Podcasts about Alfred Hitchcock

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English filmmaker

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  • 3,269EPISODES
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  • Oct 20, 2021LATEST
Alfred Hitchcock

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Best podcasts about Alfred Hitchcock

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Latest podcast episodes about Alfred Hitchcock

Deadtime Stories
Chapter 74: Mother Knows Best (Part Two)

Deadtime Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 31:48


Whelp we're still stuck in Plainfield and little Eddie Gein's all grown up now. Trust me you do not want to miss the exciting conclusion to his story. Much like Alfred Hitchcock's Psycho shocked the audience, you might be surprised by today's ending. I know I was shocked when I was researching it!Written and narrated by Schuyler Fastenau and executive produced by Daniel Jones. Additional voices by Tamara Perry, Jordan Katcher, Janette Zosche, Taylor Shurte, Jeremy Staple, Daniel Jones, and Gabriel Rivers. Cover artwork by Catherine Fastenau. Theme music by Tracy Zales. Editing and sound design by Brian Campbell.Follow us on:Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/OGDeadtimeInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/theoriginaldeadtimestories/Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/DeadtimeStoriesPodcast/Twitter: https://twitter.com/DeadtimeThe

Genre Grinder
Episode 25: Year in Horror: 1960 feat. Patrick Ripoll of Tracks of the Damned (part 1 of 2)

Genre Grinder

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 90:47


PSYCHOPATHS! PEEPING TOMS! CRUMBLING HOUSES! EYELESS FACES! CITIES OF THE DEAD! LITERAL HELL!   Happy Halloween! It's time to settle some schoolyard arguments and decide once and for all the most incredible year in horror cinema history. Our world's greatest scientists, historians, and statisticians have compiled all the pertinent data and come to the following conclusion: 1960 was the best year for horror movies. Gabe and returning guest Patrick Ripoll of Tracks of the Damned parsed 32 of the year's genre releases and chose six to discuss at length – Georges Franju's Eyes without a Face, Michal Powell's Peeping Tom, Roger Corman's (Fall of the) House of Usher, Nobuo Nakagawa's Jigoku, Mario Bava's Black Sunday, and John Llewellyn Moxey's City of the Dead. Alfred Hitchcock's Psycho also comes up constantly, but not at length, because it's one of the most popular movies ever made.   This didn't end up being as long as some of Gabe & Patrick's other list episodes, but the discussion still went long, so the three-hour episode has been split into two Fun-Sized treats (instead of three or four, so don't worry).   00:00 – Intro: Why 1960? and a brief history of horror movie booms 17:40 – Eyes without a Face 44:46 – Peeping Tom 1:05:57 – (Fall of the) House of Usher   Here's the complete Letterboxd list that we were originally working from: https://letterboxd.com/gabepowers/list/1960s-horror-movies/

Canceled Too Soon
Canceled Too Soon #221 - Dark Intruder (aka The Black Cloak)

Canceled Too Soon

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 39:44


Alfred Hitchcock's production company made a supernatural detective TV series starring Leslie Nielsen in a Lovecraftian mystery that plays a lot like the movie MALIGNANT?! Oh, we gotta find out if that was CANCELED TOO SOON. William Bibbiani and Witney Seibold explore the failed television pilot DARK INTRUDER, aka THE BLACK CLOAK, for this year's SCARYTOBER!  Subscribe on Patreon at www.patreon.com/criticallyacclaimednetwork for exclusive content and exciting rewards, like bonus episodes, commentary tracks and much, much more! And visit our TeePublic page to buy shirts, mugs and other exciting merchandise!  And if you want soap, be sure to check out M. Lopes da Silva's Etsy store: SaltCatSoap! Follow us on Twitter at @CriticAcclaim, join the official Fan Club on Facebook, follow Bibbs at @WilliamBibbiani and follow Witney at @WitneySeibold, and head on over to www.criticallyacclaimed.net for all their podcasts, reviews and more!  And don't forget to email us at letters@criticallyacclaimed.net, so we can read your correspondence and answer your questions in a future episode! And check out our Amazon Wish List to send us more exciting one season wonders that we can review on the show! Support the show: https://www.patreon.com//criticallyacclaimednetwork See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Murder Behind The Movie's Podcast

Our spooky season continues this week with the film The Birds! Find out whats true about this killer birds. Come find out where the legendary director Alfred Hitchcock got the idea for the movie! 

The Spooky Succubus-Cast

This week, it's our triumphant return for our 2nd Season & our 50th episode! To celebrate, we are taking on a whale of a film: Hitchcock's near perfectly made 1954 classique, Rear Window! Is this movie an extraordinary feat of technical filmmaking? Yes! Does misogynist shit man Alfred Hitchcock belong in a stinky garbage can covered in old banana peels? Also yes! Join us and we'll cover it all.

Nerdy Legion Podcast Network
BRIGHT SIDE HOME THEATER:

Nerdy Legion Podcast Network

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 79:41


What is HDR?Are there any clear examples of HDR vs SDR?How is the DTSX sound?All great questions. DJ does a deep dive into Alfred Hitchcock's Psycho from 1960 in 4K and has some answers to all of that and more!  Push play and to hear about one of the finest movies ever made.  PODCAST Time StampsPsycho 4K Review - 1:59Scene Reviews- 6:24To Help Support the Podcast you can sign up for a Monthly Donation HERE to become a Patreon Member

Fandom Podcast Network
Good Evening An Alfred Hitchcock Podcast Episode 67: AHP: One More Mile to Go

Fandom Podcast Network

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 19:21


Good Evening An Alfred Hitchcock Podcast Episode 67: AHP: One More Mile to Go In this episode of Good Evening: An Alfred Hitchcock Podcast, your hosts Brandon-Shea Mutala, Tom Caldwell, and Chris Haigh continue their discussions on the episodes of Alfred Hitchcock Presents directed by Hitch. Today's episode: One More Mile to Go Hosts: Brandon-Shea Mutala, Tom Caldwell, and Chris Haigh Find us: Twitter: @goodeveningpod @brandonmutala @higher_boy @TomCaldwell3000 Facebook: Good Evening: An Alfred Hitchcock Podcast Email: goodeveningpodcast@hotmail.com And, as always, Good Evening is a proud member of the Fandom Podcast Network. @fanpodnetwork Thanks to our Associate Producer, Pat McFadden, our Man Who Knows Exactly Enough. Thanks so much to Jason Cullimore for our awesome theme song! http://www.jasoncullimore.com https://soundcloud.com/jason-cullimore https://www.instagram.com/jasoncullimoreartist/ - fpnet.podbean.com - FPNet on Podbean app - Fandom Podcast Network on: Apple Podcasts / Stitcher / Podbean / Google Play / Spotify / Iheartradio - Facebook: Fandom Podcast Network - Email: fandompodcastnetwork@gmail.com - Instagram: FandomPodcastNetwork  - Twitter: @fanpodnetwork Please help support the Fandom Podcast Network through reviews on Apple Podcasts / iTunes and our Fandom Podcast Network Store on Tee Public.  The FANDOM PODCAST NETWORK is now on YouTube! Join us! Link: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCib-kbKfAagsxrWlJU01Rcg PLEASE SUBCRIBE to our YouTube channel to receive notifications of new podcast episodes and live events. Fandom Podcast Network Tee Public Store: Get Your Fandom Podcast Network and Couch Potato Theater Merchandise on Tee Public! Please visit our TeePublic store where you can help support the Fandom Podcast Network while wearing your Couch Potato Theater and other awesome Fandom Podcast Network favorite show logos with pride! Tee Public Store: https://www.teepublic.com/user/fandompodcastnetwork  Please listen to our other awesome podcasts on the Fandom Podcast Network: Master Feed: https://fpnet.podbean.com/ 

Best Supporting Podcast
Episode 101: Janet Leigh - "Psycho" (1960)

Best Supporting Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 61:53


So much has already been said about Alfred Hitchcock's "Psycho" and its impact on the horror genre and American cinema in general, but its worth also mentioning that Janet Leigh was nominated for Best Supporting Actress for her performance as the ill-fated Marion Crane. While she's best known for her shower scene, the conversation over sandwiches with Anthony Perkins' perfectly played Norman, the constant inner turmoil behind her eyes while driving, and of course those beautiful brows make her truly fascinating in this role. We also queen out on the Hitchcock hunks, including cutie patootie Perkins, Assistant to the BSA Vera Miles as the maybe lesbian Lila, Bernard Herrmann's iconic score, connections to both "Halloween" and "The Blair Witch Project," and reasons to not bother with the 1998 remake. Plus: who we would cast in "Psycho" today, some wishful thinking about John Gavin's sexuality, and a plea to the congregation for "Mass." Email: thebsapod@gmail.com Twitter: @bsapod Colin Drucker Twitter: @colindrucker Instagram: @colindrucker_ Nick Kochanov Twitter: @nickkochanov Instagram: @nickkochanov

Cinegarage
Además del 007 los mejores espías en el cine

Cinegarage

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 65:23


En este episodio nos acercamos a la figura de los espías, al tema del espionaje y a la manera como se ha transformado desde los inicios del cine. Hicimos una gran lista con las mejores películas sobre espionaje en el cine En esta ocasión invitamos al crítico de cine Sergio Huidobro, quien nos recuerda los nombres esenciales dentro de este mundo cinematográfico, desde Fritz Land y Alfred Hitchcock hasta Spielberg y Katryn Bigelow. Síguenos en @sonoropodcast en todas las redes sociales.

Classic Movie Musts
Archive: The Lady Vanishes (1938) w/ special guest Ted Walch

Classic Movie Musts

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 46:18


Enjoy this episode from our archive on Alfred Hitchcock's film, The Lady Vanishes (1938), starring Margaret Lockwood, Robert Redgrave, Paul Lukas, and May Whitty.

