Podcasts about CTO

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    Best podcasts about CTO

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    Latest podcast episodes about CTO

    The CyberWire
    Christian Lees: it's not always textbook. [CTO] [Career Notes]

    The CyberWire

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 14, 2022 9:23


    Christian Lees, CTO at Resecurity, shares his story and insight on coming into the cybersecurity world. He considers himself a late bloomer because he did not go to college until he was 23. He wasn't sure of what he wanted to do, and a family friend gave him a computer and the rest was history, he says. He fell in love with computers and started working at different companies trying to get ahead. He says it's not always textbook, and sometimes you just need to cut your teeth on something to get where you're going. Throughout his journey, he was constantly questioning whether he made the right decision, and in the end he says you have to be willing to "define friction points in it, you may join security field, not knowing what you're gonna do, but by being that curious person and breaking things and putting it back together, you'll find the right way and just never stop being curious."

    Career Notes
    Christian Lees: it's not always textbook. [CTO]

    Career Notes

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 14, 2022 9:23


    Christian Lees, CTO at Resecurity, shares his story and insight on coming into the cybersecurity world. He considers himself a late bloomer because he did not go to college until he was 23. He wasn't sure of what he wanted to do, and a family friend gave him a computer and the rest was history, he says. He fell in love with computers and started working at different companies trying to get ahead. He says it's not always textbook, and sometimes you just need to cut your teeth on something to get where you're going. Throughout his journey, he was constantly questioning whether he made the right decision, and in the end he says you have to be willing to "define friction points in it, you may join security field, not knowing what you're gonna do, but by being that curious person and breaking things and putting it back together, you'll find the right way and just never stop being curious."

    The Tech Blog Writer Podcast
    2069: The Gen Z Insights Startup Unlocking Market Data With Video Analysis AI

    The Tech Blog Writer Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 13, 2022 20:32


    Gen Z is transforming the way we consume. With a keen eye toward sustainability, they are influencing older generations to prioritize sustainability in their purchasing decisions. Raahish Kalara, CTO of Knit, joins me on Tech Talks Daily. The consumer insights startup appeared on my radar after learning it provides market data for Gen Z audiences and works with NASCAR, the Minnesota Twins, the San Antonio Spurs, and JBL Speakers, to name a few brands. Using the Knit platform, brands can upload questions and get 30-90 second "selfie" video responses from hundreds of Gen Z consumers in as quickly as a few hours. With their video analysis AI, brands can analyze hours of video feedback in minutes, helping larger brands rapidly learn more about what Gen Z audiences want. We discuss the three key 'takeaways' brands should keep in mind when looking to attract the attention of Gen Z'ers and what Gen Z data tell us about building thriving communities online.

    ROAD TO GROWTH : Success as an Entrepreneur
    Nico Ramirez & Isaac Dubuque - Founders of Verilink

    ROAD TO GROWTH : Success as an Entrepreneur

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 13, 2022 32:33


    In this episode of the Road to Growth podcast, we are pleased to introduce you to Nico Ramirez & Isaac Dubuque. Nico has always been fascinated by the intersection of the physical and digital. It makes sense that his latest venture, Verilink, revolves around linking physical goods to NFTs on the blockchain. Nico graduated from U of M with a degree in computer science and began his career as a quant developer. After the pandemic cost him his job right as he graduated, he began working at FlashPlays, a sports gaming startup. During his time at FlashPlays he came up with the idea for Verilink and realized that he couldn't leave the opportunity on the table.   Isaac is a University of Michigan computer engineering alumni with an early career in Embedded Systems and Robotics. His pursuits in decentralized networks sparked his interest in blockchain technology and the impact it could have on the world. This unique background as a full-stack and blockchain developer, and embedded systems engineer led him to the role of CTO and co-founder of Verilink. In his free time, Isaac enjoys reading, hiking, and surfing on the West Coast.    Learn more and connect with Nico Ramirez & Isaac Dubuque by visiting them on Twitter: https://twitter.com/isaac_dubuque Twitter: https://twitter.com/VerilinkTeam Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/verilink.technology/     Be sure to follow us on Twitter: Twitter.com/to_growth on Facebook: facebook.com/Road2Growth   Subscribe to our podcast across the web: https://www.theenriquezgroup.com/blog Spotify: https://spoti.fi/2Cdmacc iTunes: https://apple.co/2F4zAcn Castbox: http://bit.ly/2F4NfQq Google Play: http://bit.ly/2TxUYQ2 Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCKnzMRkl-PurAb32mCLCMeA?view_as=subscriber   If you are looking to be a Guest on Podcasts please click below  https://kitcaster.com/rtg/  For any San Diego Real Estate Questions Please Follow Us at web: www.TheEnriquezGroup.com Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCKnzMRkl-PurAb32mCLCMeA or Call : 858 -345 - 7829 Recently reduced properties in San Diego County * Click **** bit.ly/3cbT65C **** Here* ****************************************************************************

    ITSPmagazine | Technology. Cybersecurity. Society
    A Conversation With Slater Victoroff, Founder & CTO @ Indico | VP of Research At NeoCybernetica | The Founder Pack Podcast With Brendon Rod

    ITSPmagazine | Technology. Cybersecurity. Society

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 13, 2022 28:57


    Layoffs are always the first thing that people jump to and think about. But I think that it's really important to also realize that you can hurt or help your company depending on how you do it.Indico was founded by Slater Victoroff in an Olin College dorm room (literally) as a developer platform aimed at making deep learning more accessible to those with only a basic knowledge of programming.He raised ~$5M of venture capital from top-tier VCs including General Catalyst, .406 Ventures, Boston Seed, Hyperplane as well as many high-profile Boston Angel Investors.He now also serves as VP of Research @ Neo CyberneticaKey topics:Creative ways to keep your team during a recessionHow to avoid the death spiralPractical ways to weather the stormLooking deeper at how you deliver ROI across NetRevenue Retention (NRR)____________________________GuestSlater VictoroffFounder & CTO @ Indico [@indicoData]On LinkedIn | https://www.linkedin.com/in/slatervictoroff/____________________________This Episode's SponsorsAre you interested in sponsoring an ITSPmagazine Channel?

    Modern CTO with Joel Beasley
    Starting Your Strategic Data Foundation Now with Greg Vesper, CTO of Smarsh

    Modern CTO with Joel Beasley

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2022 37:41


    Today we're talking to Greg Vesper, CTO of Smarsh; and we discuss how most companies are headed towards having to deal with exabytes of data, and how to set up a strategic data foundation now to future proof your organization. All of this right here, right now, on the Modern CTO Podcast! Check out more of Greg and Smarsh at https://www.smarsh.com/

    The Stack Overflow Podcast
    A conversation with Spencer Kimball, creator of GIMP and CockroachDB

    The Stack Overflow Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2022 30:01


    Spencer was one of the original creators of open-source, cross-platform image editing software GIMP (GNU Image Manipulation Program), authored while he was still in college. He went on to spend a decade at Google, plus two years as CTO of Viewfinder, later acquired by Square.In 2014, he cofounded Cockroach Labs to back his creation CockroachDB, a cloud-native distributed SQL database.Database sharding is essential for CockroachDB: “a critical part of how Cockroach achieves virtually everything,” says Spencer. Read up on how sharding a database can make it faster.Like many engineers who find themselves in the C-suite, Spencer went from full-time programmer to full-time CEO. He says it's been a “relatively gentle” evolution, but he can always go back.Like lots of you out there, Spencer started programming on a TI-99/4, the world's first 16-bit home computer.Connect with Spencer on LinkedIn or learn more about him.Today's Lifeboat badge goes to user Hughes M. for their answer to the question Multiple keys pointing to a single value in Redis (Cache) with Java.

    Telecom Reseller
    Meeting clients where clients want to be met while working where workers want to work, Movius Podcast

    Telecom Reseller

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2022


    “Historically, there was a very sledgehammer approach to solving things,” says Amit Modi, the CTO and CISO at Movius. “Some firms would say, hey, let's shut one channel off because I really don't have control over it, and I really don't know what's being discussed. A case in point: messaging.” Phone calls to clients, calls to partners, calls between employees, once was the one size fits all real time communication that everyone could agree on. Today, a three or four generation household, not uncommon, might present a company a baker's dozen of preferred platforms to communicate as clients, and perhaps a half a dozen of preferred platforms that the two-working people in that same household might want to use for work. Even the notion that you might be able to at least hub everything through the family's smartphones, might be challenged by one family member who still prefers a landline. A bank might serve all four as customers and might have one or two people in that household as employees. How can a business find a platform that that will deliver employee productivity, client engagement and security? In this podcast Modi outlines the challenge and then discusses the Movius MultiLine which works across on any phone, is all software, is an app that is carrier neutral, lives well with other platforms such as Teams, and above all delivers all three needs, concurrently. The app enables employees to use their own devices but provide a formal corporate identity, which is separate, secure and offer privacy for the employee who is working from home or working from anywhere but wants a professional identity and contact coordinate. Meanwhile the app enables the company and its team to engage clients their way, with secure and recorded. MultiLine operates within all the regulations facing financial firms and offers the same level of compliance in several other highly regulated verticals. Visit https://movius.ai/

    In Depth
    Operations vs. Algorithms: Advice for scaling startups, from Opendoor CTO Ian Wong

    In Depth

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2022 66:37 Very Popular


    Today's episode is with Ian Wong, co-founder and CTO of Opendoor. Before founding Opendoor, Ian was Square's first data scientist, where he developed machine learning models and infrastructure for fraud detection. In today's conversation, we cover his essential advice for how to integrate data science into your startup. As Ian puts it, in the early innings it might make sense for your startup to be operations heavy. But as you start to scale, data science becomes a critical component for running a business with longevity in mind. We dive into how both Square and Opendoor approached this transition. Along those lines, we discuss some of the early considerations for your fledgling data science team, including the type of folks to hire for the early team, like whether to look for generalists or specialists, and how to set up your interview loops. Ian also dives into his lessons on structuring the data science function so that it's deeply integrated with the rest of the technical org. Next, we dive into some of his biggest lessons as a first-time founder and CTO, including his practice with Opendoor's leadership team of doing pre-mortems to predict why something might not work. He also encourages founders to run through a bi-yearly exercise of re-writing their job rec. You can follow Ian on Twitter at @ihat You can email us questions directly at review@firstround.com or follow us on Twitter @ twitter.com/firstround and twitter.com/brettberson

    State of Identity
    Your Digital Footprint

    State of Identity

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2022 29:00


    How do you define frictionless identity verification? On this week's State of Identity podcast, we are joined by Footprints founders, Eli Wachs, CEO, and Alex Grinman, CTO for a discussion on leveraging AWS nitro enclaves to provide a secure computing environment with best-in-class encryption and access control.

    The Siemens Energy Podcast
    Understanding How e-fuels and eMobility Complement Each Other with Dr. Michael Steiner, CTO and Board Member of Porsche

    The Siemens Energy Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2022 19:40


    While electric vehicles and eMobility get a lot of attention these days, it's important to see how e-fuels complement eMobility and are helping to address decarbonization in the immediate future.Dr. Michael Steiner, CTO and Board Member of Porsche, works with both e-fuels and eMobility on a daily basis and that's why we wanted to speak to him on the latest episode of the Siemens Energy Podcast. When he's not working on these issues at work, he's thinking about them when driving: he has a fully electric Taycan and an old-fashioned 9/11 GT3, which is conventionally fueled.Host Amy Pempel starts the conversation by having Dr. Steiner explain the why of e-fuels: that they allow us to use our existing car fleet while addressing decarbonization.Amy and Dr. Steiner also discuss:The current renewable/fossil energy gap in EuropeHow e-fuels are madeDetails of a Porsche and Siemens Energy e-fuel collaboration in ChileYou'll also hear Dr. Steiner's explanation of how e-fuels help power many different industries besides cars. Enjoy!If you enjoyed today's show, please leave a 5-star review. For more information and links to all the resources mentioned in today's episode, visit Siemens-Energy.com Our GDPR privacy policy was updated on August 8, 2022. Visit acast.com/privacy for more information.

