Podcasts about IP

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  • 5,213PODCASTS
  • 16,462EPISODES
  • 36mAVG DURATION
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  • Jan 26, 2022LATEST

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Best podcasts about IP

Show all podcasts related to ip

Latest podcast episodes about IP

I Hate It But I Love It
259: Wild Things

I Hate It But I Love It

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 26, 2022 53:38


To close out Erotic Thriller Month, we're discussing Wild Things! Kat and Jocelyn discuss double standards (OH, so you can show girls making out, but no boys making out?), surprise appearance by Kevin Bacon's bepis, and reminisce about one of the worst boy band songs of all time. Today's episode brought to you in part by Nutrafol. Nutrafol helps you take control of hair growth, it is formulated with potent botanicals to help you grow hair as strong as you are. And it's physician-formulated to be one hundred percent drug-free. For free shipping and $15 off head to www.Nutrafol.com and use promo code LOVE. For hair as strong as you are. This episode brought to you in part by Surfshark. Change your virtual location, bypass censorship, mask your IP address, and stay safe using Surfshark VPN. Go to www.surfshark.deals/love  and use promo code LOVE to get 83% off plus 3 extra months for free! This episode is brought to you in part by Little Spoon. A one stop shop for healthy, easy mealtime and snacktime for your baby, toddler and big kid, delivered right to your door. With kids meals under $5 and baby food under $3. Get 50% OFF your first order with the code LOVE at check out at www.littlespoon.com  IHIBILI Logo by Cubbyhole Studio www.cubbyhole.studio Produced by Andrew Ivimey as part of The From Superheroes Network. Visit www.FromSuperheroes.com for more podcasts, articles, YouTube series, web comics, and more.

Podcast Unlocked
Our Dream Xbox-Activision Collabs + Who Should Xbox Buy Next?

Podcast Unlocked

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 26, 2022 58:39


We can't stop thinking about last week's landmark Xbox acquisition of Activision-Blizzard, so on this week's podcast, we're talking about A) Who Microsoft might strategically target for acquisition next, and B) our dream Xbox-Bethesda-Activision-Blizzard project collaborations and IP revivals. Plus: Respawn announces THREE new Star Wars games, and more!

IP...Frequently
Ep. 118 - Cows, Octopuses, and Sleepy Chickens

IP...Frequently

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 25, 2022 61:25


It's a veritable menagerie on this episode of IP...Frequently. David and Brad discuss 3-eyed cows, octopus rights, and a #trending culinary delicacy known as 'Sleepy Chicken'.

Franck Ferrand raconte...
L'arrivée de la couronne d'épines

Franck Ferrand raconte...

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 25, 2022 22:43


Lorsque l'empereur latin de Constantinople propose à Louis IX de lui confier l'a Sainte Couronne, s'organiste le voyage de la plus grande relique de la Chrétienté. Mention légales : Vos données de connexion, dont votre adresse IP, sont traités par Radio Classique, responsable de traitement, sur la base de son intérêt légitime, par l'intermédiaire de son sous-traitant Ausha, à des fins de réalisation de statistiques agréées et de lutte contre la fraude. Ces données sont supprimées en temps réel pour la finalité statistique et sous cinq mois à compter de la collecte à des fins de lutte contre la fraude. Pour plus d'informations sur les traitements réalisés par Radio Classique et exercer vos droits, consultez notre Politique de confidentialité.

Franck Ferrand raconte...
Bloody Sunday

Franck Ferrand raconte...

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 24, 2022 21:10


A l'initiative d'un jeune député, Ivan Cooper, des Catholiques d'Irlande du Nord se sont assemblés pour une grande manifestation pacifiste anti-anglaise. La situation dégénère, et c'est un bain de sang : le Bloody Sunday. C'était le 30 janvier 1972, il y a 50 ans… Mention légales : Vos données de connexion, dont votre adresse IP, sont traités par Radio Classique, responsable de traitement, sur la base de son intérêt légitime, par l'intermédiaire de son sous-traitant Ausha, à des fins de réalisation de statistiques agréées et de lutte contre la fraude. Ces données sont supprimées en temps réel pour la finalité statistique et sous cinq mois à compter de la collecte à des fins de lutte contre la fraude. Pour plus d'informations sur les traitements réalisés par Radio Classique et exercer vos droits, consultez notre Politique de confidentialité.

Xbox Expansion Pass
Xbox Expansion Pass 116: Microsoft Buys Activision | Guest: Captain Logun

Xbox Expansion Pass

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 24, 2022 65:21


In episode 116 of the Xbox Expansion Pass we Captain Logun of The Xbox Wrap-Up on to discuss the $69 billion purchase of Activision by Microsoft. With Xbox now boasting over 30 studios and double that in IP the possibilities are endless. Join us and enjoy! The Xbox Expansion Pass (XEP) is a podcast dedicated to interpreting the goings on in the world of video games and analyzing how they impact the Xbox ecosystem. Luke Lohr, the InsipidGhost, plays host and discusses various topics throughout the industry. The guests on the show are meant to help gamers expand their knowledge of the gaming industry. Twitter: InsipidGhost Contact: InsipidGhost@gmail.com Please consider leaving a review on iTunes or Spotify. It is the best way to support the show. Thank you!

Sharon Kleyne Hour
Encore My Harvesting Intangible Assets

Sharon Kleyne Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 24, 2022 55:37


Author Andrew J. Sherman shares insights and expertise gleaned from his work with some of the world's leading companies who have capitalized on intellectual assets such as patents, trademarks, customer information, software codes, databases, business models, home-grown processes, and employee expertise. Featuring instructive examples from organizations including Proctor & Gamble, IBM, and Google, Harvesting Intangible Assets reveals how companies large or small can uncover their intellectual property rights that are hiding just below the strategic surface. You'll learn how to implement IP-driven growth and licensing strategies, foster a culture of innovation, turn research and development into revenue, and maximize your company's profits. Smart companies reap what they sow.

Tentpole Trauma
The Lone Ranger

Tentpole Trauma

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 24, 2022 70:03


Attempting to capitalize on Johnny Depp and Disney's Pirates of the Caribbean heat with a fresh take on a classic western IP probably seemed like a good idea back in 2013. Add to that rising star and cannibal fetishist Armie Hammer as a co-lead and what could possibly go wrong kemosabe? Join Sebastian and Jennifer as they climb aboard Gore Verbinski's 250 million dollar box office trainwreck and peek under the mask of The Lone Ranger.

Sacred Symbols: A PlayStation Podcast
#186: A Very Stupid Arms Race

Sacred Symbols: A PlayStation Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 24, 2022 209:00


Microsoft -- as it's wont to do -- just went and spent a bunch of money on a publisher. But this is no ordinary publisher or forgettable amount of money: By buying Activision-Blizzard for a record $68.7 billion, Xbox now controls some of the industry's most vital IP and studios, including the king of them all, Call of Duty, and its constellation of developers, including Infinity Ward and Treyarch. Yet, Microsoft's bullish move will likely set off an even-further damaging series of mergers and acquisitions that remove risk for certainty and eliminates creativity for volume. It amounts to a very stupid arms race that everyone else will be compelled to compete in, whether they want to or not, and there's only one entity to blame. Then: Release dates for Ghostwire Tokyo, LEGO Star Wars: The Skywalker Saga, and WWE 2K22 have emerged, God of War does big numbers on PC, Sony renews trademarks related to defunct first party team Psygnosis, and more. Then: Listener inquiries! What's our temperature on Horizon: Forbidden West less than a month away from launch? Are we not keeping an open enough mind when it comes to the possibilities of gaming NFTs? Will Sony botch the little things that could make Project Spartacus shine? Is David Jaffe more attractive than Colin Moriarty? Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

那些電影教我的事
ep250 - 幸福到連鬼都討厭:鬼滅之刃音柱教你成為人生勝利組

那些電影教我的事

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 23, 2022 35:53


重點摘要: 1. IP介紹 2. 遊郭篇故事背景 3. 華麗的音柱 4. 悲慘的妓夫太郎 5. 哪種方式適合自己? 遊郭篇最多人問的7大問題:https://youtu.be/CQU8UUuDWCA 你也可以在這裡找到《那些電影教我的事》: FB:www.facebook.com/lessonsfrommovies IG:www.instagram.com/lessonsfrommovies/ YT:bit.ly/2wOTHd8 LINE:@lessonsfrommovies 合作洽談:shuimou@gmail.com 《那些電影教我的事》,在FaceBook、Instagram專頁,以及YouTube頻道上共有300萬名訂閱者。是由一對夫妻水尢與水某,共同經營的影視評論自媒體。每週更新電影、影集、動漫等等內容帶給兩人的啟發。

Franck Ferrand raconte...
[Rediffusion] Rose Delaunay à la Bastille

Franck Ferrand raconte...

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 23, 2022 24:40


Les murs de la Bastille, sous l'Ancien Régime, ont enseveli bien des secrets ; parmi eux : la curieuse et poignante histoire d'amour de Rose Delaunay, incarcérée sous la Régence. Mention légales : Vos données de connexion, dont votre adresse IP, sont traités par Radio Classique, responsable de traitement, sur la base de son intérêt légitime, par l'intermédiaire de son sous-traitant Ausha, à des fins de réalisation de statistiques agréées et de lutte contre la fraude. Ces données sont supprimées en temps réel pour la finalité statistique et sous cinq mois à compter de la collecte à des fins de lutte contre la fraude. Pour plus d'informations sur les traitements réalisés par Radio Classique et exercer vos droits, consultez notre Politique de confidentialité.

Defining Duke: An Xbox Podcast
Xbox Has Acquired Activision Blizzard

Defining Duke: An Xbox Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 23, 2022 201:43


For the long time Defining Duke listeners, we all know you have been waiting for a week like this. A time where a major haymaker is delivered by Microsoft and we can break it all down together. For the staggering price of $68.7 billion, Xbox has acquired publisher Activision and with it come a slew of development teams and IP that we're not quite sure even they know what to do with. Beyond inheriting a plethora of potential exclusive games and bolstering Game Pass, Xbox takes in damaged goods. Activision is far from squeaky clean as they have suffered from toxic workplace conditions for years with a leader at the top willing to purchase two companies with game's media in an effort to steer the narrative away from such a truth. It's ugly and there's a lot of tendrils to this conversation. Games, exclusives, monopoly, mobile gaming, and so much more. It's time to talk about about the industry's most historic acquisition yet in what will be a series of many from the hungry competitor moving forward. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Tech Guy (MP3)
Leo Laporte - The Tech Guy: 1861

The Tech Guy (MP3)

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 23, 2022 163:10


How to log and print an SMS conversation, updating older PCs to Windows 11, correcting the geolocation for an IP address, upgrading to a new Mac Mini, using a YubiKey from Yubico, changing the layout for Outlook, converting images to SVGs, finding a Chromebook that supports USB printing, understanding the difference between different types of audio cables, and finding a better cellular carrier for frequent travel. Plus, conversations with Johnny Jet and Dick Debartolo. Cryptocurrencies tumble, with bitcoin falling 15% and ether down 20% | CNBC El Salvador's plan to create the first Bitcoin-powered nation is tanking the economy—and is a mess by every measure | Fortune Twitter NFT for Twitter Blue | Twitter The IRS will soon make you use facial recognition to access your taxes online | The Verge IRS Will Soon Require Selfies for Online Access | Krebs on Security iMazing EaseUS How to use the PC Health Check app | Microsoft YouTube TV Will Stream 2022 Winter Olympics in 4K | Cord Cutters News Some Roku smart TVs are now showing banner ads over live TV | Ars Technica Correct a GeoIP Location | MaxMind IP Address Location Incorrect | WhatIsMyIP.com American VPN, Alaska VPNs | American VPN Mac Mini 2022 — everything we know so far | Tom's Guide Semiconductor Shortage Forces Canon to Dump Toner Copy Protection Chips | Tom's Hardware Meet the YubiKey | Yubico Advanced Protection Program | Google Warning: Domestic Airfares Will Increase 7% Each Month So Buy Your 2022 Flights Now | Johnny Jet Crystal Cruises temporarily halts sailings due to bankruptcy: What you need to know | USA Today FBI says crooks are using fake QR codes to steal money | CNN Don't assume every COVID-19 test site is legit | FTC Get free at-home COVID-⁠19 tests | USPS Create, change, or customize a view | Microsoft Vector Magic Being Mortal: Medicine and What Matters in the End | Atul Gawande Google is shutting down Cloud Print this week | Engadget (2020) Set up your printer | Chromebook Help PodTrak P4 | Zoom BTA-2 Bluetooth Adapter for PodTrak Recorders | Zoom Google Fi Just when I thought there was no coffee maker type left for me to try, I find a new one! | The Giz Wiz Host: Leo Laporte Guests: Scott Wilkinson, Johnny Jet, and Dick DeBartolo Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Show notes and links for this episode are available at: https://twit.tv/shows/the-tech-guy/episodes/1861 Download or subscribe to this show at: https://twit.tv/shows/the-tech-guy

The Tech Guy (Video HI)
Leo Laporte - The Tech Guy: 1861

The Tech Guy (Video HI)

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 23, 2022 163:56


How to log and print an SMS conversation, updating older PCs to Windows 11, correcting the geolocation for an IP address, upgrading to a new Mac Mini, using a YubiKey from Yubico, changing the layout for Outlook, converting images to SVGs, finding a Chromebook that supports USB printing, understanding the difference between different types of audio cables, and finding a better cellular carrier for frequent travel. Plus, conversations with Johnny Jet and Dick Debartolo. Cryptocurrencies tumble, with bitcoin falling 15% and ether down 20% | CNBC El Salvador's plan to create the first Bitcoin-powered nation is tanking the economy—and is a mess by every measure | Fortune Twitter NFT for Twitter Blue | Twitter The IRS will soon make you use facial recognition to access your taxes online | The Verge IRS Will Soon Require Selfies for Online Access | Krebs on Security iMazing EaseUS How to use the PC Health Check app | Microsoft YouTube TV Will Stream 2022 Winter Olympics in 4K | Cord Cutters News Some Roku smart TVs are now showing banner ads over live TV | Ars Technica Correct a GeoIP Location | MaxMind IP Address Location Incorrect | WhatIsMyIP.com American VPN, Alaska VPNs | American VPN Mac Mini 2022 — everything we know so far | Tom's Guide Semiconductor Shortage Forces Canon to Dump Toner Copy Protection Chips | Tom's Hardware Meet the YubiKey | Yubico Advanced Protection Program | Google Warning: Domestic Airfares Will Increase 7% Each Month So Buy Your 2022 Flights Now | Johnny Jet Crystal Cruises temporarily halts sailings due to bankruptcy: What you need to know | USA Today FBI says crooks are using fake QR codes to steal money | CNN Don't assume every COVID-19 test site is legit | FTC Get free at-home COVID-⁠19 tests | USPS Create, change, or customize a view | Microsoft Vector Magic Being Mortal: Medicine and What Matters in the End | Atul Gawande Google is shutting down Cloud Print this week | Engadget (2020) Set up your printer | Chromebook Help PodTrak P4 | Zoom BTA-2 Bluetooth Adapter for PodTrak Recorders | Zoom Google Fi Just when I thought there was no coffee maker type left for me to try, I find a new one! | The Giz Wiz Host: Leo Laporte Guests: Scott Wilkinson, Johnny Jet, and Dick DeBartolo Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Show notes and links for this episode are available at: https://twit.tv/shows/the-tech-guy/episodes/1861 Download or subscribe to this show at: https://twit.tv/shows/the-tech-guy

