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Wireless local area networks technology based on IEEE's 802.11 standards

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    How to Scale Commercial Real Estate
    How Managed Wi-Fi Puts the Smart in Smart Apartments

    How to Scale Commercial Real Estate

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 4, 2022 22:22


    Technology is transforming the future of real estate. Learn more about how managed Wi-Fi systems can provide added value and smart solutions to properties with our guest Todd Thorpe.   Todd is the VP of Sales of Dojo Networks, a leading provider of high-speed data services focused on working with multifamily communities. He breaks down what makes a managed Wi-Fi system a valuable amenity to multifamily properties. He also goes in-depth on the process of installation, including the costs involved as well as the ancillary revenue that can be generated.  [00:01 - 07:49] What is Managed Wi-Fi? Todd on his background and doing MDU sales The advantage of having a managed Wi-Fi system Designing a managed wi-fi for the best coverage and best experience   [07:50 - 21:25] Adding Value with Managed Wi-Fi Increasing NOI and revenue through managed Wi-Fi How it can benefit the owner and the resident Uses of managed Wi-Fi in maintenance and security Reducing trouble and service calls How to seamlessly integrate a managed Wi-Fi system into a property   [21:26 - 22:21] Closing Segment Reach out to Todd!  Links Below Final Words Tweetable Quotes   “Once you put in a managed Wi-Fi system within that property, then you can start layering in all this other really cool technology… which again, that's what residents are looking for.”  - Todd Thorpe   “Managed Wi-Fi needs to be like running water or a light switch. You flip it on and you expect it to work. You don't think about it, right?” - Todd Thorpe “You're creating an environment where the resident is happy, they're more apt to renew the lease…'cause you're offering these additional types of amenities.” - Todd Thorpe   -----------------------------------------------------------------------------   Connect with Todd! Shoot him an email at todd.thorpe@dojonetworks.com or contact him at 608-669-6514. Follow him on LinkedIn.   Connect with me:   I love helping others place money outside of traditional investments that both diversify a strategy and provide solid predictable returns.     Facebook   LinkedIn   Like, subscribe, and leave us a review on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, or whatever platform you listen on.  Thank you for tuning in!   Email me → sam@brickeninvestmentgroup.com Want to read the full show notes of the episode? Check it out below:   [00:00:00] Todd Thorpe: You're gonna pay that 20 to $25 per unit, but then you're gonna turn around and charge your resident, maybe $50, $60 per unit, an amenity fee or a tech fee. And then you're going to keep that difference. And that's where you are increasing your NOI and you're generating this ancillary revenue and you're still way below what the retail rate would be for the resident to go out and get internet on their own from the local cable provider or the local phone provider. [00:00:48] Sam Wilson: Todd Thorpe is a well respected multifamily veteran with over 30 years of industry experience. Todd, welcome to the show.  [00:00:55] Todd Thorpe: Sam, thank you so much, man.  [00:00:57] Sam Wilson: Hey, man, the pleasure's mine. There's three questions I ask every guest who comes in the show: in 90 seconds or less, can you tell me where's to start? Where are you now? And how did you get there?  [00:01:05] Todd Thorpe: Okay, well those are pretty easy questions. So got my start in cable TV probably 30 years ago. So I'm kind of dating myself, right out of college. Started doing public access programming, kind of the, the Wayne's World thing and got into ad sales and then kind of got into sales, direct sales and have spent literally probably 20 years in MDU sales, multifamily sales from, from a telecom technology perspective. [00:01:34] Todd Thorpe: And I am in Greenville, South Carolina right now. So got out of the, the cold Northern Illinois, got sick of shoveling snow and move down here and love it. [00:01:46] Sam Wilson: And love it. Absolutely. Man, come on down the, the south. It's a good place to be so welcome. Question for you there, what, just for our listeners and for my own sake, I have no idea what MDU sales even means.  [00:01:59] Todd Thorpe: MDU. So multi-dwelling unit. So you have your, your SFUs, which is your single family homes. And then you have MDU, which is multi-dwelling unit or multi-family. Okay. Multifamily properties. So student housing, your traditional or conventional multifamily, senior properties, and then affordable housing is also really big right now. [00:02:25] Todd Thorpe: And all of those types of verticals are deploying managed Wi-Fi. They're putting in technology now as an amenity for their residents, and that's a way to generate ancillary revenue, increase NOI on the property, which as a, as an investor, you know how important that is, 'cause you wanna increase your NOI and make the property more valuable and creating a, a marketing tool that attracts residents to your property versus the property across the street. Why should I rent from ABC property? Well, because they have all these great amenities, and they also have managed Wi-Fi, kind of turnkey. [00:03:11] Sam Wilson: Now, so that's part of the MDU sales is what you were talking about there when you say MDU sales, correct. You're looking at all of this tech package as a whole. [00:03:19] Todd Thorpe: Yep. Like a prop tech is kind of the big buzzword right now. And that includes managed Wi-Fi. And then once you put in a, a managed Wi-Fi system within that property, then you can start layering in all this other really cool technology, like smart thermostats, smart locks, creating that smart home or that smart apartment environment, which again, that's what residents are looking for. [00:03:47] Todd Thorpe: They want these, these amenities, 'cause they don't wanna have to go out and get it on their own. It's like going to a, checking into a hotel. Imagine, imagine checking into the Holiday Inn or the Hyatt or a hotel that doesn't have Wi-Fi right today. You wouldn't even think about that. 20 years ago, 10 years ago. It was all brand new. [00:04:07] Sam Wilson: Tell me about, I mean, cause this is really fascinating, 'cause I've not heard a lot of people spending a lot of time even, you know, investing in this sort of technology. It's kind of, I mean, obviously it's been around for a while, but the, I guess, putting it all together into a seamless package, I would imagine is kind of, kind of a problem. [00:04:24] Sam Wilson: One, how do you guys solve that? And two, is there a certain class of property this works in? Is it all class A, is it class B? What are we talking about?  [00:04:33] Todd Thorpe: So, how we solve it is we take a real expert or consultative approach by guiding owners and developers, could be existing properties. [00:04:45] Todd Thorpe: It could be brand new developments, and we kind of guide them through that process. And just like an architect would kind of walk you through the best way to design your home or your new kitchen, we will walk them through how to design a managed Wi-Fi for the best coverage and the best experience for the resident. [00:05:10] Todd Thorpe: And as far as the class, it's class A, class C properties, it doesn't really matter so much, the class. Where it does start to make sense or maybe doesn't make sense are real small property. So if you get below 50 units, putting in a managed Wi-Fi system is probably not gonna be cost effective, but you get north of that, especially you get north of a hundred units. That's where it really starts to make sense. And we're, we're seeing a lot of success. That developers and, and owners are achieving, is value add properties where they're putting in, you know, in their underwriting and their proforma, they're making sure that there is capital funds not to just do landscaping and brand new fixtures, and paint, and kind of aesthetic things, but also, you know, and maybe putting in a new roof, they're also making sure that there's money set aside in that underwriting to install a managed Wi-Fi system, to start installing all that technology. So, Sam, it's all across the board, it's value add, and it's these real kind of sexy, resort style class A properties that are, you know, monster 10 story buildings and 500 units, right?  [00:06:39] Sam Wilson: Do you guys do the actual installation of this or are you just consultants on this?  [00:06:45] Todd Thorpe: Both. So we are a, a turnkey, soup to nuts provider. So we bring in fiber to the property and then we will either do all the low voltage running fiber and ethernet throughout the property, putting in access point in every unit and all the common spaces. [00:07:05] Todd Thorpe: And we also work with the owner and the developer, especially in new construction where they maybe already have a low voltage contractor and we will work with that contractor. They'll do all the wiring and then we just bring all the electronics, hook everything up, flip the switch on, and everything's working. [00:07:24] Todd Thorpe: And that's really what this is all about is managed Wi-Fi needs to just like running water or a light switch. You flip it on and you expect it to work. You don't think about it, right? We're talking, we got Wi-Fi going right now to, to keep this, this podcast going and you don't even think about it. You just start the Zoom, you start the podcast then going, just kind of rely on it.  [00:07:49] Sam Wilson: Yeah. That's absolutely, absolutely true. On the value add side of things, obviously, for those of us who are buying value add multifamily properties, the thing we want to do is to increase rent. I mean, we wanna drive revenue. [00:08:02] Sam Wilson: And so give me, I guess, a general, if you can, a general case there of, say, Hey man, here's a hundred units. Here is the range that, you know, you could expect to spend. Here's what we see on an average rent bump. I mean, I'm sure you guys have some of those kind of basic metrics. Can you help break some of that down for us? [00:08:19] Todd Thorpe: Yep. Yep. So every situation's gonna be a little different, garden style versus mid-rise or high rise. If it is an existing property versus new construction, but by and large, kind of back of the napkin figures, you're looking at maybe 800 to a thousand dollars, a unit in CapEx cost, one time, you know, upfront costs. [00:08:49] Todd Thorpe: And then you're looking at around $20 to $25 a unit. And you're operating costs, you're monthly. So that's what you would pay us, but here's, here's the kicker. Here's the beauty part. Then this is where, where the NOI comes in. And this is where you, you drive that ancillary revenue. So you're paying maybe 20 and we've even seen it in the, the high teens. [00:09:16] Todd Thorpe: It depends on what kind of cost you can get from that bandwidth, fiber circuit coming into the property. But you're gonna pay that $20 to $25 per unit, but then you're gonna turn around and charge your resident, maybe $50, $60 per unit, an amenity fee or a tech fee. And then you're going to keep that difference. [00:09:40] Todd Thorpe: And that's where you are increasing your NOI and you're generating this ancillary revenue and you're still way below what the retail rate would be for the resident to go out and get internet on their own from the local cable provider or the local phone provider, right? So it's a win-win for everybody, the owner or the developer gets this fantastic what we call frictionless Wi-Fi experience. The resident doesn't have to go out and get the service on their own. And you're creating an environment where the resident then is, is happy, they're more apt to renew the lease. And first of all, they're more apt to just rent from you versus the property down the street, 'cause you're offering these additional types of amenities, valet services and you know, waste haul and you know, you got a pool and that's what residents are looking for is, and that's, you know, value add properties. That's what you're trying to do is increase the rent, right? And in some cases you're able to even do that. You're, you're able to increase the rent. You're able to add that maybe that tech feed to the rent because now you are giving them more value than they would get before.  [00:10:57] Sam Wilson: Yeah. And so I guess that's the, you just have to include that, you know, the practically speaking, you have to include that in your lease upfront, you just say, Hey, all leases include a 50 buck tech fee, whatever it is. Of course. I know we're just talking back with the napkin numbers here, but every lease either you build it into the lease or you, you know, line item and out, and, but it's still a required, Hey, it's a $50 tech fee. What are things outside of smart locks and thermostats? I mean, I get it. People wanna pay for Wi-Fi. People may not care as much about smart locks or even smart thermostats. Obviously, as the building owner, we would care about things like that. And I guess as a tenant, you probably would too. If you could control your thermostat and have a lower utility bill. What are some things that are kind of on the horizon that you see where this could be the next level or the scalability of this PropTech platform? Like where, where do you want this to go outside of just maybe those three items?  [00:11:49] Todd Thorpe: Well, so besides the, the thermostats and the locks, you're right. Not all residents want or need that. And it really depends a little bit on the property type. There are student housing properties where internet is a must. [00:12:08] Todd Thorpe: And that's where managed Wi-Fi started really taking off was in student housing because they live and breathe by that internet connection. They have to take their tests and, you know, that's, that's how they watch everything. They watch it on their phone. My kids had TVs in, in their bedroom growing up in high school and they never watched them. [00:12:27] Todd Thorpe: They were constantly on their phone, but, you know, from a, from a maintenance and a property standpoint, When you turn that unit by being able to, so it's an advantage for the resident, but it's also an advantage for the maintenance staff and the property staff, because now they can lower that or raise that temperature, turn on the AC, turn on the heat, lower it when somebody moves out. [00:12:54] Todd Thorpe: So you can just do that remotely. The whole lock thing, you don't need physical keys anymore. So you're saving money. You're saving time, you're saving resources. So there's an advantage of the resident experience, but there's also an advantage for the property itself. So you want to kind of weigh those options. [00:13:17] Todd Thorpe: Maybe you don't think that the resident would necessarily benefit from it, but the property could. So when you're adding and thinking about these amenities, you wanna kind of look at both sides, but then in addition to that, you can do video surveillance. You can put up cameras and things and, you know, affordable housing. [00:13:37] Todd Thorpe: We're seeing that, especially very prevalent, putting in security systems and things like that. Water and leak detection, so you can add those devices as well. Running toilets, busted pipe, especially in, in the, the north where it's cold, those types of services you can easily add once you have that managed Wi-Fi. [00:14:04] Todd Thorpe: And then there's just all the things that haven't been invented yet, right? That are, that are going to be coming that we just don't know. But as technology advances typically costs come down, the cost of bandwidth should go down over time and how much bandwidth you can, you can purchase and get usually increases just like technology and hardware. The flat screen TV today, you can buy for $300 and, you know, seven years ago it was $3,000. But the one thing that we do, Sam, is we make sure that we stay up on technology. We're always in the lab, we're testing the latest and greatest technology. We are an elite Ruckus partner. [00:14:50] Todd Thorpe: Ruckus is in the managed Wi-Fi space, in the hardware space is the best of the best when it comes to hardware for access points and switches. We only use the best because by doing that upfront and by being extremely proactive on the front end, that reduces your, your trouble call and your service call. [00:15:16] Todd Thorpe: So here's a, here's a statistic. On average, less than half a percent of our customers submit a troubled call or a service ticket on an annual basis. So less than half a percent and the industry average is 8%. That's a testament to, we're able to achieve those statistics because we do it right upfront. We answer the phone, our customer care answers the phone in 15 seconds, you're gonna get a live technician when you call in if you do have a problem, and our average speed to resolve a trouble ticket is eight minutes.  [00:16:02] Sam Wilson: That's amazing. Tell me about this. You mentioned the word fiber. Is this available in areas where fiber hasn't yet made it? I mean, I know right now I'm in my own neighborhood and they're, they're, they're finally running fiber here and it's like, oh, that's cool. So is that, is that a prerequisite for you guys? Like, there has to be fiber in the area.  [00:16:20] Todd Thorpe: Yeah. I mean, you, we can look at other options and you can feed a property with coax. That doesn't mean that it can't be done. And you can achieve some pretty great speeds over coax. So we never, we never wanna just say absolutely no. And we walk away from that opportunity. But there are certainly with, with the $65 billion that the federal government is, is doling out in ISPs and cable companies deploying fiber. [00:16:51] Todd Thorpe: And there's a lot of resources out there. Yeah. There's gonna be pockets of real, you know, urban areas where it's gonna take a while to catch up. But we were a nationwide company. We service properties all over the country and we have yet to be able to find an area where, I mean, we just have to say, no, sorry. There's just no fiber available. Most of the developments are in, you know, and that we're seeing, especially are in areas that are serviced and there's a lot of fiber providers out there.  [00:17:26] Sam Wilson: Right. When does it make sense? I know you said class A, the class C, like, you can put it in any of it, but let's say we bought a property. And, you know, we've owned it for maybe a year or two. You've got people in the, you know, you've got a call, go back to the hundred units, 80 of those have their own internet connection. Everybody's got their own contracts that started at different times. How do you navigate that in the middle of an ownership, you know, period? Like, what do you guys say? Do you just go to all the residents and say, Hey guys, by the way, we're bringing in know, managed Wi-Fi, you know, cancel your contracts. I mean, what, what is, how does that process, that sounds like it could be a cumbersome integration. I'm sure you've got a solution to that. [00:18:09] Todd Thorpe: Yeah. And, and it's really not as complicated as you would like to think, but yes, we work through all of those logistics with the owner to make sure that we roll it out seamlessly to the resident. The key there is communication to the resident and there really are no contracts anymore. If a person goes out and they, they get their own internet service with the local cable company or the phone provider, you know, none of them really have contracts anymore. It's all pretty much once to month. So you don't have to worry about that. You know, you can cancel your internet, you know, pretty much at any time now. Your mobile bill, like your mobile phone, typically you have a contract there, but that's usually, you're just trying to pay off the phone too. But with the internet, you don't really have to worry about that. [00:18:58] Todd Thorpe: It's kind of a lease up and you're going to kind of ramp those people up. And we can certainly work with owners in some sort of ramp to kind of ease those residents in, especially if you know, you're talking literally, like you said, 80 out of a hundred units, probably 80 of those residents are gonna have internet. [00:19:21] Todd Thorpe: 'Cause when you think about it, That's the first thing, when you move into an apartment or a home, what do you have to do? I got to call the cable company. I got to get my internet set up. Even before you get there, you want to like it on and working. So, you know, it's just a, it's just a matter of kind of working through those logistics. [00:19:40] Todd Thorpe: We hand hold the, the owner, make sure there's no trip ups. The other key is, is to plan well in advance. So if you do have a contract, like you're the owner, and maybe you have a, a bulk agreement with the local cable company or the local phone provider, maybe you have bulk TV or something like that. You want to be well in advance of all of that. If you're building a property, you want to be at least 12 to 18 months out before your first certificate of occupancy. So just planning, and by planning ahead, you really minimize and reduce and kind of eliminate all of those, potholes that you might run into.  [00:20:22] Sam Wilson: And I would imagine that as soon as we get a property under contract, correct me if I'm wrong, but that would be when we'd also wanna be reaching out to you and saying, Hey, we're under contract. This is something we'd like to implement. What is, what is, is even possible? What's it look like? And, and you guys can probably help guide the process from there.  [00:20:39] Todd Thorpe: Yep. That's exactly it. Yeah and really like hold periods don't really affect it either. You know, a lot of people hold a property for five years. We've seen owners where they, they do that and they want to use this as a way to increase the value of the property. So when they do go to sell it, they can certainly increase the value.  [00:20:59] Sam Wilson: Right, right. Yeah. I mean, just simple back of the napkin math, I think where we're looking at there, you said, you know, basically a thousand bucks, a unit. And if we had a hundred units, that's a hundred thousand dollars and if you're charging 25 bucks, we pay you 25 bucks a month. That's 2,500 bucks a month. We're charging 5,000. That's, that's a spread of 2,500 a month. That's 30,000 a year. So you're getting a 30% annualized return. That smells very good on a six, seven cap deal. [00:21:25] Todd Thorpe: There you go.  [00:21:26] Sam Wilson: That's a win-win man. Todd, thank you for coming on today. I certainly appreciate it. If our listeners wanna get in touch with you, learn more about you, what is the best way to do that?  [00:21:34] Todd Thorpe: So I'm very active on LinkedIn, so you can look me up there. My email address is todd.thorpe@dojonetworks.com or cell phone (608) 669-6514.  [00:21:51] Sam Wilson: Todd. Thank you so much. Certainly appreciate it. Have a great rest of your day.  [00:21:54] Todd Thorpe: You too, Sam. Thanks. 

