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Latest episodes from Light Reading Podcasts

The Notebook Dump: Chips and salsa for the win

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2022 10:35


Light Reading editors Kelsey Ziser, Mike Dano and Phil Harvey sign off from MWC with a 10-minute informal recap of the work week ended September 30.The rest of the show notes and story links can be found at https://www.lightreading.com/lr-podcast. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

The Divide: How FirstLight is connecting communities with middle-mile fiber

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2022 14:00


This episode features Maura Mahoney, chief marketing officer, and Patrick Coughlin, chief development officer, with FirstLight Fiber, a digital infrastructure provider servicing enterprise and carrier customers on a 25,000 route mile fiber network. We discuss how the company's middle-mile fiber network is helping bridge the digital divide "from Bangor to Buffalo," how the company factors network stability into its buildout, the process of applying for NTIA infrastructure grants and more. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

What's the story? Helium Mobile's high hopes for MVNO

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2022 20:11


Mike Dano returns to the podcast to discuss Helium Mobile, which recently signed an MVNO agreement with T-Mobile. Helium Mobile customers will be able to access T-Mobile's existing 5G network and the do-it-yourself, Helium-branded 4G network in exchange for cryptocurrency rewards. Mike explains how the MVNO will work and which new and noteworthy elements Helium Mobile will bring into the US wireless industry. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

The Notebook Dump: Ericsson acquires Vonage, national spectrum strategy, eSIM startup and Elvis impersonators

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2022 25:16


Light Reading editors Mike "can't be bothered" Dano, Phil "the higher the hair the closer to heaven" Harvey and Kelsey "finger guns" Ziser get together for an informal recap of what's happened during the work week ended September 23, 2022.The stories covered include:10G, PON and pandemic PR: Light Reading's super-official SCTE Cable-Tec Expo wrap™Ericsson gets US clearance for Vonage take-offEricsson's $6.2B Vonage deal has befuddled investors – no wonderThe iPhone satellite service looks desperately niche5G may expand into 12.7GHz-13.25GHz nextRiPSIM promises to show carriers the bright side of eSIMsIf you want to skip around and listen, here are a few more things covered in this interview:SCTE Cable-Tec Expo show recap (00:50)Kelsey finally gets a new iPhone after hanging onto the XR for four years... but the satellite service on her iPhone 14 isn't available just yet (02:30)Ericsson hints at an update to the Vonage acquisition (Note: The update from Ericsson is coming out on September 26, not this week as initially stated during the podcast. Stay tuned for more from Light Reading on the acquisition next week). (06:17)The NTIA spectrum event and why Mike hates the phrase "the race to 5G" (09:21)Metaverse woes and why Second Life still sucks (12:30)Startup RiPSIM launches a new eSIM product (14:17)Things you never needed to know including the fact that New York ranks 8th for best states to go fishing in (not to be confused with phishing) (20:30)See you at Mobile World Congress Las Vegas, but don't ask Phil or Mike for an Elvis impersonation (23:51) Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

The Divide: Ziply VP chats rural fiber builds, permit reforms and micro-trenching

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2022 23:43


Jessica Epley, vice president of regulatory and external affairs at Ziply Fiber joins the podcast to discuss the company's fiber buildout strategy in the northwest US, how it's preparing for the opportunities and competition presented by Broadband, Equity, Access and Deployment (BEAD) funding, and why permitting reform would help accelerate broadband delivery where it's needed most. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Executive Spotlight Q&A: Flexible, Cloud Native Networking is Here

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2022 13:32


Enterprises have fully moved their IT stack into the cloud, and network infrastructure is next. Dave Ward, PacketFabric's CEO, joins Light Reading to discuss the need for serious positive disruption in telecom, the flexibility of a cloud-native network, and how PacketFabric delivers real-time connectivity anywhere you want to go. #sponsored Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Reminiscing with Bob Gold about cable milestones, Dan Aykroyd and media screwups

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 29:15


If you've been in the cable tech industry for more than five minutes, there's a good chance you know Bob Gold, the super-energetic PR/marketing guy and Cable TV Pioneer who's been representing cable tech companies and startups since the late 1990s. Gold got his agency start representing a video remultiplexing company (sexy, right?) called Imedia. Since then, off the top of this hack's head, he's flacked for is currently flacking for companies such as Canal Plus, Pioneer (back when it was making cable boxes and interactive guides), Media One, Incanta and ClearBand (we'll get to that those in more detail), Plume, the recently rechristened National Content & Technology Association (NCTC) and Vidgo, a virtual multichannel video programming distributor (vMVPD) that competes in the market with the likes of YouTube TV, Hulu, Philo and Sling TV.Full disclosure – he and the crew at Bob Gold & Associates have pitched a ton of stories to me about many of them over the years. Bob and I don't always see eye-to-eye, but I've written about many of them over the years. And Gold did nominate me for the Cable TV Pioneers class of 2018, so perhaps I wasn't as big of a jerk to him, his staff and his clients over the years as I thought I was. Hey, I tried. Usually news tied to Gold has to do with a company he represents, but this time it's all about Bob – his agency recently turned 25-years-old. He got that up and running about the time I started writing about the industry and had to Google "DOCSIS" to figure out what the heck I was about to do my first story on.So, we've got a lot of industry stuff in common, enough that it made sense to get together on the podcast and hop in the "Wayback Machine" to reminisce about the last two decades-plus.You can download a lightly edited transcript of the podcast here. If you want to skip around and listen, here's a timestamped list of the convo: How Gold and the crew celebrated the silver anniversary. And, yes, a PR crisis did interfere (1:15) How Gold, whose background includes marketing and communications exec roles with major cable programmers, turned a disaster into a new career as the head of an agency that focused on the crazy world of tech – and other stuff (5:50) How a top exec of a company didn't even believe in a fiber-based product that was being pitching to the press (12:30) How startups like Incanta and ClearBand had great ideas about streaming TV to devices but were just too early with respect to tech or content rights… or both (14:00) How Gold pitched me on a cable theft story, and I royally screwed up the embargo and the bad guy got away (15:30) Which client was Gold's greatest completed Hail Mary (18:30) Why Dan Aykroyd was Gold's favorite celeb to work with, back when video-on-demand was just appearing on the cable scene (20:30) Why Gold, at one time, viewed Amazon Prime as the most infuriating organization (24:00) Gold's biggest gain. After the fact, he told me to add Plume to the list (26:44) Gold's proudest moment – next to being my guest on the podcast, of course (27:30)— Jeff Baumgartner, Senior Editor, Light Reading Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Omdia on the rocky road to private 5G for manufacturing