TechnoRetro Dads
Enjoy Stuff: Halloween Horror Classics

TechnoRetro Dads

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 82:20


Classic horror movies were the foundation of a scream inducing movie genre. This week Jay and Shua discuss movies from the 31 Days of Horror articles and how they defined what was to come. Join us as we Enjoy horror movies   Since cinema was invented, filmmakers have been trying to make their audiences scream. The Horror genre is still going strong today, but where did all the ideas come from. This week we look at some of the classics that defined the genre and how it has evolved to what it is today.  News -Check out these Kellogg's action figures from Plastic Meatball -William Shatner is heading to space for real! -The latest cereal to be inspired by other food is Wendy's Frosty Breakfast Cereal -This amazing Ghostbuster projection display will make you want to trick-or-treat at this house in California What we're Enjoying Shua finally got around to watching the Disney live action remake Cruella. He liked it fine, but what really stood out to him was the soundtrack. The eclectic mix of punk, rock, covers, and new songs are a fun playlist to listen to this autumn. Jay read some cool comic biographies, The Twilight Man: Rod Serling and the Birth of Television and Lugosi: The Rise and Fall of Hollywood's Dracula both by Koren Shadmi and published by Life Drawn. It's a new, fun way to learn about a couple of important men in Hollywood.  Enjoy Movies Filmmakers in the early days of Hollywood recognized that audiences love to be scared. And the idea quickly evolved into movies that have defined the genre even today. 1931's Dracula with Bella Lugosi created some important characteristics of vampires that might just save your life today, (if you happen to run into a vampire). The movie's popularity quickly spawned another story when the cinematic version of Mary Shelly's Frankenstein, giving us a Boris Karloff monster that has inspired hundreds of future stories.   Universal kept riding the wave with the Mummy (1932) and The Wolf Man (1941). It wasn't too long before master filmmakers like Alfred Hitchcock were honing the craft of the scare. Psycho is not only one of the best scary movies, but one of the best overall movies of all time.    But many of the ones on our list were likely never intended to be classics, or inspirations. Nevertheless, we began to see branches of horror movies about zombies, possession, haunted houses, and psycho killers. (Qu'est-ce que c'est?) Night of the Living Dead, Rosemary's Baby, The Texas Chainsaw Massacre, and Friday the 13th are just a few.    Do you like classic horror movies? What are some of your favorites? Turn on a classic and join us on Enjoy Stuff   Be sure to check out Jay's articles, “31 Days of Horror” on RetroZap.com. Talk to us in the Discord channel or send us an email to podcast@enjoystuff.com

Inside Psycho
Wondery Presents: Over My Dead Body - Fox Lake

Inside Psycho

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 5:44


A small town cop is gunned down in a swamp in the summer of 2015. He quickly became a martyr in the national media, until a dogged investigator uncovered the officer's bizarre and dark past. When the truth comes out, the townspeople must reconcile betrayal, corruption and the secrets of an American hero. From Wondery, the makers of The Shrink Next Door and Dr. Death comes the third season of Over My Dead Body: Fox Lake.Listen to Over My Dead Body Fox Lake - wondery.fm/FL_InsideSeriesSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Actual Anarchy Podcast - AnCap Movie Reviews from a Rothbardian Perspective
Episode 255: Episode 255 - Swing Kids (1:42:44)

Actual Anarchy Podcast - AnCap Movie Reviews from a Rothbardian Perspective

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2021 102:44


A longtime listener of the show, Reverend Lee, comes on to talk about “Swing Kids”.Swing Kids is a 1993 American dramatic film directed by Thomas Carter and starring Christian Bale, Robert Sean Leonard and Frank Whaley.  A group of teens adores forbidden music in Nazi Germany just before the outbreak of World.It don't mean a thing, if it ain't got that swing.Join us next week as we change the type of horror to a more traditional one as Snobby Bobby of the Not For Everyone Podcast returns to discuss the Alfred Hitchcock classic, “Psycho.”Show notes:   http://www.actualanarchy.com/255Presented by www.ActualAnarchy.comRobert and I analyze popular movies from a Rothbardian/Anarcho-Capitalist perspective. We use movies as a starting point for people who may not be familiar with this way of thinking. Discussion of the plot and decisions that characters make in relation to morality and violations of the non-aggression principle are our bread and butter. We also will highlight and discuss any themes or lessons from Austrian Economics that we can glean from the film. The point is to show what anarchy actually is with instances that are presented in film. We publish at least once per week; and occasionally will do specials surrounding holidays or events (elections/olympics) and have guests. SUBSCRIBE, RATE AND REVIEW ON APPLE PODCASTS (or iTUNES)

Scary Movie & Chill Podcast
[Ep. 54] Scary Movie & Chill (Psycho (1960)) [RE-UPLOAD]

Scary Movie & Chill Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2021 99:15


Hey Ghouls heyyyy!! This week we watch Alfred Hitchcock's 1960 psychological thriller, Psycho. This is one of Bonny's all-time favorite scary movies which means Mike definitely has not seen it before. No one else could have played Norman Bates as well as the late great Anthony Perkins in this classic. Does Psycho still hold up in 2021? Tune in as we watch the movie and chat about Mike's terrible child-sized bucket hat, Bonny's recent LA burger tour stop, where is Chino, California, the Universal Studios back-lot fire, Midnight Mass, how kids continue to ruin everything, that Norman Bates swagger tho, ship lamps, Mike's Hamburger Helper habit, Alfred Hitchcock facts, the real reason this movie is named Psycho, the transatlantic accent, a Women's March recap, backward outlooks, a rare Los Angeles thunderstorm, Dark Harvest Haunt and more. Enjoy! --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/scarymovieandchillpodcast/support

You Have To See ... with Declan and Noah

Declan and Noah continue through their month of horror with Alfred Hitchcock's classic nature takes revenge thriller 'The Birds' from 1963. In addition to unconvincing effects and the proliferation of bird thrillers in recent years, the boys also discuss uneasy tonal shifts and purposeful bad acting. Plus, recently seen including the classic Cameron Diaz vehicle 'Bad Teacher' and the already-forgotten 'Eyes of Tammy Faye' starring Jessica Chastain. Follow the show on Instagram and Twitter @youhavetoseepod Email Declan and Noah at youhavetoseepod@gmail.com

Have You Seen This One? (HYSTO?)
HYSTO? #134 Psycho

Have You Seen This One? (HYSTO?)

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2021 89:19


Join us for Episode #134 where we discuss Alfred HItchcock's 1960 masterpiece Psycho! With special guests Elle & Brent Garrison! Timestamps: :45 What's New?, 24:55 Psycho trailer edit, 26:04 Comments on Psycho, 1:25:00 Contact Info, 1:25:44 Next Time

Fandom Podcast Network
Good Evening An Alfred Hitchcock Podcast Episode 66: AHP: Mr. Blanchard's Secret

Fandom Podcast Network

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2021 18:14


Good Evening An Alfred Hitchcock Podcast Episode 66: AHP: Mr. Blanchard's Secret In this episode of Good Evening: An Alfred Hitchcock Podcast, your hosts Brandon-Shea Mutala, Tom Caldwell, and Chris Haigh continue their discussions on the episodes of Alfred Hitchcock Presents directed by Hitch. Today's episode: Mr. Blanchard's Secret Hosts: Brandon-Shea Mutala, Tom Caldwell, and Chris Haigh Find us: Twitter: @goodeveningpod @brandonmutala @higher_boy @TomCaldwell3000 Facebook: Good Evening: An Alfred Hitchcock Podcast Email: goodeveningpodcast@hotmail.com And, as always, Good Evening is a proud member of the Fandom Podcast Network. @fanpodnetwork Thanks to our Associate Producer, Pat McFadden, our Man Who Knows Exactly Enough. Thanks so much to Jason Cullimore for our awesome theme song! http://www.jasoncullimore.com https://soundcloud.com/jason-cullimore https://www.instagram.com/jasoncullimoreartist/ - fpnet.podbean.com - FPNet on Podbean app - Fandom Podcast Network on: Apple Podcasts / Stitcher / Podbean / Google Play / Spotify / Iheartradio - Facebook: Fandom Podcast Network - Email: fandompodcastnetwork@gmail.com - Instagram: FandomPodcastNetwork  - Twitter: @fanpodnetwork Please help support the Fandom Podcast Network through reviews on Apple Podcasts / iTunes and our Fandom Podcast Network Store on Tee Public.  The FANDOM PODCAST NETWORK is now on YouTube! Join us! Link: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCib-kbKfAagsxrWlJU01Rcg PLEASE SUBCRIBE to our YouTube channel to receive notifications of new podcast episodes and live events. Fandom Podcast Network Tee Public Store: Get Your Fandom Podcast Network and Couch Potato Theater Merchandise on Tee Public! Please visit our TeePublic store where you can help support the Fandom Podcast Network while wearing your Couch Potato Theater and other awesome Fandom Podcast Network favorite show logos with pride! Tee Public Store: https://www.teepublic.com/user/fandompodcastnetwork 

The Next 100 Days Podcast
#294 – David Garfinkel – Copywriting

The Next 100 Days Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 53:15


Copywriting with David Garfinkel David Garfinkel is The World's Greatest Copywriting Coach. In this week's episode, David continues to go through the Old Masters. Maxwell Sackheim http://thenext100days.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/09/Garfinkel-Maxwell-Sackheim.mp4 Check out Sackheim's headline:      Do You Make These Mistakes in .... Can the headline be adapted to:  ...talking to your wife? Come listen to what I'm doing and avoid all these mistakes. Always give your reader something to do. Otherwise, you'll lose them forever. In direct mail, it could be a coupon. This all talks to having a Call to Action. It could be give your email address. Give me your phone number. Sign up for a free consultation. John Caples How to put enthusiasm into your copy. http://thenext100days.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/09/Garfinkel-John-Caples.mp4 Caples says get moving. Write anythings. Just get started. When you are frozen, your brain doesn't work properly for copywriting. The second step, before you publish it. Cool down. Get a legal check. The number one fear is PUBLIC SPEAKING. People are afraid of others laughing at them. That's the idea behind the headline. Plus that ad was his first in a new job. Don't forget to tune into David's podcast: Copywriters Podcast We got talking about speaking. David mentioned his friend, Patricia Fripp. Apparently she got help from SIX comedy coaches. She has won loads of awards for speaking. David says Patricia worked damned hard for her success. The greats know how to reach out and get help! Claude Hopkins Use the power of drama to make a boring product interesting. David told us about 'vegetable shortening' http://thenext100days.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/09/Garfinkel-Claude-Hopkins-2.mp4 "Drama is life with all the dull bits cut out" - Alfred Hitchcock. Victor Schwab - How to Write a Good Advertisement Schwab said there a 5 fundamentals in the writing of a good advertisement: Get Attention Show people an Advantage Prove it Persuade people to grasp this advantage Ask for action. We asked David to recall these bullets off the top of his head, and all bar one, he did. Amazing. What Did David Think To Being on The Next 100 Days Podcast? http://thenext100days.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/09/Garfinkel-Testimonial.mp4   Resources from the David Garfinkel The Next 100 Days Podcast This link covers material covered in Episode 293 and Episode 294. Click here for David Garfinkel Resources Get in touch with The Next 100 Days hosts… Want to know more about Graham Arrowsmith? Finely Fettled helps out financial advisers, investment brokers and care homes to market to affluent and high net worth customers. Meet Professionals – This is Graham's business focused on providing lead generation systems for financial advisory companies. Contact Graham: LinkedIn: Visit Graham's LinkedIn Profile Twitter: Visit Graham's Twitter Page Email:  Email Graham Direct   Ever wondered what Kevin Appleby does? Kevin is a Chartered Accountant who has worked as a management consultant for a number of years specialising in finance transformation and implementing business change. Currently he is COO of GrowCFO. GrowCFO is Where Finance Leaders Grow Together. Becoming a successful CFO requires commitment and dedication towards delivering your full potential. GrowCFO provides both a community and CPD accredited training designed to grow the next generation of finance leaders. You can find Kevin on linkedin and at kevinappleby.com fusebox_track_player url="https://traffic.libsyn.com/secure/thenext100days/episode294.mp3" background="default" social_linkedin="true" social_pinterest="true" ]

