Podcasts about Digital

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  • 24,021PODCASTS
  • 82,323EPISODES
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  • Oct 21, 2021LATEST

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Best podcasts about Digital

Show all podcasts related to digital

Latest podcast episodes about Digital

Behind The Smoke
Digital Restaurants and the Future of Food | Authors Meredith Sandland and Carl Orsbourn | DH119

Behind The Smoke

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 43:48


Delivering the Digital Restaurant teaches how to build a successful digital restaurant business that will survive and thrive into the future. Authors Meredith Sandland (@meresandland) and Carl Orsbourn (@carlorsbourn) were guests on the Digital Hospitality podcast to discuss what they learned while writing their must-read restaurant business book, Delivering the Digital Restaurant Your Roadmap to the Future of Food. ➤ ORDER THE BOOK: https://www.deliveringthedigitalrestaurant.com Three Takeaways From This Podcast Episode: https://youtu.be/Wgqlw9npU28   1. Monthly Services Make Daily Differences – There was a time when only corporate companies could afford access to digital innovations that optimized orders or operations. That time has passed. Regardless of your size or scale, consider implementing software or systems that might come with a monthly fee but will change your business for the better day after day.   2. Your Competition is Your Community – We are all in this together. By having conversations with the restaurants in your community and discussing trends in your industry, you can create a better food landscape for your city or neighborhood as a whole.   3. There's No Such Thing as Throwaway Content – With all the research that went into writing a book, Carl and Meredith still had 90 percent of their conversations scrapped from the final copy that hit Amazon. So, did they just discard it? Of course not! They will continue to share untold stories through their social platforms as should you.   When Carl Orsbourn and Meredith Sandland began writing their book, Delivering the Digital Restaurant: Your Road Map to the Future of Food, they didn't know how they'd finish it, but they knew why they had to. “Our 'why' is really about helping restaurants navigate this digital change,” beams Meredith Sandland on the Digital Hospitality podcast. “We are incredibly passionate about the magnitude of this change and want to see everyone successfully get through it and thrive because they have figured out how to master it.” As alluded, that change is seeing restaurants of every size, shape and scale embrace evolving technology to better serve their customer base and grow their business. For years, both Meredith Sandland and Carl Orsbourn have worked in different ends of the food industry, expanding brands such as Taco Bell and British Petroleum to a new world with new customers. “I was seeing the enormous level of change of better quality food in the gas station environment,” reflects Carl Orsbourn. “There's so much change happening, so many exciting things that really are only at the front of where I think this industry is going.” Meeting at ghost kitchen company Kitchen United, the co-workers turned co-authors were already on the cutting edge of where the food industry was headed in the 2020s. After years of working for big brands and joining forces at a start-up, both could see that change was imminent. However, no one knew just how much 2020 would expedite this dramatic digital shift. “Everything that's happening is really an existential crisis for the restaurant industry,” Meredith Sandland shares. “We started the book back before the pandemic when we thought this would all take three to five years to play out. Of course, the pandemic accelerated all of that and laid bare the digital divide.”   Digital Restaurants: Because of the rapid change the restaurant industry faced due to the Coronavirus pandemic, restaurants either adapted or closed during the tough and evolving times. Even for those businesses that are still standing, it's essential that they learn through their competition and peers to best adjust their strategy and tools for the good of the communities they serve. “It is critical to figure this out together,” notes Meredith. “When I think in particular of our local independent restaurants, the ones that are the fabric of our community that make ...

The Church Digital Podcast
The "BIG ANNOUNCEMENT" at THECHURCH.DIGITAL

The Church Digital Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 19:42


So what's going on at THECHURCH.DIGITAL? What's this big announcement? Jump on this podcast to get the news first-ish... and find out how THECHURCH.DIGITAL is moving towards helping churches like yours with practical, grounded insight & tips. Once you check out the podcast swing over to http://thechurch.digital/sidekick --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/thechurchdigital/message

Diego Dreyfus
#136 - El enojo también es energía

Diego Dreyfus

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 5:58


Sinceramente esta es la razón por las que algunas veces puedo llegar a tomar en cuenta algunos comentarios de mis haters. Te la cuento en este episodio. Para ti que escuchas mi podcast, si aun no conoces mi Membresía Digital, la puse a un precio especial para que la pruebes. Chécala en www.tevasamorir.com/podcast

Online Genius Podcast
EP 237: Digital Marketing Is Just Marketing Using Digital Channels

Online Genius Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 11:52


On Thursdays, we're going to start a new series where we break down some of the foundational concepts of marketing. To kick things off, today we're answering the question, what is digital marketing? We'll break down a few misconceptions about digital marketing and look at what it really is. It's important for online marketers to know about traditional marketing because we're doing the same thing but online. Instead of newspapers, billboards, and television, we use digital channels like email, social media, and blogs. WHAT YOU'LL LEARN IN TODAY'S EPISODE: Digital marketing is marketing using digital channels What is different about digital marketing? The ability to communicate at scale in a customized way Digital marketing allows you to tailor your messaging The focus is still on sending the right message to the right person at the right time You should understand and leverage the strengths of your particular communication channel RESOURCES IN TODAY'S EPISODE: BADA$$ Online Marketing University Free Privacy Policy BADA$$ Online Marketers Follow Bobby on Instagram

Body Contouring Academy's Proven Profits Podcast
Why digital courses build highly successful body contouring businesses

Body Contouring Academy's Proven Profits Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 11:06


We are so often asked, “Are all of your courses online?”  And, “How do I learn how to perform the treatments online?”  We break down our answers to both of these questions in this podcast.  In our experience, online learning students become highly skilled body contouring technicians and build highly successful body contouring businesses...much more often than those who attend in-person workshops.  Listen to our reasons, and see if you agree.

Comic Lab
20 Comics Commandments

Comic Lab

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 101:59


Today's show is brought to you by Wacom — makers of the powerful, professional, portable Wacom One!  Help us celebrate our 200th show at ComicLabCashGrab.com ! We're celebrating 200 episodes of ComicLab with a special king-sized episode in which we assemble a list of our best advice — and discuss how to best implement them.  If you want the commemorative magnet with all 20 tips, head over to ComicLabCashGrab.comThe 20 Comics CommandmentsMake. A. Good. Comic. Nothing else we talk about will be very effective until you do.Own and control your work.Ideas aren't special. The execution of ideas is special.You can't get worse at something you do every day.Good writing saves bad art. Rarely does that work in reverse.You can't drive toward your style, you can only see in the rearview mirror.Lettering: Nobody will read your comic...if they can't read your comic. And for goodness' sake, learn the Crossbar-I rule.Time is the best editor. So edit...wait...edit...wait.If you're not enjoying the comic, they're not enjoying the comic.The 4-Cs of social media are: Creation, Curation, Commercial, Kindness.Don't compare your blooper reel to someone else's highlight reel.You have the audience you deserve.Every day someone is reading your comic for the first time.Research your market...not your mirror.Never listen to a reader; always listen to your readers.The first person to say they want merch is the first person to disappear when you make the merch.Crowdfunding: First comes the crowd, then comes the funding.It's easy to be in the right place at the right time…if you're always there.No one will ever care about your career as much as you do, so make your own magic.Being an overnight success will take you about 10 years. Your career is a marathon, not a sprint.Today is a great time to bump up your ComicLab membership to the $10 tier! Patreon backers at that level will get exclusive access to livestream recording sessions — as well as an archive of previous livestreams!You get great rewards when you join the ComicLab Community on Patreon$2 — Early access to episodes$5 — Submit a question for possible use on the show AND get the exclusive ProTips podcast. Plus $2-tier rewards.$10 — Gain access to the ComicLab livestreamed recording sessions (including an archive of past livestreams), plus $5-tier rewardsBrad Guigar is the creator of Evil Inc and the editor of Webcomics.com Dave Kellett is the creator of Sheldon and Drive.Listen to ComicLab on...Apple PodcastsGoogle PodcastsSpotifyPandoraStitcherComicLab is hosted on Simplecast, helping podcasters since 2013. with industry-leading publishing, distribution, and sharing tools.

RN Drive - Separate stories podcast
Will a digital label confirming authenticity help protect Indigenous artists?

RN Drive - Separate stories podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 5:13


The government has released their National Indigenous Visual Arts Action Plan today providing a welcomed financial boost to the sector.  But does their plan to rollout digital labelling for artworks leave some independent Indigenous artists out in the cold?   

Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)
WestRock Digital Chief Amir Kazmi on Creating a Sustainable Supply Chain

Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 25:12


604: In this interview, Amir Kazmi, Chief Information and Digital Officer of WestRock, focuses on the role of digital in creating sustainable packaging solutions for supply chains. Amir provides an overview of WestRock's business as a sustainable packaging solutions company and the purview of the two sides to his role as Chief Information and Digital Officer. He gives a few examples of how WestRock has grown its digital channels, what role digital plays in the supply chain, and how he builds greater digital dexterity and acumen across the company. Additionally, he discusses how his experience as a CEO of a startup informed his current role as a tech executive, how he continues to work with and leverage the capabilities of startups through ecosystems, and why providing leadership on a board of directors can make a real impact on the company and society. Finally, Amir shares with us a few tech trends he is looking forward to in the future.

Talk with Renee Dalo
110 | Talk About the Power of Digital Products with Christina Scalera

Talk with Renee Dalo

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 41:22


In this episode, Digital shop owner Christina Scalera talks about how creating digital products, no matter what industry you're in, can help you make money in your sleep. We talk about why you should and how as much effort as it may take initially, if done right, the benefits can help grow both your business and your wallet. So grab your coffee and a pen, and lets talk it out! 

Transformação Digital CBN
Transformação Digital CBN #133 - Crescimento e impactos do podcast no Brasil

Transformação Digital CBN

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 32:20


A pesquisa Statista Global Consumer Survey mostra que entre 2020 e 2021 o Brasil cresceu como um dos maiores consumidores de podcast no mundo, onde mais de 40% da população ouve conteúdos neste formato de mídia nos últimos doze meses, passando os Estados Unidos onde os ouvintes de podcast totalizam 34% da população. De acordo com uma pesquisa do Ibope, mais de 28 milhões de brasileiros consomem podcasts. O episódio de hoje é especial em comemoração ao Dia do Podcast, celebrado em 21 de outubro, e para falar sobre o crescimento do podcast no Brasil, sua influência nos conteúdos produzidos e a importância e representação do podcast brasileiro no mundo convidamos Pedro Kurtz, que é Head de Conteúdo Deezer no Brasil.

Happy Shooting - Der Foto-Podcast
#733 – Aus dem Vollem gedingst

Happy Shooting - Der Foto-Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021


Diese Folge als Video schauen Aus der Preshow: Sahne und Susi, Boris bassed, Boris muted, News über Kameras, Objektive, Film, Schwarz/Weiß, Feedback Fast immer dienstags, gerne mal um 18:00 Uhr: Happy Shooting Live. Täglich im Slack mitmachen – auch Audio-/Videokommentare werden gern angenommen. Danke an alle Spender des freiwilligen Solidaritätsabos. BUNQ-Link für direkte Spenden per … „#733 – Aus dem Vollem gedingst“ weiterlesen Der Beitrag #733 – Aus dem Vollem gedingst ist ursprünglich hier erschienen: Happy Shooting - Der Foto-Podcast.