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 22:39


Service providers have been banging on about the benefits of private 5G networks for the manufacturing industry, but that vertical has been reluctant to move forward with 5G technologies.In this podcast interview, Omdia analysts Pablo Tomasi and Anna Ahrens explain why the manufacturing industry, oft-cited as fertile ground for 5G, hasn't been that excited about private 5G network adoption."[5G] has a large promise of ultra-reliable, low-latency communications, which is actually a basic requirement of industrial communication," said Ahrens. "But what no one counted on or what no one expected is that it is not ready to go technology, it is a technology which still needs to be evolved."In addition, Ahrens and Tomasi dive into their joint research report, Demystifying Private 5G in Manufacturing: How to Seize a New Opportunity, and explain what can be done about the mismatch of expectations for 5G between the telcos and manufacturing sector.You can download a lightly edited transcript of the podcast here. If you want to skip around and listen, here are a few more things covered in this interview:Why the manufacturing industry is hesitant about adopting 5G (02:45)The reality of ROI for 5G (04:01)Why the manufacturing sector is resistant to disruptive technologies (06:07)Why the manufacturing industry is slow to adopt new technologies provided by telcos (08:11)What service providers believe is the advantage of 5G for the manufacturing industry (10:44)Near term opportunities for service providers in the manufacturing sector (14:24)Impetus behind Ahrens and Tomasi deciding to team up on their joint report (17:19)How telcos can better develop 5G services that enterprises need (19:16) Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

The Notebook Dump: Broadband proliferation, chicanery and hotel soap

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022 22:29


Light Reading editors Kelsey Ziser, Nicole Ferraro and Jedi Padawan Mike Dano join sentient vanilla latte Phil Harvey for an informal recap of what's happened during the work week ended September 16, 2022.The show notes and video for this episode are available right here. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Light Reading's super-official SCTE Cable-Tec Expo 2022 Preview

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022 21:04


SCTE Cable-Tec Expo is in Philadelphia September 19-22, a triumphant return to an in-person cable-fest since the 2019 show in New Orleans – just mere months before the whole world went to hell. But the show is back. Booths will be erected. Real, live people will be milling around schmoozing. Technology and products will be on display that can be seen and (gasp!) touched.Prediction: Someone might get drunk! And Light Reading will be there to cover it all! Or at least as much as we can get to before our brains melt under the white hot pressure of engineering diagrams, mathematical equations and enough slide decks to make a product manager weep with joy. But what will this year's show be about? Feel free to check the event schedule to get a sense of what's what. You'll see sessions on DOCSIS 4.0, rural broadband, AI, an update on cable's power efficiency efforts, something about how cable's combating video piracy, and an announcement on who is going to take home the big money in the "10G Challenge."Please, read away if you must. But audio can be – nay, is – much more fun! In this episode of the Light Reading Podcast, editors Jeff Baumgartner and Nicole Ferraro and cable analyst/guru Alan Breznick chew the fat on what they think the show will be about, or at least what they think it should be about. The point? Thinking occurred. We'd tell you more here, but that would be like spoiling the finale of Lost. Please go listen to our banter. You'll be glad that you did. Or if you're still the reading type, you can download a lightly edited transcript of the podcast here.Or if you're just too damn busy getting ready for the show and only have time to cherry pick the audio, here's a timestamped list of stuff we chatted about: Our sense of what the hot topics will be at the show (01:09) Hey, there's not a lot on the agenda specifically about a five-letter F-word (4:25) Alan reviews what's in store at the Light Reading-hosted breakfast sessions on Tuesday and Wednesday of the show. Chance of bacon: 87% (05:26) What we think will be the focus of the opening general session (7:00) Should the industry be concerned about slowing broadband subscriber growth? Short answer: yep (11:15) We speculate on whether Comcast will remain the Lone Wolf when it comes to Full Duplex DOCSIS (14:30) Predictions on the big takeaways from the show (16:45) — Jeff Baumgartner, Senior Editor, Light Reading Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Brightcove CEO braces for the next big shift in streaming

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2022 35:07


Marc DeBevoise has had a front seat during the video market's streaming revolution. He was a top exec at CBS when the broadcaster surprised the media world in 2014 with the launch of CBS All Access, a service that has since evolved to become Paramount+ following the merger with Viacom and the eventual formation of what's known as Paramount Global today. "In 2013, we started to pitch internally that we needed to go over-the-top and disrupt ourselves," he recalls. He's also been front and center to witness the shift to streaming on mobile devices, the surge of direct-to-consumer streaming services and, more recently, the rise in streaming deals for live sporting events. DeBevoise joins the Light Reading Podcast about five month after becoming CEO of Brightcove to discuss his vision for the streaming tech specialist and to dig into some key trends that are impacting the broader industry. In addition to setting a goal to become "most trusted streaming technology company in the world," DeBevoise is focused on accelerating growth at Brightcove and creating more scale for a business that's evenly split in serving customers in the enterprise and media/entertainment sectors. DeBevoise, an exec also late of Starz and NBCUniversal, believes there's scale to pursue amid a "shift" in the market whereby some of largest media companies around the world are looking to save money on streaming technology and the resources required to support it by hooking up with specialized streaming companies such as Brightcove. DeBevoise also weighed in on several big picture streaming trends, including the rise in sports rights deals and whether the underlying streaming infrastructure is prepared to handle major live events such as Amazon's big deal to live-stream Thursday night NFL games starting the night of September 15. "I think the technology is there to support it," he said. "I think this week, you'll see the audience come in light versus what the TV audience was, just because it's harder to find and there is a section of the population that just doesn't yet embrace this part of the ecosystem, but it'll get there. I have full faith." You can download a lightly edited transcript of the podcast here. If you want to skip around and listen, here are a few topics discussed during this podcast:A rundown of DeBevoise's priorities at Brightcove and his vision for the streaming specialist (00:22) How DeBevoise intends to scale Brightcove's business (5:00) How DeBevoise has identified a shift in the marketplace in which large media companies around the world are seeking to save money on streaming tech, opening a possible door for Brightcove to step in (7:00) What's surprised DeBevoise about the way the streaming market has evolved (17:45)Whether today's streaming infrastructure is up to the task to take on massive, live sporting events amid Amazon's exclusive to stream Thursday night NFL games (24:00) Looking beyond video, an exploration of other apps and services will start to cut into the streaming pie (29:00) Thoughts on why the volume levels for 4K streaming remain relatively small (30:30) —Jeff Baumgartner, Senior Editor, Light Reading Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

What's the story? '2022 is the year of T-Mobile'

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2022 15:56


Light Reading's Mike Dano explains why T-Mobile now claims to be the biggest wireless network operator in the world. He also discusses T-Mobile's strategies around spectrum acquisition, it's fixed wireless access service and more. In addition, Mike weighs in on the new iPhone 14 and it's satellite connectivity feature. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

QOS Networks CEO brings AIOps to Zayo Group

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 24:14


Former CEO of QOS Networks Frank Cittadino, now SVP of edge services for Zayo Group, joins the podcast to discuss why Zayo acquired managed service provider QOS Networks. In addition, Cittadino explains Zayo's edge and multi-cloud strategies and the difference between network monitoring and network observability. Cittadino also describes the four key components of artificial intelligence (AI), and shares why Zayo has its sights set on more software acquisitions in the future. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

What's the story? German telcos face geopolitical troubles

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022 13:42


In this episode, Light Reading's Iain Morris explains why German service providers could be in hot water. Germany's reliance on Russian energy sources, plus the use of networking technology from Huawei, could present some serious problems now and in the long term for German service providers.You can download an unedited transcript of the podcast here. If you want to skip around and listen, here are some highlights in this interview:Why Germany's relationships with Russia and China could present problems for German service providers (00:46)How Deutsche Telekom's customers could be impacted by energy shortages, and the consequences of tricky trade relations (03:06)Long-term impacts of German telcos' collaboration with Huawei (07:48)Privacy concerns for mobile customers traveling through Germany (09:28) Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

The Notebook Dump: New iPhones, data center alleys and Comcast's big gigs

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2022 24:09


Light Reading editors Kelsey Ziser, Jeff Baumgartner and Phil Harvey gather around for an informal (let's be honest, downright silly) discussion of what's happened during the work week ended September 9, 2022. For the full show notes, please visit www.lightreading.com. Our GDPR privacy policy was updated on August 8, 2022. Visit acast.com/privacy for more information.