    That's Cool News | A weekly breakdown of positive Science & Tech news.
    112. Autonomous Trucks On US Roads in Q3, New Device Treats Pain Without Drugs, Starlink Gets FCC Green Light

    That's Cool News | A weekly breakdown of positive Science & Tech news.

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 4, 2022 26:17


    News: Cabless autonomous electric truck approved for US public roads | New Atlas (01:35) Freight technology company Einride first introduced its cabless autonomous electric T-pod truck back in 2017.Couple years later in 2020, it started rolling along Swedish Roads Now the company has been given the green light for operation on public roads in the US. In what Einride claims is a first, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) has approved its purpose-built autonomous electric vehicle to operate on public roads in the US, and there'll be no driver in the cab as the Einride Pod doesn't have a cab. The T-pod Truck makes use of an onboard sensor suite:cameras, radars and LiDARs  will be monitored remotely by a human operator If you are curious about the sizing:Each vehicle should measure about 7 meters (23 ft) in length, and be capable of carrying 15 standard pallets worth of cargo.  It will weigh 20 tons with a full load, covering a distance of approximately 200 km (124 miles) on one charge of its 200-kWh battery pack. The public road pilot is due to start in Q3 of this year, where the vehicle will merge with existing fleet operations at a GE Appliances manufacturing facility.Expected to move goods between warehouses and operate on public roads in mixed traffic.   Enzyme reverses muscle loss due to aging and cancer | The Bright Side News (05:25) An international team led by uOttawa Faculty of Medicine researchers have published findings that could contribute to future therapeutics for muscle degeneration due to old age, and diseases such as cancer and muscular dystrophy. Their work demonstrates the importance of the enzyme GCN5 in maintaining the expression of key structural proteins in skeletal muscle.Those are the muscles attached to bone that breathing, posture and locomotion all rely on. GCN5: a well-studied enzyme which regulates multiple cellular processes such as metabolism and inflammation.  Over the span of roughly five years, the uOttawa-led international collaboration painstakingly experimented with a muscle-specific mouse “knockout” of GCN5. In this case, multiple experiments were done to examine the role the GCN5 enzyme plays in muscle fiber.  What they found:A notable decline in muscle health during physical stress, such as downhill treadmill running, a type of exercise known by athletes to cause micro-tears in muscle fibers to stimulate muscle growth.  The affected mice became dramatically weaker as they scurried downhill, like those of old mice, while wild-type mice were not similarly impacted. Dr. Menzies, the senior author of the study, says the findings are akin to what is observed in advanced aging, or myopathies and muscular dystrophy, a group of genetic diseases that result in progressive weakness and loss of muscle mass. Ultimately, the team's research found that GCN5 boosts the expression of key structural muscle proteins, notably dystrophin, and a lack of it will reduce them.This is significant because dystrophin is the body's most important protein for maintaining the membrane of muscle cells, serving as a kind of anchor and cushioning shock absorber in cells of muscles.  Dr. Menzies suggests the research could help to create a foundation for developing therapeutics down the line: “These findings may therefore be useful for the discovery of new therapeutics that regulate GCN5 activity, or its downstream targets, for maintaining healthy muscle during cancer, myopathies, muscular dystrophy or aging,” Scientists develop first-of-its-kind implant that relieves pain without drugs | Interesting Engineering (11:13) Researchers at Northwestern University have developed a device that sounds straight out of science fiction: a small, soft, flexible first-of-its-kind implant that relieves pain on demand, without the use of drugs and dissolves.Could provide a much-needed alternative to opioids and other highly addictive medications. As per the researchers, the device could be highly valuable for patients who undergo routine surgeries or amputations that most often need post-operative medications. Northwestern's John A. Rogers, who led the device's development, in a press release stated:“As engineers, we are motivated by the idea of treating pain without drugs — in ways that can be turned on and off instantly, with user control over the intensity of relief. The technology reported here exploits mechanisms that have some similarities to those that cause your fingers to feel numb when cold. Our implant allows that effect to be produced in a programmable way, directly and locally to targeted nerves, even those deep within surrounding soft tissues.” The device works by wrapping around nerves softly, to deliver precise and targeted cooling.This in turn numbs nerves and blocks pain signals to the brain.  An external pump helps the user to remotely activate the device and control its intensity. Once the device is no longer required, it is naturally absorbed into the body — "bypassing the need for surgical extraction". Why does coolness help with pain?Study co-author Dr. Matthew MacEwan of Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis said that as nerves become cooler, the signals that travel through them become slower - eventually stopping completely.  “By delivering a cooling effect to just one or two targeted nerves, we can effectively modulate pain signals in one specific region of the body," The device contains tiny microfluidic channels to induce the cooling effect, while concurrently, a tiny integrated sensor monitors the temperature of the nerve to ensure that it doesn't get too cold, which could damage the tissue. Rodgers talks on the monitoring:"By monitoring the temperature at the nerve, the flow rates can be adjusted automatically to set a point that blocks pain in a reversible, safe manner. On-going work seeks to define the full set of time and temperature thresholds below which the process remains fully reversible." At the thickness of a sheet of paper, the soft, elastic nerve cooling device is ideal for treating highly sensitive nerves.   Scientists Say New James Webb Images Are So Powerful That It Was Emotional Just Looking at Them | Futurism (18:25) While we await the ceremonial release of the first official images taken by NASA's uber-expensive James Webb Space Telescope, early reactions to the long-awaited shots are already sounding pretty promising. NASA's scientific missions lead Thomas Zurbuchen told reporters on Wednesday:“The images are being taken right now… There is already some amazing science in the can, and some others are yet to be taken as we go forward. We are in the middle of getting the history-making data down." NASA plans to release several images on July 12, the inaugural "first light" observations from the space telescope and a potentially groundbreaking moment for the field of astronomy. Zurbuchen admitted he was in his feelings over the new images:“It's really hard to not look at the universe in a new light and not just have a moment that is deeply personal … It's an emotional moment when you see nature suddenly releasing some of its secrets. and I would like you to imagine and look forward to that." The images are expected to include unprecedented views of the depths of the universe and the atmosphere surrounding a distant exoplanet, potentially giving us glimpses of a habitable world other than our own. It's the culmination of over a decade of research, and a $10 billion investment that could soon pay off in a big way.   Elon Musk's Starlink gets FCC green light to beam broadband into moving cars, planes, boats | Business Insider (21:56) SpaceX won approval from the Federal Communications Commission to let its Starlink satellites send broadband internet to moving vehicles on Thursday.Cleared a major hurdle as it has already signed deals with airline carriers including Hawaiian Airlines and exclusive jet firm JSX to provide in-flight WiFi to passengers. "Authorizing a new class of terminals for SpaceX's satellite system will expand the range of broadband capabilities to meet the growing user demands that now require connectivity while on the move, whether driving an RV across the country, moving a freighter from Europe to a US port, or while on a domestic or international flight," the FCC said in its authorization order published Thursday. The FCC's authorization will allow Starlink to pursue deals with transport companies more vigorously.Royal Caribbean became the first cruise line to request Starlink on its ships in June. Starlink also launched a $135 monthly subscription for RVs in May. At launch the company said the internet service could not be used while the RV was in motion.  