New Books Network
Christina Lane, "Phantom Lady: Hollywood Producer Joan Harrison, the Forgotten Woman Behind Hitchcock" (Chicago Review Press, 2020)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 63:42


A platinum beauty with an ugly secret; a tall, dark, and handsome husband with murder in his eyes; starkly lit interiors that may or may not include the silhouette of a rotund British gentleman…. This may sound like a catalog of images from the films of Alfred Hitchcock, but it is just as much an encapsulation of the works of Joan Harrison, a studio-era producer, a prolific cinematic storyteller, and a pioneer of female-centered suspense media at mid-century. Harrison remains best known as Alfred Hitchcock's right-hand woman—that is, to the extent that she is known at all. Christina Lane has written the first-ever book dedicated to the life and art of Joan Harrison, entitled Phantom Lady: Hollywood Producer Joan Harrison, The Forgotten Woman Behind Hitchcock (Chicago Review Press, February 2020). Born into a middle-class family in Surrey, Harrison took a secretarial job with Alfred Hitchcock as an aimless twenty-something, only to become a producer on films including Foreign Correspondent (1940), Rebecca (1940), and Suspicion (1941). In the 1940s, Harrison branched out, building a solo career producing movies for RKO and Universal Studios, only to return to the Hitchcock fold to run TV's Alfred Hitchcock Presents (1955-1962). In this discussion, Lane shares how she uncovered this obscure history, placing this “phantom lady” at the center of her own story. She also discusses the trajectory of Harrison's career and how she adapted her research for a broader readership. Christina Lane is Professor in the Cinematic Arts Department at the University of Miami and Edgar®-Award winning author of Phantom Lady: Joan Harrison, the Forgotten Woman Behind Hitchcock. She provides commentary for such outlets as the Daily Mail, CrimeReads and AirMail, and has been a featured guest speaker at the Film Forum, and on NPR and Turner Classic Movies. Annie Berke is the Film Editor at the Los Angeles Review of Books and author of Their Own Best Creations: Women Writers in Postwar Television (University of California Press, 2022). Her scholarship and criticism has been published in Feminist Media Histories, Public Books, Literary Hub, and Ms. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in Biography
Christina Lane, "Phantom Lady: Hollywood Producer Joan Harrison, the Forgotten Woman Behind Hitchcock" (Chicago Review Press, 2020)

New Books in Biography

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 63:42


A platinum beauty with an ugly secret; a tall, dark, and handsome husband with murder in his eyes; starkly lit interiors that may or may not include the silhouette of a rotund British gentleman…. This may sound like a catalog of images from the films of Alfred Hitchcock, but it is just as much an encapsulation of the works of Joan Harrison, a studio-era producer, a prolific cinematic storyteller, and a pioneer of female-centered suspense media at mid-century. Harrison remains best known as Alfred Hitchcock's right-hand woman—that is, to the extent that she is known at all. Christina Lane has written the first-ever book dedicated to the life and art of Joan Harrison, entitled Phantom Lady: Hollywood Producer Joan Harrison, The Forgotten Woman Behind Hitchcock (Chicago Review Press, February 2020). Born into a middle-class family in Surrey, Harrison took a secretarial job with Alfred Hitchcock as an aimless twenty-something, only to become a producer on films including Foreign Correspondent (1940), Rebecca (1940), and Suspicion (1941). In the 1940s, Harrison branched out, building a solo career producing movies for RKO and Universal Studios, only to return to the Hitchcock fold to run TV's Alfred Hitchcock Presents (1955-1962). In this discussion, Lane shares how she uncovered this obscure history, placing this “phantom lady” at the center of her own story. She also discusses the trajectory of Harrison's career and how she adapted her research for a broader readership. Christina Lane is Professor in the Cinematic Arts Department at the University of Miami and Edgar®-Award winning author of Phantom Lady: Joan Harrison, the Forgotten Woman Behind Hitchcock. She provides commentary for such outlets as the Daily Mail, CrimeReads and AirMail, and has been a featured guest speaker at the Film Forum, and on NPR and Turner Classic Movies. Annie Berke is the Film Editor at the Los Angeles Review of Books and author of Their Own Best Creations: Women Writers in Postwar Television (University of California Press, 2022). Her scholarship and criticism has been published in Feminist Media Histories, Public Books, Literary Hub, and Ms. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/biography

New Books in History
Christina Lane, "Phantom Lady: Hollywood Producer Joan Harrison, the Forgotten Woman Behind Hitchcock" (Chicago Review Press, 2020)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 63:42


A platinum beauty with an ugly secret; a tall, dark, and handsome husband with murder in his eyes; starkly lit interiors that may or may not include the silhouette of a rotund British gentleman…. This may sound like a catalog of images from the films of Alfred Hitchcock, but it is just as much an encapsulation of the works of Joan Harrison, a studio-era producer, a prolific cinematic storyteller, and a pioneer of female-centered suspense media at mid-century. Harrison remains best known as Alfred Hitchcock's right-hand woman—that is, to the extent that she is known at all. Christina Lane has written the first-ever book dedicated to the life and art of Joan Harrison, entitled Phantom Lady: Hollywood Producer Joan Harrison, The Forgotten Woman Behind Hitchcock (Chicago Review Press, February 2020). Born into a middle-class family in Surrey, Harrison took a secretarial job with Alfred Hitchcock as an aimless twenty-something, only to become a producer on films including Foreign Correspondent (1940), Rebecca (1940), and Suspicion (1941). In the 1940s, Harrison branched out, building a solo career producing movies for RKO and Universal Studios, only to return to the Hitchcock fold to run TV's Alfred Hitchcock Presents (1955-1962). In this discussion, Lane shares how she uncovered this obscure history, placing this “phantom lady” at the center of her own story. She also discusses the trajectory of Harrison's career and how she adapted her research for a broader readership. Christina Lane is Professor in the Cinematic Arts Department at the University of Miami and Edgar®-Award winning author of Phantom Lady: Joan Harrison, the Forgotten Woman Behind Hitchcock. She provides commentary for such outlets as the Daily Mail, CrimeReads and AirMail, and has been a featured guest speaker at the Film Forum, and on NPR and Turner Classic Movies. Annie Berke is the Film Editor at the Los Angeles Review of Books and author of Their Own Best Creations: Women Writers in Postwar Television (University of California Press, 2022). Her scholarship and criticism has been published in Feminist Media Histories, Public Books, Literary Hub, and Ms. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

New Books in Film
Christina Lane, "Phantom Lady: Hollywood Producer Joan Harrison, the Forgotten Woman Behind Hitchcock" (Chicago Review Press, 2020)

New Books in Film

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 63:42


A platinum beauty with an ugly secret; a tall, dark, and handsome husband with murder in his eyes; starkly lit interiors that may or may not include the silhouette of a rotund British gentleman…. This may sound like a catalog of images from the films of Alfred Hitchcock, but it is just as much an encapsulation of the works of Joan Harrison, a studio-era producer, a prolific cinematic storyteller, and a pioneer of female-centered suspense media at mid-century. Harrison remains best known as Alfred Hitchcock's right-hand woman—that is, to the extent that she is known at all. Christina Lane has written the first-ever book dedicated to the life and art of Joan Harrison, entitled Phantom Lady: Hollywood Producer Joan Harrison, The Forgotten Woman Behind Hitchcock (Chicago Review Press, February 2020). Born into a middle-class family in Surrey, Harrison took a secretarial job with Alfred Hitchcock as an aimless twenty-something, only to become a producer on films including Foreign Correspondent (1940), Rebecca (1940), and Suspicion (1941). In the 1940s, Harrison branched out, building a solo career producing movies for RKO and Universal Studios, only to return to the Hitchcock fold to run TV's Alfred Hitchcock Presents (1955-1962). In this discussion, Lane shares how she uncovered this obscure history, placing this “phantom lady” at the center of her own story. She also discusses the trajectory of Harrison's career and how she adapted her research for a broader readership. Christina Lane is Professor in the Cinematic Arts Department at the University of Miami and Edgar®-Award winning author of Phantom Lady: Joan Harrison, the Forgotten Woman Behind Hitchcock. She provides commentary for such outlets as the Daily Mail, CrimeReads and AirMail, and has been a featured guest speaker at the Film Forum, and on NPR and Turner Classic Movies. Annie Berke is the Film Editor at the Los Angeles Review of Books and author of Their Own Best Creations: Women Writers in Postwar Television (University of California Press, 2022). Her scholarship and criticism has been published in Feminist Media Histories, Public Books, Literary Hub, and Ms. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/film

New Books in American Studies
Christina Lane, "Phantom Lady: Hollywood Producer Joan Harrison, the Forgotten Woman Behind Hitchcock" (Chicago Review Press, 2020)