Thale-Harate Kannada Podcast
ಮೊಬೈಲ್ ಕನ್ನಡ ಸಾಹಿತ್ಯ. Indian Literature in the App-era

Thale-Harate Kannada Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 66:38


ಪ್ರತಿಲಿಪಿಯ ಅಕ್ಷಯ್ ಬಾಳೆಗೆರೆ ಸ್ಮಾರ್ಟ್ ಫೋನಿನ ಕಾಲದಲ್ಲಿ ಭಾರತದ ವಿವಿದ ಭಾಷೆಯ ಬರವಣಿಗೆ ಮತ್ತು ಓದುವಿಕೆ ಹೇಗೆ ಬದಲಾಗುತ್ತಿದೆ ಎಂಬುದರ ಕುರಿತು ಮಾತನಾಡುತ್ತಾರೆ.ಕಳೆದ ದಶಕಗಳಿಂದ ಕನ್ನಡ ಸಾಹಿತ್ಯ ಮತ್ತು ಕಾದಂಬರಿಗಳ ಬರವಣಿಗೆ ಹಾಗು ಓದುವ ರೀತಿಯಲ್ಲಿ ಬದಲಾವಣೆಯನ್ನು ಕಾಣಬಹುದು. ಈ ಬದಲಾವಣೆಗೆ ಅಂತರ್ಜಾಲದ ಬೆಳವಣಿಗೆ ಮುಖ್ಯ ಕಾರಣವಾಗಿರುವುದು ಸುಳ್ಳಲ್ಲ.ಅಕ್ಷಯ್ ಬಾಳೆಗೆರೆ ರವರು ಪ್ರತಿಲಿಪಿ ಸಂಸ್ಥೆಯ ಕನ್ನಡ ಸಂಪಾದಕ ಮತ್ತು ಮ್ಯಾನೇಜರ್ ಆಗಿದ್ದಾರೆ. ನಮ್ಮ ತಲೆ-ಹರಟೆ 115ನೇ ಸಂಚಿಕೆಯಲ್ಲಿ ಅಕ್ಷಯ್ ಮತ್ತು ಪವನ್ ಶ್ರೀನಾಥ್ ರವರು ಅಂತರ್ಜಾಲದ ಏರಿಕೆ ಸಾಹಿತ್ಯಗಳ ಮೇಲೆ ಬೀರುವ ಪರಿಣಾಮ ಮತ್ತು ಪ್ರತಿಲಿಪಿ ಸಂಸ್ಥೆಯ ಹಲವಾರು ವಿಷಯಗಳ ಬಗ್ಗೆ ತಿಳಿಸುತ್ತಾರೆ.ಪ್ರತಿಲಿಪಿ ಭಾರತದ ಅತಿ ದೊಡ್ಡ ಸ್ವಪ್ರಕಾಶನ ಸಂಸ್ಥೆ. ತಮ್ಮ ಬರಹವನ್ನು (ಕಥೆ, ಕವಿತೆ, ಲೇಖನಗಳು ಮತ್ತು ಕಾದಂಬರಿಗಳು) ಪ್ರತಿಲಿಪಿ ಆಪ್ಪ್ ಮತ್ತು ವೆಬ್ಸೈಟ್ ಮೂಲಕ ಪ್ರಕಟಿಸಬಹುದು ಮತ್ತು ಓದಬಹುದು. ಪ್ರತಿಲಿಪಿಯಲ್ಲಿ ಹನ್ನೆರೆಡು ಭಾಷೆಗಳಲ್ಲಿನ ಸಾಹಿತ್ಯವನ್ನು ಓದಿ ಆನಂದಿಸಬಹುದು. ಪ್ರತಿಲಿಪಿ ಮೂಲತಃ ಸ್ವಪ್ರಕಾಶನ ಸಂಸ್ಥೆಯಾಗಿದ್ದು, 2021ವರ್ಷದಲ್ಲಿ ಮೂರುವರೆ ಲಕ್ಷಕ್ಕೂ ಅಧಿಕ ಬರಹಗಾರರು ಮತ್ತು ಮೂರು ಕೋಟಿ ಬಳಕೆದಾರರು ಹನ್ನೆರೆಡು ಭಾಷೆಗಳ ಸಾಹಿತ್ಯವನ್ನು ಆಸ್ವಾದಿಸುತ್ತಿದ್ದಾರೆ. ಬನ್ನಿ ಕೇಳಿ!Pratilipi Kannada's Akshay Balegere talks about how Indian language writing and reading is changing in the era of the smartphone.Pratilipi is India's most popular literature app, that allows users to read, write and engage with stories across 12 Indian languages, including English. In 2021, more than 3 crore (30 million) people use the app every month, and over 3.5 lakh authors write stories, poems, serialised novels, reviews, and more on the platform.Disclosure - IVM Podcasts is a part of Pratilipi since October 2020.Akshay Balegere is the Author Engagement Manager for Pratilipi Kannada, and has helped the platform grow over the last several years. On Episode 115 of the Thale-Harate Kannada Podcast, Akshay speaks to host Pavan Srinath about the writing and reading of Kannada literature and fiction over the last several decades, explores the impact of the rise of the internet, and shares the Pratilipi story. Akshay also shares how Pratilipi's top authors have now started earning from their writing, and how the app ecosystem has made that possible.Related links:Akshay Balegere's Profile on Facebook and on Pratilipi. https://kannada.pratilipi.com/ - Android App and iOS App.Pratilipi Kannada Facebook group Pratilipi Kannada on Facebook, Instagram, Twitter.Recommended listening:Thale-Harate: ಕನ್ನಡ ಪುಸ್ತಕಗಳ ಮುಂದಿನ ದಾರಿ: ಡಿಜಿಟಲ್. The Future of Kannada Publishing is Digital! With Pavaman Athani and Vasant Shetty.[English video] Co-founder Ranjeet Pratap Singh on building Pratilipi.ಫಾಲೋ ಮಾಡಿ. Follow the Thalé-Haraté Kannada Podcast @haratepod. Facebook: https://facebook.com/HaratePod/ , Twitter: https://twitter.com/HaratePod/ and Instagram: https://instagram.com/haratepod/ .ಈಮೇಲ್ ಕಳಿಸಿ, send us an email at haratepod@gmail.com or send a tweet and tell us what you think of the show!The Thale-Harate Kannada Podcast is made possible thanks to the support of The Takshashila Institution and IPSMF, the Independent Public-Spirited Media Foundation.You can listen to this show and other awesome shows on the new and improved IVM Podcast App on Android: https://ivm.today/android or iOS: https://ivm.today/ios and check out our website at https://ivmpodcasts.com/ .You can also listen to the podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Gaana, Amazon Music Podcasts, JioSaavn, Castbox, or any other podcast app. We also have some video episodes up on YouTube! ಬನ್ನಿ ಕೇಳಿ!

Bitcoin Magazine
THE QUEST FOR DIGITAL CASH by Alex Gladstein - Bitcoin Magazine Audible

Bitcoin Magazine

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 58:43


"Imagine that you are a military commander trying to invade Byzantium hundreds of years ago during the Ottoman Empire. Your army has a dozen generals, all posted in different locations. How do you coordinate a surprise attack on the city at a certain time? What if spies break through your ranks and tell some of your generals to attack sooner, or to hold off? The entire plan could go awry. The metaphor translates to computer science: How can individuals who are not physically with each other reach consensus without a central coordinator? For decades, this was a major obstacle for decentralized digital cash. If two parties could not precisely agree on the state of an economic ledger, users could not know which transactions were valid, and the system could not prevent double-spending. Hence all ecash prototypes needed an administrator. The magic solution came in the form of a mysterious post on an obscure email list on Friday, October 31, 2008, when Nakamoto shared a white paper, or concept note, for Bitcoin." Join Guy Swann as he narrates "The Quest for Digital Cash", a remarkable piece written by Alex Gladstein where he dives into the history of digital money and the remarkable journey of Bitcoin in particular: evolving from just an idea in the minds of cypherpunks to a worldwide settlement network on the path to becoming global base layer money. 

Bitcoin Audible (previously the cryptoconomy)
Read_571 - The Quest For Digital Cash [Alex Gladstein]

Bitcoin Audible (previously the cryptoconomy)

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 83:54


"The fight that the cypherpunks mounted was one of the main reasons that the U.S. government lost the Crypto Wars. The authorities tried to stop the code and failed. This realization would loom large in Back's mind 15 years later, in the summer of 2008, as he worked through that first email from Nakamoto." - Alex Gladstein Today we are reading an incredible article about the decades long quest of the cypherpunks, and the enormous contributions from Adam Back in that journey, to create digital cash. Another brilliant piece by Alex Gladstein and published on the Bitcoin Magazine. The Holy Grail of the cypherpunk mission is here, succeeding more every day and working its way into the psyche of every citizen in the world. But where did it arise, from what philosophy was it borne, and who were the players that made this possible today? All this and more in today's amazing piece. Check out the original article at the link below: https://bitcoinmagazine.com/culture/bitcoin-adam-back-and-digital-cash If you are new to Bitcoin and want to go deeper into the economics and concepts that shed light on the Bitcoin system, I suggest starting with Guy's Take #44 - Bitcoin Is Not What You Think It Is For the best products and services to get you started in Bitcoin, our sponsors are literally a handful of those that I use most in this space: • Buy Bitcoin automatically and painlessly with SwanBitcoin • Get Bitcoin rewards on literally everything you buy with the Fold Card (20% discount) • Keep your Bitcoin keys safe on the secure, open source BitBox02 (5% discount code GUY) • Get tickets to the biggest & most exciting Bitcoin conference in the world! Bitcoin 2022 (10% discount code GUYSWANN) Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Podcast Reviews Reviews Podcast
Macrosode 2 - Digital Humor

Podcast Reviews Reviews Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 132:50


Visit prrp.website for links to Patreon, merch, leaving reviews, et al.

Dental All-Stars | Dental Practice Training & Systems
Podcast: Protecting Your Practice From Ransomware and other Digital Threats, with Dr. Lorne Lavine, The Digital Dentist

Dental All-Stars | Dental Practice Training & Systems

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 42:20


All-Star Dental Academy Lead Mastery Coach Eric Vickery is joined by the Digital Dentist Dr. Lorne Lavine. Technology in the dental practice has the power to streamline systems and improve treatment outcomes and the patient experience. But it has the potential to expose unsuspecting dentists to liabilities they may not consider. Listen to Coach Eric […] The post Podcast: Protecting Your Practice From Ransomware and other Digital Threats, with Dr. Lorne Lavine, The Digital Dentist appeared first on All-Star Dental Academy.