    MFGamers
    Pick Up Play Episode 008

    MFGamers

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 3, 2022 93:52


    Who's a pretty boy then? Ben and illdog return with another month's worth of pick ups. A little after the curve but there's some Horizon Forbidden West talk, a bit of Mario Strikers, and even some House of the Dead Remake Theme HELL YEP by Megadead / Benjamin Shaw, production by Ben.

    敏迪選讀
    敏迪選讀 7/4 原來加入歐盟這麼難,西巴爾幹國家等到頭髮白;G7用價格制裁俄羅斯行得通嗎;我家的貓得癌症了

    敏迪選讀

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 3, 2022 91:27


    本集由「NordVPN」贊助播出 NordVPN在乎你的網路安全 利用專屬的加密通道隱藏網路足跡,防止駭客透過公共Wi-Fi竊取你的資料 阻絕惡意軟體、釣魚網站,甚至是討人厭的彈出式廣告 大大提升日常生活的網路體驗 nordvpn.com/mindi 輸入敏迪選讀優惠碼【mindi】 就可以以一個月不到100元的價格購買2年方案 再額外贈送一個月喔 本週新聞重點: 00:02:46 原來加入歐盟這麼麻煩,盤點步驟一二三 00:27:04 西巴爾幹國家的困境 00:50:51 俄烏戰爭第124天,西方的「價格上限」怎麼做? 01:12:47 我家的貓得癌症了 這裡可以找到所有的敏迪 https://linktr.ee/mindiworldnews 敏迪選讀業配折扣專區 https://pse.is/43a4rz

    TendenciasTech
    Como acelerar mi internet lento con Starlink Internet Satelital de Elon Musk

    TendenciasTech

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2022 18:36


    En este podcast; Como acelerar mi internet lento con Starlink Internet Satelital de Elon Musk.Starlink es el único servicio global de Internet de alta velocidad por satélite diseñado para satisfacer las necesidades de consumidores y empresas de todo el mundo.En este vídeo se explica cómo funciona Starlink y por qué es tan importante que todo el mundo tenga acceso a Internet de alta velocidad.Si eres una de esas personas con una conexión a Internet lenta, hay algunas cosas que puedes hacer para mejorar tu velocidad. En primer lugar, comprueba que tu router está en buenas condiciones de funcionamiento.Asegúrate de que el router y los dispositivos WiFi están conectados de forma segura y de que no hay zonas muertas en la zona donde utilizas Internet.Asegúrate de que todos los dispositivos (ordenadores, portátiles, teléfonos, tabletas y otros dispositivos digitales) tienen instalados los controladores actualizados.Actualiza tu sistema operativo si tiene más de unos meses. Por último, tenga cuidado al descargar archivos de gran tamaño o transmitir vídeo en redes Wi-Fi.Estas actividades pueden provocar retrasos e interrupciones en la conexión y pueden reducir la velocidad.mi internet lentocomo arreglar mi internet lentocomo acelerar mi internet lentointernet lento en mi celularcomo saber si mi internet es rapido o lentomi pc descarga muy lento de internet windows 11xq mi internet esta muy lentomi internet anda lentomi internet anda lento windows 11porque mi internet anda lento en los juegosporque mi internet esta lento androidmi internet es muy lento como lo acelerocomo arreglar mi internet si esta lentomi pc se pone lento cuando me conecto a internetporque mi internet esta lento si tengo buena señalporque mi internet esta lento cuando juegoporque mi internet telcel en casa esta lentoporque el internet de mi computadora esta muy lentomi internet descarga lento pero navega rapidomi internet descarga lentoporque mi internet descarga lentomi internet se puso lento de repentemi internet va demasiado lentoporque mi internet esta lento datosporque mi internet es lento de nochemi internet es rapido pero descarga lentoporque mi internet se puso lento de la nadaporque mi internet es demasiado lentoporque el internet de mi pc esta lentoporque el internet de mi ps4 esta lentomi internet esta lento pcmi internet esta lento windows 11internet lento en mi pcmi internet esta lento que hagoque hacer si mi internet esta lentoque hacer si mi internet esta lento en pcqué hacer si mi internet está muy lentoporque mi internet inalambrico esta lento► ¡No olvides de suscribirte!https://youtube.com/berlingonzalez► Contacto (English - Español)tendenciastech@outlook.com► PodcastApple Podcast: http://apple.co/2CtwnidSpotify: https://spoti.fi/2lJKPzyAmazon Music: https://amzn.to/3dHBosPGoogle Podcast: https://bit.ly/3eqNnKzCastBox: https://bit.ly/33jyB4e► Redes SocialesYT: https://www.youtube.com/berlingonzalezTW: https://www.twitch.tv/berlingonzalezsFB: https://www.facebook.com/BerlinGonzalezsTT: https://www.tiktok.com/@berlingonzalezsTW: https://twitter.com/berlingonzalezsIN: https://www.instagram.com/berlingonzalezs► Donacioneshttps://www.paypal.me/tendenciastechhttps://www.patreon.com/tendenciastech#BerlinGonzalez #InternetLento #StarlinkSupport this show http://supporter.acast.com/tendenciastech. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Forth And Ten
    F&10 | Bad Wifi and Comedy Mountains

    Forth And Ten

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2022 27:33


    We have people all over the globe, so we reunited via iffy wifi to bring you our comedy Rushmores. If you want the full episode head over to Patreon.com/ForthandTen now

    The Ray & Dregs Hockey Podcast
    NHL Season Conclusion + Hockey Canada Sexual Assault Allegations

    The Ray & Dregs Hockey Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 47:49


    The end of an epic Stanley Cup Final means another hockey season is in the books! Ray and Dregs are winding down Season 3 of the podcast as well, BUT, not before another episode (or maybe two)! The guys put a bow on a busy NHL season as only they can, with candid takes and in-depth banter that you expect from two of the best in the biz!  Ray and Dregs discuss the brilliance of the Colorado Avalanche championship team, and how it might change this off-season. Goaltending is a hot topic as Darcy Kuemper adds ‘Stanley Cup Winner' to his resume and tough off-season decisions can't wait with the NHL Draft around the corner. Darren's phone is buzzing away as hockey's #1 insider checks the pulse on HEATING up trade talks in the NHL. Kevin Fiala to LA was the first domino to fall as the cap continues to force GM's to lose key players.  Hockey Canada continues to face backlash over their handling of an alleged sexual assault by eight players in 2018. TSN's Rick Westhead first reported on the story, and now sponsors are taking action by pulling their longstanding support of the organization. The guys take pause on a story that goes beyond hockey and address the disturbing allegations, accountability for the organization, and the education needed to prevent similar incidents the future. Coolbet Kris is out east celebrating his birthday, and the Wi-Fi gave him no choice but to unplug! The guys are left to ‘stomach' Joey Chestnut and the American tradition of Nathan's hot dog eating contest. Ask R+D sees questions on a talented Winnipeg Jets forward who's name keeps coming up in trade-talks… Blake Wheeler, inevitably leading to more discussion on Pierre-Luc Dubois. Ray's asked about which goalies he loved to score on most, and what injuries he played through. Plus, Dregs in a bar fight!? Ray's not the only one who's had to battle through injuries in his career! Season 3 Episode 40 is presented by our title sponsor Canadian Club Whisky: who are asking: 'Are You Over Beer?', Coolbet.co the free to play sports and casino games website, by Boston Pizza - pick it up or get it delivered right to your door, let Boston Pizza do the cooking tonight, and by DUER: Use code ‘RND15' to save 15% off pants at DUER.ca. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    1 Star Recruits
    Back strains, cockroaches & zero WiFi - a week in the life of a 1 Star

    1 Star Recruits

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 46:06


    Find out more details about this episode here:https://www.buzzsprout.com/1153229/episodes/10882276-back-strains-cockroaches-zero-wifi-a-week-in-the-life-of-a-1-starEPISODE SPONSORS:UCAN - Get 20% off + free shipping on all orders with the promo code 1STAR here - UCAN.co/1STARIN THIS EPISODE:Colorado AvalancheGeoGuessrThe Bear (Hulu show)Cheese: A Love StoryFollow 1 Star Recruits on:InstagramTwitterFacebookYoutube

    Talk 2 Much MMA
    Are Music NFTs More Than Just Songs On The Blockchain?! - T2M#78 (feat. Spottie WiFi)

    Talk 2 Much MMA

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 41:25


    Spottie WiFi, the CryptoPunk rapper, joined me this week to discuss the TRUE value of music NFTs. Are music NFTs just songs on a blockchain? That's what I've been lead to believe, but Spottie thinks they are more than that. At their core, NFTs are contracts. The same can be said for music NFTs. What can these smart contracts actually do for NFT holders? There is so much undiscovered potential in the music NFT space and Spottie WiFi joined me to help me uncover it for you guys this week.

    Town Talk
    Town Talk: Techs in the 'Burg

    Town Talk

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 42:32


    Dave the Computer Guy on speeding up your pc, increasing network speed at work, the latest in Wifi tech and which chromebook to buy.  

    Komando On Demand
    Google News redesign, IKEA AR app, Wi-Fi calling

    Komando On Demand

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 32:35


    Want to rearrange your furniture, but not sure how it will look? Use IKEA's new AR app to visualize your new space. Plus, a Google News redesign emphasizes local stories, Brave's new tool lets you create and share your own search rankings and Wi-Fi calling is a fix you need to know about. I'll also share a tech trick you can use to access Google Maps or Apple Maps when you don't have cell service. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    Hope Motivates Action
    S11 | E02 Normalizing Feelings and Exemplifying Emotional Intelligence with Alex Malebranche

    Hope Motivates Action

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 36:32


    emotionally vulnerable just isn't a priority, and as such never really acquire the skills needed to navigate intense feelings later on in life. Yet, emotionally intelligent adults will experience more professional success and improved relationships.It needs to become a higher priority for future generations.Today I'm joined by Alex Malebranche to discuss the importance of normalizing our feelings and teaching our children emotional intelligence and awareness. Alex shares personal stories from throughout his life, from his own childhood to raising his daughter, and highlights specific examples of how we can better equip future generations to navigate rough emotions.Tune in to learn more about emotional intelligence and how we can open the door to these conversations.About Alex Malebranche:Alex Malebranche is currently a tech and mental health entrepreneur out of Houston, TX. A seasoned tech veteran at companies like Amazon, AWS, and smart WiFi company, Plume, Alex Malebranche left what was comfortable and started a tech company in 2021. Throughout his journey in both tech and entrepreneurship, mental health continued to play a key role in who he was and how he handled situations. A former Army veteran as well, he has begun to lean into mental health work for veterans, entrepreneurs, and techies alike.To learn more you can follow Alex on Instagram and connect with him on LinkedIn.Mentioned In This Episode:Ace of Pay's on InstagramAce of Pay's on LinkedInWellness WebinarExpert in Hope

    All About Android (MP3)
    AAA 584: The HTC Footnote - Android 13 easter egg, Metaverse and Blockchain phones, Windows 3D pinball

    All About Android (MP3)

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 93:06


    Nothing Lives Up to Its Name, Hypes Up Nothing. Nothing Phone (1) isn't coming to the United States at launch. Android 13 Beta 3.3 rolls out to Pixel with Wi-Fi and other connectivity fixes, more. Google hatches the Android 13 easter egg and it's literally all the emoji. Google I/O 2012 set a high-water mark for innovative hardware that has yet to be approached again. OSOM OV1 is dead, now a crypto-focused smartphone called the 'Solana Saga'. HTC's smartphone division limps on with metaverse-focused Desire 22 Pro. Wear OS 3 finally launches on another smartwatch, the Montblanc Summit 3. Swatch Group arrives on the smartwatch market. Qualcomm's Snapdragon Insiders phone gets first update in months, breaks Google Pay. Google Password Manager starts offering on-device encryption on Android, iOS, and Chrome Google Password Manager now h. as an Android home screen shortcut. Chrome 103 replaces built-in password list with Android's default manager. Google Hangouts finally gets a shutdown date: November 2022. Android port of 3D Pinball for Windows – Space Cadet. A Z Fold3 bites the dust. Some Android Auto for phones alternatives. Nothing Phone features are good for accessibility. Read our show notes here: https://bit.ly/3buEj9H Hosts: Jason Howell, Ron Richards, Huyen Tue Dao, and Florence Ion Subscribe to All About Android at https://twit.tv/shows/all-about-android. Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Sponsor: Blueland.com/AAA

    All About Android (Video HI)
    AAA 584: The HTC Footnote - Android 13 easter egg, Metaverse and Blockchain phones, Windows 3D pinball

    All About Android (Video HI)

