Podcasts about southeast asian

Subregion of Asia

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Latest podcast episodes about southeast asian

True Southeast Asia Horror Stories - GHOST MAPS
#74: The Pontianak at Gymkhana Avenue - GHOST MAPS - True Southeast Asian Horror Stories

True Southeast Asia Horror Stories - GHOST MAPS

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 26, 2023 15:38


A man looks back on his secondary school days, when he went looking for trouble with his closest friends—and found it along Bukit Brown Cemetery's Gymkhana Avenue stretch. Ghost Maps follows an unnamed narrator as he chronicles true accounts of the supernatural across Southeast Asia.       ►FOLLOW US: Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/wearehantu/ YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/wearehantu Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/wearehantu/ Website: https://www.hantu.sg/   ►SUPPORT US: Libsyn: https://signup.libsyn.com/?promo_code=HANTU Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/wearehantu Merchandise: https://www.redbubble.com/people/wearehantu/shop   ►MUSIC CREDITS: Measured Paces by Kevin MacLeod Link: https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/4029-measured-paces License: https://filmmusic.io/standard-license   This House by Kevin MacLeod Link: https://filmmusic.io/song/4525-this-house License: https://filmmusic.io/standard-license   Spc X2x (Unseen Presence) by Kevin MacLeod Link: https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/6738-spc-x2x-unseen-presence- License: https://filmmusic.io/standard-license     ►THANK YOU TO OUR SUPPORTERS ON PATREON:  Stanley Santos Linda Haden NeoVegasAssassin Mai Ceph, the Writing Spook Elisabeth Cherepanova Nicolez Phua Andika Bramantio Medidi Stephens Miranda Pruett Abby Wintker Dyah Candra Hapsari Subagyo Adnan Salim Tom Johari R.Y Aayush Gupta Niko Heather Tan Kai Lin Julie Holochwost Monica Dubois Lexi   ►ABOUT HANTU: #trueghoststory #ghoststory #ghoststories #horrorstory #horrorstories #southeastsia #singapore #ghostmaps #deadair #podcast #wearehantu #hantu #hantusg

Talking Headways: A Streetsblog Podcast
Episode 417: Transportation Policy Transfer in Southeast Asia

Talking Headways: A Streetsblog Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 26, 2023 44:43


This week we're joined by Dr. Dorina Pojani, Associate Professor of Urban Planning at the University of Queensland to talk about her book Planning for Sustainable Transport in Southeast Asia: Policy Transfer, Diffusion, and Mobility. We chat about how four different Southeast Asian cities are taking transportation ideas from other places and trying to deal with congestion and mobility. You can find the book from Springer here. OOO Follow us on twitter @theoverheadwire Follow us on Mastadon theoverheadwire@sfba.social Support the show on Patreon http://patreon.com/theoverheadwire Buy books on our Bookshop.org Affiliate site!  And get our Cars are Cholesterol shirt at Tee-Public! And everything else at http://theoverheadwire.com

Eat Blog Talk | Megan Porta
378: 5 Lessons from Business School that Helped me Succeed in Blogging with Zhen Zhou

Eat Blog Talk | Megan Porta

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 23, 2023 37:44


In episode 378, Megan chats to Zhen Zhou about how her experience in business school translated into her blogging career and how that has helped her succeed. Zhen blogs about cooking up flavorful South East Asian recipes for her audience because she can't stand bland food. She also occasionally shares about the life of a food blogger. She shares her story of going from doing an MBA in London to starting a food blog as a way to reach more people with her creative work on the Internet. In this episode, you'll learn more about Zhen's top five lessons from business school, including what helps you succeed in one field won't necessarily help you get to the next level, invest in your blog like a real business, the importance of diversification, lean into what is uncomfortable and think about the consumer. - Set different goals to adapt to your blogging journey and the next step of success. - Should you focus on RPMs more than keywords? - What you don't pay for in money, you pay for in time. - Invest in courses that will help move your blog to the next level. - Ways to diversify in traffic sources and income. - If your ranking gets affected on Google, having diverse sources of traffic is useful. - There is a payoff in doing what feels uncomfortable, like being a guest on a podcast. - Imagine yourself in the consumer's shoes - do you need to adapt your marketing for your ideal audience? Connect with Zhen Zhou Website | Instagram

this is bipolar
CONVERSATIONS WITH- Edison Htun

this is bipolar

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 23, 2023 44:48


In this episode of 'Conversations With', Mental Illness Activist Shaley Hoogendoorn talks with Edison Htun. Edison shares openly about his experiences living with bipolar disorder in Southeast Asian country, especially in a conservative country with no mental health policies or regulations. It was fascinating to learn about the cultural influence on stigmas and misconceptions about Bipolar Disorder in Myanmar. Edison also shares about his own internalized stigma toward medication and diagnosis. Edison's words of encouragement to those walking a similar path. His story is one of perseverance and inspiration. I am so grateful for Edison's's voice in his country and in the world. We feel honoured that he trusted us with his story. Edison's story is not over yet.  This is bipolar... IG @this.is.bipolar Meet Edison: Kyaw Si Thu Htun (Edison) is twenty-six years old and born and raised in Yangon, Myanmar. Edison lives with Bipolar 2 Disorder with Rapid cycling and is passionate about sharing with others to help end stigma around mental health and mental illness. Edison has a B.A (Hons) Business from University of Wolverhampton and was a media focal person of U-Report Myanmar, UNICEF Myanmar's youth program. He was also a manager for Junior Creative Dance Crew (America's Got Talent: The Champion Season 2 participant). Edison is currently an Account Manager, PR Agency based in Yangon. You can find Edison on Instagram @ejiiison.   #mentalhealth #mentalillness #bipolarawareness #bipolar #thisisbipolar

Great Power Podcast
Beijing's Charm Offensive

Great Power Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2023 45:07


In this episode of GREAT POWER PODCAST, host Michael Sobolik interviews Josh Kurlantzick about the Chinese Communist Party's (CCP) public diplomacy, its malign activities around the world, and what it means for the United States. Guest Biography Joshua Kurlantzick is senior fellow for Southeast Asia at the Council on Foreign Relations (CFR). He is the author, most recently, of Beijing's Global Media Offensive: China's Uneven Campaign to Influence Asia and the World. Kurlantzick was previously a visiting scholar at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, where he studied Southeast Asian politics and economics and China's relations with Southeast Asia, including Chinese investment, aid, and diplomacy. Previously, he was a fellow at the University of Southern California Center on Public Diplomacy and a fellow at the Pacific Council on International Policy. He is currently focused on China's relations with Southeast Asia, and China's approach to soft and sharp power, including state-backed media and information efforts and other components of soft and sharp power. He is also working on issues related to the rise of global populism, populism in Asia, and the impact of COVID-19 on illiberal populism and political freedom overall. Resources from the Conversation Read Josh's new book, Beijing's Global Media Offensive Read Josh's previous book about China's public diplomacy Read reporting from Politico about Beijing's charm offensive Read reporting from The Wall Street Journal about China-Australia relations Subscribe to AFPC's Indo-Pacific Monitor

COMMNTD
The Big 4 an Indonesian Movie Review

COMMNTD

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2023 36:35


Join the crew as they recap and review the South East Asian blockbuster THE BIG 4!

Ancient History Fangirl
Creepiest Monsters of Southeast Asia (With Creepy Conversations Podcast)

Ancient History Fangirl

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2023 77:59


This week, we explore monster mythology from countries all over southeast Asia—and we invited Nikki and Kalai from the Creepy Conversations podcast to come on our show and creep us out. Hailing from the Philippines and Singapore, they cover all things creepy from southeast Asian mythology, including monsters, urban legends, ghost stories, true crime and serial killers, and more. Today we try to answer the age-old question: which Southeast Asian country has the creepiest female monsters? Is it the Philippines, home of the bone-chilling manananggal? Or maybe Japan, home of the terrifying kuchisake-onna of urban legend? What about those nightmare-inducing Shadow People who always seem to be creeping around? Or perhaps the most fearsome monsters of all are the real-life female serial killers who walk among us? Join us as we try to get to the bottom of it all. Get ad-free episodes here: https://www.patreon.com/ancienthistoryfangirl Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Talking Indonesia
Dr Ahmad Rizky M Umar - Indonesia & AUKUS

Talking Indonesia

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2023 33:58


Indonesia has expressed persistent reservations about AUKUS, the security pact reached in secret between Australia, the US and the UK and announced in September 2021. Under the pact, the three allies will share defence capabilities, with the initial headline item being Australia's acquisition of a fleet of nuclear-powered but conventionally-armed submarines. When AUKUS was announced, Indonesia's Foreign Ministry issued a statement expressing caution. In 2022, Indonesia also submitted a working paper to a UN review of the nuclear non-proliferation treaty critical of the transfer of submarine nuclear propulsion to non-nuclear weapons states. What underpins Indonesia's negative response to AUKUS, and how widely are Indonesia's views shared in Southeast Asia? What can Indonesia's response to AUKUS tell us about how Indonesia will seek to manage great power competition between the US and China? Might AUKUS spur Indonesia to alter its own defence acquisition plans? In this week's Talking Indonesia podcast, Dr Dave McRae chats with Dr Ahmad Rizky M. Umar from the School of Political Science and International Studies at the University of Queensland. Dr Umar is the author of a forthcoming paper on Southeast Asian responses to AUKUS with Yulida Santoso from Universitas Gadjah Mada. In 2023, the Talking Indonesia podcast is co-hosted by Dr Dave McRae from the Centre for Indonesian Law, Islam and Society at the University of Melbourne, Dr Jemma Purdey from Monash University, Dr Jacqui Baker from Murdoch University, and Tito Ambyo from RMIT. Photo credit: US Navy

Risky Business
Risky Business #691 -- LockBit and "Pablo Escobar syndrome"

Risky Business

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2023


On this week's show Patrick Gray and Adam Boileau discuss the week's security news, including: Royal Mail attack was LockBit and GCHQ will probably “bust some heads” CircleCI's incident report and the problem with malwared endpoints in the Zero Trust age Cloudflare backs Mastodon Paul Nakasone: NSA did some great stuff! It was really good! Cisco won't patch SMB routers sold in 2020 Much, much more This week's show is brought to you by Material Security. Material co-founder Ryan Noon and Snowflake's head of cybersecurity strategy Omer Singer are this week's sponsor guests. Links to everything that we discussed are below and you can follow Patrick or Adam on Mastodon if that's your thing. Show notes Royal Mail cyberattack linked to LockBit ransomware operation Ransomware Diaries: Volume 1 | Analyst1 Congressman calls on CISA to investigate air travel vulnerabilities after outage - The Record from Recorded Future News Ransomware attack on maritime software impacts 1,000 ships - The Record from Recorded Future News CircleCI incident report for January 4, 2023 security incident Researchers: Large language models will revolutionize digital propaganda campaigns Nick Cave - The Red Hand Files - Issue #218 GitHub - cloudflare/wildebeest: Wildebeest is an ActivityPub and Mastodon-compatible server Meta sues Voyager Labs over scraping user data Twitter says leaked data on 200 million users was likely publicly available info - The Record from Recorded Future News A Police App Exposed Secret Details About Raids and Suspects | WIRED ODIN Intelligence website is defaced as hackers claim breach | TechCrunch Nakasone: Foreign surveillance program helped fend off cyberattacks - The Record from Recorded Future News The Guardian confirms criminals accessed staff data in ransomware attack - The Record from Recorded Future News Millions of Aflac, Zurich insurance customers in Japan have data leaked after breach - The Record from Recorded Future News Dark Pink, a newly discovered hacking campaign, threatens Southeast Asian military, government organizations The FBI Won't Say Whether It Hacked Dark Web ISIS Site Norton LifeLock says 925,000 accounts targeted by credential-stuffing attacks - The Record from Recorded Future News Cisco warns of two vulnerabilities affecting end-of-life routers - The Record from Recorded Future News Fortinet says hackers exploited critical vulnerability to infect VPN customers | Ars Technica Vulnerability with 9.8 severity in Control Web Panel is under active exploit | Ars Technica CISA adds recently-announced Microsoft zero-day to exploited vulnerability catalog - The Record from Recorded Future News Hundreds of SugarCRM servers infected with critical in-the-wild exploit | Ars Technica

TBS eFM This Morning
0113 [Sports Update] with Yoo Jee-ho

TBS eFM This Morning

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2023 10:41


1. Volleyball: Latest on Heungkuk Life saga2. Southeast Asian tournament, Park Hang-seo in final for Vietnam in his last tournament in charge3. Viktor An, nee Ahn Hyun-soo, seeking return to Korea1. 여자 배구리그 흥국생명 핑크스파이더스를 둘러싼 논란2. 동남아 리그, 박항서 감독 마지막 대회 베트남전 결승 진출3. 한국으로 귀국 한 빅토르 안See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

The Glossy Beauty Podcast
Rationale's Richard Parker on building a trusted skin-care brand

The Glossy Beauty Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2023 29:50


From an early age, Richard Parker was aware of his skin. When Parker was a teenager, he was diagnosed with a skin condition caused by sun damage called ochronosis. And in his early 20s, he suffered from acne. After meeting multiple dermatologists and learning more about products and ingredients that could help his conditions, Parker was inspired to venture into health and beauty to share that knowledge with others. The knowledge Parker gained from medical experts and his own studies led him to launch Rationale in 1992. Since its creation, the skin-care brand's sole purpose has been to equip consumers with the necessary information and products to help repair damage caused by the sun and other free radical exposure.  "The information [on how to maintain healthy skin] was so valuable to women [when we launched] because there weren't any of the codebreakers or websites that we all have access to today," Parker said on the latest episode of the Glossy Beauty Podcast. "Some of the vital components that we now know are important to skin health, like immune boosters and antioxidants, didn't exist in skin care at that time."  Rationale's unique and medically-backed approach to skin care catapulted the brand's growth in Australia. Three decades later, Rationale is considered a cult favorite among many of Australia's biggest celebrities and skin-care enthusiasts. Parker is now grooming the brand to connect with consumers around the globe. He's currently focused on the U.S. and Southeast Asian markets. 