Tcast
Why Data Is Absolutely Necessary for the Evolution of Humans Part 3

Tcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 21:18


Have you ever been so caught up in the process of creating something, you wind up losing sight of what you wanted as an end product? Hard work and ambition are admirable, especially when invested in the creation of new and exciting technologies. However, it is easy to get lost in the mechanics of work and to forget about the vision that inspired you to take up the mantle in the first place. In this episode, Alexander McCaig and Jason Rigby discuss the negative impact of the ongoing tech race on humanity—and how we can fix it. Are We Real-Life Inspector Gadgets?: Jason pointed out a discussion made by Aubrey Marcus that was pertinent to humanity's current situation. It was about how Inspector Gadget was dependent on his niece, Penny, to solve crimes and figure out cases. However, he always thought that he was the one responsible for saving the world when he created all sorts of new and complex technologies. Several parallels can be seen between humanity and Inspector Gadget. One is that despite our desire to foster peace and understanding, we do not approach such lofty goals with a concrete plan nor with small actions, we can commit to on a daily basis.  Another is in our obsession to constantly develop new and exciting technologies without a clear end goal in mind. Since the 1800s, when humans started experimenting with the implications of automating routine activities and making work more efficient, there has been a tendency to look at technology as a way to bring about heaven on earth.  However, utopia cannot be achieved just by perfecting the physical aspect of our world. It's also about the parts of our human experience that are not tangible, such as our understanding of one another. The work we put in research and development can easily become divorced from our understanding of each other, and of nature when we forget about using technology to co-create with nature and not around it. Technology Is Not the Key to Happiness: Why do we keep losing our way? According to Jason, it is because we believe that more tech automatically makes us more happy—even though there was never an assurance that increasingly sophisticated technologies would bring us more fulfillment.  If modern technology is being used to process and analyze data at the speed of light, why don't we turn to nature for inspiration more? Nature is constantly generating and giving data. The problem now is we are stuck churning out technology just for the sake of having it. When it comes to smartphones, it seems like we have plenty of new models to choose from every year. Plenty of people plan their finances around the next flagship device to be released, immediately letting go of the ones they just bought as they chase the next best thing. However, there was never a need to let go of so much tech. Their main function was to serve as tools for us to make better decisions, but not to hold our hand and teach us how to make these better decisions ourselves.  What's this extravagant tech race all about? What are we trying to reach for? Constructing the Tech Tower of Babel: Perhaps we invest in the latest technologies in the hopes that it can give us a deeper understanding of ourselves.  “We've had great advances in technology, but why has there not been a correlation of war and death going down? Why has human happiness not gone up? Right? Why have all these prevalent diseases increased?” Alex asked, “It's because we still lack understanding. The technology hasn't been designed to understand one another.” We could start using technology to start asking and answering difficult questions. Maybe we can finally compel ourselves to reflect on how there are aspects of our personality that are mirror images of what is happening around us; or how our thoughts are similar to the state of nature. We can look into the log of thoughts, behaviors, and actions that are produced by our devices to finally face the parts of ourselves that we've been trying to ignore. The TARTLE marketplace envisions a world where everybody has access to that deeper understanding. Anybody, regardless of their social status or location, can take responsibility for their part in changing the world.  Closing Thoughts: Standing in Solidarity: Amidst the pandemic, the call for isolation has had a massive effect on the human experience. We are similar to trees in that when we stand alone, the likelihoods of withering away are high. However, when we live in communes the way forests are made out of a society of trees, our individual identities and personalities help ensure our continued survival as a collective.  TARTLE is analogous to what is going on in the forest. It is composed of many people, with a wide variety of characteristics, personalities, and thoughts. We have the opportunity to unite and data that is right, truthful, and meaningful with others around the clock. What's your data worth? www.tartle.co   Tcast is brought to you by TARTLE. A global personal data marketplace that allows users to sell their personal information anonymously when they want to, while allowing buyers to access clean ready to analyze data sets on digital identities from all across the globe.   The show is hosted by Co-Founder and Source Data Pioneer Alexander McCaig and Head of Conscious Marketing Jason Rigby.   What's your data worth?   Find out at: https://tartle.co/   YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/TARTLE   Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TARTLEofficial/   Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/tartle_official/   Twitter: https://twitter.com/TARTLEofficial   Spread the word!

Your Next Best Step: Helping Small Business owners build a plan for a brighter future

Anytime there is a disruptor in an industry, or industries as a whole, it tends to open up a lot of what is wrong in our businesses. Whether it's a pandemic, a recession, or whatever else may come our way, it always helps to show us the areas that aren't resilient enough to withstand adversity and that need work.

Aggregate Feed - LoadingReadyRun
Digital Errata || TTC 381

Aggregate Feed - LoadingReadyRun

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 39:06


Graham, Cameron, and Nelson discuss early peeks at the new Secret Lairs, and the recent round of banning announcements, including digital-only errata. Support LRR: http://patreon.com/loadingreadyrun More LRR comedy on our OTHER CHANNEL: http://youtube.com/loadingreadyrun #Magic #Podcast #Errata

TapTapConcede - LoadingReadyRun
Digital Errata || TTC 381

TapTapConcede - LoadingReadyRun

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 39:06


Graham, Cameron, and Nelson discuss early peeks at the new Secret Lairs, and the recent round of banning announcements, including digital-only errata. Support LRR: http://patreon.com/loadingreadyrun More LRR comedy on our OTHER CHANNEL: http://youtube.com/loadingreadyrun #Magic #Podcast #Errata

Sales Reinvented
Interactive Selling in the Virtual World with Joanne Black, Ep #268

Sales Reinvented

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 13:56


The world is virtual—that's not going to change. So Joanne Black emphasizes that we must learn to sell in this virtual world. That means organizations need to give their salespeople the right tools to sell virtually. How do you look into the camera? How do you have a conversation and build relationships? These are the things salespeople can do in person but struggle with digitally. If that's you, listen to this episode of Sales Reinvented for some tips and tricks from Joanne Black. Outline of This Episode [1:13] The difference between digital and social selling [1:45] Provide the right tools and training [2:46] Joanne's digital selling blueprint [4:37] The attributes of a great digital seller [5:41] Tools, techniques, and strategies  [7:25] Top 3 digital selling dos and don'ts [10:19] Share, comment, interact, and invite Joanne's digital selling blueprint Joanne believes you need to have a written strategy that is clearly communicated. How does it apply to each person in your organization? How can you give them the skills to carry out the process? Joanne believes KPIs need to be attached to a social strategy and outreach. Managers tend to shoot from the hip and it leaves salespeople confused. Joanne has been virtual for years and has taken courses on how to sell virtually. She believes you must train and coach your salespeople, allow them to practice, and help them get results.  The attributes of a great digital seller Joanne notes that the attributes are very similar to in-person selling. You need to build relationships and play the long game. Some people believe that it's tough to develop relationships with digital selling but Joanne disagrees. If you are well-trained and know how to look into the camera and have a conversation, you will build those relationships. Most people sell complex solutions which means you likely won't close in one or two calls. You have to think about how to meet the buyers that are essential to closing the deal. Digital selling dos and don'ts on LinkedIn You have to learn how to use digital and social selling tools such as LinkedIn. People go on LinkedIn and pitch, send automated requests, and spew garbage. The best practice is to look at shared connections and read people's recommendations. You can refer to people's education, work history, and things they've written to reference in a conversation. People forget to be just as social as they would be in person. What are the rules of engagement? Don't stalk people and send automated messages: Joanne gets LinkedIn invitations and decides who to connect with and who she thinks will pitch her. Joanne connected with someone who pitched her when she responded to her acceptance. Joanne immediately removed her as a connection. This woman messaged her and asked why she removed her...Don't pitch people in your invitation!  Engage in conversation on LinkedIn. It's so easy to “like” something. But look at the conversation and share your point of view. Comment and interact with what other people have said to build relationships.  Invite people to connect who engaged with your comments with a personalized invitation. Never send a standard invitation.  Share, comment, interact and invite Joanne saw a post on LinkedIn from a head of sales all about referrals. People were commenting all over it and there was a lot of interaction (15–20 were chatting). Joanne added her voice to the conversation and it continued to develop. She decided to write to the head of sales and asked if he wanted to do a webinar about referrals and invite the people who had commented.  He didn't respond to that question. Instead, he asked her to come in and chat with his group. She had made an offer with no strings attached and it turned into business for her. If someone posts something within your area of expertise, don't be afraid to share a best practice. It's about being open and sharing as much as you can. Resources & People Mentioned LinkedIn Connect with Joanne Black Connect on LinkedIn Follow on Twitter Connect With Paul Watts  LinkedIn Twitter  Subscribe to SALES REINVENTED Audio Production and Show notes by PODCAST FAST TRACK https://www.podcastfasttrack.com

The Global Politico
Taiwan's digital minister on China's “digital authoritarianism”

The Global Politico

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 25:12


Imagine a world in which middle schoolers fact check presidential debates and public officials publish transcripts of every conversation they have. That's the world that Audrey Tang, Taiwan's digital minister, has helped create, thereby fortifying Taiwan's democracy even as it faces increasing threats from China. Tang tells POLITICO's Ryan Heath what it's like to govern and live in the shadow of China. Audrey Tang is Taiwan's digital minister.  Ryan Heath is the host of the "Global Insider" podcast and authors the newsletter.  Olivia Reingold produces “Global Insider.”  Irene Noguchi  edits “Global Insider” and is the executive producer of POLITICO Audio.

In Godfrey We Trust
Episode #268 - The King Of Produce

In Godfrey We Trust

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 69:22


On this weeks #InGodfreyWeTrust, it's a classic episode as Godfrey and Andre Kim catch up and talk Dave Chappelle getting backlash for his Netflix special "The Closer", the wildly popular Squid Games, shitty jobs they've had, and much much more! We're not reinventing the wheel, we're just talkin' shit (twice a week).#IGWT Ep 268SUPPORT OUR SPONSORShttps://www.podcastmerch.com for LIMITED EDITION MERCH available NOW!https://www.RockAuto.com and tell them you heard about them on the "In Godfrey We Trust" Podcasthttps://www.sheathunderwear.com and use promo code GODFREY for 20% OFFWatch & SUBSCRIBE on YouTubehttps://youtube.com/channel/UC9pY7pvK-F3S17lBK2yhgvw?sub_confirmation=1In Godfrey We Trust is LIVE every TUESDAY & FRIDAY at 10PM ET ONLY on GaS DigitalOr catch the YouTube Premiere later in the week: SATURDAY's & TUESDAY's at 11PMhttps://GaSDigitalNetwork.com/LIVESign up to #GasDigitalNetwork with promo code GODFREY for a 7 Day FREE TRIAL to get access to the HD livestreams, the live chat, and all episodes On Demand in HD.https://GaSDigitalNetwork.com/high-octane-all-accessFOLLOW THE WHOLE SHOW!GodfreyInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/comediangodfreyTwitter: https://twitter.com/GodfreyComedianAndre KimInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/andrethecomedian/GaS Digital NetworkInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/gasdigitalTwitter: https://twitter.com/gasdigitalSEND US AND EMAIL: InGodfreyWeTrust@gmail.comIf you have a product or service that you'd like to advertise on a GaS Digital Network show, go to https://GaSDigitalNetwork.com/advertise and use show code GODFREY to let them know we sent you!#InGodfreyWeTrustPodcast #Godfrey #GodfreyComedianSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

คำนี้ดี
KND763 Word Association ฝึกเชื่อมโยงเพื่อสร้างประเด็นในการพูด

คำนี้ดี

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 29:52


การเชื่อมโยงเป็นหนึ่งในคุณสมบัติของความคิดสร้างสรรค์ วันนี้ #คำนี้ดี กลับมาอีกครั้งกับซีรีส์ Find Your Voice feat. Win-scope พร้อมกับเกมสนุกๆ ที่จะฝึกไม่ใช่แค่การพูด แต่ว่ากล้ามเนื้อสมองการเชื่อมโยงคำของคุณด้วย! ถ้าทุกคนพร้อมแล้ว ก็ไปชมกันเลย   #PublicSpeaking #WinScope #คำนี้ดี #KNDpodcast #KNDstudio #TheStandardPodcast   Time stamp   00:00 Intro  03:51 Air Conditioner  05:54 Candy  07:14 There are so many topics one can relate a word with, so have fun with it! 09:00 Digital  12:44 Sunlight  16:04 Anyone with any background could practice word association exercise 17:09 Glasses  21:02 Coffee 23:39 Conclusion

Agency Journey
From Independent Marketing Agency to Elite HubSpot Partner With Rikki Lear

Agency Journey

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 30:43


Rikki Lear is the Director of Digital 22, an Elite HubSpot inbound marketing agency. Digital 22 has rolled out HubSpot and inbound marketing with 73 companies to date, helping them reach their goals sooner without the pitfalls. In his role, Rikki oversees the heads of service departments like finance, marketing, and HR.Previously, Rikki was on the Partner Advisory Council for HubSpot and worked in digital marketing for Workwear Express and Optimise Marketing. He holds several certifications from HubSpot, including HubSpot Trainer, Inbound Sales, Growth-Driven Design, and more.In this episode…Are you trying to optimize HubSpot's features for your agency, but keep getting stuck? Wouldn't it be nice if there was a team of experts ready to help?Digital 22 has the inbound marketing expertise you need. The agency's team members specialize in HubSpot features and understand all the best practices for implementing them into your business. With their help, one client had an additional 167 blog views, a 140% increase in offline revenue, and a 174% increase in online revenue. So, how did Digital 22 become the powerhouse agency they are today?In this episode of Agency Journey, Gray MacKenzie is joined by Rikki Lear, the Director of Digital 22, to discuss how he created the largest 100% HubSpot agency in the UK. Rikki talks about Digital 22's bold jump from SEO and PPC agency to HubSpot partner, the agency's decision to start accepting project-based clients, and how his team stays up-to-date with HubSpot features.

