Podcasts about CTO

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  • 4,457PODCASTS
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Best podcasts about CTO

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Latest podcast episodes about CTO

Unsung Science
How the Fitbit Knows You're Dreaming

Unsung Science

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 21, 2022 33:14


Over the last decade, a group of California scientists has quietly amassed the biggest sleep database ever assembled. It includes every dozing off, every wakeup, every REM-cycle, every chunk of deep sleep, from 15 billion nights of human slumber. It can tell us the average person's bedtime, whether men or women sleep longer, and which city is really the city that never sleeps. These scientists work at Fitbit—the company that sells fitness bands. And for them, revealing your sleep patterns is only the beginning. The longer-term goal of these scientists—and the ones working on the Apple Watch, Garmins, and other wearables—is to spot diseases before you even have symptoms. Diseases of your heart, your brain, your lungs—all picked up by a bracelet on your wrist. But how? Guests: Eric Friedman, cofounder and CTO of Fitbit. Conor Heneghan, senior research scientist, Google.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

SAE Tomorrow Today
93. Test Tracks of Reality: Applied Intuition and the Simulated Road, Warehouse and Port

SAE Tomorrow Today

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2022 37:34


What if you could test hundreds of thousands of traffic and road scenarios before your autonomous vehicles ever even touched asphalt? Imagine billions of miles and an untold number of road events encountered in the virtual world before your car or truck even left the factory floor. . Talk about a head start when it comes to safety and efficiency. . Using a comprehensive suite of products created from the best practices in software development, the minds at Applied Intuition work with clients to design virtual test environments that simulate everything the road can throw at them. They are creating a world where software-enabled vehicles are an integral part of society across all industries where there are vehicles – roads, yes, but also factories and ports as well. .  In this episode of SAE Tomorrow Today, Qasar Younis, Co-Founder and CEO, and Peter Ludwig, Co-Founder and CTO of Applied Intuition, discussed how they're combining Detroit engineering know-how with Silicon Valley digital ingenuity to design differentiated solutions for customers such as VW, GM and Toyota, enabling game-changing AV development with speed and scale. .  We'd love to hear from you. Share your comments, questions and ideas for future topics and guests to podcast@sae.org. Don't forget to take a moment to follow SAE Tomorrow Today (and give us a review) on your preferred podcasting platform. .  Follow SAE on LinkedIn, Instagram, Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube. Follow host Grayson Brulte on LinkedIn, Twitter, and Instagram.

Tech Leader Talk
How to improve communication in technology companies – Jayant Chaudhary

Tech Leader Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2022 36:23


On this episode, Jayant Chaudhary and I talk about his current work with technology companies. Jayant is an Innovative CTO who works in the areas of ecommerce, marketing, payments, logistics, and team building. He has 30 years of technology and leadership experience, and enjoys helping businesses make better technology decisions as they bring in new solutions. He's been a tech leader at startups and Fortune 50 companies. Jayant has led teams of over 300 people and managed budgets of over $40 million. Today, he is the CTO of eProxim, which provides technological expertise to solve complex ecommerce and middleware problems. “Most technology projects run into trouble due to a lack of good communication.” – Jayant Chaudhary Today on the Tech Leader Talk podcast: - How to improve communication in tech startups- The importance of developing trust with your team- Tips for building a strong ecommerce platform- How to grow your ecommerce platform as your company grows- How to build a strong communication system in your organization Connect with Jayant Chaudhary: Email: jc@eproxim.com LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/jchaudhary Website: https://eproxim.com/ Thanks for listening! Be sure to get your free copy of Steve's latest book, Cracking the Patent Code, and discover his proven system for identifying and protecting your most valuable inventions. Get the book at https://stevesponseller.com/book.

DevNews
S7:E2 - Safari 15's IndexedDB Vulnerability, An Attack of the Wordle Clones, Walmart Ponders NFTs, and More

DevNews

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2022 27:44


In this episode, we talk about Walmart's plans to get into NFTs and cryptocurrency, telecom operators starting to block Apple's iCloud Private Relay, and an attack of the Wordle clones. Then we speak with Valentin Vasilyev, co-Founder and CTO at FingerprintJS, whose team spotted a vulnerability in Safari 15's IndexedDB API. Show Notes Scout APM (DevNews) (sponsor) Walmart is quietly preparing to enter the metaverse Apple under fire over iPhone encryption tech The App Store clones are here to profit off Wordle's success Exploiting IndexedDB API information leaks in Safari 15

Sales and Marketing Built Freedom
The Hyper Personalised Ad Experience With Eric Frankel

Sales and Marketing Built Freedom

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 38:08


Prior to founding AdGreetz, Eric Frankel was President of Warner Bros. Domestic Cable Distribution. While running a $1 billion a year division he created advancements in new technologies such as on-demand video, high definition quality and online distribution. He also created and successfully launched the first-ever broadband Internet network, In2TV. In this week's show, Ryan and Eric look very closely at the constantly evolving world and benefits of targeted advertising.   KEY TAKEAWAYS The formal education system is lacking in terms of training the next generation of business leaders. The best way to grow and develop these people is through practical experience. Target the relevent channels for your product – hyperpersonalisation. Know what the world wants before the rest of the world wants nefore your competitors and then getting the best team together to sell that idea. Building the right team is the most important thing. Mentorship is one key to success.   BEST MOMENTS 'Rather than looking for that skip ad button or delete, you're going to pay attention' 'I've embraced things in my career thet no-one embraced or understood for a long time' 'My favourite tool is our CTO -  he's actually worth a dozen or two dozen people' 'I don't want you to work for free because the sandwhiches are fifteen bucks'   VALUABLE RESOURCES The Scale Up Show - https://omny.fm/shows/the-scale-up-show   Apply for a Revenue Growth Consulting Session With Ryan Staley - https://www.scalerevenue.io/4-schedule-page1611678914248     ABOUT THE GUEST Eric Frankel is the CEO and founder of AdGreetz, the industry's leading video personalization tech platform that is disrupting the $628b advertising marketplace by empowering brands worldwide to build stronger relationships with customers and to easily increase engagement 5X-7X and activation 2X-3X by producing and deploying thousands (or millions) of smart, hyper-personalized, data-driven, relevant, video and display ads and messages (versus a generic, much less-activating version) on 26 channels, optimized by AI/machine learning in real time. Eric's official website: https://www.adgreetz.com/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/stargreetz/ LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/eric-frankel-bb79666   ABOUT THE SHOW How do you grow like a VC backed company without taking on investors? Do you want to create a lifestyle business, a performance business or an empire? How do you scale to an exit without losing your freedom? Join the host Ryan Staley every Monday and Wednesday for conversations with the brightest and best Founders, CEO's and Entrepreneurs to crack the code on repeatable revenue growth, leadership, lifestyle freedom and mindset. This show has featured Startup and Billion Dollar Founders, Best Selling Authors, and the World's Top Sales and Marketing Experts like Terry Jones (Founder of Travelocity and Chairman of Kayak), Andrew Gazdecki (Founder of Microacquire), Harpaul Sambhi (Founder of Magical with a previous exit to Linkedin) and many more. This is where Scaling and Sales are made simple in 25 minutes or less.   ABOUT THE HOST Ryan is a Founder, Podcast Host, Speaker, Loving Father, Husband and Dog Dad. He is a 18x award winner and grew a business unit from 0-$30M in Annual Recurring Revenue while he adding $30M in capital revenue in less than 6 years.  He did this all with only 4 sales people and without demand generation.   Whether you are a new Founder,  VP or CEO who is already generating  6, 7 or even multiple 8 figures annually, you are going to gain knowledge about sales you didn't know existed.   CONTACT METHOD Ryan Staley - https://ryanstaley.io/podcast/ LinkedIn - https://www.linkedin.com/in/ryan-staley/ Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/ryanstaleysales Support the show: https://www.linkedin.com/in/ryan-staley/ See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Talent Economy Podcast
Architecting Scalable Engineering E-book Podcast

The Talent Economy Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 21:23


For many CTOs and directors of engineering, building scalable and successful software engineering teams can be difficult, due in large part to competing pressures and responsibilities. In addition to managing growing teams, they are tasked with keeping an eye on overall business objectives and navigating the pressures of their leadership roles—overcoming technical challenges, motivating the teams, planning for scale, settling disputes, tracking key metrics, and reporting to executive management—all of which require them to make countless vital decisions daily.Toptal's new e-book, Architecting Scalable Engineering Teams, helps leaders build the right team structure to overcome technical challenges, motivate talent, plan for scale, and track key metrics. In this accompanying podcast, Toptal Director of Engineering Marco Santos interviews Josh Holat, the Chief Technology Officer and Co-founder of Cube, a company dedicated to making FP&A faster, smarter, and simpler. Marco is also joined by Nik Patel, Chief Technology Officer and Co-founder at Cohesion, a cloud-based IoT company for smart buildings.This episode highlights three of the e-book's five team models, acknowledging that any given structure for success rests largely on an organization's size, industry, and product:● Stakeholder-focused squads. At Toptal, these squads are integral to building strong relationships between engineers and business stakeholders to ensure consistent delivery of business value.● Front-end/Back-end split structure. Cube, a financial analysis and planning platform, employs two different leaders—one to helm the front-end team and another focused on the back-end team.● Satellite teams. At Cohesion, a cloud-based IoT company for smart buildings, satellite teams ensure rapid scale and eliminate the complexity of hiring, onboarding, paying, and managing each team.Across all five models, engineering leaders recognize the value of temporary help—whether it's to build their teams or to add expertise that they may not have in-house.“Sometimes, a project needs to get done, but the leadership team isn't sure if the increased capacity will be necessary in the long run,” says Santos. “That is why so many startups rely on talent networks like ours to augment their teams. When you have an extra load, it's really nice to have an amazing network of talent that can help scale up.”Download the Architecting Scalable Engineering Teams e-book here to find out:How to overcome the short- and long-term challenges engineering leaders face when building their teams.How engineering leaders structure their teams for scale and success.How to hire and retain the best engineering talent.How to strategically hire freelancers amid rapid growth.Links:MARCO SANTOS, Director of Engineering at ToptalNIK PATEL, CTO and Co-founder at CohesionJOSH HOLAT, CTO and Co-founder at Cube See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Cloud N Clear
EP 117 / RUNNING MORE SECURELY WITH SADA'S TECHNICAL EXPERTISE AND GOOGLE CLOUD SECURITY SOLUTIONS

Cloud N Clear

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 21:26


NOW PLAYING #CloudNClear! Miles Ward, CTO, SADA, interviews the brilliant Dr. Anton Chuvakin, #Security Solutions Strategy, #GoogleCloud, and unpack what's new in #cloudsecurity and #threatdetection. They discuss how #GoogleCloud is leaning on the #strategicpartnership with SADA to deliver streamlined, scalable #securitysolutions, and why organizations need a #GoogleCloudPartner like SADA to help build #secure #applications on #GCP. Listen on-demand to hear SADA unpack Google Cloud's approach to #securitytechnology and how #automation is the future for enterprise #securityoperations. #GoogleCloudPlatform #cloud #containerization #containersecurity   Host: Miles Ward Guests: Dr. Anton Chuvakin   Connect on Twitter: https://twitter.com/cloudnclear https://twitter.com/SADA https://twitter.com/milesward https://twitter.com/anton_chuvakin   Connect on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/sada/ https://www.linkedin.com/in/milesward/ https://www.linkedin.com/in/chuvakin/

IoT For All Podcast
What are Smart Hospitals? | IoT For All Podcast E152 | Mackenzie Health's Felix Zhang

IoT For All Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 23:49


IoT's integration into hospitals creates a safer and more efficient solution for healthcare workers and patients. Smart hospitals utilize IoT and Real-Time Location Systems (RTLS) to track assets, patients, and staff with smart tags to generate greater operating efficiency. Felix shares insights he's gained as the CTO of Mackenzie Health, where he led the design and implementation of all the IT and smart technology featured in Canada's first smart hospital. Felix also talks about some of his favorite solutions of IoT in hospitals and how they create a more satisfying patient experience at Cortellucci Vaughan Hospital. Opened in June of 2021, the hospital utilizes RTLS for asset tracking, safety, workflow and to create a safer environment. Felix also discusses the challenges he's faced with integrating this new tech into healthcare. Felix Zhang has over 25 years of experience in the IT sector, with the last 20 in healthcare. His background in computer sciences and extensive leadership experience has aided him in his current role with Mackenzie Health. He is responsible for all of the information technology infrastructure, applications, and integration at both Mackenzie Richmond Hill Hospital and Cortellucci Vaughan Hospital. Discover more about:Smart Hospitals at http://iotforall.comMore about Mackenzie Health: www.mackenziehealth.caFelix Zhang's Email: felix.zhang@mackenziehealth.ca

Startup Insider
Electrochaea sammelt 36 Mio. Euro für kommerzielle Power-to-Gas-Anlage ein

Startup Insider

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 32:56


In der Nachmittagsfolge begrüßen wir heute Doris Hafenbradl, CTO und Managing Director von Electrochaea, und sprechen über die Series-D-Finanzierung in Höhe von über 36 Millionen Euro. Das Unternehmen hat ein Verfahren entwickelt, mit der fossiles Erdgas ersetzt wird und zusätzlich erneuerbare Energie in großen Mengen und über lange Zeiträume gespeichert und gleichzeitig CO2 wiederverwendet werden kann. Die Power-to-Gas-Biomethanisierungstechnologie von Electrochaea erzeugt erneuerbares Methan mit Hilfe eines Bioreaktors, in dem Archaebakterien eingesetzt werden. Beim klassischen Power-to-Gas-Verfahren wird bislang in einem ersten Schritt Wasser mittels Elektrolyse in Wasserstoff und Sauerstoff gespalten. In einem zweiten Schritt wird dann der Wasserstoff mit Kohlendioxid zu Methan umgewandelt. Das Startup aus München verbindet diese beiden Schritte zu einem einzigen, bei dem eine mikrobielle elektrochemische Zelle für die Reaktion verantwortlich ist. Die Mikroben fungieren dabei als Biokatalysatoren und erledigen mit ihrem Stoffwechsel die nötigen Umwandlungsschritte von CO2 und grünem Wasserstoff zu Methan. Der Europäische Innovationsrat Fonds (EIC Fund) beteiligt sich in Höhe von 14,9 Millionen Euro an dem Startup. Die Investition vervollständigt die Series‐D-Finanzierungsrunde in Höhe von insgesamt 36 Millionen Euro. Die Runde wird vom Energietechnologieunternehmen Baker Hughes angeführt. Auch die Bestandsinvestoren MVP, die ENGIE‐Tochter Storengy, Btov, KfW, Energie 360°, Caliza und Focus First beteiligen sich erneut. Es sei die nach Unternehmensangaben weltweit größte Finanzierungsrunde für ein Power‐to‐Methane‐Unternehmen. Ziel der Investitionsrunde soll sein, die Skalierung und Kommerzialisierung der Technologie von Electrochaea weiter zu beschleunigen. One more thing wird präsentiert von OMR Reviews – Finde die richtige Software für Dein Business. Wenn auch Du Dein Lieblingstool bewerten willst, schreibe eine Review auf OMR Reviews unter https://moin.omr.com/insider. Dafür erhältst du einen 20€ Amazon Gutschein.

The Music Biz Weekly
Ep. 503 SyncFloor.com Working to Make Licensing Music a Easier Process

The Music Biz Weekly

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 44:03


SyncFloor.com is working to make licensing music much easier. Kirt Debique, CEO & CTO of SyncFloor.com, joins us to discuss how SyncFloor.com is working to make licensing music much easier. SyncFloor is a B2B platform providing licensed access to high-quality commercial music for use by businesses and creators. Built around the concept of natural language […]

HomeTeam GameDev Podcast
AJ talks with Hometeam, Part 2

HomeTeam GameDev Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 18:40


AJ (@AJKolenc) is an indie game developer (@DubioGame and @HomeImprovGame), CTO of @FIX_Health_ and freelance developer with credits including PBS Games. Visit http://ajkolenc.com for detail. Part 2 of 2. Music by Danny Baranowsky

rSlash
r/Prorevenge I Embarrassed My Lazy Boss In Front of the Entire Company!

rSlash

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 16, 2022 15:49


r/Prorevenge In today's episode, OP works for a CTO who is one of the dumbest workers on the planet. The guy honestly thought that it was a good idea to give every single person in the company the exact same password. Anybody could literally log into the CEO's email whenever they wanted. OP pointed out that this was a bad idea, but the CTO refused to make any changes because he's a lazy douchebag. So, OP calls out the CTO in front of the entire company and embarrasses his boss so badly that the CEO fires him! --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

Doppelgänger Tech Talk
#110 Lieferengpässen bei ASOS | CTO finden | Gehalt vs. ESOPs | Teamviewer | WeTransfer + StockX IPO

Doppelgänger Tech Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 15, 2022 74:20


Pip war im Fernsehen. ASOS hat Lieferengpässen. Wie findet man einen CTO / technical co-founder? Sollte man auf Gehalt für mehr ESOPs verzichten? Positive Nachrichten bei Teamviewer? WeTransfer und StockX planen IPOs. Baut Zwift das coolere Peloton Bike? Philipp Glöckler (https://twitter.com/gloeckler) und Philipp Klöckner (https://twitter.com/pip_net) sprechen heute über: (00:02:25) ASOS (00:08:50) Einfamilienhaus Tagesverlust (00:16:00) $MSFT (00:19:27) $ZIP (00:29:45) Samsara (00:34:45) CTO finden (00:40:40) Unternehmensanteile (00:48:30) Praktikum (00:52:00) Teamviewer (00:56:18) Wetransfer / Stock X IPO Shownotes: Zwift Shows Off Zwift Ride Smartbike & Zwift Wheel Hardware Designs https://www.dcrainmaker.com/2021/12/zwift-wheel-zwift-ride-hardware-designs.html **Doppelgänger Tech Talk Podcast** Earnings & Event Kalender https://www.doppelgaenger.io/kalender/ Sheet https://doppelgaenger.io/sheet/ Disclaimer https://www.doppelgaenger.io/disclaimer/ Post Production by Jan Wagener https://www.linkedin.com/in/jan-wagener-49270018b (@Jawa_video) Sponsoring Anfrage https://forms.gle/RDqb8FDFmdgxrwdZ6

Motley Fool Money
Big Banks, Big Opportunities, and What Did The Fed Chief Say?