    IoT For All Podcast
    Improving Supply Chain Logistics | Pathway's Zuzanna Stamirowska

    IoT For All Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2022 25:23


    She starts by introducing her extensive and interesting background and what Pathway is working on. She then goes on to talk about the impact of IoT in the supply chain and handling costs for companies looking to adopt it. Ryan and Zuzanna wrap up the podcast with a high-level discussion about the evolution of challenges and advice for choosing the right technology for your business. Zuzanna is the CEO of Pathway, a game-changing Dev Tool for enterprise clients, enabling real-time machine learning on live event streams. Pathway develops a Database that Thinks™, which provides a unified source of truth from raw data in logistics and other industries. Zuzanna is the author of the state-of-the-art model for forecasting maritime trade published by the American Academy of Sciences (single-author, pre-PhD). While working on this project, she saw the mismatch between the business needs, the reality of the data in logistics, and the current ML and AI methods - this was the spark to launch Pathway. During her career, she was responsible for sales of SaaS technology underlying Spoj.com. She holds a Master's degree in Economics and Public Policy from Sciences Po, Ecole Polytechnique, and ENSAE, as well as a Ph.D. in Complexity Science. Pathway develops a Database that Thinks. A game-changing Dev Tool for enterprise clients, enabling real-time machine learning on live event streams. Pathway provides a unified source of truth from raw data in logistics and other industries. Their product provides application developers with a capacity for real-time incremental in-memory transformation of complex event streams. Pathway is a female-led, deeptech developer tool company. It was started by top people in data processing and AI. Pathway's CTO, Jan Chorowski, previously worked at Google Brain, and most of the team members are top-competitive programmers. Their mission is to significantly impact the physical economy by bringing automation, scalability, and repeatability to industries that are having a hard time capitalizing on the advances in AI.

    Giant Robots Smashing Into Other Giant Robots
    435: Numerated with Adam Kenney