All TWiT.tv Shows (MP3)
The Tech Guy 1861

All TWiT.tv Shows (MP3)

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 23, 2022 163:10


How to log and print an SMS conversation, updating older PCs to Windows 11, correcting the geolocation for an IP address, upgrading to a new Mac Mini, using a YubiKey from Yubico, changing the layout for Outlook, converting images to SVGs, finding a Chromebook that supports USB printing, understanding the difference between different types of audio cables, and finding a better cellular carrier for frequent travel. Plus, conversations with Johnny Jet and Dick Debartolo. Cryptocurrencies tumble, with bitcoin falling 15% and ether down 20% | CNBC El Salvador's plan to create the first Bitcoin-powered nation is tanking the economy—and is a mess by every measure | Fortune Twitter NFT for Twitter Blue | Twitter The IRS will soon make you use facial recognition to access your taxes online | The Verge IRS Will Soon Require Selfies for Online Access | Krebs on Security iMazing EaseUS How to use the PC Health Check app | Microsoft YouTube TV Will Stream 2022 Winter Olympics in 4K | Cord Cutters News Some Roku smart TVs are now showing banner ads over live TV | Ars Technica Correct a GeoIP Location | MaxMind IP Address Location Incorrect | WhatIsMyIP.com American VPN, Alaska VPNs | American VPN Mac Mini 2022 — everything we know so far | Tom's Guide Semiconductor Shortage Forces Canon to Dump Toner Copy Protection Chips | Tom's Hardware Meet the YubiKey | Yubico Advanced Protection Program | Google Warning: Domestic Airfares Will Increase 7% Each Month So Buy Your 2022 Flights Now | Johnny Jet Crystal Cruises temporarily halts sailings due to bankruptcy: What you need to know | USA Today FBI says crooks are using fake QR codes to steal money | CNN Don't assume every COVID-19 test site is legit | FTC Get free at-home COVID-⁠19 tests | USPS Create, change, or customize a view | Microsoft Vector Magic Being Mortal: Medicine and What Matters in the End | Atul Gawande Google is shutting down Cloud Print this week | Engadget (2020) Set up your printer | Chromebook Help PodTrak P4 | Zoom BTA-2 Bluetooth Adapter for PodTrak Recorders | Zoom Google Fi Just when I thought there was no coffee maker type left for me to try, I find a new one! | The Giz Wiz Host: Leo Laporte Guests: Scott Wilkinson, Johnny Jet, and Dick DeBartolo Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Show notes and links for this episode are available at: https://twit.tv/shows/the-tech-guy/episodes/1861 Download or subscribe to this show at: https://twit.tv/episodes/latest

Radio Leo (Audio)
The Tech Guy 1861

Radio Leo (Audio)

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 23, 2022 163:10


How to log and print an SMS conversation, updating older PCs to Windows 11, correcting the geolocation for an IP address, upgrading to a new Mac Mini, using a YubiKey from Yubico, changing the layout for Outlook, converting images to SVGs, finding a Chromebook that supports USB printing, understanding the difference between different types of audio cables, and finding a better cellular carrier for frequent travel. Plus, conversations with Johnny Jet and Dick Debartolo. Cryptocurrencies tumble, with bitcoin falling 15% and ether down 20% | CNBC El Salvador's plan to create the first Bitcoin-powered nation is tanking the economy—and is a mess by every measure | Fortune Twitter NFT for Twitter Blue | Twitter The IRS will soon make you use facial recognition to access your taxes online | The Verge IRS Will Soon Require Selfies for Online Access | Krebs on Security iMazing EaseUS How to use the PC Health Check app | Microsoft YouTube TV Will Stream 2022 Winter Olympics in 4K | Cord Cutters News Some Roku smart TVs are now showing banner ads over live TV | Ars Technica Correct a GeoIP Location | MaxMind IP Address Location Incorrect | WhatIsMyIP.com American VPN, Alaska VPNs | American VPN Mac Mini 2022 — everything we know so far | Tom's Guide Semiconductor Shortage Forces Canon to Dump Toner Copy Protection Chips | Tom's Hardware Meet the YubiKey | Yubico Advanced Protection Program | Google Warning: Domestic Airfares Will Increase 7% Each Month So Buy Your 2022 Flights Now | Johnny Jet Crystal Cruises temporarily halts sailings due to bankruptcy: What you need to know | USA Today FBI says crooks are using fake QR codes to steal money | CNN Don't assume every COVID-19 test site is legit | FTC Get free at-home COVID-⁠19 tests | USPS Create, change, or customize a view | Microsoft Vector Magic Being Mortal: Medicine and What Matters in the End | Atul Gawande Google is shutting down Cloud Print this week | Engadget (2020) Set up your printer | Chromebook Help PodTrak P4 | Zoom BTA-2 Bluetooth Adapter for PodTrak Recorders | Zoom Google Fi Just when I thought there was no coffee maker type left for me to try, I find a new one! | The Giz Wiz Host: Leo Laporte Guests: Scott Wilkinson, Johnny Jet, and Dick DeBartolo Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Show notes and links for this episode are available at: https://twit.tv/shows/the-tech-guy/episodes/1861 Download or subscribe to this show at: https://twit.tv/shows/radio-leo

The Thoughtful Entrepreneur
1050 - Legally Protecting Your Business with Mohaimina Haque, PLLC

The Thoughtful Entrepreneur

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 22, 2022 15:30


In this episode of the Thoughtful Entrepreneur, your host Josh Elledge speaks to attorney at law, https://www.attorneymina.com/ (Mohaimina Haque), PLLC.  Mohaimina's law firm is a general practice firm located in Washington D.C. They represent both individuals and companies and they're a one-stop-shop and work in various legal practice areas.  Mohaimina and Josh talk about how entrepreneurs, specifically franchise owners, need to protect themselves legally. It's a heavily regulated space and before you can expand into franchising, you need to legally protect your brand and IP. Do you have your trademarks filed? In the US, you have to make sure the trademark is filed domestically and internationally. You also need to be aware of both federal and state regulatory requirements. There are many legal steps and audits involved with franchising, so prepare to seek out an attorney and check these boxes before you jump in.  Business owners need to make sure they are registered properly in their home state and any states their businesses operate in. They also need to understand franchising disclosures.  It sounds like a lot of work, and it might be for some, but this puts in place a system that protects franchises and business owners. Putting a slight barrier in place also means those entering the space really understand both the opportunities associated with franchising as well as the obstacles and logistical challenges.  Mohaimina also shares that you should consult with a trademark lawyer. There are franchise disclosure laws in the US and in foreign countries and they're not the same from place to place. Consulting a dedicated trademark attorney is one of the best ways to navigate these complex legalities.  One way to protect yourself in the legal sense when it comes to your employees – have an employee handbook available to them so everyone knows what the expectations are. Employee handbooks are also a great place to educate your employees about how they're protected by certain laws – and to educate your management team and yourself. Mohaimina also shares what she and her firm have been up to in recent months and how her work has changed over the course of the pandemic. She also plans on entering the franchising space herself and continues to offer legal support to franchise owners through her firm. She wants her clients to feel they have a trusted attorney by their side when she works with them, and she makes it easier than ever to work with her and reach her when she's needed.  Interested in learning more about Mohaimina's work? Contact the Law Office of Mohaimina Haque, PLLC at https://www.attorneymina.com/contact-us (https://www.attorneymina.com/contact-us).  Check out the Law Office of Mohaimina Haque, PLLC at https://www.attorneymina.com/ (https://www.attorneymina.com/).  Check out Mohaimina Haque, PLLC on LinkedIn at https://www.linkedin.com/in/minahaque/ (https://www.linkedin.com/in/minahaque/).  Don't forget to subscribe to The Thoughtful Entrepreneur and thank you for listening. Tune in next time! More from UpMyInfluence: ✅ We are actively booking guests for our DAILY Entrepreneur Success Podcast.https://upmyinfluence.com/guest ( Schedule HERE). ✅ Are you a 6-figure consultant? Let us fill your sales schedule and move you to 7-figures.https://upmyinfluence.com/b2b ( Learn more here). ✅ Check out our freehttps://upmyinfluence.com/1 ( Authority Transformation Masterclass).

StarkCast
Quinton Roberts

StarkCast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 22, 2022 118:32


Welcome to Episode 101 of StarkCast! I talk with my friend and fellow podcaster Quinton Roberts. SPOILER WARNING - We get into spoiler territory in this episode about LOTS of different IP's; talking about the DCEU, Star Wars, and the MCU. Be sure to check out Quinton's podcast The Reel Zodiak! Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/starkcastpod Twitter: @TheTubbyNinja Email: starkcastpod@gmail.com Website: https://media.zencast.fm/starkcast StarkCast Intro & Outro Music by James Wetzel This podcast is powered by ZenCast.fm

Franck Ferrand raconte...
[Rediffusion] La dépouille de Saint-Louis

Franck Ferrand raconte...

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 22, 2022 22:24


C'est près de Tunis, à l'été 1270, qu'est mort le roi Louis IX (saint Louis). Pour ses compagnons d'armes, un grand défi se présente : ramener en France les restes du souverain. Mention légales : Vos données de connexion, dont votre adresse IP, sont traités par Radio Classique, responsable de traitement, sur la base de son intérêt légitime, par l'intermédiaire de son sous-traitant Ausha, à des fins de réalisation de statistiques agréées et de lutte contre la fraude. Ces données sont supprimées en temps réel pour la finalité statistique et sous cinq mois à compter de la collecte à des fins de lutte contre la fraude. Pour plus d'informations sur les traitements réalisés par Radio Classique et exercer vos droits, consultez notre Politique de confidentialité.

The Cloud Pod
148: The Cloud Pod Siemplify's Our First Recording of 2022

The Cloud Pod

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 21, 2022 53:40


On The Cloud Pod this week, Peter finally gets to share his top announcements of 2021. Plus, Google increases security with Siemplify, Azure updates Defender, and AWS comes into the new year with a lot of changes. A big thanks to this week's sponsors: Foghorn Consulting, which provides full-stack cloud solutions with a focus on strategy, planning, and execution for enterprises seeking to take advantage of the transformative capabilities of AWS, Google Cloud, and Azure. This week's highlights

8-4 Play
8-4 Play 1/21/2022: STATE OF THE ARSE

8-4 Play

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 21, 2022 93:52


Mostly news, and okay, yes, we do talk about Microsoft buying Activision, but only in the sense of who we plan to main in the inevitable upcoming Super Smash Dude Bros. IP crossover franchise. Otherwise: PSVR 2, AGDQ, and the Nintendo hotel. Time – Topic Discussed: 01:38 – Nicknames 18:02 – OCTOPATH TRAVELER 32:01 – News: Playstation VR2, E3's Online Only Announcement, Microsoft & Activision, and more! 1:19:06 – ***RESIDENT EVIL: VILLAGE SPOILERS*** 1:23:01 – ***END RESIDENT EVIL: VILLAGE SPOILERS***

Franck Ferrand raconte...
La mort de Molière - Collection Molière

Franck Ferrand raconte...

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 21, 2022 22:30


La Comédie-Française célèbre cela une année sur deux : le 17 février 1673, mourrait l'un des plus grands hommes du théâtre français, Molière. Mention légales : Vos données de connexion, dont votre adresse IP, sont traités par Radio Classique, responsable de traitement, sur la base de son intérêt légitime, par l'intermédiaire de son sous-traitant Ausha, à des fins de réalisation de statistiques agréées et de lutte contre la fraude. Ces données sont supprimées en temps réel pour la finalité statistique et sous cinq mois à compter de la collecte à des fins de lutte contre la fraude. Pour plus d'informations sur les traitements réalisés par Radio Classique et exercer vos droits, consultez notre Politique de confidentialité.

This Creative Life with Sara Zarr
Ep 78: Preeti Chhibber

This Creative Life with Sara Zarr

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2022 52:24


I'm so excited to kick off 2022 with my conversation with Preeti Chhibber, a multitalented lady with just the energy we need to help take us into a new year. Preeti is an author, podcaster, speaker, and all-around badass who has published multiple IP projects as well as her original work. In this episode, we talk about how she got started in IP and what it takes to succeed in that world, managing a many-tentacled freelance career, and the risks and rewards of stating what you want to the world. Theme music by Dave Connis. This podcast is ad-free. Find out how to support it here. Thank you!

How I Grew This
Chief Growth Officer at Tilting Point: Jean-Sebastien Laverge - Driving Growth in the Gaming Industry

How I Grew This

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2022 24:06


Jean-Sebastien Laverge, the Chief Growth Officer at Tilting Point, joins us in the next episode of How I Grew This podcast. As a CGO, JS oversees more than forty game titles. Before Tilting Point, he worked for twelve years at Gameloft, where he helped generate significant annual revenues by developing retention and monetization strategies. Tilting Point is a leading award-winning free-to-play games publisher that empowers independent developers to accelerate their growth. It started as a premium game publisher then shifted to the freemium model. The team has now built a new model called progressive publishing. Some of the company's most successful games include Star Trek Timelines, Warhammer: Chaos & Conquest, and SpongeBob: Krusty Cook-Off. Tilting Point approaches growth in three directions. Firstly, paid growth, which is about user acquisition. Secondly, organic growth includes ASO, distribution platform optimization, IP integration, and marketing buzz. And lastly, monetization growth improves the user's LTV. Some of the most impactful paid channels remain Facebook and Google. When you synchronize the three axes you can unlock maximum growth for your game. According to JS, to engage and bring people back into the game, you can advertise specific offers or push notifications and emails. If you want to start in the gaming industry, you need to be passionate about it, be analytical, and understand data and statistics. If you are a leader in the gaming industry, be transparent and find good talent to help and support you.

