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State and local laws enforcing racial segregation in the Southern United States

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How To Love Lit Podcast
Kate Chopin - The Awakening - Episode 3 - Edna Pontellier Battles The Forces Without Only To Meet The Forces Within!

How To Love Lit Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 14, 2022 49:51


Kate Chopin - The Awakening - Episode 3 - Edna Pontellier Battles The Forces Without Only To Meet The Forces Within!   Hi, I'm Christy Shriver and we're here to discuss books that have changed the world and have changed us.    I'm Garry Shriver and this is the How to Love Lit Podcast.  This is our third episode discussing Kate Chopin's controversial novella, The Awakening.  Week 1 we introduced Chopin, her life and the book itself.  We talked about what a stir it made during her lifetime ultimately resulting in it being forgotten and then rediscovered midway through the 20th century.  Last week, we spent all of our time on the vacation resort island of Grand Isle.  We met Mr. ad Mrs. Pontellier, as well as the two women who represent got Edna, our protagonist, two alternating lifestyles.  Edna Pontellier, we were quick to learn, is not a happily married woman.  Her husband is outwardly kind to her, but readers are told outright that love and mutual respect was never part of the arrangement between these two.  Edna is indulged by Mr. Pontellier, for sure.  He gives her anything she wants in terms of money or material, but in exchange, she is his ornament, an expensive hobby, a pet even- something to be prized- or as Ibsen would describe it- a beautiful doll for his doll house.      The story starts in the summer at the vacation resort town of Grand Isle, Louisiana.  While vacationing on the island, Edna Pontellier experiences what Chopin terms “the awakening”.  She awakens to the understanding that she is not a pet or a doll in the doll house, and just like Nora in the The Doll's House, she decides she really doesn't want to be one anymore.     No, I guess if that were the only thing to this story, we'd have to say, Sorry Kate, Ibsen beat you by about 20 years.  In Ibsen's story, Nora awakens when her husband, Torvald, turns on her over money.      That's a good point, what awakens Edna in this book is not a marital crisis over money.  It is a crisis that awakens her, and it totally informs how she views her marriage, but it is a crisis concerning her husband at all that is the catalyst.   She is awakened to her own humanity by discovering her own sensuality.  I want to highlight that this awakening isn't overtly sexually provoked.  No man comes in and seduces Edna; she does not go off with a wild vacation crew.  She is left vulnerable, if you want to think about it that way, because of loveless marriage, but she is sensually and emotionally provoked through three  very different relationships- all of which affect her physically as well as emotionally.  The first is with a Creole woman, Adele Ratigntole, one with a younger Creole man, Robert LeBrun, and the third with the provocative music of Madame Reisz.  Experiences with these three awaken something in Edna that encourages maybe even forces her to rebel- rebel against her husband, against the culture, against the person she has always been, against the roles she has played, against everything that she has ever known.      The problem is- rebellion only takes you so far.  You may know what you DON'T want, but does that help you understand what you DO?  And this is Edna's problem.  Where do we go from here?     And so, in chapter 17, we return with the Pontellier's to their home in New Orleans.  And, as we have suggested before, New Orleans is not like any other city in America, and it is in these cultural distinctives of Creole life at the turn of the century that Chopin situates our protagonist.  But before we can understand some of the universal and psychological struggles Chopin so carefully sketches for us, we need to understand a little of the culture of this time period and this unusual place.  Garry, tell us a little about this world.  What is so special about Esplanade Street?    Well, one need only Google tourism New Orleans and a description of Esplanade street will be in the first lists of articles you run into.  Let me read the opening sentence from the travel website Neworleans.com    One of the quietest, most scenic and historic streets in New Orleans, Esplanade Avenue is a hidden treasure running through the heart of the city. From its beginning at the foot of the Mississippi River levee to its terminus at the entrance of City Park, Esplanade is a slow pace thoroughfare with quiet ambiance and local charm.  According to this same website, Esplanade Street, during the days of Chopin, functioned as “millionaire row”- which, of course is why the Pontelliers live there.    It actually forms the border between the French Quarter and the less exclusive Faubourg Marigny.  At the turn of the last century it was grand and it was populated by wealthy creoles who were building enormous mansions meant to compete with the mansions of the “Americans” on St. Charles Avenue.    “The Americans”?    Yes, that was the term for the non-Creole white people.  The ones that descended from the British or came into New Orleans from other parts of the US.     Esplanade Street was life at its most grand- there is no suffering like you might find in other parts of New Orleans.  The Pontelliers were wealthy; they were glamorous; these two were living competitively.      The first paragraph of chapter 17 calls the Pontellier mansion dazzling white. And the inside is just as dazzling as the outside. Mrs. Pontellier's silver and crystal were the envy of many women of less generous husbands.  Mr. Pontellier was very proud of this and according to our sassy narrator loved to walk around his house to examine everything.  He “greatly valued his possessions.  They were his and I quote “household gods.”    The Pontelliers had been married for six years, and Edna over this time had adjusted to the culture and obligations of being a woman of the competitive high society of Creole New Orleans.  One such obligation apparently centered around the very serious etiquette of calling cards and house calls.  This is something we're familiar with, btw, since we watch Bridgerton.  It was something we saw in Emma, too.  Garry, talk to us about the very serious social business of calling cards.     Well, this is first and foremost a European custom during this time period. It started with simple cards designed to announce a person's arrival, but as in all things human, it grew and grew into something much larger and subtextual- and of course, with rules.  During the Victorian era, the designs on the cards as well as the etiquette surrounding were elaborate.  A person would leave one's calling card at a friend's house, and by friend meaning a person in your community- you may or may not actually be friends. Dropping off a card was a way to express appreciation, offer condolences or just say hello.  If someone moved into the neighborhood, you were expected to reach out with a card, and a new arrival was expected to do the same to everyone else.      The process would involve putting the card on an elaborate silver tray in the entrance hall.  A tray full of calling cards was like social media for Victorians- you were demonstrating your popularity.    For example, if we were doing this today, we would have a place in the entrance of our home, and we'd make sure the cards of the richest or most popular people we knew were on to.  We would want people who dropped off cards to be impressed by how many other callers we had AND how impressive our friends were. The entire process was dictated by complicated social rules, and as Leonce explains to Edna, to go against these rules could mean social suicide.     It could also mean financial suicide because business always has a human component.  The function of an upper class woman would be to fulfil a very specific social obligation and this involved delivering and accepting these calling cards.  Every woman would have a specific day where she would make it known she was receiving cards, and the other ladies would go around town to pay house calls.  In some cases, a woman might remain in her carriage while her groom would take the card to the door.  During the Regency era like in Jane Austen's day, there was a system of bending down the corner of the card if you were there in person, and not if you were sending it, but by Chopin's day, I'm not sure if that was still a thing.     The main thing was that the card would be dropped off on this special silver tray. If it were a first call, the caller might only leave a card.  But, if you were calling on the prescribed day, the groom would further inquire if the lady of the house were home.  A visit would consist of about twenty minutes of polite conversation.  It was important that if someone called on you, you must reciprocate and call on then on their visiting day.      Well, the Tuesday they get back, Edna leaves the house on her reception day and does not receive any callers- a social no-no.  In fact, as we go through the rest of the book, she never receives callers again. This is an affront to the entire society, and an embarrassment to her husband; it's also just bad for business, as Mr. Pontellier tries to explain to his wayward wife, let's read this exchange.    “Why, my dear, I should think you'd understand by this time that people don't do such things; we've got to observe “les convenances” if we ever expect to get on and keep up with the procession.  If you felt that you had to leave this afternoon, you should have left some suitable explanation for your absences.      One thing I find interesting.  Mr. Pontellier assumes that Mrs. Pontellier is on the same page on wanting the same things as he wants, and what he wants is to keep up with the procession.  They'd been doing this for the last six years, and doing it well.    Another thing I notice is that he doesn't rail at her for skipping out. Mr. Pontellier, unlike her father, even as we progress through the rest of the book, is not hard on her at all.  In fact, he's indulgent.  The problem in the entire book is not that he's been overtly abusive or cruel.  Read the part where he tries to kind of help her fix what he considers to be a serious social blunder.    Page 60    Well, if taken in isolation, this exchange doesn't seem offensive, and I might even have taken sides with Mr. Pontellier if it weren't back to back with this horrid scene of him complaining about his dinner then walking out to spend the rest of the evening at the club where he clearly spends the majority of his time.  You have to wonder what is going on at that club, but beyond that.  Edna is again left in sadness.  “She went and stood at an open window and looked out upon the deep tangle of tea garden below”.  (On an aside, if you've read Chopin's story, the story of an hour, you should recognize the language here and the image of this open window).  Anyway,, Here again we have another image of a caged bird, or a person who is looking out in the world but not feeling a part of it.  “She was seeing herself and finding herself in just sweet half-darkness which met her moods. But the voices were not soothing that came to her from the darkness and the sky above and the stars.  They jeered and sounded mournful notes without promise, devoid even of home.  She turned back into the room and began to walk to and from down its whole length, without stopping, without resting.  She carried in her hands a thin handkerchief, which she tore into ribbons, rolled into a ball, and flung from her.  Once she stopped, and taking off her wedding ring, flung it upon the carpet.  When she saw it there, she stamped her heel upon it, striving to crush it.  But her small boot heel did not make an indenture, not a mark upon the little glittering circlet.  In a sweeping passion she seized a glass vase from the table and flung it upon the tiles of the hearth.  She wanted to destroy something.  The crash and the clatter were what she wanted to hear.”    She's clearly angry…and not just because Mr. Pontellier complained about the food and walked out of the house.  She's angry about everything.     Never mind the fact that we are never told what goes on at this club, but there are several indications in different parts of the book that Mr. Pontellier may be doing other things besides smoking cigars in crowded rooms.  Adele even tells Edna that she disapproves of Mr. Pontellier's club.  She goes on to say, “It's a pity Mr. Pontellier doesn't stay home more in the evenings.  I think you would be more- well, if you don't me my saying it- more united.”      Although I will add, Edna quickly replies, “'Oh dear no!' What should I do if he stayed home? We wouldn't have anything to say to each other.”  - the fact remains that MR. Pontelier does not see any need to nurture any sort of human or intimate relationship with Edna- theirs comes across as a cordial business arrangement, at best, with Edna in the position of employee.      True, and although I don't know if this is the right place to point this out, but in terms of the sexual indiscretions that may or may not be going on when Mr. Pontellier is at the club, there is likely a lot in the culture at large going on under the surface that a person from the outside wouldn't immediately be aware of.   Edna is naïve at first to all that goes on in her Victorian-Creole world.  There just is no such thing as “lofty chastity”  amongst the Creole people, or any people I might add, although Edna initially seems to believe that in spite of all the sexual innuendo in the language, nothing sexual was ever going on.  There are just too many indications otherwise in the story that that is not the case.  The reader can see it, even though Edna cannot.     True, and if you didn't catch it on Grand Isle, in the city, it is more obvious, and the farther along we go in the story, it gets more obvious as well.  Mrs. James Highcamp is one example.  She has married an “American” but uses her daughter as a pretext for cultivating relationships with younger men.  This is so well-known that Mr. Pontellier tells Edna, after seeing her calling card, that the less you have to do with Mrs. Highcamp the better.  But she's not the only example.  Victor basically details an encounter with Edna of being with a prostitute he calls “a beauty” when she comes to visit his mother..ending with the phrase that she wouldn't comprehend such things.  And of course, most obviously there is the character Arobin with whom Edna eventually does get sexually involved, but his reputation has clearly preceded him.       Well, Edna's awakening to all of this would explain part of her anger, but  there is more to Edna's awakening then just Leonce, or the new culture she's a part of, or really any outside factor.     Yes, and it is in the universality of whatever is going on inside of Edna that we find ourselves.  That's what's so great about great literature- the setting can be 120 years ago, but our humanity is still our humanity.       I agree and love that, but let's get back to her setting for a moment. I think it's worth mentioning that the 19th century culture of the Creole people in New Orleans is messy and complicated in its own unique way.  It's fascinating, but for those who are not of the privileged class, life was often a harsh reality.  The world, especially in the South, was problematic for people of mixed race heritage.  So, and this is more true the closer we get to the Civil War and the Jim Crow era, but those who called themselves “white creoles” had a problem because of the large existence of the free people of mixed race ancestry in New Orleans.  There was a strong outside pressure to maintain this illusion of racial purity, but the evidence suggests this simply wasn't reality.  Let me throw out a few numbers to tell you what I'm talking about.  From 1782-1791, the St. Louis Catholic Church in New Orleans recorded 2688 births of mixed race children.  Now that doesn't seem like a large number, but let me throw this number out- that same congregation at that time same only records 40 marriages of black or mixed race people.  Now, I know Catholics are known for having large families, but I'm not sure 20 women can account for 2688 births.      No, something feels a little wrong.  That number suggests another explanation may be in order.      Exactly, and by 1840 that number grows from 2688 to over 20,000 with mixed raced Creoles representing 18% of the total population of residents of New Orleans.  And if that doesn't convince you, here's another indicator, during this same period many many free women of color were acquiring prime real estate in New Orleans under their own names.  These women had houses built and passed estates on to their children, but notice this detail, the children of these mixed-raced women had different last names then their mothers.  We're not talking about small amounts of property here.  By 1860 $15 million dollars worth of property was in the name of children with last names that were not the same as that of their mothers, oh and by the way, a lot of that property was in the neighborhood where Edna rents her pidgeon house just around the corner from Esplanade street- in other words around the corner and walking distance from millionaire row.      Well, that's really interesting, and I guess, does add a new dimension to the subtext in the language for sure.    Well, it does, and it is likely something readers of the day would have certainly understood, more than we do 100 years later when the stakes of identifying as being of mixed raced heritage are not the difference between freedom and slavery.  But beyond just that, it's an example of cultures clashing.  Edna represents an outwardly prudish Puritan culture coming into a society that is French, Spanish and Caribbean- very different thinking.  This is a de-facto multi-cultural world; it's Catholic; it's French-speaking; it's international.  She doesn't understand what she's seeing.  And in that regard, her own situational reality is something she's realizing she is only beginning to understand, and she comes into it all very gradually. She is not, in Adele's words, “One of them.”  In fact, there may have been irony in the narrator in Grand Isle suggesting that Robert LeBrun's relationships every summer were platonic.  His relationship with the girl in Mexico we will see most certainly is not, but nor was his relationship with Mariequeita on Grand Isle, the girl they meet on the day they spent together.      Indeed.  You may be right- perhaps there is a real sense that Edna has been blind, and perhaps not just to her husband but by an entire society that presents itself one way but in reality is something entirely different altogether.  When she visits Adele and her husband at their home, everything seems perfect- of course.  Adele is the perfect woman with this perfect life.  Adele is beautiful.  Her husband adores her.  The Ratignolle's marriage is blissful, in fact to use the narrator's words, “The Ratignolles' understood each other perfectly.  If ever the fusion of two human beings into one has been accomplished on this sphere it was surely in their union.”      Do you think it's sarcasm again?  Was it truly perfect, or just presenting itself to be perfect?     It's really hard to tell.  Maybe they have worked out a great life together.  I think there is a lot in this passage to suggest they are truly happy together.  Edna even expresses that their home is much happier than hers.  She quotes that famous Chinese proverb “Better a dinner of herbs”.  The entire quote is “Better a dinner of herbs than a stalled ox where hate is.”- meaning her house has better food but she thinks of it as a hateful place- whereas this place is the opposite.   Poor thing- she sees her reality for what it is.  