True Southeast Asia Horror Stories - GHOST MAPS
#73: Ghostly Tales of New Manila, Part 2 - GHOST MAPS - True Southeast Asian Horror Stories

True Southeast Asia Horror Stories - GHOST MAPS

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2023 12:28


In the second of this two-parter, an app developer is haunted by shadowy figures wherever he goes—but are they a threat or an omen of something far more tragic? Ghost Maps follows an unnamed narrator as he chronicles true accounts of the supernatural across Southeast Asia.       ►FOLLOW US: Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/wearehantu/ YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/wearehantu Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/wearehantu/ Website: https://www.hantu.sg/   ►SUPPORT US: Libsyn: https://signup.libsyn.com/?promo_code=HANTU Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/wearehantu Merchandise: https://www.redbubble.com/people/wearehantu/shop   ►MUSIC CREDITS: Measured Paces by Kevin MacLeod Link: https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/4029-measured-paces License: https://filmmusic.io/standard-license   This House by Kevin MacLeod Link: https://filmmusic.io/song/4525-this-house License: https://filmmusic.io/standard-license   Spc X2x (Unseen Presence) by Kevin MacLeod Link: https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/6738-spc-x2x-unseen-presence- License: https://filmmusic.io/standard-license     ►THANK YOU TO OUR SUPPORTERS ON PATREON:  Stanley Santos Linda Haden NeoVegasAssassin Mai Ceph, the Writing Spook Elisabeth Cherepanova Nicolez Phua Andika Bramantio Medidi Stephens Miranda Pruett Abby Wintker Dyah Candra Hapsari Subagyo Adnan Salim Tom Johari R.Y Aayush Gupta Niko Heather Tan Kai Lin Julie Holochwost Monica Dubois Lexi   ►ABOUT HANTU: #trueghoststory #ghoststory #ghoststories #horrorstory #horrorstories #southeastsia #singapore #ghostmaps #deadair #podcast #wearehantu #hantu #hantusg

FoodCrush
Lao food, family and tradition with Victoria Sithy & Alex Hanesakda

FoodCrush

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 8, 2023 70:32


Lao cuisine is definitely having a moment. And when it comes to creative Lao fare in Southeastern Wisconsin, restaurants including Sweet Basil and SapSap are assisting in familiarizing a cuisine which has long taken a backseat to other Southeast Asian fare.This week on FoodCrush, we sat down with Victoria Sithy, co-founder of Sweet Basil and Alex Hanesakda of SapSap to chat about food, family and tradition and how all of the above have shaped the way they approach their work in the restaurant space. 

Nomad University Podcast
073_ A digital nomad who has a background in neuroscience shared his interesting story.

Nomad University Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 7, 2023 19:38


IFN OnAir
Technology Roundtable: Digitalization and the Evolution of Southeast Asian Islamic Financial Services

IFN OnAir

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2023 90:48


The digitalization of Islamic financial services: what is working, what is viable, and what is not? What do the answers to these questions mean for the evolution of Islamic financial services in Southeast Asia? With new neo-banking licenses in Malaysia, how will the development, provision and distribution of digital Islamic financial services evolve in the near-term, and what models will be deemed successful? What further measures would assist domestic Islamic financial institutions in the modernization and digital transformation of Islamic retail, commercial, Takaful and pension offerings? What are notable milestones and achievements in the development of systems and software for Islamic banks and financial institutions? What technology is available to help Islamic financial institutions drive scale, integrity, efficiency and ultimately profitability? Finally, is technology being fully utilized to address key customer concerns surrounding authenticity and the minimization of uncertainty? We ask an expert panel.

The God Culture
Understanding the Maps Used By Columbus & Magellan. Ophir, Philippines? Solomon's Gold Series 16E

The God Culture

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2023 70:07


In their own words, we know exactly which maps were used by Columbus and Magellan on their journeys. Not sure how so many scholars and academics are oblivious to this but this is the mindset that found Ophir and Tarshish and they ignore it. It's time to understand it as well as expose those using Ptolemy's maps for Southeast Asian geography when the guy left all of it off and knew nothing of such except a few legends he draws in. However, Magellan corrects him and this should be in every textbook yet we find the opposite all too often. The British ignore Magellan and this portion of Columbus as if it never happened. That's called willing ignorance not academic nor scholarly. Yah Bless. Now Available in Podcast Audio Format Internationally: https://www.thegodculture.com/podcast Alternative Video Platforms Now Available: Rumble: https://rumble.com/user/TheGodCulture Utreon: https://utreon.com/c/TheGodCulture For Our Books in eBook (Free) or Print: The Search For King Solomon's Treasure, Ophir Philippines Coffee Table Book, The Book of Jubilees: The Torah Calendar, 2nd Esdras: The Hidden Book of Prophecy, REST: The Case For Sabbath, The First Book of Enoch: The Oldest Book In History: OphirInstitute.com (All Books. Links to Amazon and Shopee PH for your area.) 2Esdras.org BookOfJubilees.org RestSabbath.org LeviteBible.com FirstEnoch.org Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/The-God-Culture-Original-376627072897316 FB Alternatives: https://parler.com/user/TheGodCulture https://gab.com/TheGodCulture Website: thegodculture.com For the many that are having difficulty with YouTube working properly, here are Series' Playlists: Solomon's Gold Series Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLru2qbCMGOi4PhVocfJEi1oZRRj0AWnzx Answers In Jubilees Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLru2qbCMGOi7bU2SrP84nw1EyRAqpQqsP Answers In 2nd Esdras Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLru2qbCMGOi6ULjeic8lJP63WRyOiW9yp Flood Series Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLru2qbCMGOi7FQ7HiGJcODyJEoBP7-0Md Lost Tribes Series Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLru2qbCMGOi7nzrJvNB4pKWG8gFOe9xDA Original Canon Series Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLru2qbCMGOi5IdRs0Efb9L0oyVL3E9r1f Sabbath Series Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLru2qbCMGOi6Fd6BamniTVm5SsNi2mZPy RESOLVED: Doctrines of Men Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLru2qbCMGOi49L5WkYemQh72yDwV0Ye7Y Feasts of YHWH Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLru2qbCMGOi4YXMnaHTYiJw-mDuBqvNtP The Name of God Series Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLru2qbCMGOi4xaPtUfKykVU0HbOZK-LeJ 100 Clues The Philippines Is Ophir: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLru2qbCMGOi5gq1FV4RlgEAKP7WRCLca9 Find The Garden of Eden Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLru2qbCMGOi4KPuAcFq4Bx4A2l8dmcfxP Rivers from Eden Theory Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLru2qbCMGOi6Xt-ts2C1QVz-ZnAZxicWJ Revelation Series Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLru2qbCMGOi6WYQajRSk9iP5tc_Oi5k1j Prophetic Warning Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLru2qbCMGOi4jpVYhQ8s5Ad_bZN69nVVh When Was Jesus Born Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLru2qbCMGOi6nC0qdzNGBvSt8jK3xmIU5 Commandments of the New Testament Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLru2qbCMGOi5jcicc67_G3Tc-C0pN0WJv All Tagalog Videos Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLru2qbCMGOi7uDwFBB6Qn_DEl4FRu_Nwk All Spanish Narrated Videos Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLru2qbCMGOi5EtdquviZxBfc8R-Chw3ijSupport the show

The Asia Chessboard
Balance of Power in Southeast Asia

The Asia Chessboard

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2023 37:47


This week, Mike and Jude are joined by Bilahari Kausikan, Chairman of the Middle East Institute at the National University of Singapore, and former Ambassador-at-Large and former Permanent Secretary of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Singapore. They start off the discussion with a look into Singapore's history and how it has shaped its foreign policy outlook. Next, they discuss the effectiveness of ASEAN in maintaining balance of power in Southeast Asia. They then discuss China's foreign policy trajectory, Southeast Asia's position amidst heightened U.S.-China competition, and the performances of other Southeast Asian partnerships. Finally, they wrap up the discussion with a conversation on the future of the Sino-Russian relationship.

True Southeast Asia Horror Stories - GHOST MAPS
13 TRUE SOUTHEAST ASIAN HORROR STORIES | 2 HOURS 30 MINUTES OF SCARY STORIES - GHOST MAPS (VOL. 3)

True Southeast Asia Horror Stories - GHOST MAPS

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 31, 2022 154:16


Countdown to the new year with a new compilation of Ghost Maps episodes! Thirteen of our favourite Southeast Asian horror stories—curated for new and long-time listeners alike.   Ghost Maps follows an unnamed narrator as he chronicles true accounts of the supernatural across Southeast Asia. Featuring 13 scary episodes of True Southeast Asian Horror: 1) (00:00:31:09) - Haunted Train Ride to Chiang Mai - GHOST MAPS - True Southeast Asian Horror Stories #58 2) (00:16:41:18)  - The Curse of the Pontianak: GHOST MAPS - True Southeast Asian Horror Stories #45 3) (00:28:50:09) - Sea Spirits of Pulau Ubin: GHOST MAPS - True Southeast Asian Horror Stories #3 4) (00:35:30:03) - The Haunting Night Drive into Kulai Malaysia: GHOST MAPS - True Southeast Asian Horror Stories #55 5) (00:54:23:15) - The Restless Spirit Along Old Tampines Road: GHOST MAPS - True Southeast Asian Horror Stories #47 6) (01:04:04:010) - Hungry Ghost Month 2021: Third Eye Curse: GHOST MAPS - True Southeast Asian Horror Stories #40 7) (01:17:26:00) - The Saka Jinn from Kedah Malaysia: GHOST MAPS - True Southeast Asian Horror Stories #31 8) (01:28:17:18) - Gangster got Haunted by a Lost Spirit: GHOST MAPS - True Southeast Asian Horror Stories #35 9) (01:39:29:11) - I found a Haunted iPhone in Bukit Batok: GHOST MAPS - True Southeast Asian Horror Stories #16 10) (01:50:15:18) - Haunted Office in Shenton Way: GHOST MAPS - True Southeast Asian Horror Stories #22 11) (01:59:58:05) - Ghostly Encounter While Racing At Mandai Road: GHOST MAPS - True Southeast Asian Horror Stories #34 12) (02:14:01:11) - The Angry Spirit of Tanglin Brunei Hostel (1/2) GHOST MAPS - True Southeast Asian Horror Stories #50 13) (02:25:03:05) - The Angry Spirit of Tanglin Brunei Hostel (2/2) GHOST MAPS - True Southeast Asian Horror Stories #51   ►FOLLOW US: Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/wearehantu/ YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/wearehantu Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/wearehantu/ Website: https://www.hantu.sg/   ►SUPPORT US: Libsyn: https://signup.libsyn.com/?promo_code=HANTU Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/wearehantu Merchandise: https://www.redbubble.com/people/wearehantu/shop   ►MUSIC CREDITS: Measured Paces by Kevin MacLeod Link: https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/4029-measured-paces License: https://filmmusic.io/standard-license   This House by Kevin MacLeod Link: https://filmmusic.io/song/4525-this-house License: https://filmmusic.io/standard-license   Spc X2x (Unseen Presence) by Kevin MacLeod Link: https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/6738-spc-x2x-unseen-presence- License: https://filmmusic.io/standard-license     ►THANK YOU TO OUR SUPPORTERS ON PATREON:  Stanley Santos Linda Haden NeoVegasAssassin Mai Ceph, the Writing Spook Elisabeth Cherepanova Nicolez Phua Andika Bramantio Medidi Stephens Miranda Pruett Abby Wintker Dyah Candra Hapsari Subagyo Adnan Salim Tom Johari R.Y Aayush Gupta Niko Heather Tan Kai Lin Julie Holochwost Monica Dubois Lexi   ►ABOUT HANTU: #trueghoststory #ghoststory #ghoststories #horrorstory #horrorstories #southeastsia #singapore #ghostmaps #deadair #podcast #wearehantu #hantu #hantusg

Soul by Chef Todd Richards
Chef Christan Willis

Soul by Chef Todd Richards

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2022 30:46


We've got a special holiday treat for Soul listeners. This is one of 4 episodes we recorded earlier in the year. Together they cover a wide range of topics celebrating the rich history of Afro-Cuisine, and tell the story of this cuisine through the eyes of diverse food culture.Atlanta native Chef Christan Willis started her culinary career at age 15 working in a fine dining restaurant. Since then she has drawn upon her African American, Southeast Asian, and Pacific Islander roots to craft fine cuisine which has propelled her to the status of celebrity chef. Beyond the several acclaimed restaurants she has worked with, she has also appeared on the Today Show, Cooks vs. Cons, Raid the Fridge, Hallmark Home and Family, HLN, and Netflix's newly released show Pressure Cooker.  Heritage Radio Network is a listener supported nonprofit podcast network. Support Soul by Chef Todd Richards by becoming a member!Soul by Chef Todd Richards is Powered by Simplecast.