The Twelfth House
What Science Misses about Near-Death Experiences with Patricia Pearson

The Twelfth House

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 56:50


Today is the third episode of our series on death with our guest, Patricia Pearson. Patricia is the author of Opening Heaven's Door, What the Dying May Be Trying to Tell Us About Where They're Going [0:10:00] Why are so many spiritual women obsessed with true crime? [0:11:00] Is it true that most violent criminals are male? [0:19:00] What prompted Patricia to write a book on threshold and near-death experiences? [0:25:00] Patricia's theory on what happens just before we die [0:32:00] The danger of relying on the scientific method to understand death [0:46:00] What are near-death experiences vs. end-of-life moments? [0:50:00] Do we really die alone? [0:56:00] Stay tuned for Patricia's upcoming book about grief and hallucination [0:57:00] What it's like for Michelle to experience sleep paralysis and how it affects her belief on death Join the waitlist for Notion for Magical Baddies: Spells and Systems here Grab your FREE Monday Hour One template here! FREE! Digital altars for your phone for protection, abundance, cleansing, and more Join us in The Cusp here and the free Holisticism Hub here Resources Mentioned Follow Patricia Pearson on Twitter @pearsonspost or visit her website at https://patriciapearson.net/ to get in contact Opening Heaven's Door (What the Dying May Be Trying to Tell Us About Where They're Going) by Patricia Pearson Rabindranath Tagore

Digital Conversations
Pharmaceutical Companies Can Lead the Healthcare Industry into the Age of Digital Consumer Engagement. Friction is the Enemy and the Opportunity.

Digital Conversations

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 19:03


Despite countless billions of dollars spent, and decades of effort, healthcare still lags behind other industries when it comes to successfully using digital technologies to interact with its customers — the patients. The ongoing challenges created by the COVID-19 pandemic have resulted in rapid advances in digital health solutions and telehealth. The pharmaceutical industry essentially performed a miracle in delivering several effective new drugs in just months. Bradford Lee, VP of Life Sciences at Lifelink Systems, sat down with Greg Kefer to share some of the developments he's been part of in his role working with top innovation executives across all segments of the pharmaceutical industry. The combination of big organizations, legacy processes, and heavy regulation have historically held back rapid innovation and Silicon Valley thinking, but that may be changing.   Mature technology that's mobile and conversational is lowering the friction barrier for patients and trial participants. Healthcare providers are showcasing their digital transformation successes, paving the path for the entire industry. We are also seeing the traditional internal barriers for digital transformation come down as life science companies begin to look for ways to deploy simple, effective solutions quickly to get wins on the board and begin to generate the kinds of results needed for wide-scale innovation. Healthcare may be on the cusp of finally catching up to the other consumer industries that the leaders keep saying they want to emulate. 

Top of Mind with Julie Rose
FDA Vaping Rules, Ocean Worlds, Digital Birds

Top of Mind with Julie Rose

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 104:03


Smart, informative, unflinching conversations that go beyond mere headlines and soundbites. Weekdays at 4pm ET/1pm PT.

Thinking Crypto Interviews & News
Luke Mulks Interview - Brave & Basic Attention Token (BAT) - Brave Talk & Search, Crypto Market

Thinking Crypto Interviews & News

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 49:45


Luke Mulks is the VP of Business operations at Brave and Basic Attention token. We talk about the latest items with the Brave browser such as Talk, Brave Search, Brave 1.30 supports Microsoft Edge's protocol on Windows. We also touch on Bitcoin and the crypto market.https://twitter.com/lukemulkshttps://brave.com/

Community Broadband Bits
Let's Talk Fiber – Episode 478 of the Community Broadband Bits Podcast

Community Broadband Bits

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 29:12


On this episode of the Community Broadband Bits Podcast, host Christopher Mitchell talks fiber with Gary Bolton, CEO and President of the Fiber Broadband Association (FBA) at the Broadband Communities Summit in Houston, TX.  The two discuss a recent fiber optic technician training program that FBA is rolling out, not only to fill expertise gaps and the labor shortage, but also … Continue reading "Let's Talk Fiber – Episode 478 of the Community Broadband Bits Podcast"

Sync
68 - How Enterprises Manage 30,000+ Devices with MDM: Jarrod Ranney, IT Delivery Manager

Sync

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 53:01


Applications run today's businesses. Those applications are increasingly sitting on iPhones, iPads, Macs, and Android devices that are distributed around the globe. You likely have lost or misplaced even just one device. Try managing tens of thousands of them. Jarrod Ranney is a device whisper and through creative MDM solutions, he's bringing order to chaos.In this conversation, we cover everything from a recent story of MDM gone wrong for Disney, where to start in the process, different options to consider like JAMF, and MDM outside the workplace.Watch the video version of this episode.Links Article: Stolen Walt Disney World iPad Used By Guest with Tour Group to Skip Ride Lines at Theme Parks Illustration: How Apple and Google build vs. everyone else Jarrod's speaking event Jarrod's website Jarrod on Linkedin Follow newsletter @kenyarmosh /in/kenyarmosh kenyarmosh.com

Experience Better: The CX Podcast
Digital Wallets Are the Future of Payments and All About CX

Experience Better: The CX Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 21:08


Paying bills certainly doesn't top many people's list of favorite things to do. At best it's a hassle– at worst, it's an extremely stressful exercise. You can take some of the pain away by offering payment solutions that make it as quick and easy for your customers to pay their bills as possible. Digital wallets do just that. They're a convenient, easy, and secure way to pay, giving customers those truly on-the-go payment experiences they're looking for. In this episode of Experience Better, we talk to Yara Alatshan, Product Marketing Manager at KUBRA, to tell us all about digital wallets and why consumers prefer to use them.  

Daily Crypto Report
"Nexo Not Guilty in NY" October 19, 2021

Daily Crypto Report

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 2:54


Today's blockchain and cryptocurrency news Brought to you by ungrocery.com Nexo Not Guilty in NY France Piloting CBDC Russia Replacing Dollar with Digital and Other Assets

True Spies
The Digital Silk Road | Investigation

True Spies

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 46:31


Linguist and intelligence analyst Charity Wright has spent her career monitoring China. But as the country expands its influence around the globe, she's worried that the balance of global power could be shifting. Vanessa Kirby reveals the ways in which Chinese espionage could shape the future of the planet. What could YOU discover? From SPYSCAPE, the home of secrets. A Cup And Nuzzle production. Series producers: Gemma Newby, Joe Foley. Produced by Morgan Childs. Music by Nick Ryan.

