very nice, and that they don't have to be capturing revenue through Medi Cal. This is through funding that has less requirements to it. But it's also pushing back and saying, do they really need to do this level of documentation? You know, so I do think it's a matter of like, thinking things through from bottom to top, like doing that assessment and really assessing yourself like, can we take this on, and being very brutally honest with yourself as a system of care, it's an exciting program, it's an exciting idea. It's one that can bring a lot of benefit. But you have to really understand what it is that you're bringing on. There's other companies that I've worked for that have said, you know, hey, we're, you know, one day down the line, we'll have peers and that way our current clientele can engage and give back, it'll be kind of a lower level service line. I think if you're thinking about it from that perspective, only, and really seeing the dollar signs as part of that image. It's not to say that, you know, money isn't the driver here, but it can't be that upfront. Otherwise, what you're doing is you're commoditizing, a service provider who is designed really to add value simply by them being there and engaging with clientele in that way, without necessarily generating dollars by increasing retention by increasing engagement in services. We know outcomes improve, when systems can demonstrate improve outcomes. Oftentimes, they're the ones that get the next grant are the ones that get the renewed contract, sometimes even a larger contract. So it's really, you know, credenza question in a short way. It's, it's all about approaching it systematically. And not just Yeah, that sounds really exciting. Let's do this.   Katie Vernoy  46:43 I think it has to be baked in, it can't be like, let's add this on to the program. It's almost like you have to build it from the ground up, to have these truly integrated into whatever the treatment program is.   Jeff Kashou  46:56 Yeah, there's kind of three different approaches that that Philadelphia tool toolbox outlines, just like that additive approach that I discussed, there's that selective approach. And then it's really taking on the one that has the greatest level of success is what's called a transformative approach, which a lot of systems are understandably nervous to take on. But to make a program successful, you have to be willing to transform things, sometimes top to bottom to make it work.   Katie Vernoy  47:21 Yeah, it's interesting, because the the program that I had, it was, it was baked in, it was like, my agency decided to do a wraparound program. And at the time, it was called an FSP. Program. And so as, you know, maybe you move clinicians into it, but it was like, here is how you do it. And it was baked in. So it wasn't like, Oh, you're already doing services, let's add this on. Functionally, maybe it looked that way. Because we had clients who then you know, like, followed their therapist, and then got these other services added on. But the program itself was well defined by LA County. And so there was discrete roles, there was training that was required. And like, especially with wraparound, there was like, a week long training where you, everybody went, and there were people from all different roles, and you went when you just first started and all the managers had to go to, so I had to go to it as well. And we would sit there for a full week and interact with other people in our same roles or in the in the peer or the you know, the all the different specialists roles. And so to me, it was, it didn't feel as chaotic because it was like it was completely structured. And it was baked in.   Jeff Kashou  48:31 Yeah, and a wraparound program is oftentimes very much set up for that, you know, they traditionally will have either bachelor's level providers as PSCs, or personal service coordinators, which truthfully appear would be phenomenal at which it sounds like that was the role that you had at your program. And because   Katie Vernoy  48:47 No we had we had bachelor's level folks, we had peers, we had a facilitator, and we had a therapist, so there was four or five people on the team.   Jeff Kashou  48:56 That's a tremendous program. You know, and we're the approach, you know, you've probably experienced this as well, the approach of a wraparound program is like whatever it takes, you know, this is a child, an individual, a family in such a challenging situation that we have to throw everything at this person that they need, and and some to get them to the, you know, to a better place.   Katie Vernoy  49:17 Yeah, yeah. I think it just is a good way to think about it as if you actually create a program from the ground up that includes these roles. I think that is stronger. I'm really glad that we're that we did this episode that we're talking about this related to our fixing mental health care in America. I know that it was mentioned in the RAND report, but I also recognize that one of the elements of this is it has been viewed. I think we did this in one of our more recent advocacy and workforce episodes as a way that we take away work from licensed credentialed mental health professionals and I really see this as an important adjunct a positive step forward. And I think we were able to really see that in the conversations that we had with our three guests today.   Curt Widhalm  50:08 And I mentioned a couple of times in the show, both this episode and recently about how little using supporting roles, like peer support specialists is actually taught as part of therapists education.   Katie Vernoy  50:22 Yeah.   Curt Widhalm  50:23 And there's a lot of emphasis on therapists education that's on what we as individuals can do to help with clients, but don't help us to look at the overall workforce system. And I'm echoing your happiness of this episode. And being able to amplify that really good. Mental, behavioral, emotional health treatments, takes a village. And it does take people from a lot of different viewpoints to really help create healing. And especially those people who have that lived experience and have a really great way of helping to help our clients interact with the system to be able to navigate it in ways that makes sense for them. So continuing to emphasize this will be part of our ongoing role in bringing mental health advocacy to the world. And we encourage you to do so as well.   Katie Vernoy  51:24 And for folks who were really interested in this, there are a lot of links in the shownotes that will help you with some of the some of these concepts, we've got the the guides and those things both onpattro and Jeff sent stuff over that are very helpful for folks who either want to be a peer support specialist or who want to implement those programs. So definitely feel free to reach out to us if can't find it on our show notes. But those things are just the really amazing resources that we were able to put down there.   Curt Widhalm  51:55 You can find those show notes over at MCSG podcast.com. And check out our social media out give us a like or a follow and schrinner Facebook group modern therapist group to further these discussions. And until next time, I'm Kurt Wilhelm with Katie Vernoy.   Katie Vernoy  52:11 Thanks again to our sponsor, trauma therapist network.   Curt Widhalm  52:15 If you've ever looked for a trauma therapist, you know it can be hard to discern who knows what and whether or not they're the right fit for you. There's so many types of trauma and so many different ways to heal. That's why Laura Reagan LCSW WC created trauma therapist network. Trauma therapist network therapist profiles include the types of traumas specialized in population served therapy methods used, making it easier for potential clients to find the right therapist who can help them. Network is more than a directory though its community. All members are invited to attend community meetings to connect consults, and network with colleagues around the country.   Katie Vernoy  52:52 Join the growing community of trauma therapists and get 20% off your first month using the promo code Mt. SG 20 at Trauma therapist network.com Once again that's capital MTS G the number 20 at Trauma therapist network.com   Announcer  53:09 Thank you for listening to the Modern Therapist Survival Guide. Learn more about who we are and what we do at MTSGpodcast.com. You can also join us on Facebook and Twitter. And please don't forget to subscribe so you don't miss any of our episodes.