    Giant Robots Smashing Into Other Giant Robots

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2022 34:49


    Adam Kenney is Chief Product Officer at Numerated, which helps banks and credit unions transform how they lend to businesses. Chad talks with Adam about what institutional banks and credit unions are like as a market and customers and what sales cycles look like, going from 17 to more than 130 customers quickly, and the scaling challenges they faced, and how the pandemic affected them as a company. Numerated (https://www.numerated.com/) Follow Numerated on Twitter (https://twitter.com/numeratedgt), YouTube (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC4igz9AZqOXJlZxtXUBO-1Q), or LinkedIn (https://www.linkedin.com/company/numerated/). Follow Adam on Twitter (https://twitter.com/ademski) or LinkedIn (https://www.linkedin.com/in/adam-kenney-ab-cmu/). Follow thoughtbot on Twitter (https://twitter.com/thoughtbot) or LinkedIn (https://www.linkedin.com/company/150727/). Become a Sponsor (https://thoughtbot.com/sponsorship) of Giant Robots! Transcript: CHAD: This is the Giant Robots Smashing Into Other Giant Robots Podcast, where we explore the design, development, and business of great products. I'm your host, Chad Pytel, and with me, today is Adam Kenney, Chief Product Officer at Numerated, which helps banks and credit unions transform how they lend to businesses. Adam, thanks so much for joining me. ADAM: Thank you, Chad. Thanks for having me. CHAD: Let's dive into Numerated a little bit more. How do you help banks and credit unions lend to businesses? ADAM: I think we're in the middle of what is a pretty meaningful transformation in terms of how businesses are expecting to get access to credit. Really what they want is something that is fast, easy, convenient, largely driven off of the change that has happened in the retail space over the last 10 to 15 years. And in many ways, business lending is still catching up to that, and so our focus is doing that. It's helping the banks and credit unions really change how they interact with their business customers. We use a combination of data and great experiences to make that process as seamless as possible. We've been noted to, using the combination of data and technology, help banks increase the number of loans that they can do with their existing staff by as much as fourfold. We are also noted for inventing what we like to refer to as the three-minute business loan. It's one of the things we were written up on in the Wall Street Journal back in our days in Eastern Labs, where we've been able to get businesses from the point of application all the way to a funded loan in less than three minutes. And that's a process that historically has taken as long as three weeks. And so really excited by the ways that we're able to really help change how banks themselves can look at their operations. But more than anything, it's how banks are able to rethink and change how they interact with businesses and help the businesses in your communities grow and get access to the credit that they need. CHAD: So from a digital product perspective, there's a piece of a product there that banks are actually taking on and white-labeling that provides a lending experience for their clients, right? ADAM: That's correct. I mean, we're a cloud-based SaaS system. But you're right; they branded as their own. And so if you're going to Eastern Bank's website and clicking through and ultimately going through the application process with us, it's going to look and feel like it's just Eastern's website. And all of the interactions that you have with Eastern or any of our customers are going to feel that way as well. So yes, it is a white-label solution that we sell to the banks, and they provide to their customers. CHAD: The actual banking industry is not one that I've had a lot of experience in. And so I'm curious what institutional banks, credit unions, that kind of thing what they're like as a market or as customers and what the sales cycle looks like and those kinds of things. ADAM: It's about as varied as an industry can get, I'll tell you that. [laughs] You have to remember that banks and credit unions can be as small as having a few hundred million dollars in assets, maybe as small as 100 million. And in some of our customers' cases, they're de novo banks, and they're just getting started. And they range up to multiple billions of dollars in assets. And so, these are organizations that scale dramatically. Each of them have their own problems. They're also going to be made up of very different tech-minded individuals. You're going to have some smaller institutions that are basically managing a book of business that's been a book of business for close to a century and are interested in how technology can make them more efficient. But they are not the technologists that you and I would be used to working with on a day-to-day basis. And then, of course, you have people like ourselves who are really trying to, from inside the bank, change what banking is to their customers. And so, it's a very diverse industry in terms of what they're looking to accomplish. We've even come up with recently this framework around how we think about and really talk to our customers about how they transform and the levels of transformation that they can go through. And for us, it's essentially a four-level transformation starting with very small and pointed technology innovations that allow them to drive innovation in very fragmented bits and pieces, for lack of a better term, up to and including they're going to transform everything or become a digital bank. And you can imagine there are lots of stops along the way in terms of where a bank is and where they want to end up as part of their strategy. CHAD: From a product perspective and managing change, do you get a lot of custom features from individual, either clients or potential clients? And how do you manage that if you do? ADAM: The way I think about it is that we certainly get a lot of requests from our customers, and every customer likes to think that they are different and unique. In reality, there's a strong theme to almost all of the requests that we get. And personally, I think that's part of what our job is as a product leader is to really understand how to create themes out of the individual requests and provide a platform back to the market that addresses as many of those in a more holistic way and drives value across not just the individual asks but across all of the customers. And so yeah, there's some uniqueness. And certainly, we need to provide a platform that allows for that. So as an example, every bank has a slightly different view into how they want their credit policy to work and be implemented, but the framework around how you make credit decisions, how I get data into the platform. How do I create a credit matrix? And how do I then decide the exact offer terms to drive out of that? Like, that's a standard capability. And so we're innovating on that based on the individual features, but it's really not with an eye towards providing a specific custom feature to individual customers. It's more providing a flexible platform that allows them to configure the nuance but in a general theme that's going to help them be a better business. CHAD: So in the U.S., we had a specific program launched, PPP loans, in the pandemic to help support businesses. And I know thoughtbot we participated in that and went through that process. I don't think our bank was using Numerated. But I know that the bank really maybe...because they weren't using Numerated, [laughs] they needed to bring together an entirely new application interface very, very quickly in order to be able to take our application to that. And I think that Numerated was right there at the start of that. ADAM: Yes. CHAD: Talk about something custom maybe quickly. ADAM: [laughs] CHAD: What did pulling that together look like? ADAM: So maybe to take a step back if I could first and just paint a picture for you because you're right, it was kind of a unique and incredible period of time. We were fortunate in our line of work because we are all about helping banks transform how they lend to businesses. We had the base platform already built and established that allowed businesses to apply for loans on our platform. Even before the pandemic, we were one of the leading technology platforms for processing SBA loans. So we were uniquely positioned for the opportunity as it results to PPP. At the start of the pandemic, we had approximately 17 customers using our platform. Fast forward six months later, we had 135. And so, to your point around there were a large number of institutions looking for a new application solution overnight, I think that shows you how aggressively banks needed a solution. And there was an opportunity for us to offer our platform to be that. I think the other thing to recognize as part of the backdrop anyway is this was a crazy time if you think back to where we were in the pandemic. No one knew what life was going to look like in a week. And most businesses, especially smaller ones, didn't know if they were going to have a business. And so for us, that also provided the opportunity and maybe a little bit of the confidence in saying, "You know, we have nothing to lose. We're well-positioned. And what else are we going to do? Because it's not like people are making other loans for the next couple of months. Let's just go own this". And so I think it was the combination of us making that recognition, having a really good base platform that had familiarity with the SBA, had familiarity with business lending, and with a team that then could really acutely focus on solving this one problem for as many customers as possible. And by the way, have the emotional impact of not only helping banks but knowing that we're basically helping hundreds of thousands of businesses stay afloat through probably the craziest time in our country's history. And so that's really what got us going. And then there was a ton of work to your point around customization around building out the platform. But the one thing we've tried to do from the beginning is hold true to some of the foundational vision that I mentioned earlier. Like, we don't want to be in the business of custom software. That's not a winning proposition for us or our customers. And so, as much as it was maybe hard at times, throughout PPP, we were always thinking about okay, so we have to make these changes to support this crazy never-before-seen lending program. But how can we do it in a way that's going to set us up to serve the businesses in a year or two when this whole pandemic thing is over? Because PPP is not going to last forever, but our customers are. The businesses are still going to need credit. So whatever we're doing as much as possible, let's be building a foundation that gets us well beyond PPP. And so we were using it as really a catalyst to build a bigger business even while we were helping customers through the pandemic. CHAD: One of the things that I really appreciated, and I have an outside perspective on it, but I really...and people can always do better. ADAM: Yes. [laughs] CHAD: But I thought it was one of the rare circumstances where everyone realized the urgency of the situation: government, banks, everybody. And there was a real willingness to realize, well, we've got to do something. If we try to figure it out all right now, it's going to take too long. So let's just do something, and we'll work out the details later. And so I think there was a willingness, and from a product perspective, my guess would be that allowed you to work iteratively too. ADAM: It did. It was [laughs], I think in some ways a blessing and a curse. CHAD: [laughs] ADAM: Because I can tell you that the number of times my team would get a set of new capabilities, which listen, were great for the customers. It made everything better for the businesses that needed help, so I would never want it any other way. But the number of times that those new capabilities were announced by the SBA on a Friday night and were expected to be live on Monday morning, let's just say it was more frequent than I would ever like to relive. [laughs] And I can remember, especially going into the second round of PPP, it just so happened that all that was happening between Thanksgiving and Christmas in a year where all families wanted to do was spend time with each other after a crazy year had gone by. But we didn't get that luxury, unfortunately. We had a job to do, and that was to make sure that we were ready for the next round. And so it did come with a lot of cost in terms of we had to work really hard to make it happen. But to your point, it allowed us to iterate. And I give the government credit, too, particularly the SBA. They could have, for example, just launched the program and then launched more money into it and stood still, but they didn't do that. To your comment, they had to get live as quick as possible. And so that first round of PPP, there were more technology hiccups. The SBA had some volume constraints. They couldn't really handle the performance. We ended up having to govern our application submissions because otherwise, the SBA couldn't handle it. There were other challenges in terms of how we were validating data. But that got better month by month. And certainly, by the time we got to the forgiveness part of the process and then the next round of PPP the following winter, they actually invested in completely ripping out their legacy API and providing us in the tech community a modern RESTful interface that was much easier, much more performant. And so, even though the volume got even crazier as we went through the program, it actually became easier for us to deliver. The first round, we were literally working around the clock because the SBA was having issues. We couldn't get enough documents through DocuSign and whatever else. We did, I want to say, close to 3 times the volume in the next round a year later but at about 15% of the energy because we had just improved that much in less than a year. And it wasn't just Numerated; it was Numerated working with our partners in government and elsewhere to just get the process that much smoother for our customers. CHAD: Were there things that you needed to do at Numerated? I mean, to go from 17 customers to more than 130 that quickly, I assume that there were some scaling challenges for you along the way. ADAM: There was. And I will say this: we were blessed to have a really good technical infrastructure in place that allowed us to scale on the infrastructure side without a ton of problems. We were able to essentially stand up new environments in our infrastructure relatively quickly and easily and even handle the peak volume of PPP, which was exponentially higher than anything we had ever done on the platform. That was not a problem for us. Where we had to scale is in two areas, one from a technical standpoint was how we were interacting with our technical partners. I mentioned already the need to govern how we were submitting applications to the SBA. We worked very closely with DocuSign to essentially put rate caps on how many documents we were generating at any given time and essentially spread the volume because none of us had dealt with that or dealt with that kind of volume before. And that's where we had technical challenges were in the interfaces and working with partners to make sure everything lined up well. So that was one area, got through it pretty well. And ultimately, like I said, for the second round, we were smooth sailing. The other area to your point around standing up all the banks was how we implemented the customers. Our typical implementation cycles going into the pandemic were multiple months. We had to stand up all over the PPP banks in less than two weeks. And so that took a combination of...I'll call it technical delivery. So we essentially created a cookie-cutter deployment and then used a deployment strategy to push that to all of the new customers all at once that we didn't have before. And we were able to create that relatively quickly. The other was we had to take a much harder stance with our customers than we had ever done around look; everyone's getting the same thing. It's government-mandated anyway, but it's going to be exactly the same. And other than the white-labeling that we, of course, gave everybody, you might want slightly different process around the workflow, around the approval. You're going to have to take the same thing that everybody else is because we just don't have time to configure the nuance across 100 banks. And so luckily, to your earlier comment around, everybody just realized we were in this unique time, we do what we have to do, and we got through it. Our banks were very willing to do that. But that was the other change we had to do to really see this scale through. Mid-Roll Ad: Now that you have funding, it's time to design, build and ship the most impactful MVP that wows customers now and can scale in the future. thoughtbot Lift Off brings you the most reliable cross-functional team of product experts to mitigate risk and set you up for long-term success. As your trusted, experienced technical partner, we'll help launch your new product and guide you into a future-forward business that takes advantage of today's new technologies and agile best practices. Make the right decisions for tomorrow, today. Get in touch at: thoughtbot.com/liftoff CHAD: If you're comfortable talking about architecture a little bit, do you have a shared sort of platform that everyone is on? Or, for each of the customers you have, do they have their own instance? ADAM: So we've made the decision, mostly because of our regulated industry; we felt like it was safer, so each customer gets their own database. We do keep everyone's data completely isolated to protect their information and give them the utmost confidence that it is protected. But we have a shared application layer. And so, our web servers are shared multi-tenant instances. And so it's essentially a combined environment where we're both sharing some resources but then also deploying individual databases and then the configuration because outside of PPP, it is unique bank by bank. And so, the configuration gets deployed within each bank's individual environment. CHAD: Cool. I've worked on systems like that before, and they can certainly present...especially when you need to scale them quickly, and you've got a lot of new customers being added. You better hope that it's been automated. [laughs] ADAM: Yes. And luckily, we had a good amount of automation in place during PPP or even going into it, I should say, but of course, PPP stretched that. And so we've just continued to get better and better as a couple of years have gone by. CHAD: So the second PPP came through. It's in the forgiveness period now, so that's winding down. So Numerated were at that point you alluded to earlier, which is when you were doing PPP, you realized it's not going to be around forever. Let's lay the groundwork now to help customers in the future. We're sort of at that point now, right? ADAM: Yes. CHAD: So what does that look like for you? ADAM: So it's essentially expanding the portfolio of loans that our customers can leverage our platform to execute. And maybe to say that better, if you look back prior to PPP, we got our start with small small business lending. And what I mean by that is loans under $250,000 that can be highly automated. That's where Numerated got its start working with Eastern first 15 customers, saw the value in getting extreme efficiency and delivering essentially capital to their businesses in a number of days instead of weeks. That's what we were great at, very similar to what PPP was, by the way, which was getting money to people in a number of hours in some cases. But we knew that that was never the vision for what we wanted to be or what our banks needed in the business banking segment. Ultimately, they want that same level of use efficiency experience for all of their business loans. But in order to support that, there are a number of capabilities that we needed to build into our platform to handle that. Underwriting gets increasingly complicated when you are underwriting loans at 500,000, a million, or $5 million. The businesses get more complicated. The collateral gets more complicated. The entire process just becomes more sophisticated. But that's what banks want, and by the way, that's what businesses want. They don't want to have a great experience when they're a little bit smaller, and they've taken out a $100,000 loan and then have the experience be crap two years later when they come back, and they've taken out a million-dollar loan. And so, that has always been our vision. We've had the fortune of being able to do really well on PPP and essentially just accelerate that vision. And so that's what we're working on right now is really building a loan origination system that allows our customers to transform how they lend to businesses in entirety. We have been building out all of the sophistication I mentioned around underwriting. We have recently acquired a company called Fincura based out of the Boston area. They automate spreading. If you're not familiar with what spreading is, it basically takes either paper or PDF versions of a bank's financial statements, and it turns them into really critical financial ratios that help banks understand the creditworthiness and the risk associated with the business. So you can imagine what that is. It's taking OCR, technology, AI, and basically taking what were PDFs and converting them into scores that can then be used to automate and drive efficiency in the credit decision, again, all part of being able to then really transform how banks are doing all of their business lending. But that's what we're working on now, converting all of the PPP customers to use the non-PPP, for lack of a better phrase, parts of the platform and really helping them change how their businesses look at them in terms of the opportunity to access credit. CHAD: So I think it's probably worth noting you made the decision to join Numerated right before the pandemic hit. ADAM: That's correct. CHAD: And so you joined when? ADAM: My last day at my previous company happened to be the day we closed the office due to the pandemic. I had obviously made the decision prior to that. But then, my first day on the job at Numerated was the second day of PPP. So essentially, you know, call it a week after everybody had gone home for what became the better part of the next year to two years. CHAD: So I assume making a decision to join a new company, you're going to be the chief product officer. You've had a lot of conversations about what the vision is and what you're going to do. And you're going into a business where hey, there are 17 customers, and we're going to scale. But you probably didn't guess what was going to happen ended up happening. ADAM: No. [laughs] CHAD: So I imagine like part of your vision for what you were going to do both as a company and as an individual must have gotten put on hold. ADAM: It's funny, yes and no. So I will say no to your lead in there. There were certainly times before I started where I was calling Dan our founder and CEO. And I was probing him and pushing him like, is this still a thing? [laughs] Are we really going to go do this? Not realizing what PPP was and really what it was going to mean for our business. So there was that period of time where I wasn't sure. I knew it was going to be different, but I didn't know what that meant yet. Once I understood what was happening and what we were doing, I actually never felt like it was putting anything on hold. And I can come back to the fact that it put some elements of our business on hold. But for me and why I joined and the vision I had, I was coming to help the team really expand what the platform could do for banks and their business customers and to accelerate the number of ways we could help. I have prior experience working at Capital One and Pegasystems with a lot of the systems and the processes that we were helping to reinvent at Numerated. And so, my vision was always to come and build off of those past experiences and accelerate what we were doing in this specific small business segment. PPP, in a lot of ways, just accelerated that. It took what would have probably been three to five years' worth of market adoption in terms of understanding what digital transformation was going to look like, getting customers fully comfortable with a more digital experience, getting comfortable with a more data-driven approach to decision-making. And the pandemic forced all of that to happen in weeks. CHAD: Well, people couldn't even go into the bank to turn in their paperwork. It had to be done remotely. The staff wasn't there either. ADAM: And the staff no longer could look at paper financial statements because they couldn't get paper financial statements. And so everything changed overnight. One of our customers has told us at multiple customer events since he's like, "You guys, you let the rabbit out of the hat, and it's not going back." It just changed overnight what was happening in the industry. And then, for us, it gave us all of this extra opportunity to invest and invest more in what we wanted to go do. Our team, when I joined, was about 40 to 45 people. Our team now is 145 people. And our engineering team went from a little over 20 to just under 60. So we have exponentially changed the rate in which we're innovating and going after things. And so, for me, it's just accelerated and made things more exciting. The one other comment I'll make in terms of putting things on hold it did put some elements of the business on hold because every one of our customers stopped thinking about what I'll call traditional business lending and focused 100% for the better part of 18 months on getting through the pandemic. And even once PPP was done, there was another six to nine months where banks were trying to figure out, are we really out of the pandemic? Are we ready to start lending the way we used to? Do we need to rethink risk? Because these businesses are all different now than they were two years ago. The things that made a business risky two years ago are different now. And so there was also a little bit of a hangover as our customers internalized within their own walls what it meant to get back into lending. And so, it did put some elements of that on hold. We were fortunate, though, that we grew so much through PPP. And we actually kept adding what I'll call core customers, not just PPP customers, during that period that our growth actually accelerated. And it's been really good for us. CHAD: That's great. You mentioned the team growth that you've had. Different companies are organized in different ways. As Chief Product Officer, where do you sit within the organization and relative to the engineering team? ADAM: So at Numerated, my responsibility includes all of the product management as well as the engineering organization. So I'm responsible with my teams for everything from initial product strategy, the product design. I have all of the UX and design team as well as then all of the execution, the delivery of the platform as well. CHAD: So does that mean that there's VP of engineering in your organization or some sort of person like that that's working closely with you? ADAM: Sort of. So I have...basically, it divides more at the director level. So I have a couple of VPs that work for me that have a combination of product and engineering, both experience, expertise, and responsibility. But then their teams have product managers, and then we have directors of engineering that then manage their individuals from teams. I also have a group of former bankers. They're product managers but act as consultants to those organizations. And that's where we get all of our industry expertise. They've worked with the SBA. They've worked in credit offices, and they really help to influence the product roadmap across those teams as well. CHAD: So the entire engineering structure also being under the chief Product Officer, I would say that and correct me if I'm wrong, I think that's probably not how the majority of companies organize it. Do you agree with that? ADAM: I have seen both, but I would agree that it is not the majority. CHAD: I would say if there is a majority, and I agree, I've seen both too, but you might have a CTO and then VP of engineering. And so, the engineering organization goes all the way up to the C-level. And then there's a Chief Product Officer. And here's the product management and product underneath them. Was this an intentional choice from the beginning as you scaled out the team for you to have it all live under you? ADAM: It was intentional. I will give my personal view on it. I think that as we continue to evolve as technology companies, one of the hardest things for us to achieve is alignment around vision and purpose. And that drives a level of focus that I think maximizes the ability to move the business forward. And based on that premise, the places where I've seen things work the best is when there is a focal point across product and engineering within specialization underneath. Because it drives, I think, the best alignment across the organization. I will acknowledge, however, that finding leaders that can actually operate effectively in that combined role is extremely difficult because you need people that have a high degree of engineering experience so that they actually know how to build for quality, build for scale, even for things that don't immediately impact the bottom line while having enough business acumen to understand the demands of the business and how to balance those priorities against what we need to grow the business at the same time. And so, it does create a little bit of a snowflake challenge. I cannot find or replace those roles as we grow and scale nearly as quickly as I can in a divided organization. But I have found that it does help me drive clarity of priorities and purpose and ultimately focus in the organization versus the places I've worked where that hasn't been the case. CHAD: So I guess given that, then I assume you're hiring. [laughs] ADAM: We are always hiring. [laughs] We are definitely in growth mode. And we are looking for great people that can help us to build a platform and really transform how our customers are thinking about how they lend to their businesses. CHAD: Well, I agree. I think there are different structures then that can achieve it. And also, a lot of it comes down to the people but that alignment and that understanding of design, and product, and development or engineering. And ideally, people and all of those skill sets and all those teams who get it and can balance those different priorities with the business is really important, and that alignment of vision. And so there are probably different structures to get it, but that's what you're aiming for. And I think that the structure that you've set up is one which is very helpful to getting that alignment. ADAM: Agreed. Agreed. I think that while we're on the topic of the team and the culture we're trying to build out, I'll maybe use that as a way to share a few more things that we're really driving towards. You can imagine a company that has scaled the way we have and continues to grow. That presents some other organizational challenges as well. One of my firm beliefs is the fastest way to scale is to create really strong, empowered, decentralized teams. That, again, gets back to the whole vision and focus thing. They have to be rowing in the same direction. But they have to be really independent in the day-to-day. And so we've really spent a lot of time over the last, I would say, year and a half shifting to that kind of a model to where each of the teams is really embracing what their individual accountabilities are. They are really focused on how they're delivering success for the business and are able to make a lot of the day-to-day decisions. But then it falls to management, leadership, myself to make sure that when they make those decisions, they understand the context in which we're trying to drive the business so that we can do as much as we can as fast as we can but in a way that's high quality and delivers value. CHAD: Awesome. Well, I sincerely wish you all the best in that. I really appreciate you stopping by and sharing. Thank you. ADAM: Yeah, my pleasure. I appreciate the time, and good to get to know you a little bit, Chad. CHAD: If folks want to find out more, maybe apply, follow along with you; where are all the places that they can do that? ADAM: Yeah, sure. So numerated.com is where they can go and learn more about the business, and they can learn more about where we're hiring. People should check me out on LinkedIn. That's probably where I'm the most active these days. And feel free to message me as well. I'll also give you my email address if anybody wants to reach out. It's pretty simple. It's adam@numerated.com. Whether it's opinions, thoughts, or reactions to anything that I've shared today, or you just want to build a relationship, I'd love to hear from people and get to know you a little bit better. CHAD: Wonderful. You can find links to all those things, probably not Adam's email address, in the show notes. ADAM: [laughs] CHAD: We want to protect him from those spam crawlers. But you can subscribe to the show and find notes along with a complete transcript for the episode at giantrobots.fm. If you have questions or comments, email us at hosts@giantrobots.fm. And you can find me on Twitter at @cpytel. This podcast is brought to you by thoughtbot and produced and edited by Mandy Moore. Thanks so much for listening, and see you next time. ANNOUNCER: This podcast was brought to you by thoughtbot. thoughtbot is your expert design and development partner. Let's make your product and team a success. Special Guest: Adam Kenney.