Screaming in the Cloud
Works Well with Others with Abby Kearns

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 39:53


About AbbyWith over twenty years in the tech world, Abby Kearns is a true veteran of the technology industry. Her lengthy career has spanned product marketing, product management and consulting across Fortune 500 companies and startups alike. At Puppet, she leads the vision and direction of the current and future enterprise product portfolio. Prior to joining Puppet, Abby was the CEO of the Cloud Foundry Foundation where she focused on driving the vision for the Foundation as well as  growing the open source project and ecosystem. Her background also includes product management at companies such as Pivotal and Verizon, as well as infrastructure operations spanning companies such as Totality, EDS, and Sabre.Links: Cloud Foundry Foundation: https://www.cloudfoundry.org Puppet: https://puppet.com Twitter: https://twitter.com/ab415 TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by Liquibase. If you're anything like me, you've screwed up the database part of a deployment so severely that you've been banned from touching every anything that remotely sounds like SQL, at at least three different companies. We've mostly got code deployments solved for, but when it comes to databases we basically rely on desperate hope, with a roll back plan of keeping our resumes up to date. It doesn't have to be that way. Meet Liquibase. It is both an open source project and a commercial offering. Liquibase lets you track, modify, and automate database schema changes across almost any database, with guardrails to ensure you'll still have a company left after you deploy the change. No matter where your database lives, Liquibase can help you solve your database deployment issues. Check them out today at liquibase.com. Offer does not apply to Route 53.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by Honeycomb. When production is running slow, it's hard to know where problems originate: is it your application code, users, or the underlying systems? I've got five bucks on DNS, personally. Why scroll through endless dashboards, while dealing with alert floods, going from tool to tool to tool that you employ, guessing at which puzzle pieces matter? Context switching and tool sprawl are slowly killing both your team and your business. You should care more about one of those than the other, which one is up to you. Drop the separate pillars and enter a world of getting one unified understanding of the one thing driving your business: production. With Honeycomb, you guess less and know more. Try it for free at Honeycomb.io/screaminginthecloud. Observability, it's more than just hipster monitoring.Corey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud. I'm Corey Quinn. Once upon a time, I was deep into the weeds of configuration management, which explains a lot, such as why it seems I don't know happiness in any meaningful sense. Then I wound up progressing into other areas of exploration, like the cloud, and now we know for a fact why happiness isn't a thing for me. My guest today is the former CEO of the Cloud Foundry Foundation and today is the CTO over at a company called Puppet, which we've talked about here from time to time. Abby Kearns, thank you for joining me. I appreciate your taking the time out of your day to suffer my slings and arrows.Abby: Thank you for having me. I have been looking forward to this for weeks.Corey: My stars, it seems like things are slow over there, and I kind of envy you for that. So, help me understand something; you went from this world of cloud-native everything, which is the joy of working with Cloud Foundry, to now working with configuration management. How is that not effectively Benjamin Button-ing your career. It feels like the opposite direction that most quote-unquote, “Digital transformations” like to play with. But I have a sneaking suspicion, there's more to it than I might guess from just looking at the label on the tin.Abby: Beyond I just love enterprise infrastructure? I mean, come on, who doesn't?Corey: Oh, yeah. Everyone loves to talk about digital transformation, reading about books like a Head in the Cloud to my children used to be a fun nightly activity before it was formally classified as child abuse. So yeah, I hear you, but it turns out the rest of the world doesn't necessarily agree with us.Abby: I do not understand it. I have been in enterprise infrastructure my entire career, which has been a really, really long time, back when Unix and Sun machines were still a thing. And I'll be a little biased here; I think that enterprise infrastructure is actually the most fascinating part of technology right now. And why is that? Well, we're in the process of actively rewritten everything that got us here.And we talk about infrastructure and everyone's like, “Yeah, sure, whatever,” but at the end of the day, it's the foundation that everything that you think is cool about technology is built on. And for those of us that really enjoy this space, having a front-row seat at that evolution and the innovation that's happening is really, really exciting and it creates a lot of interesting conversation, debate, evolution of technologies, and innovation. And are they all going to be on the money five, ten years from now? Maybe not, but they're creating an interesting space and discussion and just the work ahead for all of us across the board. And I'm kind of bucketing this pretty broadly, intentionally so because I think at the end of the day, all of us play a role in a bigger piece of pie, and it's so interesting to see how these things start to fit together.Corey: One of the things that I've noticed is that the things that get attention on the keynote stage of, “This is this far future, serverless, machine-learning Kubernetes, dingus nonsense,” great is—Abby: You forgot blockchain. [laugh].Corey: Oh, yeah. Oh, yeah blockchain as well. Like, what other things can we wind up putting into the buzzword thing to wind up guaranteeing that your seed round is at least $200 million? Great. There's that.But when you look at the actual AWS bill—my specialty, of course—and seeing where the money is actually going, it doesn't really look that different, as far as percentages go—even though the numbers are higher—than it did ten years ago, at least in the enterprise world. You're still buying a bunch of EC2 instances, you're still potentially modernizing to some of the managed services like RDS—which is Amazon's reimagining of what a database could be if you still had to manage the finicky bits, but had no control over when and how they worked—and of course, data transfer and disk. These are the basic building blocks of everything in cloud. And despite how much we talk about the super neat stuff, what we're doing is not reflected on the conference stage. So, I tend to view the idea of aspirational architecture as its own little world.There are still seasoned companies out there that are migrating from where they are today into this idea of, well, virtualization, we've just finally got our heads around that. Now, let's talk about this cloud thing; seems like a fad—in 2021. And people take longer to get to where they think they're going or where they intend to go than they plan for, and they get stuck somewhere and instead of a cloud migration, they're now hybrid because they can redefine things and declare victory when they plant that flag, and here we are. I'm not here to make fun of these companies because they're doing important work and these are super hard problems. But increasingly, it seems that the technology is not the thing that's holding them back or even responsible for their outcome so much as it is people.The more I work with tech, the more I realized that everything that's hard becomes people issues. Curious to get your take on that, given your somewhat privileged perspective as having a foot standing very deeply in each world.Abby: Yeah, and that's a super great point. And I also realized I didn't fully answer the first question either. So, I'll tie those two things together.Corey: That's okay, we're going to keep circling around until you get there. It's fine.Abby: It's been a long week, and it's only Wednesday.Corey: All day long, as it turns out.Abby: I have a whole soapbox that I drag around behind me about people and process, and how that's your biggest problem, not technology, and if you don't solve for the people in the process, I don't care what technology you choose to use, isn't going to fix your problem. On the other hand, if you get your people and process right, you can borderline use crayons and paper and get [laugh] really close to what you need to solve for.Corey: I have it on good authority that's known as IBM Cloud. Please continue.Abby: [laugh]. And so I think people and process are at the heart of everything. They're our biggest accelerators with technology and they're our biggest limitation. And you can cloud-native serverless your way into it, but if you do not actually do continuous delivery, if you did not actually automate your responses, if you do not actually set up the cross-functional teams—or sometimes fondly referred to as two-pizza teams—if you don't have those things set up, there isn't any technology that's going to make you deliver software better, faster, cheaper. And so I think I care a lot about the focus on that because I do think it is so important, but it's also—the reason a lot of people don't like to talk about it and deal with it because it's also the hardest.People, culture change, digital transformation, whatever you want to call it, is hard work. There's a reason so many books are written around DevOps. And you mentioned Gene Kim earlier, there's a reason he wrote The Phoenix Project; it's the people-process part is the hardest. And I do think technology should be an enabler and an accelerator, but it really has to pair up nicely with the people part. And you asked your earlier question about my move to Puppet.One of the things that I've learned a lot in running the Cloud Foundry Foundation, running an open-source software foundation, is you could a real good crash course in how teams can collaborate effectively, how teams work together, how decisions get made, the need for that process and that practice. And there was a lot of great context because I had access to so much interesting information. I got to see what all of these large enterprises were doing across the board. And I got to have a literal seat at the table for how a lot of the decisions are getting made around not only the open-source technologies that are going into building the future of our enterprise infrastructure but how a lot of these companies are using and leveraging those technologies. And having that visibility was amazing and transformational for myself.It gave me so much richness and context, which is why I have firmly believed that the people and process part were so crucial for many years. And I decided to go to a company that sold products. [laugh]. You're like, “What? What is she talking about now? Where is this going?”And I say that because running an open-source software foundation is great and it gives you so much information and so much context, but you have no access to customers and no access to products. You have no influence over that. And so when I thought about what I wanted to do next, it's like, I really want to be close to customers, I really want to be close to product, and I really want to be part of something that's solving what I look at over the next five to ten years, our biggest problem area, which is that tweener phase that we're going to be in for many years, which we were just talking about, which is, “I have some stuff on-prem and I have some stuff in a cloud—usually more than one cloud—and I got to figure out how to manage all of that.” And that is a really, really, really hard problem. And so when I looked at what Puppet was trying to do, and the opportunity that existed with a lot of the fantastic work that Puppet has done over the last 12 years around Desired State Configuration management, I'm like, “Okay, there's something here.”Because clearly, that problem doesn't go away because I'm running some stuff in the cloud. So, how do we start to think about this more broadly and expansively across the hybrid estate that is all of these different environments? And who is the most well-positioned to actually drive an innovative product that addresses that? So, that's my long way of addressing both of those things.Corey: No, it's a fair question. Friend of the show, Matt Stratton, is famous for saying that, “You cannot buy DevOps, but I sure would like to sell it to you,” and if you're looking at it from that perspective, Puppet is not far from what that product store look like in some ways. My first encounter with Puppet was back around 2009, 2010 or so, and I was using it in an environment I was working within and thought, “Okay, this is terrible, and it's crap, and obviously, I know what I'm doing far better than this, and the problem is the Puppet's a bad product.” So, I was one of the early developers behind SaltStack, which was a terrific, great way of approaching the problem from a novel perspective, and it wasn't crap; it was awesome. Right up until I saw the first time a customer deployed it and looked at their environment, and it wasn't crap, it was worse because it turns out that you can build a super finely crafted precision instrument that makes a fairly bad hammer, but that's how customers are going to use it anyway.Abby: Well, I mean, [sigh] look, you actually hit something that I think we don't actually talk about, which is how hard all of this shit really is. Automation is hard. Automation for distributed systems at scale is super duper hard. There isn't an easy way to solve that problem. And I feel like I learned a lot working with Cloud Foundry.Cloud Foundry is a Platform as a Service and it sits a layer up, but it had the same challenges in that solving the ability to run cloud-native applications and cloud-native workloads at scale and have that ephemerality to it and that resilience to it, and the things everyone wants but don't recognize how difficult it is, actually, to do that well. And I think the same—you know, that really set me up for the way that I think about the problem, even the layer down which is, running and managing desired state, which at the end of the day is a really fancy way of saying, “Does your environment look like the way you think it should? And if it doesn't, what are you going to do about it?” And it seems like, in this year of—what year are we again? 2021, maybe? I don't know. It feels like the last two years of, sort of, munged together?Corey: Yeah, the passing of time is something it's very hard for me to wrap my head around.Abby: But it feels like, I know some people, particularly those of us that have been in tech a long time are probably like, “Why are we still talking about that? Why is that a thing?” But that is still an incredibly hard problem for most organizations, large and small. So, I tend to spend a lot of time thinking about large enterprises, but in the day, you've got more than 20 servers, you're probably sitting around thinking, “Does my environment actually look the way I think it does? There's a new CVE that just came out. Am I able to address that?”And I think at the end of the day, figuring out how you can solve for that on-prem has been one of the things that Puppet has worked for, and done really, really well the last 12 years. Now, I think the next challenge is okay, how do you extend that out across your now bananas complex estate that is—I got a huge data estate, maybe one or two data centers, I got some stuff in AWS, I got some stuff in GCP, oh yeah, got a little thing over here and Azure, and oh, some guy spun up something on OCI. So, we got a little bit of everything. And oh, my God, the SolarWinds breach happened. Are we impacted? I don't know. What does that mean? [laugh].And I think you start to unravel the little pieces of that and it gets more and more complex. And so I think the problems that I was solving in the early aughts with servers seems trite now because you're like, I can see all of my servers; there's eight of them. Things seem fine. To now, you've got hundreds of thousands of applications and workloads, and some of them are serverless, and they're all over the place. And who has what, and where does it sit?And does it look like the way that I think it needs to so that I can run my business effectively? And I think that's really the power of it, but it's also one of those things that I don't feel like a lot of people like to acknowledge the complexity and the hardness of that because it's not just the technology problem—going back to your other question, how do we work? How do we communicate? What are our processes around dealing with this? And I think there's so much wrapped up in that it becomes almost like, how do you eat an elephant story, right? Yes, one bite at a time, but when you first look at the elephant, you're like, “Holy shit. This is big. What do I need to do?” And that I think is not something we all collectively spend enough time talking about is how hard this stuff is.Corey: One of the biggest challenges I see across the board is this idea of conference-ware style architecture; the greatest lie you ever see is someone talking about their infrastructure in public because peel it back a little bit and everything's messy, everything's disastrous, and everything's a tire fire. And we have this cult in tech—Abby: [laugh].Corey: —it's almost a cult where we have this idea that anything that isn't rewritten completely within the last six months based upon whatever is the hot framework now that is designed to run only in Google Chrome running on the latest generation MacBook Pro on a gigabit internet connection is somehow less than. It's like, “So, what does that piece of crap do?” And the answer is, “Well, a few $100 million a quarter in revenue, so how about you watch your mouth?” Moving those things is delicate; moving those things is fraught, and there are a lot of different stakeholders to the point where one of the lessons I keep learning is, people love to ask me, “What is Amazon's opinion of you?” Turns out that there's no Ted Amazon who works over there who forms a single entity's opinion. It's a bunch of small teams. Some of them like me, some of them can't stand me, far and away the majority don't know who I am. And that is okay. In theory; in practice, I find it completely unforgivable because how dare you? But I understand it's—Abby: You write a memo, right now. [laugh].Corey: Exactly. Companies are people and people are messy, and for better or worse, it is impossible to patch them. So, you have to almost route around them. And that was something that I found that Puppet did very well, coming from the olden days of sysadmin work where we spend time doing management [bump 00:15:53] the systems by hand. Like, oh, I'm going to do a for loop. Once I learned how to script. Before that, I use Cluster SSH and inadvertently blew away a University's entire config file what starts up on boot across their entire FreeBSD server fleet.Abby: You only did it once, so it's fine.Corey: Oh, yeah. I'm never going to screw up again. Well, not like that. In other ways. Absolutely, but at least my errors will be novel.Abby: Yeah. It's learning. We all learn. If you haven't taken something down in production in real-time, you have not lived. And also you [laugh] haven't done tech. [laugh].Corey: Oh, yeah, you either haven't been allowed close enough to anything that's important enough to be able to take down, you're lying to me, or thirdly—and this is possible, too—you're not yet at a point in your career where you're allowed to have access to the breaky parts. And that's fine. I mean, my argument has always been about why I'd be a terrible employee at Google, for example, is if I went in maliciously on day one, I would be hard-pressed to take down google.com for one hour. If I can't have that much impact intentionally going in as a bad actor, it feels like there'd be how much possible upside, positive impact can I have what everyone's ostensibly aligned around the same thing?It's the challenge of big companies. It's gaining buy-in, it's gaining investment in the idea and the direction you're going in. Things always take longer, you have to wind up getting multiple stakeholders on board. My consulting practice is entirely around helping save money on the AWS bill. You'd think it would be the easiest thing in the world to sell, but talking to big companies means a series of different sales conversations with different folks, getting them all on the same page. What we do functionally isn't so much look at the computer parts as it is marriage