Motley Fool Money

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 39:04


Earnings season kicks off with the latest results from JPMorgan Chase, Wells Fargo, and Citigroup. Take-Two Interactive buys Zynga for $12.7 billion. Elastic's CEO moves to the CTO role. Virgin Galactic needs more money. Meta Platforms shuts down its dating service. Domino's makes changes to deal with inflation. Crocs makes a play for the luxury market. Maria Gallagher and Jason Moser analyze those stories, discuss why they're most curious about upcoming results from Pinterest and Etsy, and share two stocks on their radar: Adyen and Nvidia. CFP Malcolm Ethridge analyzes what Federal Reserve Chair Jay Powell said on Capitol Hill this week and why it matters to investors. Plus, he offers a preview of the 2nd season of "The Tech Money Podcast" and shares why he's keeping an eye on real estate, health care, PayPal, and UnitedHealth Group. Looking to get started investing? We'd love to help with a FREE copy of our Investing Starter Kit. Just click over to www.fool.com/StarterKit and we'll email it to you. Stocks: WFC, C, JPM, TTWO, ZNGA, ESTC, PINS, AMZN, ETSY, SPCE, MTCH, META, DPZ, CROX, PYPL, UNH, NVDA, ADYEY Host: Chris Hill Guests: Maria Gallagher, Jason Moser, Malcolm Ethridge Engineer: Dan Boyd

More In Common Podcast
Genius is Not Perfect /// Ben and Fitz /// EP146:Part2

More In Common Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 28:49


No matter how much effort you put into something, it's never done alone. This applies to everyone, including the smartest or most athletic. A genius doesn't create without supplies, funding, or assistance to contribute to their field of study. Like an athlete doesn't get to show their skills if the structure of sport doesn't exist.  This is highlighted by Ben and Fitz in this Part 2 episode of their conversation. They talk about the Genius Myth and the importance of recognizing it when building highly collaborative and effective teams.   ///   Brian (Fitz) is the Founder and CTO of Tock, and he started Google's Chicago engineering office in 2005. An open-source contributor for over 13 years, Brian was the engineering manager for several Google products, and is a member of the Apache Software Foundation, a former engineer at Apple and CollabNet, and a Subversion developer,   Ben is a co-founder & author of Subversion, a popular version-control tool to help programmers collaborate. He also co-authored the main O'Reilly manual for the software. He is currently the engineering Site Lead for Google's Chicago office, having joined Google in 2005 as one of the first two engineers in Chicago. He manages multiple teams working on Google's Search-serving infrastructure.   Together they have collaborated on multiple talks and books regarding the social challenges of software development. They have given dozens of talks at conferences (many viewable on youtube), and authored a popular O'Reilly book on the subject: Debugging Teams: Better Productivity through Collaboration.   /// Topics we discuss:   PrivilegeThe relative nature of privilege Seeing privilege Their Book - Debugging TeamsGenius Myth Working together in a creative space Peter Principle Understanding others Pursue what makes sense for each   References: ORD Camp Crucial Conversations H.A.L.T. - Hungry, Angry, Lonely, Tired Free Book - Debugging Teams Nikola Tesla and Thomas Edison Peter Principle   Credits:   Music: Main Theme: "Eaze Does It" by Shye Eaze and DJ Rufbeats, a More In Common Podcast Exclusive. All music created by DJ Rufbeats

CloudSkills.fm
138: Web Assembly, Distributed Apps, and Cloud Native with Kevin Hoffman

CloudSkills.fm

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2022 32:31


In this episode Mike Pfeiffer chats with Kevin Hoffman, author of Programming Web Assembly with Rust and CTO of Cosmonic.Follow Kevin on twitter:https://twitter.com/KevinHoffmanCheck out Kevin's book:https://amzn.to/3faH92mCheck out wasmCloud:https://wasmcloud.com/https://www.youtube.com/c/wasmCloud/Check out Cosmonic:https://cosmonic.com/