Sustainable Asia
S15E5: Seoul | Too Many Coal Plants

Sustainable Asia

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2022 24:32


It turns out Seoul, Korea has the worst air pollution amongst all of the top 10 economies in the world. Why is air pollution still such a huge challenge in a country with abundant resources and advanced infrastructure? And does South Korea use any high-tech solutions to handle its dirty air that South or Southeast Asian megacities can learn from?Guests (in order of appearance): Jieon Lee, Korea Federation for Environmental Movements Gyuri Cho, Solutions for Our ClimateSign up to find out when new Sustainable Asia seasons are launched.Review us on listennotes!Check out the other research from the Heinrich Boell Foundation in Hong Kong, India, and Southeast Asia.Production credits:Producer and Co-Host: Chermaine LeeCo-Host: Khoa TranAssociate Producer: Jack LeeExecutive Producer: Marcy Trent LongIntro/outro music: Alex Mauboussin

Fringe Radio Network
Wandering the Road with Red Pill Junkie and Super Infra-Man - Where Did The Road Go?

Fringe Radio Network

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2022 86:29


Seriah welcomes Red Pill Junkie and Super Inframan for a wandering the road episode. Topics include favorite stories of high strangeness, people witnessing cartoon characters in real life, toys moving around on their own, a childhood memory of a muppet-like entity, the farmer gifted pancakes by UFO occupants, writers encountering their characters in physical reality, Alan Moore and John Constantine, Neil Gaiman and a powerful demon, Walter B. Gibson AKA Maxwell Grant and the Shadow, tulpas, Sam the Sandown Clown weird encounter, dead relatives showing up with aliens, assumptions about UFOs as spacecraft, an alien base in Lake Michigan, underwater alien base near a coastal city in Mexico, Alex Whitcomb's strange bigfoot encounter featuring out-of-synch time experiences, a fascinating speculation about Bob Lazar and a crashed extraterrestrial ship, the nature of time, Whitley Strieber and Jeffrey Kripal sharing a room and an experience at Esalen, shadow people, a physical phenomenon producing an illusion of a strange shadow, Seriah's experience of mistaken identity, the Aztecs encounter of the Spanish on horseback, ancient horses in North America, Graham Hancock, plasma bursts depicted in ancient art, Seriah relates a bizarre dream about the Devil, the TV series “Lucifer”, Satan and God in the Bible, the story of Job, the story of Adam and Eve and its implications, Gnosticism, the Demiurge, the nature of happiness, the pursuit of wealth, digital vs physical media, Christopher Ryan's “Civilized to Death”, obsessive collecting, doing tasks yourself vs hiring a skilled person, Seriah's adventure fixing his AC unit, Kenneth Grant, H.P. Lovecraft, Arthur Machen, UFOs in ancient Chinese and Southeast Asian beliefs, magical creatures that excrete precious metals, Jack Parsons, symbols and reality, how language affects perception, Terence McKenna, the movie “Arrival”, Inuit language and snow, ancient Egyptian language and the soul, Joshua Cutchin's “Ecology of Souls”, language and perceptions of color, high strangeness breaking through pre-existing mindsets, terminology specific to certain professions, Kenneth Grant's questionable numerology and drawing of connections, Marjorie Cameron, August Derleth, the Mauve Zone, Michael Bertiaux, the imaginal realm, the Necronomicon, the singularity, Aleister Crowley, a weird race of non-humans, Mayan beliefs, Cthulhu, Hekate, strange voices, magick and UFOs, elaborate hoaxes, the UMMO letters and an early 1990's alien landing in the Soviet Union, Carlos Castaneda, fiction proceeding real-life encounters, “War of the Worlds”, and much more! This is a casual but riveting discussion, not to be missed!

Politically Asian! Podcast
63. This Week in Asian American Politics: Cali Indian Tech Workers Protest, More Boba Guys Union Busting, SE Asian Prisoner Deportation, End of KPOP and Blockbuster, Debt Cancellation Pause, Microsoft

Politically Asian! Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2022 50:38


This week in Asian American politics! - Indian tech workers protest in California over H1B visas and green card restrictions. Currently, Indian tech workers have to wait 150+ years for green card approval. - Boba Guys close their original shops in SF after union busting their workers. - Shocking stories of Southeast Asian prisoners in California who are at risk of being deported by ICE. - End of Kpop on Broadway, and Koreans on Netflix's Blockbuster series. - Joe Biden's debt cancellation is put on hold - Microsoft tries to buy Activision, creator of Candy Crush and many other games. They're being sued by the FTC (Asian-led) and a group of 10 gamers. -- WHAT'S POLITICALLY ASIAN PODCAST? Two Asians talking about politics and the Asian American community to get more Asians talking about politics! Join comedians Aaron Yin (he/him) and Gerrie Lim (they/them) for 45 minutes-ish each week as they discuss current topics and events related to Asian Americans through the lenses of history, class, and advocacy. Think John Oliver's show, but there's two of us, and we're Asian. -- CHECK US OUT ON SOCIAL MEDIA: Our memes are so good Asian people will mention them when they meet us in real life. ➤ Instagram: https://instagram.com/politicallyasianpodcast/ ➤ Twitter: https://twitter.com/politicasianpod ➤ Website: https://politicallyasianpodcast.com -- INQUIRIES: politicallyasianpodcast@gmail.com -- SUPPORT US ON PATREON (currently fundraising for episode transcription services and a video editor): https://patreon.com/politicallyasian -- MUSIC by Clueless Kit: https://soundcloud.com/cluelesskit Song title: live now -- ALGORITHM? Chinese American Politics, Korean American Politics, Japanese American Politics, South Asian politics, Asian American politics, AAPI politics, Asian American Political Alliance, Asian American leader, Asian American Protests 1960s, Asian American policy, Asian leftist, Asian American leftist, Asian American leftist podcast

Diplomacy Games
The 2022 Christmas Diplomacy Trivia Show

Diplomacy Games

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2022 107:50


The guys celebrate the festive season with Round 2 of Diplomacy Trivia, some Christmas gift giving and much, much more. Intro The guys introduce the show, venue and drinks. They throw in a bit of weather talk (0 mins 10 secs)   The guys introduce the 2022 Christmas Diplomacy Trivia game and contestants: reigning champ Markus Zijlstra/CaptainMeme, 3rd place 2022 WDC player Peter McNamara, variant extraordinaire David E. Cohen and podcast Patreon supporter and well known player Hal Schild (7 mins 30 secs) The trivia contest kicks off (8 mins 45 secs) The first question starts (11 mins) The visual for which country was not altered in the very last prototype of Realpolitik before it became Diplomacy is: (20 mins 30 secs)   The next visual question relates to this board (23 mins) The contest round up with the winner declared (1 hr 5 mins) The guys return and give their thoughts on the contest (1 hr 7 mins) Christmas gifts and Diplomacy chat Being Christmas the guys exchange gifts (kind of) (1 hr 12 mins) They talk about their plans for WDC 2023 in Thailand (1 hr 20 mins 30 secs) Amby shares his dream about the winner of WDC 2023 (1 hr 24 mins 15 secs) Amby asks Kaner if he plans to do a fact finding tour for his Southeast Asian variant of the Khmer kingdoms (1 hr 27 mins) The guys get some more drinks and describe them as mid-games (1 hr 29 mins 30 secs) Around the grounds Kaner discusses briefly one of his new Europa Renovatio games (1 hr 32 mins 30 secs) Amby talks about the David E. Cohen Mandate of Heaven email game he's in where he's playing as Shu (Orange) (1 hr 33 mins 30 secs) Amby has been playing with ChatGPT to see how it can improve his Diplomacy game (1 hr 40 mins) The guys start wrapping up the show (1 hr 46 mins 30 secs) Venue: Brewdog, Brisbane Drinks of choice: Kaner: Hazy Jane Pale Ale and Gateway to Helles Pilsner from Brewdog Amby: Brewdog IPA from Brewdog and Willie Smith's Organic Apple Cider   Just a reminder you can support the show by giving it 5 stars on iTunes or Stitcher. And don't forget if you want to help pay off the audio equipment... or get the guys more drunk, you can also donate at Patreon, plus you get extra podcast episodes! *** Remember if you know something about how WordPress works and can help the guys, get in touch!!! *** Lastly, don't forget to subscribe so you get the latest Diplomacy Games episodes straight to your phone. Thanks as always to Dr Dan aka "The General" for his rockin' intro tune.  

True Southeast Asia Horror Stories - GHOST MAPS
#72: Ghostly Tales of New Manila, Part 1 - GHOST MAPS - True Southeast Asian Horror Stories

True Southeast Asia Horror Stories - GHOST MAPS

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2022 15:52


In the first of a two-parter, an app developer shares the story of an invading spirit—and how it threatened his life in more ways than one. Ghost Maps follows an unnamed narrator as he chronicles true accounts of the supernatural across Southeast Asia.       ►FOLLOW US: Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/wearehantu/ YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/wearehantu Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/wearehantu/ Website: https://www.hantu.sg/   ►SUPPORT US: Libsyn: https://signup.libsyn.com/?promo_code=HANTU Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/wearehantu Merchandise: https://www.redbubble.com/people/wearehantu/shop   ►MUSIC CREDITS: Measured Paces by Kevin MacLeod Link: https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/4029-measured-paces License: https://filmmusic.io/standard-license   This House by Kevin MacLeod Link: https://filmmusic.io/song/4525-this-house License: https://filmmusic.io/standard-license   Spc X2x (Unseen Presence) by Kevin MacLeod Link: https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/6738-spc-x2x-unseen-presence- License: https://filmmusic.io/standard-license     ►THANK YOU TO OUR SUPPORTERS ON PATREON:  Stanley Santos Linda Haden NeoVegasAssassin Mai Ceph, the Writing Spook Elisabeth Cherepanova Nicolez Phua Andika Bramantio Medidi Stephens Miranda Pruett Abby Wintker Dyah Candra Hapsari Subagyo Adnan Salim Tom Johari R.Y Aayush Gupta Niko Heather Tan Kai Lin Julie Holochwost Monica Dubois Lexi   ►ABOUT HANTU: #trueghoststory #ghoststory #ghoststories #horrorstory #horrorstories #southeastsia #singapore #ghostmaps #deadair #podcast #wearehantu #hantu #hantusg

Thip Khao Talk
EP 006: Spreading Awareness with Art, the Story of Refugee Nation

Thip Khao Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2022 24:48


Art can bring people together and create healing and transformation out of the wreckage of war. We know what that is like first-hand through the incredible work of Ova Saopeng and Leilani Chan, co-founders of Teada productions. Since 2005 collaborators Leilani Chan and Ova Saopeng have been collecting oral histories from Laotian families and community members across the country to create an interdisciplinary theater performance that explores the impact of war, refugees, global politics, and U.S. citizenship. Through the collection of oral histories, the show reveals connections between American and Southeast Asian history and the unique challenges faced by political refugees and their American children. It gives voice to the Laotian Diaspora—yet to be included in the American experience. Refugee Nation continues to grow with the certainty of new refugee arrivals coming from the Middle East, Africa, and Eastern Europe. The question remains what can we learn from the wounds of a war 50 years ago that are still yet to be healed? Find out by listening!

BFM :: The Breakfast Grille
AC Venture Looks To Strengthen Its Malaysia Footprint

BFM :: The Breakfast Grille

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2022 24:21


AC Ventures is a leading Southeast Asian venture capital firm investing in early-stage startups focused on Indonesia and ASEAN. We ask Ng Yi Chung, partner at AC Ventures Malaysia on the landscape of venture capital in Malaysia, and is tech still the darling?