What's the story? The rise of independent OS suppliers for smart TVs

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2022 20:52


Light Reading's Jeff Baumgartner discusses the rise of independent suppliers of operating systems for Smart TVs, and what their entry into the market could mean for incumbent suppliers. In addition, we take a look at Comcast and Charter's mobile strategies. Our GDPR privacy policy was updated on August 8, 2022. Visit acast.com/privacy for more information.

The Divide: TruConnect's Danielle Perry on the role of MVNOs in keeping people online

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2022 15:42


Danielle Perry, chief compliance officer at TruConnect – a mobile virtual network operator (MVNO) – joins the podcast to talk about how the company is keeping customers connected through the federal government's Lifeline program and now the Affordable Connectivity Programs (ACP). We also discuss her recent appointment to the board of directors at the National Lifeline Association, and more. Our GDPR privacy policy was updated on August 8, 2022. Visit acast.com/privacy for more information.

OSS/BSS market avoids pandemic slowdown

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2022 24:04


By 2027, analysts at Omdia expect the telco IT market to exceed $40 billion, up from $31 billion in 2021. James Crawshaw, practice leader for Omdia, joins the podcast to explain how the OSS/BSS market thrived during the pandemic, and why service providers are investing in improving automation and customer experience for their OSS/BSS platforms."It's not historically been a particularly high growth market, this OSS and BSS space is fairly mature," said Crawshaw. However, he explained that despite the pandemic forcing many to work from home, IT teams "had no trouble" implementing IT projects remotely."The other positive thing for the market has been that operators have really wanted to up their game in terms of making the customer experience more digital and more streamlined," he added.The result of this market momentum still hasn't resulted in "hypergrowth," said Crawshaw. But, many OSS/BSS suppliers are now "looking at 8% growth in their business. And for many years, it was trundling along at 2%."You can download an unedited transcript of the podcast here. If you want to skip around and listen, here are a few more things covered in this interview:Growth in telecom IT market for OSS/BSS (01:26)Fastest growth segments within the OSS/BSS market (05:43)Moving OSS/BSS applications to the public cloud (09:43)Recommendations for service providers (11:53)Impact of 5G on IT (14:19)Why tier 2 and 3 operators are underserved by the bigger OSS/BSS vendors (18:23)Whether hyperscalers will subsume the OSS/BSS market (19:59) Our GDPR privacy policy was updated on August 8, 2022. Visit acast.com/privacy for more information.

The Divide: Tarana's CEO on why FWA isn't a 'stopgap to fiber'

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2022 20:35


This episode features Basil Alwan, CEO of Tarana. We discuss what sets Tarana apart as a provider of what it calls "next-generation" fixed wireless access, or ngFWA, and how it's deploying its technology to help WISPs close the digital divide. We also get into broadband policy and why he wants legislators to reconsider unlicensed spectrum as a tool and see FWA as more than just a "stopgap" to fiber. Our GDPR privacy policy was updated on August 8, 2022. Visit acast.com/privacy for more information.

Glidr aims to help consumers navigate a sea of streaming options

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2022 32:20


What are you watching? It's a question that tends to pop up among family, friends and coworkers. The water cooler may be a corporate relic, but thanks to the rise and popularity of free and paid streaming services, the video landscape is certainly rife with water cooler-worthy TV shows, series and movies. Perhaps too many. A startup called Glidr Inc. wants to help consumers cut through the clutter and zero in on content that their social media circles enjoy and recommend. It's trying to tackle that challenge with a free app that, following several months of testing, recently launched on Android and iOS devices. The general idea is to help consumers discover content they might be interested in watching and to help them manage the various streaming services they use and pay for. But rather than relying heavily on AI and machine learning techniques to surface and recommend content, Glidr's platform is powered in part by what a user's family and friends are watching and recommending."When your friend recommends something or your family member recommends something to watch, you're probably going to watch it," contends Glidr CEO Adam Tom, who recently joined the Light Reading Podcast to discuss the company and broader trend impacting the streaming sector. "There's all these great recommendation engines out there. But when your family or friend says something, that's really a strong recommendation." Glidr's ranks include vets from the cable industry and video tech industries. Adam Tom is late of Imedia, Terayon and RGB Networks (sold to Imagine Communications in 2015), and more recently was with Samsung, heading up North American engineering for smart TVs as well as engineering for Samsung's connected TV ad business. Also joining the podcast is Christopher Lee, Glidr's product director. Lee is a video engineering vet previously with Gemstar TV Guide and Comcast, where he aided in the development of products for the operator's X1 video platform. You can download a lightly edited transcript of the podcast here. If you want to skip around and listen, here are a few topics discussed during this podcast:An expansion into the background on the Glidr team and its ties to the cable and video tech industries (00:30)A discussion about the problems and challenges Glidr is trying to address with its direct-to-consumer app. (3:22) How Glidr is tapping into a user's circle of family and friends, rather than just AI and machine learning techniques, to deliver movie and TV recommendations. (5:30) How Glidr intends to help consumers manage and track their streaming subscriptions and provide a secure way to store and manage passwords in a central location (18:00) How Glidr expects its revenue model to evolve into areas such as marketing services and sponsorships as it scales up its user base (21:00) An update on Glidr's financial situation, including a recent investment from Goodwater Capital (27:10) A snapshot of the company's plans and priorities for the rest of 2022 and into 2023 (28:45) — Jeff Baumgartner, Senior Editor, Light Reading Our GDPR privacy policy was updated on August 8, 2022. Visit acast.com/privacy for more information.

DriveNets co-founder on the white box way to lower TCO

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2022 20:45


With a fresh cash flow of $262 million, DriveNets plans to expand sales to service provider customers and grow its employee base by 30% to 450 employees.Hillel Kobrinsky, chief strategy officer and co-founder of DriveNets, joined the podcast with an update on how the networking company plans to invest its new Series C round of funding, and how the company's focus on virtualization software is impacting innovation and sales cycles with its service provider customers.In addition, Kobrinsky explained how virtualizing network infrastructure pairs well with the new work-from-home culture, and reduces total cost of ownership and operational costs for customers.You can download an unedited transcript of the podcast here. If you want to skip around and listen, here are a few more things covered in this interview:Update on DriveNets' latest funding round of $262 million (00:32)DriveNet's plans to expand with support from latest funding (02:17)Changes to software innovation cycles in coordination with white box deployment (03:43)Speed of sale cycles among service providers utilizing white boxes and increasing virtualization in their networks (06:02)Total cost of ownership and operational costs of moving to virtualized network infrastructure (08:09)Potential challenges of updates within a brownfield environment (10:20)Shift to more automated networks (14:17)Projection for expansion at DriveNets over next 18 months (17:46) Our GDPR privacy policy was updated on August 8, 2022. Visit acast.com/privacy for more information.