Screaming in the Cloud
GCP's Many Profundities with Miles Ward

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2022 42:06


About MilesAs Chief Technology Officer at SADA, Miles Ward leads SADA's cloud strategy and solutions capabilities. His remit includes delivering next-generation solutions to challenges in big data and analytics, application migration, infrastructure automation, and cost optimization; reinforcing our engineering culture; and engaging with customers on their most complex and ambitious plans around Google Cloud.Previously, Miles served as Director and Global Lead for Solutions at Google Cloud. He founded the Google Cloud's Solutions Architecture practice, launched hundreds of solutions, built Style-Detection and Hummus AI APIs, built CloudHero, designed the pricing and TCO calculators, and helped thousands of customers like Twitter who migrated the world's largest Hadoop cluster to public cloud and Audi USA who re-platformed to k8s before it was out of alpha, and helped Banco Itau design the intercloud architecture for the bank of the future.Before Google, Miles helped build the AWS Solutions Architecture team. He wrote the first AWS Well-Architected framework, proposed Trusted Advisor and the Snowmobile, invented GameDay, worked as a core part of the Obama for America 2012 “tech” team, helped NASA stream the Curiosity Mars Rover landing, and rebooted Skype in a pinch.Earning his Bachelor of Science in Rhetoric and Media Studies from Willamette University, Miles is a three-time technology startup entrepreneur who also plays a mean electric sousaphone.Links: SADA.com: https://sada.com Twitter: https://twitter.com/milesward Email: miles@sada.com TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: It seems like there is a new security breach every day. Are you confident that an old SSH key, or a shared admin account, isn't going to come back and bite you? If not, check out Teleport. Teleport is the easiest, most secure way to access all of your infrastructure. The open source Teleport Access Plane consolidates everything you need for secure access to your Linux and Windows servers—and I assure you there is no third option there. Kubernetes clusters, databases, and internal applications like AWS Management Console, Yankins, GitLab, Grafana, Jupyter Notebooks, and more. Teleport's unique approach is not only more secure, it also improves developer productivity. To learn more visit: goteleport.com. And not, that is not me telling you to go away, it is: goteleport.com.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by our friends at Redis, the company behind the incredibly popular open source database that is not the bind DNS server. If you're tired of managing open source Redis on your own, or you're using one of the vanilla cloud caching services, these folks have you covered with the go to manage Redis service for global caching and primary database capabilities; Redis Enterprise. To learn more and deploy not only a cache but a single operational data platform for one Redis experience, visit redis.com/hero. Thats r-e-d-i-s.com/hero. And my thanks to my friends at Redis for sponsoring my ridiculous non-sense.  Corey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud. I'm Corey Quinn. I am joined today, once again by my friend and yours, Miles Ward, who's the CTO at SADA. However, he is, as I think of him, the closest thing the Google Cloud world has to Corey Quinn. Now, let's be clear, not the music and dancing part that is Forrest Brazeal, but Forrest works at Google Cloud, whereas Miles is a reasonably salty third-party. Miles, thank you for coming back and letting me subject you to that introduction.Miles: Corey, I appreciate that introduction. I am happy to provide substantial salt. It is easy, as I play brass instruments that produce my spit in high volumes. It's the most disgusting part of any possible introduction. For the folks in the audience, I am surrounded by a collection of giant sousaphones, tubas, trombones, baritones, marching baritones, trumpets, and pocket trumpets.So, Forrest threw down the gauntlet and was like, I can play a keyboard, and sing, and look cute at the same time. And so I decided to fail at all three. We put out a new song just a bit ago that's, like, us thanking all of our customers and partners, covering Kool & the Gang “Celebration,” and I neither look good, [laugh] play piano, or smiling, or [capturing 00:01:46] any of the notes; I just play the bass part, it's all I got to do.Corey: So, one thing that I didn't get to talk a lot about because it's not quite in my universe, for one, and for another, it is during the pre re:Invent—pre:Invent, my nonsense thing—run up, which is Google Cloud Next.Miles: Yes.Corey: And my gag a few years ago is that I'm not saying that Google is more interested in what they're building and what they're shipping, but even their conference is called Next. Buh dum, hiss.Miles: [laugh].Corey: So, I didn't really get to spend a lot of attention on the Google Cloud releases that came out this year, but given that SADA is in fact the, I believe, largest Google Cloud partner on the internet, and thus the world—Miles: [unintelligible 00:02:27] new year, three years in a row back, baby.Corey: Fantastic. I assume someone's watch got stuck or something. But good work. So, you have that bias in the way that I have a bias, which is your business is focused around Google Cloud the way that mine is focused on AWS, but neither of us is particularly beholden to that given company. I mean, you do have the not getting fired as partner, but that's a bit of a heavy lift; I don't think I can mouth off well enough to get you there.So, we have a position of relative independence. So, you were tracking Google Next, the same way that I track re:Invent. Well, not quite the same way I track re:Invent; there are some significant differences. What happened at Cloud Next 2021, that the worst of us should be paying attention to?Miles: Sure. I presented 10% of the material at the first re:Invent. There are 55 sessions; I did six. And so I have been at Cloud events for a really long time and really excited about Google's willingness to dive into demos in a way that I think they have been a little shy about. Kelsey Hightower is the kind of notable deep exception to that. Historically, he's been ready to dive into the, kind of, heavy hands-on piece but—Corey: Wait, those were demos? [Thought 00:03:39] was just playing Tetris on stage for the love of it.Miles: [laugh]. No. And he really codes all that stuff up, him and the whole team.Corey: Oh, absol—I'm sorry. If I ever grow up, I wish to be Kelsey Hightower.Miles: [laugh]. You and me both. So, he had kind of led the charge. We did a couple of fun little demos while I was there, but they've really gotten a lot further into that, and I think are doing a better job of packaging the benefits to not just developers, but also operators and data scientists and the broader roles in the cloud ecosystem from the new features that are being launched. And I think, different than the in-person events where there's 10, 20,000, 40,000 people in the audience paying attention, I think they have to work double-hard to capture attention and get engineers to tune in to what's being launched.But if you squint and look close, there are some, I think, very interesting trends that sit in the back of some of the very first launches in what I think are going to be whole veins of launches from Google over the course of the next several years that we are working really hard to track along with and make sure we're extracting maximum value from for our customers.Corey: So, what was it that they announced that is worth paying attention to? Now, through the cacophony of noise, one announcement that [I want to note 00:04:49] was tied to Next was the announcement that GME group, I believe, is going to be putting their futures exchange core trading systems on Google Cloud. At which point that to me—and I know people are going to yell at me, and I don't even slightly care—that is the last nail in the coffin of the idea that well, Google is going to turn this off in a couple years. Sorry, no. That is not a thing that's going to happen. Worst case, they might just stop investing it as aggressively as they are now, but even that would be just a clown-shoes move that I have a hard time envisioning.Miles: Yeah, you're talking now over a dozen, over ten year, over a billion-dollar commitments. So, you've got to just really, really hate your stock price if you're going to decide to vaporize that much shareholder value, right? I mean, we think that, in Google, stock price is a material fraction of the recognition of the growth trajectory for cloud, which is now basically just third place behind YouTube. And I think you can do the curve math, it's not like it's going to take long.Corey: Right. That requires effectively ejecting Thomas Kurian as the head of Google Cloud and replacing him with the former SVP of Bad Decisions at Yahoo.Miles: [laugh]. Sure. Google has no shyness about continuing to rotate leadership. I was there through three heads of Google Cloud, so I don't expect that Thomas will be the last although I think he may well go down in history as having been the best. The level of rotation to the focuses that I think are most critical, getting enterprise customers happy, successful, committed, building macroscale systems, in systems that are critical to the core of the business on GCP has grown at an incredible rate under his stewardship. So, I think he's doing a great job.Corey: He gets a lot of criticism—often from Googlers—when I wind up getting the real talk from them, which is, “Can you tell me what you really think?” Their answer is, “No,” I'm like, “Okay, next question. Can I go out and buy you eight beers and then”— and it's like, “Yeah.” And the answer that I get pretty commonly is that he's brought too much Oracle into Google. And okay, that sounds like a bad thing because, you know, Oracle, but let's be clear here, but what are you talking about specifically? And what they say distills down to engineers are no longer the end-all be-all of everything that Google Cloud. Engineers don't get to make sales decisions, or marketing decisions, or in some cases, product decisions. And that is not how Google has historically been run, and they don't like the change. I get it, but engineering is not the only hard thing in the world and it's not the only business area that builds value, let's be clear on this. So, I think that the things that they don't like are in fact, what Google absolutely needs.Miles: I think, one, the man is exceptionally intimidating and intentionally just hyper, hyper attentive to his business. So, one of my best employees, Brad [Svee 00:07:44], he worked together with me to lay out what was the book of our whole department, my team of 86 people there. What are we about? What do we do? And like I wanted this as like a memoriam to teach new hires as got brought in. So, this is, like, 38 pages of detail about our process, our hiring method, our promotional approach, all of it. I showed that to my new boss who had come in at the time, and he thought some of the pictures looked good. When we showed it to TK, he read every paragraph. I watched him highlight the paragraphs as he went through, and he read it twice as fast as I can read the thing. I think he does that to everybody's documents, everywhere. So, there's a level of just manual rigor that he's brought to the practice that was certainly not there before that. So, that alone, it can be intimidating for folks, but I think people that are high performance find that very attractive.Corey: Well, from my perspective, he is clearly head and shoulders above Adam Selipsky, and Scott Guthrie—the respective heads of AWS and Azure—for one key reason: He is the only one of those three people who follows me on Twitter. And—Miles: [laugh].Corey: —honestly, that is how I evaluate vendors.Miles: That's the thing. That's the only measure, yep. I've worked on for a long time with Selipsky, and I think that it will be interesting to see whether Adam's approach to capital allocation—where he really, I think, thinks of himself as the manager of thousands of startups, as opposed to a manager of a global business—whether that's a more efficient process for creating value for customers, then, where I think TK is absolutely trying to build a much more unified, much more singular platform. And a bunch of the launches really speak to that, right? So, one of the product announcements that I think is critical is this idea of the global distributed cloud, Google Distributed Cloud.We started with Kubernetes. And then you layer on to that, okay, we'll take care of Kubernetes for you; we call that Anthos. We'll build a bunch of structural controls and features into Anthos to make it so that you can really deal with stuff in a global way. Okay, what does that look like further? How do we get out into edge environments? Out into diverse hardware? How do we partner up with everybody to make sure that, kind of like comparing Apple's approach to Google's approach, you have an Android ecosystem of Kubernetes providers instead of just one place you can buy an outpost. That's generally the idea of GDC. I think that's a spot where you're going to watch Google actually leverage the muscle that it already built in understanding open-source dynamics and understanding collaboration between companies as opposed to feeling like it's got to be built here. We've got to sell it here. It's got to have our brand on it.Corey: I think that there's a stupendous and extreme story that is still unfolding over at Google Cloud. Now, re:Invent this year, they wound up talking all about how what they were rolling out was a focus on improving primitives. And they're right. I love their managed database service that they launched because it didn't exist.Miles: Yeah Werner's slide, “It's primitives, not frameworks.” I was like, I think customers want solutions, not frameworks or primitives. [laugh]. What's your plan?Corey: Yeah. However, I take a different perspective on all of this, which is that is a terrific spin on the big headline launches all missed the re:Invent timeline, and… oops, so now we're just going to talk about these other things instead. And that's great, but then they start talking about industrial IOT, and mainframe migrations, and the idea of private 5G, and running fleets of robots. And it's—Miles: Yeah, that's a cool product.Corey: Which one? I'm sorry, they're all very different things.Miles: Private 5G.Corey: Yeah, if someone someday will explain to me how it differs from Wavelength, but that's neither here nor there. You're right, they're all interesting, but none of them are actually doing the thing that I do, which is build websites, [unintelligible 00:11:31] looking for web services, it kind of says it in the name. And it feels like it's very much broadening into everything, and it's very difficult for me to identify—and if I have trouble that I guarantee you customers do—of, which services are for me and which are very much not? In some cases, the only answer to that is to check the pricing. I thought Kendra, their corporate information search thing was for me, then it's 7500 bucks a month to get started with that thing, and that is, “I can hire an internal corporate librarian to just go and hunt through our Google Drive.” Great.Miles: Yeah.Corey: So, there are—or our Dropbox, or our Slack. We have, like, five different information repositories, and this is how corporate nonsense starts, let me assure you.Miles: Yes. We call that luxury SaaS, you must enjoy your dozens of overlapping bills for, you know, what Workspace gives you as a single flat rate.Corey: Well, we have [unintelligible 00:12:22] a lot of this stuff, too. Google Drive is great, but we use Dropbox for holding anything that touches our customer's billing information, just because I—to be clear, I do not distrust Google, but it also seems a little weird to put the confidential billing information for one of their competitors on there to thing if a customer were to ask about it. So, it's the, like, I don't believe anyone's doing anything nefarious, but let's go ahead and just make sure, in this case.Miles: Go further man. Vimeo runs on GCP. You think YouTube doesn't want to look at Vimeo stats? Like they run everything on GCP, so they have to have arrived at a position of trust somehow. Oh, I know how it's called encryption. You've heard of encryption before? It's the best.Corey: Oh, yes. I love these rumors that crop up every now and again that Amazon is going to start scanning all of its customer content, somehow. It's first, do you have any idea how many compute resources that would take and to if they can actually do that and access something you're storing in there, against their attestations to the contrary, then that's your story because one of them just makes them look bad, the other one utterly destroys their entire business.Miles: Yeah.Corey: I think that that's the one that gets the better clicks. So no, they're not doing that.Miles: No, they're not doing that. Another product launch that I thought was super interesting that describes, let's call it second place—the third place will be the one where we get off into the technical deep end—but there's a whole set of coordinated work they're calling Cortex. So, let's imagine you go to a customer, they say, “I want to understand what's happening with my business.” You go, “Great.” So, you use SAP, right? So, you're a big corporate shop, and that's your infrastructure of choice. There are a bunch of different options at that layer.When you set up SAP, one of the advantages that something like that has is they have, kind of, pre-built configurations for roughly your business, but whatever behaviors SAP doesn't do, right, say, data warehousing, advanced analytics, regression and projection and stuff like that, maybe that's somewhat outside of the core wheelhouse for SAP, you would expect like, oh okay, I'll bolt on BigQuery. I'll build that stuff over there. We'll stream the data between the two. Yeah, I'm off to the races, but the BigQuery side of the house doesn't have this like bitching menu that says, “You're a retailer, and so you probably want to see these 75 KPIs, and you probably want to chew up your SKUs in exactly this way. And here's some presets that make it so that this is operable out of the box.”So, they are doing the three way combination: Consultancies plus ISVs plus Google products, and doing all the pre-work configuration to go out to a customer and go I know what you probably just want. Why don't I just give you the whole thing so that it does the stuff that you want? That I think—if that's the very first one, this little triangle between SAP, and Big Query, and a bunch of consultancies like mine, you have to imagine they go a lot further with that a lot faster, right? I mean, what does that look like when they do it with Epic, when they go do it with Go just generally, when they go do it with Apache? I've heard of that software, right? Like, there's no reason not to bundle up what the obvious choices are for a bunch of these combinations.Corey: The idea of moving up the stack and offering full on solutions, that's what customers actually want. “Well, here's a bunch of things you can do to wind up wiring together to build a solution,” is, “Cool. Then I'm going to go hire a company who's already done that is going to sell it to me at a significant markup because I just don't care.” I pay way more to WP Engine than I would to just run WordPress myself on top of AWS or Google Cloud. In fact, it is on Google Cloud, but okay.Miles: You and me both, man. WP Engine is the best. I—Corey: It's great because—Miles: You're welcome. I designed a bunch of the hosting on the back of that.Corey: Oh, yeah. But it's also the—I—well, it costs a little bit more that way. Yeah, but guess what's not—guess what's more expensive than that bill, is my time spent doing the care and feeding of this stuff. I like giving money to experts and making it their problem.Miles: Yeah. I heard it said best, Lego is an incredible business. I love their product, and you can build almost any toy with it. And they have not displaced all other plastic toy makers.Corey: Right.Miles: Some kids just want to buy a little car. [laugh].Corey: Oh, yeah, you can build anything you want out of Lego bricks, which are great, which absolutely explains why they are a reference AWS customer.Miles: Yeah, they're great. But they didn't beat all other toy companies worldwide, and eliminate the rest of that market because they had the better primitive, right? These other solutions are just as valuable, just as interesting, tend to have much bigger markets. Lego is not the largest toy manufacturer in the world. They are not in the top five of toy manufacturers in the world, right?Like, so chasing that thread, and getting all the way down into the spots where I think many of the cloud providers on their own, internally, had been very uncomfortable. Like, you got to go all the way to building this stuff that they need for that division, inside of that company, in that geo, in that industry? That's maybe, like, a little too far afield. I think Google has a natural advantage in its more partner-oriented approach to create these combinations that lower the cost to them and to customers to getting out of that solution quick.Corey: So, getting into the weeds of Google Next, I suppose, rather than a whole bunch of things that don't seem to apply to anyone except the four or five companies that really could use it, what things did Google release that make the lives of people building, you know, web apps better?Miles: This is the one. So, I'm at Amazon, hanging out as a part of the team that built up the infrastructure for the Obama campaign in 2012, and there are a bunch of Googlers there, and we are fighting with databases. We are fighting so hard, in fact, with RDS that I think we are the only ones that [Raju 00:17:51] has ever allowed to SSH into our RDS instances to screw with them.Corey: Until now, with the advent of RDS Custom, meaning that you can actually get in as root; where that hell that lands between RDS and EC2 is ridiculous. I just know that RDS can now run containers.Miles: Yeah. I know how many things we did in there that were good for us, and how many things we did in there that were bad for us. And I have to imagine, this is not a feature that they really ought to let everybody have, myself included. But I will say that what all of the Googlers that I talk to, you know, at the first blush, were I'm the evil Amazon guy in to, sort of, distract them and make them build a system that, you know, was very reliable and ended up winning an election was that they had a better database, and they had Spanner, and they didn't understand why this whole thing wasn't sitting on Spanner. So, we looked, and I read the white paper, and then I got all drooly, and I was like, yes, that is a much better database than everybody else's database, and I don't understand why everybody else isn't on it. Oh, there's that one reason, but you've heard of it: No other software works with it, anywhere in the world, right? It's utterly proprietary to Google. Yes, they were kind—Corey: Oh, you want to migrate it off somewhere else, or a fraction of it? Great. Step one, redo your data architecture.Miles: Yeah, take all of my software everywhere, rewrite every bit of it. And, oh all those commercial applications? Yeah, forget all those, you got, too. Right? It was very much where Google was eight years ago. So, for me, it was immensely meaningful to see the launch at Next where they described what they are building—and have now built; we have alpha access to it—a Postgres layer for Spanner.Corey: Is that effectively you have to treat it as Postgres at all times, or is it multimodal access?Miles: You can get in and tickle it like Spanner, if you want to tickle it like Spanner. And in reality, Spanner is ANSI SQL compliant; you're still writing SQL, you just don't have to talk to it like a REST endpoint, or a GRPC endpoint, or something; you can, you know, have like a—Corey: So, similar to Azure's Cosmos DB, on some level, except for the part where you can apparently look at other customers' data in that thing?Miles: [laugh]. Exactly. Yeah, you will not have a sweeping discovery of incredible security violations in the structure Spanner, in that it is the control system that Google uses to place every ad, and so it does not suck. You can't put a trillion-dollar business on top of a database and not have it be safe. That's kind of a thing.Corey: The thing that I find is the most interesting area of tech right now is there's been this rise of distributed databases. Yugabyte—or You-ji-byte—Pla-netScale—or PlanetScale, depending on how you pronounce these things.Miles: [laugh]. Yeah, why, why is G such an adversarial consonant? I don't understand why we've all gotten to this place.Corey: Oh, yeah. But at the same time, it's—so you take a look at all these—and they all are speaking Postgres; it is pretty clear that ‘Postgres-squeal' is the thing that is taking over the world as far as databases go. If I were building something from scratch that used—Miles: For folks in the back, that's PostgreSQL, for the rest of us, it's okay, it's going to be, all right.Corey: Same difference. But yeah, it's the thing that is eating the world. Although recently, I've got to say, MongoDB is absolutely stepping up in a bunch of really interesting ways.Miles: I mean, I think the 4.0 release, I'm the guy who wrote the MongoDB on AWS Best Practices white paper, and I would grab a lot of customer's and—Corey: They have to change it since then of, step one: Do not use DocumentDB; if you want to use Mongo, use Mongo.Miles: Yeah, that's right. No, there were a lot of customers I was on the phone with where Mongo had summarily vaporized their data, and I think they have made huge strides in structural reliability over the course of—you know, especially this 4.0 launch, but the last couple of years, for sure.Corey: And with all the people they've been hiring from AWS, it's one of those, “Well, we'll look at this now who's losing important things from production?”Miles: [laugh]. Right? So, maybe there's only actually five humans who know how to do operations, and we just sort of keep moving around these different companies.Corey: That's sort of my assumption on these things. But Postgres, for those who are not looking to depart from the relational model, is eating the world. And—Miles: There's this, like, basic emotional thing. My buddy Martin, who set up MySQL, and took it public, and then promptly got it gobbled up by the Oracle people, like, there was a bet there that said, hey, there's going to be a real open database, and then squish, like, the man came and got it. And so like, if you're going to be an independent, open-source software developer, I think you're probably not pushing your pull requests to our friends at Oracle, that seems weird. So instead, I think Postgres has gobbled up the best minds on that stuff.And it works. It's reliable, it's consistent, and it's functional in all these different, sort of, reapplications and subdivisions, right? I mean, you have to sort of squint real hard, but down there in the guts of Redshift, that's Postgres, right? Like, there's Postgres behind all sorts of stuff. So, as an interface layer, I'm not as interested about how it manages to be successful at bossing around hardware and getting people the zeros and ones that they ask for back in a timely manner.I'm interested in it as a compatibility standard, right? If I have software that says, “I need to have Postgres under here and then it all will work,” that creates this layer of interop that a bunch of other products can use. So, folks like PlanetScale, and Yugabyte can say, “No, no, no, it's cool. We talk Postgres; that'll make it so your application works right. You can bring a SQL alchemy and plug it into this, or whatever your interface layer looks like.”That's the spot where, if I can trade what is a fairly limited global distribution, global transactional management on literally ridiculously unlimited scalability and zero operations, I can handle the hard parts of running a database over to somebody else, but I get my layer, and my software talks to it, I think that's a huge step.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by my friends at Cloud Academy. Something special just for you folks. If you missed their offer on Black Friday or Cyber Monday or whatever day of the week doing sales it is—good news! They've opened up their Black Friday promotion for a very limited time. Same deal, $100 off a yearly plan, $249 a year for the highest quality cloud and tech skills content. Nobody else can get this because they have a assured me this not going to last for much longer. Go to CloudAcademy.com, hit the "start free trial" button on the homepage, and use the Promo code cloud at checkout. That's c-l-o-u-d, like loud, what I am, with a “C” in front of it. It's a free trial, so you'll get 7 days to try it out to make sure it's really a good fit for you, nothing to lose except your ignorance about cloud. My thanks again for sponsoring my ridiculous nonsense.Corey: I think that there's a strong movement toward building out on something like this. If it works, just because—well, I'm not multiregion today, but I can easily see a world in which I'd want to be. So, great. How do you approach the decision between—once this comes out of alpha; let's be clear. Let's turn this into something that actually ships, and no, Google that does not mean slapping a beta label on it for five years is the answer here; you actually have to stand behind this thing—but once it goes GA—Miles: GA is a good thing.Corey: Yeah. How do you decide between using that, or PlanetScale? Or Yugabyte?Miles: Or Cockroach or or SingleStore, right? I mean, there's a zillion of them that sit in this market. I think the core of the decision making for me is in every team you're looking at what skills do you bring to bear and what problem that you're off to go solve for customers? Do the nuances of these products make it easier to solve? So, I think there are some products that the nature of what you're building isn't all that dependent on one part of the application talking to another one, or an event happening someplace else mattering to an event over here. But some applications, that's, like, utterly critical, like, totally, totally necessary.So, we worked with a bunch of like Forex exchange trading desks that literally turn off 12 hours out of the day because they can only keep it consistent in one geographical location right near the main exchanges in New York. So, that's a place where I go, “Would you like to trade all day?” And they go, “Yes, but I can't because databases.” So, “Awesome. Let's call the folks on the Spanner side. They can solve that problem.”I go, “Would you like to trade all day and rewrite all your software?” And they go, “No.” And I go, “Oh, okay. What about trade all day, but not rewrite all your software?” There we go. Now, we've got a solution to that kind of problem.So like, we built this crazy game, like, totally other end of the ecosystem with the Dragon Ball Z people, hysterical; your like—you literally play like Rock, Paper, Scissors with your phone, and if you get a rock, I throw a fireball, and you get a paper, then I throw a punch, and we figure out who wins. But they can play these games like Europe versus Japan, thousands of people on each side, real-time, and it works.Corey: So, let's be clear, I have lobbied a consistent criticism at Google for a while now, which is the Google Cloud global control plane. So, you wind up with things like global service outages from time to time, you wind up with this thing is now broken for everyone everywhere. And that, for a lot of these use cases, is a problem. And I said that AWS's approach to regional isolation is the right way to do it. And I do stand by that assessment, except for the part where it turns out there's a lot of control plane stuff that winds up single tracking through us-east-1, as we learned in the great us-east-1 outage of 2021.Miles: Yeah, when I see customers move from data center to AWS, what they expect is a higher count of outages that lasts less time. That's the trade off, right? There's going to be more weird spurious stuff, and maybe—maybe—if they're lucky, that outage will be over there at some other region they're not using. I see almost exactly the same promise happening to folks that come from AWS—and in particular from Azure—over onto GCP, which is, there will be probably a higher frequency of outages at a per product level, right? So, like sometimes, like, some weird product takes a screw sideways, where there is structural interdependence between quite a few products—we actually published a whole internal structural map of like, you know, it turns out that Cloud SQL runs on top of GCE not on GKE, so you can expect if GKE goes sideways, Cloud SQL is probably not going to go sideways; the two aren't dependent on each other.Corey: You take the status page and Amazon FreeRTOS in a region is having an outage today or something like that. You're like, “Oh, no. That's terrible. First, let me go look up what the hell that is.” And I'm not using it? Absolutely not. Great. As hyperscalers, well, hyperscale, they're always things that are broken in different ways, in different locations, and if you had a truly accurate status page, it would all be red all the time, or varying shades of red, which is not helpful. So, I understand the challenge there, but very often, it's a partition that is you are not exposed to, or the way that you've architected things, ideally, means it doesn't really matter. And that is a good thing. So, raw outage counts don't solve that. I also maintain that if I were to run in a single region of AWS or even a single AZ, in all likelihood, I will have a significantly better uptime across the board than I would if I ran it myself. Because—Miles: Oh, for sure.Corey: —it is—Miles: For sure they're way better at ops than you are. Me, right?Corey: Of course.Miles: Right? Like, ridiculous.Corey: And they got that way, by learning. Like, I think in 2022, it is unlikely that there's going to be an outage in an AWS availability zone by someone tripping over a power cable, whereas I have actually done that. So, there's a—to be clear in a data center, not an AWS facility; that would not have flown. So, there is the better idea of of going in that direction. But the things like Route 53 is control plane single-tracking through the us-east-1, if you can't make DNS changes in an outage scenario, you may as well not have a DR plan, for most use cases.Miles: To be really clear, it was a part of the internal documentation on the AWS side that we would share with customers to be absolutely explicit with them. It's not just that there are mistakes and accidents which we try to limit to AZs, but no, go further, that we may intentionally cause outages to AZs if that's what allows us to keep broader service health higher, right? They are not just a blast radius because you, oops, pulled the pin on the grenade; they can actually intentionally step on the off button. And that's different than the way Google operates. They think of each of the AZs, and each of the regions, and the global system as an always-on, all the time environment, and they do not have systems where one gets, sort of, sacrificed for the benefit of the rest, right, or they will intentionally plan to take a system offline.There is no planned downtime in the SLA, where the SLAs from my friends at Amazon and Azure are explicit to, if they choose to, they decide to take it offline, they can. Now, that's—I don't know, I kind of want the contract that has the other thing where you don't get that.Corey: I don't know what the right answer is for a lot of these things. I think multi-cloud is dumb. I think that the idea of having this workload that you're going to seamlessly deploy to two providers in case of an outage, well guess what? The orchestration between those two providers is going to cause you more outages than you would take just sticking on one. And in most cases, unless you are able to have complete duplication of not just functionality but capacity between those two, congratulations, you've now just doubled your number of single points of failure, you made the problem actively worse and more expensive. Good job.Miles: I wrote an article about this, and I think it's important to differentiate between dumb and terrifyingly shockingly expensive, right? So, I have a bunch of customers who I would characterize as rich, as like, shockingly rich, as producing businesses that have 80-plus percent gross margins. And for them, the costs associated with this stuff are utterly rational, and they take on that work, and they are seeing benefits, or they wouldn't be doing it.Corey: Of course.Miles: So, I think their trajectory in technology—you know, this is a quote from a Google engineer—it's just like, “Oh, you want to see what the future looks like? Hang out with rich people.” I went into houses when I was a little kid that had whole-home automation. I couldn't afford them; my mom was cleaning house there, but now my house, I can use my phone to turn on the lights. Like—Corey: You know, unless us-east-1 is having a problem.Miles: Hey, and then no Roomba for you, right? Like utterly offline. So—Corey: Roomba has now failed to room.Miles: Conveniently, my lights are Philips Hue, and that's on Google, so that baby works. But it is definitely a spot where the barrier of entry and the level of complexity required is going down over time. And it is definitely a horrible choice for 99% of the companies that are out there right now. But next year, it'll be 98. And the year after that, it'll probably be 97. [laugh].And if I go inside of Amazon's data centers, there's not one manufacturer of hard drives, there's a bunch. So, that got so easy that now, of course you use more than one; you got to do—that's just like, sort of, a natural thing, right? These technologies, it'll move over time. We just aren't there yet for the vast, vast majority of workloads.Corey: I hope that in the future, this stuff becomes easier, but data transfer fees are going to continue to be a concern—Miles: Just—[makes explosion noise]—Corey: Oh, man—Miles: —like, right in the face.Corey: —especially with the Cambrian explosion of data because the data science folks have successfully convinced the entire industry that there's value in those mode balancer logs in 2012. Okay, great. We're never deleting anything again, but now you've got to replicate all of that stuff because no one has a decent handle on lifecycle management and won't for the foreseeable future. Great, to multiple providers so that you can work on these things? Like, that is incredibly expensive.Miles: Yeah. Cool tech, from this announcement at Next that I think is very applicable, and recognized the level of like, utter technical mastery—and security mastery to our earlier conversation—that something like this requires, the product is called BigQuery Omni, what Omni allows you to do is go into the Google Cloud Console, go to BigQuery, say I want to do analysis on this data that's in S3, or in Azure Blob Storage, Google will spin up an account on your behalf on Amazon and Azure, and run the compute there for you, bring the result back. So, just transfer the answers, not the raw data that you just scanned, and no work on your part, no management, no crapola. So, there's like—that's multi-cloud. If I've got—I can do a join between a bunch of rows that are in real BigQuery over on GCP side and rows that are over there in S3. The cross-eyedness of getting something like that to work is mind blowing.Corey: To give this a little more context, just because it gets difficult to reason about these things, I can either have data that is in a private subnet in AWS that traverses their horribly priced Managed NAT Gateways, and then goes out to the internet and sent there once, for the same cost as I could take that same data and store it in S3 in their standard tier for just shy of six full months. That's a little imbalanced, if we're being direct here. And then when you add in things like intelligent tiering and archive access classes, that becomes something that… there's no contest there. It's, if we're talking about things that are now approaching exabyte scale, that's one of those, “Yeah, do you want us to pay by a credit card?”—get serious. You can't at that scale anyway—“Invoice billing, or do we just, like, drive a dump truck full of gold bricks and drop them off in Seattle?”Miles: Sure. Same trajectory, on the multi-cloud thing. So, like a partner of ours, PacketFabric, you know, if you're a big, big company, you go out and you call Amazon and you buy 100 gigabit interconnect on—I think they call theirs Direct Connect, and then you hook that up to the Google one that's called Dedicated Interconnect. And voila, the price goes from twelve cents a gig down to two cents a gig; everybody's much happier. But Jesus, you pay the upfront for that, you got to set the thing up, it takes days to get deployed, and now you're culpable for the whole pipe if you don't use it up. Like, there are charges that are static over the course of the month.So, PacketFabric just buys one of those and lets you rent a slice of it you need. And I think they've got an incredible product. We're working with them on a whole bunch of different projects. But I also expect—like, there's no reason the cloud providers shouldn't be working hard to vend that kind of solution over time. If a hundred gigabit is where it is now, what does it look like when I get to ten gigabit? When I get to one gigabit? When I get to half gigabit? You know, utility price that for us so that we get to rational pricing.I think there's a bunch of baked-in business and cost logic that is a part of the pricing system, where egress is the source of all of the funding at Amazon for internal networking, right? I don't pay anything for the switches that connect to this machine to that machine, in region. It's not like those things are cheap or free; they have to be there. But the funding for that comes from egress. So, I think you're going to end up seeing a different model where you'll maybe have different approaches to egress pricing, but you'll be paying like an in-system networking fee.And I think folks will be surprised at how big that fee likely is because of the cost of the level of networking infrastructure that the providers deploy, right? I mean, like, I don't know, if you've gone and tried to buy a 40 port, 40 gig switch anytime recently. It's not like they're those little, you know, blue Netgear ones for 90 bucks.Corey: Exactly. It becomes this, [sigh] I don't know, I keep thinking that's not the right answer, but part of it also is like, well, you know, for things that I really need local and don't want to worry about if the internet's melting today, I kind of just want to get, like, some kind of Raspberry Pi shoved under my desk for some reason.Miles: Yeah. I think there is a lot where as more and more businesses bet bigger and bigger slices of the farm on this kind of thing, I think it's Jassy's line that you're, you know, the fat in the margin in your business is my opportunity. Like, there's a whole ecosystem of partners and competitors that are hunting all of those opportunities. I think that pressure can only be good for customers.Corey: Miles, thank you for taking the time to speak with me. If people want to learn more about you, what you're up to, your bad opinions, your ridiculous company, et cetera—Miles: [laugh].Corey: —where can they find you?Miles: Well, it's really easy to spell: SADA.com, S-A-D-A dot com. I'm Miles Ward, it's @milesward on Twitter; you don't have to do too hard of a math. It's miles@sada.com, if you want to send me an email. It's real straightforward. So, eager to reach out, happy to help. We've got a bunch of engineers that like helping people move from Amazon to GCP. So, let us know.Corey: Excellent. And we will, of course, put links to this in the [show notes 00:37:17] because that's how we roll.Miles: Yay.Corey: Thanks so much for being so generous with your time, and I look forward to seeing what comes out next year from these various cloud companies.Miles: Oh, I know some of them already, and they're good. Oh, they're super good.Corey: This is why I don't do predictions because like, the stuff that I know about, like, for example, I was I was aware of the Graviton 3 was coming—Miles: Sure.Corey: —and it turns out that if your—guess what's going to come up and you don't name Graviton 3, it's like, “Are you simple? Did you not see that one coming?” It's like—or if I don't know it's coming and I make that guess—which is not the hardest thing in the world—someone would think I knew and leaked. There's no benefit to doing predictions.Miles: No. It's very tough, very happy to do predictions in private, for customers. [laugh].Corey: Absolutely. Thanks again for your time. I appreciate it.Miles: Cheers.Corey: Myles Ward, CTO at SADA. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn, and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, whereas if you've hated this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice and be very angry in your opinion when you write that obnoxious comment, but then it's going to get lost because it's using MySQL instead of Postgres.Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