counseling between engineering and finance. Different languages, different ways of thinking about things, ostensibly the same goals.Abby: I mean, I don't think that's a big company problem. I think that's an every company problem if you have more than, like, five people in your company.Corey: The first few years here, it was just me and I had none of those problems. I had very different problems, but you know—and then we started bringing other people in, it's like, “Oh, yeah, things were great until we hired people. Ugh, mistake. Never do that.” And yeah, it turns out that's not particularly sustainable.Abby: Stakeholder management is hard. And you mentioned something about routing around. Well, you can't actually route around people, unfortunately. You have to get people to buy in, you have to bring people along on the journey. And not everybody is at the same place in the way they think about the work you're doing.And that's true at any company, big or small. I think it just gets harder and more complex as the company gets bigger because it's harder to make the changes you need to make fast enough, but I'd say even at a company the size of Puppet, we have the exact same challenges. You know, are the teams aligned? Are we aligned on the right things? Are we focusing on the right things?Or, do we have the right priorities in our backlog? How are we doing the work that we do? And if you're trying to drive innovation, how fast are we innovating? Are we innovating fast enough? How tight are our feedback loops?It's one of those things where the conversations that you and I have had externally with customers are the same conversations I have internally all the time, too. Let's talk about innovators' dilemma. [laugh]. Let's talk about feedback loop. Let's talk about what does it mean to get tighter feedback loops from customers and the field?And how do you align those things to the priorities in your backlog? And it's one of those never-ending challenges that's messy and complicated. And technology can enable it, but the technology is also messy and hard. And I do love going to conferences and seeing how pretty and easy things could look, and it's definitely a great aspiration for us to all shoot for, but at the end of the day, I think we all have to recognize there's a ton of messiness that goes on behind to make that a reality and to make that really a product and a technology that we can sell and get behind, but also one that we buy in, too, and are able to use. So, I think we as a technology industry, and particularly those of us in the Bay Area, we do a disservice by talking about how easy things are and why—you know, I remember a conversation I had in 2014 where someone asked me if Docker was already passe because everybody was doing containerized applications, and I was like, “Are they? Really? Is that an everyone thing? Or is that just an ‘us' thing?” [laugh].Corey: Well, they talk about it on the conference stages an awful lot, but yeah. New problems that continue to arise. I mean, I look back at my early formative years as someone who could theoretically be brought out in public and it was through a consulting project, where I was a traveling trainer for Puppet back in 2014, 2015, and teaching people who hadn't had exposure before what Puppet was about. And there was a definite experience in some of the people attending class where they were very opposed to the idea. And dig down a little bit, it's not that they had a problem with the software, it's not that they had a problem with any of the technical bits.It's that they made the mistake that so many technologists made—I know I have, repeatedly—of identifying themselves with the technology that they work on. And well, in some cases, yeah, the answer was that they ran a particular script a bunch of times and if you can automate that through something like Puppet or something else, well, what does that mean for them? We see it much larger-scale now with people who are, okay, I'm in the data center working on the storage arrays. When that becomes just an API call or—let's be serious, despite what we see in conference stages—when it becomes clicking buttons in the AWS console, then what does that mean for the future of their career? The tide is rising.And I can't blame them too much for this; you've been doing this for 25 years, you don't necessarily want to throw all that away and start over with a whole new set of concepts and the rest because unlike what Twitter believes, there are a bunch of legitimate paths in this industry that do treat it as a job rather than an all-consuming passion. And I have no negative judgment toward folks who walk down that direction.Abby: Most people do. And I think we have to be realistic. It's not just some. A lot of people do. A lot of people, “This is my nine-to-five job, Monday through Friday, and I'm going to go home and I'm going to spend time with my family.”Or I'm going to dare I say—quietly—have a life outside of technology. You know, but this is my job. And I think we have done a disservice to a lot of those individuals who for better or for worse, they just want to go in and do a job. They want to get their job done to the best of their abilities, and don't necessarily have the time—or if you're a single parent, have the flexibility in your day to go home and spend another five, six hours learning the latest technology, the latest programming language, set up your own demo environment at home, play around with AWS, all of these things that you may not have the opportunity to do. And I think we as an industry have done a disservice to both those individuals, as well in putting up really imaginary gates on who can actually be a technologist, too.Corey: This episode is sponsored by our friends at Oracle Cloud. Counting the pennies, but still dreaming of deploying apps instead of "Hello, World" demos? Allow me to introduce you to Oracle's Always Free tier. It provides over 20 free services and infrastructure, networking databases, observability, management, and security.And - let me be clear here - it's actually free. There's no surprise billing until you intentionally and proactively upgrade your account. This means you can provision a virtual machine instance or spin up an autonomous database that manages itself all while gaining the networking load, balancing and storage resources that somehow never quite make it into most free tiers needed to support the application that you want to build.With Always Free you can do things like run small scale applications, or do proof of concept testing without spending a dime. You know that I always like to put asterisks next to the word free. This is actually free. No asterisk. Start now. Visit https://snark.cloud/oci-free that's https://snark.cloud/oci-free.Corey: Gatekeeping, on some level, is just—it's a horrible thing. Something I found relatively early on is that I didn't enjoy communities where that was a thing in a big way. In minor ways, sure, absolutely. I wound up gravitating toward Ubuntu rather than Debian because it turned out that being actively insulted when I asked how to do something wasn't exactly the most welcoming, constructive experience, where they, “Read the manual.” “Yeah, I did that and it was incomplete and contradictory, and that's why I'm here asking you that question, but please continue to be a condescending jackwagon. I appreciate that. It really just reminds me that I'm making good choices with my life.”Abby: Hashtag-RTFM. [laugh].Corey: Exactly. In my case, fine, its water off a duck's back. I can certainly take it given the way that I dish it out, but by the same token, not everyone has a quote-unquote, thick skin, and I further posit that not everyone should have to have one. You should not get used to personal attacks as a prerequisite for working in this space. And I'm very sensitive to the idea that people who are just now exploring the cloud somehow feel that they've missed out on their career, and that so there's somehow not appropriate for this field, or that it's not for them.And no, are you kidding me? You know that overwhelming sense of confusion you get when you look at the AWS console and try and understand what all those services do? Yeah, I had the same impression the first time I saw it and there were 12 services; there's over 200 now. Guess what? I've still got it.And if I am overwhelmed by it, I promise there's no shame in anyone else being overwhelmed by it, too. We're long since past the point where I can talk incredibly convincingly about AWS services that don't exist to AWS employees and not get called out on it because who in the world has that entire Rolodex of services shoved into their heads who isn't me?Abby: I'd say you should put out… a call for anyone that does because I certainly do not memorize the services that are available. I don't know that anyone does. And I think even more broadly, is, remember when the landscape diagram came out from the CNCF a couple of years ago, which it's now, like… it's like a NASCAR logo of every logo known to man—Corey: Oh today, there's over 400 icons on it the last time I saw—I saw that thing come out and I realized, “Wow, I thought I was going to shit-posting,” but no, this thing is incredible. It's, “This is great.” My personal favorite was zooming all the way in finding a couple of logos on in the same box three times, which is just… spot on. I was told later, it's like, “Oh, those represent different projects.” I'm like, “Oh, yeah, must have missed that in the legend somewhere.” [laugh]. It's this monstrous, overdone thing.Abby: But the whole point of it was just, if I am running an IT department, and I'm like, “Here you go. Here's a menu of things to choose,” you're just like, “What do I do with this information? Do I choose one of each? All the above? Where do I go? And then, frankly, how do I make them all work together in my environment?” Because they all serve very different problems and they're tackling different aspects of that problem.And I think I get really annoyed with myself as an industry—like, ourselves as an industry because it's like, “What are we doing here?” We're trying to make it harder for people, not only to use the technology, to be part of it. And I think any efforts we can make to make it easier and more simple or clear, we owe it to ourselves to be able to tell that story. Which now the flip side of that is describing cloud-native in the cloud, and infrastructure and automation is really, really hard to do [laugh] in a way that doesn't use any of those words. And I'm just as guilty of this, of describing things we do and using the same language, and all of a sudden you're looking at it this says the same thing is 7500 other websites. [laugh]. So.Corey: Yep. I joke at RSA's Expo Hall is basically about twelve companies selling different things. Sure, each one has a whole bunch of booths with different logos and different marketing copy, but it's the same fundamental product. Same challenge here. And this is, to me, the future of cloud, this is where it's going, where I want something that will—in my case, I built a custom URL shortener out of DynamoDB, API Gateway, Lambda, et cetera, and I built this thing largely as a proof of concept because I wanted to have experience playing with these tools.And that was great, not but if I'm doing something like that in production, I'm going with Bitly or one of the other services that provide this where someone is going to maintain it full time. Unless it is the core of what I'm doing, I don't want to build it myself from popsicle sticks. And moving up the stack to a world of folks who are trying to solve a business problem and they don't want to deal with the ten prerequisite services to understand the cloud, and then a whole bunch of other things tied together, and the billing, and the flow becomes incredibly problematic to understand—not to mention insecure: because we don't understand it, you don't know what your risk exposure is—people don't want that. They—Abby: Or to manage it.Corey: Yeah.Abby: Just the day-to-day management. Care and feeding, beyond security. [laugh].Corey: People's time is free. So, yeah. For example, do I write my own payroll system? Absolutely not. I have the good sense to pay a turnkey company to handle that for me because mistakes will show.I started my career running email systems. I pay for Google workspaces—or GSuite, or Gmail, or whatever the hell they're calling it this week—because it's not core and central to my business. I want a thing that winds up solving a business problem, and I will pay commensurately to the value that thing delivers, not the individual constituent costs of the components that build it together. Because until you're significantly scaled out and it is the core of what you do, you're spending more on people to run the monstrous thing than you are for the thing itself. That's always the way it works.So, put your innovation where it matters for your business. I posit the for an awful lot of the things we're building, in order to achieve those outcomes, this isn't it.Abby: Agreed. And I am a big believer in if I can use off-the-shelf software, I will because I don't believe in reinventing everything. Now, having said that, and coming off my soapbox for just a hot minute, I will say that a lot of what's happening, and going back to where I started around the enterprise infrastructure, we're reinventing so many things that there is a lot of new things coming up. We've talked about containers, we've talked about Kubernetes, around container scheduling, container orchestration, we haven't even mentioned service mesh, and sidecars, and all of the new ways we're approaching solving some of these older problems. So, there is the need for a broad proliferation of technology until the contraction phase, where it all starts to fundamentally clicks together.And that's really where the interesting parts happen, but it's also where the confusion happens because, “Okay, what do I use? How do I use it? How do these pieces fit together? What happens when this changes? What does this mean?”And by the way, if I'm an enterprise company, I'm a payroll company, what's the one thing I care about? My payroll software. [laugh]. And that's the problem I'm solving for. So, I take a little umbrage sometimes with the frame that every company is a software company because every company is not a software company.Every company can use technology in ways to further their business and more and more frequently, that is delivering their business value through software, but if I'm a payroll company, I care about delivering that payroll capabilities to my customer, and I want to do it as quickly as possible, and I want to leverage technology to help me do that. But my endgame is not that technology; my endgame is delivering value to my customers in real and meaningful ways. And I worry, sometimes, that those two things get conflated together. And one is an enabler of the other; the technology is not the outcome.Corey: And that is borderline heresy for an awful lot of folks out there in the space, I wish that people would wake up a little bit more and realize that you have to build a thing that solves customer pain, ideally, an expensive customer pain, and then they will basically rush to hurl money at you. Now, there are challenges and inflections as you go, and there's a whole bunch of nuances that can span entire fields of endeavor that I am hand-waving over here, and that's fine, but this is the direction I think we're going and this is the dawning awareness that I hope and trust we'll see start to take root in this industry.Abby: I mean, I hope so. I do take comfort in the fact that a lot of the industry leaders I'm starting to see, kind of, equate those two things more closely in the top [track 00:31:20]. Because it's a good forcing function for those of us that are technologists. At the end of the day, what am I doing? I am a product company, I am selling software to someone.So clearly, obviously, I have a vested interest in building the best software out there, but at the end of the day, for me, it's, “Okay, how do I make that truly impactful for customers, and how do I help them solve a problem?” And for me, I'm hyper-focused on automation because I honestly feel like that is the biggest challenge for most companies; it's the hardest thing to solve. It's like getting into your auto-driving car for the first time and letting go the steering wheel and praying to the software gods that that software is actually going to work. But it's the same thing with automation; it's like, “Okay, I have to trust that this is going to manage my environment and manage my infrastructure in a factual way and not put me on CNN because I just shut down entire customer environment,” or if I'm an airline and I've just had a really bad week because I've had technology problems. [laugh]. And so I think we have to really take into consideration that there are real customer problems on the other end of that we have to help solve for.Corey: My biggest problem is the failure mode of this is not when people watch the conference-ware presentations is that they're not going to sit there and think, “Oh, yeah, they're just talking about a nuanced thing that doesn't apply to our constraints, and they're hand-waving over a lot of stuff,” it's that, “Wow, we suck.” And that's not the takeaway anyone should ever have. Even Netflix doesn't operate the way that Netflix says that they do in their conference talks. It's always fun sitting next to someone from the company that's currently presenting and saying something to them, like, “Wow, I wish we did things that way.” And they said, “Yeah, I wish we did, too.”And it's always the case because it's very hard to get on stage and talk for 45 minutes about here's what we completely screwed up on, especially at the large publicly traded companies where it's, “Wait, why did our stock price just dive five perce—oh, my God, what did you say on stage?” People care [laugh] about those things, and I get it; there's a risk factor that I don't have to deal with here.Abby: I wish people would though. It would be so refreshing to hear someone like, “You know what? Ohh, we really messed this up, and let me walk you through what we did.” [laugh]. I think that would be nice.Corey: On some level, giving that talk in enough detail becomes indistinguishable from rage-quitting in public.Abby: [laugh].Corey: I mean, I'm there for it. Don't get me wrong. But I would love to see it.Abby: I don't think it has to be rage-quitting. One of the things that I talk to my team a lot about is the safety to fail. You can't take risk if you're too afraid to fail, right? And I think you can frame failure in a way of, “Hey, this didn't work, but let me walk you through all the amazing things we learned from this. And here's how we used that to take this and make this thing better.”And I think there's a positive way to frame it that's not rage-quitting, but I do think we as an industry gloss over those learnings that you absolutely have to do. You fail; everything does not work the first time perfectly. It is not brilliant out the gate. If you've done an MVP and it's perfect and every customer loves it, well then, you sat on that for way too long. [laugh]. And I think it's just really getting comfortable with this didn't work the first time or the fourth, but look, at time seven, this is where we got and this is what we've learned.Corey: I want to thank you for taking so much time out of your day to wind up speaking to me about things that in many cases are challenging to talk about because it's the things people don't talk about in the real world. If people want to learn more about what you're up to, who you are, et cetera, where can they find you?Abby: They can find me on the Twitters at @ab415. I think that's the best way to start, although I will say that I am not as prolific as you are on Twitter.Corey: That's a good thing.Abby: I'm a half-assed Tweeter. [laugh]. I will own it.Corey: Oh, I put my full ass into it every time, in every way.Abby: [laugh]. I do skim it a lot. I get a lot of my tech news from there. Like, “What are people mad about today?” And—Corey: The daily outrage. Oh, yeah.Abby: The daily outrage. “What's Corey ranting about today? Let's see.” [laugh].Corey: We will, of course, put a link to your Twitter profile in the [show notes 00:35:39]. Thank you so much for taking the time to speak with me. I appreciate it.Abby: Hey, it was my pleasure.Corey: Abby Kearns, CTO at Puppet. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn, and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, whereas if you've hated this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, along with a comment telling me about the amazing podcast content you create, start to finish, at Netflix.Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