New Books in American Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 63:42


A platinum beauty with an ugly secret; a tall, dark, and handsome husband with murder in his eyes; starkly lit interiors that may or may not include the silhouette of a rotund British gentleman…. This may sound like a catalog of images from the films of Alfred Hitchcock, but it is just as much an encapsulation of the works of Joan Harrison, a studio-era producer, a prolific cinematic storyteller, and a pioneer of female-centered suspense media at mid-century. Harrison remains best known as Alfred Hitchcock's right-hand woman—that is, to the extent that she is known at all. Christina Lane has written the first-ever book dedicated to the life and art of Joan Harrison, entitled Phantom Lady: Hollywood Producer Joan Harrison, The Forgotten Woman Behind Hitchcock (Chicago Review Press, February 2020). Born into a middle-class family in Surrey, Harrison took a secretarial job with Alfred Hitchcock as an aimless twenty-something, only to become a producer on films including Foreign Correspondent (1940), Rebecca (1940), and Suspicion (1941). In the 1940s, Harrison branched out, building a solo career producing movies for RKO and Universal Studios, only to return to the Hitchcock fold to run TV's Alfred Hitchcock Presents (1955-1962). In this discussion, Lane shares how she uncovered this obscure history, placing this “phantom lady” at the center of her own story. She also discusses the trajectory of Harrison's career and how she adapted her research for a broader readership. Christina Lane is Professor in the Cinematic Arts Department at the University of Miami and Edgar®-Award winning author of Phantom Lady: Joan Harrison, the Forgotten Woman Behind Hitchcock. She provides commentary for such outlets as the Daily Mail, CrimeReads and AirMail, and has been a featured guest speaker at the Film Forum, and on NPR and Turner Classic Movies. Annie Berke is the Film Editor at the Los Angeles Review of Books and author of Their Own Best Creations: Women Writers in Postwar Television (University of California Press, 2022). Her scholarship and criticism has been published in Feminist Media Histories, Public Books, Literary Hub, and Ms. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/american-studies

Have A Drink With Me
Rear Window & Coppola Wine with Sam Kimbrell

Have A Drink With Me

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 46:35


Dylan and Sam drink some fine wine and dive into the first Alfred Hitchcock movie Dylan has ever seen, Rear Window.Find Sam on Twitter @samkimbrell, Instagram @sam_kimbrell, and YouTube https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCBbZ-gEMNSU2R3dpblAiyPw/videos?view=0&sort=da----Follow Have A Drink With Me on a drunken journey as Dylan attempts to discuss movies, television, and things his guests love.Each episode Dylan picks what he and the guests talk about, but the guests tell Dylan what he has to drink.#hadwm #Coppola #Wine #samkimbrell #comedypodcast----http://shop.stricterpictures.comhttp://instagram.com/stricterpicshttp://twitter.com/stricterpicshttp://facebook.com/stricterpicsSupport the show (https://www.patreon.com/hadwm)

Founders
Steven Spielberg: A Biography

Founders

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 29:50


What I learned from reading Steven Spielberg: A Biography by Joseph McBride. Sign up to listen to the rest of this episode. You will unlock 217 full length episodes and get lifetime access to every future episode.You will learn the key insights from biographies on Steve Jobs, Elon Musk, John D. Rockefeller, Coco Chanel, Andrew Carnegie, Enzo Ferrari, Estee Lauder, Jeff Bezos, Warren Buffett, Charlie Munger, Phil Knight, Joseph Pulitzer, Arnold Schwarzenegger, Alexander Graham Bell, Bill Gates, P.T. Barnum, Edwin Land, Henry Ford, Walter Chrysler, Thomas Edison, David Ogilvy, Ben Franklin, Howard Hughes, George Lucas, Levi Strauss, Walt Disney and so many more. You will learn from the founders of Nike, Patagonia, Apple, Microsoft, Hershey, General Motors, Ford, Standard Oil, Polaroid, Home Depot, MGM, Intel, Federal Express, Wal Mart, JP Morgan, Chrysler, Cadillac, Oracle, Hyundai, Seagram, Berkshire Hathaway, Teledyne, Adidas, Les Schwab, Renaissance Technologies, IKEA, Sony, Ferrari, and so many more. WHAT OTHER PEOPLE ARE SAYING:“Without a doubt, the highest value-to-cost ratio I've taken advantage of in the last year is the Founders podcast premium feed. Tap into eons of knowledge and experiences, condensed into digestible portions. Highly, highly recommend. “Uniquely outstanding. No fluff and all substance. David does an outstanding job summarizing these biographies and hones in on the elements that make his subjects so unique among entrepreneurs. I particularly enjoy that he focuses on both the founder's positive and negative characteristics as a way of highlighting things to mimic and avoid.”“I just paid for my first premium podcast subscription for Founders podcast. Learning from those who came before us is one of the highest value ways to invest time. David does his homework and exponentially improves my efficiency by focusing on the most valuable lessons.”“I haven't found a better return on my time and money than your podcast for inspiration and time-tested wisdom to help me on my journey.“I've now listened to every episode. From this knowledge I've doubled my business to $500k a year. Love your passion and recommend your podcast to everyone.”“Founders is the only podcast I pay for and it's worth 100x the cost.”“I have listened to many podcasts on entrepreneurship (HIBT, Masters of Scale, etc.) and find Founders to be consistently more helpful than any other entrepreneurship podcast. David is a craftsperson, he carefully reads biographies of founders, distills the most important anecdotes and themes from their life, and draws commonalities across lives. David's focus is rightfully not on teaching you a formula to succeed but on constantly pushing you to think different.”“I highly highly recommend this podcast. Holy cow. I've been binge listening to these and you start to see patterns across all these incredible humans.”Listening to your podcast has changed my life and that is not a statement I make often.“After one episode I quickly joined the Misfit feed. Love the insight and thoughts shared along the way. David loves what he does and it shines through on the podcast. Definitely my go-to podcast now.”“It is worth every penny. I cannot put into words how fantastic this podcast is. Just stop reading this and get the full access.”“Personally it's one of my top 3 favorite podcasts. If you're into business and startups and technology, this is for you. David covers good books and I've come to really appreciate his perspective. Can't say enough good things.”“I quickly subscribed and it's honestly been the best money I've spent all year. It has inspired me to read biographies. Highly recommend.”“This is the most inspirational and best business podcast out there. David has inspired me to focus on biographies rather than general business books. I'm addicted.”“Anyone interested in business must find the time to listen to each any every Founders podcast. A high return on investment will be a virtual certainty. Subscribe and start listening as soon as possible.”“David saves you hundreds of hours by summarizing bios of legendary business founders and providing valuable insight on what makes an individual successful. He has introduced me to many founders I would have never known existed.”“The podcasts offer spectacular lessons on life, human nature and business achievement. David's enthusiasm and personal thoughts bring me joy. My journey has been enhanced by his efforts.”"Founders is the best self investment that I've made in years."GET LIFETIME ACCESS TO FOUNDERS

30something Movie Podcast
Episode #375: ”Have the lambs stopped screaming?” | Silence of the Lambs (1991)

30something Movie Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 218:48


Good evening, listeners. Agent in training, Clarice Starling, is thrust into the middle of the Buffalo Bill serial killer case because she might just get some information out of another notorious killer — Hannibal "The Cannibal" Lecter. For this episode we're joined by the dynamic duo of Dee Graves and Jason Colvin from the Surely You Can't Be Serious Podcast to compare Silence of the Lambs with Alfred Hitchcock's Psycho (1960) and Fritz Lang's M (1931). We hope we can enthrall you with our acumen. Anthony Hopkins, Scott Glenn, and Jodie Foster star in Silence of the Lambs. Trailer:

Couch Buddies Podcast
Ep 158: Bonus: The Hayes Code

Couch Buddies Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 26:40


It's spooky month and this month we are covering Alfred Hitchcock movies. To give some context on the censorship of the time, Kia presents a primer on the Hayes Code. Intro and outro music: Life of Riley by Kevin McCloud (InCompetech) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/

Legion Podcasts
The Dark Parade #1: Psycho

Legion Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 123:18


If it's Wednesday, it's time for a stroll in The Dark Parade! We christen the show with a look at the Psycho film series, starting with the film that launched a thousand maniacs, Alfred Hitchcock's Psycho from 1960. I was lucky to be joined by Mr. Venom, aka Jerry Cortes, and I think you'll agree this man knows his Hitchcock. I hope you'll join us for what I think is a terrific look at a classic film. You can find more from the esteemed Mr. Cortes at No More Room in Hell, Fresh Cuts, Creature Comforts, In the Mic of Madness, It's Not Horror, Okay?, and Underwater Kaiju from Outer Space. You can join the discussion live on Sundays at 5pm CST at YouTube.com/LegionPodcasts and you can subscribe to the podcast on iTunes here, Stitcher, Spotify, Amazon Music and Audible, iHeartRadio, Podchaser, Google Podcasts, and anywhere fine podcasts are found! You can find all the episodes right here and say hello on Facebook or Twitter! The post The Dark Parade #1: Psycho first appeared on Legion.

Legion Podcasts
The Dark Parade #1: Psycho

Legion Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 123:18


If it's Wednesday, it's time for a stroll in The Dark Parade! We christen the show with a look at the Psycho film series, starting with the film that launched a thousand maniacs, Alfred Hitchcock's Psycho from 1960. I was lucky to be joined by Mr. Venom, aka Jerry Cortes, and I think you'll agree this man knows his Hitchcock. I hope you'll join us for what I think is a terrific look at a classic film. You can find more from the esteemed Mr. Cortes at No More Room in Hell, Fresh Cuts, Creature Comforts, In the Mic of Madness, It's Not Horror, Okay?, and Underwater Kaiju from Outer Space. You can join the discussion live on Sundays at 5pm CST at YouTube.com/LegionPodcasts and you can subscribe to the podcast on iTunes here, Stitcher, Spotify, Amazon Music and Audible, iHeartRadio, Podchaser, Google Podcasts, and anywhere fine podcasts are found! You can find all the episodes right here and say hello on Facebook or Twitter! The post The Dark Parade #1: Psycho first appeared on Legion.

Pop! Pour! Review
Check In...Take A Shower (Psycho)

Pop! Pour! Review

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 55:52


This week on the podcast, we review the movie Psycho, in the first week of our slasher month this Halloween season! All while drinking this month's cleverly named cocktail, The Bloody Pumpkin!!!  Look out for new episodes every Monday, follow @poppourreview for all updates, click around  our website www.poppourreview.com, and for drink recipes and exclusive content become a member of our Patreon at patreon.com/poppourreview !!!         We do not own the rights to any audio clips used in the podcast.