I still see a little sarcasm in the narrator's language, but even if Adele is every bit as perfect as she seems, and even if her home is every bit as perfect as it seems, and even if her husband is every bit as perfect as he seems, in the most real of ways, that could all be true and it wouldn't matter.  E    Precisely, The Ratignole's life can be every bit as perfect as it appears. and it wouldn't make Edna want it any more.  Edna leaves Adele's happy home, realizing that even if she could have it it's not the life she wants.  She wouldn't want that world even if Leonce loved her.  It's just not for her.  The problem is, that's as far as she's gotten with her problem solving.  All she knows is what she DOESN'T want.  Her new world is a world of negation.  She wants to quit, and so she does.  She absolutely disregards all her duties to the point that it finally angers Leonce enough to confront her.    “It seems to me the utmost folly for a woman at the head of a household, and the mother of children, to spend in an atelier days which would be better employed contriving for the comfort of her family.”    An atelier is an artist studio.  It' seems Edna has left all the responsibilities she had as a housewife as well as a mother.  And let me add, Edna was never dusting, cooking, or bathing her children.  She has several house keepers and nannies.  But now, she's not even overseeing what others are doing.  Instead, she's devoting herself entirely to painting.  And surprisingly, Leonce doesn't even have a problem with that in and of itself.  Edna tells her husband, “I feel like painting.”  To which he responds, “Then in God's name paint!  But don't let the family go to the devil.  There's Madame Ratignolle, because she keeps up her music, she doesn't let everything else go to chaos.   And she's more of a musician than you are a painter.”  Yikes, that may be honest, but it does come across as a little harsh.  I know.  I think it's kind of a funny line.  To which, Edna has an interesting comeback- it's like she knows it's not about the painting. She says, “It isn't on account of the painting that I let things go.”  He asks her then why she's let everything go, but she has no answer.  She says she just doesn't know.  Garry, do you want to take a stab at what's going on with Edna?   Well, I do want to tread carefully.  What is fascinating about this book is not so much that Chopin is arguing for any specific course of action, or warning against any specific set of behaviors.  She doesn't condemn Edna for anything, not even the affair she will have with Arobin.  Instead of judging, Chopin, to me, seems to be raising questions.  And it is the questions that she raises that are so interesting.  Edna is desperately trying to rewrite the narrative of her life.  There is no question about that.  But that is an artistic endeavor, in some ways like painting or singing.   I guess we can say Chopin is blending her metaphors here.  Edna doesn't want to be a parrot and copy, but she's living her life exactly the way she is painting- it's uncontrolled; it's undisciplined; it's impulsive.  I'd also say, it's rather unoriginal.  There is no doubt that the social roles offered to her are restrictive.  There's no doubt her marriage is a problem, but as we get farther into the story, it's hard to believe that even if all of these problems could be rectified that Edna would be able define a life for herself.  We, as humans, are always more than a reaction to the social and cultural forces in our world- I hate to get back to the word we used last week, but I can't get away from it.  Even under strict social norms, which I might add, Edna is NOT under for her time period- she is after all one of the most privileged humans on planet Earth at that particular time in human history, but even if she were under severe restrictions, she, as a human, still has agency- we all do.  Yes- and to use Chopin's words from chapter 6, Mrs Pontellier was beginning to realize her position as an individual as a human being, and to recognize her relations as an individual to the world WITHIN and about her.  I think that Edna is like the rest of us in that it's easier to understand and manage the world about us as opposed to the world within.  At least I can SEE the world about me- how can I see within?  How can I understand myself?  And so Edna goes to the world of Madame Reisz having discarded the world of Adele Ratignolle- the world of art, the world of the artist- which is where Edna goes in chapter 21.  I would argue that she sees it as the polar opposite of Adele's reality.  There is the Adele version of being a woman- a totally objectified, sexualized but mothering type of woman= versus this version of womanhood who is basically asexually.  Perhaps Madame Reisz isn't a woman at all- she's an artist.    Except that world, the world of the artist, comes with its own share of difficulties nevermind that it is simply more uncomfortable.  Reisz' house is described as “dingy”.  There's a good deal of smoke and soot.  It's a small apartment.  There's a magnificent piano, but no elegant food or servants or silver trays for calling cards.  She cooks her meals on a gasoline stove herself.  Let me quote here, “it was there also that she ate, keeping her belongings in a rare old buffet, dingy and battered from a hundred years use.”  True, but there is also  the music and when the music filled the room it floated out upon the night, over the housetops, the crescent of the river, losing itself in the silence of the air and made Edna sob. The art is otherworldly, and there is something to that.  Something attractive maybe even metaphysical.  I want to talk about Kate Chopin's choice of music.  I don't think we noted this in episode one, but Chopin was an accomplished pianist.  She played by ear and read music.  She held parties, almost identical to the ones she described Madame Ratignole throwing in the book with dancing and card playing.  Music was a very big deal to Kate Chopin, so when she includes specific music in her writing, she's not just dropping in commonly used songs, she uses artists she likes for specific reasons, and in this novel, the pianist Frederic Chopin is selected intentionally- and not because he has the same last name, although I did check that out- they are not related.  Garry, as a musician yourself, what can you tell us about Frederic Chopin, the Polish composer and pianist?  Well, let me make this comparison, Frederic Chopin's music in his day was the pelvis gyrating Elvis' Rock in Roll of his day.  It was provocative.  19th century attitudes towards this type of harmony driven romantic music would seem hysterical to us.  They were seen as sensual and a destructive force, especially for women.  This may even be Chopin's sassy narrator playing with us again- Frederic Chopin's music is definitely driving sensuality in Edna. To say Kate Chopin is using it ironically is likely taking it too far, but I don't know, maybe not.  This narrator has been ironic before. The main undeniable connection is that Madame Reisz plays Impromptus.  Impromptus are improvisational music.  Frederic Chopin wrote only four of them in his career.  The one Kate selects here is called Fantasie-Impromptu in C minor- it's the only one in a minor key that he ever wrote.  You can pull it up on Spotify and hear it for yourself.   It is full of rhythmical difficulties.  It's very difficult to play. It's quick and full of emotion.  There is banging on low notes at times, thrills and rolling notes going faster and slower at others points.  Frederic Chopin, by the way, was a very temperamental person and in some ways shares a lot of the personality quirks of Madame Reisz. But he did have an interesting philosophy about music that I really like and does connect to our book.  He is recorded to have said this, “words were born of sounds; sounds existed before words…Sounds are used to make music just as words are used to form language.  Thought is expressed through sounds.  And undefined human utterance is mere sound; the art of manipulating sounds is music.”  Interesting, music is thoughts as sounds.  I like the expression “undefined human utterance” especially in regard to Edna because she absolutely cannot get her thoughts out nor is she willing to share then with anyone.  She expresses more than once that her inner world was hers and hers alone. She can't get her thoughts out when she talks to Adele; she can't get them out when she talks to her husband, and she can't get them out even with Madame Reisz which would have been a very safe space for her to express herself.  At the end of chapter 21, she's sobbing at the music and holding in her hands a letter from Robert LeBrun crumpled and damp with tears.   It would have helped her to have found someone to talk to, maybe the Dr. Mandelet that Leonce goes to in chapter 22 for advice about how to help his wife.    What we find out from Leonce's conversation is that Edna has withdrawn from every single person in her world.  She won't even go to her sister's wedding.  What the doctor sees when he goes to dinner at their house is a very outwardly engaging woman but an inwardly withdrawn one.  The Doctor wonders if she's having an affair, but she isn't.    She is, to use the title of the book, One Solitary Soul.  As a human being, there are only so many types of relationships we find meaning in: we have our parents and birth family, we have our intimate relationship, we have our children (if we have any), we have our professional relationships, and we have our social friends- at least one of these has to be working for us.  Edna finds no satisfaction in any of them.  She doesn't have a trusting relationship anywhere.    Yes, every single relationship in her life is basically a burden.  Edna is trying to relieve herself of every single responsibility in the world hoping that getting out of relationships will help her expand her identity.  The problem is getting RID of responsibilities is not really the answer.  To find meaning in this world you must DO something worth doing.  Something that takes strength and energy.  Something you can be proud of.  Of course as a classroom teacher, that is what we do everyday.  It's not helpful to give students high grades or marks for nothing.  It weakens them.  When you give them a difficult task and then they are able to do that task, they grow, they get strong, they learn they are capable of even great responsibilities.  If you want to get strong, you have to take ON responsibilities- you have to practice strength training, Edna goes the opposite way here.      Edna does look for models, and if she wanted a career path, or a professional life like we think of in  our era, Chopin threw in a character that could have served that function.  It's what I see going on in  the chapters about the races.  Edna is actually really good at horse gambling.  She knows horses.  She knows the horse-racing business and knows it well.  The text actually says that she knows more about horse-racing than anyone in New Orleans.  In fact, it's her knowledge about horses that puts her on the radar of the man she eventually has the sexual relationship with, Alcee Arobin.    Let's read the section where we see this relationship, if we want to call it that, take shape.  Arobin had first seen her perform well at the tracks and to use the narrator's words, he admired Edna extravagantly after meeting her at the races with her father.  Mrs. Highcamp is also a completely different version of a feminine ideal, although neither Edna nor the narrator seem to think enough of to give her a first name.  This confused me some when I read this because in my mind, Mrs. James Highcamp would have been this type of a liberated woman that Chopin might want to have Edna admire.  She's clearly sexualy liberated, but beyond that she's worldly, intelligent, slim, tall.  Her daughter is educated, participates in political societies, book clubs, that sort of thing.  But nothing about Mrs. James Highcamp is alluring to Edna at all.  She suffers Mrs. James Highcamp because of her interest in Arobin.   Let's read about these encounters between Arobin and Edna.   Here's the first one  Page 86     So, Arobin becomes fascinated with Edna, in part because she is so smart and different from other women.  At the end of that evening, they dined with the Highcamps. And afterwards Arobin takes Edna home.  The text says this “She wanted something to happen- something, anything, she did not know what.  She regretted that she had not made Arobin stay a half hour to talk over the horses.  She counted the money she had won.  There was nothing else to do, so she went to bed, and tossed there for hours in a sort of monotonous agitation.  And so the relationship with Arobin is born out of boredom.    Yes, the dominant movement in Edna's life is always drifting towards boredom.  Edna wants to rewrite her social script, but she can't seem to define what she wants.  She has trouble speaking, so she has no words to write her own story.  She doesn't want to be a mother; she doesn't want to work except in sunny weather; she has an opportunity with Mrs. Highcamp to get involved with political or literary women; but that doesn't spark her interest.  She could make a name for herself at the races, but the money doesn't motivate her- she's always had it and in some ways doesn't seem to know a world without money.  So, she's going to default into this relationship with Arobin.  I'm going to suggest that she is again playing the part of the parrot.  Messing around with Arobin is just the kind of thing she sees men doing.  It's what Victor does; it may be what her husband does; it is likely what Robert is doing down in Mexico, so she's going to try to mimic male behavior since she hasn't really found a female model she's interested in emulating, and Arobin is an opportunitiy for this.    And yet, she's self-aware enough to not be seduced by Arobin.  The first time he really tries to make a move on her by kissing her hand, this is what she says which I find insightful,  “When she was alone she looked mechanically at the back of her hand which he had kissed so warmly.  Then she leaned her head down on the mantlepiece.  She felt something like a woman who in a moment of passion is betrayed into an act of infidelity, and realizes the significance of the act without being wholly awakened from its glamour.  The thought was passing vaguely through her mind, “what would he think?”  She did not mean her husband; she was thinking of Robert LeBrun.  Her husband seemed to her now like a person whom she had married without love as an excuse.  She lit a candle and went up to her room.  Alcee Arobin was absolutely nothing to her.  Yet his presence, his manners, the warmth of his glances, and above all the touch of his lips upon her hand had acted like a narcotic upon her.  She slept a languorous sleep, interwoven with vanishing dreams.”  Garry, is there a connection between Edna's boredom with her new life and her desire to pursue this relationship with Arobin.   Well, again, Dr. Kate Chopin is playing the psychologist.  Science has absolutely confirmed there is a relationship with boredom and risk-taking behaviors.  In other words, the more bored you find yourself, the more likely you are to do something risky.  It's one reason teenagers are so prone to dangerous behaviors like drugs.  They don't know yet how to cope with personal down time.  They can't manage their own boredom.  Bored people don't know what they want to do.  They also score low on scares that measure self-awareness.  Bored people can't monitor their own moods or understand what they truly want.  And here's another characteristic that should sound familiar in the life of Mrs. Edna Pontellier, notice that last line “vanishing dreams”, Edna is not dreaming.  She's not working at writing a script for her life..structuring a story for herself.  Her dreams and not building anything, they are vanishing.  That's not good.  And it's not that doesn't have illusions, she does, but a dream is not an illusion.  Dreams are what inspire us to do something different. Both a dream and an illusion are unreal, but an illusion will always be an illusion- it has no chance of becoming real; out of dreams new realities are born.  We are not seeing Edna dream.  Her dreams are vanishing.    Which brings us to the place where I want to end with this episode- chapter 26 and Edna's decision to move out of her husband's house.  I mentioned that this book is constructed with the archetypal 3 in mind at every point.  Edna has been living on Esplanade street- the wealthy gilded cage life, and she doesn't want that.  She has visited Madame Reisz's apartment, but she doesn't seem to want that- it's, and I quote, “cheerless and dingy to Edna”.  So what does she do? She moves two steps away from Esplanade Street, to a house Ellen calls, “the pigeon house.”  Pigeons are the oldest domesticated bird in the world.  They never fly far from home- homing pigeons is actually a term. She's building an illusion. Edna is going out of her husband's house to a place around the corner, but is she really building a new life of any kind?  What is this about?   Edna describes it to Madame Reisz, this way,  “I know I shall like it, like the feeling of freedom and independence.”    But is the feeling of freedom and independence the same as actually having freedom and independence?  Well, obviously not.  They are worlds apart.  But Edna lives in feelings.  She works when she feels like it.  She plays with her children when she feels like it, and now she admits to Madame Reisz that she's in love with Robert LeBrun, who by the way is coming back.  And when she finds that out she feels, and I quote “glad and happy to be alive.”  And what does she do after that, she stops at a candy store, buys a box to send to her children who are with their grandparents in the country and she writes a charming letter to her husband.  Her letter was brilliant and brimming with cheerfulness.  I'm sorry, but Edna frustrates the feminist in me.    Well, Edna is struggling for sure.  She can't connect with people.  She can't identify a dream worth pursuing.  She can't write her own story.  There is no doubt that a lot of this has to so with cultural and social forces at work in her world.   These are powerful forces.  However,  it is not the outside forces of her world that will do her in.  Edna is smart.  She's beautiful.  She's charming.  She actually has a lot going for her, especially for a woman during this time period.  If Chopin had wanted to write a story where a woman breaks free and soars, she has a protagonist who is positioned to do that very thing.    But she's in a mess.  And maybe that's why she's so relatable.  Many of us have made messes of our lives.  We have an incredible ability to screw up, but  humans are also incredibly resilient.  Look at Chopin's own life as an example.  In some ways, she's both Adele Ragntingole and Madame Reiz, at different points in her life she'd been both.  She may even have been Mrs. James Highcamp to a lesser degree. Why is Edna struggling here?  Well, humans are incredibly resilient, but you know what else we are- we are social beings.  Let's revisit that original book title, “One Solitary Soul”- it's my experience that no one gets out alone- not even the rich, the beautiful or the smart.  No one gets out alone.    Ah, Edna is strong enough to confront the forces without, but who will help her confront the forces within?  And so next episode, we will see her confront those internal forces.  There are no more female characters to meet; no more male characters either for that matter.  We will see Edna confront Edna alone, and we will see what happens.  Thank you for listening.  If you enjoy our podcast, please share it with a friend, a relative, your classmates, your students.  We only grow when you share.  Also, come visit with us via our social media how to love lit podcast- on Instagram, facebook and our website.  Feel free to ask questions, give us your thoughts, recommend books.  These are all things we love.  Thanks for being with us today.  Peace out.         