Franck Ferrand raconte...
L'autre Molière - Collection Molière

Franck Ferrand raconte...

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2022 25:31


Dans un roman très inspiré, L'Autre de Molière, Eve de Castro rend sensible la collaboration supposée entre un vieux poète, Pierre Corneille, et le jeune comédien et chef de troupe Poquelin. Et si le pacte secret de ces deux génies avait donné naissance à l'œuvre dite « de Molière » ? Mention légales : Vos données de connexion, dont votre adresse IP, sont traités par Radio Classique, responsable de traitement, sur la base de son intérêt légitime, par l'intermédiaire de son sous-traitant Ausha, à des fins de réalisation de statistiques agréées et de lutte contre la fraude. Ces données sont supprimées en temps réel pour la finalité statistique et sous cinq mois à compter de la collecte à des fins de lutte contre la fraude. Pour plus d'informations sur les traitements réalisés par Radio Classique et exercer vos droits, consultez notre Politique de confidentialité.

Entertainment(x)
Dan Looney Part 2 ”Don't Be a Di*khead”

Entertainment(x)

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2022 28:37


Dan Looney (TW:@dan_looney)(IG:@dan.looney)(LI:@dan-looney)is a founder of the DLAP Group which is an award-winning corporation focusing on commercial entertainment across the globe. Comprised of ten subsidiary companies: DLAP Production, DLAP Management, DLAP Accountancy, DLAP Programming, DLAP Venues, DLAP Tickets, DLAP Agency, Creative Rights International, Fourth Wall Live and Ace Pantomimes. The company has won four Olivier awards for its co-production of Stephen Sondheim's musical, Company at the Gielgud Theatre in London's West End. It also received the Best Musical Award at the 2019 Deagu International Musical Festival in South Korea for their production of The Wedding Singer. DLAP produced the world premiere stage adaptation of The Last King of Scotland, based on the award-winning novel by Giles Foden (Sheffield Crucible Theatre) and the UK premiere of Kander and Ebb's musical-whodunnit, Curtains, starring Jason Manford (UK Tour and Wyndham's Theatre, West End) as well as The Last Five Years (Garrick Theatre, West End). DLAP's hit production of the 80's rock musical Rock of Ages toured the UK and Berlin in 2018-2019 and is currently playing on its second major UK Tour. DLAP has also produced the 30th Anniversary production of Fame! the musical on tour in the UK, internationally and in the West End (Peacock Theatre), as well as The Wedding Singer on tour in the UK throughout 2017 and at the Wembley Park Theatre in London in 2020, starring Strictly Come Dancing's Kevin Clifton. The company produced the legendary Broadway star, Chita Rivera Live in Concert at Cadogan Hall in 2019 and Phantom of the Opera In Concert at Beau Sejour, Guernsey. In 2020, DLAP launched a major new IP acquisition and development company, Creative Rights International, backed by venture capitalist Patrick Bradley of Station12 and in paertnership with InFine Theatre. The company controls a large portfolio of theatre, film and TV IP which it exploits globally. DLAP formed a new live events and concerts company, Fourth Wall Live, with renowned concert producer, Darren Bell. Fourth Wall produced the Live in London season at the London Hippodrome Casino in December 2019. 2021/22 concerts include Bonnie & Clyde In Concert (Theatre Royal Drury Lane), The Greatest Showman's Keala Settle as well as Shoshana Bean, Jenna Russell and Jessica Vosk (all at London's Cadogan Hall). DLAP most recently formed Ace Pantomimes with seasoned pantomime producers, Immersion Theatre.

I Hate It But I Love It
258: Disclosure

I Hate It But I Love It

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 60:01


Continuing Erotic Thriller Month, we're talking about Disclosure! Kat and Jocelyn discuss Michael Douglas's mullet, how the sex scene resembles two Pepe Le Pews, and a truly fascinating depiction of VR. This episode brought to you in part by Best Fiends. If you're looking for a fun game to pass the time while engaging your brain and enjoying breathtaking visuals and a gripping story, your answer is Best Fiends. Engage your brain with fun puzzles and collect tons of cute characters. With over 100 million downloads, this 5-star rated mobile puzzle game is a must play! Download the 5 star-rated puzzle game, Best Fiends FREE today on the App Store or Google Play. This episode brought to you in part by Surfshark. Change your virtual location, bypass censorship, mask your IP address, and stay safe using Surfshark VPN. Go to www.surfshark.deals/love  and use promo code LOVE to get 83% off plus 3 extra months for free! This episode brought to you in part by Jenni Kayne. Curated, stylish staples that work with everything in your closet. Adding Jenni Kayne to your wardrobe will instantly make you the best-dressed version of yourself. Find your forever pieces at www.jennikayne.com and get 15% off your first order when you use code LOVEIT at checkout. This episode brought to you in part by Green Chef. Green Chef is USDA certified organic company that makes eating well easy and affordable with plans to fit every kind of lifestyle. They deliver premium ingredients and easy recipes to cook delicious dinners in about 30 minutes. Each box includes new recipes from the meal plan of your choice such as; Keto, Paleo, Vegan, and Vegetarian. For $130 off your first month plus free shipping, go to www.greenchef.com/love130 and use promo code LOVE130 at checkout. IHIBILI Logo by Cubbyhole Studio www.cubbyhole.studio Produced by Andrew Ivimey as part of The From Superheroes Network. Visit www.FromSuperheroes.com for more podcasts, articles, YouTube series, web comics, and more.

Yo soy un Gamer
Microsoft adquirirá a Activision Blizzard para mejorar su catálogo de juegos, dominar en PC, juegos móviles, eSports y el metaverse

Yo soy un Gamer

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 8:44


Lo Más Caliente | 19 de enero del 2022 – Microsoft adquirirá a Activision Blizzard para mejorar su catálogo de juegos, dominar en PC, juegos móviles, eSports y el metaverse Puedes escuchar “Lo Más Caliente” de Yo soy un Gamer en: Apple Podcast, Spotify, Anchor, iHeart y GooglePodcast. Como dato adicional, Frankie López "Hambo", graba estas noticias a las 4am todos los días para que salgan en diferentes programas de radio: Molusco y Los Reyes de la Punto por la Mega 106.9FM @lamegapr (Puerto Rico), El Jukeo por Urbana 103.5FM/103.7FM @eljukeodeurbana (Orlando/Kissimmee) y El Flow por Mix 98.3FM @elflowdemiami (Miami). Fuentes: https://news.xbox.com/en-us/2022/01/18/welcoming-activision-blizzard-to-microsoft-gaming/ https://www.levelup.com/noticias/658277/Call-of-Duty-Crash-y-mas-Todas-estas-IP-de-Activision-Blizzard-seran-de-Xbox ___________________ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ Únete a nuestro Patreon y ayúdanos a crear contenido awesome: https://www.patreon.com/yosoyungamer Todo sobre videojuegos en un solo lugar: https://www.yosoyungamer.com #Gaming​ #YosoyunGamer​ #Videojuegos​ #Gamer​ #PuertoRico #youtubeislife #subscriber #youtubeguru #youtubecontent #newvideo #subscribers #youtubevideo #youtub #youtuber #youtubevideos #florida #orlando #podcast --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/yosoyungamer/support

Franck Ferrand raconte...
La querelle du Tartuffe - Collection Molière

Franck Ferrand raconte...

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 24:01


De toutes les pièces de Molière, Tartuffe est celle qui aura causé le plus d'ennuis à son auteur. Interdictions répétées, querelles, règlements de compte… quand le divertissement se mêle de politique. Mention légales : Vos données de connexion, dont votre adresse IP, sont traités par Radio Classique, responsable de traitement, sur la base de son intérêt légitime, par l'intermédiaire de son sous-traitant Ausha, à des fins de réalisation de statistiques agréées et de lutte contre la fraude. Ces données sont supprimées en temps réel pour la finalité statistique et sous cinq mois à compter de la collecte à des fins de lutte contre la fraude. Pour plus d'informations sur les traitements réalisés par Radio Classique et exercer vos droits, consultez notre Politique de confidentialité.

80-Bit Podsmash
Bonus Level - Microsoft Acquired Activision?!

80-Bit Podsmash

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 55:52


Penguin & Termite digest the biggest video game industry news in possibly a decade! The gaming industry is changing in a MAJOR way. We discuss the impact on Microsoft, the impact on Activision | Blizzard, what this could mean for the future of the IP under this new umbrella, and finally - where do Penguin and Termite stand in all this? Music: Ozzed - Super Secret Tune http://ozzed.net https://linktr.ee/80bitpodsmash Resource: https://news.xbox.com/en-us/2022/01/18/welcoming-activision-blizzard-to-microsoft-gaming/?ocid=Evergreen_soc_omc_xbo_tw_Photo_lrn_1.18.1 https://www.wsj.com/articles/microsoft-to-buy-activision-blizzard-games-11642512435 https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2022-01-18/microsoft-to-buy-activision-blizzard-in-69-billion-gaming-deal https://www.theverge.com/platform/amp/2022/1/18/22889393/microsoft-gaming-ceo-phil-spencer-activision-blizzard-email

The Rebound
375: Stupid Technology Topic

The Rebound

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 45:08


Apple headset rumors are heating up. No, wait, it's the headset itself that's heating up.We have some more SE rumors to talk about.Moltz is begging you to use Wordle Quarantine.Some NFT bros either don't get how IP law works or are just laundering money like usual.Netflix is increasing its prices again.Apple is reportedly pushing back the VR headset release so it doesn't burn your head.The Netherlands is making Apple allow alternate payment methods… for dating apps.We should be getting a new iPad Air this spring.Our thanks to Harry's. Harry's crafts high-quality, long-lasting blades and durable weighted handles that make a close, comfortable shave quick and enjoyable. Go to harrys.com/rebound to get your Starter Set for just 3 bucks! Don't wait, get the shave you deserve.Our thanks as well to Wix, the leading website creation platform. Wix has all the tools you need to create, manage and grow your brand. Want to get started? Head over to wix.com and create your website today.If you want to help out the show and get some great bonus content, consider becoming a Rebound Prime member! Just go to prime.reboundcast.com to check it out!You can now also support the show by buying our EXCLUSIVE shirt! Tim says GOOOOD MORNNNNING to all listeners of The Rebound! (Prime members, check your email for a special deal on the shirt.)

Alpha Exchange
Matt Amberson, Founder, Option Research and Technology Services

Alpha Exchange

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 48:27


Matt Amberson is among those who have watched the steady and consequential evolution of the listed equity options market over the last 3 decades. Getting his start on the floor of the CBOE in the 90's, he was in the trenches during the period of incredible single stock volatility that was tied to the original tech bubble. While markets were not nearly as efficient then as they are now, Matt sought to improve his edge in trading options, seeking enhanced methods for estimating a stock's volatility and searching for instances where the market may have left value undiscovered.Using proprietary option valuation and hedging techniques, Matt backed traders who were tasked with implementing this systematic approach some 25 years ago. And while those days are past, the IP developed lives on in the form of the company founded by Matt, ORATS, Option Research and Technology Services. Throughout our conversation, we learn about the growth of the US-listed options market and how Matt and his partners have developed their data, analytics and option back-testing service. In the process, we consider risk events like GME and hear Matt's perspective on risk-management protocol in light of the increasing frequency of up-shocks in stocks.  I hope you enjoy this episode of the Alpha Exchange, my conversation with Matt Amberson.

Secrets To Scaling Online
Ep 287: 4-8x Return on Connected TVs With Michael Eraso, Gathre

Secrets To Scaling Online

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 25:52


There's no denying iOS14 hurt our ability to track our customers, but did you know there's a way around losing that data? That's the power of Connected TV, which utilizes IP addresses to track instead of cookies.In this episode, Gathre President Michael Eraso shares about Connected TV and how he is able to Track via a third-party app. He talks about how to track the Return on Ad Spend via the use of IP Addresses.Listen up and learn something new.KEY TAKEAWAYS FROM THIS EPISODEIt is important to be in tune with your finances and budgeting and to have KPIs and metrics that show that the dollars spent are done so wisely. Know your numbers and know the keys to scaling up.Invest in social platforms and updating content sharing if you're really into knowing your customers.Diversifying your marketing channels is powerful.The idea of connected TV bypasses some of the IOS 14 changes because it's based on IP addresses.There's no way to skip Ads on connected TVs.Finding other channels is great, but so is relying on your tried and true channels.1% improvements can sometimes be overlooked, but they all add up over time. Do a lot of tests.Recommended Tool:Google Analyticshttps://analytics.google.com/Enquire Labshttps://enquirelabs.comMNTNhttps://mountain.com/Recommended Book:How Will You Measure Your Life? by Clayton Christensenhttps://www.amazon.com/How-Will-Measure-Your-Life/dp/0062102419Today's Guest:Michael Eraso is the President and Co-Founder of Gathre.Gathre is a design company that develops and produces products for the modern parent, located in the Provo, Utah area.Connect and learn more about Michael and Gathre here:Website: https://gathre.com/#Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/michaelerasoThis month's sponsor is KnoCommerce - the first survey platform built for eCommerce brands. Gain insight on everything from marketing attribution to purchase motivation, while leveraging your customer data for enhanced personalization.Start for free at KnoCommerce.comWe love our podcast community and listeners so much that we have decided to offer a free eCommerce Growth Plan for your brand! To learn more and how we can help, click here:https://mindfulmarketing.co/growthplan-applyIf you've been paying attention and your brand is ready to GROW, apply now to be the one new brand we take on this month!https://mindfulmarketing.co/apply

Screaming in the Cloud
The re:Invent Wheel in the Sky Keeps on Turning with Pete Cheslock