Snap-on TV
Quick Release Digital Torque Wrench

Snap-on TV

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 1:00


Automotive repair shops don't have time to waste which is why we developed the Quick Release Digital Torque wrench. With quality and accuracy expected from Snap-on Tools, these torque wrenches will be your go-to in shop.

Afternoon Ti
Chrome Music Lab and Soundtrap: From Instruments to Paper to Digital

Afternoon Ti

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 12:59


Show Notes: 8x4x2 Chrome Lab/Soundtrap Student Worksheet and Slides 8x4x2 Soundtrap Directions Chrome Music Lab: Songmaker   Afternoon Ti Instagram: @highafternoonti Blog Have you purchased the Afternoon Ti Book and Journal?!  Get your copy at Amazon or F-Flat books now. Intro/Outro Music: Our Big Adventure by Scott Holmes

Serie A Chronicles
Controversy as Allegri's Juventus defeats Mourinho's Roma

Serie A Chronicles

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 71:34


Controversy struck Serie A this past weekend (surprise surprise!) as Roma scored a goal that was disallowed for a penalty kick in their favour, which was subsequently missed and Juventus won. Nobody knew what was going on, especially when Jose Mourinho didn't rage about it.Then upon Simone Inzaghi's return to the Stadio Olimpico, Inter got mad over Lazio not kicking the ball out when their player was faking an injury. It all got a bit crazy. Then a red card came out after the match and who'd be a referee?!?!Elsewhere, an excellent comeback from 2 goals down saw the agony and the ecstasy of football: an impressive Milan victory secured with a heartbreaking own-goal in the Verona net, and emotional scenes after the match as the forgotten man of Milanello, Samuel Castillejo, produced a fine performance to help rescue his team and earn the adulation of San Siro, Silvio Pioli and his team mates.Victor Osimhen inspired Napoli to their 8th win in a row to keep up their winning record and stay on top of the Serie A table.And then Nicky and Mina review the "Footballgate" episode of the new Netflix documentary series "Bad Sport", in which Mina Rzouki is featured, detailing the calciopoli scandal that saw the biggest upheaval in the history of Italian football.01:00 Juventus v Roma21:10 Lazio v Inter32:30 Supporters shoutout36:00 Milan v Verona50:00 Napoli v Torino58:50 Bad Sport Netflix discussionDon't forget our ChroniclesQ&A mailbag show on Friday.Tweet us your questions to @serieAchronpod with the hashtag #ChroniclesQandAFor sponsorship opportunities with Serie A Chronicles podcast email marketing@mediachronicles.com.au.Find Serie A Chronicles on social media (all the links here) and at our website serieachronicles.com.Please give us a rating and review on Apple Podcasts.You can also become a Chronicles Tifoso by supporting the podcast to help keep us running, at serieachronicles.com/supporter.Serie A Chronicles is a Media Chronicles production.Digital content and social media by Calido Media.Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/serie-a-chronicles. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Tcast
Why Data Is Absolutely Necessary for the Evolution of Humans Part 2

Tcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 16:44


How many times have we been placed in uncomfortable situations, and in which ones can we confidently say that we had the knowledge we needed to exit the circumstance with grace? Sometimes, our minds take shortcuts when we need to work through complex problems so that we do not overburden ourselves— but when we start relying on ducking into the side alleys to get to the destination, we do not get a full perspective of what we are truly dealing with. In this episode, Alexander McCaig and Jason Rigby discuss the harmful tendency to live lives within our little bubbles, comfort zones, and echo chambers. They point to how data can show us the ultimate truth and the objective reality—and why we need to start paying attention. Zero and the Inter-Dimension: Right off the bat, Alexander and Jason kickstarted the discussion by comparing the function of our choices to the number line, with zero as the space where there is no value. The positives lie to the right dimension of zero, while the negatives make up the left dimension. This makes zero, as the middle point, an inter-dimension of sorts. We choose to pivot one way or another when faced with difficult events and circumstances in life. However, we may not always have the full capacity to make the best-informed choice. It is human nature to sit within our own comfort zones and echo chambers, because we like information that validates us and exchanges where we know what to do. Our best solution lies in harnessing the power of data. Regardless of religion, political affiliation, or social class, data is capable of making us question the distorted lens we view reality with. We have the opportunity to hold ourselves responsible for our thought processes and interactions with the help of data, instead of continuing to live our lives in a passive manner.  It is difficult to face the reality that we may not be making the most out of our lives now. After all, procrastination is a natural human instinct.  “When you stagnate and you don't afford yourself new catalysts. It's like you're working with the same old data set every single day. What's there to be learned? The data sets [have] stopped.” Alexander explained.  Data as the Ultimate Truth: We underestimate the power of an objective and apolitical observer in our lives, which is what data represents. It captures our thoughts, actions, and perceptions— even the ugly parts of us that are distorted. This could be caused by a subconscious adherence to tradition, lifestyle, beliefs, values, ignorance, and others.  These misconceptions affect our openness to other people. We may become upset because they do not follow the same thought processes or behavioral patterns we do. In the long term, it could isolate us from other people or communities because it feeds into an us versus them mentality.  A lack of self-awareness does not just have an impact on our quality of life, or the lives of those around us. We slowly become vulnerable to the whims of more influential figures, who do not have any qualms with exploiting the minorities and pandering to the needs of the masses for personal gain.  Since data represents the ultimate truth, we need to harness its power for ourselves. It can empower us to make better decisions on so many levels. We deserve the truth and the ability to make better choices. Closing Thoughts: Overcoming Cognitive and Personal Bias: While the capacity to make better choices is a reward in and of itself, it can now be an opportunity to be financially compensated as well. The TARTLE marketplace is a way for us to earn from contributing to the ultimate truth. It is a platform that encourages us to be more collaborative over authentic information.  We are in need of tools and platforms that give us the opportunity to see beyond ourselves. It is time for us to take a step forward. Understanding the truth behind our circumstances gives us a glimpse of what is timeless, of the objective reality around all of us. We no longer need to think in abstractions or to bend over backwards to justify our emotions when we can be energized by what is present in the here and now. What's your data worth? www.tartle.co   Tcast is brought to you by TARTLE. A global personal data marketplace that allows users to sell their personal information anonymously when they want to, while allowing buyers to access clean ready to analyze data sets on digital identities from all across the globe.   The show is hosted by Co-Founder and Source Data Pioneer Alexander McCaig and Head of Conscious Marketing Jason Rigby.   What's your data worth?   Find out at: https://tartle.co/   YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/TARTLE   Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TARTLEofficial/   Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/tartle_official/   Twitter: https://twitter.com/TARTLEofficial   Spread the word!