Southeast Asia Crossroads Podcast - CSEAS @ NIU
Chinese Diplomacy in the Malay Archipelago

Southeast Asia Crossroads Podcast - CSEAS @ NIU

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 12, 2022 55:25


In this episode, Drs Jones and J. Casey Hammond discuss China and their 5g network and tensions with Huawei and the United States. J. Casey Hammond is a China and Southeast Asian affairs analyst, university lecturer, and independent researcher. He received his PhD in History from the University of Pennsylvania and holds an MCP in Economic Development and Regional Planning from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Factal Forecast
Iran's protests carry on while uncertainty over morality police continues

Factal Forecast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2022 11:23 Transcription Available


Editors Jimmy Lovaas and Agnese Boffano discuss the uncertain future of Iran's morality police amid months of protest, plus more on the first summit between China and Arab states, European Union and Southeast Asian nations holding their first full summit, an important bridge between Colombia and Venezuela reopening to traffic and a strike by British nurses.Subscribe to the show: Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts and many more. These stories and others are also available in our free weekly Forecast newsletter.This episode was produced with work from Factal editors Sophie Perryer, Hua Hsieh, Irene Villora, Jess Fino and Agnese Boffano.  Music courtesy of Andrew Gospe. Have feedback, suggestions or events we've missed? Drop us a note: hello@factal.comWhat's Factal? Created by the founders of Breaking News, Factal alerts companies to global incidents that pose an immediate risk to their people or business operations. We provide trusted verification, precise incident mapping and a collaboration platform for corporate security, travel safety and emergency management teams. If you're a company interested in a trial, please email sales@factal.com. To learn more, visit Factal.com, browse the Factal blog or email us at hello@factal.com.Read the full episode description and transcript on Factal's blog.Copyright © 2022 Factal. All rights reserved.

IHS Markit Energy
EnergyCents- Ep 97: Reprioritized: The impact of a surge in European gas demand on Southeast Asia

IHS Markit Energy

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2022 26:38


Russia's Ukraine invasion led to gas supply constraints to Europe that rerouted global gas flows throughout the summer and fall. Gas market expert Johan Utama joins EnergyCents this week to review the role of natural gas in Southeast Asian markets, and how a spike in European demand influenced local balances half a world away. Learn more about S&P Global Commodity Insights' petroleum-sector risk coverage at: https://www.spglobal.com/commodityinsights/en/ci/products/asia-pacific-regional-integrated.html Join the conversation at energycents@spglobal.com

True Southeast Asia Horror Stories - GHOST MAPS
#71: The Tragic Spirit of Bayshore Estate - GHOST MAPS - True Southeast Asian Horror Stories

True Southeast Asia Horror Stories - GHOST MAPS

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2022 12:42


While shooting a short film, a group of teenagers discover a condominium's dark secret. Ghost Maps follows an unnamed narrator as he chronicles true accounts of the supernatural across Southeast Asia.       ►FOLLOW US: Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/wearehantu/ YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/wearehantu Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/wearehantu/ Website: https://www.hantu.sg/   ►SUPPORT US: Libsyn: https://signup.libsyn.com/?promo_code=HANTU Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/wearehantu Merchandise: https://www.redbubble.com/people/wearehantu/shop   ►MUSIC CREDITS: Measured Paces by Kevin MacLeod Link: https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/4029-measured-paces License: https://filmmusic.io/standard-license   This House by Kevin MacLeod Link: https://filmmusic.io/song/4525-this-house License: https://filmmusic.io/standard-license   Spc X2x (Unseen Presence) by Kevin MacLeod Link: https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/6738-spc-x2x-unseen-presence- License: https://filmmusic.io/standard-license     ►THANK YOU TO OUR SUPPORTERS ON PATREON:  Stanley Santos Linda Haden NeoVegasAssassin Mai Ceph, the Writing Spook Elisabeth Cherepanova Nicolez Phua Andika Bramantio Medidi Stephens Miranda Pruett Abby Wintker Dyah Candra Hapsari Subagyo Adnan Salim Tom Johari R.Y Aayush Gupta Niko Heather Tan Kai Lin Julie Holochwost Monica Dubois Lexi   ►ABOUT HANTU: #trueghoststory #ghoststory #ghoststories #horrorstory #horrorstories #southeastsia #singapore #ghostmaps #deadair #podcast #wearehantu #hantu #hantusg

Where Did the Road Go?
Wandering the Road - Nov 26, 2022

Where Did the Road Go?

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2022


Seriah welcomes Red Pill Junkie and Super Inframan for a wandering the road episode. Topics include favorite stories of high strangeness, people witnessing cartoon characters in real life, toys moving around on their own, a childhood memory of a muppet-like entity, the farmer gifted pancakes by UFO occupants, writers encountering their characters in physical reality, Alan Moore and John Constantine, Neil Gaiman and a powerful demon, Walter B. Gibson AKA Maxwell Grant and the Shadow, tulpas, Sam the Sandown Clown weird encounter, dead relatives showing up with aliens, assumptions about UFOs as spacecraft, an alien base in Lake Michigan, underwater alien base near a coastal city in Mexico, Alex Whitcomb's strange bigfoot encounter featuring out-of-synch time experiences, a fascinating speculation about Bob Lazar and a crashed extraterrestrial ship, the nature of time, Whitley Strieber and Jeffrey Kripal sharing a room and an experience at Esalen, shadow people, a physical phenomenon producing an illusion of a strange shadow, Seriah's experience of mistaken identity, the Aztecs encounter of the Spanish on horseback, ancient horses in North America, Graham Hancock, plasma bursts depicted in ancient art, Seriah relates a bizarre dream about the Devil, the TV series “Lucifer”, Satan and God in the Bible, the story of Job, the story of Adam and Eve and its implications, Gnosticism, the Demiurge, the nature of happiness, the pursuit of wealth, digital vs physical media, Christopher Ryan's “Civilized to Death”, obsessive collecting, doing tasks yourself vs hiring a skilled person, Seriah's adventure fixing his AC unit, Kenneth Grant, H.P. Lovecraft, Arthur Machen, UFOs in ancient Chinese and Southeast Asian beliefs, magical creatures that excrete precious metals, Jack Parsons, symbols and reality, how language affects perception, Terence McKenna, the movie “Arrival”, Inuit language and snow, ancient Egyptian language and the soul, Joshua Cutchin's “Ecology of Souls”, language and perceptions of color, high strangeness breaking through pre-existing mindsets, terminology specific to certain professions, Kenneth Grant's questionable numerology and drawing of connections, Marjorie Cameron, August Derleth, the Mauve Zone, Michael Bertiaux, the imaginal realm, the Necronomicon, the singularity, Aleister Crowley, a weird race of non-humans, Mayan beliefs, Cthulhu, Hekate, strange voices, magick and UFOs, elaborate hoaxes, the UMMO letters and an early 1990's alien landing in the Soviet Union, Carlos Castaneda, fiction proceeding real-life encounters, “War of the Worlds”, and much more! This is a casual but riveting discussion, not to be missed! - Recap by Vincent Treewell of The Weird Part Podcast Outro Music is DramaScream with Sham Download

POLITICO Energy
Commerce names companies evading China solar tariffs

POLITICO Energy

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 5, 2022 8:28


On Friday, the Commerce Department said four Chinese solar companies were routing products through Southeast Asian countries in order to evade tariffs. The investigation has worried solar companies in the U.S. that fear they won't get the imported panels they need for their projects, but Commerce's findings included key exceptions that could blunt the short-term impact on the sector. POLITICO's Kelsey Tamborrino breaks down Commerce's decision. Plus, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit sent a transmission case back to FERC in a win for renewables.   Josh Siegel is an energy reporter for POLITICO.  Kelsey Tamborrino is a reporter covering clean energy. Nirmal Mulaikal is a POLITICO audio host-producer. Raghu Manavalan is a senior editor for POLITICO audio. Jenny Ament is the executive producer of POLITICO's audio department.

Thoughts on the Market
Jonathan Garner: A Bullish Turn on Asia and Emerging Markets

Thoughts on the Market

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2022 4:15


As Asia and Emerging Markets move from a year of major adjustment in 2022 towards a less daunting 2023, investors may want to change their approach for the beginning of a new bull market.----- Transcript -----Welcome to Thoughts on the Market. I'm Jonathan Garner, Chief Asia and Emerging Market Equity Strategist at Morgan Stanley. Along with my colleagues, bringing you a variety of perspectives, in this episode on our 2023 outlook, I'll focus on why we recently turned more bullish on our coverage. It's Thursday, 1st of December at 8 a.m. in Singapore. 2022 was a year of major adjustment, with accelerating geopolitical shifts towards a multipolar world, alongside macro volatility caused by a surge in developed markets inflation, and the sharpest Fed tightening cycle since the Paul Volcker era 40 years ago. This took the U.S. dollar back to early 1980s peaks in real terms, and global equities fell sharply, with most markets down by double digit percentages. North Asian markets performed worse as a slowdown in tech spending, and persistently weak growth in China, weighed on market sentiment. But structural improvement in macro stability and governance frameworks was rewarded for Japan equities, as well as markets in Brazil, India and Indonesia. Our 2023 global macro outlook paints a much less daunting picture for equity markets, despite a slower overall GDP growth profile globally than in 2022. Current market concerns are anchored on inflation and that central banks will keep hiking until the cycle ends with a deep recession, a financial accident en route, or perhaps worse - that they leave the job half done. But, and crucially, our economists forecast that U.S. core PCE inflation will fall to 2.5% annualized in the second half of next year. Alongside slowing labor market indicators, our team sees January as the last Fed hike, with rates cuts coming as soon as the fourth quarter of 2023, down to a rate of 2.375% at the end of 2024. Meanwhile, inflation pressures in Asia remain more subdued than elsewhere. This top down outlook of growth, inflation and interest rates all declining in the U.S. and continued reasonable growth and inflation patterns in Asia should lead to a weaker trend in the U.S. dollar, which tends to be associated with better performance from Asia and emerging market equities.Meanwhile, for the China economy, we think a gradual easing of COVID restrictions and credit constraints on the property sector deliver a cyclical recovery, which drives growth reacceleration from 3.2% in 2022 to 5.0% in 2023. Consumer discretionary spending, which is well represented in the offshore China equity markets, should show the greatest upturn year on year as 2023 progresses. Crucially, this means that we expect corporate return on equity in China, which has declined in both absolute and relative terms in recent years, to pick up on a sustained basis from the current depressed level of 9.5%. We also think that end market weakness in semiconductors and technology spending, consequent upon the reversal of the COVID era boom, should gradually abate. Our technology and hardware teams expect PC and server end markets to trough in the fourth quarter of this year, whereas smartphone has already bottomed in the third quarter. They recommend looking beyond the near-term weakness to recognize upside risks, with valuations for the sector now at prior market troughs and the current pain and fundamentals priced in by recent earnings estimates downgrades in our view. We therefore upgraded Korea and Taiwan and the overall Asia technology sector in early October and expect these parts of our coverage to lead the new bull market into 2023. Finally, given greater GDP growth resilience and less sector exposure to global downturns, Southeast Asian markets such as Singapore, Malaysia, Indonesia and Thailand, collectively ASEAN, tend to outperform emerging markets in Asia during bear markets, but underperform in bull markets given their low beta nature. Having seen a sharp spike in ASEAN versus Asia, relative performance in the prior bear market, which we think is now ending, our view is that the trend should reverse from here. Thanks for listening. If you enjoyed the show, please leave us a review on Apple Podcasts and recommend Thoughts on the Market to a friend or colleague today.

The Negotiation
Arnault Castel Part 2 | Online vs Offline And The Future Of Retail In Asia

The Negotiation

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2022 40:28


This episode of The Negotiation features part 2 of our conversation with Arnault Castel. Arnault is the founder of Kapok, a retail experience that focuses on designers and brands whose work provides quality craftsmanship and creativity in design. Arnault has developed an extensive knowledge and understanding of the Asian consumer goods and retail environment since 1996 when he moved to Hong Kong from France. In 2001, he joined the team in charge of the development of the Lomography brand in Asia as the head of Southeast Asian operations. Arnault was also the co-owner and director of Working Unit Limited founded in 2005, the exclusive distributor for the Moleskine brand in Southeast Asia.In part two of our conversation, Arnault discusses how Kapok works with brands in his store, which brands are doing well resonating with consumers in Asia, whether or not it's important to have a brick-and-mortar presence in today's D2C environment, and more. He also discusses some of the risks he's taken that have paid off (and the ones that haven't), his experience as the managing director of Lomography Asia-Pacific, and what business principles he learnt while there. We close out the conversation by diving deep into the future of commerce and retail in Asia. Enjoy! Topics Discussed and Key Points: Creative control in a retail environment  Market localization and why it is important Why the Japanese market is so special and distinct from the rest of the world Why Kapok failed in Singapore and Taiwan, and the lessons learned What makes  Hong Kong so special for Kapok What Arnault did while at Lomography Asia-Pacific  Why certain geographies and markets do not work for Kapok  The future of commerce and retail in Asia Changes he is seeing at the intersection of commerce and creativity in Asia  Timestamps [00:57] How Arnault works with brands in their stores, how he promotes their brands,, and what creative control he has[06:44] Arnault's market risks, which didn't always work[13:00] Arnault's experience as the MD of Lomography Asia-Pacific and the business principles he learned[26:05] Fashion and lifestyle brands that are doing well in Asia today[29:25] Are customers shifting from brick-and-mortar to digital?[34:00] How will the intersection of commerce and creativity change in the coming years?Notable Quotes[00:01:32] “When a brand is inside Kapok, we have to respect the brand. But they are also in our environment, you know.”[00:02:18] “We need to localize because people need to feel that a particular model is someone that is like me, that looks like me, that has the same job as me, and the same height as me.” [00:03:38] “Japan is special. Japan is not like the rest of the world. And that can be limiting because what might work in the rest of the world doesn't work in Japan.” [00:07:14] “When I tried to bring Kapok outside of Hong Kong, you know, in Singapore or In Taiwan, it didn't work out, you know, because multi-brand retail is very, very detail oriented, you know? You receive new products, so you need training on the products and the brand.”[00:09:51] “Sometimes you like something, and you realize you like something only when you don't have it anymore. So, when we closed in Singapore, people said:, ``Oh, we're so sad, Kapok closed. I loved the shop.”[00:15:48] “I was not this natural born entrepreneur, but you arrive here and everyone is doing it.”[00:16:14]” I would never have opened up and done all this entrepreneurialism if it's not in Hong Kong, because this is a place where people take a lot of risks.”[00:21:22] “In order to succeed, I need to do things in a different, different way. If 50 people tell me ‘you have to do it this way, then I have to find the 51st way.” [00:35:27] “Over time, the marketing set of skills is going to be distributed to everyone, and you cannot defend yourself anymore by how well you play the digital marketing game. So, it's going to go back to how good your product is, how happy it makes your customer, and how strong is your brand story.”