The Art Of Entrepreneurship
Are My Goals Big Enough?

The Art Of Entrepreneurship

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 6:48


Welcome to another Monday episode of Big Questions, Short Answers! IMO, the goals you set should make you uncomfortable, and maybe even scare you. So today, we're discussing how I found out that mine weren't big enough, and how to examine yours. Listen in as I share how I went from thinking small and setting goals just within an arm's reach to really pushing myself, and the early seeds that planted a lot of growth—not just for me, but for my company, Accelity.  Finally, at the end of the episode, we are going to discuss auditing who is in your circle and why that matters in relation to setting huge goals. Growth can be uncomfortable, but the results are also so incredibly rewarding. If you want more tips on how to grow via setting goals, this episode is for you!  Episode Highlights: 00:50 Your goals should make you uncomfortable, and they should scare you.  2:45 It's been easy to lose sight of those big goals while we're surviving these past couple of years, but my mind is opening up to new things.  4:02 I think a lot of people take pleasure in other people's misery. Comparing yourself to make sure you're doing better doesn't make you any better.  4:22 The people that I spend time with now are big thinkers, and they're action takers.  4:48 They challenge me, they don't put up with my crap, and they make me think larger.  Contact:  Jackie Hermes https://www.linkedin.com/in/thejackiehermes/ (LinkedIn) https://www.instagram.com/thejackiehermes/ (Instagram) https://www.tiktok.com/@jackie.hermes? (TikTok) https://www.jackiehermes.com/ (Website)

More Than a Song - Discovering the Truth of Scripture Hidden in Today's Popular Christian Music

Does the idea of trembling before the Lord inspire you or make you feel uncomfortable? Lauren Daigle's song "Tremble" inspired me to explore where people are described as trembling before the Lord. Spoiler alert: It should inspire you. Join me as we examine a couple of places in Scripture where we see why and how we should tremble before the Lord. In this episode, I discuss: Taking a B.I.T.E. out of Scripture - this week's Bible Interaction Tool Exercises include: Explore a topic Read in context Read and keep on reading Repetition Follow the cross-reference Compare and contrast Make a list Examine the text in various translations Complete a word study The 30 Day Music Challenge Getting a Scripture starting point by typing in a keyword into BibleHub.com Understanding what the text actually says before moving to what it means before moving to what it means for me Finding the instruction to "serve the Lord with fear, and rejoice with trembling" - Psalm 2:11 Heading back to 1 Corinthians (where we were studying last week in Episode 402) - 1 Corinthians 2:3 How the Greco-Roman world of the Corinthian church placed a high value on professional orators who could persuade the audience through entertaining instruction - 1 Corinthians 1:22 How the gospel was silly to the Greeks and horrifying to the Jews - 1 Corinthians 1:23 Looking at the founding of the Corinthian church in Acts 18 Paul's chosen preaching approach in Corinth - 1 Corinthians 2:1-5 Comparing and contrasting what the audience expected with what Paul delivered and why Paul's fear and trembling were not a tactic; instead, they were a reflection of his deep-seated understanding of how weak and small he really is Enjoy the official live music video of our inspiration song below. More Than a Song Playlist Additional Resources Lyrics - NewReleaseToday.com ESV Study Bible - Amazon Paid Link Overview of 1 Corinthians - BibleProject.com This Week's Challenge Read and meditate on Psalm 2 and let it launch you back into 1 Corinthians. Ponder the cultural surroundings of the Corinthians. Contrast your observations with our culture today as you move into what the truths of this text might mean for you today. In your prayer time this week, set aside every thought except that of Christ and Him crucified and see how that may change the way you think. And the next time you enter into the glorious presence of God, don't boast and don't beg, just worship and tremble.