Packet Pushers - Fat Pipe
Tech Bytes: Embracing Policy-Driven Networks To Support Hybrid Work (Sponsored)

Packet Pushers - Fat Pipe

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2022 18:19


Today on the Tech Byte podcast we discuss redefining networks and policy in today's hybrid world–that is, a network that needs to be available anywhere, anytime, anyhow, and any way. Aruba is our sponsor and we're joined by James Robertson, CTO Advisor and Technology Strategist in the Office of the CTO. The post Tech Bytes: Embracing Policy-Driven Networks To Support Hybrid Work (Sponsored) appeared first on Packet Pushers.

Packet Pushers - Full Podcast Feed
Tech Bytes: Embracing Policy-Driven Networks To Support Hybrid Work (Sponsored)

Packet Pushers - Full Podcast Feed

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2022 18:19


Today on the Tech Byte podcast we discuss redefining networks and policy in today's hybrid world–that is, a network that needs to be available anywhere, anytime, anyhow, and any way. Aruba is our sponsor and we're joined by James Robertson, CTO Advisor and Technology Strategist in the Office of the CTO. The post Tech Bytes: Embracing Policy-Driven Networks To Support Hybrid Work (Sponsored) appeared first on Packet Pushers.

Leap of Fate
81. How to Ace Your Job Interview: Tips and Examples From Hiring Managers

Leap of Fate

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2022 43:04


Looking for interview tips from senior hiring managers sharing real-world examples and answers? In Leap of Fate Pod 81, we go over How to Ace Your Job Interview: Tips and Examples. Leap of Fate's guest Mark Herschberg has been teaching at MIT for 20 years in addition to building multiple startup companies as a CTO. Mark is the author of The Career Toolkit, Essential Skills for Success That No One Taught You. I, Randy, have been a manager of global teams since I was 22 (7+ years now) building out multiple global sales teams across multiple continents for Cisco and Oyster.We start by sharing the 10 key traits that hiring managers normally look for during job interviews. Then we go into specific examples from interviews we have led and workplace situations to provide you actionable and real-world examples. We talk about:1. How to Sell Yourself in Interviews2. What Managers Look for in Interviews3. 3 Key Things To Do Before, During, and After Interviews4. Reference Checks and Creating Good Lasting Relationships5. Great Practice: Be the interviewer to see the opposite side6. Sending Follow Up Emails post InterviewCheck out The Career Toolkit written by Mark for a deep dive into essential kills for success that no one taught you! And use this pod to practice and Ace Your Job Interview to make your 2022 goals and beyond a reality!Links:The Career ToolKitMark's LinkedInSocials: @CareerToolkitBkSupport the show (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCrmJ8rY4ivAKnN3zG0W-1_A)

IT Career Energizer
326: Diversity of Experience Is Crucial and Let People Know What Excites You with Michal Juhas

IT Career Energizer

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2022 30:23


In this week's show, Phil talks to Michal Juhas, who has worked in the tech industry for more than 16 years. He has held a variety of positions during his career, from software developer to chief technical officer. And in 2019 he founded Geek Recruiters and he is now an IT Talent Advisor, Recruiter, Career Coach and Trainer as well as the author of 6 books and the creator of multiple video courses. Michal joins Phil to talk about why it's crucial to gain as much experience as possible in the early days of your career, as well as the ways in which a note could help your job applications.   KEY TAKEAWAYS:   TOP CAREER TIP At the beginning of your IT career journey, look for ways to gain more experience by accepting tasks from those who need work done. This looks great on your record when you come to the interviewing process.   WORST CAREER MOMENT When Michal's company went out of business. He had built it from scratch, but it ultimately failed. Michal learned not to be too over-optimistic and be more realistic when it comes to challenges.   CAREER HIGHLIGHT Working as a coach and recruiter, Michal finds many highlights these days by discovering new talent – those who bring something special to the role they have taken.   THE FUTURE OF CAREERS IN I.T The global nature of IT means that developers can now take positions around the world. Technology allows free movement in remote terms, and skills can be put to good use, no matter where we live.   THE REVEAL What first attracted you to a career in I.T.? – After a suggestion from a friend, Michal fell into IT. What's the best career advice you received? – to read more books, as they inspire the mind. What's the worst career advice you received? – What would you do if you started your career now? – Michal would experiment with more technologies and learn more programming languages. What are your current career objectives? Identifying the companies that he wants to work for. What's your number one non-technical skill? – Marketing, sales and copywriting. How do you keep your own career energized? – Working with mission-driven companies, which adds a new sense of purpose. What do you do away from technology? – Spending time with family.   FINAL CAREER TIP When applying for a job, always include a note to explain why you are excited about a particular opportunity.   BEST MOMENTS (5:08) – Michal - “Diversity of experience helps you to find solutions for different problems” (13:23) – Michal - “Shift the focus from the salary to the other benefits of the work” (20:43) – Michal – “Read lots of books!” (24:15) – Michal – “Effectively, as a developer, as an IT professional, you are selling yourself on the market, so you need to be able to find your unique selling proposition”   ABOUT THE HOST – PHIL BURGESS Phil Burgess is an independent IT consultant who has spent the last 20 years helping organizations to design, develop, and implement software solutions.  Phil has always had an interest in helping others to develop and advance their careers.  And in 2017 Phil started the I.T. Career Energizer podcast to try to help as many people as possible to learn from the career advice and experiences of those that have been, and still are, on that same career journey.   CONTACT THE HOST – PHIL BURGESS Phil can be contacted through the following Social Media platforms: Twitter: https://twitter.com/_PhilBurgess LinkedIn: https://uk.linkedin.com/in/philburgess Instagram: https://instagram.com/_philburgess Website: https://itcareerenergizer.com/contact Phil is also reachable by email at phil@itcareerenergizer.com and via the podcast's website, https://itcareerenergizer.com Join the I.T. Career Energizer Community on Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/groups/ITCareerEnergizer   ABOUT THE GUEST – MICHAL JUHAS Michal Juhas has worked in the tech industry for more than 16 years. He has held a variety of positions during his career, from software developer to chief technical officer. And in 2019 he founded Geek Recruiters and he is now an IT Talent Advisor, Recruiter, Career Coach and Trainer as well as the author of 6 books and the creator of multiple video courses.   CONTACT THE GUEST – MICHAL JUHAS Michal Juhas can be contacted through the following Social Media platforms: LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/michaljuhas/ Personal Website: https://michaljuhas.com/welcome Career Tools Website: https://careerupgradetools.com/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/juhas.michal/ YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCvfRMDDiKKqNVaezfvBVR0A

Science Friday
Pizza Science, Remembering E.O. Wilson And Richard Leakey. Jan 7 2022, Part 2

Science Friday

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 7, 2022 53:20


How A Former Microsoft Exec Mastered The Perfect Slice—Using Science Who doesn't love pizza? It's a magical combination of sauce, cheese, crust, and maybe even a topping or two. Depending on where you eat it, the ratio of sauce and cheese and toppings changes: Neapolitan, NY Style, and Chicago Deep Dish each have a slightly different recipe. And different methods of baking impart their signature flavor on the end result—whether that's coal, wood, or gas-fired ovens. Nearly every country in the world has some type of variation on the classic. Author Nathan Myhrvold visited over 250 pizzerias all over the world to appreciate their differences. Then he made over 12,000 pizzas, using physics and chemistry to tweak each one slightly. Myhrvold and his co-author, chef Francisco Migoya wrote all about the gourmand experiment in a three-volume, 35-pound set of beautifully illustrated and painstakingly researched books. Ira talks with Nathan Myhrvold, former CTO at Microsoft, founder of Intellectual Ventures and Modernist Cuisine about his discoveries and his most recent book, Modernist Pizza. E.O. Wilson's Indelible Mark On Ecology Ecologist and ant biologist Edward O. Wilson (often called E. O. Wilson) died December 26, at the age of 92. Though he was known for his study of ants and their social behavior, his impact extended much further—from sociobiology, the study of the influence of genetics on behavior, to the way science was taught and understood. His writing twice won the Pulitzer Prize. Wilson appeared on Science Friday many times. In this short remembrance of Wilson, Ira replays selections from past conversations with the scientist, recorded between 2006 and 2013.   The Fossil—And Family—Records Of Richard Leakey Paleoanthropologist Richard Leakey died on January 2 at the age of 77. The Kenyan conservationist and fossil hunter was the son of paleoanthropologists Louis and Mary Leakey, who helped redefine the early parts of the human family tree. Richard was part of the team that discovered ‘Turkana Boy,' a Homo erectus skeleton—one of the most complete early hominin skeletons ever found. In later years, he was the director of the National Museum of Kenya, the head of the Kenya Wildlife Service, helped found a political party, and led the Kenyan Civil Service in the midst of an anti-corruption campaign. In this edited interview from 2011, Leakey describes his work in the field, his famous fossil-hunting lineage, and his desire to convince skeptics of the reality of human evolution.  

Smart Business Dealmakers
Bob Norton, CEO of AirTight Management

Smart Business Dealmakers

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 7, 2022 35:42


Bob Norton, founder and CEO of AirTight Management, has been a serial entrepreneur for more than 30 years. In that time, he's seen startups launch, grow, succeed and fail. He talks about what separates those who succeed from those who don't, what investors are looking for at the earliest stages, and how insisting that your buddy from college remains your CTO for life might not be the best strategy for winning that Series A.

CTO Studio
CTO And Data Ownership in Web3

CTO Studio

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2022 40:16


Just like we saw the B2B landscape change with SOC2 requirements, what does it look like when our users and customers start demanding a new level of data ownership. We talk about  NFT, IPFS and the role of CTO in leading discussions and innovation in our startups. The botom line is that we need to collaborate and learn together.Thank you to our guests Agustin Lebron, Bryan Hall, Michael Bastos, Frank Febbraro and Ken Cone.Join the CTO Studio Slack Community at https://7ctos.com/podcastAs always, feel free to reach out to me any time at etienne@7ctos.com

More In Common Podcast
Fixing Culture is a Moral Imperative /// Ben and Fitz /// EP146:Part1

More In Common Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2022 37:14


  Culture is an agreed-upon set of values and norms that we accept and embrace. In organizations, if these aren't intentional and established, the company is not likely to operate at its best. Ben and Fitz came to some remarkable conclusions about Culture in the collective time at Google causing them to write their book, Debugging Teams. Their goal is to ensure teams operate at their best by being intentional about how they work together and for each other.    ///   Brian (Fitz) is the Founder and CTO of Tock, and he started Google's Chicago engineering office in 2005. An open-source contributor for over 13 years, Brian was the engineering manager for several Google products, and is a member of the Apache Software Foundation, a former engineer at Apple and CollabNet, and a Subversion developer,   Ben is a co-founder & author of Subversion, a popular version-control tool to help programmers collaborate. He also co-authored the central O'Reilly manual for the software. He is currently the engineering Site Lead for Google's Chicago office, having joined Google in 2005 as one of the first two engineers in Chicago. He manages multiple teams working on Google's Search-serving infrastructure.   Together they have collaborated on multiple talks and books regarding the social challenges of software development. They have given dozens of talks at conferences (many viewable on youtube), and authored a popular O'Reilly book on the subject: Debugging Teams: Better Productivity through Collaboration. /// Topics we discuss:   Learning when to speakUsing a 20 sided die as a tool Learning to listen Finding Common Ground Taking a breakH.A.L.T. When it's not possible Ending Phone Notifications Moral Imperative of fixing CultureTheir growth to seeing the importance Observations of the pandemic Earn Trust   References:   ORD Camp Crucial Conversations H.A.L.T. - Hungry, Angry, Lonely, Tired Free Book - Debugging Teams Nikola Tesla and Thomas Edison Peter Principle   Credits:   Music: Main Theme: "Eaze Does It" by Shye Eaze and DJ Rufbeats, a More In Common Podcast Exclusive. All music created by DJ Rufbeats

CIO Classified
Driving Insurance into the Digital Future with Shivani Govil, Chief Product Officer, CCC Intelligent Solutions, and Seth Rachlin, Executive Vice President, Capgemini

CIO Classified

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 31:18


Shivani Govil, Chief Product Officer at CCC Intelligent Solutions, and Seth Rachlin, Executive Vice President at Capgemini, discuss the ways digital technology is transforming the insurance industry, share advice on balancing internal innovation with external stability, and much more.---------“At the end, it's about streamlining towards the outcomes that you're trying to deliver. It's very important that as we think about this need for digital transformation, it's not an isolation of, ‘Oh, I want to go on this journey because everyone is doing it.' It's about how do you deliver those better outcomes as a business and as an organization?”- Shivani Govil“I think many who sit in the CIO and CTO seat, we are enamored of technology. We love technology. I think too many of us don't recognize that there needs to be a business imperative for technology to make a difference… The secret is figuring out how to make it relevant and meaningful, and how to make it resonate for customers, employees, and for stakeholders through the ecosystem, because otherwise it's just cool technology.”- Seth Rachlin---------Time Stamps:* (1:53) New tech's influence on consumer's expectations* (5:11) Balancing internal innovation and external stability * (8:22) How new tech and world events will impact insurance in 2022* (11:04) Reasons for digital transformation outside remote working * (17:10) Advice to legacy companies for digital transformation * (21:07) Innovating with a purpose and plan* (23:03) Shivani and Seth share what keeps them motivated--------SponsorThis podcast is brought to you by Asana. Asana is a leading work management platform that empowers teams to orchestrate their work — from daily tasks to big strategic initiatives — all in one place. By enabling the world's teams to work together effortlessly, Asana helps organizations of all sizes and industries achieve their goals, faster. Learn more at Asana.com.--------LinksConnect with Shivani on LinkedinConnect with Seth on LinkedinLearn more about CCC Intelligents SolutionsLearn more about Capgemini

NASCIO Voices
West Virginia CIO Josh Spence

NASCIO Voices

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 26:37


Matt and Amy talk with West Virginia's state CIO Josh Spence about his background in the National Guard and as WV CISO, how his role was modernized along with his title change from CTO to CIO, his thoughts on the cybersecurity grant program, and his main focus for 2022. 