These Are Bad Movies
Not Crazy About Hitchcock

These Are Bad Movies

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 2, 2021 44:03


These Are Bad Movies kicks off a month of horror with the classic Alfred Hitchcock film, Psycho. We admit, we kind of love Hitchcock movies, but there are some glaring problems with his work, not the least of which was the man himself.Join the conversation!Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TheseAreBadMovies/Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/thesearebadmovies/Twitter: https://twitter.com/these_badYouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC0S0bYgLw1LhbFActubC8_A

KCPN
Not Crazy About Hitchcock

KCPN

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 2, 2021 44:03


These Are Bad Movies kicks off a month of horror with the classic Alfred Hitchcock film, Psycho. We admit, we kind of love Hitchcock movies, but there are some glaring problems with his work, not the least of which was the man himself.Join the conversation!Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TheseAreBadMovies/Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/thesearebadmovies/Twitter: https://twitter.com/these_badYouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC0S0bYgLw1LhbFActubC8_A

Fandom Podcast Network
Good Evening An Alfred Hitchcock Podcast Episode 65: The Right Sisters: The Wrong Man

Fandom Podcast Network

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 52:14


Good Evening An Alfred Hitchcock Podcast Episode 65: The Right Sisters: The Wrong Man In this episode of Good Evening: An Alfred Hitchcock Podcast Chris Haigh and Brandon-Shea are joined by Annie and Kathryn of the Good Evening: An Alfred Hitchcock Presents Podcast to discuss the 1956 thriller “The Wrong Man.” Hosts: Brandon-Shea Mutala, Tom Caldwell, and Chris Haigh Guests: Annie Snow and Kathryn Ormsbee Find us: Twitter: @goodeveningpod @brandonmutala @higher_boy @TomCaldwell3000 Facebook: Good Evening: An Alfred Hitchcock Podcast Email: goodeveningpodcast@hotmail.com And, as always, Good Evening is a proud member of the Fandom Podcast Network. @fanpodnetwork Thanks to our Associate Producer, Pat McFadden, our Man Who Knows Exactly Enough. Thanks so much to Jason Cullimore for our awesome theme song! http://www.jasoncullimore.com https://soundcloud.com/jason-cullimore https://www.instagram.com/jasoncullimoreartist/ - fpnet.podbean.com - FPNet on Podbean app - Fandom Podcast Network on: Apple Podcasts / Stitcher / Podbean / Google Play / Spotify / Iheartradio - Facebook: Fandom Podcast Network - Email: fandompodcastnetwork@gmail.com - Instagram: FandomPodcastNetwork  - Twitter: @fanpodnetwork Please help support the Fandom Podcast Network through reviews on Apple Podcasts / iTunes and our Fandom Podcast Network Store on Tee Public.  The FANDOM PODCAST NETWORK is now on YouTube! Join us! Link: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCib-kbKfAagsxrWlJU01Rcg PLEASE SUBCRIBE to our YouTube channel to receive notifications of new podcast episodes and live events. Fandom Podcast Network Tee Public Store: Get Your Fandom Podcast Network and Couch Potato Theater Merchandise on Tee Public! Please visit our TeePublic store where you can help support the Fandom Podcast Network while wearing your Couch Potato Theater and other awesome Fandom Podcast Network favorite show logos with pride! Tee Public Store: https://www.teepublic.com/user/fandompodcastnetwork  Please listen to our other awesome podcasts on the Fandom Podcast Network: Master Feed: https://fpnet.podbean.com/ 

Movie Munch Podcast
Ep. 40 - Psycho (1960)

Movie Munch Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 86:26


Grab your dead mom, get her favorite dress and put on a wig as you listen to the beginning of MovieMunchPod's month of horror running from October 1st all the way to Halloween. We start out the month with one of the most iconic films of all time, we go in depth on the shower scene and talk about the legacy of Alfred Hitchcock along with the actors starring in this movie, in addition to our thoughts on other recent movies we watched 'The Witch' and 'The Invisible Man' Connect with us here: Twitter - https://twitter.com/MovieMunchPod Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/moviemunchpod/ --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

Legion Podcasts
Legion Podcasts 31 Days of Halloween: Day 1 – Psycho

Legion Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 19:30


Welcome to October! As such, this is the first day of 31 podcasts, each discussing a movie tailor-made for this most special of holidays. We are beginning with a classic, Alfred Hitchcock's Psycho! Hope you enjoy this, and come back each and every day for a new movie. Also, join the discussion on our Facebook group, Twitter, or Instagram. You can hear the show exclusively on Legion Podcasts, so be sure to subscribe on Apple Podcasts, Google, Spotify, Android, Pandora, iHeartRadio, Stitcher, Podchaser, or wherever podcasts are found.

Legion Podcasts
Legion Podcasts 31 Days of Halloween: Day 1 – Psycho

Legion Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 19:30


Welcome to October! As such, this is the first day of 31 podcasts, each discussing a movie tailor-made for this most special of holidays. We are beginning with a classic, Alfred Hitchcock's Psycho! Hope you enjoy this, and come back each and every day for a new movie. Also, join the discussion on our Facebook group, Twitter, or Instagram. You can hear the show exclusively on Legion Podcasts, so be sure to subscribe on Apple Podcasts, Google, Spotify, Android, Pandora, iHeartRadio, Stitcher, Podchaser, or wherever podcasts are found.

Canceled Too Soon
The Iron List #22 | The Best Alfred Hitchcock Movies!

Canceled Too Soon

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 116:18


Every month on THE IRON LIST, the Patrons of the Critically Acclaimed Network get to pick a topic for a giant-sized episode! This month it's THE BEST ALFRED HITCHCOCK MOVIES, an entire two-hour podcast dedicated to William Bibbiani and Witney Seibold's favorite films by one of the most acclaimed and prolific filmmakers in history! And somehow only two films that show up on both of our critics' top ten lists... can you guess which two? Subscribe on Patreon at www.patreon.com/criticallyacclaimednetwork for exclusive content and exciting rewards, like bonus episodes, commentary tracks and much, much more! And visit our TeePublic page to buy shirts, mugs and other exciting merchandise!  And if you want soap, be sure to check out M. Lopes da Silva's Etsy store: SaltCatSoap! Email us at letters@criticallyacclaimed.net, so we can read your correspondence and answer YOUR questions in future episodes! Follow us on Twitter at @CriticAcclaim, join the official Fan Club on Facebook, follow Bibbs at @WilliamBibbiani and follow Witney at @WitneySeibold, and head on over to www.criticallyacclaimed.net for all their podcasts, reviews and more! 

Stars on Suspense (Old Time Radio)
Episode 258 – Otto Kruger

Stars on Suspense (Old Time Radio)

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 97:39


Suave and silver-haired, Otto Kruger made a name for himself as debonair villains on screen. He memorably ran a deadly domestic spy ring in Alfred Hitchcock's Saboteur, menaced Philip Marlowe in Murder, My Sweet, and many more. We'll hear him in his only Suspense appearance - the Cornell Woolrich story "After Dinner Story" (originally aired on CBS on October 26, 1943). Then, he joins the cast of Laura in a recreation on The Lux Radio Theatre (originally aired on CBS on February 5, 1945).

This Film is Lit
Psycho

This Film is Lit

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 90:10


The picture you MUST see from the beginning... Or not at all!... For no one will be seated after the start of... Alfred Hitchcock's greatest shocker. It’s Psycho, and This Film is Lit. Let Me Sum Up Guess Who? Was That in the Book? Lost in Adaptation Better in the Book Better in the Movie The Movie Nailed It Odds and Ends Final Verdict Our next movie is Don't Look Now!

The Old Soul Movie Podcast
The Trouble with Harry (1955)

The Old Soul Movie Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 53:15


Double, double, toil and trouble.  Gather 'round and snuggle down as we finish up our September month of double trouble! In tandem with our Jerry Mathers interview, we thought this would be the perfect time to cover Alfred Hitchcock's The Trouble with Harry (1955)! This zany dark rom-com is one of a kind.  From beautiful Vermont foliage, to a mysterious dead body, to popping art work and a dreamy score, this is a perfect flick to turn on as we celebrate the autumn season.Please Comment, Rate, and Share our episodes and tell us what you like and what you want to hear more of!—Be sure to check us out onOur website: https://the-old-soul-movie-podcast.simplecast.com/FacebookTwitter: @oldsoulpodInstagram: @oldsoulmoviepodcast