    CTO Connection
    Short Byte: Mindaugas Mozūras - Mental health for engineering leaders

    CTO Connection

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2022 28:22


    In this week's episode, I got to talk with Mindaugas Mozūras, who runs an engineering org of over 400 people for Vinted out of Lithuania. We talked about the importance of mental health, the benefits of therapy, and what getting coaching and mental health support taught Mindaugas about managing his team.PARTNERThanks to our partner CloudZero — Cloud Cost Intelligence Platform. Control cost and drive better decisions with CloudZero cloud cost intelligence. The CloudZero platform provides visibility into cloud spend without the typical pitfalls of legacy cloud cost management tools, like endless tagging or clunky Kubernetes support. Optimize unit economics, decentralize cost data to engineering, and create a shared language between finance and technical teams. CloudZero helps you organize cloud spending better than anyone else.Join companies like Drift, Rapid7, and SeatGeek by visiting cloudzero.com/ctoconnection to get started.

    Sixteen:Nine
    Thomas Philippart de Foy, Appspace

    Sixteen:Nine

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 39:21


    The 16:9 PODCAST IS SPONSORED BY SCREENFEED – DIGITAL SIGNAGE CONTENT Appspace has now been active in this industry for 20 years, and through much of that time the software company was one of the larger players in a crowd of companies all chasing the general business opportunity of digital signage. But in the last few years the company has pivoted, in a big way, to the well-defined vertical of workplace. The company now describes itself as a workplace experience platform for both physical and digital workplaces. Digital signage is still a main component of what Appspace does, but just one of several in a unified platform. I caught up with Thomas Philippart de Foy, who has been with Appspace for a decade and is now the EVP of Product Innovation. In our chat, we get into what took Appspace down the workplace path, and then how it all works within an organization. The company has a PILE of users and says its software is in place at roughly 200 of the companies listed in the Fortune 500. But it also offers free accounts to smaller users, drafting off the well-used concept of freemium software - allowing people to try before they buy. If you are looking at workplace - either as a vendor or as an HR, IT or ops person, listen and learn. Subscribe to this podcast: iTunes * Google Play * RSS TRANSCRIPT Thomas, thank you for joining me. You've been with Appspace for a very long time, right?  Thomas Philippart de Foy: Just celebrating 10 years in September!  Oh, okay, and we first met a number of years ago in Dubai, but then you moved to Costa Rica, which was a bit of a pivot, but now you're in Belgium for a holiday, right? Thomas Philippart de Foy: That's correct. I relocated to Costa Rica to get closer to the US time zone while still enjoying tropical weather. You don't get tropical weather in Antwerp or wherever you're in Belgium?  Thomas Philippart de Foy: Rarely, once a year in the summer, there's a good day, and then the rest is rainy.  And you don't like that?  Thomas Philippart de Foy: Once a year, maybe.  So Appspace, that's a company that's been around for a very long time. When I first got to know Appspace, it was very much a general digital signage CMS platform, you know, “What are you doing? We can help you out!” And you were, at that time I believe, working pretty closely with Cisco, but in the last few years you could, you very much seem to have become a company that's all about workplace experience and digital signage is one of your outputs as opposed to being a pure digital signage company.  Is that a fair assessment?  Thomas Philippart de Foy: Absolutely. We're celebrating our 20 years anniversary this month, so such a big milestone, and the firs 15-16 years was really building a cloud-based CMS for digital signage. We had some mission statements. We wanted to be hardware agnostic, OS agnostic. We wanted to be cloud first, and then a few years back, we started expanding our offering and went into the room scheduling worlds, where a lot of other companies were playing, and just added that as a feature. Then just two years ago, Summer 2020, one of our biggest customers on the West Coast came over to us and said, “Hey, we're looking to return to the office after the pandemic. We need help in providing our users with an app that would allow them to reserve workspaces, comply with security policies and so forth.” And we decided to get onto that journey and build a product, and six months later we launched. So January 2021 and 30 days later, we signed one of the biggest tech companies as a customer, and from there it's been quite a ride.  Did the company go towards workplace because it looked like an opportune vertical to be in, or was it what the customers who you touching or asking for and it pulled you that way? Thomas Philippart de Foy: Yeah, in the last 10 years, I spent a lot of time meeting with customers and trying to understand their challenges and see where Appspace could help them. In this scenario, the customer came over and they had a real challenge, which we saw many other companies would have, and there was really no one in the market that had an answer for it two years ago. So we thought that's an opportunity in which we could really put some focus, leverage our existing enterprise grade platform, cloud-first experience and credibility in our large enterprise customer base to just go and expand the use case.  Really, we also see that there is a correlation happening with workplace communication and workplace management. It's not gonna be two different things, it's actually gonna be one, and we thought we could come from our workplace communication expertise and go that direction while probably some more workplace management products would probably start moving towards workplace communication, and there would be a consolidation. You also acquired a company called Beezy, which was all about the workplace as well, right?  Thomas Philippart de Foy: Yeah, when we entered workplace management, we also launched our employee app, and from there, we got a lot of requests from customers to focus on employee communication in the app itself, and we met with Beezy, they had a very similar company culture, they had a good size and they had a product which was very modern, very forward looking and built on Microsoft SharePoint, and we thought that would nicely align with our product platform and our vision, so that's been a very fun journey, onboarding them into the Appspace world for the last few months.  Now is Beezy still a brand, or is it that their IP and their capabilities are rolled into Appspace?  Thomas Philippart de Foy: We're rolling them into Appspace step by step. The brands are consolidating under a single brand. Now, it's the Appspace Modern Internet by Beezy, but we are clearly focusing on aligning all the different teams under a single organization, and also the brand and the product will be one.  We definitely don't wanna run two separate products. We've always had that philosophy that with Appspace, it was one platform and features and not multiple point products so we're gonna continue doing that.  There are digital science CMSs that say that the workplace is one of the verticals that they're in, and then there are companies that just do room booking software, and maybe the displays hardware as well, they blend those together. There are hot desk companies and everything else. I'm thinking, like in a lot of other vertical markets, that the end user really doesn't wanna have to cobble together an overall solution that features all these different components and different companies doing them, they'd rather just have one company doing it all. Is that a fair statement? Thomas Philippart de Foy: Yes, and the pandemic has accelerated the need for platforms versus point products.  Pre-pandemic on the workplace management, you had the IWMS to manage all your assets, you had room booking solutions for the room scaling panels, you had visitor management solutions to bring visitors into the office. There were all point products, and then on the workplace comm, you had digital signage that was a point product, you had kiosks often very close to digital signage, and then you had email publishing, you had intranet. All of those were point products as well. I think what we're seeing now is they're unifying on both sides. So you're starting to see vendors who offer room booking, hot desking, visitor management, and then on the other side, you've got companies who are starting to consolidate and acquire, and they're doing digital signage, employee app, intranet, email publishing, and what we're doing is both at the same time, which is probably our biggest unique differentiator. We believe, if you have an employee app, it's not only about employee communication or workplace management, it's the two combined. So a single app on users' devices versus multiple apps. And I assume that resonates well with the business communicators and the IT people within a company, because they don't wanna have to deal with all these different logins and back in and out stuff?  Thomas Philippart de Foy: I guess there's two sides to it. There's certainly the administrative side to it, but there's also the user adoption. A big part of the return to the office is implementing new tools for employees to reserve access into a building, reserve a meeting room or a desk, and comply with formalities, that's for sure. But the other side of it is how do you communicate with those employees? How do you let them know what are the new rules in place? What are the new policies? How do you communicate what are the new benefits in the office, the new technology available?  So being able to communicate in the same app that you're actually gonna reserve your workspace, invite your visitors, makes a lot of sense, and I think that's what HR and Corp comms are really liking with our story is that one app will do it all and it will of course integrate with all their backend systems and so forth. So if I am a business communicator at a large corporation and I want to address these issues, what can you do for them and how does it work?  Are they buying an enterprise license? Is it cloud based or are they installing something on prem, and how does it all come together? Thomas Philippart de Foy: Yeah, it's a great question and it's a big one and there's two sides to it. Once again on one side, you've got the admin, the console is fully cloud based, you don't need to install any software on your desktop, and you can start by just going on Appspace.com, create a free account and you get a full featured Appspace environment. We don't monetize features, we monetize users and devices. So even with a free account, you'll have all the features of Appspace, but you'll be limited in the number of users that can log into the app and the number of devices that you can register back. So it's the whole idea of Freemium?  I just wanted to ask because “free” is intriguing to me. You don't see that very much in digital science anymore, unless it's entry level super limited in what it does and so on, but you're doing free with the idea of onboarding people, getting them used to the system and them realizing, I like this and I'm willing to pay for it?  Thomas Philippart de Foy: Yeah, so what we think is that in order to be successful with Freemium, you need to have a platform that's really self-service, and I think that's what we focused a lot over the last 10 years is simplifying the product to the point where someone who just goes on our website, creates a free account, in 30 seconds is in the Appspace account, able to register a device, create some awesome content, publish it to the device and it's working, and we were able to do that for digital signage, but then we were able to expand that into all the digital communication channels and also for workplace management.  So we maintained Freemium when a lot of other companies started thinking, “That doesn't work for us, let's go back to a trial account with someone hand holding you.” We don't need that with Appspace, you can get started, and so we have a huge amount of customers that create free accounts every month, and then when they're ready to expend, they just need to click on the link and they get in contact with a Sales rep and they can just either swipe their credit card or work through one of our partners to buy a subscription. Is that a huge amount of free signups every month? Are there no maintenance until they actually contact a Sales rep and say, “I'm interested in paying for this”?  Thomas Philippart de Foy: That's correct. They're touchless most of the time.  We have very large organizations that will have a lot of different free accounts, different departments, different team members who will create free accounts and get started, and then when they're ready to move and they want to do the security assessment and they want to talk contract and large scale deployments, they reach out to us.  So I guess your sales people might look at big tech company, X and see that they have five different free accounts in different departments, and the salesperson could go to them and say, “Guys, you're using a lot of this now, do you wanna harmonize it?”  Thomas Philippart de Foy: Yeah. Our sales team, for sure, we also have a big marketing organization now. The product is also supported, so when you log into Appspace, you will have certain steps to follow to register a device, create content. It's the system that is holding your hand, not users. And then along the way, you will have opportunities to get help, to talk to people. You can go to the knowledge center. Our Sales reps are already really there to help customers get to the next level, which makes it nice because when our Account Executives talk to customers, they already have a good understanding of what the customer has been doing with Appspace and they can really jump right into it.  What happens when you have potential new customers who already have some sort of a room booking system and scheduling system, and they like them.  Do you have APIs where you can just continue to work with them or do they have to abandon that and go entirely with Appspace? Thomas Philippart de Foy: No, so we have open APIs, fully documented and online for every feature of our product. So we're happy to integrate with existing solutions that the customer may have still under contract or they're happy with it. What we're seeing though is very quickly customers consolidate because they see an opportunity for cost savings, for ease of management. And then, you know the story of a unified platform, if you have an integration with an emergency system or your building management system and the fire alarm goes on, you can broadcast that message to a digital sign, to a visitor management kiosk, to a room scheduling panel inside the room on the video device, and that can be done really easily when you're using a platform. It's much harder to achieve when you're using point products, because you need to integrate each point product with a security system and many don't even support that concept of broadcast.  So what we're seeing is when customers onboard Appspace for one use case, they very quickly start seeing the opportunity to save money, ease operations, and then benefit from the platform features and capabilities.  Are you able to provide analytics?  I've heard about this in the past where you start to get a sense of how a workplace is being used and where people are dwelling and how often rooms actually get booked and how many people are in the rooms, and it helps to size and maybe rethink some of the meeting spaces that a company may have. Thomas Philippart de Foy: Yeah, so analytics and reporting is huge, and it's actually for the two sides of the product: for the workplace communication, understanding how users are interacting with content, whether it's on the app, on their phone, on their desktop, whether it's on a kiosk.  We have this concept of a corporate Netflix. We've had that for yours where users can actually browse content on demand, very much like you browse your video content on Netflix. You do that with the remote control, with a touch panel, whatever the interaction you want to use. We track all of that, and that gives a lot of analytics on how content is being consumed, the success of a campaign and so forth. And then on the workplace management, we have the analytics of what are the most active users, what type of workspace they book? How long do they sit at a desk? How long do they use a meeting room? If the meeting room for 10 people was booked, but used by two people, we have that data, so you can size your resources accordingly based on demand.  And then you can visualize everything inside Appspace, but we also created integrations into Tableau, into Power BI. So customers can actually export the data and visualize it in their preferred data visualization tool.  