Gospel Tangents Podcast
*Comparing Mormons & Pentecostals (Part 8 of 8)

Gospel Tangents Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 0:43


Dr. Christopher Thomas of the Pentecostal Theological Seminary discusses similarities and differences with Mormon Culture. We also learn about the structure of the various Pentecostal Churches. Chris:  Well, the version of Pentecostalism I grew up in is the Holiness tradition. And there were real clear kind of dress mores. I mean, the women seem to […] The post *Comparing Mormons & Pentecostals (Part 8 of 8) appeared first on Gospel Tangents.

Rock Springs Church
Overcoming an Ungrateful Spirit (Audio)

Rock Springs Church

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2021


Signs of Ingratitude: 1. We rarely EXPRESS thanks to God and others. 2. We expect people to respond to our needs IMMEDIATELY. 3. We are constantly COMPARING. 4. We are constantly COMPLAINING. 5. We give very LITTLE back.   Motivation for Being...

Single To Soulmate Podcast with Johnny and Lara Fernandez
S5EP14: Comparing How Men and Women Think About Sex

Single To Soulmate Podcast with Johnny and Lara Fernandez

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2021 27:20


You probably have noticed this or had this thought. Men think about sex way too much! Well, you might be right. Learn more about why you might notice this in this episode.   WHAT YOU WILL LEARN: - Why men seem to think about sex a lot - How women think about sex - Why men and women approach sex differently READY TO MAKE A DRAMATIC CHANGE IN YOUR LOVE LIFE? If you are ready to take action and control over your love life to find the man of your dreams go to http://bit.ly/SingleToSoulmate-Call to book a FREE call with one of our Love Breakthrough Specialists to assess exactly what's been holding you back in love, what is it you REALLY want, and how to get there as quickly as possible. Want to know your Love Pattern? After over 15 years of helping women find their soulmate, we have identified 5 different Love Patterns, each with different characteristics that keep you from finding true love. You can find what your love pattern is and how to overcome it by taking our quiz. Just go to http://bit.ly/STS-LovePatternQuiz    ----   Did you enjoy this episode? If so, please share it with a friend and let us know by leaving a review. To get notified when a new episode comes out, subscribe to the show on your favorite platform.

Come Let Us Reason Podcast
Science and Evidence for God: A Finely Tuned Universe (Part 2)

Come Let Us Reason Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2021


Science and Evidence for God: A Finely Tuned Universe (Part 2) Atheists and others have argued that as scientific knowledge increases, our belief on God will seem more and more silly. They say we simply believe in a "God of the gaps." However, one of the startling results of the modern scientific enterprise is just the reverse: the more we understand our universe, the more we need God as creator to explain it. This class is part of a full series of lectures entitled "Christianity and Science: Tackling the Issues of the 21st Century." To find out more, visit the comereason.org web site. Part 2 of 2

Wade Keller Pro Wrestling Podcast
WKPWP Interview Classic (5 Yrs Ago): Keller talks with Sean "X-Pac" Waltman comparing Vince and Hunter philosophies, Reigns heel potential

Wade Keller Pro Wrestling Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2021 144:46


PWTorch editor Wade Keller presents an Interview Classic from five years ago (11-20-2016). Wade interviews Sean “X-Pac” Waltman, who talks about his new weekly talk show called “X-Pac 1-2-360” on Afterbuzz TV, plus callers chime in to get his thoughts on Stephanie McMahon as a central figure on WWE TV, Survivor Series, the influence behind the scenes of Road Dogg these days, his Mount Rushmore of pro wrestling, and more. Then, in the previously VIP-exclusive portion, Sean talks about the differing philosophies of Vince McMahon and Triple H, whether Roman Reigns should turn heel, how Seth Rollins's babyface turn was bungled, the Zeb Colter WrestleMania promo that Donald Trump praised, have fans changed over the years, thoughts on TNA's ownership battle including blunt comments regarding Dixie Carter, and more.