We Make Books Podcast
Episode 70 - You Only Want Me for My MacGuffin

We Make Books Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 33:36


We Make Books is a podcast for writers and publishers, by writers and publishers and we want to hear from our listeners! Hit us up on our social media, linked below, and send us your questions, comments, and concerns for us to address in future episodes. We hope you enjoy We Make Books! Twitter: @WMBCast  |  @KindofKaelyn  |  @BittyBittyZap Instagram: @WMBCast  Patreon.com/WMBCast Episode Transcript (by Rekka) [Upbeat Ukulele Intro Music] Rekka: This is We Make Books, a podcast about writing publishing and everything in between. Rekka is a published Science Fiction and Fantasy author, and Kaelyn is a professional genre fiction editor. Together, they'll tackle the things you never knew you never knew about getting a book from concept to finished product, with explanations, examples, and a lot of laughter. Get your moleskin notebook ready. It's time for We Make Books. Kaelyn: I love MacGuffins. R: Or weenies. I think we should start calling them "weenies" again. K: Go back to the original name. Yeah, it's funny because like, I think MacGuffin has like a negative connotation around it and I love it as a plot device where it's just like, there's this thing. And everyone wants it. In some cases we don't even really know what it does. There's like oh, the suitcase from pulp fiction. That's a great MacGuffin. R: That was going to be my example. K: In one of the Mission: Impossible movies, the one with Phillip Seymour Hoffman, you know, they're trying to get this, this thing from this guy. And Phillip Seymour Hoffman is this like the most terrifying crime lord in the world. And he can't get this thing. We literally never find out what it does, why they need to keep it out of his hands so badly and, and have it for themselves. But yeah we kinda conceived of this episode is talking about MacGuffin versus plot devices. So, let's be clear. All MacGuffins are plot devices, not all plot devices are MacGuffins. So as I always like to do a, you know, a little bit of history here, MacGuffin the terms often chalked up as being coined by, Alfred Hitchcock and his friend and screenwriter, MacPhail, but it actually goes back quite a bit before that there was an actress in the 1920s named of Pearl White, which I can only assume as a stage name. R: Her movies brought to you by Colgate. K: I genuinely hope that's a stage name. But she was in a lot of spy movies or action movies where everyone was chasing after something. And she was in so many of them that she started calling the items in question "weenies" because it didn't matter. And the, it was almost getting a little formulaic in her movies that it could have been, you know, like a roll of film, a document, a, a key that opens a certain, you know, safe or something. It really didn't matter what they were. It was just, you know, these suspense action inspired movies, everyone trying to chase down the same object. R: The reason that it doesn't matter is because no one actually ever really uses it. You just want to have it, right? K: Yeah. Yeah. It's frequently MacGuffin-related plots are resolved by "the real treasure was the friends we made along the way," which is one of the more infuriating endings. R: I like friends. K: Friends are great. Yeah. But like, okay. So I was going to get to this, to this later and the thing that, like one of my favorite examples of a MacGuffin that becomes un-MacGuffinned and is National Treasure That film is very rare in that they actually find and maintain hold of the treasure in the end of it, think of like, you know, like the Goonies or Pirates of the Caribbean, like Treasure Planet, they all find the treasure, but they don't really actually get to keep any of it. National Treasure really upended that by, by letting those characters not only find it, but then we find out how much money they got for it. R: And Disney's Atlantis. They did have the treasure at the end, too. K: That's true. R: They didn't tell anyone they had treasure. They just suddenly were all very wealthy. K: Yes, it was very good. So yeah, MacGuffins are by definition, it's a functionally meaningless interchangeable object whose only purpose is to drive the plot. The function of a MacGuffin is that there are characters or multiple groups of characters that want it, and they're all competing or outwitting or racing to get this object. R: The method by which it drives the plot. It creates the tension between different parties. K: Yes, exactly. Or it could be, you know, something like a treasure hunt where, you know, the MacGuffin is the treasure. So we know what its function is. It's going to make somebody rich, but it really is just there as an object to be desired. One of the fun things I learned while doing, you know, putting some notes together, researching this is it's generally accepted that one of the first MacGuffin in commonly accepted MacGuffin and literature was the holy grail, which is very common plot device for Arthurian legend. And then, you know, later tales where this is also treasure. Yes. It had religious significance, but therefore making it a worthwhile pursuit for these holy and sanctified nights. But yeah, it was functionally a MacGuffin because once you get the holy grail, what do you do with it? Well, it depends. If you're in an Indiana Jones movie or not, I know. The Arthurian knights were not not planning to make themselves immortal by that. They were planning to just get it and put it somewhere to look at it and go, it's the holy grail. Yay. So MacGuffins, like I said, it's got a negative connotation around it, I believe. And I do think that is that's very unfair. It's often treated like, well, it's just something that they had to put in there to get the characters, to act, to do something. And it's like, well, yeah, but that's a book. R: Yeah. You need a plot. K: That's how plot devices work. I think where MacGuffins get a bad rep so to speak is because they're meaningless and interchangeable. There are a lot of books, movies, TV shows where the MacGuffin is interchangeable. How many, you know, heist films have you watched where it's like, we need to get this thing in order to, you know, make this next step. And then it turns out that it's like, oh no, wait, things have changed. We need get this other thing. It doesn't have to be the same MacGuffin through the course of the story. They can change based on, you know, how the plot's moving or circumstances or the needs or wants of the characters. As I mentioned before, all MacGuffin are plot devices, not all plot devices are a MacGuffin. So that was kind of, you know, we wanted to talk a little bit about what a MacGuffin is and what it isn't thereby, what is a plot device and what its function is. K: Plot devices are basically a technique and narrative use to move the plot forward. It can be anything from, you know, characters and their actions to objects, to gifts of mysterious origins that we're not quite sure about. Now. It can be relationship, plot devices cover a lot of different things. One of them is MacGuffin. So, you know, saying like, well saying this object, it's just a plot device. Well, it might not be just a plot device. It might be a MacGuffin, but plot devices can be other things. Chekov's gun is of course a plot device. The Chekov's gun rule is if you're going to have a gun on the stage in the first act of a play, somebody needs to fire it in the third act of a play because otherwise it's just, you know, a decoration at that point. I don't like that. R: I don't think it's just that it's a decoration it's that your audience is going to wonder about it and that you don't want to distract or disappoint. K: If there's a play going on and there's a gun hanging on the wall and it's set in a hunting lodge that seems fairly normal. R: But for example, if I see somebody in a movie, pick a rifle out of their nightstand and tuck it into their belt, I know that, you know, something's going to escalate. K: Yeah, exactly. Or at least we're, we should be reading into that. Character is planning for there to be some kind of a conflict or a scenario in which they may need to defend themselves. Right. But let's talk a little bit about pot devices. As I mentioned, they're things that are intended to move the plot along. There's an endless list of things that are plot devices. And as I said, these can be anything from relationships. Like a love triangle is a frequently as plot device. Definitely one of my least favorites. First of all, they're very rarely actually triangles. They're more like two lines converging on a single point in order for there to be a triangle, all three people involved need to be having— R: So is the object of the other two's interest a MacGuffin? K: Could be, I've talked endlessly about what a ridiculous character Bella from Twilight is. And I mean, she's, she's borderline a MacGuffin. Like really, you know what, God, that's a really good thought experiment. I'm going to have to like find some kind of a summary now and go, go through this and see if like Bella is actually a MacGuffin. R: If the character themself doesn't have any agency, like the damsel in distress that you don't even see until you storm the castle in the third act. K: Yeah, exactly. Yeah. And we'll get to things that can be MacGuffin that you might not think would be a MacGuffin. So one of them that I actually stumbled across that I didn't think about as a plot device is the Deus ex Machina. So Deus ex Machina it's was a commonly used plot device, especially in Greek comedies and tragedies, primarily tragedies, I suppose where an improbable event is used to resolve everything and bring the story to a conclusion, usually a happy conclusion, fun fact about the Deus ex Machina, of course, you know, it's the Latin for "God in the machine." it was because that's because in a lot of great tragedies and plays, they'd have this mechanism by which an actor portraying a God was lowered into the stage, does god things, you know, changes whatever's happening, and then that's the end of the story. So God in the machine was what was coined for that. This one I will say generally is something that writers are encouraged to avoid. It's it's not great storytelling. Like if, you know, you're lining up for the big conflict and everyone's squared off and waiting to see what happens. And then an earthquake happens and kills everyone... R: Yeah. You know, the earthquake, wasn't something that had been foreshadowed or anything like that. It's kinda like the "Oh, and I woke up and it was all a dream." K: I always say like the T-Rex at the end of the first Jurassic Park movie. R: Just shows up and chomps. K: Just shows up and is like "Raptors! Mmm!" R: A lot of people were pretty satisfied by the T-Rex if, if it had been T-Rexes in the tragedies, we could've had a whole new view of the Deus ex Machina. K: Yeah. It was a, it was a very satisfying ending and it was certainly a "whoa, holy crap. Like, yeah, I forgot. There's also huge dinosaurs running around here. Right." R: And again, so like that was foreshadowed. It was Chekov's T-Rex for your T-Rex Machina. K: It is a little bit of an ex Machina because first of all, the last time we saw the T-Rex, it was very far from the visitor center. And also no one can explain to me how it got in there. So, but you know. It's fine. R: Hey, look. If you really want to nitpick Jurassic Park, let's just talk about how the Jeep fell into the T-Rex enclosure. They did not get to a fence. And yet there were brachiosaurs. Why were they in the T-Rex enclosure? K: I thought they were outside the T-Rex enclosure along a cliff. R: I didn't see a fence. K: The geography of this is, is definitely slightly slightly suspect. But also a plot device, the T-Rex in this is, you know, serving as, as a plot device, in that it is forcing the characters to act and make decisions really. We all know that if they just sat quietly in the cars, the movie would have been a lot different. R: But the MacGuffin of Jurassic Park would be the dinosaur DNA. K: Yes. in one aspect of the plot, definitely, the Nedry plot. I would argue that that is much more relevant to everything, but like, it is a weird little side plot where this chain of events gets kicked off because of yes, the dinosaur DNA, which is not meaningful for the story. Is it interchangeable? I don't know. I would say no on that, but it definitely, for that particular part of the plot serves as a MacGuffin. K: One of the examples I always use that, you know, people point to and say is a MacGuffin, but is absolutely not, is the one ring from Lord of the Rings. It's not an interchangeable object there, isn't another, you know, another thing that they could go take and throw into this volcano, the only reason they're going to throw in this ring into Mount Doom is because it has to be that specific ring. And it has to be thrown into Mount Doom. We lose the whole story of the one ring corrupting and torturing everybody that's holding it. You know, we lose the the character development that comes from the people who have to carry this ring and what it does to them. So that's one we're, you know, I see like people saying like, oh yeah, and the one ring, the MacGuffin. Like it's not, that is not a MacGuffin. It is a plot device, but it is not a MacGuffin. R: Right. It's an object that everybody wants, but it is a carefully crafted object in terms of the story that is the foundation of the story itself. K: Yeah. The one ring, I would say, even goes so far as to serve as a theme in that story, essentially. One of my favorite plot devices is a plot coupons. Rekka also loves these. R: Like you need the blue key card and then come back with the blue key card. And then, you know, you can open this blue locked door. The idea that you need this thing before the story can go any further and it has to be this thing. But that thing is not going to come around later. It's not like that key will open another door later. It will open this one door that we need to progress, but there's probably going to be another door later. K: And again, this is not a MacGuffin because it's not interchangeable. You need that specific key. The other way to sort of integrate plot coupons into your story is there's a certain number of objects you need to collect in order to get something else. My favorite one of these is Dragon Ball. You want to summon the dragon. I believe his name was Shen. You have to collect all seven dragon balls to do that. So the story is being driven by the quest to find all of these, some in the dragon and then summoning the dragon from there typically drives the plot forward even more. It's very rarely goes the way you want it to when you're collecting, collecting things for a larger thing. It's not like a carnival where you get enough tickets, you get the giant teddy bear and then you go home. That teddy bear might kill you. Yeah. Similarly to, to plot coupons is a plot voucher which is something that a character is given or, you know, picks up on a whim or just, you know, is particularly entranced by and goes, I'm going to take this object. And then it turns out to be incredibly useful or life-saving, or exactly the thing that they needed or didn't realize the value of it. Something like that. R: This is frequently