And in a workplace, the Power BI and Tableau stuff is interesting. I'm curious, are workplaces now much more sophisticated to where they see digital signage and visual communications as doing a lot more than congratulating somebody on their birthday or their 20th year with the company or whatever it may be. They're getting into visualizing KPIs in real time and that sort of thing? Thomas Philippart de Foy: Oh, yes, for sure. The number of customers that display building analytics when you enter the building, when you get on the first floor, where you can see the floor plan, you can see the heat maps, you can see the air quality, you can see the average temperature of the neighborhood. That certainly is a very common use case nowadays, providing building insights to users on digital signs is becoming really exciting.  I think what we're seeing is a huge opportunity of combining workplace management and workplace communication is when you now have context to where digital signage can help, and you know that in the retail world, there's been a bunch of vendors who've monitored gender, age, ethnicity in order to manage communication campaign to those audience and measure also. In workplace management, you don't really care about age or gender. But what you do care is which user is sitting where, and when you've got a majority of salespeople sitting in a neighborhood, can you actually change the content to relate to those people? And that's been something that we've done a lot over the last year and a half is creating that context of digital signage experience, where even though I'm going back into an office where it's a hot desking hotel, the content still speaks to me, because the system is aware that I'm gonna be sitting there, and I think that's huge, because in those days you used to know exactly where people were sitting so you were planning your content for the sales team based on where people were sitting. Now, the system will automate that process based on the data they get from their workplace management feature. And they're not using computer vision or things like that? Because when I come in to work at an office, I have to book a specific desk, and that's how you know that I'm there, right?  Thomas Philippart de Foy: Either because you're booking a specific desk or you're sitting at a specific desk, and when you're actually sitting, we are able to identify who you are, and therefore dynamically say what's interesting to you is more sales data or more product marketing data, and therefore we mush multiple channels of content together to provide a perfect playlist that matches the audience.  But how do you know I'm at that desk?  Thomas Philippart de Foy: That's where workplace technology comes, whether it's smart docking stations, whether it's physically connecting into the network and passing the user identity, whether it's those new video devices that we see popping left and right on the desks. It could be when you have a desk puck, which is similar to a room scheduling panel, you arrive and you will scan the QR code with your phone and authenticate and check into a desk and say, this is now my desk. So we have a lot of different tools that allows us to identify the user and therefore to get that data that we need to personalize the workspace environment.  Through the pandemic, particularly in the first months, there was all kinds of discussion about how the workplace was gonna change, because those workplaces were being hollowed out through lockdowns and so on, and there's been all kinds of discussions and debate and everything else, particularly in the last six months or so, is where workplaces have started to repopulate as to whether it really did change all that much, and whether everybody's just working from home or everybody's into a hybrid thing.  You're on the ground, so to speak, you're dealing with companies who are implementing this stuff. What's your sense of what's actually happening?  Thomas Philippart de Foy: I think companies are worried that people are not coming back to the office as quickly as they had hoped they would, and although many companies during the pandemic said that they would not require employees to go back to the office. It's very different two years later, we realize how the workplace culture is important, and having people, if not every day, at least a few days a week, come into the office and meet their teammates and so forth. So we're now seeing a sense of urgency from many customers to find ways to convince people to go back to the office and that comes with offering a new experience, offering new services.  The new experience is making sure that regardless of where I sit in the building, I have the building talking to me, the building is aware that I'm there and being able to personalize that experience, and I think that's where digital signage is playing such a critical role. But then in the employee app, when I'm booking a room or when I'm booking a desk, I may need different types of services, maybe I need different technology, or maybe I want catering services. I should be able to do that from the app and reserve this ahead of time, and we're seeing a lot of demand around those new experiences where employees will get more benefits when they come to the office, not only benefits of a better physical workplace, but also benefits in terms of the services that are offered, and that will incentivize them to come back into the office, and then naturally, as people will come back to the office, they will meet their teammates again, and they will see why it's so important to meet in person, and that will create a dynamic, and at some point I think we'll get back to somewhat a normal situation where most people will go to the office more regularly. Did the pandemic accelerate something that, from your perspective, was going to happen anyways and just speed it up out of necessity, or were there a lot of companies that weren't really thinking about changing how their workplaces were experienced?  Thomas Philippart de Foy: That's a great question. I actually think the pandemic gave the opportunity for large organizations to make a cultural change in the workplace that was planned, but maybe seen as a 5-10 years initiative, and they were able to do it in 2 years.  Hot-desking in hotels is an example. We've been talking about hotels and hot-desking for years, but no one was able to implement it. It was such a big cultural change. The pandemic gave the opportunity for companies to take the decision, to reduce real estate and implement hot-desking in hotels, and they had a good reason for that, and for employees, it was like a natural thing that was happening. It would have taken years to get there otherwise. That's why no one was really focusing on the technology for it.  I also think that the pandemic has accelerated the adoption of apps, like Microsoft Teams. Many companies were still using Skype for Business and other tools and they were struggling to unify under a modern app like Microsoft Teams or Slack or WebEx, and this gave them the opportunity to do that, and by doing that, all employees now have one common app on their personal device, whether it's a phone or a desktop, they're able to communicate, chat, exchange files, and we've just launched our embedded app for Teams. So now you have Appspace embedded in Teams, which means users don't need to download a new app to reserve their workspaces or receive team communication. They have all of it inside one app, and I think that's an acceleration that's a result of the pandemic.  We obviously saw how Zoom and Microsoft and WebEx grew from that. That has also helped in the adoption of new technology, like workplace management and employee comms.  Yeah, I was curious about that because if you have all these other workplace tools, the next logical thing to integrate into there would be video conferencing, but that's that's an entirely different business and pretty damn complicated. So the easier path would be to integrate with something like Teams, right? Thomas Philippart de Foy: That's correct. I think Teams offer the framework to embed an app fully into Teams, handle the authentication for the user, and then from there, we have so much insights on what the user needs that we're really able to personalize the experience. The Teams embedded app is a huge win for customers because if you think of a very large service organization with 200,000 desk workers, rolling out a new app for communication and for workplace management is a big challenge. Getting users to download the app or deploying the app to their personal device, enabling user authentication, tracking how users are actually logging in the app. This is no longer a challenge when you are embedded in Teams, because one morning you wake up and on your sidebar, you've got a new button, you click on it and that's where you reserve your workspace, that's where you see your workplace communication, all of it in an app that you were already logging in every morning.  So I'm a CTO at a very large tech company, and if I'm a CTO, the company's going down, but regardless of that, if I'm sitting across from you and I say, “okay, this is interesting, make me comfortable that this is secure.” What do you tell me?  Thomas Philippart de Foy: We obviously work with close to two hundred of the Fortune 500 companies, so we're used to working with very large organizations that have very strict security requirements, and our product (the cloud service) is already approved by IT, by Security and enabled whether it's for digital signage or room booking or visitor for one of the features.  Enabling suddenly to turn on the other features doesn't require any more security assessment because the product has been approved. We also have only one app, whether you are running our app on a system on a chip display, on a kiosk, on an iPad, it's the same app in a different container. And this means that once you have your app approved for one of the use cases, your app is actually approved for all the other use cases. That's again been strengths on our side is trying to keep it single simple platform that allows you to really very quickly scale this across your organization. One thing that's come up a lot in the last couple years is digital science companies who addressed some of the ideas of remote work by having, in effect, a network screensaver, something that would push out to home based workers and pop messaging on a screen and all that. Are you doing that sort of thing, and if so, is it widely adopted?  Thomas Philippart de Foy: Yeah, it's a little bit what we started doing five years ago inside meeting rooms on video devices. When the video device is not used for video conferencing, pop up a screensaver and its Appspace, it's running natively on the client and it will display all the important communication. In the case of a meeting room, we're targeting a wider audience.  Now, when you run our UWP app on a Windows device, we obviously know who is the owner of that device, so we're able to personalize the content. Now, I see this as an interesting use case for screensavers. Although I've never seen someone sitting in front of his laptop watching a screensaver as they do a digital sign, drinking a coffee, but I do like the experience of: you're running the Appspace app on the desktop, it's in screensaver mode. When you plug in your laptop in the office or at home, it pops up the experience where as a user, you can say, “Hey, I'm working from home” or “I'm in the office”, and that then trickles into a whole series of events that makes your colleagues, your teammates aware of where you are working from today, are you in the office and so forth.  So screensaver for just pure content playlist, that's really easy to achieve, but I don't know that this is a huge benefit and a huge win, but coupling that with workplace management can be really interesting. Yeah, I do like the idea of being able to instant message somebody in a way, other than an email, but you're right. If I was working for a large company and I was sitting at home and there was something steadily popping up on the screen telling me about Millie's birthday or Bob's retirement or whatever, I'd be looking very hard to figure out some way to disable it.  Thomas Philippart de Foy: One thing we did though, is we worked with a big law firm in Canada, and the CIO managed to convince the partners to move from a physically assigned office to a hot office, if you will. Very challenging, because lawyers and partners are very conventional. They like their workspace environment. They want their corner office. And what the CIO was able to convince is there would be new sacrifice in the personal experience and to do that, they put in every office, a digital sign, 55 inch display coupled with video or not, depending on the office profile. Outside the office, there is an office scheduling panel.  The partner from home is able to reserve on their Appspace app, “Hey, I need an office from 8:00 AM to 6:00 PM and these are the amenities I need.” They reserve that workspace, and when they come into the office, they actually check on the panel outside or on their phone and the digital sign instantly switches to their personal channel. They have potentially their practice news, maybe their preferred sports news, and also their family pictures that they want, and they've just personalized that office with content for the partners and that made them really excited because now they had a big 55 inch display showing their practice news or their family pictures instead of those little frames on the desk that would take the dust. I think when technology really increases the user experience and doesn't sacrifice anything, I think this works really well as a home office as well. If you have an extra display and you can use that real estate, that makes sense, but let's not be mistaken, people care about themselves primarily, they want information that's relevant to them. If I'm at home, I don't know that I want this birthday of a colleague, but I wouldn't mind having pictures of a year ago from my family and kids that I celebrated, maybe that's more useful for me.  We haven't talked about back of house and all the discussions around being workplace, as it relates to an office, are you doing work in production areas and industrial areas and so on? Thomas Philippart de Foy: Yeah. So if you remember, we acquired a company called The Marlin Company a couple of years ago, and their main focus was industrial. A very large amount of customers in that space, and we've been working a lot with those customers in transitioning from digital signage, which was a normal evolution of printed posters to digital content and focus a lot around safety and workplace wellbeing and so forth to communicate on personal devices.  Now, frontline workers typically don't have a company email address. So how do they log into the app? So we combine digital signage with the employee app. Digital signage will say, “Hey, there's a new employee app. To access the app, scan this QR code!” User scans the QR code on their phone, enters an employee ID and a phone number and a few seconds later, they get a one time password to create their credentials and they are now logged into the same app as the desk workers with different feature sets, but it's the same app, and now they also have the ability to have employee communication, team communication. They can chat, they can react socially and comment on the content the same way anyone else.  This is breaking the barrier between the desk workers and the frontline workers where really the frontline workers who didn't have a lot of the technology stack because they didn't have a company email address, where everyone has a smartphone so why wouldn't they have the same benefits? And that one time password, no email login has been huge win for us and for our customers in making sure every employee is aligned and has access to the same capabilities.  Last question, this conversation flew by. What's the installed footprint for Appspace at this point?  Thomas Philippart de Foy: It's always hard to say because we count users. We evaluate that around 10 million users benefit from Appspace around workplace management and workplace communication today. We have around 2,500 customers, two hundred of the Fortune 500, and deployments that will scale on the screen size between 50 screens and 10,000 screens for a single customer. And on the user side, our largest deployment is 175,000 users logging into our app to receive team communication or reserve workspaces. So very large deployments. We like to focus on large customers, but with the Marlin acquisition, we were able to really get into the industrial segment where you have a lot of smaller organizations, maybe not always smaller in terms of number of workers, but maybe smaller in terms of number of physical workspaces. Yeah. All right, this was great. I learned a lot, which is, I guess the point. Thomas Philippart de Foy: That was great. Thank you so much for giving us the time. 