True Southeast Asia Horror Stories - GHOST MAPS
#70: Mountain Spirits of the Chiang Rai Village - GHOST MAPS - True Southeast Asian Horror Stories

True Southeast Asia Horror Stories - GHOST MAPS

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 27, 2022 13:48


Gangsters in a small Chiang Rai village discover that there are other forces at work within the region—forces that are far more terrifying than they are. Ghost Maps follows an unnamed narrator as he chronicles true accounts of the supernatural across Southeast Asia.       ►FOLLOW US: Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/wearehantu/ YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/wearehantu Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/wearehantu/ Website: https://www.hantu.sg/   ►SUPPORT US: Libsyn: https://signup.libsyn.com/?promo_code=HANTU Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/wearehantu Merchandise: https://www.redbubble.com/people/wearehantu/shop   ►MUSIC CREDITS: Measured Paces by Kevin MacLeod Link: https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/4029-measured-paces License: https://filmmusic.io/standard-license   This House by Kevin MacLeod Link: https://filmmusic.io/song/4525-this-house License: https://filmmusic.io/standard-license   Spc X2x (Unseen Presence) by Kevin MacLeod Link: https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/6738-spc-x2x-unseen-presence- License: https://filmmusic.io/standard-license     ►THANK YOU TO OUR SUPPORTERS ON PATREON:  Stanley Santos Linda Haden NeoVegasAssassin Mai Ceph, the Writing Spook Elisabeth Cherepanova Nicolez Phua Andika Bramantio Medidi Stephens Miranda Pruett Abby Wintker Dyah Candra Hapsari Subagyo Adnan Salim Tom Johari R.Y Aayush Gupta Niko Heather Tan Kai Lin Julie Holochwost     ►ABOUT HANTU: #trueghoststory #ghoststory #ghoststories #horrorstory #horrorstories #southeastsia #singapore #ghostmaps #deadair #podcast #wearehantu #hantu #hantusg

KPFA - APEX Express
APEX Express – 11.24.22 Lavender Phoenix’s Peer Counseling Program by and for Trans Nonbinary Asian Pacific Islander people