a Star Trek: The Next Generation thing where Wesley is working on this school project and that school project saves the planet later when he connects it to the war coils. K: Yeah. There you go. Yeah. it's a very common thing in especially fantasy because you know, it's this there's a lot of concepts of hidden and mysterious objects where something that you have, you don't realize that's what it is the whole time you have it. And then suddenly it's magically revealed at the end. One of my favorites. I don't know if anyone listening to this or Rekka, I feel like you may have read like the, you know, the subsequent Wizard of Oz books. R: I have not read the sequels. K: Oh really? Okay. Yeah, and um R: I always meant to, but I just never got around to it. K: They're good. They're good. I got, I got really into them and I believe it's, is it in the second book? I can't remember. And one of them were Dorothy returns to Oz and they're trying to, you know, so Oz is now without a leader and she goes off on this whole quest with this boy that she finds who he's an orphan. And he doesn't have a lot of memories from when he was younger and they go in this whole thing and they're trying R: Well that sounds like a missing king. K: Better. It's a missing queen. Because they finally turn— their whole thing is they're trying to track down this witch who may know where the heir Ozma is. And they finally confront her and she tearfully breaks down and points to the boy and says, "I turned her into a boy." Dorothy's had the queen with her the whole time and didn't realize it. So yeah, that's a, you know, that's a good, I'm not sure that really fits the plot voucher, but I'm going to say that it does, because Dorothy does go out of her way to have this boy accompany her. I think the boy's name is Pip because of course it would be. You know, somebody who on a whim picks up like a bulletproof vest or has given a bullet professed and then get shot later. Or you know, there's always like the little meek character that they give like a knife or a gun to, and say here, hold this just in case. K: And then the main character is getting strangled to death and they use it. Those are plot vouchers. Another one— and then I promise I'll stop going through plot devices here, but I, I always enjoy this—is a good red herring. Very common in murder mysteries and thriller stories and even a spy novels. You know, this is trying to divert the audience of the reader's attention away from something and draw it to something else. You know, I mentioned murder mystery. So like this would be like, you know, the whole family's gathered for dinner and the grandmother suddenly dies. And the doctor of the family declare she's been poisoned, and who would have the motive for doing this? And while you, the reader trying to sort through all of this, there becomes a character who it's to you very clear has the best motives, the best opportunity and everything. But in the case of that, being a red herring, what it's doing is it's distracting you from something that's happening in the background, where there is actually a better candidate to be the murderer, but the author doesn't want you to know that yet. Red herrings are frequently used for another plot device, which is of course the plot twist, right? Very difficult to have a plot twist without a series of very well laid out red herrings. Yeah. R: And you have to be very balanced in how you use them. So you don't tip off that they are red herrings. Like they can't be so overtly obvious, although in certain genres they are tropes and people want the red herring and they want to be the smart one who figures out who the actual killer is before the detective realizes they are after the wrong person or whatever. K: Red herrings can actually be used within the book as well. Something that the you know, antagonist of the story does, to deliberately mislead our band of noble heroes and send them off on a wild goose chase so they can continue their nefarious plans undeterred, would be a red herring used within the context of the story. That's I hope kind of a good, "This is a plot device. This is a MacGuffin," but one thing I did want to touch on was things that can be MacGuffins, but don't seem like they would be MacGuffins. Because as we mentioned, MacGuffin is need to be, you know, functionally meaningless interchangeable and lacking agency. And these don't necessarily seem like things that would check off those boxes R: Just by their inherent nature. You're going to say people as your first one. So like you would see a character and you're going to think they're going to act with some agency. They're going to try to manipulate the world around them to get what they want. But sometimes... K: Sometimes they're just MacGuffins. You know, I mentioned, I am going to go back and try to figure this out. If Bella from Twilight is actually just a MacGuffin. My— I'm going to say in some books, yes. For staggeringly, large parts of the book. Baby Yoda is a MacGuffin for a really long time in the Mandalorian. Yes, it's a sentient functioning creature that in some cases does interact with and change the environment, but he really doesn't have a lot of agency. He's just sort of, kind of getting carted around by, by the Mandalorian. R: He wants to eat amphibians. K: He wants to eat amphibians and their eggs. And everybody wants him. Everyone is trying to get this child that—the viewer see some examples of his power early on, but most of the people trying to get him don't realize that. And even, you know, up to the very end, if not like at the, you know, the end of the story so far, he's suddenly become a very involved, interactive character, altering and changing the world around him. He's still, he's an object that's handed off. R: Right. Although technically by sending the Jedi signal homing signal, yes, he does get used. So therefore—. K: Yes, he becomes a plot device at that point. R: He is no longer a MacGuffin, but yeah, for most of the season, he is. K: He's kind of a Deus ex Machina there. R: Well, okay. Is he the Deus ex Machina or is Luke showing up to take him away the Deus ex Machina? K: Spoilers for Mandalorian season two, which— R: If you care, you already know. K: Yeah, Exactly. No, I would say he's the Deus ex Machina because by that point, Luke is a function of him. He only shows up for him. Okay. He's not a MacGuffin because he's not interchangeable if you know, Han Solo showed up that wouldn't have been very helpful for everyone. I mean, you know, extra gun, I guess, but Luke's the one we really needed in that situation, but yeah. And you see this you see this a lot in video games, like the escort quests, where, you know, you just have like some silly character that keeps trying to like run into dangerous situations and you have to prevent them from doing it. That's, they're serving as a MacGuffin at that point. You know, Rekka made the example of like the damsel in distress. People can be MacGuffins for a time and then change into plot devices or then even characters. R: Okay. But when you are looking over somebody or something from a story, how do you say here's where they change? And that changes them like before they weren't a plot device? K: Where, where is the crossover? R: Well, like when you're, when you're saying like, yes, that's a MacGuffin or yes, that's a plot device. Like if, as a plot device that meant that later they did something. So then were they ever a MacGuffin? K: Yes. MacGuffins do not have to stay MacGuffins. Hmm. You can graduate from MacGuffin to plot device and plot device to character. That's what typically is going to take a person from a MacGuffin to, you know, being part of the story, be it as a character or a plot device is them acting either on their own behalf or on the behalf of the people that were basically treating them as a MacGuffin at that point. Some of the common tropes with this is them suddenly gaining a power of some kind, you know, maybe this was like this you know, child princess that needed to be escorted across the galaxy. So she could go back and claim her throne. But basically we just had to keep her hidden and locked away and make sure, you know, people keep attacking the ship and trying to stop us from getting her home. K: But then she touches a crystal that she shouldn't have. And now she's going to get them all safely home she's then, you know, not a MacGuffin at that point, she is, you know, a character or maybe on some level, a plot device, usually in order for a person to be a true MacGuffin, they have to be completely helpless: babies, children that can't take care of themselves or, oh, here's a good one. Macguffins that will—like I mentioned with Ozma in, you know, the Wizard of Oz sequel books—MacGuffins that you didn't realize were with you the whole time. And they transform into something that transcends being a MacGuffin. You know, they were cursed to just be this rock. And for some reason, someone's got the rock with them the whole time and it's a MacGuffin, but then it's, you know, we broke the curse and it's actually a person. R: Or in science fiction, you might have somebody that's like in stasis, in cryo, and you don't know why you're transporting them or why everyone keeps attacking your ship to get them or something. K: Macguffins aren't static. They don't always have to stay MacGuffin. A good example of a MacGuffin that does not stay MacGuffin is an egg, anytime, you know, there's a, a precious egg or something similar that we have to, you know, be transporting and getting to wherever it needs to hatch or something. And then it hatches probably dragons are a really good example or trope here. And then it actually hatches and turns into a dragon. Well, that dragon is not a MacGuffin because it's a dragon. R: And at the very least it changes the plot by being a hungry, now-alive thing. K: Very much so, very much. So other things that can be MacGuffins. We talked about interchangeable objects a little bit, you know, the MacGuffin does not have to be the static standard object to the whole time. It can change. It can be, you know, it's whatever the character or characters desire or need at that moment. R: It could be a relay race of MacGuffins. K: Exactly. Really, honestly it could. It really could. And then the other one that I had made a note of here is a place. So, you know, we think of the MacGuffin as an object that you're trying to hold, but it can also be a place that you're trying to get to that is, you know, maybe not, we're not sure if it's real, if it's a fabled, you know, legendary location El Dorado is a good example of that. A lot of, a lot of treasure seeking-based stories have places that sort of serve as MacGuffins. And to the clear, the treasure being a MacGuffin and the place being a MacGuffin are two different things, because the treasure—like I'll go back to National Treasure—Um they very explicitly stayed in that, that it's been moved around a lot. So they're not trying to find a specific place. They are trying to find a specific thing. They just don't know where it is. R: And once they get it, they're going to remove it from that place. K: Yes. A MacGuffin that is a place is a specific spot that you've got to get to. Maybe it's a sacred temple where you could only perform this specific resurrection spell, or maybe it's a city made entirely of gold or like Treasure Planet was a good one because you had to get to that specific planet and that specific place on the planet in order to, you know, find and access all of this treasure. R: Or in the Mummy Returns, when they are trying to release the scorpion bracelet from their son's wrist, they have to go to this temple specifically to do that. K: Yeah. So places can be a little tricky. They, they verge a little bit more on, on plot devices, but there are definitely a place can serve as a MacGuffin, especially if it's like a legendary one that nobody can really prove exists. K: By the way, if there's a lot to read on a MacGuffin is out there and you know, why they're, they're really not actually a bad, a bad thing. But conflating them, you know, conflating all plot devices and saying it's a MacGuffin is not actually accurate. K: Because plot devices are a lot more dynamic than MacGuffins. And there's a lot of different types and how they can be replied. Plot devices are a writing technique. Macguffins are a component of the writing technique. So anyway, I like a good MacGuffin. I think they're a lot of fun. And I think plot devices can be really helpful for, for writing. Again, it's something that like, there are these things that I think like they just exist. They're things that we have and things we have to, you know, have in our stories, but we talk about them very dismissively for some reason. I'm never quite sure why that is. R: I think a lot of the dismissiveness comes from people who have more of a literary mind with regard to their storytelling. K: Possibly. R: So that either they are dismissive of genre fiction entirely, or they feel like it's their duty to elevate genre fiction by eliminating tropes, which would then eliminate the genre. K: Yeah. R: Um yeah, I think that that's the perception I get anyway from the discourse I see about these things, but yeah. I definitely got the impression as a, you know, emerging writer that MacGuffins, were a bad thing. But you know, as we pointed out, there's a lot of people's favorite movies, favorite stories, favorite movies, favorite plays that are just chock full of MacGuffins. K: All of the Indiana Jones, R: Pretty much, yeah. This belongs in a museum because it can just go behind glass and stay there. But in the meantime, let's fight over it. K: They Ark of the Covenant by the way, is one of my favorite MacGuffins: the Instakill MacGuffin. By the way, this is a trope is the MacGuffin that you get. And you're finally like, "Haha I have the thing." And then it kills everyone. R: The MacGuffin that you should not mess with. K: Yes. I like MacGuffins. R: Macguffins are good. And if the advice is, "I don't know what to do in the scene," "make something blow up." Like why not use a MacGuffin to keep your plot moving forward? K: Yeah. R: There's definitely a draw in like wanting an object. People can understand multiple people wanting the same object. This is the nature of humanity. So it's something we can identify quickly and relate to and understand without spending a whole bunch of time on it. K: If you just exist in your life, you're going to come across a lot of MacGuffins. My current MacGuffin is I really want a bagel. R: But it has to be a New York bagel. So it's not just a MacGuffin. K: It has to be the everything bagel with scallion cream cheese from the place around the corner from me. And the thing is, I don't have time to go get it right now, but I really want it. And for my life, it is functionally meaningless and interchangeable, because I could very easily just go get some toast out of the fridge and that will nourish and satiate me. But it's not the thing that I desire. R: But it's not. Yeah. It's not going to satisfy you. It's just going to feed you. K: Yes, exactly. Exactly. All right. Well, I think that's MacGuffins. Thank you so much, everyone for listening. R: And we'll be back with something else that we have opinions on in two weeks. K: We have a lot of opinions. R: Thanks, everyone.