    Heavybit Podcast Network: Master Feed
    Ep. #30, Cilium and eBPF with Thomas Graf of Isovalent

    Heavybit Podcast Network: Master Feed

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 67:26


    In episode 30 of The Kubelist Podcast, Marc Campbell and Benjie De Groot speak with Thomas Graf, Co-Founder and CTO of Isovalent. This conversation includes a deep dive on eBPF, the origins of Cilium and the lessons learned while creating it in the open, and insights on kernel development.

    The Kubelist Podcast
    Ep. #30, Cilium and eBPF with Thomas Graf of Isovalent

    The Kubelist Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 67:26


    In episode 30 of The Kubelist Podcast, Marc Campbell and Benjie De Groot speak with Thomas Graf, Co-Founder and CTO of Isovalent. This conversation includes a deep dive on eBPF, the origins of Cilium and the lessons learned while creating it in the open, and insights on kernel development.

    CIO Classified
    The Future of Employee Experience: Insights From the World's Leading CIOs

    CIO Classified

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 26:21


    The competition to attract and retain talent remains fierce, and today's leading CIOs understand that creating an employee experience model should be just as high of a priority as technology and innovation. In this episode, we've compiled advice from CIOs and technology leaders who are creating employee-centric cultures at their companies, and examine strategies used by successful organizations—from VMware to the Boston Red Sox—that keep employees engaged, productive, and happy.---------Quotes“The key is to offload work that doesn't require synchronous co-creation to the machine. Find ways to make that work readable, visible, doable, and extensible by the machine.” - Wendy Pfeiffer, CIO, Nutanix “You need to have a defined workflow that is the map of how work gets done across the organizations. Then, have some monitoring on them to make sure that you're continually reflecting and speeding yourselves up.” - Alex Hood, CPO, Asana“We've done a few things to mix it up a bit in town halls. For example, we've had people on the team kick off the meeting. We've had some people singing—some people play the guitar. We've even had some people singing and playing guitar at the same time. We always try to mix it up and have something interesting upfront.” - David Vidoni, VP of IT, Pegasystems “There's a tendency to throw human capital at problems. We're looking at ways where we can bring a lot more automation and hopefully, a lot more efficiency to how their particular jobs operate. This way, people can be better informed and able to leverage data that they've never had before—really make decisions that otherwise were historically time-consuming.” - Brian Shield, SVP and CTO, Boston Redsox.“If we can fundamentally change the culture and get into a place where people feel genuinely and sincerely delighted, surprised, and amazed by the experience of using technology, they will be more productive. They will feel good about who they work with and what they're doing.” - Jason Conyard, SVP and CIO, VMWare“We've been really focused on the onboarding experience because so many people boarded during the pandemic. We've been trying to keep our game up by making it very simple and seamless, especially when you're doing it from a remote perspective.” - Ginna Raahauge, EVP and CIO, Zayo Group“We get employees involved in the decision-making process. We want them to have a say in which tool, vendor, and features they like… We believe technology is now a utility and everybody needs to participate in the decision-making process.” - Prasad Ramakrishnan, SVP of IT and CIO, Freshworks“We can't just assume people coming in know how to be a technologist, or know the basics of tackling technology. We have to create a great employee experience before they start, the day they start, and all the way through.” - Carter Busse, CIO, Workato“Continuously learning about new technologies or new ways of working… that creates a resilient culture by default.” - Apratim Purakayastha, CTO, SkillSoft and SumTotal“If your team is happy and productive, that customer experience will resonate and other people in the organization will look to IT to help solve their problems rather than a potential blocker to getting things done.” - Johan Dowdy, Global Head of IT, Asana---------Time Stamps:* (1:45) Why it's important to create less work about work* (8:05) Creative solutions to increase employee engagement* (11:50) Ideas for optimizing the employee onboarding process* (16:57) How to make employees feel like their voices are heard* (21:36) How to build resilience into the workplace culture --------SponsorThis podcast is brought to you by Asana. Asana is a leading work management platform that empowers teams to orchestrate their work — from daily tasks to big strategic initiatives — all in one place. By enabling the world's teams to work together effortlessly, Asana helps organizations of all sizes and industries achieve their goals, faster. Learn more at Asana.com.--------LinksConnect with Ian on LinkedInLearn more about Caspian Studios

    Resilient Cyber
    S3E13: Jimmy Mesta - Kubernetes Security & Compliance

    Resilient Cyber

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 43:34


    Chris: For those not familiar with Kubernetes, can you tell us what it is and why there is so much buzz around it?Chris: Kubernetes, while it has many benefits also is a very complex technology, what are some of the key things organizations should keep in mind when using Kubernetes securely?Nikki: What kind of role do you see RBAC playing with Kubernetes? I don't hear a lot of talk around this subject and I'm curious what you think may be the importance of RBAC around KubernetesChris: Any nuances or recommendations to those rolling their own versus using managed Kubernetes offerings?Nikki: What does governance look like around Kubernetes - specifically around large, multi-cluster environmentsChris: From a compliance perspective, what are some resources organizations can use to securely provision and operate Kubernetes from a compliance perspective?Nikki: Can we also chat about Kubernetes API logs when it comes to auditing and assessments?Chris: You lead the Kubernetes Top 10 project with OWASP, can you tell us a bit about that?Nikki: Where do you think kubernetes, clusters, etc are heading? What does the future look like for security teams to not only understand these new technology areas, but to understand how to secure them properly?Chris: Do you feel like security practitioners are keeping pace with the rate of innovative technologies like Kubernetes, and if now, how can we fix that?Chris: We know you are the CTO and Co-Founder of KSOC - tell us a bit about the firm and what you all specialize in and what led you to founding it?

    The Catalyst by Softchoice
    Next stop, metaverse?

    The Catalyst by Softchoice

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 31:33


    How will the metaverse transform modern business? And how can companies seize this virtual opportunity? Medha Parlikar, co-founder and CTO of CasperLabs, joins Erika to explore how IT leaders can leverage the metaverse with real-world applications. Mehda reviews the pros and cons of engaging in a virtual world and explains how a 3D version of the internet will create the most immersive user experience yet. Featuring: Medha Parlikar, Co-Founder and CTO at CasperLabs. Special thanks to Softchoice and the Pilgrim production team for sharing their thoughts. The Catalyst by Softchoice is the podcast shining a light on the human side of IT leaders and reframing our relationship with technology. 

    You, Me, and Your Top Three
    80 Percent of the Day (wsg Craig Vanderburg)

    You, Me, and Your Top Three

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 53:45


    80% OF THE DAY | Craig Vanderburg, COO of Trion Solutions, joins host Gregg Garrett to discuss the success his firm has had in outsourcing HR for small and mid-sized firms. Of course, Craig speaks about how he spends 80% of his day with his Top 3, including Pathik Mody, Craig Sherman, Don Turowski, and Trion's operations team. And you have to hear what he has to say about the importance of a routine. ABOUT CRAIG VANDERBURG Craig Vanderburg is among the nation's most-experienced professionals in the HR-administration industry and is used frequently by local and national media as an expert resource on issues such as workplace policies, compliance issues, health and workers' compensation insurance, and challenges faced by small to mid-size businesses. He is a former member of the National Association of Professional Employer Organizations (NAPEO) board of directors and a former Chairman of its Accounting Practices Committee. He was a former President and CEO of two HR-administration companies and was formerly a Managing Partner of Affinity Group LL, an M&A and investment-banking firm that was assisting service and growth companies on issues including private equity, senior and sub-debt, and mezzanine and hedge-fund financing. He earned his Bachelor of Finance degree from Wayne State University in Detroit and was an active member of the Young Presidents Organization.  He serves on the Board of Directors of the Troy Chamber of Commerce. He is a popular public speaker and resource to news media on a variety of business issues. SHOW HIGHLIGHTS During this episode:  Introduction [0:00] Do you have your Dream Team? [1:10] Introduction of Craig [4:30] Outsourcing Space [6:20] The “Top Three” Pathik Mody, CTO at Trion [4:12] Craig Sherman, VP of Client Onboarding and Implementation [20:52] Don Turowski, friend turned business partner [32:20] Key Ops Team [38:15] You have to hear this… Routine [50:00] ADDITIONAL INFORMATION Contact Craig Vanderburg: Craig's LinkedIn Craig's email Trion Solutions Website   Contact Gregg Garrett: Gregg's LinkedIn Gregg's Twitter Gregg's Bio   Contact CGS Advisors: Website LinkedIn Twitter

    Bridging The Gap
    Guiding Your Clients's Financial Journey with Dave Connolly and Moira Summers

    Bridging The Gap

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 43:52


    We're joined by two guests on today's episode of Bridging The Gap. Dave Connolly, CEO and Co-Founder of Knudge, and Dr. Moira Summers, Financial Psychologist and Executive Coach, share how they help bridge the gap between financial motivations and systems that help clients reach their financial goals.  We explore procrastination, three steps of implementation for your clients, the shared responsibility of implementation, what works and what doesn't work when it comes to helping your clients reach financial goals, and more.  We also dive into a conversation about how simple reminders from you as the advisor can have a huge impact on your clients's financial journey.  Guest Bios: Dave Connolly, co-founder and CEO of Knudge, a platform that helps advisors manage their clients' action items and automates follow up via email, text or push notifications to encourage their clients to get more done. For over 20 years Dave has been designing and developing web based products. Former Lead User Interface Designer at Bain & Company - responsible for designing dozens of internal web based applications. More recently co-founder and CTO of HourlyNerd (now Catalant Technologies) an online marketplace that provides global enterprises access to business expertise on demand. Dr. Moira Somers is a psychologist, family wealth consultant, and executive coach based in Manitoba, Canada. She is the behavioural strategist at Knudge (a FinTech company dedicated to improving follow-through on financial advice), as well as the founder of consulting company Money, Mind and Meaning. She is the author of Advice that Sticks: How to Give Financial Advice that People Will Follow. Dr. Somers is a faculty member at the Ultra High Net Worth Institute and the Sudden Money Institute. Undergirding all of her work is her grounded and pragmatic approach to changing financial behaviours, attitudes, relationships and organizations for the greater good of individuals and society.

    CHURN.FM
    EP 177 | Matt Young (UserVoice) - How to collect retention driving feedback

    CHURN.FM

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 42:31


    Today on the show we have Matt Young, CEO of UserVoiceIn this episode, Matt shares how he has navigated the shift from CTO to CEO with his biggest learning along the way.We then discussed how UserVoice uses its product to collect user feedback, why user interviews are the most impactful form of customer feedback, and how you can maximize the time invested while doing them and we wrapped up by discussing how to avoid confirmation bias while conducting your research.As usual, I'm excited to hear what you think of this episode, and if you have any feedback, I would love to hear from you. You can email me directly at Andrew@churn.fm. Don't forget to follow us on Twitter.