Dr Reality - Dave Champion
Ep 1069 – Comparing Ivermectin & Pfizer’s New COVID Treatment Pill. SURPRISE!

Dr Reality - Dave Champion

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2021 13:00


Dr Reality explains the similarities and differences between Paxlovid (Pfizer's new COVID treatment drug) and Ivermectin. The similarity will shock you! Dave's books are at https://drreality.news Study Links: https://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/acsptsci.0c00108# https://pubs.rsc.org/en/content/articlehtml/2021/cp/d1cp02967c https://www.nature.com/articles/s42003-020-01577-x https://pubs.rsc.org/en/content/articlehtml/2020/ra/d0ra06379g https://www.nice.org.uk/bnf-uk-only https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7996102/ https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fmicb.2020.592908/full

Coders Campus Podcast
EP53 - Intro to Streams in Java

Coders Campus Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 43:44


GitHub link here: https://github.com/tp02ga/FunWithStreams In this episode we'll talk about: What are streams and why you should care about them Comparing a simple Stream example to a Looping example Intermediate vs Terminal operations

Zone Podcasts
JMart and Ramon 11-19-21 Hour Two: Comparing Current Titans Squad to Previous Successful Teams, Texans-Titans History

Zone Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 35:43


Rhett draws a parallel between a recent “Midweek Motivation” with Inky Johnson and how the Titans have built their culture under Amy Adams Strunk/Jon Robinson/Mike Vrabel. Rhett also compares this team to previous successful Titans squads and provides context to the Texans-Titans rivalry.

Hoge and Jahns from WGN Radio 720
Bears coaching candidates, comparing Justin Fields & Lamar Jackson, 3 Big Questions & more with Jeff Zrebiec & Kevin Fishbain

Hoge and Jahns from WGN Radio 720

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 69:41


It's Ravens at Bears and Lamar Jackson at Justin Fields' Soldier Field this weekend. Is the Bears defense up to the challenge? Is Justin Fields' play style anything like Lamar Jackson's? Jeff Zrebiec, Ravens writer for the Athletic joins the pod for some quality Baltimore perspective, Pernell McPhee memories and more before Kevin Fishbain stops by for a little Bears coaching candidate talk, 3 Big Questions and Bold Predictions ahead of week 11. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Your Financial Pharmacist
YFP 230: 5 Steps to Get Ready for a Home Purchase

Your Financial Pharmacist

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 39:54


Tony Umholtz talks through five steps for getting ready for a home purchase.  Key Points From This Episode Why now is a good time to buy a home. Where you can find out the average interest rates in the home loan industry. Tony explains what discount points are and why you need to understand them.  The importance of reading the fine print.  Know your budget! How lenders determine how much they are going to lend. What the 28/36 rule is.  Tony runs through the pros and cons of a 20% down payment.  How savvy investors look at returns.  Comparing pre-approval and pre-qualification.  The value of a credit report. How lenders work out your credit score, and why this differs from what you will see if you use a monitoring service.  Examples of the different types of lenders that exist.  Information that you will need to provide to the lender you choose once you have a property under contract.  Links Mentioned in Today's Episode Learn More About IBERIABANK/First Horizon's Pharmacist Home Loan and Start the Pre-Approval Process YFP Planning: Financial Planning for Pharmacists 5 Steps to Getting a Home Loan YFP 216: Common Credit Blunders to Avoid When Buying a Home Freddie Mac Fannie Mae  Your Financial Pharmacist Disclaimer and Disclosures

Big Kat Lounge
Social Anxiety Talks with Mark Metry

Big Kat Lounge

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 32:14


Today's guest has been a Forbes featured TEDx speaker, host of a global top 100 podcast, bestselling author, documentary series cast member, who is helping the world effectively manage social anxiety. He takes his personal life and his habits very seriously. People don't see results in their life because they aren't consistent. The human brain is so interesting because it can normalize anything. When you do the same stuff everyday you feel stuck. Certain habits like meditation teaches our brains how to rewire our brain cells to give us that boosted confidence. In 2017 Mark Metry was in a spot in his life where he didn't know what to do. Some of his biggest realizations came when he was having 1 on 1 honest conversations. You look at your goals and you don't compare yourself to anyone negatively. Comparing yourself to other people can be a great thing if done correctly. Some key nuggets that really hit home were the fact that Mark doesn't go on social media before he posts, which helps tremendously as you can go down a rabbit hole if you start scrolling and consuming toxic information. I recently enrolled in Mark's Social Anxiety program and I believe it's something that we all need in our lives: markmetry.com/program This was a great episode where we touched upon mental health, social anxiety, systems, his book & programs, how to build confidence and much more. When you smile in the moment, it gives you more control. If you or your company is interested in Mark speaking at any of your events, conferences, please reach out and text him at 508-925-0261. To follow Mark Metry's journey head to his website- markmetry.com or email him at markmetry722@gmail.com. Subscribe to all Big Kat Lounge Podcast episodes and please leave us a review to help us grow to international status. #screwbeingshy #mentalhealth #wellness #podcaster #forbes #speaker #tedx #helpingothers #support #authors #anxiety #bigkatlounge --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