KPFA - APEX Express

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2022 59:58


A weekly magazine-style radio show featuring the voices and stories of Asians and Pacific Islanders from all corners of our community. The show is produced by a collective of media makers, deejays, and activists. This episode highlights Lavendar Phoenix's Peer Counseling Program. Tonight you'll be hearing interviews from Iris Yip, Phibi Loc Tran, Madhvi  trivedi-pathak, and Al.  They launched their Peer Counseling Program back in August 2022 and  This pilot came out the Trans Justice committee's Up to Us needs assessment finding around trans and non binary API people struggling with mental health and not being able to access affirming mental health support. We wanted to create a free mental healing program that was led by trans API people and did not involve the police.  About 7+ trans and non binary API members planned and organized for almost 2 years to make this pilot happen in Aug 2022. In June-August 2022 we trained 10 trans and non binary API counselors in abolitionist and disability justice based peer counseling (with the help of Project LETS and Asian American Peer Counseling).  In August 2022 we held peer counseling with 8 participants.  The majority of the organizers, counselors and participants were from our priority groups: working class, South Asian/South East Asian/PI/Central Asian. We chose these groups to prioritize those most impacted by systemic oppression in our community. One participant who received counseling said: “Both of my peer counselors were so lovely to talk to, and I felt more seen in that one session than I have in 10 years of searching for a therapist who could understand my intersectionality.” Lavender Phoenix builds transgender, non-binary, and queer Asian and Pacific Islander power in the Bay Area. We inspire and train grassroots leaders, transform our values from scarcity to abundance, and build vibrant intersectional movements. AACRE Thursdays is monthly radio show featuring an organization from the AACRE: Asian American for Civil Rights and Equality. AACRE Thursdays premiers every third Thursday of the month at 7pm. Find more APEX Express Shows here. Links: Donate to sustain our work: lavenderphoenix.org/donate Instagram: @lavphoenix Facebook: facebook.org/lavphoenix Twitter: @lav_phoenix Lavender Phoenix Transcript: [11/23/22] Peer Counseling pilot [00:00:00] Apex express Asian Pacific expression. Unity and cultural coverage, music and calendar, new visions, and voices coming to you with Asian Pacific Islander point of view. It's time to get on board the apex express.  [00:00:14] paige: Hello, welcome to acre Thursdays on apex express radio. My name is Paige Chung and tonight we'll be listening to interviews from lavender Phoenix, an organization of transgender non-binary and queer Asian Pacific Islanders fighting for community safety, healing justice. And sustainable movements in the San Francisco bay area.  [00:00:33] paige: I'm really excited tonight to showcase lavender. Phoenix is peer counseling program. Tonight. You'll be hearing interviews from Iris Yip , Phoebe loc tran, Madvi Trivedi-Pathak, and Al, all members of lavender, Phoenix. So they launched their peer counseling program back in August, 2022. And this pilot came out of their trans justice committee's needs assessment findings called “up to us”. In their findings they found out that trans and nonbinary API people [00:01:00] struggle with mental health and not being able to access, affirming mental health support. So they wanted to create a free mental health healing program that was led by trans Asian Pacific Islander people. And did not involve the police.  [00:01:13] paige: So about seven plus trans and non binary API planned organized for almost two years to make this pilot happen in August, 2022. So From June to August, 2022, they trained 10 trans and non-binary API counselors. And abolitionists and disability, justice based peer counseling. Using the help of project LETS and Asian-American peer counseling. Then in August, 2022, they held their peer counseling program with eight participants. The majority of the organizers, the counselors and the participants were from the priority groups of lavender, Phoenix, which include the working class, south Asian people, Southeast Asian people, Pacific Islander people and central Asian people. And they chose these groups to prioritize because they're the most [00:02:00] impacted by systematic oppression in their community. And one participant who receives counseling said, ” both of my peer counselors were so lovely to talk to. And I felt more seen in one session that I have in 10 years of searching for a therapist who could understand my intersectionality.”  [00:02:16] paige: So we'll first hear from Iris. Yep. And Mahdavi, and then you'll hear from Phoebe and I'll later on. And yeah, we'll hear about their peer counseling program that they launched and their reflections from it. Here is Iris Yip.  [00:02:31] Iris: So the first question is about the planning process of the pilot. So thinking about the planning process with peer counseling pilot what do you think has been going well with the process? [00:02:42] Madhvi: With the planning process? Process? I came in during a later iteration. So by the time that I entered into this space there, several folks through Healing Justice and maybe even other committees that had given their [00:03:00] input. [00:03:00] Madhvi: So it's gone through many different folks, many different perspectives have been included in the planning process, and I think that creates a really well-rounded experience. You can tell that there's a lot of consideration too, on who's been generally excluded from life spaces where gaining the tools for healing and community support and really trying to center the planning around. Amplifying and creating a space that feels welcoming for folks that are often excluded, even within our large QT API umbrella. It's nice that this is a trans centered space. This is one that is really trying to honor working class narratives to think that's a place of invisibilization often. So there's a lot of thoughtfulness that has been put into the planning process. [00:03:48] Iris: And what would you say that is the impact of that thoughtfulness and having had so many perspectives be involved in the creation of this? [00:03:56] Madhvi: I think impact is that when there has been gaps, it does end up [00:04:00] getting filled. There is an abundance of perspectives coming in. So there's this flow of thoughts that , keep it full , very thoughtful in that way. also the folks who are on, who are in this iteration of the planning and organizing. I'll come from really interesting, unique backgrounds. So you're able to see the input from each different person and it gives it a really beautiful, full experience to be able to see the ways in which the curriculums can develop the way in. And the art connecting to the flyers, that was created by a previous summer organizer too. There's just it's nice to have a history already, in this mix, being made and so many people being involved. Okay.  [00:04:45] Iris: And then thinking about the planning process again what has been difficult about the process? [00:04:50] Madhvi: Since this is a first time pilot program, there's so much beauty and potential for what seeds are being sewed in this segue of [00:05:00] wanting to make sure things feel. Evenly doable for folks who are the peer counselors in training as well as the people who are on the organizing end and so it's this chemistry situation where we're , okay. [00:05:13] Madhvi: I'm , does this feel too much too soon? Or does it feel not enough? We wanna be able to. Support folks and feeling supported to be able to do this pilot. It's new for everyone, for the organizers, for the people who are being trained, for the folks that are gonna be receiving the counseling. So there's a lot of considerations around ethics, safety, holding, these notions of what is safe? What feels the individual, in their agency and autonomy can hold and the organization too. Where are the places where lavender, phoenix, maybe impacted, Are there things around informed consent or if there is some kind of moment things that we've had conversations about, it's okay, what.  [00:05:53] Madhvi: Someone gets activated a peer counselor's not able to hold the space or they end up leaving feeling [00:06:00] activated from a session. We were thinking a lot about the chain of support, so how the organizers can support the peer counselors as they're supporting the people being counseled and then how lavender Phoenix can help the organizers. So it's just a lot of figuring it out for the first time. . And also peer counseling is really beautiful in this way where it's separate from the clinical, mandated regulations that maybe counselors who are held by, state laws are in relationship with.  [00:06:30] Madhvi: So there's more freedom here. And then also moving through that space. It's also when we're in that place of freedom, there's this underlying, I feel the state tries to instill fear in people who are trying to do this work that you're gonna fuck up or gonna do something wrong. And it's really a lot of us being , we actually know what we need to do, how to be able to maneuver out of these state based policies that rely on violence systems and give each other the tools. [00:06:57] Iris: Okay. And then last question [00:07:00] on the planning process do you have any recommendations for improving the process or [00:07:05] Madhvi: For the planning process? I think that there's really great intention to share, if people are feeling. Burnt out overexerted. And also I think that a lot of us, including myself, [laughter], I think from the , I will not really share that when it's happening, even though the language at Lavender Phoenix and the culture is ask for help when you need it. [00:07:25] Madhvi: There's so much of that. And then yet there's still this feeling of resistance or feeling , Bad about not being able to do more and pushing past, what does feel comfortable I'm wondering if there's a space for people in the planning process as organizers to kinda anonymously send feedback to staff anonymous feedback survey sort of thing, during the process to kinda gauge. People's level of feeling energized, exhausted, what maybe is needed. [00:07:56] Madhvi: And since there are people who are yeah, the working class [00:08:00] end too, of the organizing side. It would be cool if there were stipends. It is a lot of work and labor that goes into it for compensation is a cool thing. And also it's one of those things too, even saying it feels a guilt twinge or being , this is something where it's community. We're doing it for a reason outside. But it's also the, sometimes it's hard to be able to do the psych work when our own cups are emp. [00:08:26] Iris: Yeah. Great. Thank you for sharing the ation. And I think there's a of the important things there, especially around feedback. Yeah. I think anonymous feedback is to bridge that of job and how difficult it's my next set of. Is it that the sustainability you talk a little bit about, but I know that the peer counseling team has tried to do a lot of work around making the process sustainable for both the planning team and counsel. So thinking about the sustainability of the process what do you think has worked so far? [00:08:57] Madhvi: Sustainability wise, it has [00:09:00] been nice to be able to have the larger healing justice committee plug into the efforts. And there's I think five or six of us who are in the organizing peer counseling side right now, but they're , Yeah, as I shared before, there have been so many people the earlier iterations of this too. It's being able to know that you can kinda pass the torch and there's gonna be other people there. It's not all of the responsibility is on this group of five or six people. There are so many people who are down to rise to the occasion and support and be here for the next iteration too. I think that's gonna be something that's gonna help with. Long term visions of sustainability too, and knowing that there will be breath in between and there's always consent in the process too, really invitations to kind join into these efforts. Nothing feels, it feels the space to communicate. [00:09:55] Madhvi: Okay, if it's when does it end? Are we. ending there. Are we [00:10:00] continuing, it does seem there's a finite end point for this moment in time, which gives a break and that feels just good to know in terms of future planning and if the invitation to come back to help the pilot program or the program if it wants, if it grows. Something that's gonna be a larger part, for the future of lavender Phoenix. And there's that aspect, which is great. Sustainability wise, it's cool that we're not, the organizers are not doing all the trainings. I thought that was originally what it was and it felt a lot. [00:10:28] Madhvi: But we're able to resource out to people in the community who've been doing this work for a really long. Who are living their lives, Project lets folks in that word Stephanie, get to make their living off of doing this amazing disability justice work. And it's cool to be able to financially support them too in the process of feel sustainable. Even in the way that we're creating the relationships, new relationships to other orgs that haven't been part of Lavender Phoenix's network in the past. So it feels yeah, there's that way of [00:11:00] being able to be supportive, sustaining other people, other projects, other orgs, utilizing other folks' knowledge. [00:11:07] Iris: Yeah. as a follow up to that, what you think the impact has been of outsourcing, the training to project LETS rather than digging it. [00:11:16] Madhvi: Yeah, The impact has been a really great learning experience, I think for even the organizers doing this too. We get to learn alongside the peer counselors, we get to build relationships with project labs other groups too we're gonna be doing role play later. I'm forgetting what the acronym starts with aapc. And just being able to these are folks that have been doing peer counseling specifically in Asian American communities, for a good second too. So they have inside guidance, a history, a way to be able to support and navigate and offer their own wisdom. As this specific, lavender, phoenix seed is in its way of sprouting out a peer counseling. So [00:12:00] it's lovely being able to , have people who've been doing this, be able to offer feedback throughout the process to offer guidance that doesn't , feel one of those things , ah, we're starting from scratch. [00:12:10] Madhvi: No, it's it's already here. This resource is here and we're connecting to what is already, and then if, Yeah, making the changes that feel the needed transformation, maybe if it. Spaces haven't honored trans, non-binary, intersex communities, in the process of centering their spaces, That's what we're able to do better. What we're able to commit to doing better is owning those kinds of spaces and having folks within our own communities getting trained who have lived experience in that way. So just different places, orgs that have lived experience in their own ways, taking the gems and then knowing that our peer counselors have this other lived experience that maybe not as represented in other spaces. They get to add their own little non-binary flare too. Yeah. [00:12:58] Iris: And then on the flip [00:13:00] side thinking about the sustainability of this project, what do you think could make this process more sustainable? [00:13:06] Madhvi: It really feels in the future since we've already kinda done a lot of the initial connecting, getting the trainings, learnings and understandings, from this experience, going forward it's gonna be a lot less work on the organizing end since we've done a lot of research amongst all the different iterations of folks who have passed through the planning process for this. That there's just a beautiful database that is growing and growing in so many resources that are growing and growing that it's feeling very. A tangible vault of okay, this is where we're gonna go and we know where we're gonna go. Versus I'm not sure yet. It's kinda we transgressed into the place of knowing okay, these orgs are here and that helps, that feeling of sustainability and kind shortening, that place of panic of Oh, where do we go? Who do we turn to support us and who can we support to in. .  [00:13:58] Madhvi: Yeah, and [00:14:00] if we're able to keep in touch and keep those relationships strong, there may be even more places of connecting and growing and offering. People in not just the live under Phoenix community, but community, but larger communities the ability to access maybe free or, Yeah, free trainings on peer counseling and letting it be more of a widespread so to resource that it's just a really beautiful thing that folks can tap into feeling that level of agency, that feels self sustainable, too, sustainable for organizations when people , feel they're equipped. [00:14:35] Iris: Thank you for your response to that. My last two questions are about the future of the program. So first do you have any thoughts on if we should continue this program after the pilot stage and what would the impact of that be? Whether we do or not? [00:14:53] Madhvi: I think it would be really wonderful for it to be something that happens.[00:15:00] A few times a year. I know when peer support things do start out, it's smaller, shorter, and then as people can be more familiar with the process and the comfort of knowing their own agency and holding space, it feels something that it could be in many seasons throughout the year and the space of just. [00:15:21] Madhvi: Drop in support. It's something that feels a need that's always gonna be a need. And it's also to have free, culturally competent, gender expansive, aware ways of being, in listening in support. That feels a forever healing justice. Home to kinda be able to provide community. It feels important. It seems and fingers crossed, that people who are going through this training program are able to tap in deeper cuz there's a good handful of folks, I believe 16 people and those folks can be organizers in so many different renditions down the line too, having had [00:16:00] this experience and they're coming in. Yeah. I'm just so curious to hear their own feedback on this process and what they think future peer counselors would need for it to grow. I'm sure that there's gonna be maybe more, carefully cultivated, cohort experiences could be a. Powerful experience for folks. [00:16:19] Madhvi: Cause right now it does feel a little bit looser in the sense of different parts of , the summer organizer. There's a strong sense of Oh, we're building relationships with each other. That doesn't seem it exists so strongly for people who are peer counselors right now, they're showing. These spaced weekends with minimal contact with each other throughout. So maybe that could be the future, where there's a more of a cohort experience. Yeah.  [00:16:44] Iris: Yeah. The last question is, do you have new recommendations for continuing this program beyond the pilot? If it does. [00:16:53] Madhvi: Yeah, I think this cohort experience would be cool. Maybe art, kinda. Component too [00:17:00] are a, creating a space, it is something that we didn't really talk about, but there are ways of making virtual s and things that, And that could be really beautiful as part of this. I'm also curious to hear more people's stories as to why they're interested in this work. There was a little bit of that in the welcoming but just the ability to know folks a little bit more feels it could be important. And in the spirit of doing that too, it feels the training would maybe need to. be closer in time as well as instead of spaced out over several months. [00:17:36] Madhvi: I think the spacing out really helped us as the planning team. Yeah. Cause a lot of things have been figured out very as we're going, even though we tried to plan ahead, things changed. So it's okay. But that timeline that allows a sense of intimacy and connection to in a way that feels , okay, more concrete. And yeah, I think more interactive aspects too would be [00:18:00] helpful. It does feel a lot of absorbing, which is super important. And also I think when we get to the role play, we're gonna be able to witness more so of the peer counselors in the process of. Doing the embodied and the relaying aspects of this where Yeah, right now it's a lot of absorbing, taking in. [00:18:21] Madhvi: Yeah. I'm also wondering for the peer counselors in their own lives too, the way that , these interview questions have been kinda asking about sustainability. Or the planning team and all of those I'm curious too, for them, how they would need more support from us. If it feels it's even an open invitation too, I'm not entirely sure if that has been as carefully created and Yeah. So I think that would. An important thing to consider going forward. Just kinda checking in on where the individuals are too in their life and knowing that they can receive support. I , I hope that they know, in our [00:19:00] emails, there is always that space of feel free to, to connect on things anything in the reading feels activating. This is who you can reach out to and so I hope that There in a way that sometimes even when something is there in that way, it doesn't mean that people are gonna use it if there's not that trust and rapport built.  [00:19:19] Madhvi: So I feel needing to have some trust building, relationship building for people to feel safe enough to actually reach out if they dunno folks. Yeah. Okay. And actually I have one follow up to your, It's about what do you think would be the impact of having a closer connection between the counselor cohort if they had more opportunities to , interact with each other and talk in that way? , I honestly think that it. I'm just thinking about my own cohort experiences in different places. I've been able to lean on those folks, maybe more so than the people who are holding the container. There's a distance between the people who are holding the [00:20:00] container and the people who are going through the process with you, shared experiences, more maybe of the same questions, insecurities, excitement, joy and being able to have that kinda space to know okay, we're going through this together, this part of the journey. It could just help additional processing that, stronger feeling of grounded in purpose as well. Yeah.  [00:20:24] Madhvi: Great. And I totally agree, and that's my question. Yeah. Thank you for talking with me. I'm going to end the recording now. [00:20:33] paige: All right. That was the first interview with Iris yip and Madvhi. So now we're going to take a quick music break and listen to queer brown love by Leo Hegde who is on staff. I love under Phoenix. This is queer brown love by Leo Hegde.  [00:21:00] [00:22:00] [00:23:00] [00:24:00]  [00:24:20] paige: You just listened to queer brown love by Leo Hegde who is a staff at lavender Phoenix. You are listening to apex express on KPFA 94.1 and online@kpfa.org. Let's get back into these interviews by lavender Phoenix. And this next interview will be conducted by Iris Yip who will be talking to Al.  [00:24:41] Iris: This is the first question. What has gone, what has worked well with the training content?  [00:24:45] al: Yeah, so what has worked really well, I believe is Lavender Phoenix outsourcing the education to those that are actively learning and practicing. Peer [00:25:00] counseling based on their own lived experiences. I think that opportunity to collaborate with project lets created such a in depth and I. Just , how do I say this? Enlightening space for me and my peers to learn and also express curiosity, ask questions in live time with the coordinator of project lets, and process hard emotions and also bring in our own lived experiences and ask for best practices in live time. [00:25:29] al: So I just, That has been very revolutionary for me because just in multiple learning spaces that I've been in from school to workplaces to internships, people tend to cut corners around education. They think that trainings are just trainings PowerPoints, but. I think that learning from guest speakers that are actually within the realm of work, and especially for this work of working with people, I think that this will create influential impacts on each and every peer counselor.  [00:25:59] al: There's [00:26:00] no way that I feel this curriculum has been disengaging. It's been so engaging and so memorable. And I wanna say too, that I've been in different peer counseling cohorts and I've been trained on this topic area, but the content was ableist, not trauma-informed, controversial and harmful. And the content that peer counseling has been teaching me has been healing me and been helping me to expand my scope on my family, my lived experiences, and myself and my community. And it's so much more than just a training. It's a revolutionary space for sure.  [00:26:40] Iris: Awesome. Yeah. I love that. Has there been any, specific part of the training that you can share that you think has had that impact on you?  [00:26:47] al: Has that healing impact on me? Yeah I think that I've. I think this might be normal in lavender, phoenix spaces, but it's not normal for me in my other spaces in my everyday life. [00:27:00] But calling one selves in to whenever they misspoke for instance, one time the coordinator of Project LETS had said something about the word darkness and they had not caught themselves about the racist implications that, that may have because of the just how society binary things, black, white, darkness and light. And there's a lot of connotations around the words you use and using mindful language. And I didn't know that it was. Irking, I didn't know that. But then in that space, someone called them in and the speaker corrected themselves.  [00:27:34] al: And I got to watch, someone that I look up to model behavior in lifetime of what I'm learning as they're learning and seeing my educators , or my mentors facilitators, having that student always mentality too, that they're here to learn from us as well. That's groundbreaking because I have so much respect for queer elders cuz they've lived through so much stuff. But the fact that. The queer [00:28:00] elders in this space in particular want to learn from us, the youth in this space. I think that's what's really healing, because in this space, I just see a world where I really actually wanna live in. And that could make me cry because the state of the world outside of the space is really ugly. [00:28:16] Iris: That's amazing. I'm really glad this training has given me that space. I really resonated with what you said about being an environment where there's, again, mutual sense of learning and wanting to learn from each other. I think that curiosity really helps bring an open mind to these kinds of spaces.  [00:28:30] Iris: Okay. The next question is, so I think you've touched on this already, but what do you think has been the impact? Of outsourcing this, people that are really, I guess doing the work of anti ableist behavior and anti-racism, culturally competent peer counseling. What is the impact of that being in this kind of training? [00:28:47] al: I think that it's resistance in the making and movement in the making. I think that I feel very lucky to have access this knowledge because not everyone gets the chance to learn what [00:29:00] happens when someone's under psychiatric arrest? That's something that you will hear more about when you go through the project lETS training, but understanding. Because I'm coming from a place of privilege where I've never been 51 50 that I've never been arrested. I've never been on the inside doors of a psychiatric treatment facility. So speaking from that point of view and hearing from someone who has, and the harm that the state has on patients and how vulnerable patients are, I feel like that creates movement and solidarity with people who do not have lived experiences with it, but know people who have lived experiences with it and see how fucked up it is and wants to do something better and provide alternative sources and resources for care, specifically community care because . [00:29:48] al: One of the main reasons why I'm so politicized is because growing up I watch my dad struggle to get the mental health access care he needs because he has severe [00:30:00] mental psychosis that relapses annually. And I believe that the reason why it happens so repetitively and cyclically is because there's a need that's not being met and that need should met by the healthcare system in this first world country. But it's so inaccessible. It's so culturally irrelevant and dare say it's harmful, it's abusive, it's traumatizing. And so Okay. I'm going on tangents, but it's, it, I never understood what happened when my dad was hospitalized because I was always on the outside. [00:30:32] al: I was always his caretaker, wanting to find him a source for him to get care. But He was never able to really communicate to me what was happening on the inside of those doors because of language barriers, because how hard it is to talk about these things in Vietnamese culture. It's just, there's so much that separates us from being able to talk about everything he feels and everything he experiences. [00:30:51] al: There's just not words to describe how bizarre the state of there is in this country and neglect that he's faced due to war and [00:31:00] colonization. He doesn't have the words to describe what he's going through, but I can see the effects and now I know the effects. I know I have the knowledge and education of what happens behind those hospital doors and how he spends hours and hours trying to pay his hospital bills that are bizarre. [00:31:16] al: Hundreds of thousands of dollars and so I know these things now because of the space that I hear from other people. And I think that in knowing this, I'm fired up, I'm heated and I, my drive is to build community. My drive is to build actual healing spaces that, we have the potential to create as a collective. And I just don't wanna rely on the state anymore. And I want better for my dad. I want better for me, I want better for our community Now, future past, I. We can do better now with these tools that we're learning in this space and how we're opening our hearts to each other through the various pains and barriers that, that the state is trying to keep in between us all. Yeah.  [00:31:58] Iris: Yeah. Thank you for [00:32:00] sharing both so vulnerably and so passionately. Oh, no, I really love the way you are always very reflective in what you say. And I think it gives such great knowledge that I can learn from too yeah. Yeah. Awesome. Oh my God, this is great. Okay. My next question is do you think there's any other additional trainings that you would find helpful or that you think you would to learn more about that hasn't been met yet? [00:32:25] al: Yeah. So I actually went to. Bystander Intervention training led by the Safety Committee, Community Safety Committee. I feel that should have been everyone who's training to be a peer counselor should have gone to that. I feel because it was so relevant. It was basically one thing in particular that I feel , just related so much is because they gave us real life scenarios. What would you do if someone was experiencing active psychosis in the park? What would you do with your body? What would you do with yourself? Would you get other people? All these things that are relevant practice for what's coming up in this training. [00:33:00] Cuz I know that looking forward we are going to have a pilot program and the more practice that we can get, especially role play practice and especially being in person with one another and establishing those connections with one another, I think that's so crucial and yeah I, Does that answer your question? [00:33:19] Iris: Yeah, definitely. And once again, the follow up. What do you think the impact of that would be if everybody that was becoming a peer counselor would take that kind of bystand training?  [00:33:27] al: Yeah, I think that the effect of that is that we would be able to reach more people who have various learning styles because I know that for me personally, it's hard for me to learn through Zoom because I don't have a safe space to be taking my meetings. I still live in my parents house and it's really hard for me to focus sometimes and feel entirely safe. So having spaces in person for me personally is a space for me to exhale. And be a different type of present cuz I'm with people and [00:34:00] I'm sharing space — space that is established and intentionally safe or encouraged to push you to be brave. [00:34:08] al: I don't know if everyone will feel safe there, but that's definitely the intention. And just for me personally, yeah, being on Zoom kind of you can't assume that everyone can learn that way, yeah. As effectively, especially since I feel the generation that's primarily in lavender, Phoenix and the training, we grew up going to school in person. That's the probably 90 to 95% of the experience. It was just such a shift and learning these super relevant topics. All the while I'm in a space that's far back in terms of. It's just being in this house is going back in time or just being in spaces that are not lavender, phoenix it is, you're going back in time. [00:34:44] al: Racism is there, homophobia is there, all the bad things are there. But when you're with lavender Phoenix, you're just I'm in this new world that I actually have hope in. I was saying earlier, so having a central location for people to meet would be so cool. But I also know that Lavender Phoenix is so spread across the Bay area, [00:35:00] which is so cool. So I know it wouldn't work for everybody, but I don't know. Yeah. [00:35:04] Iris: Yeah. Absolutely .  [00:35:06] al: Oh, another thing too, an impact that I, a positive impact is that having those scenarios will allow us to practice these skills with various demographics and various sectors of our lives and just honestly live by what we learn. And not just practice it in work, but actually apply it and externally and internally in all facets of our lives, which I think is awesome. That's what education should be. It's for liberating the soul and for liberating the people. It's, yeah, it's not for a grade, it's not for a Certifi certificate. It's for you, and for the people. So I think that getting opportunities to practice with one another and treating it , it's more than just a training that you can just click through, that's the difference I think. Yeah.  [00:35:48] Iris: Yeah. Totally. Awesome. Okay, so next question is going to be moving a little bit away from the training content into, so I know the peer [00:36:00] counseling team has been doing a lot of work to try to make this process sustainable for both the planning team and for the counselors. So thinking about sustainability have there been things that, you've seen this program do that you think has worked to make this process more sustainable for the counselors? [00:36:17] al: Have I seen anything that makes the process seem sustainable for, Is that the question? [00:36:24] Iris: Yeah. [00:36:24] al: Remind me again is this peer counseling training program, has it been through generations already? Or is this the first cohort?  [00:36:31] Iris: This is the first time.  [00:36:32] al: Have I seen anything that [00:36:34] al: let's see. I think it's been. I think it's too soon for me to say cause I missed the first meeting because. It was an awkward transition. I had just joined Lavender Phoenix when Lavender Phoenix changed their name. So I missed all the information for the first meeting. I don't know what it, what the community building aspect that they had planned was at all. And that's how me, I could have watched the training back, but [00:37:00] it was an hour long and I didn't want to. Yeah, I would also feel fomo. I was , Oh, I missed it. I wasn't there. I think that maybe. No, I don't know how to answer this question cuz I missed  [00:37:09] Iris: Yeah, that's OK . That's ok. Yeah. Then perhaps, is there anything you can think of that Loud could implement to make this process more sustainable? And thinking perhaps in the long run. When this pilot program is actually started now and people are doing the counsel sessions.  [00:37:25] al: Yeah. I have a couple of things. Yeah. I would say since I missed the first one, I would say that I just wanna get to know people in my cohort better. I think that One thing that works in the past in my other peer counseling programs was that I established a feeling of familiarity with the people that I was learning with and why they're here and stuff that. And had a lot of focus groups and we practiced on each other for role play. Yeah, feeling less alone in this would definitely make this more, less nerve-wracking. So there's that for [00:38:00] sustainability of just cause the way that these meetings roll on, I feel not everyone can make it out to each one. So I think time should be cut away for folks to just get to know each other more besides the why are you here? But just prompt questions. [00:38:12] al: I know Lavender Phoenix can, ask some heartfelt questions and get people to open up to one another because I think that making that making it more personable will make it more sustainable. Cause, when you don't have a connection to people in a group, I don't think you're as likely to return and hold significance for it. So yeah, build building community in that way and not just for meeting. And other thing is I noticed that our meetings are quite sporadic. So I don't even really remember what I've the last time I met with the cohort, so having a more consistent pattern of meetings so that the knowledge that I learned can be processed and then added onto, but there's been so much processing time that I've almost forgotten it already. [00:38:52] al: So just having more consistent meetings for the next cohorts maybe and then for another, I know that since this [00:39:00] is a pilot program, there may be a lot of pressure around building curriculum. So I understand that's really challenging and I would say I would love to be a part of the planning process. I don't know what that would look for Lavender Phoenix and how they do things, but maybe their next court around you can have alumnis come back and be a part of the planning and the conversation. Or even right now opening up this space or opening up spaces for people in the cohort to provide active feedback since there are so many gaps between meetings, just talk to us so we can improve as we go, as opposed to wait and then improve. So more dialogue. [00:39:37] Iris: I love that. I love feedback. I think it's important as well. Okay and then now last question. Moving gone. Woo. You already shared some of this, but also thinking about the future of this program, do you have any recommendations for continuing this beyond the pilot that we're going to have?  [00:39:52] al: Yeah, please have more cohorts. That's my feedback. , I think that if Lavender Phoenix has capacity, a cohort a year would be [00:40:00] awesome or I feel very blessed to have had this opportunity, so I want it to keep going. I can't remember the days in which we were meeting, but having weekend meetings are awesome for students and people who work. Other feedback that I have for longevity and future planning maybe expand the, I don't know how many people are planning the thing, but maybe more support would help. I have no idea if they're struggling or what, but yeah, making sure that, cuz this is tough work. It's a lot of pressure to be birthing such a beautiful generation, So I hope that, on the other end of things, people are being properly supported and taken care of in terms of each other and themselves. [00:40:37] Iris: Yeah. Yeah, I the, there's one more question. There's just the follow with always the impact. So what do you think? So what will be the impact? And just what will be the impact of program, of peer counseling will be impact.  [00:40:49] al: Intergenerational community care within the, when this, within this queer, trans, non-binary, a API community I think it starts [00:41:00] here and I could see this being a force that spreads across the world. I think what we're doing is historical and we're carrying on other history legacies, And I think ultimately this saves lives. It saves lives of the people in this space, people who know the people in this space, and people that are in the space that we haven't even met. And it preserves our peoples, our stories and our powers and our energies. I'm getting emotional as to how much I love this program. It saves lives, it sets people free. [00:41:33] al: Yeah. Damn, you're not a cry. Yeah. I think the impact is be out of this world, I don't want it to end, I wanna return. I wanna keep learning. I think that's another thing too, is that as someone is in the core right now, I don't want it to end. I'd hate to see it end. I wanna keep learning. Yeah. So what does that look ? I don't know. Maybe I can return and facilitate and learn from people in the cohort. That would be beautiful.  [00:41:58] Iris: Thank you. Truly [00:42:00] amazing. And I agree from am I involvement in this process too? I really see the power of it and I really, the learning. Community. It's great. It's amazing. It's . So good. Yeah, With that, I'm gonna stop recording now.  [00:42:15] paige: All right. That concludes the second interview from lavender Phoenix. We'll be taking a short break. You're listening to 94.1 KPFA San Francisco, 89.3, Berkeley 88.1, Fresno and 97.5 in Santa Cruz. And of course, online@kpfa.org.  [00:46:56] paige: You're listening to 94.1 KPFA San Francisco, 89.3, Berkeley 88.1, Fresno and 97.5 Santa Cruz and online@kpfa.org. We're going to listen to the last interview from lavender Phoenix. That includes Iris yip interviewing Phoebe. And talking about the peer counseling program that they launched in august of 2022.  [00:47:26] Iris: So the first question our first set of questions has to do with the planning process for this pilot. And in thinking about the planning process for the peer counseling pilot, what would you say has been going well with the process?  [00:47:44] Phibi: Yeah. For what's been going well with the process? It's been nice that we've been able to go at our own pace and capacity, and we've also had lot of different learning lessons among the team that our time together. And also helping Jasmine as a staff person just check in with us from time to time has also helped [00:48:00] consolidate our ideas and moving out the process. [00:48:02] Iris: Great. And on the other hand, what would, what do you think has been difficult about the planning process?  [00:48:08] Phibi: Yeah, what's been difficult about the process is that there's actually been a lot of timeline shifts. For example, the pilot was intended to happen a one day, and then it was pushed back and then push back again. And that main thing that dragged out the process, which can be training in some context. Yeah. And then also what's been difficult is yeah, how the healing justice members involved in contributing Yeah. Cuz we weren't sure how to exactly even implement a process for folks outside of the peer counseling team in healing Justice can to support us. And it's also because, it's a novel process. It's just. Staff guided, on the side rather than a directly staff involved process. And making this part from scratch presents a lot of difficulties on the first time.  [00:48:46] Iris: Speaking on it's staff guided rather than staff involved. I think it's a, you said what do you think is the impact of that rather than that, the other way of doing it?  [00:48:56] Phibi: Yeah I think one of the positive impacts is that it takes some weight [00:49:00] off of the staff. Cause the staff carry on a lot of different responsibilities. And it helps them in that sense. And also it allows more spaciousness for different folks in the planning team to actually take on leadership in the context of makes sense for them, but passively rather than turning to the staff person for the next step, it's actually up to us to continue the process and then refer to them if we need support along the way. [00:49:19] Iris: Yeah. Great. Okay. And then, so think about the planning process question, which is, do you have any recommendations for improving the planning process? Maybe for now or for later?  [00:49:33] Phibi: Yeah, I think. Some recommendations would be to have the staff challenge us with more kinda push or challenging questions. I think I think during the time when Yuan was still the staff member for for counseling, it was someone would ask some really deep questions and I think that really helped us certify our values and also helped us stay on track. So I think times questions that challenge us I guess we wanna do this, but also , why are we doing this important? What is the meaning of it? Yeah. Yeah. And then we also kinda implementing a more formal [00:50:00] process. I think one example would be , Mocha could be a good process or just Or when we first had the pilot, when we first had the planning team set up, it's oh, we didn't actually have to have a structure. It was unstructured. And so having a more structured thing in the future would be helpful. And then also listing out all the different resources and contacts that we actually have, including different community organizations is helpful. And I guess if there's a second iteration of the peer counseling project or pilot, I guess program would be referring back to previous year's work if this could, if this goes on for multiple years yeah. [00:50:30] Iris: Yeah. Great. Okay. Next of questions to do around the sustainability of, so I know that the peer counseling team was doing a lot of work around making the process sustainable for both the planning team and the counsel. So thinking about the sustainability of this process, what do you think has worked? [00:50:48] Phibi: Yeah. Something we recently done is that we actually changed our monthly meetings from the duration of one hour to the duration of an hour and 30. And this actually allowed us to have longer checkins and actually do more relationship building. [00:51:00] Because back when we had just one hour meetings, it just felt really rushed. [00:51:03] Phibi: We had to check in super quick and then we had to do all our action items and it just felt very , limiting. And so that definit. And also recruiting more Pennington numbers definitely gave us more capacity and also more d and more experiences of folks coming in. And also having deeper and honest conversations or check-ins about the process. [00:51:21] Phibi: Where are we at? How is our capacity? Doing those type of checkings and finding the balance of , where. We should split up and do certain tasks or we should all, all come together to work on. I think that's a good balance to help those. Yeah. And so what do you think is the impact of having I guess longer and deeper, check-ins? [00:51:39] Phibi: Yeah I think having, longer check-ins allows you to settle into the space. Can be coming from anything before. And so I haven't had a deeper check in can be more real about what, where is your capacity at? And what can you more realistically take on? Yeah. [00:51:52] Phibi: All right. So thinking about the sustainability of this process again, what do you think could be done to make this [00:52:00] process more sustainable? Yeah. To make this process more sustainable? I'd say having a more solidified structure and action plan, and also making sure that we all feel really grounded in our values. And then also I check in on those values, do they still feel good? Do we change? Do we change anything? Add anything. And. Lesson that we learned was , you really have to do relationship building early on. . And it's you can't just put just the work first because then everyone will burn out. If you only do work, you need to check the balance. I wish. And something that we experimented with was working sessions. So outside of the meetings have additional time just to just chill and also do work and also just get to know each other. [00:52:36] Iris: Okay. Let's see. So next one, next set of questions is about the training content. What is thinking about the training content, is there anything that you think has worked really well in terms of the training that the counselors have been given and the peer counseling team has created? [00:52:53] Phibi: For the training content, we actually leaned a lot in the different community organizations that were in contact with. For example, the Asian [00:53:00] American peer counseling. We pulled some of their readings from the reading library to help us do work to figure out what the readings for the counselors. We both found their library and also with Project let's we we're in contact with them and we able to purchase the training for the ERs and also invite Stephanie from project lets to do a debrief, which is really nice. But also cost the budget too. And so for costed money as well. [00:53:22] Phibi: So having a balance of something that would cost money and also something that would be free as well, such as Asian American food concert, the time and also. Having a good mix of experiences and knowledge from the depend team. I know that some other folks are , they've done peer counseling before, or they even are therapists in training. [00:53:37] Iris: That's really important. Makes sense. Little more project labs this outside. And what it aepc those outside organizations that you've worked with. What do you think is an impact of kinda outsourcing some of that training to other organizations rather than having peer counsel team develop everything on their own? [00:53:54] Phibi: Yeah, I think impact one of the financial aspect of oh, you have to pay a good amount for project lots. And also but it did [00:54:00] also take some. Some pressure off of the team to to do more of  [00:54:03] Phibi: for example, I think crisis training is difficult and so I think having outsourcing that made things a lot easier. And working with folks who , have had real, hands on experience in the field before, which is why I'll talk about outsourcing think was helpful. We do have a balance. [00:54:17] Phibi: We have. Training session. That's just us. Yeah. [00:54:20] Iris: Okay. And then is there any additional training that you think maybe would've been helpful to include? Or it would be helpful to include in the future? Yeah.  [00:54:30] Phibi: Oh, and then I actually have one more answer for the previous question as well.  [00:54:33] Iris: Sorry. Yeah. Go for it. [00:54:34] Phibi: Yeah. And then also outsourcing to other organizations helps build relationships, with the other organizations too, for example, Asian American for counseling, they actually I think they were in the process trying to help other organizations start for counseling. And so it was kinda mutually beneficial and it didn't feel transactional and I felt I genuine to do this with them. And then to go back to the current question about what additional training would be helpful yeah, I think rather than outsourcing to have a [00:55:00] direct hands on training us with knowledge that we have I think that would be cool. And then also some somatic training or for example, How do you self-regulate your body when you're triggered? Those type of practices meditation or movement, I think those can help dreams.  [00:55:13] Iris: Awesome. Great. Okay. And these are the last set of questions. And this is thinking about the future of the program. So first do you think we should continue the program? What would the impact be if we did or if we didn't? [00:55:26] Phibi: I think we should continue the program. I think the only limiting factor is budget for training and just fast of the planning team at the time. I think, excuse me, I think it's hard to gauge how future peer counseling programs would be , because this palette took more than. I think two years to implement. And so for example, the next one would just be , it would just be ready to go probably a year, less than a year, season for example. And so it would take less time to do it. And so it would actually would be easier to continue the program I think cause we have the foundation already set up and would just be revising over time. [00:55:58] Phibi: I think in terms of more specific [00:56:00] impact, we'd be. We to get to train more and more folks at Lavender Phoenix. And it could even be in a similar way to how there's seasonal fundraising where folks get trained every season ish. And so eventually, if folks wanted to, good number of folks at Lavender Phoenix could be trained in prayer counseling at some point, which is really cool. And also it helps us meet our healing justice goal. And it also accomplish the task of Supporting community members along the way. [00:56:25] Iris: Awesome. Ok. And then my last question is, do you have any recommendations for continuing this program beyond the pilot?  [00:56:33] Iris: Yeah. Yeah, I think as I said, the seasonal format probably be good. But the key difference would. This pilot actually only has one session with a participant. But in the future, I think it would be great to have more than one session, multiple sessions. And impact of that would be , they see their pre more often or Yeah, more than once. Yeah, because you can't just settle everything in just one session. Usually that consistency is really helpful for folks.  [00:56:54] Iris: Yeah. Okay. Do you have anything else that you would to say? Any of these questions?  [00:56:59] Iris: I'm good.  [00:56:59] Iris: [00:57:00] Awesome. Okay, then will stop the right now. That concludes our episode if you want to organize alongside lavender Phoenix, you can join us. Follow us at L a V p H O E N I X laugh Phoenix on Instagram and find us at lavender, phoenix.org. [00:57:19]  Miko Lee: Thank you so much for joining us. Please check out our website, kpfa.org backslash program, backslash apex express to find out more about the show tonight and to find out how you can take direct action. We thank all of you listeners out there. Keep resisting, keep organizing, keep creating and sharing your visions with the world. Your voices are important. Apex express is produced by Miko Lee Jalena Keane-Lee and Paige Chung and special editing by Swati Rayasam. Thank you so much to the KPFA staff for their support have a great night.  Apex express Asian Pacific expression. Unity and cultural coverage, [00:58:00] music and calendar,  The post APEX Express – 11.24.22 Lavender Phoenix's Peer Counseling Program by and for Trans Nonbinary Asian Pacific Islander people appeared first on KPFA.