The Rush Limbaugh Show
Clay Travis and Buck Sexton Show H1 – May 13 2022

The Rush Limbaugh Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 37:06


Clay hosts solo while Buck visits Chicago for the first time. Musk pauses Twitter purchase as information arbitrage rages on Twitter. Clay says Musk may think Twitter price is inflated due to him wanting to buy Twitter, and "he could walk away, allow the stock price to collapse, and then potentially come back and try to make a play for that." Will Biden's ministry of truth call out its own disinformation? Nina Jankowicz wants verified Twitter users to be able to edit other people's tweets like Wikipedia. Jim Crow 2.0? Record turnout in Georgia primaries. FBI investigates moms and dads for testifying at school boards. CNN: Half of January covid deaths were double vaxxed. Clay takes a call on young people and social media. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Guy Benson Show
Formula For Disaster: Parents Struggle To Find Baby Formula As Shortage Persists

Guy Benson Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 122:09


3:05pm: Safe Smoking Kits Include Free Crack Pipes 3:20pm: Jim Crow on Steroids suppression update 3:35pm: Guest: Dagen McDowell, anchor and analyst on the Fox Business Network  3:50pm: Guy Benson Show 4:05pm: Guest: Dana Perino, co-anchor of America's Newsroom as well as co-host of The Five 4:20pm: WAPO: Abortion activism from WaPo video games correspondent 4:35pm: Guest: Senator Marsha Blackburn (R-TN)  4:50pm: Dem Abortion vote fail  5:05pm: Guest: Bill Hemmer, co-host of America's Newsroom  5:20pm: Guest: Bill Hemmer, co-host of America's Newsroom  5:35pm: (Replay Dagen) 5:50pm: Homestretch: Passenger with ‘no idea how to fly airplane' lands Plane  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

This Is Hell!
Staff Picks: Love Poems to Black Women Prisoners in the United States / Damaris B. Hill

This Is Hell!

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 55:04


Writer DaMaris Hill traces a history, and present, of Black women imprisoned in America - under a parallel regime of sexual violence and exploitation in the Jim Crow era and beyond, subject to the edges of a legal and economic system built on repression, risking freedom and safety in the simple acts of navigating daily life in a racist country. https://www.bloomsbury.com/us/a-bound-woman-is-a-dangerous-thing-9781635572629/ https://abortionfunds.org/funds/

3 Martini Lunch
Senate Sinks Abortion Bill, Georgia's Record Turnout, Massive Producer Inflation

3 Martini Lunch

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 26:03


Join Jim & Greg as they cheer a majority of U.S. senators rejecting the Democrats' abortion bill that would have ended hundreds of state restrictions and forced pro-life doctors to perform abortions. They're also glad to see record early voting turnout in Georgia, a vindication of last year's new election laws that Democrats said was Jim Crow 2.0. And they shudder as the Producer Price Index measure of inflation was still at 11 percent in April.Please visit our great sponsors:Novohttps://novo.com/martiniGet access to over $5000 in perks and discounts only at novo.com/martiniXChairhttps://xchairmartini.comCall 1-844-4xchair to save $100 today!

Keen On Democracy
Leslie Fenwick: How the Legacy of Jim Crow Still Infects American Schools

Keen On Democracy

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 42:33


Hosted by Andrew Keen, Keen On features conversations with some of the world's leading thinkers and writers about the economic, political, and technological issues being discussed in the news, right now. In this episode, Andrew is joined by Leslie Fenwick, co-author of Jim Crow's Pink Slip: The Untold Story of Black Principal and Teacher Leadership. Leslie T. Fenwick is a professor of education policy, Dean Emerita of the Howard University School of Education, and Dean in Residence at the American Association of Colleges for Teacher Education (AACTE). Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Heartland Stories
Dr. Christopher Carter: “The Spirit of Soul Food: Race, Faith, and Food Justice”

Heartland Stories

Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2022 29:01


Dr. Christopher Carter is an assistant professor of theology and religious studies at the University of San Diego and a pastor in the United Methodist Church. He just published his first book “The Spirit of Soul Food: Race, Faith, and Food Justice” and is on the board of directors of Farm Forward, an anti-factory farming non-profit. Tune in to learn more about: His grandfather's experience being a migrant farm worker picking cotton, and attending school until 4th grade during Jim Crow laws; The colonization of food and why we overlook Indigenous food when we look back in history; The consequence of racial trauma; What soul food is; Why the foundation of our food system is based on structural racism; His own journey on becoming a vegan; About Farm Forward and the anti-factory farming non-profit. To learn more about Dr. Christopher Carter go to https://www.drchristophercarter.com/spirit-soul-food. You can buy his new book here or at your local bookstore. 