The Shamrock: A show about the Notre Dame Fighting Irish
Guest: Tom Luginbill; comparing Notre Dame to other top programs

The Shamrock: A show about the Notre Dame Fighting Irish

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 47:00


Pete Sampson and Matt Fortuna are joined by ESPN/ABC's Tom Luginbill to discuss his impressions of the Irish last weekend against Virginia. Plus, can Notre Dame close the gap on the other top programs? And Tom's love for Joe Montana! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Lions on Leashes
Ep. 33 - Katherine Wintsch, CEO + Founder, The Mom Complex & Author, Slay Like A Mother

Lions on Leashes

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 39:21


Katherine Wintsch is the founder and CEO of The Mom Complex and author of Slay Like A Mother. Katherine helps the largest companies in the world such as Walmart, Johnson & Johnson and Airbnb better support their mom customers and employees. In her latest venture, Katherine combines 10+ years of groundbreaking research with her own personal journey in her popular book Slay Like a Mother – which Parade magazine recently named one of the “top 10 life-changing self-help books of the year.” Katherine's sought-after research has been featured by The Today Show, The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal and Working Mother magazine. She shares her journey to eliminating self-doubt that then inspired her to write Slay Like A Mother. What We Also Talk About: - Living with the dragon of self-doubt - Why are we not talking about the damn doubt? - When meeting your high expectations is the worst thing you can do - External pressure and ques proving you're doing a good job - The external chaos is always going to exist - Why women carry that baggage - "I don't know what I'm doing" - Comparing your worse to others at their best - Entrepreneurial goal doesn't have to mean growth Resources: SlayLikeAMother.com - Order your copy today! Sign up for the Slay Like a Mother Newsletter, here! Momcomplex.com IG: @slaylikeamother Watch Katherine's Ted Talk: Unmasking Motherhood

Under Center Podcast
Teven Jenkins returns from injury, evaluating the rest of the Bears season

Under Center Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 37:12


Bears rookie Teven Jenkins returns to practice as the second half of the season is set to begin. The entire Under Center crew of Ken Davis, Adam Hoge, Eric Strobel, and Alex Shapiro discuss Jenkins' return to the Bears and what are the expectations for him and they discuss the second half of the season and the worst and best case scenarios for the Bears. Later on, the crew does some comparing between Lamar Jackson and Justin Fields and sees if Justin can be a future MVP as well.(1:36) - Expectations for Teven Jenkins as he returns from injury(6:30) - Will Jenkin's return for the Bears to shuffle the offensive line?(12:00) - How will the Bears evaluate the second half of the season and the job done by Matt Nagy and Ryan Pace(20:30) - Worst case scenarios for the Bears(26:00) - Comparing and contrasting Lamar Jackson and Justin FieldsSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Turmeric and Tequila
119. Knowing Your Self Worth & Putting A Price On It