Clearer Thinking with Spencer Greenberg
Behind the scenes of the online dating world (with Tom Quisel)

Clearer Thinking with Spencer Greenberg

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 80:51


How do men and women differ in their approach to online dating? How do online dating services deal with the fact that men send many times more messages to women than women send to men? How can online dating services' recommendation algorithms avoid merely recommending the most attractive people over and over to everyone? To what extent do users of such services agree about what makes a person attractive? How do transactions and interactions on these platforms shape the way users pursue short-term and/or long-term relationships? What surprising effects emerge in aggregate as a result of these transactions? How well do people really know themselves? How well do they know what kind of relationship partners would actually make them happy? How does gay male online dating (especially on Grindr) differ from heterosexual online dating? What makes for effective management and/or leadership? Is anger a useful tool for managers? How should managers weight the importance of various hiring tools (e.g., résumés, interviews, work samples, personality tests, contract periods, etc.)? What are some tools for designing highly effective self-experiments? Is there alien life in the universe? Should we be trying to reach out to aliens?Tom Quisel is the CTO at Grindr, where he practices servant leadership and works to build a culture that values diversity, collaboration, ownership, and quality craft. He's passionate about making a positive impact on the world and is an online dating veteran with 9 years of experience in the industry, including 2.5 years as OkCupid's CTO. He has a BS in Computer Science from Carnegie Mellon, with a background in software engineering, distributed systems, data science, and machine learning. Tom lives in Santa Barbara and loves to mountain bike, explore philosophy with friends, and pursue life-long learning.

RCA Radio
2022 Industry Outlook - Medical Device

RCA Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 32:13


In this episode of RCA Radio, host Brandon Miller, Seyed Khorashahi, and Thor Rollins explore what is happening in the medical device industry in 2022 and provide you with insight on how to prepare yourself for these upcoming initiatives. Seyed is Regulatory Compliance Associates® Inc. (RCA) Executive VP of Medical Device and CTO. Thor is Nelsons Laboratory's Toxicology, and Extractables and leachables (E&L) Expert. Listen in as we provide an outlook into the most important things happening in 2022 to the medical device industry such as; New technology uses cases, new notified body regulations, upcoming onsite inspections, supply chain issues, and much more.

Venture Stories
Building a World-Class Team with Elias Torres of Drift

Venture Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 43:07


Elias Torres (@eliast), co-founder and CTO at Drift, joins Lucas Bagno for this episode, which was recorded as part of a special event for Villagers. They discussed:- Why Elias is so grateful for the US and the differences he noticed when he came here from Nicaragua.- How he has forged a great relationship with a co-founder who is the opposite of him in many ways.- Why people should be taking more risks.- Why they hired a recruiter as their first employee at Drift.- Why they place less emphasis on resume and more on culture fit, as well as how to test for fit.Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform. Check us out on the web at www.villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.Want to get updates from us? Subscribe to get a peek inside the Village. We'll send you reading recommendations, exclusive event invites, and commentary on the latest happenings in Silicon Valley. www.villageglobal.vc/signup

Inevitable: The Future of Work
081 Closing the Chasm between Technology and Business

Inevitable: The Future of Work

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 49:59


Jennifer Byrne, CEO of Arrived Workforce and former CTO of Microsoft US, walks us through a variety of challenges and options we have for best utilizing technology versus being used by it. We cover topics ranging from AI to data to the cloud to how closely to follow a recipe!

True Growth con Fernando Trueba
#063. Paula Enei (Platanus Ventures) - Secretos Para Formar Una Comunidad

True Growth con Fernando Trueba

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 57:23


Paula Enei es co-fundadora de Platanus Ventures, la incubadora de startups Chilena que en muy poco tiempo se ha ganado el calificativo de "la Y-Combinator de Latinoamérica". Platanus Ventures invierte $100mil dólares en startups en etapa temprana que cuentan con un CTO o un co-fundador con conocimiento de desarrollo de tecnología. Paula es la responsable de la gran comunidad de emprendedores, mentores e inversionistas que ha logrado formar Platanus Ventures en menos de dos años. En este episodio, Paula cuenta sus secretos para formar comunidades comprometidas con los objetivos y la visión de Platanus Ventures.

CTO Studio
Build Your Own CTO Peer Group So That You Can Succeed

CTO Studio

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 23:31


In this conversation, Etienne and Britt talk about the importance of having a team of peers that support your growth and can form an alliance with you. We live in a brave new world where mental health challenges are real and being locked up in our homes can lead to loneliness and distorted view of our reality. Get a team alliance going so that you can get out of your own head!Check out https://7ctos.com/podcast for more information.

Billionaire lifestyle with Emmitt Muckles - Conversations with conscious entrepreneurs, solopreneurs and life changers

Simona Spilak is an executive coach to world-class leaders who need a coach and confidant to help them successfully navigate their world of responsibilities, opportunities and high stakes decision making. She has more than 20 years' experience working in the corporate world at the senior level and began her own entrepreneurial journey in 2016. Now she spends her time running an executive search firm in the Central and Eastern Europe region and providing executive coaching services to C-suite leaders ( Common roles in the C-suite include the chief executive officer (CEO), the chief financial officer (CFO), and the chief technology officer (CTO) and executives, a business which she built from scratch.

HomeTeam GameDev Podcast
AJ talks with Hometeam, Part 1

HomeTeam GameDev Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 23:09


AJ (@AJKolenc) is an indie game developer (@DubioGame and @HomeImprovGame), CTO of @FIX_Health_ and freelance developer with credits including PBS Games. Visit http://ajkolenc.com for detail. Part 1 of 2. Music by Danny Baranowsky

Hidden Forces
Why Putin Plans to Invade Ukraine & What the West Can Do About It | Dmitri Alperovitch

Hidden Forces

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 43:38


In Episode 226 of Hidden Forces, Demetri Kofinas speaks with Dmitri Alperovitch, the former CTO and co-founder of CrowdStrike, the world's largest cybersecurity company, which has been involved in investigations of several high-profile cyberattacks including the 2014 Sony Pictures hack, the 2015–2016 cyber-attacks on the Democratic National Committee (DNC), and the 2016 email leak involving the DNC. Alperovitch currently serves as Chairman of the non-profit Silverado Policy Accelerator, where he focuses on advancing American prosperity and global leadership by working directly with both the executive branch and Capitol Hill on issues related to cyber, trade & industrial security, and ecological & economic security. What prompted this conversation was a Twitter thread that Dmitri published recently, in which he explained why he believes the Kremlin has already made its decision to invade Ukraine later this winter—in late January or possibly early February—and that military confrontation is in fact the preferred route for Putin at this point. It's a fascinating thread and we encourage you all to read through it after listening to today's episode. Kofinas and Alperovitch spend the first half of their conversation discussing the various signals that Dimitri believes point to the increased likelihood of a military invasion of Ukraine and the partitioning of the country by Russia in the next several months, as well Putin's possible motivations and objectives in doing so. The second part of their conversation, which is available to premium subscribers focuses on the cyber component of this conflict, including evidence of increased cyber intrusions into the Ukrainian government and civilian networks, what the targets have been, and what can be further inferred about the Kremlin's objectives based on the nature of those targets. Alperovitch also shares his views on how he thinks the Biden administration can credibly respond to the mounting pressure on Ukraine's defenses, the effectiveness of sanctions as a tool for dissuading Russian aggression as well as for punishing Kremlin leadership after the fact, and the similarities between Ukraine and Taiwan and what lessons the Chinese communist party may be drawing from our response or failure to respond to mounting Russian aggression on Ukraine's eastern border. You can access the second part of this episode, as well as the transcript and rundown to this week's conversation through the Hidden Forces Patreon Page. All subscribers gain access to our premium feed, which can be easily added to your favorite podcast application. If you enjoyed listening to today's episode of Hidden Forces you can help support the show by doing the following: Subscribe on Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Stitcher | SoundCloud | YouTube | CastBox | RSS Feed Write us a review on Apple Podcasts Subscribe to our mailing list through the Hidden Forces Website Producer & Host: Demetri Kofinas Editor & Engineer: Stylianos Nicolaou Subscribe & Support the Podcast at https://patreon.com/hiddenforces Join the conversation on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter at @hiddenforcespod Follow Demetri on Twitter at @Kofinas Episode Recorded on 12/27/2021

The CyberWire
Cybersecurity predictions for 2022. [CyberWire-X]

The CyberWire

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 2, 2022 29:54


Industry experts discuss their cybersecurity predictions for 2022, what trends and attacks will be most prevalent in the year ahead, and how organizations should be preparing for the new year. In this show, we cover what they think the industry might see in 2022 (and some we probably won't see). The CyberWire's Rick Howard speaks with Hash Table member Kevin Magee, Chief Security Officer at Microsoft Canada, and show sponsor Keeper Security's CTO & Co-Founder Craig Lurey joins The CyberWire's Dave Bittner on this CyberWire-X and shares his insights on the topic.

21st Century Entrepreneurship
Slater Victoroff: The future of enterprise data is intelligent

21st Century Entrepreneurship

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 1, 2022 39:50


Slater Victoroff is the Founder and CTO of Indico, an enterprise AI solution for unstructured content that emphasizes document understanding. His company recently announced a $22 million Series B raise. Slater spoke enthusiastically about his company's progress and the award-winning AI system, as well as how he had grown it. He was recently named to Forbes' 30 Under 30 list.

Second in Command: The Chief Behind the Chief
Ep. 194 – Mindbody, Inc. President & CTO, Sunil Rajasekar

Second in Command: The Chief Behind the Chief

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 1, 2022 42:51


Our guest today is Mindbody, Inc's President & CTO, Sunil Rajasekar.  Sunil has served as Mindbody's chief technology officer since November 2018 and as its president since August 2020. With more than 20 years of consumer and enterprise experience, his work is focused on the company's product and technology strategy, consumer marketplace expansion, and platform […] The post Ep. 194 – Mindbody, Inc. President & CTO, Sunil Rajasekar appeared first on COO Alliance.

Postal Hub podcast
Ep 258: Cross-border, PUDOs, returns, delivery visibility, digital transformation

Postal Hub podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2021 45:21


In this special episode, four experts from the delivery world join me to talk about the trends that are bubbling beneath the surface… for now! Mike Richmond, Chief Commercial Officer at Doddle, discusses: Pressure points on e-commerce delivery: Supply chain problems and growing costs Increased rates of e-commerce returns Last mile capacity management Increasing value of including PUDO in delivery networks E-commerce returns The need to better understand customers Driving savings via digital returns Lack of delivery options at checkout Delivery companies undervaluing their importance to customer conversion at checkout Nudge theory - check episode 171 of the Postal Hub Podcast for more Wayne Haubner, CTO at Escher, covers: What digital transformation means for the postal and parcel sector: Automation, data, and the customer experience Going from “delivery point” mentality to “customer” mentality Moving from customer information being stored in employee's minds to a digital system New postal services Using automation to reduce costs David Spottiswood, co-founder at Hurricane Commerce, joins me to cover: Legislative changes in 2021 affecting cross-border delivery Automating cross-border data exchange Impact on low value cross-border parcel volumes Are e-commerce retailers collecting and using the right data for cross-border purchases? Are customs authorities doing the right thing? Reducing needless returns HS code database update Bertrand Späth, co-founder at Kizy Tracking, discusses: Predictability of delivery Last mile capacity management The delivery of everything! Delivery of pharmaceuticals

Smart Venture Podcast
#88 Co-CEO & Founder of Bubble ($106.3M+ Raised) Emmanuel Straschnov

Smart Venture Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021 47:18


088 Emmanuel Straschnov is the Co-CEO & Founder of Bubble, a no-code platform that helps non-technical founders build influential tech companies. Bubble has raised $100 million in series A. Prior to founding Bubble, Emmanuel worked as the special assistant to the CEO of Prada USA. He also received an MBA from Harvard Business School.  Check out our brand new YouTube Video Podcast!  https://www.SmartVenturePod.com IG/Twitter/FB @GraceGongGG LinkedIn:@GraceGong YouTube: https://bit.ly/gracegongyoutube Join the SVP fam with your host Grace Gong. In each episode, we are going to have conversations with some of the top investors, super star founders, as well as well known tech executives in the silicon valley. We will have a coffee chat with them to learn their ways of thinking and actionable tips on how to build or invest in a successful company. ======================= https://www.pair.com/grace Use Promo Code GRACE =======================  

Software Engineering Radio - The Podcast for Professional Software Developers
Episode 492: Sam Scott on Building a Consistent and Global Authorization Service

Software Engineering Radio - The Podcast for Professional Software Developers

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021 46:01


Sam Scott, CTO of Oso discusses how to build a global authorization service and challenges with host Priyanka.

That's my JAMstack
S3E1 - Sean C. Davis on the Jamstack philosophy, NextJS, and more