What's the story? T-Mobile, SpaceX team up on satellite launch

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2022 11:29


T-Mobile and SpaceX have teamed up to connect mobile phones to SpaceX's new Starlink satellites. According to the two companies, this could eliminate all cellular dead zones around the US. However, the new satellites won't be launched until next year and in the meantime, Verizon and AT&T are working on their own satellite plans."Verizon plans to use Amazon's planned Project Kuiper satellites to connect its rural cell towers to the Internet, and AT&T is planning a similar setup with OneWeb's own growing constellation of low-Earth orbit (LEO) satellites," wrote Dano in a recent Light Reading article.During this podcast, Light Reading's Mike Dano also provides an update on the iPphone 14 launch. The new iPhone, which should be available next month, is expected to be able to directly connect to satellites. Our GDPR privacy policy was updated on August 8, 2022. Visit acast.com/privacy for more information.

Juniper COO on a sustainable approach to cloud metro management

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2022 21:36


Manoj Leelanivas, COO of Juniper, joins the podcast with an update on Juniper's Cloud Metro platform. Leelanivas explains how a number of factors are contributing to driving network traffic through the metro network and how Juniper is taking on new approaches to managing cloud infrastructure. He also shares why increasing automation in the management of cloud infrastructure is beneficial to service provider and enterprise customers."The AI and cloud-delivered automation actually simplifies this mundane work stream, so people can actually focus on actually more satisfying work, like service creation," he said.Leelanivas also provides insight into Juniper's sustainability strategy, the importance of reducing e-waste and total cost of ownership (TCO).You can download an unedited transcript of the podcast here. If you want to skip around and listen, here are a few more things covered in this interview:Background on Leelanivas' roles at Juniper (00:39)Juniper's Cloud Metro platform and its impact on service providers (01:43)Sustainability components to Cloud Metro platform (04:39)Reducing e-waste (09:27)Addressing e-waste and sustainability on earnings calls (11:49)Why Juniper is focusing on zero trust security (10:03) Our GDPR privacy policy was updated on August 8, 2022. Visit acast.com/privacy for more information.

The Divide: How private wireless can help close connectivity gaps

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2022 21:18


This episode features David Broecker, chief innovation officer at Purdue Research Foundation (PRF), and Özer Dondurmacıoğlu, vice president of strategic accounts at enterprise networking company Celona. We discuss the digital divide in the state of Indiana where Purdue Research Foundation (part of Purdue University) is based, why PRF worked with Celona to deploy a private 5G network on CBRS spectrum at PRF's Discovery Park District, and how private wireless technology can help organizations and institutions close digital skills and literacy gaps. Our GDPR privacy policy was updated on August 8, 2022. Visit acast.com/privacy for more information.

Investor interest in fiber hot as 'open access networks' come into focus

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 22, 2022 34:50


There's no shortage of topics in the world of broadband these days. Fiber network M&A activity and upgrades have not slowed down. Billions of dollars are flowing into rural broadband. Cable operators are considering multiple paths forward on their access network upgrades amid flagging broadband subscriber growth. Meanwhile, fixed wireless access (FWA) seems to be all the rage. To cover that ground and help analyze those various-but-related-topics, two cable industry vets, David Strauss and Jay Rolls, now execs at Broadband Success Partners, recently joined the Light Reading Podcast. Broadband Success Partners, a company founded in 2017, has completed more than 40 technical due diligence engagements from about 25 clients, including a growing number of them outside the US. Heading into 2023, the company is also exploring how it might bring its expertise to the public sector. "When you consider the $65 billion of infrastructure funding – broadband funding – that's coming down the pike here, perhaps there's an opportunity. We're just exploring it at this stage," David Strauss, co-founder and principal of Broadband Success Partners and an exec formerly of Lightpath, Comcast, AT&T and Sprint, explained.Meanwhile, investor interest in fiber "is very strong and not abating," says Rolls, an exec who previously held top engineering slots at Charter Communications and Cox Communications, and now serves as CTO of Broadband Success Partners. "I would even say it might be a little stronger than we saw six months ago." And Broadband Success Partners is seeing the notion of the "open access network," a model already somewhat popular in Europe, get more traction and interest in the US. You can download a lightly edited transcript of the podcast here. If you want to skip around and listen, here are a few topics discussed during this podcast:Background on the market focus of Broadband Success Partners and the number of M&A-related due diligence projects completed so far (0:50) On the opportunities emerging outside the US and, within the US, the potential to engage with the billions of dollars being freed up to bring broadband to unserved and underserved areas (4:15) An update on the current level of investor interest in fiber, and how the notion of an "open access network" built on fiber is becoming an emerging topic in the US (6:45) How active Ethernet, not just PON, is making waves in the world of fiber access networks (9:50) How in-home services, such as managed Wi-Fi, are becoming increasingly important attributes for broadband service providers that are trying to differentiate beyond speeds, feeds and pricing (11:30) A discussion on the various options available to cable operators as they pursue what's next on the access network – DOCSIS 3.1 enhancements, future DOCSIS 4.0 upgrades or overbuilds based on fiber-to-the-premises (FTTP) technology (17:00) An update on potential pricing for DOCSIS 4.0 network upgrades (22:00) As cable faces slowing broadband subscriber growth, what's more important: keeping prices and margins steady amid that slowdown, or driving promos that can rekindle subscriber growth? (27:00) How fixed wireless is factoring into the discussion, particularly in rural areas (31:45)—Jeff Baumgartner, Senior Editor, Light Reading Our GDPR privacy policy was updated on August 8, 2022. Visit acast.com/privacy for more information.

How the CHIPS and Sciences Act could boost US optical networking

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2022 17:30


Infinera CEO David Heard is optimistic about what the CHIPS and Sciences Act can do for US optical networking vendors, especially those endeavoring to be less dependent on foreign suppliers.You can download an unedited transcript of the podcast here.Here are just a few things covered in this podcast episode:What the CHIPS and Sciences Act does for companies like Infinera (01:38)How it benefits the optical networking industry overall (06:33)Infinera's reorganization and market acceptance (09:47)The road to 800Gbit/s and the upcoming growth cycle. (13:39)Check our post about this episode on www.lightreading.com for more. Our GDPR privacy policy was updated on August 8, 2022. Visit acast.com/privacy for more information.