Turmeric and Tequila

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 51:19


“Know your worth. People always act like they're doing more for you than you're doing for them.” – Kanye West I am so excited to welcome Lindsay Simonds to the T&T mic! Lindsay is a fellow Colorado native and all things non-profit pro! Lindsay founded LSC (Lindsay Simonds Consulting) in 2017 and is a senior, non-profit, fundraising and management professional with a decade of experience partnering with organizations for transformational change. Having raised over $1 billion philanthropic dollars Lindsay's mission and the message are just beginning. Today we discuss Lindsay's journey navigating the nonprofit world where investing and spending are often misunderstood. Shouldn't we do it all for free if for charity? No. We explain why AND how this awareness of self-worth translates into all you do, in every arena (personally and professionally). Dialing into your self-worth, measured by money or time, can be a tricky process. It's takes time, awareness, trail, and error to really dial into your own valuation point. Then there are the conversations around price point phycology and your own narrative around money. We are here to unpack it all with you! If you are an emerging or experienced entrepreneur (or thinking about taking the leap), this conversation is for you! Developing self-worth and putting a price on it is not easy, but very necessary. Enjoy this convo and put some respect on the checks you will continue to write to yourself… #youreworthit :)   Highlights: Giving and making money in the nonprofit space. Self-awareness, self-worth, growth. Money management and identifying our own narrative around money. How to ask for money and how to know what you deserve. Comparing the non-profit and for-profit work spaces. Monetizing the scares, battles, time, and energy. Taking the leap from the corporate world to the entrepreneurial one. Priorities and priority shifts. Maturity, security, and taking risks.   Lindsay Simonds: Lindsay Simonds founded LSC (Lindsay Simonds Consulting) in 2017 after her role as Vice President at CCS, a leading global fundraising consulting and management firm providing services including feasibility studies, capital campaigns, prospect research, public relations and case developments. She is a senior, nonprofit, fundraising and management professional with a decade of experience partnering with organizations for transformational change. Having raised over $1 billion philanthropic, she is an integral lead in expanding and deepening donor relationships, philanthropic strategies, and development operations. With a rich career and diverse portfolio of experiences and expertise, she is a solutions-based thinker and conscious communicator. With an eye for major gifts strategy, structures of influence, community engagement, project management, compelling storytelling, and brand evangelism, Lindsay brings her clients a comprehensive fundraising knowledge. A graduate of the University of Denver, Lindsay majored in International Studies at the Joseph Korbel School of International Studies with an emphasis on gender issues, conflict resolution and economics. She minored in Spanish and is conversationally fluent. She has a deep love for culture and people – she has traveled to over 23 countries (and counting!).  She currently lives in San Francisco where she is an active volunteer and board member at both the Sanford Institute of Philanthropy at John F. Kennedy University and Imagine Bus Project. In her free time, she teaches yoga and practices Reiki, and is the founding chairwoman for Laughing Lotus yoga studio's Love Saves the Day – a nonprofit dedicated to increasing access to yoga for all. A member of the National Professional Women's Alliance, she also leads a small women's group in San Francisco. linkedin.com/in/lindsaysimonds   About LSC: Lindsay Simonds Consulting is a nonprofit fundraising and management firm with over two decades of experience partnering with organizations for transformational change. Having raised over $1 billion philanthropic dollars, LSC an integral lead in expanding and deepening donor investments and major gifts campaigns. With a rich career and diverse portfolio of experiences and expertise, LSC is a solutions-based firm calling on metrics-driven analysis, conscious communication and natural creativity. With an eye for structures of influence, donor engagement, project management, compelling storytelling, brand evangelism and productivity, LSC brings all clients a comprehensive fundraising expertise.   Areas of Specialty: Cultivating, securing and stewarding leadership and major gifts ranging from $10K to $250M Designing and directing major fundraising campaigns Coaching, training and managing fundraising officers Fundraising training and workshop facilitation Orchestrating fundraising audits and assessments Conducting feasibility studies and relationship-mapping / 360 plans Developing and managing boards and volunteers Shaping institutional advancement programs Guiding corporate partnership initiatives Building event sponsorships and auctions donations Planning and managing employee-giving Benchmarking and crafting retail / cause-marketing campaigns   LOCATION: San Francisco / Bay Area, Greater Los Angeles, Denver CONTACT: info@ lindsaysimondsconsulting.com PODCAST: Creating Community for Good We are all in this together. Welcome to Creating Community for Good, a podcast dedicated to philanthropy: the love of humankind. Here we will band together across disciplines within the ecosystem of the nonprofit sector to illuminate perspectives, decode motivations, and leverage strategies in the business of generosity. On this show, your host, Lindsay Simonds, invites you to a friendly conversation about contributing to good. With this, we will ultimately increase empathy, create stronger bonds and make more impact on mission-driven work. Whether you are a nonprofit executive, a legacy donor, a major gifts fundraiser, a crowdsource hacker, program director, impact investor, corporate partner or beneficiary, this space is for all of us to inform, inspire and evolve.   Season 1 is complete! Season 2 is in production now. Stay tuned for future episodes to come in the fall. Be sure to check out the summer blog and live chats on clubhouse Wednesdays at 9am Mountain Time every other week. More info on Linkedin and IG. Follow me at @creatingcommunityforgood.      Connect with T&T: IG: @TurmericTequila Facebook: @TurmericAndTequila Website: www.TurmericAndTequila.com   Host: Kristen Olson IG: @Madonnashero Tik Tok: @Madonnashero Email: Info@KOAlliance.com Website: www.KOAlliance.com    

Talking Beats with Daniel Lelchuk
Ep. 120: Around the World in 80 Books with David Damrosch