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 54:52


About PetePete does many startup things at Allma. Links: Last Tweet in AWS: https://lasttweetinaws.com Twitter: https://twitter.com/petecheslock LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/petecheslock/ TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part byLaunchDarkly. Take a look at what it takes to get your code into production. I'm going to just guess that it's awful because it's always awful. No one loves their deployment process. What if launching new features didn't require you to do a full-on code and possibly infrastructure deploy? What if you could test on a small subset of users and then roll it back immediately if results aren't what you expect? LaunchDarkly does exactly this. To learn more, visitlaunchdarkly.com and tell them Corey sent you, and watch for the wince.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by our friends at Redis, the company behind the incredibly popular open source database that is not the bind DNS server. If you're tired of managing open source Redis on your own, or you're using one of the vanilla cloud caching services, these folks have you covered with the go to manage Redis service for global caching and primary database capabilities; Redis Enterprise. To learn more and deploy not only a cache but a single operational data platform for one Redis experience, visit redis.com/hero. Thats r-e-d-i-s.com/hero. And my thanks to my friends at Redis for sponsoring my ridiculous non-sense.  Corey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud. I'm Corey Quinn. I am joined—as is tradition, for a post re:Invent wrap up, a month or so later, once everything is time to settle—by my friend and yours, Pete Cheslock. Pete, how are you?Pete: Hi, I'm doing fantastic. New year; new me. That's what I'm going with.Corey: That's the problem. I keep hoping for that, but every time I turn around, it's still me. And you know, honestly, I wouldn't wish that on anyone.Pete: Exactly. [laugh]. I wouldn't wish you on me either. But somehow I keep coming back for this.Corey: So, in two-thousand twenty—or twenty-twenty, as the children say—re:Invent was fully virtual. And that felt weird. Then re:Invent 2021 was a hybrid event which, let's be serious here, is not really those things. They had a crappy online thing and then a differently crappy thing in person. But it didn't feel real to me because you weren't there.That is part of the re:Invent tradition. There's a midnight madness thing, there's a keynote where they announce a bunch of nonsense, and then Pete and I go and have brunch on the last day of re:Invent and decompress, and more or less talk smack about everything that crosses our minds. And you weren't there this year. I had to backfill you with Tim Banks. You know, the person that I backfield you with here at The Duckbill Group as a principal cloud economist.Pete: You know, you got a great upgrade in hot takes, I feel like, with Tim.Corey: And other ways, too, but it's rude of me to say that to you directly. So yeah, his hot takes are spectacular. He was going to be doing this with me, except you cannot mess with tradition. You really can't.Pete: Yeah. I'm trying to think how many—is this third year? It's at least three.Corey: Third or fourth.Pete: Yeah, it's at least three. Yeah, it was, I don't want to say I was sad to not be there because, with everything going on, it's still weird out there. But I am always—I'm just that weird person who actually likes re:Invent, but not for I feel like the reasons people think. Again, I'm such an extroverted-type person, that it's so great to have this, like, serendipity to re:Invent. The people that you run into and the conversations that you have, and prior—like in 2019, I think was a great example because that was the last one I had gone to—you know, having so many conversations so quickly because everyone is there, right? It's like this magnet that attracts technologists, and venture capital, and product builders, and all this other stuff. And it's all compressed into, like, you know, that five-day span, I think is the biggest part that makes so great.Corey: The fear in people's eyes when they see me. And it was fun; I had a pair of masks with me. One of them was a standard mask, and no one recognizes anyone because, masks, and the other was a printout of my ridiculous face, which was horrifyingly uncanny, but also made it very easy for people to identify me. And depending upon how social I was feeling, I would wear one or the other, and it worked flawlessly. That was worth doing. They really managed to thread the needle, as well, before Omicron hit, but after the horrors of last year. So, [unintelligible 00:03:00]—Pete: It really—Corey: —if it were going on right now, it would not be going on right now.Pete: Yeah. I talk about really—yeah—really just hitting it timing-wise. Like, not that they could have planned for any of this, but like, as things were kind of not too crazy and before they got all crazy again, it feels like wow, like, you know, they really couldn't have done the event at any other time. And it's like, purely due to luck. I mean, absolute one hundred percent.Corey: That's the amazing power of frugality. Because the reason is then is it's the week after Thanksgiving every year when everything is dirt cheap. And, you know, if there's one thing that I one-point-seve—sorry, their stock's in the toilet—a $1.6 trillion company is very concerned about, it is saving money at every opportunity.Pete: Well, the one thing that was most curious about—so I was at the first re:Invent in-what—2012 I think it was, and there was—it was quaint, right?—there was 4000 people there, I want to say. It was in the thousands of people. Now granted, still a big conference, but it was in the Sands Convention Center. It was in that giant room, the same number of people, were you know, people's booths were like tables, like, eight-by-ten tables, right? [laugh].It had almost a DevOpsDays feel to it. And I was kind of curious if this one had any of those feelings. Like, did it evoke it being more quaint and personable, or was it just as soulless as it probably has been in recent years?Corey: This was fairly soulless because they reduced the footprint of the event. They dropped from two expo halls down to one, they cut the number of venues, but they still had what felt like 20,000 people or something there. It was still crowded, it was still packed. And I've done some diligent follow-ups afterwards, and there have been very few cases of Covid that came out of it. I quarantined for a week in a hotel, so I don't come back and kill my young kids for the wrong reasons.And that went—that was sort of like the worst part of it on some level, where it's like great. Now I could sit alone at a hotel and do some catch-up and all the rest, but all right I'd kind of like to go home. I'm not used to being on the road that much.Pete: Yeah, I think we're all a little bit out of practice. You know, I haven't been on a plane in years. I mean, the travel I've done more recently has been in my car from point A to point B. Like, direct, you know, thing. Actually, a good friend of mine who's not in technology at all had to travel for business, and, you know, he also has young kids who are under five, so he when he got back, he actually hid in a room in their house and quarantine himself in the room. But they—I thought, this is kind of funny—they never told the kids he was home. Because they knew that like—Corey: So, they just thought the house was haunted?Pete: [laugh].Corey: Like, “Don't go in the west wing,” sort of level of nonsense. That is kind of amazing.Pete: Honestly, like, we were hanging out with the family because they're our neighbors. And it was like, “Oh, yeah, like, he's in the guest room right now.” Kids have no idea. [laugh]. I'm like, “Oh, my God.” I'm like, I can't even imagine. Yeah.Corey: So, let's talk a little bit about the releases of re:Invent. And I'm going to lead up with something that may seem uncharitable, but I don't think it necessarily is. There weren't the usual torrent of new releases for ridiculous nonsense in the same way that there have been previously. There was no, this service talks to satellites in space. I mean, sure, there was some IoT stuff to manage fleets of cars, and giant piles of robots, and cool, I don't have those particular problems; I'm trying to run a website over here.So okay, great. There were enhancements to a number of different services that were in many cases appreciated, in other cases, irrelevant. Werner said in his keynote, that it was about focusing on primitives this year. And, “Why do we have so many services? It's because you asked for it… as customers.”Pete: [laugh]. Yeah, you asked for it.Corey: What have you been asking for, Pete? Because I know what I've been asking for and it wasn't that. [laugh].Pete: It's amazing to see a company continually say yes to everything, and somehow, despite their best efforts, be successful at doing it. No other company could do that. Imagine any other software technology business out there that just builds everything the customers ask for. Like from a product management business standpoint, that is, like, rule 101 is, “Listen to your customers, but don't say yes to everything.” Like, you can't do everything.Corey: Most companies can't navigate the transition between offering the same software in the Cloud and on a customer facility. So, it's like, “Ooh, an on-prem version, I don't know, that almost broke the company the last time we tried it.” Whereas you have Amazon whose product strategy is, “Yes,” being able to put together a whole bunch of things. I also will challenge the assertion that it's the primitives that customers want. They don't want to build a data center out of popsicle sticks themselves. They want to get something that solves a problem.And this has been a long-term realization for me. I used to work at Media Temple as a senior systems engineer running WordPress at extremely large scale. My websites now run on WordPress, and I have the good sense to pay WP Engine to handle it for me, instead of doing it myself because it's not the most productive use of my time. I want things higher up the stack. I assure you I pay more to WP Engine than it would cost me to run these things myself from an infrastructure point of view, but not in terms of my time.What I see sometimes as the worst of all worlds is that AWS is trying to charge for that value-added pricing without adding the value that goes along with it because you still got to build a lot of this stuff yourself. It's still a very janky experience, you're reduced to googling random blog posts to figure out how this thing is supposed to work, and the best documentation comes from externally. Whereas with a company that's built around offering solutions like this, great. In the fullness of time, I really suspect that if this doesn't change, their customers are going to just be those people who build solutions out of these things. And let those companies capture the up-the-stack margin. Which I have no problem with. But they do because Amazon is a company that lies awake at night actively worrying that someone, somewhere, who isn't them might possibly be making money somehow.Pete: I think MongoDB is a perfect example of—like, look at their stock price over the last whatever, years. Like, they, I feel like everyone called for the death of MongoDB every time Amazon came out with their new things, yet, they're still a multi-billion dollar company because I can just—give me an API endpoint and you scale the database. There's is—Corey: Look at all the high-profile hires that Mongo was making out of AWS, and I can't shake the feeling they're sitting there going, “Yeah, who's losing important things out of production now?” It's, everyone is exodus-ing there. I did one of those ridiculous graphics of the naming all the people that went over there, and in—with the hurricane evacuation traffic picture, and there's one car going the other way that I just labeled with, “Re:Invent sponsorship check,” because yeah, they have a top tier sponsorship and it was great. I've got to say I've been pretty down on MongoDB for a while, for a variety of excellent reasons based upon, more or less, how they treated customers who were in pain. And I'd mostly written it off.I don't do that anymore. Not because I inherently believe the technology has changed, though I'm told it has, but by the number of people who I deeply respect who are going over there and telling me, no, no, this is good. Congratulations. I have often said you cannot buy authenticity, and I don't think that they are, but the people who are working there, I do not believe that these people are, “Yeah, well, you bought my opinion. You can buy their attention, not their opinion.” If someone changes their opinion, based upon where they work, I kind of question everything they're telling me is, like, “Oh, you're just here to sell something you don't believe in? Welcome aboard.”Pete: Right. Yeah, there's an interview question I like to ask, which is, “What's something that you used to believe in very strongly that you've more recently changed your mind on?” And out of politeness because usually throws people back a little bit, and they're like, “Oh, wow. Like, let me think about that.” And I'm like, “Okay, while you think about that I want to give you mine.”Which is in the past, my strongly held belief was we had to run everything ourselves. “You own your availability,” was the line. “No, I'm not buying Datadog. I can build my own metric stack just fine, thank you very much.” Like, “No, I'm not going to use these outsourced load balancers or databases because I need to own my availability.”And what I realized is that all of those decisions lead to actually delivering and focusing on things that were not the core product. And so now, like, I've really flipped 180, that, if any—anything that you're building that does not directly relate to the core product, i.e. How your business makes money, should one hundred percent be outsourced to an expert that is better than you. Mongo knows how to run Mongo better than you.Corey: “What does your company do?” “Oh, we handle expense reports.” “Oh, what are you working on this month?” “I'm building a load balancer.” It's like that doesn't add the value. Don't do that.Pete: Right. Exactly. And so it's so interesting, I think, to hear Werner say that, you know, we're just building primitives, and you asked for this. And I think that concept maybe would work years ago, when you had a lot of builders who needed tools, but I don't think we have any, like, we don't have as many builders as before. Like, I think we have people who need more complete solutions. And that's probably why all these businesses are being super successful against Amazon.Corey: I'm wondering if it comes down to a cloud economic story, specifically that my cloud bill is always going to be variable and it's difficult to predict, whereas if I just use EC2 instances, and I build load balancers or whatnot, myself, well, yeah, it's a lot more work, but I can predict accurately what my staff compensation costs are more effectively, that I can predict what a CapEx charge would be or what the AWS bill is going to be. I'm wondering if that might in some way shape it?Pete: Well, I feel like the how people get better in managing their costs, right, you'll eventually move to a world where, like, “Yep, okay, first, we turned off waste,” right? Like, step one is waste. Step two is, like, understanding your spend better to optimize but, like, step three, like, the galaxy brain meme of Amazon cost stuff is all, like, unit economics stuff, where trying to better understand the actual cost deliver an actual feature. And yeah, I think that actually gets really hard when you give—kind of spread your product across, like, a slew of services that have varying levels of costs, varying levels of tagging, so you can attribute it. Like, it's really hard. Honestly, it's pretty easy if I have 1000 EC2 servers with very specific tags, I can very easily figure out what it costs to deliver product. But if I have—Corey: Yeah, if I have Corey build it, I know what Corey is going to cost, and I know how many servers he's going to use. Great, if I have Pete it, Pete's good at things, it'll cut that server bill in half because he actually knows how to wind up being efficient with things. Okay, great. You can start calculating things out that way. I don't think that's an intentional choice that companies are making, but I feel like that might be a natural outgrowth of it.Pete: Yeah. And there's still I think a lot of the, like, old school mentality of, like, the, “Not invented here,” the, “We have to own our availability.” You can still own your availability by using these other vendors. And honestly, it's really heartening to see so many companies realize that and realize that I don't need to get everything from Amazon. And honestly, like, in some things, like I look at a cloud Amazon bill, and I think to myself, it would be easier if you just did everything from Amazon versus having these ten other vendors, but those ten other vendors are going to be a lot better at running the product that they build, right, that as a service, then you probably will be running it yourself. Or even Amazon's, like, you know, interpretation of that product.Corey: A few other things that came out that I thought were interesting, at least the direction they're going in. The changes to S3 intelligent tiering are great, with instant retrieval on Glacier. I feel like that honestly was—they talk a good story, but I feel like that was competitive response to Google offering the same thing. That smacks of a large company with its use case saying, “You got two choices here.” And they're like, “Well, okay. Crap. We're going to build it then.”Or alternately, they're looking at the changes that they're making to intelligent tiering, they're now shifting that to being the default that as far as recommendations go. There are a couple of drawbacks to it, but not many, and it's getting easier now to not have the mental overhead of trying to figure out exactly what your lifecycle policies are. Yeah, there are some corner cases where, okay, if I adjust this just so, then I could save 10% on that monitoring fee or whatnot. Yeah, but look how much work that's going to take you to curate and make sure that you're not doing something silly. That feels like it is such an in the margins issue. It's like, “How much data you're storing?” “Four exabytes.” Okay, yeah. You probably want some people doing exactly that, but that's not most of us.Pete: Right. Well, there's absolutely savings to be had. Like, if I had an exabyte of data on S3—which there are a lot of people who have that level of data—then it would make sense for me to have an engineering team whose sole purpose is purely an optimizing our data lifecycle for that data. Until a point, right? Until you've optimized the 80%, basically. You optimize the first 80, that's probably, air-quote, “Easy.” The last 20 is going to be incredibly hard, maybe you never even do that.But at lower levels of scale, I don't think the economics actually work out to have a team managing your data lifecycle of S3. But the fact that now AWS can largely do it for you in the background—now, there's so many things you have to think about and, like, you know, understand even what your data is there