Cable industry invests in a smarter power grid

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2022 19:24


The utility grid is undergoing a massive change, transforming in a similar way to the cable network 30 years ago, according to Dr. Robert Cruickshank, managing member of Power Networks."Now with distributed solar, and storage, you know, battery storage in people's homes, we actually have content creation and storage at the edge," said Cruickshank on the podcast.The "unprecedented change" to the grid isn't without growing pains, explained Cruickshank. Extreme weather conditions, increased electricity usage and a reduction in traditional energy sources such as fossil fuels have all placed a strain on the utility grid.On the bright side, the US is moving toward a smarter grid, supported by efforts such as the SCTE 267 standard, explained Cruickshank."And we actually, in the Society of Cable Telecom Engineers, we created a standard called SCTE 267. And in that standard, we define how you can communicate with devices, and tell them exactly what you were saying," said Cruickshank.You can download an unedited transcript of the podcast here. If you want to skip around and listen, here are a few more things covered in this interview:Current state of US power grid (00:33)Potential issues if utility grid isn't updated (03:23)What can be done to update the power grid (04:00)Smart grid transformation (05:02)SCTE 267 standard and importance of demand response (08:19)Large scale examples of smart grids (10:03)How cable operators and broadband providers can support smart grid transformation (11:54)Cyber security challenges to the smart grid (12:58)How long the smart grid transformation will take (17:10)Additional resources (18:09) Our GDPR privacy policy was updated on August 8, 2022. Visit acast.com/privacy for more information.

Comcast on the surge of botnets and how businesses can properly defend themselves

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 16, 2022 26:19


With the range, scope and variety of damaging botnet attacks on the rise, businesses large and small need to prioritize cybersecurity and ensure they are taking proactive and iterative measures to protect against potentially devastating attacks. "Cyber[security], like many things in life, is a journey. It's not a destination," said Ivan Shefrin, executive director for managed security services at Comcast Business, who joined the Light Reading Podcast to discuss the rising threat of botnets. "Even the largest companies in the world are not fully mature. You can always improve continuously and get better." Shefrin said adopting such an approach is critical for businesses as cybersecurity threats increase. The 2021 Comcast Business DDoS Threat Report found that distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) botnet attacks have risen 14% since 2019, and 41% since 2021. "We're in an arms race now," Shefrin said. "Machine learning and automation are the leading edge of that arms race … It unfortunately means that botnets are only going to grow in size and scope and complexity – and the difficulty in defending them." You can download a lightly edited transcript of the podcast here. If you want to skip around and listen, here are a few topics discussed during this podcast:A brief introduction to the world of botnets and the threat they pose to businesses (1:13)The number and variety of attacks that can be perpetuated by botnets, and how network providers can play a role in mitigating threats (4:50)Discoveries made and trends detected by Comcast's latest DDoS Threat Report, including a rise in the number of DDoS botnet attacks and how modernized attacks are difficult to defend against (9:30) Why DDoS botnet attacks are on the rise (11:20) How unpatched systems have created targets for cybercriminals, and why keeping those systems patched presents a major challenge for larger companies (16:00) How botnets have evolved to become fungible assets for cybercriminals (21:15) — Jeff Baumgartner, Senior Editor, Light Reading Our GDPR privacy policy was updated on August 8, 2022. Visit acast.com/privacy for more information.

What's the story: HBO Max and Discovery+ to merge next year

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 15, 2022 13:07


There's a new collaboration on the horizon for the streaming video world. Earlier this month, Warner Bros. Discovery (WBD) announced that HBO Max and Discovery+ will be combined next year."One of the big things that kind of came out of the call, the recent earnings call, is a plan to launch HBO Max and Discovery+ as a single service and kind of a global brand, initially in the US next summer, and then a bunch of international markets in the following couple of years," said Light Reading's Jeff Baumgartner in regard to WBD's recent earnings call.Baumgartner said the name of the combined service is yet to be announced. It's going to be a bit of a waiting game to see if the combined video service of HBO Max and Discovery+ will be able to scale, and if it'll bring in a bigger and broader audience.You can download an unedited transcript of the podcast here.Related stories and links:Record number of streamers cut the pay-TV cord – studyAmazon, HBO Max on path to a new streaming deal – reportWarnerMedia-Discovery merger could spell trouble for Roku Our GDPR privacy policy was updated on August 8, 2022. Visit acast.com/privacy for more information.

NCTC CEO recaps annual show, offers update on MVNO plan

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2022 35:07


Lou Borrelli, CEO of the National Content & Technology Cooperative (NCTC), joins the Light Reading Podcast to reflect on the recently concluded The Independent Show in Florida, and reactions to the new name of the organization, which kept the NCTC designation but dropped the "cable" and "television" labels. Borrelli, who joined the podcast from his boat moored in Martha's Vineyard, also provided a few updates on the organization's major, new initiatives, including a "Connectivity Exchange" and a plan to offer mobile options to the NCTC membership by the fourth quarter of 2022. This year's show, which returned as an in-person event after 2021's all-digital confab, was marked by "pent up energy, for wanting to reconnect," Borrelli recalled. "The Independent Show is really the last standing old school cable show. It's the only one that combines programming and technology, just like the good ol' days. And it had that feel to it." And what about that name change? "I think a lot of people felt like it was overdue," Borrelli said. "I haven't had any negative feedback about the name. I think the fact that we kept the acronym the same, to me, was important." Borrelli said the NCTC is on track to have multiple mobile options available to its membership of 700-plus operators. "The deal that we're contemplating is flexible. From the members' perspective, they can choose how much or how little they want to actually take on for themselves," he said. You can download a lightly edited transcript of the podcast here. If you want to skip around and listen, here's a sampling of topics discussed during this podcast:Reflections on The Independent Show returning to an in-person event, and a recap from the event for those who didn't make the trip to Florida (00:57)Reaction to the recent name change from the National Cable Television Cooperative to the National Content & Technology Cooperative. (09:00) How and why the NCTC shifted to focus on its collective broadband base rather than its historical focus on collective video subscribers. (11:00) On the opportunity and challenge to get hundreds of independent operators – big, medium and small – focused on similar projects and goals. (13:41) How mobile became a priority at the NCTC and updates on the organization's plan to have multiple mobile service options available to members by the fourth quarter of 2022. (18:45)An anticipated timeline on when NCTC members will be able to take advantage of a new "Connectivity Exchange" that will enable independent operators to participate in national RFPs for last-mile connectivity. (25:30) Borrelli participated in the podcast from his sailboat. How does he stay connected from the water? (30:30) —Jeff Baumgartner, Senior Editor, Light Reading Our GDPR privacy policy was updated on August 8, 2022. Visit acast.com/privacy for more information.

Orange VP on automating the API ecosystem

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2022 21:13


DENVER – MEF Annual Members Event – Orange Business Services VP Franck Morales returns to the podcast to share how the service provider is utilizing MEF's Lifecycle Service Orchestration (LSO) APIs.In addition to working to further automate transactions with other service providers and enterprise customers via the APIs, Morales said his role as a member of MEF's board provides him with the opportunity to help develop SD-WAN and SASE standards.You can download an unedited transcript of the podcast here. If you want to skip around and listen, here are a few more things covered in this interview:Orange's use of the MEF LSO APIs (00:23)Development of SD-WAN and SASE standards (03:17)New Integrated Trust Network (ITN) and blockchain groups (04:25)How use of APIs improves automation of business functions (11:00)New MEF security standard (16:27)Standardized definition of SASE (17:20) Our GDPR privacy policy was updated on August 8, 2022. Visit acast.com/privacy for more information.