Melaninwhitecoats's Podcast
Episode 52- Politics and Medicine, Aint one without the other. Get to know Democratic Candidate for Lieutenant Governor of Georgia, Dr Jason Hayes

Melaninwhitecoats's Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 2, 2022 61:10


On this episode, we have Dr. Jason Hayes, Democratic Candidate for Lieutenant Governor of Georgia talk about his foray into politics and why physicians need to continue to advocate for their communities. We also discuss  some of the most important aspects of his campaign how Medicare and Medicaid are essential components to those needing healthcare access and why we need to support those who are burdened by the healthcare system how SB202, a bill passed in Georgia continues to promote voter suppression and affects underrepresented communities  why critical race theory should be essential in all our school systems? how systemic racism continues to affect communities today and the historical precedence surrounding it from Jim Crow to Reaganomics in the 1980's why we need to continue to support our HBCU's which creates outstanding and excellent black leaders. Why has the state of Tennessee withheld millions of state dollars for the illustrious Tennessee State University to this day? Pay Attention and MORE!   Tune in , like, subscribe and share Donate to the Melaninwhitecoats Annual Podcast Scholarship here Follow us on IG here Follow Dr Hayes on IG here Follow Dr Hayes on Twitter here Donate to Dr Hayes Campaign here Check Dr Hayes Campaign here Tune into Dr Hayes Podcast, Beyond the Race Podcast, here

Black History Matters 365
BH365 Sunday Memoirs: Ministers In Medicine: W.H.C. Stephenson - African American Medical Doctor and Minister

Black History Matters 365

Play Episode Listen Later May 1, 2022 4:57


Sunday MemoirsMinisters in MedicineW.H.C. StephensonDoctor and PreacherSunday Memoirs  takes a look back in the past to find inspiration for the future. We will take time to share great inspiring accounts and building moments of the Black Church and others, depicting religious traditions and spiritual awakenings that contributed to the foundation of the church and our faith today.  At times we will share inspirational words to educate and encourage individuals on their journey of faith in God.For the month of May, starting this Sunday we will introduce a series called "Ministers In Medicine", focusing on the preachers that risk their lives in many cases during enslavement to spread the message of the gospel and start some of our greatest churches and traditions of the day while at the same time practicing medicine. We start our journey with W.H. Stephenson. W. H. C. Stephenson (c.1825 – April 6, 1899) was a doctor, preacher, and civil rights activist in Virginia City, Nevada, and Omaha, Nebraska. He was probably the first black doctor in Nevada and worked for the rights of blacks in that city. He was noted for his efforts in support of black suffrage in Nevada at the passing of the Fifteenth Amendment in 1870. He helped found the first Baptist church in Virginia City. He moved to Omaha in the late 1870s and continued his medical, religious, and civil rights work. He founded another Baptist church in Omaha, and was a prominent Republican and activist in the city.These preachers did what they could during the 1800's to help the community of the enslavement.  Although it had been through some hard changes and some endured harsh times in history, the black church and the preacher himself has always been a  safe haven for people of African descent during the unrelenting onslaughts of enslavement, racist bigotry, Jim Crow and other forms of oppression and suppression from before the Civil War all the way through and past the Civil Rights Movement. Even today, it still rings true of some preachers and their churches being a pillar in the community. Although,  preachers today must ask, are we still influential to our communities and making sure that they are taken care of any every way possible medically and spiritually? Can we look back at some of the preachers during enslavement and learn from their relentless faith in God and apply this to today? Its a challenge, but we must ask and face the truth.Click the link below to get  the book: "BH365: An Inclusive Account of American History" https://bit.ly/Joannbh365Check us out on social media: (Black History 365 Education)FacebookTwitterInstagramYouTubeMusic By: Kirk Whalum, Title Song: Wade In the WaterEdited by: Juels N. Evans, Sound EngineerPicture/Content: Blackpast.com and WK

The Chris Voss Show
The Chris Voss Show Podcast – Gin, Jesus, and Jim Crow: Prohibition and the Transformation of Racial and Religious Politics in the South (Making the Modern South) by Brendan J. J. Payne

The Chris Voss Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 1, 2022 41:55


Gin, Jesus, and Jim Crow: Prohibition and the Transformation of Racial and Religious Politics in the South (Making the Modern South) by Brendan J. J. Payne In Gin, Jesus, and Jim Crow, Brendan J. J. Payne reveals how prohibition helped realign the racial and religious order in the South by linking restrictions on alcohol with political preaching and the disfranchisement of Black voters. While both sides invoked Christianity, prohibitionists redefined churches' doctrines, practices, and political engagement. White prohibitionists initially courted Black voters in the 1880s but soon dismissed them as hopelessly wet and sought to disfranchise them, stoking fears of drunken Black men defiling white women in their efforts to reframe alcohol restriction as a means of racial control. Later, as the alcohol industry grew desperate, it turned to Black voters, many of whom joined the brewers to preserve their voting rights and maintain personal liberties. Tracking southern debates about alcohol from the 1880s through the 1930s, Payne shows that prohibition only retreated from the region once the racial and religious order it helped enshrine had been secured.

GirlTrek's Black History Bootcamp
Crews | Day 17 | Black Teachers of The Freedman's Bureau

GirlTrek's Black History Bootcamp

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 28, 2022 40:54


1863. The Emancipation Proclamation freed 4 million people from human bondage.  Southern whites would illegally hold hostage our family members for two more years.  Once defeated in the most un-Civil War, free Black men, women, and children would become their biggest threat.  With the 15th Amendment, our forefathers were guaranteed the vote, equal representation in government, and 40 acres and a mule.  Black “freedmen” were in a position to live and provide for their families.  That freedom was met with vicious violence and terrorism. The Freedmen's Bureau was established by Abraham Lincoln as The Bureau for Refugees, Freedmen, and Abandoned Lands. Its complex name hints at its complex history.  The Freedmen's Bureau issued land grants, negotiated labor contracts, reunited families, held legal hearings, collected historic records, provided healthcare, and built schools.  1000+ schools and universities became the Bureau's most powerful legacy.  Confronting that progress was Lincoln‘s assassination, Andrew Johnson's painstaking racism, the birth of the Ku Klux Klan, Ulysses S. Grant's liquor-soaked graft, and the malicious Black Codes that became Jim Crow.  …and on the front lines of these orchestrated attacks was a band of Black teachers.  Today, we honor them. 

New Books in Medicine
Anthony Hatch, "Silent Cells: The Secret Drugging of Captive America" (U Minnesota Press, 2019)

New Books in Medicine

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 28, 2022 57:45


It's no secret that the United States has the most expansive prison system of any nation in the world. And the US carceral system overwhelmingly and unjustly impacts Black and Brown individuals and communities. With postwar efforts to dismantle Jim Crow policies, our era of mass incarceration reproduced the old logics of white supremacism that uphold racist capitalism in this new setting. These are the things we know. But in his book, Silent Cells: The Secret Drugging of Captive America (U Minnesota Press, 2019), Professor Anthony Hatch observes a feature of mass incarceration essential to its everyday function that many of us had never considered: the large-scale, persistent use of psychotropic drugs, including antipsychotics and antidepressants, not for medical care but rather to control the behavior of incarcerated people. Making a persuasive claim drawn from his training in STS and sociology, Hatch observes how the drugs are used at the level of individual brain chemistry to commit “soul murder” with enormous systemic implications and political stakes. What's more, the carceral elites' use of psychotropic drugs for the purposes of pacification, not care, of their wards extends to other (often state-backed) settings of “captive America,” including the military, foster care, elder care, and international detention centers. “Is it possible for the US carceral state to exist without psychotropics,” Hatch asks. “I think we can say the answer is no.” Silent Cells accomplishes more than the (important) tasks of documentation and analysis. It is a work of liberatory social science. The book is of a piece with Hatch's abolitionist agenda that he pursues through his generous and generative scholarly and activist engagements, including his work as director of the Black Box teaching laboratory and chair of the Program in Science in Society at Wesleyan University. This interview was a collaborative effort among Professor Laura Stark and students at Vanderbilt University in the course “Prison.” Please email Laura with any feedback on the interview or questions about the collaborative interview process: laura.stark@vanderbilt.edu . Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/medicine

New Books in American Studies
Anthony Hatch, "Silent Cells: The Secret Drugging of Captive America" (U Minnesota Press, 2019)

New Books in American Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 28, 2022 57:45


It's no secret that the United States has the most expansive prison system of any nation in the world. And the US carceral system overwhelmingly and unjustly impacts Black and Brown individuals and communities. With postwar efforts to dismantle Jim Crow policies, our era of mass incarceration reproduced the old logics of white supremacism that uphold racist capitalism in this new setting. These are the things we know. But in his book, Silent Cells: The Secret Drugging of Captive America (U Minnesota Press, 2019), Professor Anthony Hatch observes a feature of mass incarceration essential to its everyday function that many of us had never considered: the large-scale, persistent use of psychotropic drugs, including antipsychotics and antidepressants, not for medical care but rather to control the behavior of incarcerated people. Making a persuasive claim drawn from his training in STS and sociology, Hatch observes how the drugs are used at the level of individual brain chemistry to commit “soul murder” with enormous systemic implications and political stakes. What's more, the carceral elites' use of psychotropic drugs for the purposes of pacification, not care, of their wards extends to other (often state-backed) settings of “captive America,” including the military, foster care, elder care, and international detention centers. “Is it possible for the US carceral state to exist without psychotropics,” Hatch asks. “I think we can say the answer is no.” Silent Cells accomplishes more than the (important) tasks of documentation and analysis. It is a work of liberatory social science. The book is of a piece with Hatch's abolitionist agenda that he pursues through his generous and generative scholarly and activist engagements, including his work as director of the Black Box teaching laboratory and chair of the Program in Science in Society at Wesleyan University. This interview was a collaborative effort among Professor Laura Stark and students at Vanderbilt University in the course “Prison.” Please email Laura with any feedback on the interview or questions about the collaborative interview process: laura.stark@vanderbilt.edu . Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/american-studies

New Books Network
Anthony Hatch, "Silent Cells: The Secret Drugging of Captive America" (U Minnesota Press, 2019)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 28, 2022 57:45


It's no secret that the United States has the most expansive prison system of any nation in the world. And the US carceral system overwhelmingly and unjustly impacts Black and Brown individuals and communities. With postwar efforts to dismantle Jim Crow policies, our era of mass incarceration reproduced the old logics of white supremacism that uphold racist capitalism in this new setting. These are the things we know. But in his book, Silent Cells: The Secret Drugging of Captive America (U Minnesota Press, 2019), Professor Anthony Hatch observes a feature of mass incarceration essential to its everyday function that many of us had never considered: the large-scale, persistent use of psychotropic drugs, including antipsychotics and antidepressants, not for medical care but rather to control the behavior of incarcerated people. Making a persuasive claim drawn from his training in STS and sociology, Hatch observes how the drugs are used at the level of individual brain chemistry to commit “soul murder” with enormous systemic implications and political stakes. What's more, the carceral elites' use of psychotropic drugs for the purposes of pacification, not care, of their wards extends to other (often state-backed) settings of “captive America,” including the military, foster care, elder care, and international detention centers. “Is it possible for the US carceral state to exist without psychotropics,” Hatch asks. “I think we can say the answer is no.” Silent Cells accomplishes more than the (important) tasks of documentation and analysis. It is a work of liberatory social science. The book is of a piece with Hatch's abolitionist agenda that he pursues through his generous and generative scholarly and activist engagements, including his work as director of the Black Box teaching laboratory and chair of the Program in Science in Society at Wesleyan University. This interview was a collaborative effort among Professor Laura Stark and students at Vanderbilt University in the course “Prison.” Please email Laura with any feedback on the interview or questions about the collaborative interview process: laura.stark@vanderbilt.edu . Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

Everyday Conversations on Race for Everyday People
How to End Racial Bias in Media with Karen Hunter and Daniel Stedman

Everyday Conversations on Race for Everyday People

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 28, 2022 59:01


Karen Hunter, journalist and host of the Karen Hunter Show on Sirius XM and Daniel Stedman, founder of the New Ed-Tech platform Pressto, join me in this conversation on race. They share how Black students in the US and the African diaspora, and other low income and young people of color are using Pressto to create their own newspapers and zines. This is one solution for young people to express their views and share real experiences with race, culture and diversity instead of consuming false information from biased media.   You'll hear how Karen had to confront her white editor at the Daily News about racial bias in their coverage of police shootings and how she convinced him to change his perspective.   Key topics:  • Real news gathering has been replaced by algorithms and public opinion presented as fake facts. That includes how gaslighting, misinformation, and disinformation take the place of actual fact gathering, particularly in issues around race and racism. • How Pressto gives young people hope and inspiration to be seen and heard, like how Daniela Fraser took out her phone and documented the murder of George Floyd. • What does it mean to be white? Karen Hunter asks why people identify as white and foster the system of white supremacy. She talks about race as a social construct, and why she wants to dismantle the construct of race. • Hunter's experience as a Black journalist with the Daily News when Amadou Diallo was murdered by police in his vestibule and how her editor wanted to glorify the police without knowing what happened. After she  asked her editor if that could happen in a rich white neighborhood, he allowed her to address the issues of racism. She talks about the murder of Eleanor Bumpurs, Sean Bell and others who were killed by police because they were Black • Why Pressto can help young people of color and other kids be future journalists who get the truth out and share their stories. • How Daniel Stedman created the EdTech software Pressto, because he was inspired to make learning fun for kids and spark them to be journalists of the future. • The importance of diversity of ideas and bringing Pressto to the African Diaspora including Jamaica and Canada. • Karen asks Daniel Stedman about what it means to be white, if he sees himself as white. Daniel talks about his strong identification about his Jewish culture and what it means to be white. • The fact that the Nazi Nuremberg laws crafted their strategy from the Jim Crow laws in the US. Listen to the episode with Karen Hunter and Daniel Stedman to hear about the future of journalism, dismantling systemic racism and other bias in the media and how white people can use and share the privilege they have to take actions against racism.  Guest Bios Daniel Stedman is the CEO & Founder of Pressto, a tool that makes learning to write fun for kids and easy for teachers. Previously, Daniel was the Founder of Northside Media (acquired), the parent company to Northside Festival, Taste Talks, SummerScreen and Brooklyn Magazine. He has spoken at CES, Orange Institute and SXSW and has been featured in the NY Times, New York Magazine, New York Observer, Huffington Post, and more. Daniel is a published children's book author and award-winning film director. Karen Hunter is a Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist, professor, publisher and “change agent,” according to Essence magazine, which named her one of the “Woke100” of 2018. She was also selected to the 2020 Ebony magazine's Power 100 List. As a writer, Karen has coauthored eight New York Times bestsellers. As CEO of Karen Hunter Publishing, an imprint of Simon & Schuster, she published more than 35 books, including No. 1 NYT bestseller True You by pop icon Janet Jackson, as well as bestsellers with Kris Jenner and E. Lynn Harris. Karen has been named one of the 100 Most Important Radio Talk Show Hosts in America by industry bible Talkers Magazine every year since 2015. A New Jersey native, a Drew University graduate, Karen has been a full-time professor and Distinguished Lecturer in the Film & Media Department at Hunter College in New York City since 2004. In 2020, during the pandemic, Karen launched Knarrative, which is home to the largest Africana Studies classroom in the world.   Simma Lieberman, The Inclusionist helps leaders create inclusive cultures. She is a consultant, speaker and facilitator and the host of the podcast, “Everyday Conversations on Race for Everyday People.” Contact Simma@SimmaLieberman.com Go to www.simmalieberman.com and www.raceconvo.com for more information Simma is a member of and inspired by the global organization IAC (Inclusion Allies Coalition) 