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 93:32


    Nothing Lives Up to Its Name, Hypes Up Nothing. Nothing Phone (1) isn't coming to the United States at launch. Android 13 Beta 3.3 rolls out to Pixel with Wi-Fi and other connectivity fixes, more. Google hatches the Android 13 easter egg and it's literally all the emoji. Google I/O 2012 set a high-water mark for innovative hardware that has yet to be approached again. OSOM OV1 is dead, now a crypto-focused smartphone called the 'Solana Saga'. HTC's smartphone division limps on with metaverse-focused Desire 22 Pro. Wear OS 3 finally launches on another smartwatch, the Montblanc Summit 3. Swatch Group arrives on the smartwatch market. Qualcomm's Snapdragon Insiders phone gets first update in months, breaks Google Pay. Google Password Manager starts offering on-device encryption on Android, iOS, and Chrome Google Password Manager now h. as an Android home screen shortcut. Chrome 103 replaces built-in password list with Android's default manager. Google Hangouts finally gets a shutdown date: November 2022. Android port of 3D Pinball for Windows – Space Cadet. A Z Fold3 bites the dust. Some Android Auto for phones alternatives. Nothing Phone features are good for accessibility. Read our show notes here: https://bit.ly/3buEj9H Hosts: Jason Howell, Ron Richards, Huyen Tue Dao, and Florence Ion Subscribe to All About Android at https://twit.tv/shows/all-about-android. Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Sponsor: Blueland.com/AAA

    All TWiT.tv Shows (Video LO)
    All About Android 584: The HTC Footnote

    All TWiT.tv Shows (Video LO)

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 93:32


    Nothing Lives Up to Its Name, Hypes Up Nothing. Nothing Phone (1) isn't coming to the United States at launch. Android 13 Beta 3.3 rolls out to Pixel with Wi-Fi and other connectivity fixes, more. Google hatches the Android 13 easter egg and it's literally all the emoji. Google I/O 2012 set a high-water mark for innovative hardware that has yet to be approached again. OSOM OV1 is dead, now a crypto-focused smartphone called the 'Solana Saga'. HTC's smartphone division limps on with metaverse-focused Desire 22 Pro. Wear OS 3 finally launches on another smartwatch, the Montblanc Summit 3. Swatch Group arrives on the smartwatch market. Qualcomm's Snapdragon Insiders phone gets first update in months, breaks Google Pay. Google Password Manager starts offering on-device encryption on Android, iOS, and Chrome Google Password Manager now h. as an Android home screen shortcut. Chrome 103 replaces built-in password list with Android's default manager. Google Hangouts finally gets a shutdown date: November 2022. Android port of 3D Pinball for Windows – Space Cadet. A Z Fold3 bites the dust. Some Android Auto for phones alternatives. Nothing Phone features are good for accessibility. Read our show notes here: https://bit.ly/3buEj9H Hosts: Jason Howell, Ron Richards, Huyen Tue Dao, and Florence Ion Subscribe to All About Android at https://twit.tv/shows/all-about-android. Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Sponsor: Blueland.com/AAA

    All TWiT.tv Shows (MP3)
    All About Android 584: The HTC Footnote

    All TWiT.tv Shows (MP3)

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 93:06


    Nothing Lives Up to Its Name, Hypes Up Nothing. Nothing Phone (1) isn't coming to the United States at launch. Android 13 Beta 3.3 rolls out to Pixel with Wi-Fi and other connectivity fixes, more. Google hatches the Android 13 easter egg and it's literally all the emoji. Google I/O 2012 set a high-water mark for innovative hardware that has yet to be approached again. OSOM OV1 is dead, now a crypto-focused smartphone called the 'Solana Saga'. HTC's smartphone division limps on with metaverse-focused Desire 22 Pro. Wear OS 3 finally launches on another smartwatch, the Montblanc Summit 3. Swatch Group arrives on the smartwatch market. Qualcomm's Snapdragon Insiders phone gets first update in months, breaks Google Pay. Google Password Manager starts offering on-device encryption on Android, iOS, and Chrome Google Password Manager now h. as an Android home screen shortcut. Chrome 103 replaces built-in password list with Android's default manager. Google Hangouts finally gets a shutdown date: November 2022. Android port of 3D Pinball for Windows – Space Cadet. A Z Fold3 bites the dust. Some Android Auto for phones alternatives. Nothing Phone features are good for accessibility. Read our show notes here: https://bit.ly/3buEj9H Hosts: Jason Howell, Ron Richards, Huyen Tue Dao, and Florence Ion Subscribe to All About Android at https://twit.tv/shows/all-about-android. Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Sponsor: Blueland.com/AAA

    Total Jason (Audio)
    All About Android 584: The HTC Footnote

    Total Jason (Audio)

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 93:06


    Nothing Lives Up to Its Name, Hypes Up Nothing. Nothing Phone (1) isn't coming to the United States at launch. Android 13 Beta 3.3 rolls out to Pixel with Wi-Fi and other connectivity fixes, more. Google hatches the Android 13 easter egg and it's literally all the emoji. Google I/O 2012 set a high-water mark for innovative hardware that has yet to be approached again. OSOM OV1 is dead, now a crypto-focused smartphone called the 'Solana Saga'. HTC's smartphone division limps on with metaverse-focused Desire 22 Pro. Wear OS 3 finally launches on another smartwatch, the Montblanc Summit 3. Swatch Group arrives on the smartwatch market. Qualcomm's Snapdragon Insiders phone gets first update in months, breaks Google Pay. Google Password Manager starts offering on-device encryption on Android, iOS, and Chrome Google Password Manager now h. as an Android home screen shortcut. Chrome 103 replaces built-in password list with Android's default manager. Google Hangouts finally gets a shutdown date: November 2022. Android port of 3D Pinball for Windows – Space Cadet. A Z Fold3 bites the dust. Some Android Auto for phones alternatives. Nothing Phone features are good for accessibility. Read our show notes here: https://bit.ly/3buEj9H Hosts: Jason Howell, Ron Richards, Huyen Tue Dao, and Florence Ion Subscribe to All About Android at https://twit.tv/shows/all-about-android. Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Sponsor: Blueland.com/AAA

    Total Jason (Video)
    All About Android 584: The HTC Footnote

    Total Jason (Video)

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 93:32


    Nothing Lives Up to Its Name, Hypes Up Nothing. Nothing Phone (1) isn't coming to the United States at launch. Android 13 Beta 3.3 rolls out to Pixel with Wi-Fi and other connectivity fixes, more. Google hatches the Android 13 easter egg and it's literally all the emoji. Google I/O 2012 set a high-water mark for innovative hardware that has yet to be approached again. OSOM OV1 is dead, now a crypto-focused smartphone called the 'Solana Saga'. HTC's smartphone division limps on with metaverse-focused Desire 22 Pro. Wear OS 3 finally launches on another smartwatch, the Montblanc Summit 3. Swatch Group arrives on the smartwatch market. Qualcomm's Snapdragon Insiders phone gets first update in months, breaks Google Pay. Google Password Manager starts offering on-device encryption on Android, iOS, and Chrome Google Password Manager now h. as an Android home screen shortcut. Chrome 103 replaces built-in password list with Android's default manager. Google Hangouts finally gets a shutdown date: November 2022. Android port of 3D Pinball for Windows – Space Cadet. A Z Fold3 bites the dust. Some Android Auto for phones alternatives. Nothing Phone features are good for accessibility. Read our show notes here: https://bit.ly/3buEj9H Hosts: Jason Howell, Ron Richards, Huyen Tue Dao, and Florence Ion Subscribe to All About Android at https://twit.tv/shows/all-about-android. Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Sponsor: Blueland.com/AAA

    Empowered Relationship Podcast: Your Relationship Resource And Guide
    ERP 326: What Is Sexual Enlightenment & How It Can Support Your Love & Relationship — An Interview With Dr. Elsbeth Meuth and Freddy Zental Weaver

    Empowered Relationship Podcast: Your Relationship Resource And Guide

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 57:16


    Frequencies such as WiFi and radio are all around us. Although our brains are not equipped to see or hear these, we know that they exist. In the same way, frequency, also known as lifeforce energy, runs through our bodies at all times. In this episode, Dr. Elsbeth Meuth and Freddy Zental Weaver discuss how to work consciously with the lifeforce of sexual energy as a transformational vehicle to make deeper and more meaningful connections not only in romantic relationships but also in other aspects of life. Dr. Elsbeth Meuth and Freddy Zental Weaver have assisted thousands of couples and singles create lasting intimacy and fulfillment in their life and relationships. They are featured on Showtime's documentary series Sexual Healing and the Emmy Award-winning NBC show Starting Over, best-selling authors of Sexual Enlightenment endorsed by world-renowned Spiritual Pioneer Dr. Michael Beckwith and the co-founders of TantraNova Institute in Chicago. Elsbeth and Freddy Zental are beloveds, husband & wife as well as business partners residing in Chicago. Check out the transcript of this episode on Dr. Jessica Higgin's website. In this episode 7:18 How Elsbeth and Freddy came to share their intimacy and love message. 12:38 Elsbeth's quest for fulfillment led her to the Tantric intimacy journey. 20:39 How sexual enlightenment benefit individuals and couples, and how it manifests in various areas of one's life. 25:21 Understanding how energy flows in our bodies. 50:08 Workshops and products to assist individuals and couples on their journey. 51:31 Final words of wisdom. Mentioned Sexual Enlightenment: How to Create Lasting Fulfillment in Life, Love, and Intimacy (*Amazon Affiliate link) (book) Sustaining Masculine Pleasure Awaken to Your Feminine Essence Secrets to Lasting Intimacy Relationship Map To Happy, Lasting Love Connect with Dr. Elsbeth Meuth and Freddy Zental Weaver Websites: tantranova.com Facebook: facebook.com/TantraNova Twitter: twitter.com/TantraNova YouTube: youtube.com/channel/UCKincrF-VHfsabcIvsbQEhQ Instagram: instagram.com/tantranova_institute LinkedIn: linkedin.com/in/elsbethmeuth Pinterest: pinterest.com/elsbethfreddy/tantranova Connect with Dr. Jessica Higgins Facebook: facebook.com/EmpoweredRelationship  Instagram: instagram.com/drjessicahiggins  Podcast: drjessicahiggins.com/podcasts/ Pinterest: pinterest.com/EmpowerRelation  LinkedIn: linkedin.com/in/drjessicahiggins  Twitter: @DrJessHiggins  Website: drjessicahiggins.com   Email: jessica@drjessicahiggins.com If you have a topic you would like me to discuss, please contact me by clicking on the “Ask Dr. Jessica Higgins” button here.  Thank you so much for your interest in improving your relationship.  Also, I would so appreciate your honest rating and review. Please leave a review by clicking here.  Thank you!   *With Amazon Affiliate Links, I may earn a few cents from Amazon, if you purchase the book from this link.

    WBZ NewsRadio 1030 - News Audio
    Natick Police Sign Up For 'Neighbors' Ring Phone App, Connecting Community

    WBZ NewsRadio 1030 - News Audio

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 0:46


    Residents with the app can voluntarily and anonymously post images or video from Wi-Fi cameras at their homes. WBZ's Chris Fama reports.