because, like, not all data is the same. And since S3 is basically like a big giant database you can query, you got to really think about some of that stuff. But honestly, what I—I don't know if—I have no idea if this is even be worked on, but what I would love to see—you know, hashtag #AWSwishlist—is, now we have countless tiers of EBS volumes, EBS volumes that can be dynamically modified without touching, you know, the physical host. Meaning with an API call, you can change from the gp2 to gp3, or io whatever, right?Corey: Or back again if it doesn't pan out.Pete: Or back again, right? And so for companies with large amounts of spend, you know, economics makes sense that you should have a team that is analyzing your volumes usage and modifying that daily, right? Like, you could modify that daily, and I don't know if there's anyone out there that's actually doing it at that level. And they probably should. Like, if you got millions of dollars in EBS, like, there's legit savings that you're probably leaving on the table without doing that. But that's what I'm waiting for Amazon to do for me, right? I want intelligent tiering for EBS because if you're telling me I can API call and you'll move my data and make that better, make that [crosstalk 00:17:46] better [crosstalk 00:17:47]—Corey: Yeah it could be like their auto-scaling for DynamoDB, for example. Gives you the capacity you need 20 minutes after you needed it. But fine, whatever because if I can schedule stuff like that, great, I know what time of day, the runs are going to kick off that beat up the disks. I know when end-of-month reporting fires off. I know what my usage pattern is going to be, by and large.Yeah, part of the problem too, is that I look at this stuff, and I get excited about it with the intelligent tiering… at The Duckbill Group we've got a few hundred S3 buckets lurking around. I'm thinking, “All right, I've got to go through and do some changes on this and implement all of that.” Our S3 bill's something like 50 bucks a month or something ridiculous like that. It's a no, that really isn't a thing. Like, I have a screenshot bucket that I have an app installed—I think called Dropshare—that hooks up to anytime I drag—I hit a shortcut, I drag with the mouse to select whatever I want and boom, it's up there and the URL is not copied to my clipboard, I can paste that wherever I want.And I'm thinking like, yeah, there's no cleanup on that. There's no lifecycle policy that's turning into anything. I should really go back and age some of it out and do the rest and start doing some lifecycle management. It—I've been using this thing for years and I think it's now a whopping, what, 20 cents a month for that bucket. It's—I just don't—Pete: [laugh].Corey: —I just don't care, other than voice in the back of my mind, “That's an unbounded growth problem.” Cool. When it hits 20 bucks a month, then I'll consider it. But until then I just don't. It does not matter.Pete: Yeah, I think yeah, scale changes everything. Start adding some zeros and percentages turned into meaningful numbers. And honestly, back on the EBS thing, the one thing that really changed my perspective of EBS, in general, is—especially coming from the early days, right? One terabyte volume, it was a hard drive in a thing. It was a virtual LUN on a SAN somewhere, probably.Nowadays, and even, like, many years after those original EBS volumes, like all the limits you get in EBS, those are actually artificial limits, right? If you're like, “My EBS volume is too slow,” it's not because, like, the hard drive it's on is too slow. That's an artificial limit that is likely put in place due to your volume choice. And so, like, once you realize that in your head, then your concept of how you store data on EBS should change dramatically.Corey: Oh, AWS had a blog post recently talking about, like, with io2 and the limits and everything, and there was architecture thinking, okay. “So, let's say this is insufficient and the quarter-million IOPS a second that you're able to get is not there.” And I'm sitting there thinking, “That is just ludicrous data volume and data interactivity model.” And it's one of those, like, I'm sitting here trying to think about, like, I haven't had to deal with a problem like that decade, just because it's, “Huh. Turns out getting these one thing that's super fast is kind of expensive.” If you paralyze it out, that's usually the right answer, and that's how the internet is mostly evolved. But there are use cases for which that doesn't work, and I'm excited to see it. I don't want to pay for it in my view, but it's nice to see it.Pete: Yeah, it's kind of fun to go into the Amazon calculator and price out one of the, like, io2 volumes and, like, maxed out. It's like, I don't know, like $50,000 a month or a hun—like, it's some just absolutely absurd number. But the beauty of it is that if you needed that value for an hour to run some intensive data processing task, you can have it for an hour and then just kill it when you're done, right? Like, that is what is most impressive.Corey: I copied 130 gigs of data to an EFS volume, which was—[unintelligible 00:21:05] EFS has gone from “This is a piece of junk,” to one of my favorite services. It really is, just because of its utility and different ways of doing things. I didn't have the foresight, just use a second EFS volume for this. So, I was unzipping a whole bunch of small files onto it. Great.It took a long time for me to go through it. All right, now that I'm done with that I want to clean all this up. My answer was to ultimately spin up a compute node and wind up running a whole bunch of—like, 400, simultaneous rm-rf on that long thing. And it was just, like, this feels foolish and dumb, but here we are. And I'm looking at the stats on it because the instance was—all right, at that point, the load average [on the instance 00:21:41] was like 200, or something like that, and the EFS volume was like, “Ohh, wow, you're really churning on this. I'm now at, like, 5% of the limit.” Like, okay, great. It turns out I'm really bad at computers.Pete: Yeah, well, that's really the trick is, like, yeah, sure, you can have a quarter-million IOPS per second, but, like, what's going to break before you even hit that limit? Probably many other things.Corey: Oh, yeah. Like, feels like on some level if something gets to that point, it a misconfiguration somewhere. But honestly, that's the thing I find weirdest about the world in which we live is that at a small-scale—if I have a bill in my $5 a month shitposting account, great. If I screw something up and cost myself a couple hundred bucks in misconfiguration it's going to stand out. At large scale, it doesn't matter if—you're spending $50 million a year or $500 million a year on AWS and someone leaks your creds, and someone spins up a whole bunch of Bitcoin miners somewhere else, you're going to see that on your bill until they're mining basically all the Bitcoin. It just gets lost in the background.Pete: I'm waiting for those—I'm actually waiting for the next level of them to get smarter because maybe you have, like, an aggressive tagging system and you're monitoring for untagged instances, but the move here would be, first get the creds and query for, like, the most used tags and start applying those tags to your Bitcoin mining instances. My God, it'll take—Corey: Just clone a bunch of tags. Congratulations, you now have a second BI Elasticsearch cluster that you're running yourself. Good work.Pete: Yeah. Yeah, that people won't find that until someone comes along after the fact that. Like, “Why do we have two have these things?” And you're like—[laugh].Corey: “Must be a DR thing.”Pete: It's maxed-out CPU. Yeah, exactly.Corey: [laugh].Pete: Oh, the terrible ideas—please, please, hackers don't take are terrible ideas.Corey: I had a, kind of, whole thing I did on Twitter years ago, talking about how I would wind up using the AWS Marketplace for an embezzlement scheme. Namely, I would just wind up spinning up something that had, like, a five-cent an hour charge or whatnot on just, like, basically rebadge the CentOS Community AMI or whatnot. Great. And then write a blog post, not attached to me, that explains how to do a thing that I'm going to be doing in production in a week or two anyway. Like, “How to build an auto-scaling group,” and reference that AMI.Then if it ever comes out, like, “Wow, why are we having all these marketplace charges on this?” “I just followed the blog post like it said here.” And it's like, “Oh, okay. You're a dumbass. The end.”That's the way to do it. A month goes by and suddenly it came out that someone had done something similarly. They wound up rebadging these community things on the marketplace and charging big money for it, and I'm sitting there going like that was a joke. It wasn't a how-to. But yeah, every time I make these jokes, I worry someone's going to do it.Pete: “Welcome to large-scale fraud with Corey Quinn.”Corey: Oh, yeah, it's fraud at scale is really the important thing here.Corey: This episode is sponsored by our friends at Oracle HeatWave is a new high-performance accelerator for the Oracle MySQL Database Service. Although I insist on calling it “my squirrel.” While MySQL has long been the worlds most popular open source database, shifting from transacting to analytics required way too much overhead and, ya know, work. With HeatWave you can run your OLTP and OLAP, don't ask me to ever say those acronyms again, workloads directly from your MySQL database and eliminate the time consuming data movement and integration work, while also performing 1100X faster than Amazon Aurora, and 2.5X faster than Amazon Redshift, at a third of the cost. My thanks again to Oracle Cloud for sponsoring this ridiculous nonsense.Corey: I still remember a year ago now at re:Invent 2021 was it, or was it 2020? Whatever they came out with, I want to say it wasn't gp3, or maybe it was, regardless, there was a new EBS volume type that came out that you were playing with to see how it worked and you experimented with it—Pete: Oh, yes.Corey: —and the next morning, you looked at the—I checked Slack and you're like well, my experiments yesterday cost us $5,000. And at first, like, the—my response is instructive on this because, first, it was, “Oh, my God. What's going to happen now?” And it's like, first, hang on a second.First off, that seems suspect but assume it's real. I assumed it was real at the outset. It's “Oh, right. This is not my personal $5-a-month toybox account. We are a company; we can absolutely pay that.” Because it's like, I could absolutely reach out, call it a favor. “I made a mistake, and I need a favor on the bill, please,” to AWS.And I would never live it down, let's be clear. For a $7,000 mistake, I would almost certainly eat it. As opposed to having to prostrate myself like that in front of Amazon. I'm like, no, no, no. I want one of those like—if it's like, “Okay, you're going to, like, set back the company roadmap by six months if you have to pay this. Do you want to do it?” Like, [groans] “Fine, I'll eat some crow.”But okay. And then followed immediately by, wow, if Pete of all people can mess this up, customers are going to be doomed here. We should figure out what happened. And I'm doing the math. Like, Pete, “What did you actually do?” And you're sitting there and you're saying, “Well, I had like a 20 gig volume that I did this.” And I'm doing the numbers, and it's like—Pete: Something's wrong.Corey: “How sure are you when you say ‘gigabyte,' that you were—that actually means what you think it did? Like, were you off by a lot? Like, did you mean exabytes?” Like, what's the deal here?Pete: Like, multiple factors.Corey: Yeah. How much—“How many IOPS did you give that thing, buddy?” And it turned out what happened was that when they launched this, they had mispriced it in the system by a factor of a million. So, it was fun. I think by the end of it, all of your experimentation was somewhere between five to seven cents. Which—Pete: Yeah. It was a—Corey: Which is why you don't work here anymore because no one cost me seven cents of money to give to Amazon—Pete: How dare you?Corey: —on my watch. Get out.Pete: How dare you, sir?Corey: Exactly.Pete: Yeah, that [laugh] was amazing to see, as someone who has done—definitely maid screw-ups that have cost real money—you know, S3 list requests are always a fun one at scale—but that one was supremely fun to see the—Corey: That was a scary one because another one they'd done previously was they had messed up Lightsail pricing, where people would log in, and, like, “Okay, so what is my Lightsail instance going to cost?” And I swear to you, this is true, it was saying—this was back in 2017 or so—the answer was, like, “$4.3 billion.” Because when you see that you just start laughing because you know it's a mistake. You know, that they're not going to actually demand that you spend $4.3 billion for a single instance—unless it's running SAP—and great.It's just, it's a laugh. It's clearly a mispriced, and it's clearly a bug that's going to get—it's going to get fixed. I just spun up this new EBS volume that no one fully understands yet and it cost me thousands of dollars. That's the sort of thing that no, no, I could actually see that happening. There are instances now that cost something like 100 bucks an hour or whatnot to run. I can see spinning up the wrong thing by mistake and getting bitten by it. There's a bunch of fun configuration mistakes you can make that will, “Hee, hee, hee. Why can I see that bill spike from orbit?” And that's the scary thing.Pete: Well, it's the original CI and CD problem of the per-hour billing, right? That was super common of, like, yeah, like, an i3, you know, 16XL server is pretty cheap per hour, but if you're charged per hour and you spin up a bunch for five minutes. Like, it—you will be shocked [laugh] by what you see there. So—Corey: Yeah. Mistakes will show. And I get it. It's also people as individuals are very different psychologically than companies are. With companies it's one of those, “Great we're optimizing to bring in more revenue and we don't really care about saving money at all costs.”Whereas people generally have something that looks a lot like a fixed income in the form of a salary or whatnot, so it's it is easier for us to cut spend than it is for us to go out and make more money. Like, I don't want to get a second job, or pitch my boss on stuff, and yeah. So, all and all, routing out the rest of what happened at re:Invent, they—this is the problem is that they have a bunch of minor things like SageMaker Inference Recommender. Yeah, I don't care. Anything—Pete: [laugh].Corey: —[crosstalk 00:28:47] SageMaker I mostly tend to ignore, for safety. I did like the way they described Amplify Studio because they made it sound like a WYSIWYG drag and drop, build a React app. It's not it. It basically—you can do that in Figma and then it can hook it up to some things in some cases. It's not what I want it to be, which is Honeycode, except good. But we'll get there some year. Maybe.Pete: There's a lot of stuff that was—you know, it's the classic, like, preview, which sure, like, from a product standpoint, it's great. You know, they have a level of scale where they can say, “Here's this thing we're building,” which could be just a twinkle in a product managers, call it preview, and get thousands of people who would be happy to test it out and give you feedback, and it's a, it's great that you have that capability. But I often look at so much stuff and, like, that's really cool, but, like, can I, can I have it now? Right? Like—or you can't even get into the preview plan, even though, like, you have that specific problem. And it's largely just because either, like, your scale isn't big enough, or you don't have a good enough relationship with your account manager, or I don't know, countless other reasons.Corey: The thing that really throws me, too, is the pre-announcements that come a year or so in advance, like, the Outpost smaller ones are finally available, but it feels like when they do too many pre-announcements or no big marquee service announcements, as much as they talk about, “We're getting back to fundamentals,” no, you have a bunch of teams that blew the deadline. That's really what it is; let's not call it anything else. Another one that I think is causing trouble for folks—I'm fortunate in that I don't do much work with Oracle databases, or Microsoft SQL databases—but they extended RDS Custom to Microsoft SQL at the [unintelligible 00:30:27] SQL server at re:Invent this year, which means this comes down to things I actually use, we're going to have a problem because historically, the lesson has always been if I want to run my own databases and tweak everything, I do it on top of an EC2 instance. If I want to managed database, relational database service, great, I use RDS. RDS Custom basically gives you root into the RDS instance. Which means among other things, yes, you can now use RDS to run containers.But it lets you do a lot of things that are right in between. So, how do you position this? When should I use RDS Custom? Can you give me an easy answer to that question? And they used a lot of words to say, no, they cannot. It's basically completely blowing apart the messaging and positioning of both of those services in some unfortunate ways. We'll learn as we go.Pete: Yeah. Honestly, it's like why, like, why would I use this? Or how would I use this? And this is I think, fundamentally, what's hard when you just say yes to everything. It's like, they in many cases, I don't think, like, I don't want to say they don't understand why they're doing this, but if it's not like there's a visionary who's like, this fits into this multi-year roadmap.That roadmap is largely—if that roadmap is largely generated by the customers asking for it, then it's not like, oh, we're building towards this Northstar of RDS being whatever. You might say that, but your roadmap's probably getting moved all over the place because, you know, this company that pays you a billion dollars a year is saying, “I would give you $2 billion a year for all of my Oracle databases, but I need this specific thing.” I can't imagine a scenario that they would say, “Oh, well, we're building towards this Northstar, and that's not on the way there.” Right? They'd be like, “New Northstar. Another billion dollars, please.”Corey: Yep. Probably the worst release of re:Invent, from my perspective, is RUM, Real User Monitoring, for CloudWatch. And I, to be clear, I wrote a shitposting Twitter threading client called Last Tweet in AWS. Go to lasttweetinaws.com. You can all use it. It's free; I just built this for my own purposes. And I've instrumented it with RUM. Now, Real User Monitoring is something that a lot of monitoring vendors use, and also CloudWatch now. And what that is, is it embeds a listener into the JavaScript that runs on client load, and it winds up looking at what's going on loading times, et cetera, so you can see when users are unhappy. I have no problem with this. Other than that, you know, liking users? What's up with that?Pete: Crazy.Corey: But then, okay, now, what this does is unlike every other RUM tool out there, which charges per session, meaning I am going to be… doing a web page load, it charges per data item, which includes HTTP errors, or JavaScript errors, et cetera. Which means that if you have a high transaction volume site and suddenly your CDN takes a