The Neil Haley Show
Judith Mudd-Krijgelmans, Author of Flowers For Brother Mudd

The Neil Haley Show

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 27, 2022 14:00


Today on The Neil Haley Show, Neil will interview Judith Mudd-Krijgelmans, Author of Flowers For Brother Mudd. Judith Mudd-Krijglemans wrote a memoir of Jim Crow segregation. She also fulfilled her dream of working in the Foreign Service; in New Delhi, Mumbai, Dhaka, Taipei, Hong Kong, Brussels, Libreville, Bujumbura, and Brazzaville.   From Washington she supported civic education in South Africa she led public diplomacy in eight French-speaking African countries. ​ Lauded for outstanding achievement of U.S interests, since leaving the Foreign Service she leads memoir courses about her African American triumph story in Northern Virginia where she lives with her husband, Belgian writer Claude Krijgelmans.    

Teaching Hard History: American Slavery
Music Reconstructed: Lara Downes' Classical Perspective on Jim Crow – w/ Charles L. Hughes

Teaching Hard History: American Slavery

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 26, 2022 24:19


From concertos to operas, Black composers captured the changes and challenges facing African Americans during Jim Crow. Renowned classical pianist Laura Downes is bringing new appreciation to the works of artists like Florence Price and Scott Joplin. In our final installment of Music Reconstructed, Downes discusses how we can hear the complicated history of this era with historian Charles L. Hughes. And for helpful classroom resources, check out the enhanced full transcript of this episode.

Everyday Conversations on Race for Everyday People
How to End Racial Bias in Media with Karen Hunter and Daniel Stedman

Everyday Conversations on Race for Everyday People

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 23, 2022 59:07


Karen Hunter, journalist and host of the Karen Hunter Show on Sirius XM and Dan Stedman, founder of the New Ed-Tech platform Pressto, join me in this conversation on race. They share how Black students in the US and the African diaspora, and other low income and young people of color are using Pressto to create their own newspapers and zines. This is one solution for young people to express their views and share real experiences with race, culture and diversity instead of consuming false information from biased media.   You'll hear how Karen had to confront her white editor at the Daily News about racial bias in their coverage of police shootings and how she convinced him to change his perspective.   Key topics:  • Real news gathering has been replaced by algorithms and public opinion presented as fake facts. That includes how gaslighting, misinformation, and disinformation take the place of actual fact gathering, particularly in issues around race and racism. • How Pressto gives young people hope and inspiration to be seen and heard, like how Daniela Fraser took out her phone and documented the murder of George Floyd. • What does it mean to be white? Karen Hunter asks why people identify as white and foster the system of white supremacy. She talks about race as a social construct, and why she wants to dismantle the construct of race. • Hunter's experience as a Black journalist with the Daily News when Amadou Diallo was murdered by police in his vestibule and how her editor wanted to glorify the police without knowing what happened. After she  asked her editor if that could happen in a rich white neighborhood, he allowed her to address the issues of racism. She talks about the murder of Eleanor Bumpurs, Sean Bell and others who were killed by police because they were Black • Why Pressto can help young people of color and other kids be future journalists who get the truth out and share their stories. • How Daniel Stedman created the EdTech software Pressto, because he was inspired to make learning fun for kids and spark them to be journalists of the future. • The importance of diversity of ideas and bringing Pressto to the African Diaspora including Jamaica and Canada. • Karen asks Daniel Stedman about what it means to be white, if he sees himself as white. Daniel talks about his strong identification about his Jewish culture and what it means to be white. • The fact that the Nazi Nuremberg laws crafted their strategy from the Jim Crow laws in the US. Listen to the episode with Karen Hunter and Daniel Stedman to hear about the future of journalism, dismantling systemic racism and other bias in the media and how white people can use and share the privilege they have to take actions against racism.  Guest Bios Daniel Stedman is the CEO & Founder of Pressto, a tool that makes learning to write fun for kids and easy for teachers. Previously, Daniel was the Founder of Northside Media (acquired), the parent company to Northside Festival, Taste Talks, SummerScreen and Brooklyn Magazine. He has spoken at CES, Orange Institute and SXSW and has been featured in the NY Times, New York Magazine, New York Observer, Huffington Post, and more. Daniel is a published children's book author and award-winning film director. Karen Hunter is a Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist, professor, publisher and “change agent,” according to Essence magazine, which named her one of the “Woke100” of 2018. She was also selected to the 2020 Ebony magazine's Power 100 List. As a writer, Karen has coauthored eight New York Times bestsellers. As CEO of Karen Hunter Publishing, an imprint of Simon & Schuster, she published more than 35 books, including No. 1 NYT bestseller True You by pop icon Janet Jackson, as well as bestsellers with Kris Jenner and E. Lynn Harris. Karen has been named one of the 100 Most Important Radio Talk Show Hosts in America by industry bible Talkers Magazine every year since 2015. A New Jersey native, a Drew University graduate, Karen has been a full-time professor and Distinguished Lecturer in the Film & Media Department at Hunter College in New York City since 2004. In 2020, during the pandemic, Karen launched Knarrative, which is home to the largest Africana Studies classroom in the world.   Simma Lieberman, The Inclusionist helps leaders create inclusive cultures. She is a consultant, speaker and facilitator and the host of the podcast, “Everyday Conversations on Race for Everyday People.” Contact Simma@SimmaLieberman.com Go to www.simmalieberman.com and www.raceconvo.com for more information Simma is a member of and inspired by the global organization IAC (Inclusion Allies Coalition) 

Public Theologians
Brendan J. Payne - Gin, Jesus and Jim Crow

Public Theologians

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 18, 2022 53:51


Dr. Brendan J. Payne joins to discuss his book Gin Jesus and Jim Crow: Prohibition and the Transformation of Racial and Religious Politics in the South from LSU Press. Brendan traces the prohibition debate through the lens of Baptist and Methodist traditions, in concert with the progressive voices of the day who successfully lobbied for the 18th Amendment. A familiar theme arose in his research. White religious folk and politicians were...wait for it...super racist and used Black voters as pawns while doing little to nothing to secure their rights. The more things change, the more they stay the same. A note about the podcast: This will be the last in the season, we'll be returning in August but with a new name! Henceforth we'll be known as Dissident Orthodoxy. The feed will stay the same and the content will be similar. Look for some new art work, new music and a bit more descriptive language for what I've been aiming at these two years! Talk to you in August! -------------------------------------------------------- BRENDAN J. J. PAYNE is chair of the Department of History at North Greenville University in South Carolina. Check out CH Podcast Booking Service Follow Casey's substack Rate/Review on Apple Podcasts Support us on Patreon and win a book! Music: Orbach Art: Phil Nellis

Catholic Women Preach
The Promise of the Cross with Valerie D. Lewis-Mosley, OPA

Catholic Women Preach

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 15, 2022 8:58


Lifting up the experience, faith, and wisdom of her ancestors and elders, Valerie D. Lewis-Mosley, OPA preaches for Good Friday: "Whenever I would ask my grandparents and great-grandparents about their experiences in the Jim Crow south of segregation and the terror of the Ku Klux Klan, their response was 'A burning cross has no power over the Cross of Calvary.' It was their abiding faith and trust in the Blood poured out that day on Calvary that allowed my ancestors and elders the confidence to believe and trust that their help cometh from the Lord." Valerie D. Lewis-Mosley, OPA is the retired Director of Religious Education at the Church of Christ the King - Jersey City, New Jersey, a historical Black Catholic Parish an Apostolate for Evangelization in the African American community. She now serves in various capacities across the nation as a mentor to youth and adults evangelist, retreat leader and revivalist and public speaker, life coach and Spiritual Director. Catechesis to children and youth and women's spirituality and empowerment are a major component of her ministry as a pastoral associate. She is an Adjunct Professor in the Department of Theology at Caldwell University, Caldwell, New Jersey, and Xavier University of Louisiana Institute for Black Catholic Studies. Valerie is a member of the Black Catholic Theological Symposium. She holds multiple advanced degrees in nursing, law, and theology, including a Doctor of Ministry from Drew Theological School in Madison, NJ. Visit www.catholicwomenpreach.org/preaching/04152022 to learn more about Valerie, to read her preaching text, and for more preaching from Catholic women.

Teaching Hard History: American Slavery
Music Reconstructed: Adia Victoria and the Landscape of the Blues – w/ Charles L. Hughes

Teaching Hard History: American Slavery

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 12, 2022 16:30


When we consider the trauma of white supremacy during the Jim Crow era—what writer Ralph Ellison describes as “the brutal experience”—it's important to understand the resilience and joy that sustained Black communities. We can experience that all through the “near-comic, near-tragic lyricism” of the blues. In part 3 of this series, acclaimed musician, songwriter and poet Adia Victoria shows how the bittersweet nature of blues does “the very emotionally mature work of acknowledging” this complex history. And for helpful classroom resources, check out the enhanced full transcript of this episode.

Read, White, & Blue
The Long Road to Justice | Gilbert King (Devil in the Grove)

Read, White, & Blue

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 12, 2022 37:40


On the final episode of Season 1 of "Read, White, & Blue," Speaker Sprowls sits down with Pulitzer Prize-winning author Gilbert King to discuss his book, "Devil in the Grove," a tragic historical account of Jim Crow-era Florida and the false accusation and sentencing of the Groveland Four: Charles Greenlee, Walter Irvin, Samuel Shepherd, and Ernest Thomas. King recounts his research into the prejudice in rural Florida in the 1940s and 50s and the horrible miscarriage of justice that followed the false accusations against these four young Black men. Speaker Sprowls and King discuss how "Devil in the Grove" brought awareness to this tragedy and the instrumental role it played in the Florida Legislature's decision to pursue the long overdue pardon and exoneration of the Groveland Four beginning in 2017.

Insight On Business the News Hour
The Business News Headlines 11 April 2022

Insight On Business the News Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 11, 2022 12:55


Welcome back to another work week.  A reminder that the markets will be closed on Friday for the Good Friday and start of Passover. Today our first story is a shocking bit of news as we focus on folks that, even today, make less than fifteen-dollars an hour. 50% of women of color make less than $15 an hour; The link to Jim Crow? Gas prices are trending lower and why; Another tech giant to offer a stock split; Recreational pot sales in New Jersey?  Could be. Starbucks seeking a lawyer in union relations; McDonald's closing stores and the impact on the bottom line; The Wall Street Report; Etsy sellers on strike and why. Thanks for coming by! The award winning Insight on Business the News Hour with Michael Libbie is the only weekday business news podcast in the Midwest. The national, regional and some local business news along with long-form business interviews can be heard Monday - Friday. You can subscribe on PlayerFM, Podbean, iTunes, Spotify, Stitcher or TuneIn Radio. And you can catch The Business News Hour Week in Review each Sunday Noon on News/Talk 1540 KXEL. The Business News Hour is a production of Insight Advertising, Marketing & Communications. You can follow us on Twitter @IoB_NewsHour.       

KTUH Online
Kwok Talk: The Accident of Color

KTUH Online

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 10, 2022 52:27


Guest: Daniel Brook, author/journalist Discussion: Daniel discusses the social and racial hierarchies in Charlston and New Orleans pre-Jim Crow and his latest work on German Jewish sexologist Dr. Magnus Hershfeld.