    The Phoblographer
    Quit Your Hate! This Is Great! Canon EOS R5 Review

    The Phoblographer

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 26:40


    The Canon EOS R5 is the company's first major professional mirrorless camera, and it's wonderful! There was a time when I was angry at Canon. But when the Canon EOS R launched, that anger subsided. It was a nice entry into the serious mirrorless camera world. But the Canon EOS R5 is arguably the camera they should have launched at the start. This camera can easily become the bread and butter of any professional photographer using it. It can also be a great tool for a multimedia shooter. Better yet, the hobbyist photographer who is passionate about the craft will enjoy what this camera can do. There has been a lot of wrongful bashing of the Canon EOS R5 on the web. And in this review, we're going to talk to the practicality of it all. Note that before you go on, we're not sensationalizing things just for clicks. If you're a shooter that left Canon for another system, we're probably going to tell you a few things you don't want to hear. So, please keep your superiority complexes in check. You can view this article and much more with minimal ads in our brand new app for iOS, iPadOS, and Android. This review has been updated in June 2022. Table of Contents Pros and Cons Pros Cons Gear Used with the Canon EOS R5 Canon EOS R5 Tech Specs Canon EOS R5 Ergonomics Canon EOS R5 Build Quality Canon EOS R5 Ease of Use Canon EOS R5 Autofocus Performance Update December 2021 Update July 2022 Canon EOS R5 Image Quality JPEG Output RAW File Versatility High ISO Output TimeLapse Shooting Extra Image Samples from the Canon EOS R5 Canon EOS R5 Review Conclusions Likes Dislikes Pros and Cons Pros Well built Excellent battery life So intuitive for a Canon shooter Feels very good in the hand Image stabilization is pretty much second to none Wonderful menu systems Excellent details Weather sealed Reliable Canon's Mobile App connection setup is as simple as ever Doesn't overheat with short clips Wifi sending of full HD video is pretty fast High ISO RAW files hold a fair amount of data. There's great dynamic range and colors, but the noise is a bit painful. Wireless RAW file transmission with Capture One 22 Cons The joystick is in an odd spot In some ways feels like an old 60D, but it's totally not I personally feel the magnification button is in an odd spot Can't transfer 8K video via Wifi 4K movie clips shorter than 30 seconds take a while to send, and then ultimately don't end up on your phone High ISO Raw files above 12,800 tend to get a bit messy The price is a bit high at $3,899 Gear Used with the Canon EOS R5 We tested the Canon EOS R5 with the: Canon RF 24-105mm f4 L IS USM Canon RF 50mm f1.2 L USM Samyang 85mm f1.4 AF Profoto B10 Canon EOS R5 Tech Specs In Brief: High Image Quality featuring a New 45 Megapixel Full-frame CMOS Sensor DIGIC X Image Processor with an ISO range of 100-51200; Expandable to 102400 Dual Pixel CMOS AF covering Approx. 100% Area with 1,053 AF Areas Subject tracking of People and Animals using Deep Learning Technology In-body Image Stabilizer can provide up to 8 stops of Shake Correction Dual Card Slots for CFexpress and UHS-II SD Memory Cards Built-in 0.5″ 5.76 Million Dots OLED EVF with 120fps refresh rate, Vari-angle LCD Touchscreen 2.4/5Ghz Built-in Wi-Fi, Bluetooth Technology Full Specs taken from the LensRentals Listing 45MP Full-Frame Sensor and DIGIC X Processor. The Canon EOS R5's newly designed 45MP full-frame CMOS sensor works in tandem with the DIGIC X processor to produce high-resolution stills and video with plenty of speed. The native ISO range of 100-51,200 can be expanded to 100-102,400, making this camera suitable for working in a wide range of lighting conditions. 8K30 RAW and 4K 120 Video. The EOS R5's 45MP sensor makes internal DCI 8K 30 fps RAW capture possible, in addition to 4K recording at up to 120 fps in 4:2:2 10-bit with Canon Log and HDR-PQ. Please note that DCI 8K is the only format in which you can shoot RAW with the R5—every other resolution offers All-I or IPB compression. External HD...

    No Invite Podcast
    EP93 It's The Universe

    No Invite Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 45:35


    Trying to make sure we keep up with whats going on in the world we drop this new one for you with An and HT Momma. We flexed the WiFi for this with a zoom session and lets just say life comes at you fast. From diet to disaster we trying y'all. SUBSCRIBE TO THE YOUTUBE CHANNEL FOR EXCLUSIVE VIDEO CONTENT https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCG2DctC7X0jK1-LV0SvLPrQFOLLOW: Follow Blaze On Instagram @blaze1diz_https://www.instagram.com/blaze1diz_/FOLLOW: AN ON INSTAGRAM @THE_BEST_KEPT_SECREThttps://www.instagram.com/the_best_kept_secret1/FOLLOW On Instagram @16thworldhttps://www.instagram.com/16thworld/Mixed and Edited By Blaze1Diz Produced and Recorded By Patty for 16th World Productions.Executive Produced By Blaze for RiBirth Media Filmz. Contact Info: ribirthmediafilmz1@gmail.com

    Screaming in the Cloud
    TikTok and Short Form Content for Developers with Linda Vivah