nap like Fastly did for an hour last year, suddenly your bill is stratospheric for this because errors abound and cascade, and you can have thousands of errors on a single page load for these things, and it is going to be visible from orbit, at least with a per session basis thing, when you start to go viral, you understand that, “Okay, this is probably going to cost me some more on these things, and oops, I guess I should write less compelling content.” Fine. This is one of those one misconfiguration away and you are wailing and gnashing teeth. Now, this is a new service. I believe that they will waive these surprise bills in the event that things like that happen. But it's going to take a while and you're going to be worrying the whole time if you've rolled this out naively. So it's—Pete: Well and—Corey: —I just don't like the pricing.Pete: —how many people will actively avoid that service, right? And honestly, choose a competitor because the competitor could be—the competitor could be five times more expensive, right, on face value, but it's the certainty of it. It's the uncertainty of what Amazon will charge you. Like, no one wants a surprise bill. “Well, a vendor is saying that they'll give us this contract for $10,000. I'm going to pay $10,000, even though RUM might be a fraction of that price.”It's honestly, a lot of these, like, product analytics tools and monitoring tools, you'll often see they price be a, like, you know, MAU, Monthly Active User, you know, or some sort of user-based pricing, like, the number of people coming to your site. You know, and I feel like at least then, if you are trying to optimize for lots of users on your site, and more users means more revenue, then you know, if your spend is going up, but your revenue is also going up, that's a win-win. But if it's like someone—you know, your third-party vendor dies and you're spewing out errors, or someone, you know, upgraded something and it spews out errors. That no one would normally see; that's the thing. Like, unless you're popping open that JavaScript console, you're not seeing any of those errors, yet somehow it's like directly impacting your bottom line? Like that doesn't feel [crosstalk 00:35:06].Corey: Well, there is something vaguely Machiavellian about that. Like, “How do I get my developers to care about errors on consoles?” Like, how about we make it extortionately expensive for them not to. It's, “Oh, all right, then. Here we go.”Pete: And then talk about now you're in a scenario where you're working on things that don't directly impact the product. You're basically just sweeping up the floor and then trying to remove errors that maybe don't actually affect it and they're not actually an error.Corey: Yeah. I really do wonder what the right answer is going to be. We'll find out. Again, we live, we learn. But it's also, how long does it take a service that has bad pricing at launch, or an unfortunate story around it to outrun that reputation?People are still scared of Glacier because of its original restore pricing, which was non-deterministic for any sensible human being, and in some cases lead to I'm used to spending 20 to 30 bucks a month on this. Why was I just charged two grand?Pete: Right.Corey: Scare people like that, they don't come back.Pete: I'm trying to actually remember which service it is that basically gave you an estimate, right? Like, turn it on for a month, and it would give you an estimate of how much this was going to cost you when billing started.Corey: It was either Detective or GuardDuty.Pete: Yeah, it was—yeah, that's exactly right. It was one of those two. And honestly, that was unbelievably refreshing to see. You know, like, listen, you have the data, Amazon. You know what this is going to cost me, so when I, like, don't make me spend all this time to go and figure out the cost. If you have all this data already, just tell me, right?And if I look at it and go, “Yeah, wow. Like, turning this on in my environment is going to cost me X dollars. Like, yeah, that's a trade-off I want to make, I'll spend that.” But you know, with some of the—and that—a little bit of a worry on some of the intelligent tiering on S3 is that the recommendation is likely going to be everything goes to intelligent tiering first, right? It's the gp3 story. Put everything on gp3, then move it to the proper volume, move it to an sc or an st or an io. Like, gp3 is where you start. And I wonder if that's going to be [crosstalk 00:37:08].Corey: Except I went through a wizard yesterday to launch an EC2 instance and its default on the free tier gp2.Pete: Yeah. Interesting.Corey: Which does not thrill me. I also still don't understand for the life of me why in some regions, the free tier is a t2 instance, when t3 is available.Pete: They're uh… my guess is that they've got some free t—they got a bunch of t2s lying around. [laugh].Corey: Well, one of the most notable announcements at re:Invent that most people didn't pay attention to is their ability now to run legacy instance types on top of Nitro, which really speaks to what's going on behind the scenes of we can get rid of all that old hardware and emulate the old m1 on modern equipment. So, because—you can still have that legacy, ancient instance, but now you're going—now we're able to wind up greening our data centers, which is part of their big sustainability push, with their ‘Sustainability Pillar' for the well-architected framework. They're talking more about what the green choices in cloud are. Which is super handy, not just because of the economic impact because we could use this pretty directly to reverse engineer their various margins on a per-service or per-offering basis. Which I'm not sure they're aware of yet, but oh, they're going to be.And that really winds up being a win for the planet, obviously, but also something that is—that I guess puts a little bit of choice on customers. The challenge I've got is, with my serverless stuff that I build out, if I spend—the Google search I make to figure out what the most economic, most sustainable way to do that is, is going to have a bigger carbon impact on the app itself. That seems to be something that is important at scale, but if you're not at scale, it's one of those, don't worry about it. Because let's face it, the cloud providers—all of them—are going to have a better sustainability story than you are running this in your own data centers, or on a Raspberry Pi that's always plugged into the wall.Pete: Yeah, I mean, you got to remember, Amazon builds their own power plants to power their data centers. Like, that's the level they play, right? There, their economies of scale are so entirely—they're so entirely different than anything that you could possibly even imagine. So, it's something that, like, I'm sure people will want to choose for. But, you know, if I would honestly say, like, if we really cared about our computing costs and the carbon footprint of it, I would love to actually know the carbon footprint of all of the JavaScript trackers that when I go to various news sites, and it loads, you know, the whatever thousands of trackers and tracking the all over, like, what is the carbon impact of some of those choices that I actually could control, like, as a either a consumer or business person?Corey: I really hope that it turns into something that makes a meaningful difference, and it's not just greenwashing. But we'll see. In the fullness of time, we're going to figure that out. Oh, they're also launching some mainframe stuff. They—like that's great.Pete: Yeah, those are still a thing.Corey: I don't deal with a lot of customers that are doing things with that in any meaningful sense. There is no AWS/400, so all right.Pete: [laugh]. Yeah, I think honestly, like, I did talk to a friend of mine who's in a big old enterprise and has a mainframe, and they're actually replacing their mainframe with Lambda. Like they're peeling off—which is, like, a great move—taking the monolith, right, and peeling off the individual components of what it can do into these discrete Lambda functions. Which I thought was really fascinating. Again, it's a five-year-long journey to do something like that. And not everyone wants to wait five years, especially if their support's about to run out for that giant box in the, you know, giant warehouse.Corey: The thing that I also noticed—and this is probably the—I guess, one of the—talk about swing and a miss on pricing—they have a—what is it?—there's a VPC IP Address Manager, which tracks the the IP addresses assigned to your VPCs that are allocated versus not, and it's 20 cents a month per IP address. It's like, “Okay. So, you're competing against a Google Sheet or an Excel spreadsheet”—which is what people are using for these things now—“Only you're making it extortionately expensive?”Pete: What kind of value does that provide for 20—I mean, like, again—Corey: I think Infoblox or someone like that offers it where they become more cost-effective as soon as you hit 500 IP addresses. And it's just—like, this is what I'm talking about. I know it does not cost AWS that kind of money to store an IP address. You can store that in a Route 53 TXT record for less money, for God's sake. And that's one of those, like, “Ah, we could extract some value pricing here.”Like, I don't know if it's a good product or not. Given its pricing, I don't give a shit because it's going to be too expensive for anything beyond trivial usage. So, it's a swing and a miss from that perspective. It's just, looking at that, I laugh, and I don't look at it again.Pete: See I feel—Corey: I'm not usually price sensitive. I want to be clear on that. It's just, that is just Looney Tunes, clown shoes pricing.Pete: Yeah. It's honestly, like, in many cases, I think the thing that I have seen, you know, in the past few years is, in many cases, it can honestly feel like Amazon is nickel-and-diming their customers in so many ways. You know, the explosion of making it easy to create multiple Amazon accounts has a direct impact to waste in the cloud because there's a lot of stuff you have to have her account. And the more accounts you have, those costs grow exponentially as you have these different places. Like, you kind of lose out on the economies of scale when you have a smaller number of accounts.And yeah, it's hard to optimize for that. Like, if you're trying to reduce your spend, it's challenging to say, “Well, by making a change here, we'll save, you know, $10,000 in this account.” “That doesn't seem like a lot when we're spending millions.” “Well, hold on a second. You'll save $10,000 per account, and you have 500 accounts,” or, “You have 1000 accounts,” or something like that.Or almost cost avoidance of this cost is growing unbounded in all of your accounts. It's tiny right now. So, like, now would be the time you want to do something with it. But like, again, for a lot of companies that have adopted the practice of endless Amazon accounts, they've almost gone, like, it's the classic, like, you know, I've got 8000 GitHub repositories for my source code. Like, that feels just as bad as having one GitHub repository for your repo. I don't know what the balance is there, but anytime these different types of services come out, it feels like, “Oh, wow. Like, I'm going to get nickeled and dimed for it.”Corey: This ties into the re:Post launch, which is a rebranding of their forums, where, okay, great, it was a little crufty and it need modernize, but it still ties your identity to an IAM account, or the root email address for an Amazon account, which is great. This is completely worthless because as soon as I change jobs, I lose my identity, my history, the rest, on this forum. I'm not using it. It shows that there's a lack of awareness that everyone is going to have multiple accounts with which they interact, and that people are going to deal with the platform longer than any individual account will. It's just a continual swing and a miss on things like that.And it gets back to the billing question of, “Okay. When I spin up an account, do I want them to just continue billing me—because don't turn this off; this is important—or do I want there to be a hard boundary where if you're about to charge me, turn it off. Turn off the thing that's about to cost me money.” And people hem and haw like this is an insurmountable problem, but I think the way to solve it is, let me specify that intent when I provision the account. Where it's, “This is a production account for a bank. I really don't want you turning it off.” Versus, “I'm a student learner who thinks that a Managed NAT Gateway might be a good thing. Yeah, I want you to turn off my demo Hello World app that will teach me what's going on, rather than surprising me with a five-figure bill at the end of the month.”Pete: Yeah. It shouldn't be that hard. I mean, but again, I guess everything's hard at scale.Corey: Oh, yeah. Oh yeah.Pete: But still, I feel like every time I log into Cost Explorer and I look at—and this is years it's still not fixed. Not that it's even possible to fix—but on the first day of the month, you look at Cost Explorer, and look at what Amazon is estimating your monthly bill is going to be. It's like because of your, you know—Corey: Your support fees, and your RI purchases, and savings plans purchases.Pete: [laugh]. All those things happened, right? First of the month, and it's like, yeah, “Your bill's going to be $800,000 this year.” And it's like, “Shouldn't be, like, $1,000?” Like, you know, it's the little things like that, that always—Corey: The one-off charges, like, “Oh, your Route 53 zone,” and all the stuff that gets charged on a monthly cadence, which fine, whatever. I mean, I'm okay with it, but it's also the, like, be careful when that happen—I feel like there's a way to make that user experience less jarring.Pete: Yeah because that problem—I mean, in my scenario, companies that I've worked at, there's been multiple times that a non-technical person will look at that data and go into immediate freakout mode, right? And that's never something that you want to have happen because now that's just adding a lot of stress and anxiety into a company that is—with inaccurate data. Like, the data—like, the answer you're giving someone is just wrong. Perhaps you shouldn't even give it to them if it's that wrong. [laugh].Corey: Yeah, I'm looking forward to seeing what happens this coming year. We're already seeing promising stuff. They—give people a timeline on how long in advance these things record—late last night, AWS released a new console experience. When you log into the AWS console now, there's a new beta thing. And I gave it some grief on Twitter because I'm still me, but like the direction it's going. It lets you customize your view with widgets and whatnot.And until they start selling widgets on marketplace or having sponsored widgets, you can't remove I like it, which is no guarantee at some point. But it shows things like, I can move the cost stuff, I can move the outage stuff up around, I can have the things that are going on in my account—but who I am means I can shift this around. If I'm a finance manager, cool. I can remove all the stuff that's like, “Hey, you want to get started spinning up an EC2 instance?” “Absolutely not. Do I want to get told, like, how to get certified? Probably not. Do I want to know what the current bill is and whether—and my list of favorites that I've pinned, whatever services there? Yeah, absolutely do.” This is starting to get there.Pete: Yeah, I wonder if it really is a way to start almost hedging on organizations having a wider group of people accessing AWS. I mean, in previous companies, I absolutely gave access to the console for tools like QuickSight, for tools like Athena, for the DataBrew stuff, the Glue DataBrew. Giving, you know, non-technical people access to be able to do these, like, you know, UI ETL tasks, you know, a wider group of a company is getting access into Amazon. So, I think anything that Amazon does to improve that experience for, you know, the non-SREs, like the people who would traditionally log in, like, that is an investment definitely worth making.Corey: “Well, what could non-engineering types possibly be doing in the AWS console?” “I don't know, jackhole, maybe paying the bill? Just a thought here.” It's the, there are people who look at these things from a variety of different places, and you have such sprawl in the AWS world that there are different personas by a landslide. If I'm building Twitter for Pets, you probably don't want to be pitching your mainframe migration services to me the same way that you would if I were a 200-year-old insurance company.Pete: Yeah, exactly. And the number of those products are going to grow, the number of personas are going to grow, and, yeah, they'll have to do something that they want to actually, you know, maintain that experience so that every person can have, kind of, the experience that they want, and not be distracted, you know? “Oh, what's this? Let me go test this out.” And it's like, you know, one-time charge for $10,000 because, like, that's how it's charged. You know, that's not an experience that people like.Corey: No. They really don't. Pete, I want to thank you for spending the time to chat with me again, as is our tradition. I'm hoping we can do it in person this year, when we go at the end of 2022, to re:Invent again. Or that no one goes in person. But this hybrid nonsense is for the birds.Pete: Yeah. I very much would love to get back to another one, and yeah, like, I think there could be an interesting kind of merging here of our annual re:Invent recap slash live brunch, you know, stream you know, hot takes after a long week. [laugh].Corey: Oh, yeah. The real way that you know that it's a good joke is when one of us says something, the other one sprays scrambled eggs out of their nose. Yeah, that's the way to do it.Pete: Exactly. Exactly.Corey: Pete, thank you so much. If people want to learn more about what you're up to—hopefully, you know, come back. We miss you, but you're unaffiliated, you're a startup advisor. Where can people find you to learn more, if they for some unforgivable reason don't know who or what a Pete Cheslock is?Pete: Yeah. I think the easiest place to find me is always on Twitter. I'm just at @petecheslock. My DMs are always open and I'm always down to expand my network and chat with folks.And yeah, right, now, I'm just, as I jokingly say, professionally unaffiliated. I do some startup advisory work and have been largely just kind of—honestly checking out the state of the economy. Like, there's a lot of really interesting companies out there, and some interesting problems to solve. And, you know, trying to spend some of my time learning more about what companies are up to nowadays. So yeah, if you got some interesting problems, you know, you can follow my Twitter or go to LinkedIn if you want some great, you know, business hot takes about, you know, shitposting basically.Corey: Same thing. Pete, thanks so much for joining me, I appreciate it.Pete: Thanks for having me.Corey: Pete Cheslock, startup advisor, professionally unaffiliated, and recurring re:Invent analyst pal of mine. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, whereas if you've hated this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice along with an angry comment calling me a jackass because do I know how long it took you personally to price CloudWatch RUM?Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