Teaching Hard History: American Slavery
Black Political Thought – w/ Minkah Makalani

Teaching Hard History: American Slavery

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 8, 2022 65:20


Black political ideologies in the early 20th century evolved against a backdrop of derogatory stereotypes and racial terrorism. Starting with Marcus Garvey and the Universal Negro Improvement Agency, historian Minkah Makalani contextualizes an era of Black intellectualism. From common goals of racial unity to fierce debates over methods, he shows how movements of the 1920s and 1930s fed into what became the Civil Rights and Black Power Movement. Educators! Get a professional development certificate for listening to this episode—issued by Learning for Justice. Listen for the code word, then visit learningforjustice.org/podcastpd. And be sure to visit the enhanced episode transcript for additional classroom resources for teaching about the intersection of sports and race during the Jim Crow era.

GirlTrek's Black History Bootcamp
Crews | Day 3 | Tuskegee Legends: Booker T. Washington and George Washington Carver

GirlTrek's Black History Bootcamp

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 7, 2022 43:59


Brick-by-brick, crop-by-crop, farm-by-farm, today's crew of Black men did the unglamorous work to build an economic future for our people. They built an institution, an infrastructure and an entire new economy to revive the American South. They called him The Black President. He didn't ask for dignity and equal rights. He assumed them. Booker T. Washington convinced the Carnegies and Rockefellers to invest in the economic and political come-up of his people. And while we love W.E.B DuBois, young Dubois applied for a teaching job at Tuskegee. Don't get it twisted. Booker T. Washington was the most influential Black man of the turn of the century. And the smartest thing he did was invite a quiet-spoken genius to join his crew. At the turn of the century. Before cars were invented, Henry Ford was asking a black man named George Washington Carver for advice. Ford said Carver was “the greatest scientist in the world.” Time Magazine called him  “The Black Aristotle.” And Mahatma Gandhi praised Carter for feeding a nation. (And y'all talking'bout some peanuts.) Thomas Edison offered Carver  $100,000 to quit working with Washington and work in his lab. He said no. He was devoted to serving his people. They built Tuskegee. 700 acres of farmland, livestock, 27 vocations in industrial trades: farming, printing, wagon making, tailoring, brick laying. The students themselves built the 50-building campus - by hand. And the school has an endowment bigger than Harvard's at the time. True progress raging across the South until Washington raised his fist at The Atlanta Esposition - his full power on display - bringing the full backlash of Jim Crow terror, lynching and distraction. These men are the most misunderstood crew in Black history - and it may be intentional because when we get economic, industrial and agricultural power.  Listen. Today we try to understand. Both men were born into slavery.  How did they rise to such power? Let's talk about it. Disclaimer: We do not own the rights to the music or speech excepts reference or played during this broadcast. You can find original content that was referenced or played here:The Rubberband Man| The Spinners:https://open.spotify.com/track/13Mzsb8VzRSZ5w3pM48cn6?si=9584cLZQTm-56OcUToKeDw Will the Circle Be Unbroken | The Staple Singers:https://open.spotify.com/track/2XQlZQGMQKIElKRYSf5NWx?si=q4Nwb5yyTWOzZ5QYtkxhxQVisions of Sunset | Boyz II Men:https://open.spotify.com/track/6lQREztig1UKUHeyQhw7As?si=GtlyZfuHT2SH82aiFGTiAA

Ear to the Pavement
Adolph Reed, Jr. on "The South: Jim Crow and Its Afterlives"

Ear to the Pavement

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 7, 2022 63:41


History Unplugged Podcast
Most Historians Consider Warren G. Harding America's Worst President. This One Thinks He Belongs in the Top 10

History Unplugged Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 7, 2022 38:33


Most historians think of Warren G. Harding as a jazz-age hedonist who was much more of an empty suit than a serious president. Once in the White House, they argue, the 29th president busied himself with golf, poker, and his mistress, while appointees and cronies plundered the U.S. government. His secretary of the interior allowed oilmen, in exchange for bribes, to access government oil reserves, including one in Teapot Dome, Wyoming, the namesake for the scandal that hangs over Harding's legacy today.But one American history professor thinks that this narrative is hopelessly simplified andsimplistic. In fact, Walters, author of the book The Jazz Age President: Defending Warren G. Harding, that he belongs in the Top Ten list of U.S. chief executives.He credits Harding with the following: • Inheriting a postwar depression, Harding turned it into an economic boom. On his watch personal prosperity soared and unemployment fell to 1.6 percent• He reversed Wilson's grandiose plans to hand over American sovereignty to ambitious internationalist organizations• He healed a nation in the throes of social disruption, releasing citizens imprisoned by the Wilson administration under the controversial Sedition Act of 1918 and using the bully pulpit to promote civil rights in the heyday of Jim Crow

New Books in African American Studies
David Hajdu and John Carey, "A Revolution in Three Acts: The Radical Vaudeville of Bert Williams, Eva Tanguay, and Julian Eltinge" (Columbia UP, 2021)

New Books in African American Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 6, 2022 54:35


Too often, vaudeville is seen from the perspective of its decline: it is the corny, messy art form that predated the book musical, or that gave us Chaplin, Keaton, and the Marx Brothers. Rarely is it seen as the populist avant-garde form it was at its height. David Hajdu and John Carey's graphic history, A Revolution in Three Acts: The Radical Vaudeville of Bert Williams, Eva Tanguay, and Julian Eltinge (Columbia University Press, 2021), corrects this misconception, giving us illustrated biographies of three of the genre's most outré and successful stars. Eva Tanguay challenged contemporary gender roles through her outrageous behavior and sexually suggestive songs. Julian Eltinge also subverted gendered expectations of femininity by performing them to the hilt -- but as a man. And Bert Williams, a black man who performed in black face, tried to use his fame to soften the hard edges of Jim Crow bigotry but eventually became exhausted by the racism he encountered within the entertainment industry. These three performers truly were revolutionary, and their stories should be known to any theatre fan or historian. Andy Boyd is a playwright based in Brooklyn, New York. He is a graduate of the playwriting MFA at Columbia University, Harvard University, and the Arizona School for the Arts. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/african-american-studies

New Books in Biography
David Hajdu and John Carey, "A Revolution in Three Acts: The Radical Vaudeville of Bert Williams, Eva Tanguay, and Julian Eltinge" (Columbia UP, 2021)

New Books in Biography

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 6, 2022 54:35


Too often, vaudeville is seen from the perspective of its decline: it is the corny, messy art form that predated the book musical, or that gave us Chaplin, Keaton, and the Marx Brothers. Rarely is it seen as the populist avant-garde form it was at its height. David Hajdu and John Carey's graphic history, A Revolution in Three Acts: The Radical Vaudeville of Bert Williams, Eva Tanguay, and Julian Eltinge (Columbia University Press, 2021), corrects this misconception, giving us illustrated biographies of three of the genre's most outré and successful stars. Eva Tanguay challenged contemporary gender roles through her outrageous behavior and sexually suggestive songs. Julian Eltinge also subverted gendered expectations of femininity by performing them to the hilt -- but as a man. And Bert Williams, a black man who performed in black face, tried to use his fame to soften the hard edges of Jim Crow bigotry but eventually became exhausted by the racism he encountered within the entertainment industry. These three performers truly were revolutionary, and their stories should be known to any theatre fan or historian. Andy Boyd is a playwright based in Brooklyn, New York. He is a graduate of the playwriting MFA at Columbia University, Harvard University, and the Arizona School for the Arts. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/biography

New Books Network
David Hajdu and John Carey, "A Revolution in Three Acts: The Radical Vaudeville of Bert Williams, Eva Tanguay, and Julian Eltinge" (Columbia UP, 2021)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 6, 2022 54:35


Too often, vaudeville is seen from the perspective of its decline: it is the corny, messy art form that predated the book musical, or that gave us Chaplin, Keaton, and the Marx Brothers. Rarely is it seen as the populist avant-garde form it was at its height. David Hajdu and John Carey's graphic history, A Revolution in Three Acts: The Radical Vaudeville of Bert Williams, Eva Tanguay, and Julian Eltinge (Columbia University Press, 2021), corrects this misconception, giving us illustrated biographies of three of the genre's most outré and successful stars. Eva Tanguay challenged contemporary gender roles through her outrageous behavior and sexually suggestive songs. Julian Eltinge also subverted gendered expectations of femininity by performing them to the hilt -- but as a man. And Bert Williams, a black man who performed in black face, tried to use his fame to soften the hard edges of Jim Crow bigotry but eventually became exhausted by the racism he encountered within the entertainment industry. These three performers truly were revolutionary, and their stories should be known to any theatre fan or historian. Andy Boyd is a playwright based in Brooklyn, New York. He is a graduate of the playwriting MFA at Columbia University, Harvard University, and the Arizona School for the Arts. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in History
David Hajdu and John Carey, "A Revolution in Three Acts: The Radical Vaudeville of Bert Williams, Eva Tanguay, and Julian Eltinge" (Columbia UP, 2021)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 6, 2022 54:35


Too often, vaudeville is seen from the perspective of its decline: it is the corny, messy art form that predated the book musical, or that gave us Chaplin, Keaton, and the Marx Brothers. Rarely is it seen as the populist avant-garde form it was at its height. David Hajdu and John Carey's graphic history, A Revolution in Three Acts: The Radical Vaudeville of Bert Williams, Eva Tanguay, and Julian Eltinge (Columbia University Press, 2021), corrects this misconception, giving us illustrated biographies of three of the genre's most outré and successful stars. Eva Tanguay challenged contemporary gender roles through her outrageous behavior and sexually suggestive songs. Julian Eltinge also subverted gendered expectations of femininity by performing them to the hilt -- but as a man. And Bert Williams, a black man who performed in black face, tried to use his fame to soften the hard edges of Jim Crow bigotry but eventually became exhausted by the racism he encountered within the entertainment industry. These three performers truly were revolutionary, and their stories should be known to any theatre fan or historian. Andy Boyd is a playwright based in Brooklyn, New York. He is a graduate of the playwriting MFA at Columbia University, Harvard University, and the Arizona School for the Arts. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

New Books in Gender Studies
David Hajdu and John Carey, "A Revolution in Three Acts: The Radical Vaudeville of Bert Williams, Eva Tanguay, and Julian Eltinge" (Columbia UP, 2021)

New Books in Gender Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 6, 2022 54:35


Too often, vaudeville is seen from the perspective of its decline: it is the corny, messy art form that predated the book musical, or that gave us Chaplin, Keaton, and the Marx Brothers. Rarely is it seen as the populist avant-garde form it was at its height. David Hajdu and John Carey's graphic history, A Revolution in Three Acts: The Radical Vaudeville of Bert Williams, Eva Tanguay, and Julian Eltinge (Columbia University Press, 2021), corrects this misconception, giving us illustrated biographies of three of the genre's most outré and successful stars. Eva Tanguay challenged contemporary gender roles through her outrageous behavior and sexually suggestive songs. Julian Eltinge also subverted gendered expectations of femininity by performing them to the hilt -- but as a man. And Bert Williams, a black man who performed in black face, tried to use his fame to soften the hard edges of Jim Crow bigotry but eventually became exhausted by the racism he encountered within the entertainment industry. These three performers truly were revolutionary, and their stories should be known to any theatre fan or historian. Andy Boyd is a playwright based in Brooklyn, New York. He is a graduate of the playwriting MFA at Columbia University, Harvard University, and the Arizona School for the Arts. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/gender-studies

New Books in American Studies
David Hajdu and John Carey, "A Revolution in Three Acts: The Radical Vaudeville of Bert Williams, Eva Tanguay, and Julian Eltinge" (Columbia UP, 2021)

New Books in American Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 6, 2022 54:35


Too often, vaudeville is seen from the perspective of its decline: it is the corny, messy art form that predated the book musical, or that gave us Chaplin, Keaton, and the Marx Brothers. Rarely is it seen as the populist avant-garde form it was at its height. David Hajdu and John Carey's graphic history, A Revolution in Three Acts: The Radical Vaudeville of Bert Williams, Eva Tanguay, and Julian Eltinge (Columbia University Press, 2021), corrects this misconception, giving us illustrated biographies of three of the genre's most outré and successful stars. Eva Tanguay challenged contemporary gender roles through her outrageous behavior and sexually suggestive songs. Julian Eltinge also subverted gendered expectations of femininity by performing them to the hilt -- but as a man. And Bert Williams, a black man who performed in black face, tried to use his fame to soften the hard edges of Jim Crow bigotry but eventually became exhausted by the racism he encountered within the entertainment industry. These three performers truly were revolutionary, and their stories should be known to any theatre fan or historian. Andy Boyd is a playwright based in Brooklyn, New York. He is a graduate of the playwriting MFA at Columbia University, Harvard University, and the Arizona School for the Arts. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/american-studies