The Negotiation
Arnault Castel Part 1 | The Coolest Store In Hong Kong

The Negotiation

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2022 49:11


This episode of The Negotiation features part 1 of our conversation with Arnault Castel. Arnault is the founder of Kapok, a retail experience that focuses on designers and brands whose work provides quality craftsmanship and creativity in design. Arnault has developed an extensive knowledge and understanding of the Asian consumer goods and retail environment since 1996 when he moved to Hong Kong from France. In 2001, he joined the team in charge of the development of the Lomography brand in Asia as the head of Southeast Asian operations. Arnault was also the co-owner and director of Working Unit Limited founded in 2005, the exclusive distributor for the Moleskine brand in Southeast Asia.In today's episode, Arnault tells us what brought him to Hong Kong, what made him start Kapok, his curated ecosystem and why customers keep coming back. We also talk about price positioning in the market, how distribution and merchandising happen and the importance of having an entertaining shopping experience for customers. Tune in for more! Topics Discussed and Key Points: What brought Arnault to Hong Kong  The Kapok identity and customer base Why do customers return to Kapok? Arnault's curated ecosystem Price positioning Geography and culture's impact on Kapok's identity Why the shopping experience for customers has to be entertaining Why it's necessary to have both online and offline stores as a brand Online shopping's introduction in 2006 and its effects on Arnault's businesses Characteristics of successful brands in Asia  Timestamps [00:07] Who is Arnault Castel?[01:22] How Arnault ended up in Hong Kong[04:09] A little bit about Kapok and what it does[04:44] What makes someone a Kapok customer?[06:10] The reasons behind repeat purchases of Kapok's products[10:03] What criteria does Arnault use to select the products and brands for his carefully curated ecosystem?[12:49] What does it mean to Arnault to “not be Kapok”?[19:41] How have geography and culture shaped Kapok's identity?[22:53] Kapok's customer loyalty in the APAC region[29:05] What is the origin of the name Kapok?[33:01] Major evolutions in the APAC region's retail market since 2006[41:07] What are some of the characteristics that cause a brand to succeed in Asia?  

Daily News Brief by TRT World
November 22, 20222

Daily News Brief by TRT World

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2022 2:18


*) Hunt for buried survivors after deadly quake hits Indonesia Rescuers continued their search for survivors after a powerful earthquake hit Indonesia's main island of Java. At least 162 people have died in Monday's magnitude 5.6 quake, which also injured thousands. The death toll is expected to rise as many remain trapped in collapsed buildings. Indonesia's President Joko Widodo said the government would hand out compensation to victims and their families. *) Türkiye neutralises 184 PKK/YPG terrorists: Defence ministry Türkiye could launch a ground operation to eliminate the terrorist threat posed by the PKK and YPG, President Recep Tayyip Erdogan has said. The statement came a day after Ankara launched an aerial operation called Claw-Sword in northern Iraq and Syria where so far, dozens of targets have been destroyed and 184 terrorists neutralised, according to the defence ministry. Three people, including a student and teacher, were also killed inside Türkiye after the terrorist group fired mortars into the southeastern city of Gaziantep. *) Malaysia's king expected to pick next prime minister In Malaysia, King Al-Sultan Abdullah is now expected to pick the next prime minister, after Saturday's election produced a hung parliament. Political parties missed a Tuesday deadline to put together alliances for a majority and present their choice for PM. The uncertainty prolongs economic and political instability in the Southeast Asian nation, which has had three prime ministers in as many years. *) Mali bans French-backed NGOs' activities — govt Mali's military government has announced a ban on the activities of NGOs, including humanitarian organisations, funded or supported by France. Mali's interim prime minister said it was in response to France's decision to stop development aid for Mali, the latest move in a worsening row between the countries. France announced the decision last week, three months after finalising its pull-out of forces from the country. *) World Cup: England off to a flyer after routing Iran 6-2 England saw a flying start to their World Cup campaign in Qatar as it won its first game against Iran 6-2. The blistering score came after the Iranian players chose not to sing the national anthem before the match, in apparent support for Mahsa Amini demonstrations that have rocked their country for the past two months. Iran coach Carlos Queiroz said the unrest in Iran had put his players under enormous strain.

Spill The Thésis
flop is temporary, slay is 4ever

Spill The Thésis

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2022 58:35


some say flop is temporary, but is slay 4ever? there's only way to find out. no clothes allowed, only your anime plush toy & tamagotchi around your neck. this is for the girlies who don't wanna speak with words, only kawaii emojis and cat sounds. u've been strong 4 so long, so now just be cute n filthy. being perceived is outdated, u just wanna be UwU. falling 4 u hardcore. just wanna go (*>﹏

Tales of Southwest Michigan's Past
The Amazing Story of Gwen Dew

Tales of Southwest Michigan's Past

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2022 40:58


A native of Albion, Michigan, Gwen Dew became a prolific writer, journalist and photographer in the late 1930's through the 1950's. She was a world traveler, and served as a Southeast Asian correspondent for the Detroit News and Newsweek Magazine in the early 1940's. In December 1941, she was in Hong Kong when the Japanese invaded, and was taken prisoner. She would spend six months as a prisoner of war until her release in June of 1942. When she returned home, despite poor health, she wrote a book on her experiences and toured the nation selling war bonds and enlightening the people on the homefront about the war. Following the war, she was the first female journalist to cover the rebuilding of Japan under MacArthur. Her story is an amazing one, and she was an amazing woman from Southwest Michigan. To hear the radio program 'Prisoner of the Japs' in full, visit: OldTimeRadioDownloads.com For more information on Michael Delaware, visit: https://www.michaeldelaware.com --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/michael-delaware/support

Unfold
Linking Wartime Trauma to Dementia in Vietnamese American Communities

Unfold

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2022 17:01


Since the fall of Saigon in 1975, more than 1.2 million Southeast Asian refugees have resettled in the U.S. Many of them have experienced significant trauma. Now, many Vietnamese refugees in the U.S. are at ages where they're beginning to develop dementia. But like other underrepresented groups in the U.S, they also face barriers to seeking treatment for trauma and dementia.  In this episode of Unfold, we talk to a UC Davis researcher embarking on the first long-term study examining early life contributors to dementia in Vietnamese communities.   In this episode: Oanh Meyer, social psychologist at Alzheimer's Disease Center at UC Davis Health Duy Nguyen, former child refugee from Vietnam, recent graduate of UC Davis School of Medicine and psychiatry resident at UCSF Fresno

RNZ: Checkpoint
Ardern in Vietnam after ASEAN summit in Cambodia

RNZ: Checkpoint

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2022 6:05


The Cambodian Prime Minister's tested positive for Covid after meeting and greeting world leaders including Jacinda Ardern and US President Joe Biden at the ASEAN Summit in Phnom Penh. Ardern is on a week long South East Asian trip for security and regional summits - with a heavy focus on trade. She's now moved on to Vietnam. RNZ business editor Gyles Beckford is on the trip.