The Divide: How a co-op is solving 'the broadband problem' in rural Georgia

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2022 24:44


On this episode, we're joined by Jonathan Chambers, a partner with Conexon; and Herschel Arant, senior vice president of energy supply and external services at Central Georgia EMC, a rural electric cooperative serving parts of 14 counties in central Georgia. We discuss their partnership to build out a fiber broadband network to an unserved region of the state and how their collaboration led to the creation of Conexon's ISP arm, Connect. We also get into why electric cooperatives are especially well placed to close the digital divide in the rural US and Chambers' view that they should receive the bulk of federal broadband funding.Read an unedited episode transcript here. Our GDPR privacy policy was updated on August 8, 2022. Visit acast.com/privacy for more information.

Verizon Frontline demos connectivity and emergency response to chemical spill drill

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 10:16


In this podcast, Verizon's Mark Paff described in detail the service provider's role in emergency response scenarios and explained that Verizon's efforts are "all done in close coordination with the local responders that are setting up that incident command center after the event." Our GDPR privacy policy was updated on August 8, 2022. Visit acast.com/privacy for more information.

What's the story? Open RAN, semiconductor markets marred by supply chain, geopolitical dustups

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 12:10


Many industries are feeling the squeeze of supply chain challenges, and the open RAN and semiconductor businesses are no exception.Despite the flexibility that open RAN promises from an equipment and technology standpoint, supply chain speed bumps plus geopolitical factors are presenting new challenges to that market, Light Reading's Iain Morris explained on the podcast."Open RAN for people who aren't that familiar with it is really just a set of interfaces that allow you to mix and match components and software from different companies," said Morris. "But the idea is that because you don't need an end-to-end portfolio, it's a lot easier then for smaller companies and specialists to come into the mix and kind of compete."Morris recently reported on one of the most prominent players in the open RAN game, Parallel Wireless, which had to lay off employees."They've had to let go of a lot of their staff," he said. "It depends on what reports you read how many have gone, but there are some saying it's up to 80%, which sounds pretty disastrous, really, for a company to lose that many."In addition to discussing open RAN woes, Morris explained why a potential Chinese invasion of Taiwan could have a major impact on the semiconductor market.You can download an unedited transcript of the podcast here. Our GDPR privacy policy was updated on August 8, 2022. Visit acast.com/privacy for more information.

Lumen CTO on automating and standardizing network infrastructure

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 13:16


DENVER – MEF Annual Members Event – Lumen's sights are set on developing a customer experience where connectivity service orders are placed through a portal or API for a more digital, automated experience, Andrew Dugan, CTO of Lumen Technologies, told Light Reading.Accomplishing that goal requires automation of Lumen's infrastructure via the use of APIs, said Dugan. He added that the service provider is currently partnering with an enterprise customer on testing and deploying MEF's Lifecycle Service Orchestration (LSO) APIs.In addition to explaining how Lumen is utilizing the LSO APIs, Dugan shared updates on developments of MEF's standards for SD-WAN and SASE.You can download an unedited transcript of the podcast here. If you want to skip around and listen, here are a few more things covered in this interview:Lumen's experience implementing LSO APIs for automation of business functions (00:34)Impact of MEF's efforts to standardize SD-WAN and SASE on how operators deploy those services (02:55)Importance of a SASE definition to clear up confusion in the industry (05:00)Impact of hybrid workforce trend on SD-WAN and SASE deployments (06:20)MEF passes W128 security standard for LSO APIs (08:00)Differences between zero trust and zero trust network access (08:36)Future developments of APIs (09:52)Use of blockchain for managing transactions between service providers and enterprise customers (11:17) See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Divide: WISPs are the digital divide's 'first responders,' says new WISPA CEO

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 23:07


In this episode, we're joined by David Zumwalt, president and CEO of the Wireless Internet Service Providers Association (WISPA), a trade organization that represents the fixed wireless industry. Zumwalt assumed his role roughly two months ago, in June 2022, after former CEO Claude Aiken stepped down from his post at the organization in April. We discuss what he learned about the digital divide from his prior role at an ISP in the US Virgin Islands, and his vision for WISPA as the federal government prepares to hand down tens of billions in grants for states to eradicate their broadband gaps. We also get into the important role that WISPs play in closing the digital divide, and why he likens them to "first responders."Read a full transcript of this episode here. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Interpret's Brett Sappington on the streaming evolution and its impact on pay-TV

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 35:48


There's no shortage of change and disruption being meted out by the streaming market. Netflix, which benefits from a sizable chunk of TV viewing time, is pursuing an ad-supported option to help restoke customer growth. Meanwhile, sports rights are rapidly gravitating to deep-pocketed streaming platforms and the world of Big Tech. Even the NFL is getting into that act with a new "NFL+" premium streaming service for superfans as the league negotiates a new deal for its coveted Sunday Ticket package, with Apple rumored to be in the lead to land it. Beneath all of that, the traditional pay-TV bundle continues to struggle as customers flee from fat bundles paired with high prices and continue to see the best shows and TV series get funneled to direct-to-consumer (DTC) services that aren't inherently part of those bundles. Brett Sappington, a long-time industry analyst who leads the video and entertainment research practice at Interpret, recently joined the Light Reading Podcast to sift through and make sense of some of these trends, how they impact pay-TV and what the pay-TV players can do to stay relevant and perhaps benefit from those trends. You can download an unedited transcript of the podcast here. If you want to skip around and listen, here's a snapshot of topics discussed during this podcast: Sappington's reaction to Netflix's Q2 earnings, which saw better-than-expected subscriber losses and initiatives focused on clamping down on account sharing. (1:20) How Netflix's sizable and growing share of TV viewing time could play a role in the success of the streamer's new ad play. (11:25) As major programmers and studios continue to strip-mine their best content for direct-to-consumer services and alter the traditional availability windows of new shows and movies, what will that mean for the already-struggling pay-TV bundle? (14:00) How new streaming deals for live sports, long viewed as the glue holding the pay-TV bundle together, stand to further disrupt the video marketplace. (18:08) The role the National Football League's new NFL+ premium streaming service for superfans could play in the streaming market. (23:31) As more entertainment content and live sports shift to streaming and direct-to-consumer offerings, what is the future role of the pay-TV package as consumers create their own bundles? How can pay-TV distributors stay relevant as the market amplifies its focus on streaming and the direct-to-consumer sales model? (28:24) Is streaming ushering in a "Great Rebundling" that can provide lower prices, or is this merely a shift toward an aggregation model in which consumers are forming "collections" of streaming services devoid of discount benefits? (31:42) — Jeff Baumgartner, Senior Editor, Light Reading See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

MEF's Stan Hubbard on accelerating automation with APIs

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022 14:54


DENVER – MEF Annual Members Event – Service providers have long been working toward automated networks. One way service providers are reducing manual processes is by adopting MEF's Lifecycle Service Orchestration (LSO) Sonata APIs. Currently, 22 service providers are in production with the APIs, which automate inter-carrier transactions of connectivity services such as Carrier Ethernet.Stan Hubbard, principal analyst for MEF, said an additional 90 service providers are now tracked in the LSO Sonata adoption lifecycle – from interest through to implementation. Of those 90 operators, 41 are committed to using the APIs."We launched our LSO framework about five or six years ago," said Hubbard. Service providers that utilize the LSO APIs can improve their service delivery, accelerate time to revenue and improve the customer experience, he added."Service providers had to deal with lots of manual processes up until now," said Hubbard. " … We're saying, 'Invest in the APIs, standardize APIs one time, and be able to use that with your partners on the buy and sell side. It has huge potential to save time in the long run'."You can download an unedited transcript of the podcast here. If you want to skip around and listen, here are a few more things covered in this interview:Background on MEF's Annual Members Meeting (00:33)Update on MEF's new Technology Advisory Board (TAB) (01:28)Service provider adoption of LSO Sonata APIs to manage and automate transactions of business functions (02:16)How the use of APIs moves the needle on network automation (04:30)Initiatives to develop standards for SD-WAN and SASE services (08:45)Educating enterprise customers on SASE (09:52)Using blockchain to verify billing and settlement (12:40) See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Dell's CTO on building broadband and private 5G networks