    Screaming in the Cloud

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 34:01


    Full Description / Show Notes Corey and Linda talk about Tiktok and the online developer community (1:18) Linda talks about what prompted her to want to work at AWS (5:29) Linda discusses navigating the change from just being part of the developer community to being an employee of AWS (10:37) Linda talks about moving AWS more in the direction of short form content, and Corey and Linda talk about the Tiktok algorithm (15:56) Linda talks about the potential struggle of going from short form to long form content (25:21) About LindaLinda Vivah is a Site Reliability Engineer for a major media organization in NYC, a tech content creator, an AWS community builder member, a part-time wedding singer, and the founder of a STEM jewelry shop called Coding Crystals. At the time of this recording she was about to join AWS in her current position as a Developer Advocate.Linda had an untraditional journey into tech. She was a Philosophy major in college and began her career in journalism. In 2015, she quit her tv job to attend The Flatiron School, a full stack web development immersive program in NYC. She worked as a full-stack developer building web applications for 5 years before shifting into SRE to work on the cloud end internally.Throughout the years, she's created tech content on platforms like TikTok & Instagram and believes that sometimes the best way to learn is to teach.Links Referenced:lindavivah.com: https://lindavivah.com TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by Honeycomb. When production is running slow, it's hard to know where problems originate. Is it your application code, users, or the underlying systems? I've got five bucks on DNS, personally. Why scroll through endless dashboards while dealing with alert floods, going from tool to tool to tool that you employ, guessing at which puzzle pieces matter? Context switching and tool sprawl are slowly killing both your team and your business. You should care more about one of those than the other; which one is up to you. Drop the separate pillars and enter a world of getting one unified understanding of the one thing driving your business: production. With Honeycomb, you guess less and know more. Try it for free at honeycomb.io/screaminginthecloud. Observability: it's more than just hipster monitoring.Corey: Let's face it, on-call firefighting at 2am is stressful! So there's good news and there's bad news. The bad news is that you probably can't prevent incidents from happening, but the good news is that incident.io makes incidents less stressful and a lot more valuable. incident.io is a Slack-native incident management platform that allows you to automate incident processes, focus on fixing the issues and learn from incident insights to improve site reliability and fix your vulnerabilities. Try incident.io, recover faster and sleep more.Corey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud. I'm Corey Quinn. We talk a lot about how people go about getting into this ridiculous industry of ours, and I've talked a little bit about how I go about finding interesting and varied guests to show up and help me indulge my ongoing love affair on this show with the sound of my own voice. Today, we're going to be able to address both of those because today I'm speaking to Linda Haviv, who, as of this recording, has accepted a job as a Developer Advocate at AWS, but has not started. Linda, welcome to the show.Linda: Thank you so much for having me, Corey. Happy to be here.Corey: So, you and I have been talking for a while and there's been a lot of interesting things I learned along the way. You were one of the first people I encountered when I joined the TikToks, as all the kids do these days, and was trying to figure out is there a community of folks who use AWS. Which really boils down to, “So, where are these people that are sad all the time?” Well, it turns out, they're on TikTok, so there we go. We found my people.And that was great. And we started talking, and it turns out that we were both in the AWS community builder program. And we've developed a bit of a rapport. We talk about different things. And then, I guess, weird stuff started happening, in the context of you were—you're doing very well at building an audience for yourself on TikTok.I tried it, and it was—my sense of humor sometimes works, sometimes doesn't. I've had challenges in finding any reasonable way to monetize it because a 30-second video doesn't really give nuance for a full ad read, for example. And you've been looking at it from the perspective of a content creator looking to build the audience slash platform is step one, and then, eh, step two, you'll sort of figure out aspects of monetization later. Which, honestly, is a way easier way to do it in hindsight, but, yeah, the things that we learn. Now, that you're going to AWS, first, you planning to still be on the TikToks and whatnot?Linda: Absolutely. So, I really look at TikTok as a funnel. I don't think it's the main place, you're going to get that deep-dive content but I think it's a great way, especially for things that excite you or get you into understanding it, especially beginner-type audience, I think there's a lot of untapped market of people looking to into tech, or technologists that aren't in the cloud. I mean, even when I worked—I worked as a web developer and then kind of learned more about the cloud, and I started out as a front-end developer and shifted into, like, SRE and infrastructure, so even for people within tech, you can have a huge tech community which there is on TikTok, with a younger community—but not all of them really understand the cloud necessarily, depending on their job function. So, I think it's a great way to kind of expose people to that.For me, my exposure came from community. I met somebody at a meetup who was working in cloud, and it wasn't even on the job that I really started getting into cloud because many times in corporations, you might be working on a specific team and you're not really encountering other ends, and it seems kind of like a mystery. Although it shouldn't seem like magic, many times when you're doing certain job functions—especially the DevOps—could end up feeling like magic. So, [laugh] for the good and the bad. So sometimes, if you're not working on that end, you really sometimes take it for granted.And so, for me, I actually—meetups were the way I got exposed to that end. And then I brought it back into my work and shifted internally and did certifications and started, even, lunch-and-learns where I work to get more people in their learning journey together within the company, and you know, help us as we're migrating to the cloud, as we're building on the cloud. Which, of course, we have many more roles down the road. I did it for a few years and saw the shift. But I worked at a media company for many years and now shifting to AWS, and so I've seen that happen on different ends.Not—oh, I wasn't the one doing the migration because I was on the other end of that time, but now for the last two years, I was working on [laugh] the infrastructure end, and so it's really fascinating. And many people actually—until now I feel like—that will work on maybe the web and mobile and don't always know as much about the cloud. I think it's a great way to funnel things in a quick manner. I think also society is getting used to short videos, and our attention span is very low, and I think for—Corey: No argument here.Linda: —[crosstalk 00:04:39] spending so mu—yeah, and we're spending so much time on these platforms, we might as well, you know, learn something. And I think it depends what content. Some things work well, some things doesn't. As with anything content creation, you kind of have to do trial and error, but I do find the audience to be a bit different on TikTok versus Twitter versus Instagram versus YouTube. Which is interesting how it's going to play out on YouTube, too, which is a whole ‘nother topic conversation.Corey: Well, it's odd to me watching your path. It's almost the exact opposite of mine where I started off on the back-end, grumpy sysadmin world and, “Oh, why would I ever need to learn JavaScript?” “Well, genius, because as the world progresses, guess what? That's right. The entire world becomes JavaScript. Welcome.”And it took me a long time to come around to that. You started with the front-end world and then basically approached from the exact opposite end. Let's be clear, back in my day, mine was the common path. These days, yours is very much the common path.Linda: Yeah.Corey: I also want to highlight that all of those transitions and careers that you spoke about, you were at the same company for nine years, which in tech is closer to 30. So, I have to ask, what was it that inspired you, after nine years, to decide, “I'm going to go work somewhere else. But not just anywhere; I'm going to AWS.” Because normally people don't almost institutionalized lifers past a certain point.Linda: [laugh].Corey: Like, “Oh, you'll be there till you retire or die.” Whereas seeing significant career change after that long in one place, even if you've moved around internally and experienced a lot of different roles, is not common at all what sparked that?Linda: Yeah. Yeah, no, it's such a good question. I always think about that, too, especially as I was reflecting because I'm, you know, in the midst of this transition, and I've gotten a lot of reflecting over the last two weeks [laugh], or more. But I think the main thing for me is, I always, wherever I was—and this kind of something that—I'm very proactive when it comes to trying to transition. I think, even when I was—right, I held many roles in the same company; I used to work in TV production and actually left for three months to go to a coding boot camp and then came back on the other end, but I understood the product in a different way.So, for that time period, it was really interesting to work on the other end. But, you know, as I kind of—every time I wanted to progress further, I always made a move that was actually new and put me in an uncomfortable place, even within the same company. And I'm at the point now that I'm in my career, I felt like this next step really needs to be, you know, at AWS. It's not, like, the natural progression for me. I worked alongside—on the client end—with AWS and have seen so many projects come through and how much our own workloads have changed.And it's just been an incredible journey, also dealing with accounts team. On that end, I've worked alongside them, so for me, it was kind of a natural progression. I was very passionate about cloud computing at AWS and I kind of wanted to take it to that next place, and I felt like—also, dealing with the community as part of my job is a dream part to me because I was always doing that on the side on social media. So, it wasn't part of my day-to-day job. I was working as an SRE and an infrastructure engineer, so I didn't get to do that as part of my day-to-day.I was making videos at 2 a.m. and, you know, kind of trying to, like, do—you know, interact with the community like that. And I think—I come from a performing background, the people background, I was singing since I was four years old. I always go to—I was a wedding singer, so I go into a room and I love making people happy or giving value. And I think, like, education has a huge part of that. And in a way, like making that content and—Corey: You got to get people's attention—Linda: Yeah.Corey: —you can't teach them a damn thing.Linda: Right. Exactly. So, it's kind of a mix of everything. It's like that performance, the love of learning. You know, between you and I, like, I wanted to be a lawyer before I thought I was going to—before I went to tech.I thought I was going to be a lawyer purely because I loved the concept of going to law school. I never took time to think about the law part, like, being the lawyer part. I always thought, “Oh, school.” I'm a student at heart. I always call myself a professional student. I really think that's part of what you need to be in this world, in this tech industry, and I think for me, that's what keeps my fire going.I love to experiment, to learn, to build. And there's something very fulfilling about building products. If you take a step back, like, you're kind of—you know, for me that part, every time I look back at that, that always is what kind of keeps me going. When I was doing front-end, it felt a lot more like I was doing smaller things than when I was doing infrastructure, so I felt like that was another reason why I shifted. I love doing the front-end, but I felt like I was spending two days on an Internet Explorer bug and it just drove me—[laugh] it just made it feel unfulfilling versus spending two days on, you know, trying to understand why, you know, something doesn't run the infrastructure or, like, there's—you know, it's failing blindly, you know? Stuff like that. Like, I don't know, for me that felt more fulfilling because the problem was more macro. But I think I needed both. I have a love for both, but I definitely prefer being back-end. So. [laugh]. Well, I'm saying that now but—[laugh].Corey: This might be a weakness on my part where I'm basically projecting onto others, and this is—I might be completely wrong on this, but I tend to take a bit of a bifurcated view of community. I mean, community is part of the reason that I know the things I know and how I got to this place that I am, so use that as a cautionary tale if you want. But when I talk to someone like you at this moment, where you're in the community, I'm in the community, and I'm talking to you about a problem I'm having and we're working on ways to potentially solve that or how to think about that. I view us as basically commiserating on these things, whereas as soon as you start on day one—and yes, it's always day one—at AWS and this becomes your day job and you work there, on some level, for me, there's a bit shift that happens and a switch gets flipped in my head where, oh, you actually work at this company. That means you're the problem.And I'm not saying that in a way of being antagonistic. Please, if you're watching or listening to this, do not antagonize the developer advocates. They have a very hard job understanding all this so they can explain that to the rest of us. But how do you wind up planning to navigate, or I guess your views on, I guess, handling the shift between, “One of the customers like the rest of us,” to, as I say, “Part of the problem,” for lack of a better term.Linda: Or, like, work because you kind of get the—you know. I love this question and it's something I've been pondering a lot on because I think the messaging will need to be a little different [coming from me 00:10:44] in the sense of, there needs to be—just in anything, you have to kind of create trust. And to create trust, you have to be vulnerable and authentic. And I think I, for example, utilize a lot of things outside of just the AWS cloud topic to do that now, even, when I—you know, kind of building it without saying where I work or anything like that, going into this role and it being my job, it's going to be different kind of challenge as far as the messaging, but I think it still holds true that part, that just developing trust and authenticity, I might have to do more of that, you know? I might have to really share more of that part, share other things to really—because it's more like people come, it doesn't matter how much somet—how many times you explain it, many times, they will see your title and they will judge you for it, and they don't know what happened before. Every TikTok, for example, you have to act like it's a new person watching. There is no series, you know? Like, yes, there's a series but, like, sometimes you can make that but it's not really the way TikTok functions or a short-form video functions. So, you kind of have to think this is my first time—Corey: It works really terribly when you're trying to break it out that way on TikTok.Linda: [laugh]. Yeah.Corey: Right. Here's part 17 of my 80-TikTok-video saga. And it's, “Could you just turn this into a blog post or put this on YouTube or something? I don't have four hours to spend learning how all this stuff works in your world.”Linda: Yeah. And you know, I think repeating certain things, too, is really important. So, they say you have to repeat something eight times for people to see it or [laugh] something like that. I learned that in media [crosstalk 00:12:13]—Corey: In a row, or—yeah. [laugh].Linda: I mean, the truth is that when you, kind of like, do a TikTok maybe, like, there's something you could also say or clarify because I think there's going to be—and I'm going to have to—there's going to be a lot of trial and error for me; I don't know if I have answers—but my plan is going into it very much testing that kind of introduction, or, like, clarifying what that role is. Because the truth is, the role is advocating on behalf of the community and really helping that community, so making sure that—you don't have to say it as far as a definition maybe, but, like, making sure that comes across when you create a video. And I think that's going to be really important for me, and more important than the prior even creating content going forward. So, I think that's one thing that I definitely feel like is key.As well as creating more raw interaction. So, it depends on the platform, too. Instagram, for example, is much more community—how do I put this? Instagram is much more easy to navigate as far as reaching the same community because you have something, like, called Instagram Stories, right? So, on Instagram Stories, you're bringing those stories, mostly the same people that follow you. You're able to build that trust through those stories.On TikTok, they just released Stories. I haven't really tried them much and I don't play with it a lot, but I think that's something I will utilize because those are the people that are already follow you, meaning they have seen a piece of content. So, I think addressing it differently and knowing who's watching what and trying to kind of put yourself in their shoes when you're trying to, you know, teach something, it's important for you to have that trust with them. And I think—key to everything—being raw and authentic. I think people see through that. I would hope they do.And I think, uh, [laugh] that's what I'm going to be trying to do. I'm just going to be really myself and real, and try to help people and I hope that comes through because that's—I'm passionate about getting more people into the cloud and getting them educated. And I feel like it's something that could also allow you to build anything, just from anywhere on your computer, brings people together, the world is getting smaller, really. And just being able to meet people through that and there's just a way to also change your life. And people really could change their life.I changed my life, I think, going into tech and I'm in the United States and I, you know—I'm in New York, you know, but I feel like so many people in the States and outside of the States, you know, all over the world, you know, have access to this, and it's powerful to be able to build something and contribute and be a part of the future of technology, which AWS is.Corey: I feel like, in three years or whatever it is that you leave AWS in the far future, we're going to basically pull this video up and MST3k came together. It's like, “Remember how naive you were talking about these things?” And I'm mostly kidding, but let's be serious. You are presumably going to be focusing on the idea of short-form content. That is—Linda: Yeah.Corey: What your bread-and-butter of audience-building has been around, and that is something that is new for AWS.Linda: Yeah.Corey: And I'm always curious as to how companies and their cultures continue to evolve. I can only imagine there's a lot of support structure in place for that. I personally remember giving a talk at an AWS event and I had my slides reviewed by their legal team, as they always do, and I had a slide that they were looking at very closely where I was listing out the top five AWS services that are bullshit. And they don't really have a framework for that, so instead, they did their typical thing of, “Okay, we need to make sure that each of those services starts with the appropriate AWS or Amazon naming convention and are they capitalized properly?” Because they have a framework for working on those things.I'm really curious as to how the AWS culture and way of bringing messaging to where people are is going to be forced to evolve now that they, like it or not, are going to be having significantly increased presence on TikTok and other short-form platforms.Linda: I mean, it's really going to be interesting to see how this plays out. There's so much content that's put out, but sometimes it's just not reaching the right audience, so making sure that funnel exists to the right people is important and reaching those audiences. So, I think even YouTube Shorts, for example. Many people in tech use YouTube to search a question.They do not care about the intro, sometimes. It depends what kind of following, it depends if [in gaming 00:16:30], but if you're coming and you're building something, it's like a Stack Overflow sometimes. You want to know the answer to your question. Now, YouTube Shorts is a great solution to that because many times people want the shortest possible answer. Now, of course, if it's a tutorial on how to build something, and it warrants ten minutes, that's great.Even ten minutes is considered, now, Shorts because TikTok now has ten-minute videos, but I think TikTok is now searchable in the way YouTube is, and I think let's say YouTube Shorts is short-form, but very different type of short-form than TikTok is. TikTok, hooks matter. YouTube answers to your questions, especially in chat. I wouldn't say everything in YouTube is like that; depends on the niche. But I think even within short-form, there's going to be a different strategy regarding that.So, kind of like having that mix. I guess, depending on platform and audience, that's there. Again, trial and error, but we'll see how this plays out and how this will evolve. Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by our friends at Vultr. 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My thanks to them for sponsoring this ridiculous podcast.Corey: I feel like there are two possible outcomes here. One is that AWS—Linda: Yeah.Corey: Nails this pivot into short-form content, and the other is that all your TikTok videos start becoming ten minutes long, which they now support, welcome to my TED Talk. It's awful, and then you wind up basically being video equivalent for all of your content, of recipes when you search them on the internet where first they circle the point to death 18 times with, “Back when I was a small child growing up in the hinterlands, we wound—my grandmother would always make the following stew after she killed the bison with here bare hands. Why did grandma kill a bison? We don't know.” And it just leads down this path so they can get, like, long enough content or they can have longer and longer articles to display more ads.And then finally at the end, it's like ingredient one: butter. Ingredient two, there is no ingredient two. Okay. That explains why it's delicious. Awesome. But I don't like having people prolong it. It's just, give me the answer I'm looking for.Linda: Yeah.Corey: Get to the point. Tell me the story. And—Linda: And this is—Corey: —I'm really hoping that is not the direction your content goes in. Which I don't think it would, but that is the horrifying thing and if for some chance I'm right, I will look like Nostradamus when we do that MST3k episode.Linda: No, no. I mean, I really am—I always personally—even when I was creating content these last few years and testing different things, I'm really a fan of the shortest way possible because I don't have the patience to watch long videos. And maybe it's because I'm a New Yorker that can't sit down from the life of me—apart from when I code of course—but, you know, I don't like wasting time, I'm always on the go, I'm with my coffee, I'm like—that's the kind of style I prefer to bring in videos in the sense of, like, people have no time. [laugh]. You know?The amount of content we're consuming is just, uh, bonkers. So, I don't think our mind is really a built for consuming [laugh] this much content every time you open your phone, or every time you look, you know, online. It's definitely something that is challenging in a whole different way. But I think where my content—if it's ten minutes, it better be because I can't shorten it. That's my thing. So, you can hold me accountable to that because—Corey: Yeah, I want ten minutes of—Linda: I'm not a—Corey: Content, not three minutes of content in a ten-minute bag.Linda: Exactly. Exactly. So, if it's a ten-minute video, it would have been in one hour that I cut down, like, meaning a tutorial, a very much technical types of content. I think things that are that long, especially in tech, would be something like, on that end—unless, of course, you know, I'm not talking about, like, longer videos on YouTube which are panels or that kind of thing. I'm talking more like if I'm doing something on TikTok specifically.TikTok also cares about your watch time, so if people aren't interested in it, it's not going to do well, it doesn't matter how many followers you have. Which is what I do like about the way TikTok functions as opposed to, let's say, Instagram. Instagram is more like it gives it to your following—and this is the current state, I don't know if it always evolves—but the current state is, Instagram Reels kind of functions in a way where it goes first to the people that follow you, but, like, in a way that's more amplified than TikTok. TikTox tests people that follows you, but if it's not a good video, it won't do well. And honestly, they're many good videos videos that don't go viral. I'm not talking about that.Sometimes it's also the topic and the niche and the sound and the title. I mean, there's so many people who take a topic and do it in three different ways and one of them goes viral. I mean, there's so many factors that play into it and it's hard to really, like, always, you know, kind of reverse engineer but I do think that with TikTok, things won't do well, more likely if it's not a good piece of content as opposed to—or, like, too long, right? Not—I shouldn't say not good a good piece of content—it's too long.Corey: The TikTok algorithm is inscrutable to me. TikTok is firmly convinced, based upon what it shows me, that I am apparently a lesbian. Which okay, fine. Awesome. Whatever. I'm also—it keeps showing me ads for ADHD stuff, and it was like, “Wow, like, how did it know that?” Followed by, “Oh, right. I'm on TikTok. Nevermind.”And I will say at one point, it recommended someone to me who, looking at the profile picture, she's my nanny. And it's, I have a strong policy of not, you know, stalking my household employees on social media. We are not Facebook friends, we are not—in a bunch of different areas. Like, how on earth would they have figured this out? I'm filling the corkboard with conspiracy and twine followed by, “Wait a minute. We probably both connect from the same WiFi network, which looks like the same IP address and it probably doesn't require a giant data science team to put two and two together on those things.” So, it was great. I was all set to do the tinfoil hat conspiracy, but no, no, that's just very basic correlation 101.Linda: And also, this is why I don't enable contacts on TikTok. You know, how it says, “Oh, connect your contacts?”Corey: Oh, I never do that. Like, “Can we look at your contacts?”Linda: Never.Corey: “No.” “Can we look at all of your photos?” “Absolutely not.” “Can we track you across apps?” “Why would anyone say yes to this? You're going to do it anyway, but I'll say no.” Yeah.Linda: Got to give the least privilege. [laugh]. Definitely not—Corey: Oh absolutely.Linda: Yeah. I think they also help [crosstalk 00:22:40]—Corey: But when I'm looking at—the monetization problem is always a challenge on things like this, too, because when I'm—my guilty TikTok scrolling pleasures hit, it's basically late at night, I just want to see—I want something to want to wind down and decompress. And I'm not about ready to watch, “Hey, would you like to migrate your enterprise database to this other thing?” It's, I… no. There's a reason that the ads that seem to be everywhere and doing well are aimed at the mass market, they're generally impulse buys, like, “Hey, do you want to set that thing over there on fire, but you're not close enough to get the job done? But this flame thrower today. Done.”And great, like, that is something everyone can enjoy, but these nuanced database products and anything else is B2B SaaS style stuff, it feels like it's a very tough sell and no one has quite cracked that nut, yet.Linda: Yeah, and I think the key there—this is, I'm guessing based on, like, what I want to try out a lot—is the hook and the way you're presenting it has to be very product-focused in the sense that it needs to be very relatable. Even if you don't know anything about tech, you need to be—like, for example, in the architecture page on AWS, there's a video about the Emirates going to Mars mission. Space is a very interesting topic, right? I think, a hook, like, “Do want to see how, like, how this is bu—” like, it's all, like, freely available to see exactly [laugh] how this was built. Like, it might—in the right wording, of course—it might be interesting to someone who's looking for fun-fact-style content.Now, is it really addressing the people that are building everyday? Not really always, depends who's on there and the mass market there. But I feel like going on the product and the things that are mass-market, and then working backwards to the tech part of it, even if they learn something and then want to learn more, that's really where I see TikTok. I don't think every platform would be, maybe, like this, but that's where I see getting people: kind of inviting them in to learn more, but making it cool and fun. It's very important, but it feels cool and fun. [laugh]. So.Because you're right, you're scrolling at 2 a.m. who wants to start seeing that. Like, it's all about how you teach. The content is there, the content has—you know, that's my thing. It's like, the content is there. You don't need to—it's yes, there's the part where things are always evolving and you need to keep track of that; that's whole ‘nother type thing which you do very well, right?And then there's a part where, like, the content that already exists, which part is evergreen? Meaning, which part is, like, something that could be re—also is not timely as far as update, for example, well-architected framework. Yes, it evolves all the time, you always have new pillars, but the guide, the story, that is an evergreen in some sense because that guide doesn't, you know, that whole concept isn't going anywhere. So, you know, why should someone care about that?Corey: Right. How to turn on two-factor authentication for your AWS account.Linda: Right.Corey: That's evergreen. That's the sort of thing that—and this is the problem, I think, AWS has had for a long time where they're talking about new features, new enhancements, new releases. But you look what people are actually doing and so much of it is just the same stuff again and again because yeah, that is how most of the cloud works. It turns out that three-quarters of company's production infrastructures tends to run on EC2 more frequently than it tends to run on IoT Greengrass. Imagine that.So, there's this idea of continuing to focus on these things. Now, one of my predictions is that you're going to have a lot of fun with this and on some level, it's going to really work for you. In others, it's going to be hilariously—well, its shortcomings might be predictable. I can just picture now you're at re:Invent; you have a breakout talk and terrific. And you've successfully gotten your talk down to one minute and then you're sitting there with—Linda: [laugh].Corey: —the remainder of maybe 59. Like, oh, right. Yeah. Turns out not everything is short-form. Are you predicting any—Linda: Yep.Corey: Problems going from short-form to long-form in those instances?Linda: I think it needs to go hand-in-hand, to be honest. I think when you're creating any short-form content, you have—you know, maybe something short is actually sometimes in some ways, right, harder because you really have to make sure, especially in a technical standpoint, leaving things out is sometimes—leaves, like, a blind spot. And so, making sure you're kind of—whatever you're educating, you kind of, to be clear, “Here's where you learn more. Here's how I'm going to answer this next question for you: go here.” Now, in a longer-form content, you would cover all that.So, there's always that longevity. I think even when I write a script, and there's many scripts I'm still [laugh] I've had many ideas until now I've been doing this still at 2 a.m. so of course, there's many that didn't, you know, get released, but those are the things that are more time consuming to create because you're taking something that's an hour-long, and trying to make sure you're pulling out the things that are most—that are hook-style, that invite people in, that are accurate, okay, that really give you—explain to you clearly where are the blind spots that I'm not explaining on this video are. So, “XYZ here is, like, the high level, but by the way, there's, like, this and this.” And in a long-form, you kind of have to know the long-form version of it to make the short-form, in some ways, depending on what—you're doing because you're funneling them to somewhere. That's my thing. Because I don't think there should be [crosstalk 00:27:36]—Corey: This is the curse of Twitter, on some level. It's, “Well, you forgot about this corner case.” “Yeah, I had 280 characters to get into.” Like, the whole point of short-form content—which I do consider Twitter to be—is a glimpse and a hook, and get people interested enough to go somewhere and learn more.For something like AWS, this makes a lot of sense. When you highlight a capability or something interesting, it's something relevant, whereas on the other side of it, where it's this, “Oh, great. Now, here's an 8000-word blog post on how I did this thing.” Yeah, I'm going to get relatively fewer amounts of traffic through that giant thing, but the people who are they're going to be frickin' invested because that's going to be a slog.Linda: Exactly.Corey: “And now my eight-hour video on how exactly I built this thing with TypeScript.” Badly—Linda: Exactly.Corey: —as it turns out because I'm a bad programmer.Linda: [laugh]. No, you're not. I love your shit-posting. It's great.Corey: Challenge accepted.Linda: [laugh]. I love what you just mentioned because I think you're hitting the nail on the head when it comes to the quality content that's niche focus, like, there needs to be a good healthy mix. I think always doing that, like, mass-market type video, it doesn't give you, also, the credibility you need. So, doing those more niche things that might not be relevant to everybody, but here and there, are part of that is really key for your own knowledge and for, like, the com—you know, as far as, like, helping someone specific. Because it's almost like—right, when you're selling a service and you're using social media, right, not everybody's going to buy your service. It doesn't matter what business you're in right? The deep-divers are going to be the people that pay up. It's just a numbers game, right? The more people you, kind of, address from there, you'll find—Corey: It's called a funnel for a reason.Linda: Right. Exactly.Corey: Free content, paid content. Almost anyone will follow me on Twitter; fewer than will sign up for a newsletter; fewer will listen to a podcast; fewer will watch a video, and almost none of them will buy a consulting engagement. But ‘almost' and ‘actually none of them,' it turns out is a very different world.Linda: Exactly. [laugh]. So FYI, I think there's—Corey: And that's fine. That's the way it works.Linda: That's the way it works. And I think there needs to be that niche content that might not be, like, the most viral thing, but viral doesn't mean quality, you know? It doesn't. There's many things that play into what viral is, but it's important to have the quality content for the people that need that content, and finding those people, you know, it's easier when you have that kind of mass engagement. Like, who knows? I'm a student. I told you; I'm a professional student. I'm still [laugh] learning every day.Corey: Working with AWS almost makes it a requirement. I wish you luck—Linda: Yeah.Corey: —in the new gig and I also want to thank you for taking time out of your day to speak with me about how you got to this point. And we're all very eager to see where you go from here.Linda: Thank you so much, Corey, for having me. I'm a huge fan, I love your content, I'm an avid reader of your newsletter and I am looking forward to very much being in touch and on the Twitterverse and beyond. So. [laugh].Corey: If people want to learn more about what you're up to, and other assorted nonsense, where's the best place they can go to find you?Linda: So, the best place they could go is lindavivah.com. I have all my different social handles listed on there as well a little bit about me, and I hope to connect with you. So, definitely go to lindavivah.com.Corey: And that link will, of course, be in the [show notes 00:30:39]. Thank you so much for taking the time to speak with me. I really appreciate it.Linda: Thank you, Corey. Have a wonderful rest of the day.Corey: Linda Haviv, AWS Developer Advocate, very soon now anyway. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, whereas if you've hated this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, smash the like and subscribe buttons, and of course, leave an angry comment that you have broken down into 40 serialized TikTok videos.Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