That's my JAMstack

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021


Transcript Bryan Robinson 0:14 Hello, and welcome back to season three of That's My Jamstack. It's amazing that we've been going this long. I know it's been quite a bit since our last episode, but to jog your memories, That's My Jamstack is the podcast asks that time honored and tested question. What is your jam in the Jamstack? I'm your host, Bryan Robinson and we've got a lot of great guests lined up for this season. So without further ado, let's dive in. On today's episode, we talk with Sean C. Davis. Sean is a passionate tinkerer and teacher. He's currently working as a developer experience engineer at stack bit. Bryan Robinson 1:04 All right, Shawn. Well, thanks so much for coming on the show and talking with us today. Sean C. Davis 1:07 Thanks for having me, Brian. Excited to be here. Bryan Robinson 1:09 Awesome. So first and foremost, tell us a little bit about yourself. What do you do for work? And what do you do for fun outside of work Sean C. Davis 1:15 For for work, I am currently the developer experience engineer for stack bit. I've been in the web development space for about a decade or so the first nine years, were all in agency space building agency freelancing, building websites for folks. And just this last year, took a shift into the product space and spending some time with stack bid. And that's that's been so that's super exciting. That's what I've been doing every day. And I'm sure we'll we'll dig into that a bit. For fun on the side. Well, I feel like I'm the I'm the classic developer in the sense that there's always some, there's always some technical thing that's happening on the side. Right now that thing is, it's it's my personal site I've had, I've had a couple of different blogs that I've maintained over the years. And within the last two years or so I've been trying to focus that content, bringing it all into my personal site. But right now, it's still kind of just like a, it's just a, it's a blog, most of most folks who come there, Googled some problem, they get the solution, and it serves those folks really well. But I'm in this transition of trying to make it more of a learning hub. So that's, it's kind of a side project now. But that's but it's still like it's fun, but it's still I don't know, it's where it could still be in a developer. I'm so like, the the other part of me, I've got two little kids at home and like a lot of folks when the pandemic hits kind of focused a lot of energy and attention into the home. So it's various projects around the house or like like many people I am part of the reason you couldn't find flour at the grocery store because I got really into baking for a while and still doing that a little bit to some like some gardening kind of just fun fun stuff around the house. Bryan Robinson 3:06 In your in your baking exploits. Are we talking like bread, baking, pastry baking, but what kind of baking Sean C. Davis 3:13 where I spend most of my time and still doing a little bit today is the classic sourdough loaf. So mostly bread, mostly bread, at least I'm better at the bread. I've done a bit of the Sweet Treats and trying to learn a little bit about the decorating but it's just the presentation isn't my strong suit. So the flavor might be there. I've got a ways to go in the inner desert department. Bryan Robinson 3:37 Yeah, I've got I've got my own sourdough starter and all that. So I definitely feel I actually, I like a time I can be a hipster about something. And so when my son was born, actually so that was six years ago now. So pre pandemic, my wife my birthday that year, two months after he was born he got me a sourdough starter from King Arthur baking and amazing. I lapsed right because obviously like infant and all that and I baked for a little bit but yeah, then started back up during the pandemic as well. Because who, who doesn't want to do that? We're gonna do Yeah, exactly. You got something to focus on. Anyway, I actually love your site. I'm sure that when we do shout outs at the end, we'll talk about that Sean C. Davis calm but one things that came up on the little repeating thing on your homepage is you're afraid of bears and Bs. Is that Is that a thing? Or is that just a funny thing? Sean C. Davis 4:21 Oh, yeah, it's a it's a funny thing. I mean, I I I love both of them, but also am terrified of both that I do. I do. I guess I didn't mention this in the fun thing. I really enjoy hiking and camping. haven't done much camping since having little kids. We're gonna eventually get them out there. But we do a fair amount of hiking. And so yeah, I've had a number of run ins with both bears and bees. And it's terrifying every time but I also very much appreciate and respect them for what they do for us. Yes. Bryan Robinson 4:54 All right. So let's talk a little bit about the Jamstack. So what was your entry point into this space? It seems this idea of Jamstack or static sites or whatever it was at the time. Sean C. Davis 5:03 It that's an interesting question. Because Okay, so if you say, Yeah, entry point into Jamstack, or static sites, if you broke that apart and said, What's your entry point into Jamstack? And what's your entry point into static sites? I have two different answers. So I'll tell you a little bit about the the journey from one to the other. It's, I find it kind of interesting. So it static sites were was the first thing before I knew anything about Jamstack. In fact, before Jamstack was coined, because the gens Jamstack term comes from I think, later in 2015, I believe. So the first agency job, I had built a few sites with middleman, they were originally a PHP shop, and about the time I joined, were transitioning into becoming a Rails shop. And so Ruby was the bread and butter programming language. And there were a few clients that would come on, who didn't want to pay for a CMS or just like they needed something real quick, and it could be static and totally fine. And so we, we were building middleman sites, but deploying, deploying them to like a digital ocean or equivalent, it's still running on a web server still serving up these pages in real time, even though they're just HTML files city like kind of silly, but But there weren't great solid patterns at that time. And about that time, 2013 or so is also when I started building custom content management systems. I built it, I evolved, and I iterated on it. And I think I was looking at this recently, I believe there were four major, different versions that I built over the series, or course of about three or four years in there. And so I'll come back to that. But as I was, so set, this first agency working on middleman, I built a few middleman sites is when I switched to freelancing. And then at this at the last Agency, also, a few middleman sites like middleman kept kept popping up when I was when I was freelancing there. Actually, that's when I built the fourth and final version of that CMS. And at that time, this is probably I think we're talking about 2016, maybe 20. Yeah, I think that seems right 2016. And so the Jamstack term exists, the term headless CMS exists, but I had no idea that these things were things that people were doing. But I had this need, where I had a client who wanted a mobile native application, and a, also a website. And it seemed like a lot of the content was going to overlap. And I was like, Well, I'm building this next version of a CMS, what should it look like? Maybe it should be able to serve both of these. And so I was like, Oh, brilliant, decoupled architecture like this is this is gonna be great. And so that that last CMS I built was API driven. And, and I believe, I believe the website was a middleman site, it, it may have been some other framework, but it was like this Jamstack pattern, but again, still deployed, still using a web server to serve every request. So like missing that, that final piece that that Netlify gives us in the CDN in that instant cache invalidation. So fast forward to this last agency, and we're also a rail shop Sean C. Davis 8:40 and built a few middleman sites. But what happened was, why I think that the 2017, I believe, the the CTO, late 2017, early 2018, our CTO gets wind of the Jamstack. And so this is pre Jamstack. Conference, still really small kind of tight knit community. And we're like, and everything just kind of aligned because we won this work. For a company where it was going to be building them a new marketing website, it was gonna be a fairly big site. But this company also had a product and an internal product team. And that team had already switched to building that product with React. And so and we had heard a little bit about Jamstack. We heard about Gatsby and we're like, Oh, perfect, perfect time. Gatsby is the cool kid in town. Like we can jump all in on the Jamstack we think we can reduce development costs over time. You know, all the all the classic Jamstack benefits like we can get those and so we took a leap. We jumped all in and so that was like that was the real introduction to Jamstack and I find it I find it kind of funny looking back on it now because I spent all those years with Jamstack like patterns and using tool and middleman was part of all of those and then we're like, oh Jamstack, but also switched to JavaScript based frameworks at the same time, which I think a lot of folks went through that pattern. But I don't know if funny to reflect on. Bryan Robinson 10:11 Yeah, definitely. And like that that kind of journey is really interesting. Like in that agency world, the fact that, like you were having defined these patterns on your own, and then this community kind of sprang up next to what you were doing, and then look like we can do those things, maybe even slightly better than than kind of where we are now that we see kind of this broader scope, and there are products out there. That's really, really interesting. And it kind of mirrors on my own journey. I was at an agency when I discovered all this as well and never really implemented at the agency that we had a customer we had a full fledge, like custom content management system that like the agency had built, so never got a big we Sean C. Davis 10:49 did we did too, I don't it was like it was a compelling enough idea to our CTO, that he's like, we're throat, like we're throwing it all out where we're, I, we had a lot of, I mean, you know, there's issues with you, you have to maintain your own software. And it's it's another piece of the stack. And he's like that we were just getting bogged down with this site went down. And there's a bug in this CMS. And I think the crux was, there was one site where we didn't protect the slash admin route, like, should have done that. And we're like, Okay, well, let's, this is a way to never make that mistake. Again. I'm not Bryan Robinson 11:27 gonna speak for you on this. But my advice to anyone listening out there is if you think you should build a content management system, don't just don't do it. Sean C. Davis 11:38 Yes, yes. I don't know if I may have written a post about this at one point, or maybe it was just an idea in my head, but it was gonna be ashes, I should see if I can find it. The idea was, here's how you can build a content management system and my journey and exactly why you shouldn't do it. Like it's, it's, I think the the lesson I have baked in there is, it can be a really powerful experience for learning about content schemas and know how to organize pages and components and like structured data. But it's also just not a good idea to do it. Because there's there are how many dozens or hundreds of companies that are focusing on that problem every single day. Bryan Robinson 12:20 And let's be fair to our past selves, right, like in 2012 2013 weren't as many companies do, and they weren't as fully featured as they are today. I think it's kind of the same thing. A lot of people have probably created their own, like, custom static site generator in the past, like, Oh, I just made a couple include stuff like that. Let's just, oh, but we have them now. From from the middleman and Jekyll times all the way through to all the fancy ones today. Let's fast forward to now. How are you using Jamstack philosophies professionally? And personally? And obviously, you're at stack bet. So probably quite a bit professionally nowadays. Sean C. Davis 12:54 Yeah. Yeah. Interesting. So Stackbit is, I mean, if the Netlify is the Jamstack tool, but also when you think stack bit like stack bit is, exists, because the Jamstack exists. And it's, I know, the, the Jamstack pattern was really powerful and felt like a great entry point for newer developers. But it, it turned out that it was it was kind of difficult, because it's like you could get started really, really kind of simple to get started. Really difficult to go to the next level, which requires stitching together all of these decoupled services. And so stack bit pops up originally three years ago, as a solution to basically say, well, your start, here's the starting point. And it's Netlify and Jekyll and some markdown files or you know, in some styles, something like that, and it has evolved and now as a full fledge visual editor, what's, what's interesting is, we're in a transition where we're just about to release a new version, or the beta version of a new version. And it's still largely following that pattern. It's a really powerful visual editing experience. But the the Jamstack I feel like Jamstack is kind of in this identity crisis sort of mode or, or maybe not like figuring out where they where they fit. You know, what Jamstack actually means and knowing that the web is going to continue to evolve. And so if you, depending when, when this episode gets released, it's like what we, if we look before this release, and what happens after it right now you go to the website, so pre pre release, and like Jamstack is plastered all over it real big, top of the homepage. And I I'm seeing that this, this language is going to shift a little bit and so we're still very much Jamstack tool. Websites are going to get deployed. They're going to be built with next they're going to be static by default. They're going to be deployed To Netlify using Marco. So it's like still, it's still very much Jamstack pattern. But I think how we, how we talk about that might change a little bit. That's, that's professionally and personally, I mentioned, the, the project I'm spending most of time on now is my personal site, that site is built with eleventy. and deploy to Netlify. And using Mark, just local markdown for content. I, I've been thinking a lot about like, well, what's the future of this? For me, if I really want to make this a hub, and I want to make it a content engine? And I'm thinking well, okay, well, eventually, I'm going to have to go to like a next or something like that. But honestly, I every change that I make, I say, Well, okay, well, can I get this done with eleventy? And I consistently finding that the answer is yes, like it has, there's probably a limit to this some point in my future. But right now, I'm in love with, but eleventy is giving me and so I've kind of have this classic Jamstack pattern happening on the side and loving that Bryan Robinson 16:08 perfectly. And then I mean, I can go on and on about love. And it is it is kind of where I'm at in the last of two and Zach Leatherman, the creator of 11. D, recently just even showed like gated content with 11, D serverless. And so like the, the line is blurring about what 11 D can and can't do, it used to be pretty solid, like there was a pretty solid point where like 11 D didn't serve you anymore. Little little iffy. Now, Sean C. Davis 16:30 I think that the big question for me was, oh, there were two. So one is that I'm I built my own kind of component system using nunchucks shortcodes in and so like, you have this smart transformers that make it nice and easy to work with. But it's I mean, it's still a little clunky, I would love to be able to use something like reactors felt and then hydrate them on the fly as needed. And fortunately, we have been homes and slinky, working on that exact problem. So that's really exciting to follow that. And then the second question I had, and second hurdle I thought I was going to run into was authentication, I don't need it now. But my plan is to start to build out some courses, and some of them will be free, and you don't have to track them. And other ones, you know, I feel like well down the road, I'm going to want people to people are gonna want to sign in, they're gonna want to track their progress, maybe some of them are paid. And just this last week, a video came out where Zach was going through the process of showing authentication with 11. D. And now I'm like I, I mean, I feel like the wall I'm going to hit now has less to do with features, and is probably going to have more to do with how many files can we read from the file system? And but I also think that it's getting smarter in terms of incremental builds. And so maybe I don't hit that. Well, I don't know. I'm gonna keep pushing it. We'll see what happens. Bryan Robinson 17:58 Yeah, that wall becomes smaller and further and smaller and further. Yeah, that's right. That's right. All right. So we've talked about a few technologies. We've talked about a few methodologies. But what would you say currently? Is your jam in the Jamstack? What's your favorite service? Maybe its stack, but are your favorite framework or philosophy? What what makes you love working in the Jamstack? Sean C. Davis 18:19 Yeah, talk philosophically for a minute, I suppose. Yeah. So what I really loved about the Jamstack, especially in the early days of me discovering it, I'm thinking pre NextJs. JS blowing up. So like 2019. And before? Is that it? To me, it was it's, well, it's still very much this way like you. It's a methodology. It's not a prescription say this all the time. And there's something really powerful in that in that if here's a pattern that we think is a really strong way to build websites that it's it improves the developer experience, and delivers great experience for end users. But you can use whatever tool you think is best for your particular project. And I what I've realized is as the web continues to evolve, is that the there were more kind of guardrails on what Jamstack is than I originally thought, like there, there are more opinions baked in than I originally was, was seeing. However, it's still within within those guardrails and within that pattern, very open and, and not not prescriptive in terms of tooling. And I think what that has led to that even though the community is led by a product in in Netlify, that it's very open in talking about what tools you can use in the space. It's really everyone's really respectful in that space and empowering and so just like the My Favorite I'd love to philosophy itself, the community that came out of that philosophy. It's is like a really, really great thing to be involved in. But I think in terms of tooling, yeah, I can't. I mean, I love stack. But that's why it's why I'm at stack, but I think it's a, it's a great, I do think it's a great entry point into the Jamstack. space. And it it's, it's a such a unique tool that it can serve. The personal blogger, especially someone who isn't super technically savvy, wants to learn a little development. But it can also serve a serve enterprises that have hundreds 1000s of pages, but are storing those in Contentful, or Sanity, some other headless CMS. But really, I keep coming back to eleventy. Especially, there was some news in the last couple of weeks where Rich Harris, the creator of spelt joined, we joined Vercel. Right, so so it's he gets to work on it full time. It's still community driven, but it still also kind of feels a little bit like funding from Vercel. And with that, I, I don't Okay, I don't know if this is entirely accurate. But it's, I think of the group of static site generators or front end frameworks, popular front end frameworks today. The vast majority of them are funded by or have some ulterior motive for where they're there. The people are working for some particular company. And so even though they're open source, they're, I mean, I don't I'm not saying that they've done their communities to services in any way. But eleventy what I love about eleventy is that it is it for now. I mean, today, it's all about the community it is it is very much driven by the community. And it is. And I just I love the way that Zach leads that project. It's, it's really exciting. And similar to what I said about a stack bit and what we just mentioned about eleventy, it's, it's great, because you can get started and know if you know HTML, like you can, you're good, you can build a website, and you can just you can fly. And then you can you can piece together things a little bit at a time, like learn a little bit of nunchucks. Or eventually if we have if when slinky gets to version one, and maybe it's like maybe you just dip your toes into React and, and, but that it also seems like it's going to it's scaling well for a handful of folks. And so it's not like you learn it as an entry level tool. I think that's that's where it was for a while, like a great entry level tool. And then our I don't want to build a serious site. So I'm going to go get a serious framework. It's starting to become a serious framework, and, but without necessarily raising the barrier to entry. And I think that's, that's really cool. So that's, yeah, I just, I feel like I'm just gonna keep talking about stack bid and 11. D all day. Bryan Robinson 23:07 Yeah, no, that doesn't that that's a great combo. Anyway. Um, I also think it's entering you said, like, you know, rich, rich chains go into Vercel. And, I mean, Zack Letterman's at Netlify. But he's building sites for Netlify. And so I think the interesting thing that's happened there is that he's learned what a company the size of Netlify needs out of some of what it's doing. And that's what's been kind of powering is not that Netlify has been prescribing what he needs. But Zack as a developer using 11. D to build sites for an enterprise level company now knows more about what what 11 D needs for that area. I think that's an interesting bit of information that he's kind of feeding back into the the 11 D framework. That's Sean C. Davis 23:51 a great point. Absolutely. Bryan Robinson 23:53 All right, so let's shift gears a little bit. Let's go away from technology and let's let's find out what is your actual jam right now? What's your favorite song or musician? Or what are you listening to day in day out? Sean C. Davis 24:04 Alright, so I had I had to look this up because I'm I am all over the board in terms of music and I haven't hadn't been listening to as much recently as I have in the past it you know, excluding like, all the all the Disney soundtracks that are on all the time, kids. Okay, so just to tell you how weird my, my taste in music is. I was like, alright, well, what are what are a few of the what are a few of the albums that have been on in the last week or two? Okay, so I've had gone all the way back to the Beatles revolver. I love that one. Okay, then what I'm almost like chronologically What have I done? I put on I put on Jay Z's Black Album. I had. I forget what it's called is Sturgill. Simpson. He released a couple blue grass albums, I think I think they're called cutting grass. Maybe not. Do you know? I do not know. Okay. Blue Grass. And then what did I have? I've had the newer Lord and Taylor Swift albums on as well. So I'm like, all over all over the place all over the Bryan Robinson 25:18 place. Yeah. That's awesome. That's I mean, it's variety is the spice of life, right? Sure. Yes. Yes. I love that. Now, it's kind of open forum, right? Is there anything that you that you are doing right now you stack that whomever that you want to promote and get out into the Jamstack. Community. Sean C. Davis 25:34 I mentioned a little bit earlier, this this idea of the the Jamstack identity crisis. And I try to talk about this without sounding disparaging or critical, because I actually think it's a good thing. And I think there's a lot to come in come from being from the community being introspective and figuring out who we are. And so I had, I've had lots of conversations around this topic throughout the year. And in, in doing so what a few of us realized is that the, it? You know, I think we all kind of have a little bit of different opinion of like, well, where's the line? What exactly does Jamstack mean, but maybe it doesn't, maybe it doesn't totally matter. But it's still, like, like we talked about earlier, like, there's still a there's still that the the guardrail is in a sense, like, there, there is an established pattern, in a way to build websites, the web is going to continue to evolve, and it won't necessarily be the cool thing on the cool kid on the block forever. But that, that that community can still exist. So what what a few of us have done is we said, Okay, well, what if we step outside of that? And to say, What if we created a space where folks could talk about all sorts of different patterns and ways to build websites, and Jamstack and all of the tools and variations within within that community is part of that discussion, but it's not the only part of that discussion. So there's also folks who are building rail sites and are choosing rails for a good reason or choosing full stack WordPress for for a good reason. I'm sure there's a good reason in there somewhere. Maybe. And so it's it's goofy, and it's brand new, but it's called good websites club. And it's at you can visit the bare bones website. It's good websites dot club. And so we're there's, it's just a tiny discord community with a little bit of chatter now, but there are there are some grand visions for it. There's someone who's talking about conference and 20, to 23, maybe some, maybe some various meetups throughout there. Personally, I am starting a show that I'm calling the the good websites show, and I don't know exactly what it's gonna be, it's gonna, it'll evolve. But it's, it's gonna start as a live just like a live interview show. And in kind of, we'll talk about, yeah, grab various folks from around different communities and talk about problems they have solved on the web, all kind of in a way to help inform developers or even marketers, content editors just have different different patterns, different ideas that are out there, and kind of kind of help them hone in on what exactly they are. They're going after, and I think we'll see, my prediction is we're gonna see it largely be, there's, there's gonna be this huge fear to draw a Venn diagram, like a lot of overlap with Jamstack in the beginning, and maybe it evolves, I don't really know. But that's, I'm kind of excited to see where that goes, while also being really heavily invested in Jamstack. And seeing how that evolves, because this, this recent announcement of Netlify got got their next series of funding, and they're gonna pump $10 million investing in the Jamstack. And that is really exciting. I cannot wait to see what that means for the community. So that's, I'm working on Yeah, like, websites club, but but, but also really excited for the Jamstack at same time, Bryan Robinson 29:25 absolutely cool. I'm now a member of the discord as of two months ago. So I'm really excited to see that everyone else listening should go go sign up as well. And then keep an eye out for Shawn doing good websites show in the future as well. So Shawn, thanks so much for taking the time to talk with us today. And we look forward to seeing more amazing stuff you in the future. Sean C. Davis 29:46 Alright, thanks for having me, Bryan. Bryan Robinson 29:48 Thanks again to our guest and thanks to everyone out there listening to each new episode. If you enjoy the podcast, be sure to leave a review rating star heart favorite whatever it is in your podcast app of choice. Until next time, keep doing amazing things on the web. And remember, keep things jammy Intro/outtro music by bensound.com Support That's my JAMstack by contributing to their Tip Jar: https://tips.pinecast.com/jar/thats-my-jamstack