Franck Ferrand raconte...
Les deux Jean-Baptiste - Collection Molière

Franck Ferrand raconte...

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 25:47


A l'instar de Molière pour la vie théâtrale, on peut dire que Lully domine la vie musicale en France durant le règne du roi-soleil, à la fois par ses dons de musicien, d'organisateur et de courtisan, mais aussi d'intrigant. « Les deux Jean-Baptiste » s'allieront pour servir au mieux leur souverain avant de s'entredéchirer. Mention légales : Vos données de connexion, dont votre adresse IP, sont traités par Radio Classique, responsable de traitement, sur la base de son intérêt légitime, par l'intermédiaire de son sous-traitant Ausha, à des fins de réalisation de statistiques agréées et de lutte contre la fraude. Ces données sont supprimées en temps réel pour la finalité statistique et sous cinq mois à compter de la collecte à des fins de lutte contre la fraude. Pour plus d'informations sur les traitements réalisés par Radio Classique et exercer vos droits, consultez notre Politique de confidentialité.

Jorgenson's Soundbox
SquidDAO: Web3 Project Deep-Dive: Part Crypto Hedge Fund, Part NFT DAO. An Anonymous Conspiracy for Mutual Enrichment

Jorgenson's Soundbox

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 109:05


SquidDAO is an “Economic Flywheel denominated in Ethereum.” What does that mean? Good question, I wondered too. It's basically a conspiracy amongst anonymous people on the internet to make money together. And anyone can join! I dug in with a few members to see what it's all about.  They sell NFTs, they issue tokens, they invest a treasury… they earn money! And they share it with token and NFT holders.  This is my first pseudonymous podcast as well as the longest one I've ever done. In this episode, we explore a relatively new web3 project, Squid DAO, with a few guys I only know by their online handles. Squid DAO is described as an economic flywheel backed by Ethereum and is part company, part DeFi investment fund, and part NFT project. SQUID is currently trading for roughly the value of the assets it holds in the treasury, which could make it a great investment opportunity. Squid DAO is a great microcosm of the world of web3 as it is essentially a megatron of the various forks of web3 projects, which makes it a great learning opportunity. To start off the episode, each team member provides a little on their background and how they got involved in Squid DAO. Big Squid has a background in FinTech, got started in crypto in December of 2017 and eventually left his regular job to be a crypto DeFi degen full time and went on to work full time on Squid DAO. Squid Steed says he's very new compared to most people in the degen space. He's worked in TradFi for 12 years and says he is mainly focused on top-down optimization of Squid DAO. ZOption went from working at a big bank to starting a couple tech companies, and he got started in crypto in 2016 as a miner. He first got involved in Squid DAO by making an early investment and realizing the DAO could use some help. We then go over a 101 of what Squid DAO is. Based on a TradFi web2 description, it is a SPAC that raised ETH. Squid DAO is now tasked with putting the ETH to work, and it can be described as a profitable tech company with different revenue streams. The DAO is an investment vehicle through which the more ETH comes in. The more ETH is invested, and the more strategies there are to look into. Squid DAO has three revenue sources from forked protocols: the first is similar to raising money from bonds, the second is interest earned from putting ETH to work, and the third is NFT auctions. Also important is the opportunity for users to interact with the DAO and contribute. We also talk about why the team chooses to be anonymous and how trust is built. ZOption says that wallets and blockchains never lie and you know everyone's position. The team members all concur that it is easier to stay anonymous and that contributors prove themselves through their work rather than politics. The culture and people in the Discord, including the big whales, are helpful and respectful, and everyone is working towards a common goal but in different ways. Members are allowed to come up and present their strategies to be approved by the DAO's governance. We explore the economics of the DAO and why it is denominated in ETH rather than dollars. It can be valued via income derivative, the multiple on the treasury, or what it is trading at against what is on the balance sheet. Recently, a new governance proposal was passed making Squid and NFTs productive assets so that users may better run analyses. ETH is considered the best index and essentially operates like cash for the DAO.  We wrap up the episode by talking about how to learn more and get involved. Squid DAO's Twitter and Discord are great ways to learn more, but the best way to gain mastery is by investing your own money. If looking to get involved, you can help with whatever skills you have to offer, be it marketing, as a developer, a degen or coding strategist, or someone with a web2 background. Links:    Squid DAO NFT Auctions   Squid Docs   Squid Treasury Dashboard   Squid Discourse (Governance Forum)   Olympus DAO   Index Coop   SquidDAO Discord   The Squids on Twitter   @SquidDAO @BigSquid0x @Zoption @0xSquidSteed Topics:   (4:53) - Introducing the Squids: Big Squid    (9:10) - Introducing the Squids: Squid Steed   (13:05) - Introducing the Squids: ZOption    (17:05) - Squid DAO 101: What the Hell is it?   (19:55) - Squid's three different revenue protocols   (26:08) - What are the opportunities for an individual who interacts with SquidDAO?   (27:50) - What's the draw for people to get involved in Governance?   (31:17) - Incentive Alignment   (34:13) - Do Squid NFT Holders accrue new ETH in their wallet periodically?   (39:13) - Alpha Sharing   (41:26) - How do you build trust as an anonymous account?   (48:25) - Why are you all working so hard to stay anonymous?   (52:36) - How was SquidDAO born?   (56:19) - What does the “Org Chart” for the DAO look like?   (58:10) - What do partnerships look like?   (1:05:15) - The economics of the DAO   (1:22:07) - Building around ETH & other strategies   (1:27:51) - SquidDAO by the Numbers: The difference between market value and risk-free value   (1:32:44) - Putting Squid numbers in the context of a SPAC   (1:35:21) - What does the SquidDAO look like at it's highest aspiration?   (1:37:50) - What kind of help do you need to get there faster?   (1:41:32) - Who should people follow on Twitter & where should potential investors go?   (1:44:21) - Wrap up and final thoughts Additional Episodes If You Enjoyed: Simon Judd: How Index Coop is building Crypto Index products   Jason Hitchcock: Your Guide to Web3 (DeFi, NFTs, and The Metaverse)   Sean O'Connor: How Blockchain is Changing Society with Costless Transactions     If you want to support the podcast, here are a few ways you can:  >> Buy a copy of the Navalmanak: www.navalmanack.com/  >> Share the podcast with your friends and on social media  >> Give the podcast a positive review to help us reach new listeners  >> Make a weekly, monthly, or one-time donation: https://app.omella.com/o/9Bufa  >> Follow me on Twitter: @ericjorgenson >> Learn more and sign up for the “Building a Mountain of Levers” course and community: https://www.ejorgenson.com/leverage  I appreciate your support!     Important quotes from Naval on building wealth and the difference between wealth and money:   How to get rich without getting lucky. - Naval Ravikant   Making money is not a thing you do—it's a skill you learn. - Naval Ravikant   I came up with the principles in my tweetstorm (below) for myself when I was really young, around thirteen or fourteen. I've been carrying them in my head for thirty years, and I've been living them. Over time (sadly or fortunately), the thing I got really good at was looking at businesses and figuring out the point of maximum leverage to actually create wealth and capture some of that created wealth. - Naval Ravikant   Seek wealth, not money or status. - Naval Ravikant   Wealth is having assets that earn while you sleep. - Naval Ravikant   Money is how we transfer time and wealth. - Naval Ravikant   Ignore people playing status games. They gain status by attacking people playing wealth creation games.    You're not going to get rich renting out your time. You must own equity—a piece of a business—to gain your financial freedom.  - Naval Ravikant   The most important skill for getting rich is becoming a perpetual learner. You have to know how to learn anything you want to learn. The old model of making money is going to school for four years, getting your degree, and working as a professional for thirty years. But things change fast now. Now, you have to come up to speed on a new profession within nine months, and it's obsolete four years later. But within those three productive years, you can get very wealthy. - Naval Ravikant     Important quotes from the podcast by Naval on Leverage:   “Give me a lever long enough and a place to stand, and I will move the earth.”  —Archimedes    To get rich, you need leverage. Leverage comes in labor, comes in capital, or it can come through code or media. But most of these, like labor and capital, people have to give to you. For labor, somebody has to follow you. For capital, somebody has to give you money, assets to manage, or machines. - Naval Ravikant   Fortunes require leverage. Business leverage comes from capital, people, and products with no marginal cost of replication (code and media). - Naval Ravikant   Capital and labor are permissioned leverage. Everyone is chasing capital, but someone has to give it to you. Everyone is trying to lead, but someone has to follow you. - Naval Ravikant   Code and media are permissionless leverage. They're the leverage behind the newly rich. You can create software and media that works for you while you sleep. - Naval Ravikant   If you can't code, write books and blogs, record videos and podcasts. - Naval Ravikant   Leverage is a force multiplier for your judgment. - Naval Ravikant   Apply specific knowledge, with leverage, and eventually you will get what you deserve. - Naval Ravikant   “We live in an age of infinite leverage, and the economic rewards for genuine intellectual curiosity have never been higher. Following your genuine intellectual curiosity is a better foundation for a career than following whatever is making money right now.” - Naval Ravikant   Important Quotes from the podcast on Business and Entrepreneurship   There is no skill called “business.” Avoid business magazines and business classes. - Naval Ravikant   You have to work up to the point where you can own equity in a business. You could own equity as a small shareholder where you bought stock. You could also own it as an owner where you started the company. Ownership is really important.     Everybody who really makes money at some point owns a piece of a product, a business, or some IP. That can be through stock options if you work at a tech company. That's a fine way to start.    But usually, the real wealth is created by starting your own companies or even by investing. In an investment firm, they're buying equity. These are the routes to wealth. It doesn't come through the hours. - Naval Ravikant

Tore Says Show
Mon 17 Jan: Comeback - MLK Echos - Fix All - Corp Rules - Airplane Mode - Fake Bots - This Way

Tore Says Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 138:42


Long time observers are seeing old events come back around. There's the DEVOS meeting and their anti freedom agenda. Then, Astana is in the news again. It's Russian troops, Ukraine and NATO, the Euro Council, and a clean slate. MLK, the C_A, and the sacrifices made. Riding the VAX wave until it's flat. Google is the company. How about those 8,192 IP's? There is a lot of money currently changing hands. Just 30 seconds of world coms is massive. Where is all that stored again? Transparency should be a true goal. Some people don't want things fixed. The Dominion suit has it all. RICO means trafficking, fraud and real conspiracy. Fake support means pants fall down faster. It had to be this way, or when it's all over we would just be in the same position. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Corporate Escapees
363 - Protecting Your IP To Scale Freely With Devin Miller

Corporate Escapees

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 43:44


Many business owners push legal to the back of their priorities. But the reality is that if you want to scale, you need to protect your intellectual property and everything you've been working on for so many years.   Devin Miller, founder and CEO of Miller IP Law, is here to save the day. He loves helping small businesses and start-up owners save time and money by having their IP protected. In this episode, you will learn the difference between a patent, a trademark and copyright, a really cool way of getting some leads, and some great ways of getting your potential clients into calls.   Links 363 - Show Notes Masterclass Accelerated Sales Program   Connect With Paul  On LinkedIn On Facebook On Twitter: @BuildLiveGive On Instagram: @paulhigginsmentoring Email: Paul@paulhigginsmentoring.com   Thank You for Tuning In!

Franck Ferrand raconte...
Marquise Du Parc - Collection Molière

Franck Ferrand raconte...