New Books in Dance
David Hajdu and John Carey, "A Revolution in Three Acts: The Radical Vaudeville of Bert Williams, Eva Tanguay, and Julian Eltinge" (Columbia UP, 2021)

New Books in Dance

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 6, 2022 54:35


Too often, vaudeville is seen from the perspective of its decline: it is the corny, messy art form that predated the book musical, or that gave us Chaplin, Keaton, and the Marx Brothers. Rarely is it seen as the populist avant-garde form it was at its height. David Hajdu and John Carey's graphic history, A Revolution in Three Acts: The Radical Vaudeville of Bert Williams, Eva Tanguay, and Julian Eltinge (Columbia University Press, 2021), corrects this misconception, giving us illustrated biographies of three of the genre's most outré and successful stars. Eva Tanguay challenged contemporary gender roles through her outrageous behavior and sexually suggestive songs. Julian Eltinge also subverted gendered expectations of femininity by performing them to the hilt -- but as a man. And Bert Williams, a black man who performed in black face, tried to use his fame to soften the hard edges of Jim Crow bigotry but eventually became exhausted by the racism he encountered within the entertainment industry. These three performers truly were revolutionary, and their stories should be known to any theatre fan or historian. Andy Boyd is a playwright based in Brooklyn, New York. He is a graduate of the playwriting MFA at Columbia University, Harvard University, and the Arizona School for the Arts. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/performing-arts

Time To Say Goodbye
Adolph Reed Jr: Jim Crow + race/class debates

Time To Say Goodbye

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 5, 2022 98:45


Prof. Adolph Reed Jr. speaks with Andy about his new book *The South*; criticisms of neoliberal ('race first') antiracism; and locating racial ideology within histories of class rule.  This is a public episode. Get access to private episodes at goodbye.substack.com/subscribe

Savvy Citizen: A Gaston County Podcast
From Segregation to the Current: Seeking Equality

Savvy Citizen: A Gaston County Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 4, 2022 33:35


Rev. Willie Jones sat down with Savvy Citizen to close out Black History Month at the end of February to talk about growing up in Gaston County during segregation and his views on what work has been done since the Jim Crow era and what remains for society to tackle. Gaston County Deputy Communications Director Dandria Bradley guest hosts. 

The Brion McClanahan Show
Ep. 609: The Southern Political Tradition

The Brion McClanahan Show

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 4, 2022 26:13


The Southern political tradition is not slavery and Jim Crow, as the historian George Rogers pointed out in 1981. We would do well to emulate what Southerners thought was important. https://mcclanahanacademy.com https://brionmcclanahan.com/support http://learntruehistory.com --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/brion-mcclanahan/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/brion-mcclanahan/support

Straight White American Jesus
Weekly Roundup: The Rise of Donald Crow

Straight White American Jesus

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 1, 2022 52:27


Brad and Dan begin by discussing how Madison Cawthorn's claims about cocaine and orgies sounded like youth group scare tactics. They then dig into the significance of the texts between Ginni Thomas and Mark Meadows, focusing on the Christian nationalism rife in their conversations, their characterization of Democrats as "evil," and the hope that God would not allow for the fair and free election of Joe Biden to go through. They also point out how this poses a conflict of interest for Clarence Thomas on SCOTUS cases involving January 6 and provide rebuttals to the Uncle Ron claims that criticism of Ginni Thomas is just misogyny. In the second segment Brad examines Trump's hopes that since Putin is now mad at Biden, Putin might release dirt on the President. For Brad and Dan this shows how the enemy of the people in the minds of MAGA Nation is not a war criminal like Putin, but their political opponents, who are not real Americans. The episode finishes with a lengthy discussion of the rise of Donald Crow--arguing that Trumpism will outlast Trump through the bundle of policies that are being passed at the state level. Trump himself was very bad at passing legislation. But governors and state legislatures are now putting into law the animus that his platform activated in the MAGA base. In the future, regardless of what happens with Trump and his role in public office, the legacy of Donald Crow will divide the country along lines similar to Jim Crow. This idea was first put forth by Charles Blow: https://www.nytimes.com/2022/03/27/opinion/desantis-trump-republican-party.html To Donate: https://www.paypal.com/paypalme/BradleyOnishi For an ad-free experience and to support SWAJ: https://irreverent.supportingcast.fm/straight-white-american-jesus-premium To become a patron: https://www.patreon.com/straightwhiteamericanjesus Produced by Brad Onishi Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://swaj.supportingcast.fm

Uncancellable
LIBERALS ARE MEANIES: JIM CROW CALIFORNIA

Uncancellable

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 1, 2022 28:31


HOLY CRAPPPPP AM I IN "TOLERANT" CALIFORNIA OR BACK IN THE JIM CROW SOUTH OF THE 1940s???? Sorry, I couldn't tell. I have to be escorted to class by security because liberals are hateful and tolerant of anyone who doesn't bow down to whatever they say. They're behaving the same way Democrats did in the Jim Crow era. For some reason liberals don't seem to understand that just because an individual makes a statement that they don't like, it doesn't mean they should be assaulted/threatened/harassed. We could teach that lesson to a 2 year old.What does it mean to "support" your gay child? Is support in 2022 defined the same way love is in 2022 (meaning: One must support EVERY DECISION one's child makes without question or they don't love them). *I said pro-choice in the episode, I meant pro-lifeY'all we have a lot to discuss. It's Frappuccino friday, GET ONE AND BE UNCANCELLABLE

American Institute for Economic Research
Black Land Ownership Following Emancipation By Clifford F. Thies

American Institute for Economic Research

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 1, 2022 4:03


“The problem in the South following emancipation wasn't that blacks were unable to navigate a private property-based, market-oriented economy; but it was segregation, especially of the public schools, and Jim Crow laws in general.” ~ Clifford F. Thies

旅行熱炒店
EP95 「我有一個夢」的之前與之後,阿拉巴馬州民權運動歷史現場行腳

旅行熱炒店

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 1, 2022 70:40


1963年馬丁路德金恩的「我有一個夢」演講,可謂1960年代美國民權運動的高光時刻,也是許多國家學生必讀的英文教材;然而在這場演講的之前與之後,還有更多的事情正在美國全境(特別是南方各州)發生著! 有人因為和不同膚色的人一起搭巴士,而遭受牢獄之災; 有人為了去學校上學,必須出動聯邦政府警力保護才能如願; 有人擔心參與遊行會讓自己失業,於是將青少年推上街頭; 有人為了爭取投票權,手無寸鐵的受到催淚彈與棍棒的攻擊⋯⋯ 為了更了解這段歷史,主廚在三月初用了幾天的時間,親自前往民權運動的「熱點」——美國南方的阿拉巴馬州取材,循著歷史的軌跡一一拜訪事件現場,並設身處地想像當時的情景。這集節目中將介紹四個具有代表性的事件,以類似真實犯罪節目的手法,介紹其發生的經過、為後世帶來的影響,以及如果到當地旅行,能夠看到哪些留存至今的景物。 這是旅行熱炒店迄今為止最長的一集,也可以說是話題最沈重、內容最硬的一集,然而在烏俄戰爭持續進行、各國族群議題仍然難解的此刻,或許透過這樣的內容,能讓我們看到「我有一個夢」之外,那艱辛而嚴酷的民權之路,並且問自己: 「為了自由,你願意付出多少代價?」 (不)溫馨提醒:節目中部分情節涉及暴力與流血衝突,請斟酌服用。 ✅ 本集重點: (00:00:20) 開場前言,節目介紹與踏上這段旅程的原因 (00:04:25) 從奴隸貿易到南北衝突,19世紀上半的黑人歷史 (00:08:16) 從看似一片光明的重建期,到Jim Crow種族隔離政策的全面開展 (00:12:16) 一位不願意讓座的黑人女性,開啟了超過一年的巴士抵制運動:Rosa Parks (00:17:53) 384天的蒙哥馬利巴士抵制運動,沒巴士坐那要怎麼上班上學? (00:23:05) 蒙哥馬利巴士抵制運動相關景點推薦 (00:25:04) 搭長途巴士出去玩也會有生命危險?自由乘車者與死灰復燃的3K黨 (00:30:25) 阿拉巴馬州的連續暴力襲擊事件,與密西西比州的牢獄之災 (00:37:15) 自由乘車者相關景點推薦 (00:40:50) 三天兩頭就發生爆炸案的城市伯明罕,與南北戰爭後黑人教會的出現 (00:45:13) 兒童十字軍,為什麼大人不自己上戰場? (00:48:54) 16街浸信會爆炸案,週日早晨無辜生命的逝去 (00:52:41) 兒童十字軍、16街浸信會爆炸案相關景點推薦 (00:55:30) 南方各州阻止黑人投票的各種伎倆 (00:59:20) 投票權爭取運動演變成流血衝突,遊行之路與血腥星期天 (01:04:36) 塞爾瑪—蒙哥馬利遊行相關景點推薦 (01:06:41) 結語:為了自由,你願意付出多少代價? Show note https://ltsoj.com/podcast-ep095 Facebook https://facebook.com/travel.wok Instagram https://instagram.com/travel.wok 意見回饋 https://forms.gle/4v9Xc5PJz4geQp7K7 寫信給主廚 travel.wok@ltsoj.com 旅行熱炒店官網 https://ltsoj.com/

Commonwealth Club of California Podcast
A.J. Baime: White Lies

Commonwealth Club of California Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 31, 2022 68:56


Bestselling author AJ Baime returns to The Commonwealth Club to discuss his biography of Walter F. White, a civil rights leader who often passed for white in order to investigate racist murders. White led a double life: one as a leader of the Harlem Renaissance and the NAACP in the early 20th century, the other as a white newspaperman who covered lynching crimes in the Deep South at the height of racial violence. Born mixed race, with very fair skin and straight hair, White was able to “pass” for white. He leveraged this ambiguity as a reporter, bringing to light the darkest crimes in America and helping to plant the seeds of the Civil Rights Movement. He was simultaneously a second-class citizen subject to Jim Crow laws at home and a widely respected professional with full access to the white world at work. His life was fraught with internal and external conflict—much like the story of race in America. Starting out as an obscure activist, White became a prominent civil rights leader, but until now a character study of White's life and career in all its complexity has never been told. MLF ORGANIZER George Hammond SPEAKERS A.J. Baime Author, White Lies: The Double Life of Walter F. White and America's Darkest Secret In Conversation with Sheryl Davis Executive Director, San Francisco Human Rights Commission In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, we are currently hosting all of our live programming via YouTube live stream. This program was recorded via video conference on March 28th, 2022 by the Commonwealth Club of California. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Dreams of Black Wall Street (Formerly Black Wall Street 1921)
S3 E10 Documenting Unsung Women Leaders of Black Durham and North Carolina Part 2

Dreams of Black Wall Street (Formerly Black Wall Street 1921)

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 31, 2022 46:44


Black women have often been omitted or written out of history. This much is true when it comes to many women leaders of Black Durham in the first several decades of the 20th century, when Durham, North Carolina's Black Wall Street was at it's height, as well as Black women across the state of North Carolina during this time period. As a result many Black women have never received the recognition or credit they deserved, in life or afterwards, for the contributions they made to their communities and society. This includes many Black women who took on central roles as de facto, sometimes clandestine political figures in the Jim Crow era after the disfranchisement of Black men in 1900. Some of Dr. Glenda Elizabeth Gilmore's work refocuses attention on these women by exploring the instrumental and interconnected relationship of gender, class and race in North Carolina politics. Musical Attribution: 1. Title: African Moon by John Bartmann. License, disclaimer and copyright information: CC0 1.0 Universal (CC0 1.0) Public Domain Dedication https://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/ Link to Music: https://freemusicarchive.org/music/John_Bartmann/Public_Domain_Soundtrack_Music_Album_One/african-moon 2. Title: Window Sparrows by Axletree. Licensed under a Attribution License. License, disclaimer and copyright information: Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0) Link to music: https://freemusicarchive.org/music/Axletree/Ornamental_EP/Window_Sparrows

Windy City Historians Podcast
Episode 27 – The Great Migration

Windy City Historians Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 31, 2022 58:10