Talking Beats with Daniel Lelchuk

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 46:29


"We're living in a time of shrinking borders and a rise of ethnonationalism. Literature is a privileged means of accessing other parts of the world and other peoples." World literature expert David Damrosch is here, armed with his new book Around the World in 80 Books. With the lofty goal of bringing the reader on an entire world tour through 80 literary works, Damrosch creates many hurdles through which he must jump. First off, how does one go about compiling such a list? How does one judge quality of works from far away places and times? How can great literature even exist in a world of cancellations and trigger warnings? This and much more is explored in the wide-ranging conversation. Support Talking Beats. David Damrosch is Ernest Bernbaum Professor of Literature and Chair of the Department of Comparative Literature at Harvard University. He is a past president of the American Comparative Literature Association, and is the founder of the Institute for World Literature (www.iwl.fas.harvard.edu). He was trained at Yale and then taught at Columbia from 1980 until he moved to Harvard in 2009. He has written widely on issues in comparative and world literature, and is the author of The Narrative Covenant: Transformations of Genre in the Growth of Biblical Literature (1987), We Scholars: Changing the Culture of the University (1995), Meetings of the Mind (2000), What Is World Literature? (2003), The Buried Book: The Loss and Rediscovery of the Great Epic of Gilgamesh (2007), How to Read World Literature (2009, 2017), Comparing the Literatures: Literary Studies in a Global Age (2020), and Around the World in 80 Books (2021). He is the founding general editor of the six-volume Longman Anthology of World Literature (2004, 2009) and of The Longman Anthology of British Literature (4th ed. 2009), and editor of Teaching World Literature (2009) and of World Literature in Theory (2014). Co-edited works include The Routledge Companion to World Literature (2d ed. 2022), Approaches to Teaching the Works of Orhan Pamuk (2017), Futures of Comparative Literature: ACLA State of the Discipline Report (2017), Crime Fiction as World Literature (2016), and The Princeton Sourcebook in Comparative Literature (2009). His translation of Georges Ngal's Giambatista Viko, ou le viol du discours africain is forthcoming from the Modern Language Association in 2022. He has lectured in some fifty countries around the world, and his work has been translated into an eclectic variety of languages, including Arabic, Chinese, German, Hungarian, Japanese, Polish, Spanish, Turkish, and Vietnamese.

Toucher & Rich
Ted Johnson In-Studio // Grading Belichick & McDaniels // 2021 Patriots Comparisons To 2001 Patriots - 11/16 (Hour 2)

Toucher & Rich

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 43:06


(00:00) 3x Super Bowl champion Ted Johnson joins Toucher & Rich in-studio for his weekly hour long segment. Ted shares his thoughts on Sunday's 57-7 Patriots win against the Cleveland Browns. (14:14) Ted doesn't believe Bill Belichick has had a good season and Josh McDaniels has outshined the head coach. (30:14) Patriots fans continue to be annoyed by Fred's stance on the Patriots, which is that they're a playoff team. Ted Johnson talks about the time he played against Michael Vick and the Atlanta Falcons. Comparing the 2021 Patriots to the 2001 Super Bowl champion Patriots. Watch Toucher & Rich every morning on Twitch! Watch them live or whenever you want: Twitch.tv/thesportshub

The Catfish on Ice Podcast
Catfish On Ice: S2 EP.80

The Catfish on Ice Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 93:04


The "Winging It" episode! EPISODE 80: -Are the Preds selling us some fool's gold? -Comparing this strong start to previous seasons -Roman Josi is playing on a MVP level -Kyle Perkins joins for another edition of Perk's Picks -Sidney Crosby above the law? Presented by DraftKings, promo code THPN at sign-up

Data Skeptic
Comparing Time Series with HCTSA

Data Skeptic

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 42:51


Today we are joined again by Ben Fulcher, leader of the Dynamics and Neural Systems Group at the University of Sydney in Australia, to talk about hctsa, a software package for running highly comparative time-series analysis.

The A Game Podcast: Real Estate Investing For Entrepreneurs
Making Millions in Airbnb, Cryptocurrencies & Monetizing Social Media | Austin Rutherford