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 27:13


De la troupe de Molière, elle aura été la comédienne la plus charmante, la plus séduisante, la plus sulfureuse aussi. Marquise Du Parc incarne, à elle seule, tous les sortilèges du Grand Siècle. Mention légales : Vos données de connexion, dont votre adresse IP, sont traités par Radio Classique, responsable de traitement, sur la base de son intérêt légitime, par l'intermédiaire de son sous-traitant Ausha, à des fins de réalisation de statistiques agréées et de lutte contre la fraude. Ces données sont supprimées en temps réel pour la finalité statistique et sous cinq mois à compter de la collecte à des fins de lutte contre la fraude. Pour plus d'informations sur les traitements réalisés par Radio Classique et exercer vos droits, consultez notre Politique de confidentialité.

Entertainment(x)
Dan Looney Part 1 ”Don't Be A Di*khead”

Entertainment(x)

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 22:23


Dan Looney (TW:@dan_looney)(IG:@dan.looney)(LI:@dan-looney)is a founder of the DLAP Group which is an award-winning corporation focusing on commercial entertainment across the globe. Comprised of ten subsidiary companies: DLAP Production, DLAP Management, DLAP Accountancy, DLAP Programming, DLAP Venues, DLAP Tickets, DLAP Agency, Creative Rights International, Fourth Wall Live and Ace Pantomimes. The company has won four Olivier awards for its co-production of Stephen Sondheim's musical, Company at the Gielgud Theatre in London's West End. It also received the Best Musical Award at the 2019 Deagu International Musical Festival in South Korea for their production of The Wedding Singer. DLAP produced the world premiere stage adaptation of The Last King of Scotland, based on the award-winning novel by Giles Foden (Sheffield Crucible Theatre) and the UK premiere of Kander and Ebb's musical-whodunnit, Curtains, starring Jason Manford (UK Tour and Wyndham's Theatre, West End) as well as The Last Five Years (Garrick Theatre, West End). DLAP's hit production of the 80's rock musical Rock of Ages toured the UK and Berlin in 2018-2019 and is currently playing on its second major UK Tour. DLAP has also produced the 30th Anniversary production of Fame! the musical on tour in the UK, internationally and in the West End (Peacock Theatre), as well as The Wedding Singer on tour in the UK throughout 2017 and at the Wembley Park Theatre in London in 2020, starring Strictly Come Dancing's Kevin Clifton. The company produced the legendary Broadway star, Chita Rivera Live in Concert at Cadogan Hall in 2019 and Phantom of the Opera In Concert at Beau Sejour, Guernsey. In 2020, DLAP launched a major new IP acquisition and development company, Creative Rights International, backed by venture capitalist Patrick Bradley of Station12 and in paertnership with InFine Theatre. The company controls a large portfolio of theatre, film and TV IP which it exploits globally. DLAP formed a new live events and concerts company, Fourth Wall Live, with renowned concert producer, Darren Bell. Fourth Wall produced the Live in London season at the London Hippodrome Casino in December 2019. 2021/22 concerts include Bonnie & Clyde In Concert (Theatre Royal Drury Lane), The Greatest Showman's Keala Settle as well as Shoshana Bean, Jenna Russell and Jessica Vosk (all at London's Cadogan Hall). DLAP most recently formed Ace Pantomimes with seasoned pantomime producers, Immersion Theatre.

Franck Ferrand raconte...
[Rediffusion] L'invention de la préhistoire

Franck Ferrand raconte...

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 16, 2022 22:24


Ce n'est pas le moindre des paradoxes que la Préhistoire – l'idée d'une longue aventure humaine avant l'Histoire – ait vu le jour aux temps modernes ! Son inventeur fut un certain Boucher de Perthes…Mention légales : Vos données de connexion, dont votre adresse IP, sont traités par Radio Classique, responsable de traitement, sur la base de son intérêt légitime, par l'intermédiaire de son sous-traitant Ausha, à des fins de réalisation de statistiques agréées et de lutte contre la fraude. Ces données sont supprimées en temps réel pour la finalité statistique et sous cinq mois à compter de la collecte à des fins de lutte contre la fraude. Pour plus d'informations sur les traitements réalisés par Radio Classique et exercer vos droits, consultez notre Politique de confidentialité.

Franck Ferrand raconte...
[Rediffusion] Dans l'intimité de Guillaume le Conquérant

Franck Ferrand raconte...

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 15, 2022 22:24


Avant d'être « le Conquérant », Guillaume de Normandie aura été « le Bâtard ». C'est sans doute dans son enfance rude qu'il a puisé la force de se lancer à l'assaut de l'Angleterre… Mention légales : Vos données de connexion, dont votre adresse IP, sont traités par Radio Classique, responsable de traitement, sur la base de son intérêt légitime, par l'intermédiaire de son sous-traitant Ausha, à des fins de réalisation de statistiques agréées et de lutte contre la fraude. Ces données sont supprimées en temps réel pour la finalité statistique et sous cinq mois à compter de la collecte à des fins de lutte contre la fraude. Pour plus d'informations sur les traitements réalisés par Radio Classique et exercer vos droits, consultez notre Politique de confidentialité.

Wealth, Actually
EP.100 SHAPING WEALTH with BRIAN PORTNOY

Wealth, Actually

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 15, 2022 24:15


Welcome Back to the Wealth Actually Podcast- This episode marks a big milestone.  We have hit the 100th EPISODE. I was pleasantly surprised to see that we have been downloaded in all 50 states and 114 countries. A big thank you to everyone who listens. As always, it's great for the show's momentum if you subscribe, leave reviews and share. For this 100th episode, I'm thrilled to have my friend, BRIAN PORTNOY, on the podcast. We talk about the next phase of behavioral psychology in the wealth management industry, the formation of his new company, SHAPING WEALTH, and his entrepreneurial journey. Brian is one of the world's leading experts on the psychology of money.   He has written multiple bestselling books, including The Geometry of Wealth, https://www.amazon.com/Geometry-Wealth-shape-money-meaning-ebook/dp/B07CXS9NLG/ Brian is a CFA Charterholder and earned a PhD at the University of Chicago. Last but certainly not least, he is the founder of the wealth education firm, Shaping Wealth which we're going to talk about here. SHAPING WEALTH -Describe what "Shaping Wealth" does? How is it grounded in your book's teachings? -What is the problem that the Wealth Advice industry has that SA is addressing? -How does reframing the psychology of "enough" advance financial advice for people? -How do advisors evolve to think more "psychologically" and with longer term legacy time horizons? - How does Shaping Wealth integrate with the tools that advisors use to advise their clients? -The entrepreneurial path- what is it like going down this road? -What is the experience of building a company off of your vision/IP? -What has been fun? What has been challenging? OUTRO - How do we stay in touch? How do advisors reach out to you? SHAPINGWEALTH.COM @BRIANPORTNOY on twitter https://twitter.com/brianportnoy https://www.amazon.com/Wealth-Actually-Intelligent-Decision-Making-1-ebook/dp/B07FPQJJQT/

Double Barrel Gaming
Xbox Exclusive S.T.A.L.K.E.R 2 Gets A MASSIVE Delay, NEW Twisted Metal Coming From Firesprite!

Double Barrel Gaming

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 123:23


Time Stamp Information: 01:00 Panel Intros 05:00 The team that was just acquired by Sony on 2021, Firesprite has been given the reigns for the Twisted Metal Reboot, I'm excited to "Revisit" this classic IP, are YOU? 00:33 A New Bloomberg Report has CONFIRMED that SIE will continue to make PS4 Consoles to take preasure of the PS5 shortages so far in 2022! Good idea or Bad one?? 1:15:00 STALKER 2 gets a MASIVE delay of 7 Months, does Microsoft "Need" to have another BIG AAA 3rd Party IP to replace the Unreal Engine 5 Post Apocoliptic FPS?? 2:10:00 Panel Outros and Special Message To The Community --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/craig-ravitch/support

Wake Up Call
97. John Rizvi, Esq.: The Patent Professor®

Wake Up Call

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 79:34


Let's kick off 2022 with some major inspiration. John Rizvi, better known as The Patent Professor, is a Board Certified Patent Attorney and the founder of an IP law firm located in South Florida. John goes back to his childhood: the time where his interest in engineering and patent law started to peek through (since little, he already had dreams and sketches to create a spherical Rubik's Cube!). He has been featured in renowned magazines and his law firm is considered one of the fastest-growing private companies in the United States. Nevertheless, he's been through some challenging times, which he shares in this interview, and, fortunately, they have gotten him to where he is now. Listening to John talk about the trajectory of his career will motivate you to start working on that wild dream or idea you've been thinking about, but have been holding off. So ditch the fear and embarrassment, and make 2022 the year you start making big things happen for YOU! Included in this conversation: Why he chose to become a lawyer How he started his business Why he prefers to work with passionate individuals instead of large corporations His engineering background His childhood dream: creating a spherical Rubik's Cube The best and worst part of being a patent lawyer What to do when you come up with a new idea or invention The important change made to the US patent law in 2013 Steps to patent an idea How he markets his business Why you need to hire extraordinary people for your company Why getting too comfortable is sabotaging your success The importance of self-discipline when you're an entrepreneur Being authentic: the key to success Read more about John Rizvi and his practice here: https://thepatentprofessor.com/ Follow John on Instagram: @thepatentprofessor https://www.instagram.com/thepatentprofessor/ Find him on Facebook: @patentprofessor https://www.facebook.com/patentprofessor/ Find him on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/the-patent-professor/ Follow me on social media here: Instagram @theprev www.instagram.com/theprev/ Facebook @wakeupcallthepodcast www.facebook.com/wakeupcallthepodcast Twitter @ThePrevite twitter.com/theprevite You can also watch episodes of Wake Up Call on YouTube: www.youtube.com/channel/UCjlkBJChmRfcu4l-kLs2Rwg If you think you would be an awesome guest on Wake Up Call, DM me on Instagram!

Franck Ferrand raconte...
Molière a 400 ans - Collection Molière

Franck Ferrand raconte...

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 24:34


Le 15 janvier 1622, à Paris, dans le quartier des Halles, naissait Jean-Baptiste Poquelin, appelé à devenir la gloire du théâtre français. Son 400e anniversaire est l'occasion rêvée d'explorer plus avant sa vie si mystérieuse. Mention légales : Vos données de connexion, dont votre adresse IP, sont traités par Radio Classique, responsable de traitement, sur la base de son intérêt légitime, par l'intermédiaire de son sous-traitant Ausha, à des fins de réalisation de statistiques agréées et de lutte contre la fraude. Ces données sont supprimées en temps réel pour la finalité statistique et sous cinq mois à compter de la collecte à des fins de lutte contre la fraude. Pour plus d'informations sur les traitements réalisés par Radio Classique et exercer vos droits, consultez notre Politique de confidentialité.

Danny In The Valley
Celsius' Alex Mashinsky: “This is a fight for all the money in the world”

Danny In The Valley

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 69:40


The Sunday Times' tech correspondent Danny Fortson brings on Alex Mashinsky, founder of Celsius, to talk about creating a crypto fund manager (3:25), managing risk (8:40), growing up in Israel (11:50), buying a one-way ticket to New York (14:10), his first startup (16:10), launching a voice-over-IP company (22:50), getting kicked out of his own company (27:50), trying to build Uber before Uber (30:10), putting wifi in the New York subway (34:10), getting into crypto (37:10), getting rejected by 200 venture capitalists (42:15), going from zero to $24 billion in assets under management (44:00), “centralised finance” (48:35), why he put $300 million of his own cash into Celsius (50:25), the future of crypto (55:05), and Web 3 and the fight for the future of money (1:02:40). See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Stack Overflow Podcast
Safety in numbers: crowdsourcing data on nefarious IP addresses

The Stack Overflow Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 25:55


You can find Philippe on Twitter here and learn more about CrowdSec here.They recently put together a list of the IP addresses trying to exploit the new Log4j vulnerability.For a prescient view of today's cybersecurity challenges, Humeau recommends John Brunner's classic 1975 sci-fi novel, The Shockwave Rider.

I Hate It But I Love It
257: The Boy Next Door

I Hate It But I Love It

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022 58:54


Continuing Sexy Thriller month, we're talking about the improbable Jennifer Lopez vehicle The Boy Next Door! We talk about the "first edition" trope and how it especially doesn't work here, how this movie's conceptually doomed, and nonetheless has a PERFECT ending. This episode brought to you in part by ZocDoc. With Zocdoc, you can search for local doctors who take your insurance, read verified patient reviews and book an appointment, in-person or video chat. Now is the time to prioritize your health. Go to Zocdoc.com/LOVE and download the Zocdoc app to sign-up for FREE and book a top-rated doctor. Today's episode brought to you in part by Nutrafol. Nutrafol helps you take control of hair growth, it is formulated with potent botanicals to help you grow hair as strong as you are. And it's physician-formulated to be one hundred percent drug-free. For free shipping and $15 off head to www.Nutrafol.com and use promo code LOVE. For hair as strong as you are. Brought to you in part by Cat Person, cat food that's everything your cat needs to stay happy and healthy – high quality, high protein meals delivered right to your door! Go to CatPerson.com/love and use code LOVE to save nearly 50% on your Starter Box with free shipping. This episode brought to you in part by Surfshark. Change your virtual location, bypass censorship, mask your IP address, and stay safe using Surfshark VPN. Go to www.surfshark.deals/love  and use promo code LOVE to get 83% off plus 3 extra months for free! IHIBILI Logo by Cubbyhole Studio www.cubbyhole.studio Produced by Andrew Ivimey as part of The From Superheroes Network. Visit www.FromSuperheroes.com for more podcasts, articles, YouTube series, web comics, and more.

We Hate Movies
Space Jam: A New Legacy

We Hate Movies

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2022 122:36


On this episode, the (Some of the) Worst of the Previous Year month continues with the disgusting IP orgy, Space Jam: A New Legacy! Why couldn't they give LeBron a hilarious little house like Michael Jordan got in the first one? Why did they have to make gross, pseudo-photorealistic Looney Tunes? And how many of these familiar WB background characters were ripped right from their respective porno parodies? PLUS: Look out for Granny and her tight, cartoon pants in that Matrix world—yikes! Space Jam: A New Legacy stars LeBron James, Don Cheadle, Cedric Joe, Khris Davis, Wood Harris, Ceyair J. Wright, Lil Rel Howery, Zendaya, Michael B. Jordan, Steven Yeun, Sarah Silverman, and Sonequa Martin-Green; directed by Malcolm D. Lee. Unlock Exclusive Content!: http://www.patreon.com/wehatemovies See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.