    Life Tech & Sundry Podcast
    Out Of Office [OOF] - 06 - Super Charged Wildman

    Life Tech & Sundry Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 96:48


    All thoughts expressed are our own. Thank you, and now, enjoy. Stay Frosty. Links: Giant Of Kandahar --------- 1) [ https://youtu.be/YKwDic2qWYs ] 2) [ https://youtu.be/T92e0aaizaI ] Wildman Chasing Hiker ---------- [ https://youtu.be/Vx6YxG8SD_A ] Navy SEALS in NC on YT --------- [ https://youtu.be/21vvAektLvY] My Supercut ---------- [ https://drive.google.com/file/d/1no1nXsTN_-uuwvNsemDpMv90oLOhHNLP/view?usp=drivesdk ] NOTICE - I'm not sharing the murders of Mexico, I'll only share that it took place in "Ecatepec, MX" Known as the "Monsters Of Ecatepec, 2018" Allen Bitz • T-Mobile launches new travel-focused benefits with Wi-Fi, international data and more (thepointsguy.com) • We tried two inflight burgers to see which US airline does it best (thepointsguy.com) Social Media IG ---------- [ https://bit.ly/IG-LTS ] LTS Email & Inquiries ---------- [ lifetechsundry@gmail.com ] LTS Twitter ---------- [ https://bit.ly/LTSTweets ] Share the love ---------- [ https://bit.ly/LTSBacking ] OR Ko-fi ---------- [ https://ko-fi.com/lifetechsundry ] Youtube Channels: Podcast Background Music ---------- [ https://bit.ly/LTSPlaylist ] YT Chillhop Radio ---------- [ https://bit.ly/LTSFavoriteBeats ] Food Affairs ---------- [ https://bit.ly/FoodAffairsYT ] Life Tech & Sundry ---------- [ https://bit.ly/LTSonYT ] --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/ltspodcast/message

    Bodega Babiez Podcast
    Ep. 138 "Palm Tree Wi-Fi"

    Bodega Babiez Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 181:29


    Welcome back to another episode of Lucky View Podcast. This week Carbs calls in from Hawaii and catches up with the guys. The fellas talk new music from Chris Brown, Lil Durk, Beyonce, and more. The fellas deep dive on Drake's career and his albums. Roe vs Wade gets the guys going and state their opinion on the decision. Mahdi talks about the importance of and A&R and more. Subscribe to our Youtube Channel https://www.youtube.com/luckyviewpodcast Follow us on Instagram at https://www.instagram.com/luckyviewpodcast Twitter https://www.twitter.com/luckyviewpod Era https://www.instagram.com/iamnewera_ Papijohnson https://www.instagram.com/papijohnson Carbs https://www.instagram.comstevenc___ Mahdi https://www.instagram.com/theredpilldealer Just Believe Entertainment https://www.instagram.com/justbelieveent

    Noticentro
    Suman mil 160 escuelas públicas con wifi en CDMX

    Noticentro

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 1:18


    •Marcelo Ebrard aún es positivo a covid-19•Ataque ruso en ciudad ucraniana de Lysychansk•Más información en nuestro podcast

    The Rights Track
    Eyewitness: using digital technology to prosecute human rights abusers