Unchained: Your No-Hype Resource for All Things Crypto
Is the Metaverse Already Here? Two Experts Disagree - Ep.282

Unchained: Your No-Hype Resource for All Things Crypto

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 66:39


Andrew Steinwold, managing partner at Sfermion, and John Egan, CEO at L'Atelier BNP Paribas, discuss NFTs and debate the characteristics of the metaverse. Show highlights:  their backgrounds and how they got into NFTs how they each define the metaverse what NFTs have to do with the metaverse how John and Andrew's depiction of the metaverse differs what John thinks about Facebook's entrance into the metaverse whether Second Life is a metaverse game how blockchain technology allows for an open metaverse (and why Web2 is “communist”) what NFTs currently unlock for the metaverse whether the metaverse will necessarily have to be experienced through augmented reality whether there will be multiple metaverses across different blockchain platforms why John thinks NFT maxis and crypto maxis are destined to clash how the metaverse is changing how people generate income  how to make the metaverse more accessible whether regulators will force the metaverse to be siloed how the metaverse will handle jurisdictional disputes what happens when someone's Web3 avatar/identity is stolen in the metaverse what John and Andrew predict will happen in the metaverse over the next 6-12 months.  Thank you to our sponsors! Crypto.com: https://crypto.onelink.me/J9Lg/unconfirmedcardearnfeb2021        Nodle: http://nodle.io/unchained    NFT Research John Egan Twitter:  https://twitter.com/iamjohnegan  Website:  https://www.iamjohnegan.com/  LinkedIn https://www.linkedin.com/in/johndegan/ Content NFTs are like gambling, but could be the bedrock of virtual economy https://decrypt.co/62809/buying-nfts-like-gambling-in-a-casino-analyst Wired article on NFTs https://www.wired.co.uk/article/crypto-tokens    L'Atelier  NFT Content How NFTs are changing ownership https://atelier.net/insights/nfts-art-ownership-collecting The Virtual economy https://atelier.net/virtual-economy Real estate NFTs https://atelier.net/insights/tech-real-estate-nfts-tokenisation  Metaverse Content Unified coms vs. the Metaverse https://atelier.net/insights/unified-communications-metaverse-tech Primer on the metaverse https://atelier.net/insights/primer-define-metaverse-fortnite Digital anthropology https://atelier.net/insights/nathalie-bechet-digital-anthropology    Andrew Steinwold Twitter https://twitter.com/AndrewSteinwold LinkedIn https://www.linkedin.com/in/andrew-steinwold/ Blog must-reads A quick overview of the NFT ecosystem  https://andrewsteinwold.substack.com/p/-quick-overview-of-the-nft-ecosystem  NFTs will introduce the world to crypto?  https://andrewsteinwold.substack.com/p/nfts-will-introduce-crypto-to-the  Why functional NFTs will gain value slower than crypto art https://andrewsteinwold.substack.com/p/-the-promise-effect-why-functional  History of NFTs https://medium.com/@Andrew.Steinwold/the-history-of-non-fungible-tokens-nfts-f362ca57ae10  NFT Value Drivers https://andrewsteinwold.substack.com/p/-nonfungible-token-nft-value-drivers 

The Founder Hour
Roham Gharegozlou | How Dapper Labs Pioneered the NFT Movement

The Founder Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 61:33


If you've been on Twitter or read any news about the world of crypto in the last 6 months, you've probably heard of NFTs, or non-fungible tokens. At a basic level, an NFT is a digital asset that links ownership to unique physical or digital items, such as works of art, real estate, in-game items, music, or videos. Some of the most popular NFT projects include CryptoPunks, Art Blocks, Bored Ape Yacht Club and CryptoKitties, with more and more launching every day.In this episode, we sit down with Roham Gharegozlou. He's the founder and CEO of Dapper Labs, the team behind CryptoKitties, Cheese Wizards, NBA Top Shot, Flow Blockchain, and more, and an early pioneer of the NFT movement. Formed in February 2018, Dapper Labs was spun out of Axiom Zen, a venture studio that Roham launched, to bring the benefits of decentralization to the first billion consumers through the power of play, fairness and true ownership. The company recently raised a funding round of $250 million at a $7.6 billion valuation.We covered a ton of topics including Roham's upbringing and early career, how he fell into crypto and NFTs, why he created CryptoKitties, his vision for the future, and much more.SUBSCRIBE TO OUR NEWSLETTER & STAY UPDATED > http://bit.ly/tfh-newsletterFOLLOW TFH ON INSTAGRAM > http://www.instagram.com/thefounderhourFOLLOW TFH ON TWITTER > http://www.twitter.com/thefounderhourINTERESTED IN BECOMING A SPONSOR? EMAIL US > partnerships@thefounderhour.com

The Chris Voss Show
The Chris Voss Show Podcast – The Digital Silk Road: China’s Quest to Wire the World and Win the Future by Jonathan E. Hillman

The Chris Voss Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 32:47


The Digital Silk Road: China's Quest to Wire the World and Win the Future by Jonathan E. Hillman An expert on China's global infrastructure expansion provides an urgent look at the battle to connect and control tomorrow's networks. From the ocean floor to outer space, China's Digital Silk Road aims to wire the world and rewrite the global order. Taking readers on a journey inside China's surveillance state, rural America, and Africa's megacities, Jonathan Hillman reveals what China's expanding digital footprint looks like on the ground and explores the economic and strategic consequences of a future in which all routers lead to Beijing. If China becomes the world's chief network operator, it could reap a commercial and strategic windfall, including many advantages currently enjoyed by the United States. It could reshape global flows of data, finance, and communications to reflect its interests. It could possess an unrivaled understanding of market movements, the deliberations of foreign competitors, and the lives of countless individuals enmeshed in its networks. However, China's digital dominance is not yet assured. Beijing remains vulnerable in several key dimensions, the United States and its allies have an opportunity to offer better alternatives, and the rest of the world has a voice. But winning the battle for tomorrow's networks will require the United States to innovate and take greater risks in emerging markets. Networks create large winners, and this is a contest America cannot afford to lose.

G.I.O. Get It On
GLL Episode 1914

G.I.O. Get It On

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 105:03


CLL #1914 (feat. Cheryl Hines) 01/29/2003 – Wednesday Night Show Source – Lost Tape (2021) with KNRK CD Recording (2021) Patches This episode is 100% complete with a major audio upgrade, Cheryl...

Decoding Digital
Decoding Enterprise Transformation: Jennifer Byrne on Trust in Transformation

Decoding Digital

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 25:48


Digital transformation looks different for every business. Sometimes that transformation happens on a personal level, as well as professional. Former Microsoft CTO and Principal Owner of Digital Future Consulting, Jennifer Byrne, joined this episode to share how Microsoft navigated a tough period by being more transparent and how digital heroes at all levels play a key part in digital transformation success. Press play to hear Jennifer's thoughts on… Finding the Digital Heroes in Your Organization “The true heroes in my mind... are the folks who did the quiet work of ushering that transformation through a company. ... [S]omebody has to hold the hands of a lot of people who are trying to learn a new skill who are going to be adversely affected by this. They get no credit. They're the note takers in the meetings, but they're the people who are the lifeblood of transformation, in my opinion.” Creating a Culture of Learning “When there's a culture of learning, and where companies do it well, is where executives take that to heart. ... There is no shortcut. You have to do it also because your employees will watch. You've got to be in the boat with your people.” The Future of Work "It behooves you to think about the technology that's already encroaching in your space. Think about the job that you do today. If you go to work every day and you know exactly what your day's going to look like, you have a fairly automated, repeatable set of processes that you do. And that's actually more likely to be automated than somebody who goes to work saying ‘I have no idea how this is going to go.'"

Tech Talks
Andy Dean has found a tech solution to highlight the value of live music

Tech Talks

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 39:54


Andy is CEO of TagMix, a piece of software which adds high quality audio to user-generated video. This helps performers, venues and marketeers to position live music to as wide an audience as possible on social media. Also on the show we discuss the top startups and Web Summit, here is our list: https://websummit.com/

Legion of Skanks Podcast
Episode #585 - Oscar The Couch - Zac Amico

Legion of Skanks Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 84:36


Comedian Zac Amico joins Big Jay Oakerson and Luis J Gomez to discuss the future of Believe You Me Podcast, rock bottom moments in dating, and Hannah Gadsby's comments to the Netflix CEO about Dave Chappelle's special. All This and More, ONLY on The Most Offensive Podcast on Earth, The LEGION OF SKANKS!!! Air Date: 10/15/21Support our sponsors! Go to BreatheFUM.com/LEGION and use promo code LEGION for 10% off your order! Visit RockAuto.com for all your auto-part needs, and let them know you heard about them on Legion of Skanks Podcast! NEW Legion of Skanks merchandise is available at PodcastMerch.com/LOS!You can watch Legion of Skanks LIVE for FREE every Monday & Friday at 8:00pm EST at GaSDigitalNetwork.com/live.Once you're there, sign up to GaSDigitalNetwork.com with promo code LOS to receive a 7 day FREE TRIAL with access to our entire catalog of archived episodes! Including over 350 video episodes and over 500 audio episodes that have ever been recorded! On top of that, you'll also have the same access to ALL the other shows that GaS Digital Network has to offer!FOLLOW THE WHOLE SHOW ON SOCIAL MEDIA!Zac Amico (GUEST)Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/zacisnotfunny/Twitter: https://twitter.com/zacisnotfunnyLegion of SkanksInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/legionofskanks/Twitter: https://twitter.com/LegionOfSkanksBig Jay OakersonInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/bigjayoakerson/Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigjayoakersonLuis J. GomezInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/gomezcomedy/Twitter: https://twitter.com/luisjgomezDave SmithInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/theproblemdavesmith/Twitter: https://twitter.com/comicdavesmithGaS Digital NetworkInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/gasdigitalTwitter: https://twitter.com/gasdigitalSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

High Society Radio
HSR 10/14/21 I Just Did Leg Day Sit On My Face

High Society Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 94:27


Chris from Brooklyn and Bronx Johnny welcome the boys of Panties in the Mouth to the studio! LeMaire Lee, Nate Marshall, and Andy Malafarina help us polish off a pack of Tecate.Air Date: 10/14/21Support Our Sponsors!Promescent.comFollow HSR on Social Media:Twitter: https://twitter.com/HSRadioshowInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/highsocietyradio/Executive Producer: Alec AlaggioYou can watch High Society Radio LIVE for FREE every Thursday at 8PM on GaSDigitalNetwork.com/live.Merchandise is available at PodcastMerch.com/HSR!For access to our entire catalog of episodes On Demand in HD, subscribe to GaSDigitalNetwork.com. Use promo code HSR for a one week free trial and over 15% off your monthly membership. There, you'll have access to ALL of the other amazing shows on GaS Digital Network!See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Hipsters Ponto Tech
Transformação Digital na Ambev – Hipsters Ponto Tech #275

Hipsters Ponto Tech

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 44:05


Com certeza você já ouviu falar na Ambev, mas você conhece as muitas tecnologias envolvidas na empresa, inclusive com relação ao cliente final? No episódio de hoje do Hipsters Ponto Tech vamos falar sobre transformação digital nessa que é uma das maiores empresas do mundo. Participantes: Paulo Silveira, o host que é a cara do logo do Zé DeliveryBruno Cornet, Diretor de Tecnologia no Projeto Aurora da AmbevRicardo Albuquerque, Diretor de Transformação no Projeto Aurora da AmbevFabiana Reinert, Diretora de Transformação no Projeto Hércules da AmbevGustavo Moreira, Gerente Geral da Alura para Empresas Links: Conheça a AmbevTech Inscreva-se no YouTube da AluraInscreva-se na newsletter Imersão, Aprendizagem e Tecnologia Produção e conteúdo: Alura Cursos de Tecnologia - https://www.alura.com.br === Caelum Escola de Tecnologia - https://www.caelum.com.br/ Edição e sonorização: Radiofobia Podcast e Multimídia

Alexiomar Rodriguez
Cuál es la mejor distribuidora digital de música, pt. 2

Alexiomar Rodriguez

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 21:28


Todos quieres subir su música a plataformas como Spotify, la pregunta es cómo. En este episodio comparamos varias distribuidoras digitales: The Orchard, Ingrooves, Altafonte, Awal, iMusician, Spinnup, LANDR, Level Music. Descarga tu lista de cotejo gratis para recolectar tus regalías musicales a aquí: https://bit.ly/3tyvjVW Explora nuestros libros digitales, cursos y contratos personalizables en nuestra tienda online aquí: https://www.seedlawpr.com/tienda Únete a nuestra comunidad en YouTube aquí: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VrQVqLXERkI Conoce más sobre el equipo que utilizamos para grabar video-podcasts aquí: https://bit.ly/kit_video-podcast ENLACES DE AFILIADOS: Es posible que esta descripción contenga enlaces de afiliados que te facilitan encontrar elementos, productos, o servicios, que se mencionan en este video-podcast y que nos benefician sin costo alguno para ti. Si bien nuestra plataforma puede ganar sumas mínimas cuando utilizas los enlaces, NO ESTÁS obligado de ninguna manera a usar estos enlaces. ¡Gracias por tu apoyo! © 2021 Seed Law & Alexiomar Rodriguez. Derechos Reservados. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/seedlawpr/message

Blessed + Bossed Up
251: Take a Digital Break, Sis

Blessed + Bossed Up

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 57:23