Drop Da Mic.
EPISODE 237: FROM THE BATES TO THE BAY (PSYCHO 1960 Film Discussion)

Drop Da Mic.

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 76:37


In this very special episode, we invited Bay Area native, Ryan Jiminez onto the show for a review of Director, Alfred Hitchcock's formative classic, ‘PSYCHO.' Tune in for our brand new pop culture news and weekly recommendations for both, TV and film!

Plumbing the Death Star
Is Humanity Doomed in Alfred Hitchcock's The Birds?

Plumbing the Death Star

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2021 48:18


Sign up to our newsletter here. Join our facebook group here or join our Discord here.You can physically send us stuff to PO BOX 7127, Reservoir East, Victoria, 3073.Want to help support the show?Sanspants+ | Shop | TeesWant to get in contact with us? Email | Twitter | Website | Facebook | RedditOr individually at;Jackson | Duscher | ZammitTheme music by the wonderfully talented Benny Davis! You can find all his stuff at his website or check out his YouTube channel. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

First Timers Movie Club
Psycho (1960) with guest Solymar Romero

First Timers Movie Club

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 139:09


On this episode, Patrick and Lolo kick off the Halloween season with guest Solymar Romero by showing her Alfred Hitchcock's horror classic, PSYCHO for the very first time! A masterful film of terror, this is not one you want to miss. But will Solymar like it? Will it turn out to be everything it's been hyped up to be? And what on earth is so fascinating about this one movie that we talk about it for over two hours, making this our longest podcast to date?! Listen now to find out!Vote First Timers Movie Club the Best Local Podcast here: https://vote.thepitchkc.com/arts-and-entertainment/best-local-podcastNew episodes of First Timers Movie Club come out every other Friday so click SUBSCRIBE and rate us five stars to make sure you don't miss our next episode!Have a favorite (or least favorite) famous movie that you think we should've seen? Reach out to IX Film Productions on Twitter, Instagram or email and we'll add it to our list!Watch Solymar Romero in Under The Sun: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1rQ8RxxVmME&tDon't miss our 2021 Oscars series and the upcoming Harry Potter Episode exclusively on our Patreon: www.patreon.com/ixfilmproductionsFollow IX Film Productions for podcast updates, stand up comedy, original web shorts and comedy feature films at:Facebook: www.facebook.com/ixfilmproductionsTwitter: www.twitter.com/ixproductionsInstagram: @IXProductionsYouTube: www.youtube.com/ixfp"First Timers Movie Club" is brought to you by IX Film Productions."Making the World a Funnier Place one Film at a Time"MusicThe Curtain Rises by Kevin MacLeodLink: https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/5007-the-curtain-risesLicense: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

Anatomy of a Scream Pod Squad
The Beauty of Horror: Episode 18 - Christine Madrid French and ‘The Shining‘

Anatomy of a Scream Pod Squad

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 71:54


In this episode of The Beauty of Horror, Chandler talks with author and architecture historian Christine Madrid French about the structural beauty of The Shining (1980). The two discuss haunted spaces, how buildings help you “time travel”, the nature of hauntings, art deco hotels, and, of course, aesthetics! Want to connect more with the podcast and its guests? Check out the info below! Twitter: Chandler - @_Shockaholic Beauty of Horror - @BeautyHorrorPod Christine - @madridfrench Links: Beauty of Horror BoH Webpage BoH Ko-Fi Email Christine Instagram (Christine): @MadamHistorian Instagram (Christine's house): @pineycroftaframe First Annual HitchCon (1-3 October, virtual) Alfred Hitchcock and American Architecture: Villain's Lairs, Skyscrapers, Mansions and Motels (University of Virginia press, October 2022) Music by Karl Casey (White Bat Audio) Cover Art designed by JRGDrawing Edited by Aviva Dassen If you enjoyed this episode, please be sure to rate and subscribe! For more wonderful podcasts like this, be sure to check out anatamoyofascream.com and follow the network on Twitter and Instagram @aoas_xx!

Fandom Podcast Network
Good Evening An Alfred Hitchcock Podcast Episode 64: AHP: Wet Saturday

Fandom Podcast Network

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 17:48


Good Evening An Alfred Hitchcock Podcast Episode 64: AHP: Wet Saturday In this episode of Good Evening: An Alfred Hitchcock Podcast, your hosts Brandon-Shea Mutala, Tom Caldwell, and Chris Haigh continue their discussions on the episodes of Alfred Hitchcock Presents directed by Hitch. Today's episode: Wet Saturday Hosts: Brandon-Shea Mutala, Tom Caldwell, and Chris Haigh Find us: Twitter: @goodeveningpod @brandonmutala @higher_boy @TomCaldwell3000 Facebook: Good Evening: An Alfred Hitchcock Podcast Email: goodeveningpodcast@hotmail.com And, as always, Good Evening is a proud member of the Fandom Podcast Network. @fanpodnetwork Thanks to our Associate Producer, Pat McFadden, our Man Who Knows Exactly Enough. Thanks so much to Jason Cullimore for our awesome theme song! http://www.jasoncullimore.com https://soundcloud.com/jason-cullimore https://www.instagram.com/jasoncullimoreartist/ - fpnet.podbean.com - FPNet on Podbean app - Fandom Podcast Network on: Apple Podcasts / Stitcher / Podbean / Google Play / Spotify / Iheartradio - Facebook: Fandom Podcast Network - Email: fandompodcastnetwork@gmail.com - Instagram: FandomPodcastNetwork  - Twitter: @fanpodnetwork Please help support the Fandom Podcast Network through reviews on Apple Podcasts / iTunes and our Fandom Podcast Network Store on Tee Public.  The FANDOM PODCAST NETWORK is now on YouTube! Join us! Link: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCib-kbKfAagsxrWlJU01Rcg PLEASE SUBCRIBE to our YouTube channel to receive notifications of new podcast episodes and live events. Fandom Podcast Network Tee Public Store: Get Your Fandom Podcast Network and Couch Potato Theater Merchandise on Tee Public! Please visit our TeePublic store where you can help support the Fandom Podcast Network while wearing your Couch Potato Theater and other awesome Fandom Podcast Network favorite show logos with pride! Tee Public Store: https://www.teepublic.com/user/fandompodcastnetwork  Please listen to our other awesome podcasts on the Fandom Podcast Network: Master Feed: https://fpnet.podbean.com/ 

This Film is Lit
Prequel to Psycho - The Great Gatsby Reaction, Alfred Hitchcock, Psycho Preview

This Film is Lit

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 52:15


- Patron Shoutouts - The Great Gatsby Fan Reaction - Learning with TFIL: Alfred Hitchcock - Psycho Preview

Macabre Media Podcast
Episode 44: "Da Birbs"

Macabre Media Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2021 60:27


This week, we're discussing Hitchcock's classic horror film, The Birds.  Next time on Macabre Media podcast, we're gonna chat about the Mortal Kombat reboot.  Support Macabre Media on Patreon, follow us on Twitter and Instagram, and join our Discord server! Follow Kaleb, Jorge, and Pearson on Twitter, too. Our logo and artwork were designed by Nathanael Whale.

Inside Psycho
Stories from after 9/11

Inside Psycho

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2021 6:36


How did 9/11 the day become 9/11 the idea? That question drives award-winning host Dan Taberski (Missing Richard Simmons, Running From COPS, The Line) to shift his focus to what happened on 9/12, and every day after that. 9/12 is a poignant, surprising, and surprisingly funny seven episode series about people who wake up on 9/12 having to navigate a new, radically altered world. A teenager gets caught up in an out-of-control conspiracy theory that he helped start. A Pakistani business owner finds hundreds of his Brooklyn neighbors are disappearing. Joke-writers at The Onion must figure out just how soon is “too soon”? 9/12 asks what it all means. We know what happened on 9/11. But what happened on 9/12 to alter our memory and our perspective forever? Listen to 9/12: wondery.fm/9_12_InsideSeriesAll seven episodes of 9/12 are available to stream now on Amazon Music or Wondery+. Episodes will release weekly everywhere starting September 8th.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Sofa King Podcast
A Sofa King Classic: Ed Gein

Sofa King Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2021 74:49


This episode takes a look at the ghastly life of Ed Gein, the Plainfield Butcher. Gein was the inspiration for Alfred Hitchcock's Psycho as well as the serial killer Buffalo Bill in The Silence of the Lambs and Leatherface from Texas Chainsaw Massacre. How can one man be the genesis all of these horrific film characters? Give us a listen to find out. Gein was born at the turn of the century to a wildly religious zealot of a mother and an alcoholic father who worked tanning animal skins when he wasn't drunk (spoiler alert, the skin tanning comes in useful later in Gein's life…). As Gein grew up, he came to idolize his domineering mother and lived with her, never having gone on so much as one a date, until her death when he was 39 years old. Gein's mother died shortly after she had a stroke thought to be induced by the death of Gein's older brother Harold (who died under rather mysterious circumstances). Once alone, Gein earned the reputation as “Weird Eddy” the guy who lived alone in an empty farmhouse. He drifted through town doing odd jobs and even babysitting for people, until in 1957, when he was arrested for the murder of Bernice Warden, the clerk at the general store. She was shot on the first day of hunting season, and when police investigated Gein's home, they discovered a trove of horrors. Since his mother's death, Gein had killed several people, robbed dozens of graves, and had a house of trophies. Horrible, horrible trophies. Warden's body was hanging in a shed, being cut apart like a deer. What the police found in the house itself was even more mind blowing. Noses in a box, masks made from human faces, a “Woman suit” made from the skin of several women, a belt made of nipple, female genetalia tucked in pairs of man-sized panties, you name it. How many people did Gein kill? How many graves did he rob? Why did he do it? What other trophies did he keep? We try to get to the bottom of it in this episode, and you can get the bonus feature of Dave and Brent freaking out on air while Brad shows them pictures of some of Gein's trophies—pictures they consciously decided not to Google while they were doing their research.