Screaming in the Cloud
President Biden's Advice in Action with Dan Woods

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021 39:28


About DanDan is CISO and VP of Cybersecurity for Shipt, a Target subsidiary. He worked previously as a Distinguished Engineer on Target's cloud infrastructure. He served as CTO for Joe Biden's 2020 Presidential campaign. Prior to that Dan worked with the Hillary for America tech team through the Groundwork, and contributed as a founding developer on Spinnaker while at Netflix. Dan is an O'Reilly published author and avid public speaker.  Links: Shipt: https://www.shipt.com/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/danveloper LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/danveloper TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: It seems like there is a new security breach every day. Are you confident that an old SSH key, or a shared admin account, isn't going to come back and bite you? If not, check out Teleport. Teleport is the easiest, most secure way to access all of your infrastructure. The open source Teleport Access Plane consolidates everything you need for secure access to your Linux and Windows servers—and I assure you there is no third option there. Kubernetes clusters, databases, and internal applications like AWS Management Console, Yankins, GitLab, Grafana, Jupyter Notebooks, and more. Teleport's unique approach is not only more secure, it also improves developer productivity. To learn more visit: goteleport.com. And not, that is not me telling you to go away, it is: goteleport.com.Corey: Writing ad copy to fit into a 30 second slot is hard, but if anyone can do it the folks at Quali can. Just like their Torque infrastructure automation platform can deliver complex application environments anytime, anywhere, in just seconds instead of hours, days or weeks. Visit Qtorque.io today and learn how you can spin up application environments in about the same amount of time it took you to listen to this ad.Corey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud, I'm Corey Quinn. Sometimes I talk to people who are involved in working on the nonprofit slash political side of the world. Other times I talk to folks who are deep in the throes of commercial businesses, and I obviously personally spend more of my time on one of those sides of the world than I do the other. But today's guest is a little bit different, Dan Woods is the CISO and VP of Cybersecurity at Shipt, a division of Target where he's worked for a fair number of years, but took some time off for his side project, the side hustle as the kids call it, as the CTO for the Biden campaign. Dan, thank you for joining me.Dan: Yeah. Thank you, Corey. Happy to be here.Corey: So, you have an interesting track record as far as your career goes, you've been at Target for a long time. You were a distinguished engineer—not to be confused with ‘extinguished engineer,' which is just someone who is finally—the fire has gone out. And from there you went from being a distinguished engineer to a VP slash CISO, which generally looks a lot less engineer-like, and a lot more, at least in my experience, of sitting in a whole lot of executive-level meetings, managing teams, et cetera. Was that, in fact, an individual contributor—or IC—move into a management track, or am I just misunderstanding this because these are commonly overloaded terms in our industry?Dan: Yeah, yeah, no, that's exactly right. So, IC to leadership, two distinct tracks, distinct career paths. It was something that I've spent a number of years thinking about and more or less working toward and making sure that it was the right path for me to go. The interesting thing about the break that I took in the middle of Target when I was CTO for the campaign is that that was a leadership role, right. I led the team. I managed the team.I did performance reviews and all of that kind of managerial stuff, but I also sat down and did a lot of tech. So, it was kind of like a mix of being a senior executive, but also still continuing to be a distinguished engineer. So, then the natural path out of that for me was to make a decision about do I continue to be an individual contributor or do I go into a leadership track? And I felt like for a number of reasons that my interests more aligned with being on the leadership side of the world, and so that's how I've ended up where I am.Corey: And correct me if I'm wrong because generally speaking political campaigns are not usually my target customers given the fact that they're turning the entire AWS environment off in a few months—win or lose—and yeah, that is, in fact, remains the best way to save money on your AWS bill; it's hard for me to beat that. But at that point most of the people you're working with are in large part volunteers I would imagine.So, managing in a traditional sense of, “Well, we're going to have your next quarterly review.” Well, your candidate might not be in the race then, and what we're going to put you on a PIP, and what exactly you're going to stop letting me volunteer here? You're going to dock them pay—you're not paying me for this. It becomes an interesting management challenge I would imagine just because the people you're working with are passionate and volunteering, and a lot of traditional management and career advice doesn't necessarily map one-to-one I would have to assume.Dan: That is the best way that I've heard it described yet. I try to explain this to folks sometimes and it's kind of difficult to get that message across that like there is sort of a base level organization that exists, right. There were full-time employees who were a part of the tech team, really great group of folks especially from very early on willing to join the campaign and be a part of what it was that we were doing.And then there was this whole ecosystem of folks who just wanted to volunteer, folks who wanted to be a part of it but didn't want to leave their 9:00 to 5:00 who wanted to come in. One of the most difficult things about—we rely on volunteers very heavily in the political space, and very grateful for all the folks who step up and volunteer with organizations that they feel passionate about. In fact, one of the best little tidbits of wisdom the President imparted to me at one point, we were having dinner at his house very early on in the campaign, and he said, “The greatest gift that you can give somebody is your time.” And I think that's so incredibly true. So, the folks who volunteer, it's really important, really grateful that they're all there.In particular, how it becomes difficult, is that you need somebody to manage the volunteers, right, who are there. You need somebody to come up with work and check in that work is getting done because while it's great that folks want to volunteer five, ten hours a week, or whatever it is that they can put in, we also have very real things that need to get done, and they need to get done in a timely manner.So, we had a lot of difficulty especially early on in the campaign utilizing the volunteers to the extent that we could because we were such a small and scrappy team and because everybody who was working on the campaign at the time had a lot of responsibilities that they needed to see through on their own. And so getting into this, it's quite literally a full-time job having to sit down and follow up with volunteers and make sure that they have the appropriate amount of work and make sure that we've set up our environment appropriately so that volunteers can come and go and all of that kind of stuff, so yeah.Corey: It's always an interesting joy looking at the swath of architectural decisions and how they came to be. I talked on a previous episode with Jackie Singh, who was, I believe, after your tenure as CISO, she was involved on the InfoSec side of things, and she was curious as to your thought process or rationale with a lot of the initial architectural decisions that she talked about on her episode which I'm sure she didn't intend it this way, but I am going to blatantly miscategorize as, “Justify yourself. What were you thinking?” Usually it takes years for that kind of, “I don't understand what's going on here so I'm playing data center archeologist or cloud spelunker.” This was a very short window. How did decisions get made architecturally as far as what you're going to run things on? It's been disclosed that you were on AWS, for example. Was that a hard decision?Dan: No, not at all. Not at all. We started out the campaign—I in particular I was one of the first employees hired onto the campaign and the idea all along was that we're not going to be clever, right? We're basically just going to develop what needs to be developed. And the idea with that was that a lot of the code that we were going to sit down and write or a lot of the infrastructure that we were going to build was going to be glue, it not AWS Glue, right, ideally, but just glue that would bind data streams together, right?So, data movement, vendor A produces a CSV file for you and it needs to end up in a bucket somewhere. So, somebody needs to write the code to make that happen, or you need to find a sufficient vendor who can make that happen. There's a lot more vendors today believe it or not than there were two years ago that are doing much better in that kind of space, but two years ago we had the constraints of time and money.Our idea was that the code that we were going to write was going to be for those purposes. What it actually turned into is that in other areas of the business—and I will call it a business because we had formalized roadmaps and different departments working on different things—but in other areas of the business where we didn't have enough money to purchase a solution, we had the ability to go and write software.The interesting thing about this group of technologists who came together especially early on in the campaign to build out the tech team most of them came from an enterprise software development background, right? So, we had the know-how of how to build things at scale and how to do continuous delivery and continuous deployment, and how to operate a cloud-native environment, and how to build applications for that world.So, we ended up doing things like writing an API for managing our donor vetting pipeline, right? And that turned into a complex system of Lambda functions and continuous delivery for a variety of different services that facilitated that pipeline. We also built an architecture for our mobile app which there were plenty of companies that wanted to sell us a mobile app and we just couldn't afford it so we ended up writing the mobile app ourselves.So, after some point in time, what we said was we actually have a fairly robust and complex software infrastructure. We have a number of microservices that are doing various things to facilitate the operation of the business, and something that we need to do is we need to spend a little bit of time and make sure that we're building this in a cohesive way, right? And what part of that means was that, for example, we had to take a step back and say, “Okay, we need to have a unified identity service.” We can't have a different identity—or we can't have every single individual service creating its own identity. We need to have—Corey: I really wish you could pass that lesson out on some of the AWS service teams.Dan: [laugh]. Yes, I know. I know. Yeah. So, we went through—Corey: So, there were some questionable choices you made in there, like you started that with the beginning of, “Well, we had no time which is fine and no budget. So, we chose AWS.” It's like, “Oh, that looks like the exact opposite direction of a great decision, given, you know, my view on it.” Stepping past that entirely, you are also dealing with challenges that I don't think map very well to things that exist in the corporate world. For example, you said you had to build a donor vetting pipeline.It's in the corporate world I didn't have it. It's one of those, “Why in the world would I get in the way of people trying to give me money?” And the obvious answer in your case is, federal law, and it turns out that the best outcome generally does not involve serving prison time. So, you have to address these things in ways that don't necessarily have a one-to-one analog in other spaces.Dan: That's true. That's true. Yes, correct to the federal law thing. Our more pressing reason to do this kind of thing was that we made a commitment very early on in the campaign that we wouldn't take money from executives of the gas and oil industry, for example. There were another bunch of other commitments that were made, but it was inconceivable for us to have enough people that could possibly go manually through those filings. So, for us to be able to build an automated system for doing that meant that we were literally saving thousands of human hours and still getting a beneficial result out of it.Corey: And everything you do is subject to intense scrutiny by folks who are willing to make hay out of anything. If it had leaked at the time, I would have absolutely done some ridiculous nonsense thing about, “Ah, clearly looking at this AWS bill. Joe Biden's supports managed NAT gateway data processing pricing.” And it's absolutely not, but that doesn't stop people from making hay about this because headlines are going to be headlines.And do you have to also deal with the interesting aspect—industrial espionage is always kind of a thing, but by and large most companies don't have to worry that effectively half of the population is diametrically opposed to the thing it is that they're trying to do to the point where they might very well try to get insiders there to start leaking things out. Everything you do has to be built with optics in mind, working under tight constraints, and it seems like an almost insurmountable challenge except for the fact where you actually pulled it off.Dan: Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. We kept saying that the tech was not the story, right, and we wanted to do everything within our power to keep the conversation on the candidate and not on emails or AWS bills or any of that kind of stuff. And so we were very intentional about a lot of the decisions that we ended up making with the idea that if the optics are bad, we pull away from the primary mission of what it is that we're trying to do.Corey: So, what was it that qualified you to be the CTO of a—at the time very fledgling and uncertain campaign, given that you were coming from a role where you were a distinguished engineer, which is not nothing, let's be clear, but it's an executive-level of role rather than a hands-on level of role as CTO. And then if we go back in time, you were one of the founding developers of Spinnaker over at Netflix.And I have a lot of thoughts about Netflix technology and a lot of thoughts about Spinnaker as well, and none of those thoughts are, “This seems like a reasonable architecture I should roll out for a presidential campaign.” So, please, don't take this as the insult that probably sounds like, but why were you the CTO that got tapped?Dan: Great question. And I think in some ways, right place, right time. But in other ways probably needs to speak a little bit to the journey of how I've gotten anywhere in my career. So, going back to Netflix, yeah, so I worked in Netflix. I had the opportunity to work with a lot of incredibly bright and talented folks there. One of the people in particular who I met there and became friends with was Corey Bertram who worked on the core SRE team.Corey left Netflix to go off and at the time he was just like, “I'm going to go do a political startup.” The interesting thing about Netflix at the time—this was 2013, so, this was just after the Obama for America '12 campaign. And a bunch of folks from OFA world came and worked at Netflix and a variety of other organizations in the Bay Area. Corey was not one of those people but we were very well-connected with folks in that world, and Corey said he was going off to do a political startup, and so after my non-mutual departure from Netflix, I was talking to Corey and he said, “Hey, why don't you come over and help us figure out how to do continuous delivery over on the political startup.” That political startup turned into the groundwork which turned into essentially the tech platform for the Hillary for America campaign.So, I had the opportunity working for the groundwork to work very closely with the folks in the technology organization at HFA. And that got me more exposure to what that world is and more connections into that space. And the groundwork was run by Corey, but was the CEO or head—I don't even know what he called himself, was Michael Slaby, who was President Obama's CTO in 2008 and had a bigger technical role in the 2012 campaign.And so, for his involvement in HFA '16 meant that he was a person who was very well connected for the 2020 campaign. And when we were out at a political conference in late 2018 and he said, “Hey, I think that Vice President Biden is going to run. Do you have any interest in talking with his team?” And I said, “Yes, absolutely. Please introduce me.”And I had a couple of conversations with Greg Schultz who was the campaign manager and we just hit it off. And it was a really great fit. Greg was an excellent leader. He was a real visionary, exactly the person that President Biden needed. And he brought me in to set up the tech operation and get everything to where we ultimately won the primary and won the election after that.Corey: And then, as all things do, it ended and the question then becomes, “Great, what's next?” And the answer for you was apparently, “Okay, I'm going to go back to Target-ish.” Although now you're the CISO of a Target subsidiary, Shipt and Target's relationship is—again, I imagine I have that correct as far as you are in fact a subsidiary of Target, so it wasn't exactly a new company, but rather a transition into the previous organization you were in a different role.Dan: Yeah, correct. Yeah, it's a different department inside of Target, but my paycheck still come from Target. [laugh].Corey: So, what was it that inspired you to go into the CISO role? Because obviously security is everyone's job, which is what everyone says, which is why we get away with treating it like it's nobody's job because shared responsibilities tend to work out that way.Dan: Yeah.Corey: And you've done an awful lot of stuff that was not historically deeply security-centric although there's always an element passing through it. Now, going into a CISO role as someone without a deep InfoSec background that I'm aware of, what drove that? How did that work?Dan: You know, I think the most correct answer is that security has always been in my blood. I think like most people who started out—Corey: There are medications for that now.Dan: Yeah, [laugh] good. I might need them. [laugh]. I think like most folks who are kind of my era who started seriously getting into software development and computer system administration in the late ‘90s, early thousands, cybersecurity it wasn't called cybersecurity at the time. It wasn't even called InfoSec, right, it was just called, I don't know, dabbling or something. But that was a gateway for getting into Linux system administration, network engineering, so forth and so on.And for a short period of time I became—when I was getting my RHCE certification way back in the day, I became pretty entrenched in network security and that was a really big focus area that I spent a lot of time on and I got whatever the supplemental network security certification from Red Hat was at the time. And then I realized pretty quickly that the world isn't going to need box operators for very long, and this was just before the DevOps revolution had really come around and more and more things were automated.So, we were still doing hand deployments. I was still dropping WAR files onto a file system and restarting Apache. That was our deployment process. And I saw the writing on the wall and I said, “If I don't dedicate myself to becoming first and foremost a software engineer, then I'm not going to have a very good time in technology here.” So, I jumped out of that and I got into software development, and so that's where my software engineering career evolved out of.So, when I was CTO for the campaign, I like to tell people that I was a hundred percent of CTO, I was a hundred percent a CIO, and I was a hundred percent of CISO for the first 514 days of the campaign or whatever it was. So, I was 300 percent doing all of the top-level technology jobs for the campaign, but cybersecurity was without a doubt the one that we would drop everything for every single time.And that was by necessity; we were constantly under attack on the campaign. And a lot of my headspace during that period of time was dedicated to how do we make sure that we're doing things in the most secure way? So, when I left—when I came back into Target and I came back in as a distinguished engineer there were some areas that they were hoping that I could contribute positively and help move a couple of things along.The idea always the whole time was going to be for me to jump into a leadership position. And I got a call one day from Rich Agostino who's the CISO for Target and he said, “Hey, Shipt needs a cybersecurity operation built out and you're looking for a leadership role. Would you be interested in doing this?” And believe it or not, I had missed the world of cybersecurity so much that when the opportunity came up I said, “Yes, absolutely. I'll dive in head first.” And so that was the path for getting there.Corey: This episode is sponsored by our friends at Oracle HeatWave is a new high-performance accelerator for the Oracle MySQL Database Service. Although I insist on calling it “my squirrel.” While MySQL has long been the worlds most popular open source database, shifting from transacting to analytics required way too much overhead and, ya know, work. With HeatWave you can run your OLTP and OLAP, don't ask me to ever say those acronyms again, workloads directly from your MySQL database and eliminate the time consuming data movement and integration work, while also performing 1100X faster than Amazon Aurora, and 2.5X faster than Amazon Redshift, at a third of the cost. My thanks again to Oracle Cloud for sponsoring this ridiculous nonsense.Corey: My take to cybersecurity space is, a little, I think, different than most people's journeys through it. The reason I started a Thursday edition of the Last Week in AWS newsletter is the security happenings in the AWS ecosystem for folks who don't have the word security in their job titles because I used to dabble in that space a fair bit. The problem I found is that is as you move up the ladder to executives that our directors, VPs, and CISOs, the language changes significantly.And it almost becomes a dialect of corporate-speak that I find borderline impenetrable, versus the real world terminology we're talking about when, “Okay, let's make sure that we rotate credentials on a reasonable expected basis where it makes sense,” et cetera et cetera. It almost becomes much more of a box-checking compliance exercise slash layering on as much as you possibly can that for plausible deniability for the inevitable breach that one day hits and instead of actually driving towards better outcomes.And I understand that's a cynical, strange perspective, but I started talking to people about this, and I'm very far from alone in that, which is why people are subscribing to that newsletter and that's the corner of the market I wanted to start speaking to. So, given that you've been an engineer practitioner trying to build things and now a security executive as well, is my assessment of the further higher up you go the entire messaging and purpose change, or is that just someone who's been in the trenches for too long and hasn't been on that side of the world, and I have a certain lack of perspective that would make this all very clear. Which I freely accept, if that's the case.Dan: No, I think that you're right for a lot of organizations. I think that that's a hundred percent true, and it is exactly as you described: a box-checking exercise for a lot of organizations. Something that's important to remember about Target is—Target was the subject of a data breach in 2012, and that was before there were data breaches every single day, right.Now, we look at a data breach and we say that's just going to happen, right, that's the cost of doing business. But back in 2012 it was really a very big story and it was a very big deal, and there was quite a bit of activity in the Target technology world after that breach. So, it reshaped the culture quite literally, new executives were brought in, but there's this whole world of folks inside of Target who have never forgotten that, right, and work day-in and day-out to make sure that we don't have another breach.So, security at Target is a main centrally thought about kind of thing. So, it's very much something that is a part of the way that people operate inside of Target. So, coming over to Shipt, obviously, Shipt is—it is a subsidiary. It is a part of Target, but it doesn't have that long history and hasn't had that same kind of experience. The biggest thing that we really needed at Shipt is first and foremost to get the program established, right. So, I'm three or four months onto the job now and we've tripled the team size. I've been—Corey: And you've stayed out of the headlines, which is basically the biggest and most accurate breach indicator I've found so far.Dan: So far so good. Well, but the thing that we want to do though is to be able to bring that same kind of focus of importance that Target has on cybersecurity into the world of engineering at Shipt. And it's not just a compliance game, and it's not just a thing where we're just trying to say that we have it. We're actually trying to make sure that as we go forward we've got all these best practices from an organization that's been through the bad stuff that we can adopt into our day-to-day and kind of get it done.When we talk about it at an executive level, obviously we're not talking about the penetration tests done by the red team the earlier day, right. We're not calling any of that stuff out in particular. But we do try to summarize it in a way that makes it clear that the thing that we're trying to do is build a security-minded culture and not just check some boxes and make sure that we have the appropriate titles in the appropriate places so that our insurance rates go down, right. We're actually trying to keep people safe.Corey: There's a lot to be said for that. With the Target breach back in—I want to say 2012, was it?Dan: 2012. Yep.Corey: Again, it was a wake-up call and the argument that I've always seen is that everyone is vulnerable—just depends on how much work it's going to take to get there. And for, credit where due, there was a complete rotation in the executive levels which whether that's fair or not, I—people have different opinions on it; my belief has always been you own the responsibility, regardless of who's doing the work.And there's no one as fanatical as a convert, on some level, and you've clearly been doing a lot of things in the right direction. The thing that always surprises me is that when I wind up seeing these surveys in the industry that—what is it? 65% of companies say that they would be vulnerable to a breach, and everybody said, “Oh, we should definitely look at those companies.” My argument is, “Hang on a sec. I want to talk to the 35% who say, ‘oh, we're impenetrable.'” because, spoiler, you are not.No one is. Just the question of how heavy is the lift and how much work is it going to take to get there? I do know that mouthing off in public about how perfect the security of anything is, is the best way to more or less climb to the top of a mountain during a thunderstorm, a hold up a giant metal rod, and curse the name of God. It doesn't lead to positive outcomes, basically ever. In turn, this also leads to companies not talking about security openly.I find that in many cases it is easier for me to get people to talk about their AWS bills than their InfoSec posture. And I do believe, incidentally, those two things are not entirely unrelated, but how do you view it? It was surprisingly easy to get Shipt's CISO to have a conversation with me here on this podcast. It is significantly more challenging in most other companies.Dan: Well, in fairness, you've been asking me for about two-and-a-half years pretty regularly [laugh] to come.Corey: And I always say I will stop bothering you if you want. You said, “No, no. Ask me again in a few months. Ask me again, after the election. Ask me again after—I don't know, like, the one-day delivery thing gets sorted out.” Whatever it happens to be. And that's fine. I follow up religiously, and eventually I can wear people down by being polite yet persistent.Dan: So, persistence on you is actually to credit here. No, I think to your question though, I think that there's a good balance. There's a good balance in being open about what it is that you're trying to do versus over-sharing areas that maybe you're less proficient in, right. So, it wouldn't make a lot of sense for me to come on here and tell you the areas that we need to develop into security. But on the other side of things, I am very happy to come in and talk to you about how our incident response plan is evolving, right, and what our plan looks like for doing all of that kind of stuff.Some of the best security practitioners who I've worked with in the world will tell you that you're not going to prevent a breach from a motivated attacker, and your job as CISO is to make sure that your response is appropriate, right, more so than anything. So, our incident response areas where today we're dedicating quite a bit of effort to build up our proficiency, and that's a very important aspect of the cybersecurity program that we're trying to build here.Corey: And unlike the early days of a campaign, you still have to be ultra-conscious about security, but now you have the luxury of actually being able to hire security staff because it turns out that, “Please come volunteer here,” is not presumably Shipt's hiring pitch.Dan: That's correct. Yeah, exactly. We have a lot of buy-in from the rest of leadership to build out this program. Shipt's history with cybersecurity is one where there were a couple of folks who did a remarkably good job for just being two or three of them for a really long period of time who ran the cybersecurity operation very much was not a part of the engineering culture at Shipt, but there still was coverage.Those folks left earlier in the year, all of them, simultaneously, unfortunately. And that's sort of how the position became open to me in the first place. But it also meant that I was quite literally starting with next to nothing, right. And from that standpoint it made it feel a lot like the early days of the campaign because I was having to build a team from scratch and having to get people motivated to come and work on this thing that had kind of an unknown future roadmap associated with it and all of that kind of stuff.But we've been very privileged to—because we have that leadership support we're able to pay market rates and actually hire qualified and capable and competent engineers and engineering leaders to help build out the aspects of this program that we need. And like I said, we've managed to—we weren't exactly at zero when I walked in the door. So, when I say we were able to quadruple the team, it doesn't mean that we just added four zeros there, [laugh] but we've got a little bit over a dozen people focusing on all areas of security for the business that we can think of. And that's just going to continue to grow. So, it's exciting; it's a challenge. But having the support of the entire organization behind something like this really, really helps a lot.Corey: I know we're running out of time for a lot of the interview, but one more question I want to ask you about is, when you're the CISO for a nationally known politician who is running for the highest office, the risk inherent to getting it wrong is massive. This is one of those mistakes will show indelibly for the rest of, well, one would argue US history, you could arguably say that there will be consequences that go that far out.On the other side of it, once you're done on the campaign you're now the CISO at Shipt. And I am not in any way insinuating that the security of your customers, and your partners, and your data across the board is important. But it does not seem to me from the outside that it has the same, “If we get this wrong there are repercussions that will extend into my grandchildren's time.” How do you find that your ability to care as deeply about this has changed, if it has?Dan: My stress levels are a lot lower I'll say that, but—Corey: You can always spot the veterans on an SRE team because—when I say veterans I mean veterans from the armed forces because, “No one's shooting at me. We can't serve ads right now. I'm really not going to run around and scream like, ‘My hair's on fire,' because this is nothing compared to what stress can look like.” And yeah there's always a worst stressor, but, on some level, it feels like it would be an asset. And again this is not to suggest you don't take security seriously. I want to be very clear on that point.Dan: Yeah, yeah, no. The important challenge of the role is building this out in a way that we have coverage over all the areas that we really need, right, and that is actually the kind of stuff that I enjoy quite a bit. I enjoy starting a program. I enjoy seeing a program come to fruition. I enjoy helping other people build their careers out, and so I have a number of folks who are at earlier at points in their career who I'm very happy that we have them on our team because I can see them grow and I can see them understand and set up what the next thing for them to do is.And so when I look at the day-to-day here, I was motivated on the campaign by that reality of like there is some quite literal life or death stuff that is going to happen here. And that's a really strong presser to make sure that you're doing all the right stuff at the right time. In this case, my motivation is different because I actually enjoy building this kind of stuff out and making sure that we're doing all the right stuff and not having the stress of, like, this could be the end of the world if we get this wrong.Means that I can spend time focusing on making sure that the program is coming together as it should, and getting joy from seeing the program come together is where a lot of that motivation is coming from today. So, it's just different, right? It's a different thing, but at the end of the day it's very rewarding and I'm enjoying it and can see this continuing on for quite some time.Corey: And I look forward to ideally getting you back in another two-and-a-half years after I began badgering you in two hours in order to come back on the show. If—Dan: [laugh].Corey: —people want to hear more about what you're up to, how you view about these things, potentially consider working with you, where can they find you?Dan: Best place although I've not been as active because it has been very busy the last couple of months, but find me on Twitter, @danveloper, find me on LinkedIn. Those—you know, I posted a couple of blog posts about the technology choices that we made on the campaign that I think folks find interesting, and periodically I'll share out my thoughts on Twitter about whatever the most current thing is, Kubernetes or AWS about to go down or something along those lines. So, yeah, that's the best way. And I tweet out all the jobs and post all the jobs that we're hiring for on LinkedIn and all of that kind of stuff. So, usual social channels. Just not Facebook.Corey: Amen to that. And I will of course include links to those things in the [show notes 00:37:29]. Thank you so much for taking the time to speak with me. I appreciate it.Dan: Thank you, Corey.Corey: Dan Woods, CISO and VP of Cybersecurity at Shipt, also formerly of the Biden campaign because wherever he goes he clearly paints a target on his back. I'm Cloud Economist, Corey Quinn and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, whereas if you've hated this podcast please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice along with an incoherent rant that is no doubt tied to either politics or the alternate form of politics: Spinnaker.Dan: [laugh].Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