    This Much I Know - The Seedcamp Podcast
    Karel Obluk of Evolution Equity Partners, on Cybersecurity Risks & Opportunities, Growth Investments

    This Much I Know - The Seedcamp Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 40:50


    In this episode, Carlos Espinal is joined by Karel Obluk, a cybersecurity expert, former CTO and interim CEO at AVG Technologies (a cybersecurity software company listed on the New York Stock Exchange and ultimately acquired by Avast Software) and now a Partner at Evolution Equity Partners. They kick off the conversation with Karel's early career in tech, his leadership roles at the cybersecurity firm AVG and the history of the cybersecurity industry. They then discuss the risks and opportunities in the cybersecurity space, his firm's investment strategy, and what it takes for high-growth companies to expand internationally. Show notes: Karel Obluk - twitter.com/karelobluk Carlos Espinal - twitter.com/cee Evolution Equity Partners - evolutionequity.com Seedcamp - seedcamp.com Recommended read: Spam Nation: The Inside Story of Organized Cybercrime-from Global Epidemic to Your Front Door, by Brian Krebs

    The Industrial Talk Podcast with Scott MacKenzie
    Marc O'Regan and Marc Peters, Responsible Computing

    The Industrial Talk Podcast with Scott MacKenzie

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 22:48


    On this week's Industrial Talk we're onsite at https://www.iotsworldcongress.com/ (IoT Solutions World Congress) and talking to Marc O'Regan, CTO at Dell Technologies and Marc Peters, Distinguished Engineer/CTO for Deutsche Telekom,  about "Responsible Computing, what is it and why it's important".  Get the answers to your "Responsible Computing" questions along with their unique insights into the “How” on this Industrial Talk interview! Finally, get your exclusive free access to the https://industrialtalk.com/wp-admin/inforum-industrial-academy-discount/ (Industrial Academy) and a series on “https://industrialtalk.com/why-you-need-to-podcast/ (Why You Need To Podcast)” for Greater Success in 2022. All links designed for keeping you current in this rapidly changing Industrial Market. Learn! Grow! Enjoy! MARC PETER'S CONTACT INFORMATION: Personal LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/petersmarc/ (https://www.linkedin.com/in/petersmarc/) Company LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/ibm/ (https://www.linkedin.com/company/ibm/) Company Website: https://www.ibm.com/us-en?ar=1 (https://www.ibm.com/us-en?ar=1) MARC O'REGAN'S CONTACT INFORMATION: Personal LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/marc-o-regan-0597491/ (https://www.linkedin.com/in/marc-o-regan-0597491/) Company LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/delltechnologies/ (https://www.linkedin.com/company/delltechnologies/) Company Website: https://www.dell.com/en-us?1660040523?1660040523 (https://www.dell.com/en-us?1660040523?1660040523) PODCAST VIDEO: https://youtu.be/opycRoazbKI THE STRATEGIC REASON "WHY YOU NEED TO PODCAST": https://industrialtalk.com/why-you-need-to-podcast/ () OTHER GREAT INDUSTRIAL RESOURCES: NEOM:  https://www.neom.com/en-us (https://www.neom.com/en-us) Hitachi Vantara: https://www.hitachivantara.com/en-us/home.html (https://www.hitachivantara.com/en-us/home.html) Industrial Marketing Solutions:  https://industrialtalk.com/industrial-marketing/ (https://industrialtalk.com/industrial-marketing/) Industrial Academy: https://industrialtalk.com/industrial-academy/ (https://industrialtalk.com/industrial-academy/) Industrial Dojo: https://industrialtalk.com/industrial_dojo/ (https://industrialtalk.com/industrial_dojo/) We the 15:https://www.wethe15.org/ ( https://www.wethe15.org/) YOUR INDUSTRIAL DIGITAL TOOLBOX: LifterLMS: Get One Month Free for $1 – https://lifterlms.com/ (https://lifterlms.com/) Active Campaign: https://www.activecampaign.com/?_r=H855VEPU (Active Campaign Link) Social Jukebox: https://www.socialjukebox.com/ (https://www.socialjukebox.com/) Industrial Academy (One Month Free Access And One Free License For Future Industrial Leader): https://industrialtalk.com/wp-admin/inforum-industrial-academy-discount/ () Business Beatitude the Book Do you desire a more joy-filled, deeply-enduring sense of accomplishment and success? Live your business the way you want to live with the BUSINESS BEATITUDES...The Bridge connecting sacrifice to success. YOU NEED THE BUSINESS BEATITUDES! TAP INTO YOUR INDUSTRIAL SOUL, RESERVE YOUR COPY NOW! BE BOLD. BE BRAVE. DARE GREATLY AND CHANGE THE WORLD. GET THE BUSINESS BEATITUDES! https://industrialtalk.com/business-beatitude-reserve/ ( Reserve My Copy and My 25% Discount) PODCAST TRANSCRIPT: SUMMARY KEYWORDS Marc, consortium, computing, technology, responsibility, organization, compute, industrial, responsible, conversation, data, framework, tx, ai, business, perspective, industry, ctos, people, ibm 00:00 Industrial Talk is brought to you by Trend Micro now you know cybersecurity is important if you're on this digital transformation journey, Trend Micro networks has the solutions for you. And you're saying to yourself, Scott, they're going to be complex, they're going to be difficult. No Trend Micro's taken that into consideration. And they provide a suite of solutions that truly meet your cybersecurity needs go out to TX, one...

    Bitcoin Audible (previously the cryptoconomy)
    Chat_71 - Redesigning the Internet for Fun & for the Revolution, with Mathias Buus and Paolo Ardoino

    Bitcoin Audible (previously the cryptoconomy)

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 116:59


    Following up on the release of Keet.io and a simple to use, responsive, encrypted, & scalable P2P data sharing protocol in Holepunch, its network backend, we bring the CEO of Holepunch Mathias Buus, and the CSO of Holepunch and CTO of Bitfinex, Paolo Ardoino on the show to talk about what the long term vision of this project truly is. This isn't just a better video chat app, this is the first building block in a plan to rebuild the internet & potentially break down the walls of the internet's major platforms. Are they onto something, or is it a pipe dream? Listen to hear what they say in today's chat. Follow Mathias and Paolo on twitter at the links below to stay up on the projects they are working on, and the many new developments to come: https://twitter.com/mafintosh https://twitter.com/paoloardoino Check out Keet if you want to explore the potential of this new networking protocol and backend. If you are a developer looking to build on the P2P web, go to their discord link to find out more: https://keet.io/ https://discord.com/invite/holepunch The Cathedral & the Bazaar: Musings on Linux and Open Source by an Accidental Revolutionary: https://www.amazon.com/Cathedral-Bazaar-Musings-Accidental-Revolutionary/dp/1565927249/ref=sr_1_2?crid=32I7TKBRZH4MT&keywords=cathedral+bazaar&qid=1659981647&sprefix=%2Caps%2C69&sr=8-2) Check out our amazing sponsors and the products that Guy uses most in the space: • The best place to onboard a true Bitcoiner - Stack sats automatically, withdraw automatically, and learn or get help from the best team of Bitcoiners out there with Swan Bitcoin. (swanbitcoin.com/guy) • Gets sats back every time you dump fiat at a store, to pay your bills, everything in your fiat life pays you sats with the Fold Debit Card and FoldApp. 20% OFF with code BITCOINAUDIBLE (guyswann.com/fold) • Dive into the Bitcoin only wallet, the cypherpunk calculator, and a company that has built secure Bitcoin products for nearly a decade. Code BITCOINAUDIBLE gets 5% off everything in the store! Coinkite.com Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    The Virtual CISO Podcast
    What You Need to Know about APIs and API Security

    The Virtual CISO Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 43:34


    Application development is moving from a web-centric world to an API-centric world. If you're wondering what that looks like, what the security implications are and what an API is, you're in the right place. There is no shortage of new application security strategies to familiarize ourselves with as cybersecurity adapts to changing times. That's why I invited Rob Dickinson, CTO at Resurface Labs, to explain APIs, continuous API operation observability, and prevalent challenges in the API economy. Join us as we discuss: Moving from a web-centric to an API-centric world The value of opbersing API operation in production environment  Tackling security issues in the API economy To hear this episode, and many more like it, you can subscribe to The Virtual CISO Podcast here. If you don't use Apple Podcasts, you can find all our episodes here. Listening on a desktop & can't see the links? Just search for The Virtual CISO Podcast in your favorite podcast player 

    CISO-Security Vendor Relationship Podcast
    When Good Decisions Go Bad

    CISO-Security Vendor Relationship Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 40:00


    All links and images for this episode can be found on CISO Series You can make the right decision given the information you have, but everything is a risk, so there are times those good decisions are going to result in not the result you were hoping for. In essence, plenty of good decisions result in poor outcomes. This week's episode is hosted by me, David Spark (@dspark), producer of CISO Series and Andy Ellis (@csoandy), operating partner, YL Ventures. Our guest is Aviv Grafi, founder and CTO, Votiro and winner of season one of Capture the CISO. In this episode: We welcome the winner of “Capture The CISO!” How did they prepare in terms of making the demo and for appearing on the show? And what advice would they give for contestants in season 2? What do employers look for or ask in an interview that would lead them to hire and promote someone into a CISO role in their company? How can cybersecurity professionals improve their decision making over time?

    The Quiet Light Podcast
    Part 1: Brandon White Raises $1M for an Online Fishing Newsletter

    The Quiet Light Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 40:57


    Brandon White is the Host of the EDGE podcast, where business owners share their stories and behind-the-scenes tips to scale their businesses. Brandon has been an entrepreneur for over 20 years and unlocked the solution to greatness: align your body and health — and create a plan for success!  Brandon is the founder of two business exits, an angel investor, former venture capitalist, and worked in marketing management at America Online (AOL). Previously, he was the President and CTO of Tidal Fish Ventures, an Associate at Updata Partners, and CEO at Worldwide Angler. He graduated from Washington College with his master's in psychology and UNC Kenan-Flagler Business School with his MBA.  In this episode… Every business starts with an idea. Where can you go to build that thought into a blossoming and scalable business?  For Brandon White, it began with a hobby — and he cast the line and reeled in a success story. He promoted his fishing website through unique methods that drove traffic and invested in stocks to grow his capital. By creating a business plan (and remaining authentic and humble), Brandon knew the value of recognizing the difference between a successful company and creating wealth. Eventually, he was able to turn his idea into an enduring enterprise.  In this episode of the Quiet Light Podcast, Joe Valley sits down with Brandon White, entrepreneur and Host of the EDGE podcast, to talk about firsthand experience and lessons learned from turning a thought into an actionable plan. Brandon shares an innovative way to cultivate online engagement, how he built a business plan that hooks, and an in-depth look at venture capital for a rising entrepreneur. Stay tuned!

    IT Visionaries
    How Deel Makes Empowering an International Workforce Easier With Yaron Lavi, CTO of Deel

    IT Visionaries

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 37:30


    On an international scale, is it possible to make hiring, contracting, and paying workers a more smooth and cohesive process? Yaron Lavi, CTO of Deel, claims it's easier now than ever before with Deel. Also, tune in to hear how Yaron sets up his interview process to make great hires for his teams.Tune in to learn:What is Deel and how does the company improve the hiring process (02:04)How Yaron interviews engineers (13:02) How “put the customer first,” according to Yaron, is more than business saying for Deel (21:37) About how customer needs lead to where Deel directs its attention (27:50)What was the craziest IT problem Yaron's solved (35:00) IT Visionaries is brought to you by Salesforce Platform. If you love the thought leadership on this podcast, Salesforce has even more meaty IT thoughts to chew on. Take your company to the next level with in-depth research and trends right in your inbox. Subscribe to a newsletter tailored to your role at Salesforce.com/newsletter.Mission.org is a media studio producing content for world-class clients. Learn more at mission.org.

    It's a Material World | Materials Science Podcast
    71: Disrupting Construction with Sustainable Timber-Based Bio-Composites (ft. Jorge Christie)

    It's a Material World | Materials Science Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 52:20 Very Popular


    Woodflow technology enables the use of wood-based composites for lightweight high-performance applications. The right control over the form and material architecture allows to produce stress-tailored structural parts capable of fully profiting from wood's performance.    In today's episode, we welcome Jorge Christie, CTO and Founder of Strong by Form. With him we discuss:   What inspired Jorge to be an entrepreneur and start Strong by Form.