In American history, we were taught that pioneers and homesteaders moved from east to west settling the continent in the greater pursuit of “Manifest Destiny” -- killing and obfuscating the First Nations peoples' way of life.  However, another American pattern often overlooked is the migration from south to the north.  Starting less than a century after a Black man of Haitian decent named Jean Baptiste Point DeSable became Chicago's first non-indigenous settler; African Americans in large numbers began leaving southern States and moving to the north, which historians now call “The Great Migration”.  Their motives were that of people everywhere seeking jobs, opportunity, and a better life. Northern States offered jobs and a relief from the weight of Jim Crow. For many Chicago had became a beacon of hope as Black-owned newspapers and in particular the “Chicago Defender”, distributed by Pullman Porters, gave hope to generations of former slaves, farmers, and sharecroppers.  Beginning as early as the 1880s and then from approximately 1910 to the 1970, rural southern Blacks by the thousands made their way north throughout these decades. And, just as the journey changed them, their music, culture, and customs changed Chicago.  Northern cities, and Chicago in particular, were not always welcoming, as decent  housing was scarce as restrictive covenants and red-lining forced African Americans to live in "The Black Belt”. This tightly constrained strip of blocks on the city's south side, initially between 22nd and 31st Streets, later extending south to 39th and eventually to 95th Street and roughly sandwiched between the railroad tracks of the Rock Island on the west and Illinois Central to the east.  But even with forced segregation, many black businesses thrived, and a sense of place was established creating Bronzeville and its famous “Stroll”. Join the Windy City Historians as we delve into the Great Migration with Dr. Charles Brahnam, author and professor, and the perfect guide to take us on a journey into the Great Migration. A trip populated by famous brave and fearless black Chicagoans such as Ida B. Wells, Oscar DePriest, and Robert S. Abbott and into a better understand of this massive cultural shift for the nation and Chicago in particular. King Oliver Jazz Band "The Long-Lasting Legacy of the Great Migration", by Isabel Wilkerson for Smithsonian Magazine, Sept. 2016Great Migration from Encyclopedia of Chicago websiteDr. Charles Russell Branham interview on C-SpanSteve Green story from the Arkansas Encyclopedia websiteIllinois Gov. Len Small from Wikipedia (Please note in our interview we say he was governor, but at the time of the Steve Green story he was involved in Illinois politics but not yet governor.)Ida B Wells: WTTW Chicago StoriesIda B. Wells biography from the Black Past websiteIda B. Wells-Burnett biography from the Women's History websiteFerdinand Lee Barnett's biography from the Black Past websiteRobert S Abbott biography on WikipediaOscar Stanton De Priest biography on WikipediaEdward Herbert Wright biography on WikipediaJesse Binga biography on WikipediaCarter G. Woodson biography on WikipediaChicago Race Riot of 1919 on WikipediaJim Crow laws from Wikipedia"History of Lynching in America" from the NAACP websiteA recommended book, THE DEFENDER: How the Legendary Black Newspaper Changed America From the Age of the Pullman Porters to the Age of Obama By Ethan MichaeliBoll weevil devastation from WikipediaPullman Porters from WikipediaThe Jones Boys, "From Riots to Renaissance: Policy Kings" from WTTW's websiteThe Incredible History and Cultural Legacy of the Bronzeville Neighborhood from Chicago Detours websiteExplore Bronzeville from the Blueprint for Bronzeville websiteBooker T. Washington biography from WikipediaThe South Side's Last Remaining Jazz Landmarks article from Chicago Magazine Thomas A. Dorsey from the Gospel Music Hall of Fame websiteMahalia JacksonMahalia Jackson performs...

Unsafe Space
[Episode 0741] [Dangerous Thoughts] Ketanji Brown Jackson, Racist Babies, and Civil Rights Legislation

Unsafe Space

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 23, 2022 76:12


Inspired by the recent SCOTUS hearings for Ketanji Brown Jackson, Carter explores the concept of racism from a philosophical standpoint. What do we mean by "racial discrimination," and is it always wrong? If so, why? At the risk of offending just about everyone, he derides the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and defends Kimberlé Crenshaw's core observation about the legal system in her seminal work, "Demarginalizing the Intersection of Race and Sex: A Black Feminist Critique of Antidiscrimination Doctrine, Feminist Theory, and Antiracist Politics." He ends by thanking Ketanji Brown Jackson for her inadvertent admission when asked to define the word "woman." The video version of this episode is available here: https://unsafespace.com/ep0741 Links Referenced in the Show: Critical Race Training in Education: https://criticalrace.org/ The Antiracist Baby Learning Guide: https://images.randomhouse.com/teachers_guides/9780593110416.pdf Babies show racial preference: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/04/170411130810.htm Examples of Jim Crow laws: https://examples.yourdictionary.com/examples-of-jim-crow-laws.html The Civil Rights Act of 1964: https://www.govtrack.us/congress/bills/88/hr7152/text About Dangerous Thoughts Hosted by Carter, "Dangerous Thoughts" is a series dedicated to practical and applied philosophy, as well as deeper dives into other crucial but complex topics. Its goal is to help rational individuals become more dangerous to the intellectual and psychological enemies of the principles upon which Western Civilization was built and has thrived. Thanks for Watching! The best way to follow Unsafe Space, no matter which platforms ban us, is to visit: https://unsafespace.com While we're still allowed on YouTube, please don't forget to verify that you're subscribed, and to like and share this episode. You can find us there at: https://unsafespace.com/channel For episode clips, visit: https://unsafespace.com/clips Other video platforms on which our content can be found include: LBRY: https://lbry.tv/@unsafe BitChute: https://www.bitchute.com/channel/unsafespace/ Also, come join our community of dangerous thinkers at the following social media sites...at least until we get banned: Censorship-averse platforms: Gab: @unsafe Minds: @unsafe Locals: unsafespace.locals.com Parler: @unsafespace Telegram Chat: https://t.me/joinchat/H4OUclXTz4xwF9EapZekPg Censorship-happy platforms: Twitter: @_unsafespace Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/unsafepage Instagram: @_unsafespace MeWe: https://mewe.com/p/unsafespace Support the content that you consume by visiting: https://unsafespace.com/donate Finally, don't forget to announce your status as a wrong-thinker with some Unsafe Space merch, available at: https://unsafespace.com/shop

The Larry Elder Show
“Comparing Lia Thomas to Jackie Robinson is Insulting and Stupid”

The Larry Elder Show

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 23, 2022 57:17


 A woke Perdue University professor penned an Op-Ed for NBC, comparing trans swimmer Lia Thomas to MLB legend Jackie Robinson who broke Major League Baseball's color barrier. Carl dissects the column to prove not only is the premise of the column insulting to blacks and their plight throughout the Jim Crow era, but the column is insanely stupid as well.   More: www.Carljacksonshow.com Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/carljacksonradio Twitter:https://twitter.com/carljacksonshow Parler: https://parler.com/carljacksonshow  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Majority Report with Sam Seder
2800 - Jim Crow & Class, The Republican Q Attack On KBJ w/ Adolph Reed

The Majority Report with Sam Seder

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 21, 2022 86:02


Sam and Emma host Adolph Reed, professor emeritus of political science at the University of Pennsylvania, to discuss his recent book The South: Jim Crow and Its Afterlives, on the lasting legacy of the racial order that defined the post-reconstruction era, and its intrinsic ties to labor and exploiting the Black workforce. Professor Reed first situates when the Jim Crow period was, as regimes of racial segregation began consolidating as reconstruction waned, and becoming a genuine wholescale institution of the South at the end of the 1800s, lasting well into the 20th Century and beyond the Second World War, before he dives into the driving forces behind this coalition: power and labor. Prof. Reed leads Emma and Sam through the pushback to rising Republican populism in the South during the flux period of reconstruction, as the white Democratic elite began to fear their overthrow (just more taxes and multi-racial labor coalitions), thus pushing coups (some literally) throughout southern governments, and shutting the doors behind them, reserving politics to control of the ownership class, and employing disenfranchisement and segregation to undermine the growing power of Black freed folks. This brings them to the concept of disenfranchisement as a means to an end for the Right, keeping them in power by relying on the racial social order that had been created, and how this is representative of why the Right has found footholds in power where the left has failed: having a practical end (keeping power and elite control) that they can maneuver different means to support. Next, Professor Reed dives into two mainstream misunderstandings of the end of Jim Crow: 1) That racism ended with the end of Jim Crow, or 2) that the changes didn't truly matter. He then dives into how neoliberalism (and liberalism) have created a view of race as the one and only fault-line of American politics – that slavery and Jim Crow were made to produce racism, not cotton and sugar or Right-wing governments – and the importance of centering the labor exploitation of Black folks (alongside many others), before they wrap up the interview by looking at how anti-racism organizing and the future of US politics will have to deal with this “flattening” of political discourse. Sam and Emma also touch on Lindsay Graham complaining that he was criticized for supporting Brett Kavanaugh (potential sexual assaulter) while the Dems don't receive that backlash for the Kentanji Brown Jackson (definitely a Black woman) nomination. And in the Fun Half: Sam and Emma watch Josh Hawley go off about the constitutional nature of child pornography as he tries to tie Ketanji Brown Jackson to the people she put in jail, Chucky Summer from LA calls in about redistricting, and then they cover Kentucky's 15-week abortion ban and State Sen. Karen Berg's incredible impassioned plea as one of the few women and ONLY radiologist in the State Senate. Ronald Raygun and Emma team up to question Sam on why he doesn't capitalize on this correlation between the amount of skin he exposes and wealth redistribution to refugees. Kowalski from NE goes from Sam's body to rising wood (prices), and Ohio republicans brawl over… definitely something. Dave Rubin responds to the backlash to his birth announcement and grapples with maintaining both his dignity and grift, plus, your calls and IMs!   Purchase tickets for the live show in Brooklyn March 26th and Boston on May 15th HERE:   https://majorityreportradio.com/live-show-schedule Become a member at JoinTheMajorityReport.com: https://fans.fm/majority/join Subscribe to the AMQuickie newsletter here:  https://madmimi.com/signups/170390/join Join the Majority Report Discord! http://majoritydiscord.com/ Get all your MR merch at our store: https://shop.majorityreportradio.com/ Check out today's sponsors: LiquidIV: Cooler weather makes it easier to miss signs of dehydration like overheating or perspiration, which means it's even more important to keep your body properly hydrated. Liquid I.V. contains 5 essential vitamins—more Vitamin C than an orange and as much potassium as a banana. Healthier than sugary sports drinks, there are no artificial flavors or preservatives and less sugar than an apple. Grab your favorite Liquid I.V. flavors nationwide at Walmart or you can get 25% off when you go to https://www.liquid-iv.com/ and use code MAJORITYREP at checkout. That's 25% off ANYTHING you order when you get better hydration today using promo code MAJORITYREP at https://www.liquid-iv.com/. Outer: Ninety-three percent of life is spent indoors. So when you finally get a moment to soak in the fresh air, you gotta make it count. Warm weather is ALMOST here. It's time to build your own outdoor oasis. Outer is innovative, high-quality outdoor furniture designed to look and feel great. Create your own backyard resort with everything from teak chairs to fire pit tables. See the difference at https://liveouter.com/MAJORITY. Plus, for a limited time, get $300 off and FREE shipping. • This is Outer's BEST OFFER anywhere - ONLY available to podcast listeners - and only for a limited time - get three-hundred dollars off and FREE shipping at https://liveouter.com/MAJORITY. Terms and conditions apply. Support the St. Vincent Nurses today! https://action.massnurses.org/we-stand-with-st-vincents-nurses/ Check out Matt's show, Left Reckoning, on Youtube, and subscribe on Patreon! https://www.patreon.com/leftreckoning Subscribe to Matt's other show Literary Hangover on Patreon! https://www.patreon.com/literaryhangover Check out The Nomiki Show on YouTube. https://www.patreon.com/thenomikishow Check out Matt Binder's YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/mattbinder Subscribe to Brandon's show The Discourse on Patreon! https://www.patreon.com/ExpandTheDiscourse Check out The Letterhack's upcoming Kickstarter project for his new graphic novel! https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/milagrocomic/milagro-heroe-de-las-calles Check out Jamie's podcast, The Antifada. https://www.patreon.com/theantifada, on iTunes, or at https://www.twitch.tv/theantifada (streaming every Monday, Wednesday, Thursday and Friday at 7pm ET!) Subscribe to Discourse Blog, a newsletter and website for progressive essays and related fun partly run by AM Quickie writer Jack Crosbie. https://discourseblog.com/ Subscribe to AM Quickie writer Corey Pein's podcast News from Nowhere. https://www.patreon.com/newsfromnowhere  Follow the Majority Report crew on Twitter: @SamSeder @EmmaVigeland @MattBinder @MattLech @BF1nn @BradKAlsop Mail supplies to help Ukrainian refugees in Poland here: Urzad miejskiw Przemyslu ul. Rynek 1 37-700 Przemysl, Poland Donate to the Minneapolis teacher's strike fund here: https://www.mft59.org/strike-fund Watch Sam's debate with Don Peebles here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iSNHI9rpX58 The Majority Report with Sam Seder - https://majorityreportradio.com/