CTO Studio
CTO Under Fire Playbook

CTO Studio

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021 52:06


What a refreshing re-frame coming from Ashley Raiteri and Kevin Goldsmith for when things go awry in the C-Suite for the CTO. Conversations get contentious and trust gets eroded and we talk about the need for solid allies in the C-Suite in case things get political. Hopefully it doesn't! We talk about nurturing relationships and helping other members of the C-Suite succeed.

Game Dev Advice: The Game Developer's Podcast
Game Dev People, Starting a Studio, Discord's Power, Send the Resume, Steam's Dead for Indies, and Dota 2 with Dan Nikolaides from Studio369

Game Dev Advice: The Game Developer's Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 26, 2021 49:58


I welcome Dan Nikolaides, CEO of Symmetric Games and the CTO of Studio369 on this episode. We begin discussing his current role leading development efforts on their game MetalCore, along with the studio's first game, Rune II. Learn about the concepts in MetalCore, how they found investors, and how he started in the industry. We then dive into switching over to game teams, having projects canceled, and leaving to join Phosphor. Hear about shipping a bunch of games, then starting his studio in 2016. Learn about not being intimidated by hard problems along with the importance of a growth mindset. We then talk about the importance of new engineers knowing a game engine, the preferred language behind it, and having a strong engineering foundation. Learn Dan's advice for current engineers who want to grow and have more responsibilities, along with the kind of work most working leads actually do. Hear about the importance of being a good listener, rubber ducking, and what kills a person's morale. We then discuss some of his favorite old projects, blockchain gaming, NFTs, and the Metaverse, and how different companies are approaching this space. Hear about the industry's challenge around content overload, Steam being dead for indies, and why it's better to partner with a console. We then pivot into VR, their VR game in development, and how it's a few years away from being a breakout platform. Towards the end we discuss working from home, game industry people, Dota 2, the struggles of starting a studio, how to contact Dan, and why now is the best time ever to be looking for a new job.  Bio: Dan Nikolaides graduated from the University of Illinois in Computer Science,  and has been in the gaming industry for over 15 years. He's well known for being an Unreal Engine guru, and has worked for companies like - Midway Games, Warner Brothers, Day 1 Studios, Phosphor Studios, and Symmetric Games. His game credits include - Mortal Kombat, Stranglehold, Man of Steel, Gears of War, NBC's Heroes, World War Z, WWE Immortals, Nether, Outpost Zero, and more. Dan's currently the CEO of Symmetric Games and the CTO of Studio369 where he's leading the technical and design direction of the studio's game production for MetalCore, their upcoming release. Show Links: * Rune II Steam * PlanetSide 2 Steam * BattleTech Centers wikipedia * Phosphor Studios website * Unreal Engine website * Simon Sinek YouTube Connect Links: * Dan Nikolaides Twitter * MetalCore website * MetalCore Discord * MetalCore Trailer YouTube  Game Dev Advice Links:  * Game Dev Advice Patreon - please help support the show if you find it entertaining/useful * Game Dev Advice Twitter * Game Dev Advice email (info@gamedevadvice.com) * Game Dev Advice website * Level Ex Careers page - we're hiring for tons of roles! * Game Dev Advice Hotline: (224) 484-7733 * Subscribe and go to the website for full show notes with links Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Money Savage
Online Security with Julianna Lamb

Money Savage

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 26, 2021 18:20


LifeBlood: We talked about online security, how the industry has evolved and what it could look like in the future, and her experience founding and growing a tech company with Julianna Lamb, CoFounder and CTO of Stytch, an organization helping companies go passwordless and improve online security.  Listen to learn some tips on protecting your online security!  For the Difference Making Tip, scan ahead to 16:42! You can learn more about Julianna at Stytch.com, Twitter and LinkedIn. Thanks, as always for listening!  If you got some value and enjoyed the show, please leave us a review wherever you listen and subscribe as well.  You can learn more about us at MoneyAlignmentAcademy.com, Twitter, LinkedIn, Instagram, Pinterest, YouTube and Facebook or you'd like to be a guest on the show, contact George at Contact@GeorgeGrombacher.com.

The Bike Shed
320: Remember The Fun: 2021 Recap

The Bike Shed

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021 34:02


Steph and Chris recap their favorite things of 2019 and 2020 and share their 2021 list. Happy Holidays, y'all! Steph: * Feature flags and calm deploys * Creating observable systems * Debugging * Working in seasons * Don't forget the fun “The longer I'm in the software game, the more I want things to be calm” - Steph Chris: * Pushing logic back to the server * Svelte (https://svelte.dev/) * Remote work (but maybe hybrid!) * Vim * Joining a startup as CTO This episode is brought to you by ScoutAPM (https://scoutapm.com/bikeshed). Give Scout a try for free today and Scout will donate $5 to the open source project of your choice when you deploy. Listen to episodes from 2020 and 2019

Malicious Life
A digital ‘vaccine’ for Log4Shell [ML BSide]

Malicious Life

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2021 19:12


A digital 'vaccine' was released to address Log4Shell, which has been called 'the single biggest, most critical vulnerability ever.' Nate Nelson talks to Yonatan Striem-Amit, CTO & Co-Founder of Cybereason (our sponsor) about the vulnerability, and about Cybereason's unusual vaccine: software that uses the same vulnerability to close the breach.

The Deep End
2022 Tech Trends

The Deep End

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2021 57:34


Today is the last episode of the year, and so we're celebrating by doing something a little different. Rather than have a single guest on, we invited 11 senior On Deck employees to answer a single question: What trend do you expect to change, emerge, or accelerate in 2022? To help them answer honestly, we were very clear that these aren't necessarily predictions. Instead, my colleagues were instructed to think about patterns they've noticed this past year and project how they might shift or continue in 2022.Next year, we'll revisit this analysis and ask our colleagues where they were right, where they were wrong, and why.Here are the guests:First up is Andreas Klinger- On Deck's CTO and a seed investor on the side. Andreas is based in Berlin. You can find him on Twitter @andreasklingerMinn Kim is a partner at ODX based in San Francisco. ODX is On Deck's community-backed fund and accelerator program. In her role, Minn's job is to help the best founders in the world by removing obstacles, opening doors, and creating customized programming for each startup in the program. She's had some exposure to some incredible companies this year through her amazing work at On Deck. You can find her on twitter @minney_catEric Friedman is also an ODX Partner and has served as On Deck's interim COO. He helps founders push rocks uphill and can be found in New York City and on Twitter @ericfriedmanAnne Bosman just joined On Deck to be the General Manager of our Careers division. She joins us from Boston after 5 years leading operations at General Assembly and multiple COO/operations leadership roles at other organizations. She can be found on twitter at @anneoloughWe welcome back Atlanta-based KP to the show after he joined us in October to chat about building in public. We thought his perspective would be an interesting one to share immediately after Anne's comments to provide that contrast. As a reminder, KP is Director of On Deck's No Code program and can be found on twitter @thisiskp_Julian Weisser is a cofounder of On Deck and has helped bring many functions of our company from 0 to 1, including this podcast. He is currently helping founders get involved with our ODX accelerator program. His Twitter DMs are open @julianweisserShriya Nevatia is another return guest after joining us alongside Gaby Goldberg in our Citizens of the Metaverse episode. Shriya joins us from New York City and is the Director of On Deck Catalyst. ​​Catalyst helps ambitious students and early-career people start their first company or break into venture capital. She is on Twitter @shriyanevatia One of On Deck's two CEOs, David Booth, joins us from New Zealand. You can find David's thoughts about how to organize the world's ambition on Twitter @david__booth Katya Delaney is an Editorial lead on our Growth & Content team. Her recommendations to this podcast over the last few months have been most welcome.Earlier in the episode, Andreas mentioned that he expects more competition between different countries for remote talent. We wanted to make sure we spoke to Gonz Sanchez about this too. Gonz is the Head of Growth for our Startups division. He's based in Argentina and also writes about European tech for his newsletter @seedtable. You can find him on Twitter @gonsanchezsLast, but not least, Eade Bengard is On Deck's Director of Brand Marketing. In the past, Eade has worked with brands like AirBnb, Audi, Ideo, Levi's and more. She joins us from Austin and can be found on Twitter @eade_bengardMarshall shared his thoughts too. If there are any guests you think we should have on the show or topics you think we should cover, please DM @makosloff or @jacksonsteger on Twitter. Thank you as always, for listening.