    Backup Central's Restore it All
    The industry's first $10M data resiliency guarantee (From Druva)

    Backup Central's Restore it All

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 41:58


    Druva's new data resiliency guarantee covers more than any other guarantee in the data protection/data resilience segment. It also was written with no silly exclusions (like some other guarantees) that are simply there to keep from having to pay anyone. It requires only a certain service level and that the customer follows Druva's best practices. It protects against the five areas of risk, including cyber, human, application, operational, and environmental. It includes SLAs for uptime, backup success, restore success, immutability, and confidentiality. This week we have Stephen Manley, Druva's CTO, to tell us about this new guarantee.

    Leaders of B2B - Interviews on B2B Leadership, Tech, SaaS, Revenue, Sales, Marketing and Growth
    Mitigating the Risks of Digital Transformation With Democratized Cybersecurity with Nick Lumsden of Tenacity Cloud

    Leaders of B2B - Interviews on B2B Leadership, Tech, SaaS, Revenue, Sales, Marketing and Growth

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 33:10


    Nick Lumsden, Co-Founder and CTO at Tenacity Cloud shares great insight on the industry landscape and on personal development for business leaders. Nick's company democratizes cybersecurity. They accomplish this by providing much-needed tools to businesses that don't have the enterprise scale for a dedicated security team.Despite being a decade in, Nick thinks that the age of the cloud continues to be a boon to certain businesses. It provides a level playing field, accelerates speed to market, and makes tech easier and more affordable. These come at some risk with companies needing to navigate quick changes to avoid technical debt.Nick thinks businesses in the tech space need to adapt and embrace a product-led growth strategy. Customers are more action-oriented and want to evaluate the product by trying it. Making this experience seamless can give you a competitive advantage.Nick thinks business leaders and founders need to be their authentic selves—this allows them to attract the right circle of people. He also shares the value of deeply thinking about the context of any decision you make. Taking some time, or even refreshing your mind with a break, can deliver a better decision with more beneficial results.Business leaders who want to gain a great understanding of the SaaS landscape will find Nick's insights very helpful. The nuggets he shares on personal development will also help leaders grow. LinkedIn - https://www.linkedin.com/in/nicklumsden/Website - https://www.tenacitycloud.com/Merchandise - https://www.tenacitycloud.com/merch This episode is brought to you by Content Allies.Content Allies helps B2B tech companies launch revenue-generating podcasts. Build relationships that drive revenue through podcast networking. We schedule interviews with your ideal prospects and strategic partners so that you can build relationships & grow your business. You show up and have conversations, we handle everything else. Learn more at ContentAllies.com

    Irish Tech News Audio Articles
    Why Hackathons can help prepare you for success, Dmitry Radkovskiy, Marsbase the First Defi OTC Desk

    Irish Tech News Audio Articles

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 1:58


    We catch up with Dmitry Radkovskiy to learn more about his journey and the exciting new project he is working on as CTO of Marsbase. Dmitry Radkovskiy, Marsbase, Defi OTC Desk Dmitry Radkovskiy's brief biography CTO of dOTC Marsbase. Developer and engineering manager with 15+ years of experience, open source contributor. In DeFi since 2018, winner of multiple web3 hackathons, including 0x + Coinlist Hackathon and EOS Global Hackathon Hong Kong. The first decentralized OTC desk. Make large crypto transactions while skipping order books and decentralized liquidity pools with smart contacts of Marsbase We gather more and more useful content about Marsbase and the OTC market. Here we have made a list of articles that can help you dive deeper and learn more on the matter. Read, use and follow the advice in articles and guides -> See more podcasts here. More about Irish Tech News Irish Tech News are Ireland's No. 1 Online Tech Publication and often Ireland's No.1 Tech Podcast too. You can find hundreds of fantastic previous episodes and subscribe using whatever platform you like via our Anchor.fm page here: If you'd like to be featured in an upcoming Podcast email us at Simon@IrishTechNews.ie now to discuss. Irish Tech News have a range of services available to help promote your business. Why not drop us a line at Info@IrishTechNews.ie now to find out more about how we can help you reach our audience. You can also find and follow us on Twitter, LinkedIn, Facebook, Instagram, TikTok and Snapchat.

    Breaking Analysis with Dave Vellante
    What we hope to learn at Supercloud22

    Breaking Analysis with Dave Vellante

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 14:46


    The term supercloud is relatively new, but the concepts behind it have been bubbling for years. Early last decade when NIST put forth its original definition of cloud computing, it said services had to be accessible over a public network…essentially cutting the on-prem crowd out of the conversation. A guy named Chuck Hollis, a CTO at EMC and prolific blogger objected to that criterion and laid out his vision for what he termed a private cloud. In that post he showed a workload running both on premises and in a public cloud, sharing the underlying resources in an automated and seamless manner – what later became more broadly known as hybrid cloud.That vision, as we now know, really never materialized and we were left with multi-cloud…sets of largely incompatible and disconnected cloud services running in separate silos. The point is, what Hollis put forth – i.e. the ability to abstract underlying infrastructure complexity and run workloads across multiple heterogeneous estates with an identical experience – is what supercloud is all about.

    Speed Change Repeat
    Stefan van der Fluit - Non-Invasive Wearables | Biomarkers from Sweat | Athletic Performance

    Speed Change Repeat

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 7, 2022 45:45


    Stefan is the Co-Founder and CEO of Flowbio, a start-up focused on building the first real sweat sensor.  Together we are diving into Stefan's founder story and the vision for Flowbio and how they plan to position themselves within the wearable market.  Stefan is giving us an insight into the early days of forming the company and how his Co-Founder and CTO tackled the hardware challenge for developing a proper sweat sensor.

    Future Construct
    Dr. Mani Golparvar: Bringing the Project Site to Decision Makers at Reconstruct

    Future Construct

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 34:04


    In this week's episode of the Future Construct Podcast (34-minute podcast), our host Amy Peck (@AmyPeckXR) is thrilled to be joined by Dr. Mani Golparvar (@mgolpar2), CTO and Co-Founder of Reconstruct (@reconstructinc). Reconstruct is a startup that Mani has been a driving force behind and describes it as a “Software-as-a-Service company” that equips an “AI-powered digital twin platform.” Reconstruct operates by integrating reality modeling, building information modeling, and project scheduling to visually track progress, analyze productivity, and proactively detect potential delays using predictive analytics. We learn from Mani about the process behind Reconstruct and how they plan to impact the future of construction. Founded in 2016, Reconstruct has already been acknowledged by several industrial awards, such as Crunchbase's 50 Hot Tech Companies Globally in 2019, the 2016 World Economic Forum most innovative startup company, and the 2016 Innovation Award from Turner Construction (@turner_talk). He is also an Associate Professor of Civil Engineering, Computer Science, & Technology Entrepreneurship and the director of the Real-time and Automated Monitoring and Control lab at the University of Illinois (@UofIllinois). Dr. Golparvar is highly regarded with his list of academic and lifetime achievements going on and on. His industry-leading work in the area of computer vision, machine learning, and BIM has been recognized by many awards, including the 2018 Walter Huber Research Prize from the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE), 2017 National Top 20 Under 40 from ENR; 2016 Dan Halpin Award for Scholarship in Construction, and 2013 James Croes Medal for innovation in Civil Engineering from ASCE. Highlights of Mani's interview with host Amy Peck include:- How Reconstruct is helping construction companies design digital twins of construction sites to help paint the picture for the future of construction.- Mani discusses how he is helping influence and educate the next generation of entrepreneurs.- How KPIs can measure tangible impacts in your startup.- How Mani sees the future of robotics impacting the construction industry and coexisting with workers and management teams.Prior to his work with Reconstruct, Mani has been a part of many national and international construction companies. Most extensively with Turner Construction, where he spent 2 and a half years before becoming an assistant professor in civil engineering at Virginia Tech (@virginia_tech) and going on to become the Director of Real-Time and Automated Monitoring and Control Lab. It was through his early success and through his ongoing research that he was able to build Reconstruct into the industry-changing company it is today. Dr. Golparvar's vision is to take construction to new heights. With his expertise in AI, BIM, and augmented reality, Reconstruct is in a position to do just that. SHOW NOTES 0:12  - Amy Peck introduces Dr. Mani Golparvar, the Chief Technology Officer and Co-Founder of Reconstruct. 4:16  - Dr. Golparvar talks about weekly coordination meetings at construction sites being archaic and how Reconstruct can completely change how construction sites operate. 18:10  - Dr. Golparvar talks about his vision for the future of the construction industry and how KPIs help him and his colleagues to gauge success on several different levels. 25:16  - Amy asks Dr. Golparvar about other technologies in his industry that he is wowed by. This is followed by an interesting conversation about the impact robotics has on the future of construction.  31:19  - Dr. Golparvar talks about the “painstaking administrative work that we do in construction” and how to make it completely autonomous. “So we can have our people work, focus on more value-adding tasks.”

    ITSPmagazine | Technology. Cybersecurity. Society
    A Conversation With Will Rush, CEO & Founder at Stack | The Founder Pack Podcast With Brendon Rod

    ITSPmagazine | Technology. Cybersecurity. Society

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 31:12


    As human beings usually get two to three recessions in our entire career. And so, what you do with them, I think can be incredibly powerful. They can be opportunities.Over the past twelve years, Will has worked with seven different billion-dollar banking and securities companies and today he shared with us his insights as a founder and how his company is navigating the current recession.Key topics:The RecessionRecession Strategy & AdviceRapid Fire Questions____________________________GuestsWill RushCEO & Founder at StackOn LinkedIn | https://www.linkedin.com/in/will-rush/____________________________This Episode's SponsorsAre you interested in sponsoring an ITSPmagazine Channel?

    PPC Den: Amazon PPC Advertising Mastery
    Amazon's Marketing Stream Explained: A Technical Breakdown

    PPC Den: Amazon PPC Advertising Mastery

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 48:58


    Amazon's new Marketing Stream promises more granular data in real-time, more reporting dimensions, a simplified workflow, and more. Does it live up to its hype? Ad Badger's CTO, Nickholas Isber, dissects Marketing Stream's functionality to offer you a better understanding of its capabilities, its limits, and why it even exists. We'll see you in The PPC Den!

    Lex Fridman Podcast
    #309 – John Carmack: Doom, Quake, VR, AGI, Programming, Video Games, and Rockets

    Lex Fridman Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 322:51 Very Popular


    John Carmack is a legendary programmer, co-founder of id Software, and lead programmer of many revolutionary video games including Wolfenstein 3D, Doom, Quake, and the Commander Keen series. He is also the founder of Armadillo Aerospace, and for many years the CTO of Oculus VR. Please support this podcast by checking out our sponsors: – InsideTracker: https://insidetracker.com/lex to get 20% off – Indeed: https://indeed.com/lex to get $75 credit – Blinkist: https://blinkist.com/lex and use code LEX to get 25% off premium – Eight Sleep: https://www.eightsleep.com/lex and use code LEX to get special savings – Athletic Greens: https://athleticgreens.com/lex and use code LEX

    Made IT
    Made IT Tips x Credimi #4: Come spingere più donne in Italia ad entrare nel mondo tech?

    Made IT

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 15:06


    In questa mini serie con Credimi ragioniamo su una serie di tematiche legate a prendere la decisione di rientrare in Italia dopo un'esperienza all'estero. Se non conoscete Credimi, l'azienda fintech leader nei finanziamenti digitali per imprese in Europa, correte subito ad ascoltare l'episodio 61 per sentire la nostra intervista con Ignazio Rocco. Nelle scorse puntate abbiamo parlato delle agevolazioni fiscali per promuovere il rientro dei cervelli, delle opportunità di carriera in Italia e degli incentivi per il rientro di imprenditori dall'estero. In quest'episodio abbiamo con noi Pamela Gotti, Chief Technology Officer di Credimi. Pamela ha iniziato a programmare da piccolissima ed era una delle poche donne del suo corso al Politecnico di Milano poi al Politecnico di Torino. Ha poi lavorato da Expedia a Seattle, da Google a Dublino ed è tornata in Italia per lavorare da Policy Brain, una start-up di Milano, prima di raggiungere Credimi come CTO. In questa chiacchierata parleremo di un tema che ci sta molto a cuore: come spingere più donne in Italia ad entrare nel mondo tech, focalizzandoci anche sulle comunità tech che esistono in Italia.