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2022 26:10


John Roese, the global CTO at Dell Technologies, said the influx of federal funding to help alleviate the digital divide should be used to solve broadband coverage gaps as efficiently as possible. He said that those efforts could be hampered if federal and state agencies let legacy networking requirements limit the number of potential technology suppliers. For new broadband builds, Roese said, a new 5G standalone network is a great solution and could be provided by a wide range of companies: Dell (of course), Amazon, Microsoft and Google, plus the traditional telecom providers."There's no reason to have 4G, 3G, 2G – there's no reason to have a voice service on it," Roese said. "And yet, our general tendency is, every time we talk about broadband, we talk about all generations of broadband, all the legacy, all possible permutations," Roese said.There are plenty of cases where 3G or 4G or fiber would be required, but some new unserved or underserved areas "might actually look like legacy-free environments," Roese said. "They might start with no technical debt, no legacy hangover, and we have to be just very deliberate about what problem we are solving."You can download an unedited transcript of the podcast here. If you want to skip around and listen, here are a few more things covered in this interview:Do enterprises see the need for private 5G? (09:30)What is the competitive dynamic between cloud providers, telcos and others working to build private 5G networks? (13:50)How Dell views the edge and why it's a big growth area. (17:14)Keeping edge workloads separate from edge infrastructure. (23:39) See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Comcast's Broderick Johnson on Internet access and the pursuit of 'digital equity'

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2022 16:14


The concept of "digital equity" has been a hot topic as the FCC and private entities attempt to resolve the issue of accurate broadband mapping and uncover where resources need to be applied to get people connected in underserved and unserved rural areas. That work also extends into cities, where broadband might be available but factors like affordability or access to devices and digital training can limit the rate of adoption.Broderick Johnson, who joined Comcast just over a year ago, has a history of focusing on the pursuit of digital equity. In fact, it's right there in his title: EVP for public policy and EVP for digital equity. "This goes back … really decades," he explained, noting that the digital divide was part of the discussion during his time at the Clinton White House, where he served as deputy assistant to the president for legislative affairs. "Back then, it was more about access," recalled Johnson, who recently was in Denver to meet with community leaders and representatives from state and local government about how they and Comcast can better collaborate on digital adoption. Over time, he said, the discussion has "morphed into a more complicated set of issues" with respect to where investments are being made and what other barriers exist where deployments are happening. "We do know that there has been, over the course of these decades though, really difficult disparities based on race and economic class, and where people live," Johnson explained.Here's a snapshot of topics discussed during this podcast: How Johnson defines "digital equity" (2:20)Beyond access and affordability, other barriers are keeping consumer adoption at bay (4:05) An update on projects at Comcast focused on bridging the digital divide – including Internet Essentials, which was launched more than a decade ago, Project UP, Comcast Rise, and the deployment of more than 1,000 Wi-Fi-connected "Lift Zones" in venues such as community centers and libraries (6:30) The roles that community-trusted Digital Navigator volunteers can play in boosting Internet adoption with respect to getting access to devices and obtaining digital skills and training, and how that can translate to projects such as the FCC's Affordable Connectivity Program (ACP) (10:30) — Jeff Baumgartner, Senior Editor, Light Reading See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

What's the story? Cox undeterred by false starts into mobile biz

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 22, 2022 15:02


Light Reading's Mike Dano joins the podcast to discuss Cox Communications' new mobile service. He explains why it was a long time coming, why T-Mobile tried to slow Cox's deployment with a lawsuit, which service provider Cox ultimately chose to partner with on the mobile service, and more.Related stories and links:Cox to enter US wireless industry this fallNew ruling reopens door for Cox's mobile launchHere's how Cox blew its mobile launchCox readies a re-entry into mobile See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

What's the story? How to enter the Leading Lights Awards

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2022 25:08


Phil Harvey joins the podcast to discuss Light Reading's Leading Lights Awards and how to enter a submission. In addition, we share advice for how to craft a solid entry, tell you when the deadline to enter is, how much it costs and more.Here are just a few things covered in this podcast:Background on the Leading Lights Awards (01:10)How the award winners will be announced (03:50)How the judging process works (06:20)Advice for how to craft a solid entry and tips on what to avoid (09:15)What we mean by "innovative," and the importance of supporting documentation (14:27)How to enter, deadlines and early bird discounts (21:10)Related stories and links:Enter now: The 2022 Light Reading Leading Lights awardsAwards CategoriesGeneral Information and FAQsLeading Lights Awards entry system See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Divide: Measuring Internet equity, with Nick Feamster (bonus episode)

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2022 40:28


This week we're resharing an episode of the Light Reading Podcast featuring Nick Feamster, director of research for the Data Science Institute at the University of Chicago. He joined Light Reading's Phil Harvey and Kelsey Ziser last month to discuss his team's research based on the Internet Equity Initiative data portal, which uses Ookla Speedtest data to map out Internet inequities. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

What's the story? Ericsson's market momentum haunted by mismanagement

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 18, 2022 13:34


Light Reading's Iain Morris joins the podcast with insight into why Ericsson's stock price took a hit despite a solid second quarter."I was a bit surprised to see the share price, they opened at about 11% down, which is a big drop ... and normally that's the kind of thing that happens when they have a bad news item like the investigation for some of their activities in Iraq where there were various wrongdoings going on," said Morris.Morris provides background on Ericsson's missteps in Iraq, but explains that this is an example of poor choices from previous management. While current management's efforts have righted the ship in some ways, the sins of Ericsson's past continue to make investors skeptical.Related stories and links:Ericsson's market share has rocketed, yet investors are unhappyEricsson gets US clearance for Vonage take-off See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Plume CTO on why Amazon has the inside track on IoT brand loyalty