The A Game Podcast: Real Estate Investing For Entrepreneurs

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 63:08


Join Nick Lamagna on The A Game Podcast with guest real estate investor, cryptocurrency expert and social media sensation and founder of, "Elevate Life," Austin Rutherford!  Austin Is the author of, "From Valet To Millionaire," and is a powerhouse entrepreneur making millions and learning lifetimes of valuable lessons all before turning 30!  He discusses in this episode the benefits of adding buy and hold long and short term rentals to his real estate investing portfolio.  Along with finding ways to grow and monetize a massive social media following on such platforms as Instagram and TikTok he has also become a go to source for investing in cryptocurrencies such as bitcoin!  Austin shares tons of direct knowledge and answers you can implement right away in this episode on how to make smart decisions and reduce risk in real estate, cryptocurrency and strategy to grow and monetize your social media! Check the show notes to find all the ways to connect with Austin and make sure to contact Nick to start getting into some real estate deals together! Topics this episode include: ✅ Three things that can make you money in today's world ✅ Raising money if you have no experience ✅ How to setup payments with your contractor to not get screwed ✅ Should you be flipping or holding your properties? ✅ What is the #1 reasons investors go bankrupt ✅ How to analyze a property and market for a short term rental ✅ How to monetize your social media ✅ Why bitcoin and Cryptocurrency is an opportunity of a lifetime ✅ Comparing a real estate deal to a cryptocurrency trade Need to borrow money for Real Estate?  Email Morse@nationwidebcg.com and tell her The A Game Podcast sent you or look under affiliates by clicking here   --- Connect with Austin on: https://theaustinrutherford.com/ Austin Rutherford on Instagram Austin Rutherford on Facebook Austin Rutherford on LinkedIn Austin Rutherford on Twitter Austin Rutherford on Youtube Austin Rutherford on TikTok --- Connect with Nick Lamagna www.NickNickNick.com Click Here for all social media links and podcast options Free Checklist On How To Add Value To Your Buyers Like what you hear? Leave a rating & review by clicking here     

Ask Me How I Know: Multifamily Investor Stories of Struggle to Success

Do you know what your destination is? Do you know where you are headed?  The decisions we make in life are ways of adapting to what life has put in front of us. With most decisions, it brings a bundle of emotions especially when it involves the whole family.  But you can't compare your decisions or your determined destination with anyone! And you can't get there unless you know where you're going.  Join me today as I discuss the making of decisions and comparing with me, my yesterday.To find out more about partnering or investing in a multifamily deal schedule a call here https://calendly.com/threekeysinvestments/get-acquainted-callDownload a free e-book on Why Invest in Multifamily at ThreeKeysInvestments.comPlease RSS: Review, Subscribe, Share!Support the show (and my reading addiction)! https://www.buymeacoffee.com/AskMeHowIKnow

The Motivated Mind
5 Hacks To Stop Comparing Yourself

The Motivated Mind

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 20:44


How many times do you open Facebook or Instagram and immediately compare yourself? In today's world it can be easy to do so. This toxic cycle has many stuck in a state of unhappiness, where the daily habit is to focus on the things that we don't have rather than the things that we do. In this episode, I discuss five hacks that you can implement today to stop comparing yourself. In episode #164 we cover: Reframing your perspective Accepting your position Living intentionally Comparing with yourself Practicing gratitude Want access to subscriber-only episodes, Q&A, and ad-free listening? Become a subscriber Follow me on social for more inspiration: Instagram Facebook TikTok Twitter Join the private Facebook Group: Motivated Minds Start setting goals and achieving them: Schedule a one-on-one session Want to receive weekly episode recaps/detailed show notes and practical tips? Sign up for my free weekly newsletter Want to be featured in a future episode? Leave a review here (even one sentence helps) Sponsors mentioned in this episode: HashDash Music by: Blaize Trulson

The Retrospectors
On This Day: The (Lady) Pirates of the Carribbean

The Retrospectors

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 10:25


Anne Bonny and Mary Read - the most notorious women to swashbuckle and plunder in the ‘golden age of piracy' - were captured near Jamaica by pirate-hunter Jonathan Barnet on 8th November, 1720.Disguised as men for most of their careers, they sailed (and cavorted) with Pirate Captain ‘Calico Jack'. But, when their crimes came to trial, they both avoided being sentenced to death by ‘pleading the belly'.In this episode, Arion, Rebecca and Olly speculate about how Bonny and Read were able to pass as men so convincingly; explain how they met in the ‘pirate republic' of Nassau; and reveal why ‘Robinson Crusoe' author Daniel Defoe may just be responsible for the enduring ‘Reader's Wives' version of Bonny and Read's friendship...CONTENT WARNING: reference to rapeFurther Reading:• ‘Comparing the Female Pirates Anne Bonny and Mary Read' (ThoughtCo, 2018): https://www.thoughtco.com/facts-about-anne-bonny-mary-read-2136281• ‘How Anne Bonny and Mary Read Changed The Face Of Female Piracy' (All That's Interesting, 2018):https://allthatsinteresting.com/anne-bonny-mary-read• ‘Behind the myth of a breast-baring pirate' (BBC Reel, 2019): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vBVeQwhcjZgFor bonus material and to support the show, visit Patreon.com/RetrospectorsWe'll be back tomorrow! Follow us wherever you get your podcasts: podfollow.com/RetrospectorsThe Retrospectors are Olly Mann, Rebecca Messina & Arion McNicoll, with Matt Hill.Theme Music: Pass The Peas. Announcer: Bob Ravelli. Graphic Design: Terry Saunders. Edit Producer: Emma Corsham.Copyright: Rethink Audio / Olly Mann 2021. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.