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 18, 2022 31:00


With the pace of broadband subscriber growth showing signs of slowing after big surges during the early days of the pandemic, some service providers are expanding their influence into the management and security of IoT devices that are proliferating on the home network. While not all of those strategies have aligned perfectly among ISPs, an analysis of the data on the home Wi-Fi network can provide lots of insight about which brands and device types consumers are gravitating to. Plume, a data and cloud services specialist that manages Wi-Fi in more than 40 million homes worldwide, recently issued its latest Plume IQ report, with this one focused on the IoT brands driving the most consumer loyalty. The report found that Amazon is seemingly in the cat bird's seat, atop of Apple and Google. Notably, Amazon's position in the IoT market runs relatively independent of the smart phone being used while Apple's position is largely determined by whether the consumer is an iPhone user. Bill McFarland, Plume's chief technology officer, recently joined the Light Reading podcast with Editor-in-Chief Phil Harvey and Senior Editor Jeff Baumgartner to dig into the data and the numbers, extrapolate some broad IoT trends and explain how this kind of data can benefit the strategies of broadband operators. To pinpoint some of that activity and gather trends and insights, Plume uses AI and machine language techniques to enable "device typing" to determine what kind of device is connecting to the network. "It's not as easy as it might sound because there isn't a protocol or a standard message they send about what kind of device they are," McFarland said. "You have to kind of look at the way they're behaving, the protocols they are using and so forth, and then compare that with other devices you've seen of that type and you do a matching." Here's an outline of topics covered in this podcast:The technical basis of the Plume IQ report, and how it relies on data to uncover and identify industry trends and indicators. (1:40)Thoughts on why Amazon was high on the IoT brand loyalty list and why it seems to broadly attract consumers independent of the rest of their device ecosystem, including smartphones. (5:30) What other kind of data can be collected to help broadband service providers manage the home network and make better decisions that can cut down on the cost of their broadband delivery. (14:30)How the role of the service provider in IoT and IoT security is evolving as consumers continue to adopt more connected devices that hook into the home network. (17:00)Beyond the likes of Amazon, Apple and Google, what other products, brands and device types are making a mark in IoT? Where does Sonus and even connected cars, for example, fall in the pecking order? (26:30)— Jeff Baumgartner, Senior Editor, Light Reading See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Virtual and traditional pay-TV players take a hit on subs

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 14, 2022 18:22


Light Reading's Jeff Baumgartner joins the podcast to provide an update on some of the major players in the streaming video market. He also delivers insight into a recent report on the pay-TV market and why both traditional providers and OTT-TV players are struggling to keep their subscribers. We wrap up with our predictions on which shows win Emmys this year. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Divide: Ji Soo Song on the Department of Education's role in achieving digital equity

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 14, 2022 14:57


Ji Soo Song, broadband advisor at the US Department of Education's Office of Educational Technology (OET), joins the show to discuss the impact of the digital divide on students and the role his department plays in expanding access and affordability. We also discuss what he's learned through the Department of Education's Digital Equity Education Roundtables (DEER) initiative and how states and schools can use infrastructure funding and the Digital Equity Act to help close the digital divide for students. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

What's the story? Mike Dano on WCO, wireless wins and woes

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 11, 2022 18:08


In this episode, Light Reading's Mike Dano discusses growth predictions for the wireless industry in 2022 and why Verizon's forecast might be a little bleaker than those of AT&T and T-Mobile. He also explains the battle between WCO Spectrum and T-Mobile over the purchase of 2.5GHz spectrum licenses from academic institutions.Here are just a few things covered in this podcast:Update on wireless industry and growth predictions for 2022 (01:10)Why postpaid customers are more valuable to wireless providers (03:00)AT&T and T-Mobile pull ahead of Verizon in growth of postpaid customers (04:37)Impact of inflation on the wireless market (06:18)WCO Spectrum and T-Mobile battle over 2.5GHz spectrum licenses (08:29)Benefits of leasing versus owning spectrum (12:04)Impact of T-Mobile's right of first refusal to purchase the licenses (13:30)Related stories and links:US wireless bubble to deflate a little, but it hasn't popped yetWCO's Winnick takes huge swing at T-Mobile: 'You should be ashamed'Inside the messy world of T-Mobile's midband 5G spectrum licenses See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Divide: Vistabeam's Matt Larsen on the reliability of wireless and pitfalls of federal funding

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 7, 2022 24:32


This episode features Matt Larsen, CEO of Vistabeam, a fixed wireless provider covering underserved areas of Colorado, Nebraska and Wyoming. He joins the podcast to discuss the important role of fixed wireless and unlicensed spectrum in reaching underserved and unserved US populations. We also get into the role of federal funding in closing the digital divide, and why Larsen thinks more funding could negatively impact broadband expansion in the US. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Juniper CTO on a more efficient 5G future

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 5, 2022 22:24


Juniper CTO Raj Yavatkar joins the podcast to discuss how the telecom industry can improve energy efficiency and service expectations for 5G deployments while also reducing the cost of running 5G networks. He also shares new use cases for private 5G and explains how Juniper is partnering with Rakuten Symphony on developing RAN Intelligent Controllers (RICs).Here are just a few things covered in this podcast:Opportunities for Juniper and its customers with 5G (01:00)Growing interest in private 5G and new use cases (03:20)Partnership with Rakuten Symphony on 5G deployments (06:30)How to reduce the cost of running a 5G network for service providers (09:20)Dynamic network capacity management and improving the energy efficiency of the network (12:00)New approaches to data analytics and updates on Mist AI (13:07)Automated service assurance (17:50)Related stories and links:BIG 5G Event newsJuniper CEO: The new networking – experience, speed and scaleJuniper jumps on O-RAN bandwagon See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

'NextGenTV' goes for a ride

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2022 30:18


ATSC 3.0, the new IP-based broadcast signaling standard branded as "NextGen TV," targets the TV with a blend of enhanced capabilities such as 4K, high dynamic range (HDR), on-demand video, immersive audio and advanced advertising. But the standard is also being touted as a downstream broadband distribution pipe that can support a much wider range of use cases, including mobile applications. That mobility angle is starting to lead to apps and services for connected automobiles, including the distribution of info and entertainment services and the delivery of other large files. In the US, some of those use cases are starting to emerge at the Motown 3.0 Open Test Track in Detroit, Michigan, where a mix of technology demos are underway. Pearl Television, a consortium of several US broadcasters, serves as the test manager at the test track. "We always thought automotive was a natural extension to our television service," Anne Schelle, managing director of Pearl TV, said on the Light Reading Podcast. "We've demonstrated in multiple markets that this is a really robust signal ... meaning it's easy to receive it in a car even when you're in a garage or underground." Schelle said Pearl TV and other broadcasters view ATSC 3.0 as a distribution pipe that can complement cellular and even satellite. "Automakers need every option," she said, noting that companies that run fleets of trucks or limousines are among the areas of the automotive market that could suit this use case. South Korea, a market that is about two years ahead of the US with the standard, is also exploring the connected car use case. There, Hyundai Mobis is developing a lineup of cars that will come equipped with ATSC 3.0 receivers starting in 2023. Here's a snapshot of topics covered in this podcast:The origins of the Pearl TV consortium and its involvement with the ATSC 3.0 standard (1:30)How the delivery of data to autos is a natural extension to the new IP-based signaling standard (8:50) Background on the Motown 3.0 Open Test Track and some details and findings from the recent trials conducted there (10:15)How ATSC 3.0 is expected to fit in with other wireless and mobile network types, including 5G and satellite (12:15)Potential other use cases for NextGen TV/ATSC 3.0 (19:30) A brief overview of the regulatory environment on the new standard, including thoughts on the FCC's fresh inquiry into voluntary adoption of the new standard and what technical challenges might be faced by cable operators and other multichannel video programming distributors (MVPDs) in redistributing those signals (23:00) — Jeff Baumgartner, Senior Editor, Light Reading See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

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