    The Rights Track

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 29:17


    In epiosde 8 of Series 7 of The Rights Track, Todd is in conversation with Wendy Betts, Director of eyeWitness, an International Bar Association project launched in 2015 which collects verifiable video of human rights violations for use in investigations and trials. We're asking Wendy how the use of digital technology can help to hold accountable those who commit human rights crimes.   Transcript Todd Landman  0:01  Welcome to The Rights Track podcast, which gets the hard facts about the human rights challenges facing us today. In series seven, we're discussing human rights in a digital world. I'm Todd Landman, in this episode, I'm delighted to be joined by Wendy Betts. Wendy is director of eyeWitness an International Bar Association project launched in 2015, which collects verifiable video of human rights violations for use in investigations and trials. So today we're asking Wendy, how does the use of digital technology help to hold accountable those who commit human rights crimes? So Wendy, it's absolutely brilliant to have you on this episode of the right track. So welcome. Wendy Betts  0:38  Thanks, Todd. It's great to be here. Todd Landman  0:40  You and I met in Bergen in Norway, we were at the Rafto Foundation awards for the Human Rights Data Analysis Group and Human Rights Data Analysis Group have featured in previous episodes on The Rights Track. And I see there is a kind of correlation, if you will, between the work of the Human Rights Data Analysis Group and the work that you do at eyeWitness. It is just that the data you're collecting is really video files and video footage. So tell us a little bit about the work that you're doing with eyeWitness. Wendy Betts  1:08  Absolutely. So at eyeWitness, we are helping human rights defenders in conflict zones and other places that are experiencing large scale human rights violations, to collect photo and video information in a way that makes it easier to authenticate. So that footage can be used in investigations and trials. So we work with human rights defenders in three ways. First, we're providing a mobile camera app that we designed to help ensure that the footage can be easily authenticated. And then we are helping to securely store that footage and maintain the chain of custody so it can eventually be used in investigations and trials. And third, we work to then take a working copy of that footage that we catalogue and tag to make it easier for investigators to identify footage that's potentially of interest to their investigations and incorporate that into those processes. Todd Landman  2:01  Well, that's a great summary of the work that you do. I recall when I was a student at Georgetown University, I worked in the Lauinger Library. And my job was to produce photographs in the pre-digital age. So this was processing rolls of film in the old cans used to kind of shake them with the chemicals and then use an enlarger and make photographs. And that was fine for special collections and photographing books. But one day, a Jesuit priest came into the library and handed me a roll of film and said I need 10 copies of each of these pictures. And they were actually photographs from the crime scene where Jesuit priests had been murdered in El Salvador. And I'm curious that when we enlarge those pictures and submitted them back to the authorities that requested them, is that kind of evidence still considered verifiable evidence? And what is it that the digital elements all of this adds to the veracity and the verifiability of evidence collected on human rights crimes? Wendy Betts  2:58  There's a long history of photo and video being used as evidence, that photo and video in its hard copy form would need to be verified to go to court. So generally speaking, the court would want to speak with the photographer, or in the absence of photographer, somebody that could help explain that that footage is indeed an accurate portrayal of that location at that time. And what digital technology has done is expand the ability of who can be the photographer to collect that potential evidence. So with the two trends of smartphones in everyone's pocket, plus the rise of social media platforms where people can share this information, you're suddenly seeing this massive proliferation of the amount of available information that could be used as evidence. But indeed, this also will need to be verified in much the same way. But the challenges to doing that are slightly different. And then the technology that we can bring to bear to do that is slightly different. Todd Landman  3:52  Yes, I understand those differences. And so there's a lot of debate today, if we take the War in Ukraine as a good example, when it first started, there was a flurry of activity on Twitter that said, don't believe everything you see on Twitter. So there of course will be manipulated images manipulated video, I see manipulated video every day, some of it you can tell straight away, it just looks awful. It looks like a video game. Somebody's saying, look, you know, Ukrainians are taking out Russian tanks. And actually you look at the tank tracks and you can see it just looks like a photoshopped superimposed image of a tank running over some really bad terrain, to the fully verifiable accounts that we are seeing coming out of that conflict. So how are things verified? How does one dismiss imagery in one instance and accept imagery in another? What's the expertise required to give that verifiable account? Wendy Betts  4:43  I think when you're looking at verification, what you really want to know is whether that footage was taken where and when it was claimed. And if that footage has been edited, or as you note in your examples has it been photoshopped to look like something else? And then is it possible that even if it was authentic to begin with, and I accurate to begin with hasn't been changed somewhere along the way? So has it been taken down off social media and changed and reposted? And there's been two trends that have developed to address how we can do this. So one is the plethora of open source investigation techniques that have developed in terms of how can you geo locate images using satellite footage and other types of technology? How can you Chrono locate, so how can you figure out when and where that footage was taken? Can you do frame by frame analyses to determine if that footage has been edited in any way? So that was one approach. And that has become increasingly professionalised. And is really coming to the fore in Ukraine. And then the other approach is the one that eyeWitness has taken where we developed a tool that can be used to hardwire that information in the point that that footage was taken. So those are called controlled capture tools, because you're basically controlling the information and controlling that footage, keeping it in a controlled environment for its entire lifespan. So you're collecting information about where and when that footage was taken, you're ensuring that footage can be edited. And you are maintaining that footage in that secure state through its lifespan. Todd Landman  6:04  So the app itself has the technology built inside it, you've actually hardwired that programmable element to the app, and it can't be tampered with. So if I download this app as a user, and I'm travelling through the world, and I want to document something, it's easy to use on a mobile device, easy to proliferate and sort of disseminate if you will out to users. And it's easy to learn by those users. Because the technology itself has been created in a way that preserves the identity and the verifiability of the images that are captured. Wendy Betts  6:39  That's exactly it. The eyeWitness app is designed to be really easy to use to pick up and take and start using and on the surface for the user interface. It's much like standard mobile camera, so you have to open the app instead of your camera. But you're recording footage in the same way, you can enter the secure gallery where the footage is stored to see what you've taken. And you upload it to eyeWitness, this is how we maintain the chain of custody and secure that footage until it can be used. And then you have the option to share it with your social media networks, you can attach it to a WhatsApp message, you can do a variety of things with it. All of the verification aspect is intended to happen behind the scenes kind of inside the technology. So the app is designed indeed to collect information about where and when that footage was taken from three different sources, none of which are the user themselves. It's also collecting information to ensure that that footage can't be edited. So we are calculating basically a digital fingerprint at the moment that information is captured, that stays with that footage. So if any changes wherever to be made to it, you'd be able to spot that by running the algorithm for the fingerprint again, and then that footage is stored encrypted on the device, and then it's transmitted encrypted to eyeWitness so it can't be intercepted or manipulated either at rest on the phone or in transit on its way to us. Todd Landman  8:00  So you have a secure server where all these raw files are held. Is that right? Wendy Betts  8:05  Indeed. So we've been fortunate to partner on a pro bono relationship with LexisNexis legal and professional and so they host our server in their secure hosting environment that they have for litigation services for a variety of confidential evidence that's used in cases around the world. So they host our server, which allows us to scale up quickly and scale up to meet the need. And Ukraine is a perfect example. We've received more footage from Ukraine since the invasion began, then we have globally in the last two years. So that ability to scale up quickly is very important, and more importantly, it is stored securely. So they have their state of the art security around that in a way that we couldn't necessarily put around a server if we were hosting it ourselves. Todd Landman  8:51  That's amazing. Can you tell us a little bit about the complexity of a Ukraine investigation? Let's take the case of Bucha. We know in Bucha, that there were atrocities committed of some kind, clearly there has to be an evidentiary threshold reached, there has to be a profile of perpetrators and victims, there has to be that whole disaggregation of very complex human rights events of the kinds that you and I discussed with the team from Human Rights Data Analysis Group, but what are the steps that eyeWitness takes? What's the role that you take in the preparation of, let's say, an investigation into something like the Bucha incidents that we saw? Wendy Betts  9:30  So I think if we back up to your comment earlier about just the sheer amount of footage that we've been seeing on social media, and including from places like Bucha, that I think there's a sense that there is plenty of evidence out there, and we've got everything we need. And I think what everyone needs to take step back and realise is how complex as you said these cases are. So you need information about what actually happened on the ground, what happened to these victims, and that takes the form of witness statements, it can take the form of physical evidence, it can take the form of photo and video, but we also need to know the context in which it's happening. If you want to elevate something to be a war crime, instead of a murder, you need to understand the conflict dynamic and what's happening. And then if you want to hold people at higher levels of authority responsible, and not just the people on the ground who pulled the trigger, you need to make those linkages. And that, again, is documentary evidence, it's witness evidence. So all of these pieces of this massive evidentiary puzzle have to come together. At eyeWitness, we see ourselves as one of these pieces, we are a photo video piece of evidence that can tell part of the story but has to work together with these other aspects. So we don't do full investigations ourselves and put all these pieces together, what we do is equip either civil society investigators, ordinary citizens, journalists, or others on the ground who have access to these scenes and are collecting photo and video with a tool to do it in a way that they can feed that information into investigations because it can be so easily verified, so they can contribute to this puzzle, in order to help hold the perpetrators responsible. Todd Landman  11:03  I think this whole portrayal of the contribution that you're making is really important. In our interview with the director of Human Rights State Analysis Group, Patrick Ball, the sort of data guru as it were in these areas, he said, you know, statistics are not a silver bullet. So the work that they do, would provide the statistical analysis that showed that certain things were happening that could not be explained by chance alone. But it was only ever one part of a very complex story alongside documentary evidence, alongside testimonies alongside forensic anthropology alongside many other things. And then ultimately, a determination of, let's say, genocide was a legal judgement that was either supported or not supported by the type of statistical evidence that was provided alongside other pieces of evidence. Now you're making a very similar case that whatever body is going to be prosecuting crimes, in whether it is Bucha, or the broader conflict in Ukraine, eyeWitness is only ever going to be one part of that much bigger story. Is that right? Wendy Betts  12:02  Exactly, exactly. I think all of these different strains of investigation have to work together, people collecting witness statements, the people doing open source investigation of footage and other information that was posted early on, people who have access to official documents, all of these pieces have to fit together, because as you said, in addition to showing just the baseline conduct happening on the ground, you need to show these patterns in magnitudes. And you can only do that by amassing large amounts of information that can show some of those patterns and run those types of statistical analysis that Patrick was talking about. So it all does fit together and complements each other. Todd Landman  12:42  Yeah. And you know, the conflict in Ukraine is by no means over. And you know, I read up a report, I think it was yesterday that said, there are up to 30,000 war crimes that need to be investigated. Now, each crime itself requires extensive documentation, and then you multiply that by the number of crimes. And of course, there may be future crimes committed that will need to be documented as well. So the scale of just this conflict in Ukraine, you said, you've received more images from Ukraine, and then you have in the last two years of other areas of the world, and we may get to talking about those other areas of the world. But to me, the scale of what's happening in Ukraine, and the time that's required to fully prosecute many of these crimes means that we're really going to be in this for the long haul. Wendy Betts  13:25  Justice, unfortunately, in these types of cases is definitely a long term process, and the arc of justice is quite long. And that's what we hope is part of the value added of eyeWitness and why we provide that secure storage aspect, because the photos and videos taken now may well not be involved in an investigation or a trial for years and years to come. And so we can safeguard that footage in a way that even at that time, we can hand it over and it could stand up to the scrutiny. But indeed, I think we're looking at a long term prospect for justice. Todd Landman  13:58  Yes. And outside the Ukraine context, what are some other examples of where eyeWitness has been collecting this video footage from other parts of the world? Wendy Betts  14:06  So eyeWitness launched publicly in 2015. And we really do work globally. And we respond to the inquiries and the needs of human rights defenders in various parts of the world. Now, some places we don't advertise especially where the security situation is quite serious for some of the human rights defenders using the eyeWitness app. But in other places, we have been able to be a bit more public. So we have been working actually in Ukraine since 2017. And we put out a report about shelling of civilian dwellings to the United Nations Special Rapporteur on the right to adequate housing. So that's one area where we've been active even before the current events. We've also recently submitted a report to the UN Special Rapporteur on extrajudicial killings related to violence occurring in the middle belt area of Nigeria between farmers and herders. We've also been active in the Palestine context with partners there using the eyeWitness app. So we've been quite broadly represented around the globe. And we review accountability broadly as well. And so that's why I'm mentioning non-judicial approaches to accountability. Any efforts that can get at this conduct and get it and investigate it and helped to hold the perpetrators responsible is what we're interested in empowering human rights defenders to do. Todd Landman  15:25  Okay. And do you provide training alongside because it's one thing just to download an app and start using it, but you might make sort of fundamental errors in using the technology from the start? So do you provide a training manual or workshops or online training for users as they download the app and then say, well, actually, this is the best way to film things? Or do you just sort of allow the technology to run in the hands of the users? Wendy Betts  15:49  Our preferred approach is to work in long term partnerships with human rights defenders that want to use the app, we very much see the app as a tool and to be used effectively, you do need to put more skill building and strengthening around that tool. So we do work hand in hand with human rights defenders, who plan to use the app on not only how to use the app, but how to incorporate photo and video into demonstrating whatever types of violations that are looking into, we can provide training on how you actually film when you're at the crime scene. We work with a lot of human rights defenders whose primary efforts have been advocacy oriented, and those are very different photos than photos you want to take for evidence. And so we work to help them make that shift as well. And so then we give them ongoing feedback. Once their footage starts coming in, we can provide tech support, if they're out in the field, and we know they're going on a documentation mission, we can be ready to answer any questions if they have any. So we really want to work with them hand in hand to not just use eyeWitness but use it effectively. Todd Landman  16:54  I understand and does the technology work in the absence of a mobile signal in the absence of a WiFi connection? Can you collect videos on a phone, outside of network, and then when it gets back into the network, you're able to upload the images and videos that have been taken to a secure server? Wendy Betts  17:11  Our goal in designing eyeWitness is to make sure that it can work in the types of environments where these human rights defenders are active. And especially when you look at conflict zones where electricity may be disrupted, internet may be disrupted, cell service may be disrupted. So the app is designed to be able to collect, not only take the photos and videos, but all of the metadata that's needed to help verify where and when it was taken while offline. So you don't need to have access to the internet. Nor do you need to have a cell subscription or any other kind of data service that will collect all of that. It's designed to store that information securely in a gallery separate from the gallery on your phone. So it's hidden in a secure gallery. The idea being that these human rights defenders may have to make their way back to their headquarters or make their way back to someplace with internet before they're able to upload it to us and then delete it off their phones. So we wanted it to remain hidden in transit during that timeframe. So it is definitely aimed at helping individuals in contexts where there's high security risks, infrastructure challenges to be able to use the app. Todd Landman  18:17  You've definitely given that a lot of thought, I guess another question that flows from that is what's the minimum viable technical requirement on a phone? Obviously, it needs to be a smartphone with a camera and a video. But how far back in time can you go in terms of the age of a device because of the availability of resources, etc in some of these conflict zones? What sort of phone is the basic unit you require to use the app? Wendy Betts  18:39  That is a really good question, because it's such an important issue in terms of access and availability of these tools to the vulnerable segments of society that need them most. First thing I should say it's designed for Android, and we don't currently have an iOS version. Part of that is because the demographics of the places where we're working is primarily Android users. So it's designed for that operating system. And we've designed it to go back to android 6.0, which I think is roughly operating systems on phones back to 2015. So it does stretch back a fair way, we made a decision not to go back any further. And that's because Android changed how it handles security at the 6.0 version onward. And we could harden the security of the information both to protect the user and the integrity of the information from that version onward in a way that was more difficult in previous versions. So that's when it goes back to Todd Landman  19:32  And are there any plans to make this available in iOS? Or are there sort of limitations in terms of partnering with Apple to make that happen? Wendy Betts  19:40  We regularly revisit the question and we're actually currently in the process of again, looking at if we could replicate all the functionality that we currently offer security, the anonymity those types of questions, in an iOS version and then looking at the cost compared to the potential user base are the calculations we make. So we're looking at that right now again actually. Todd Landman  20:00  But for the user, this is free. It's an app that you download for free and then use. Is that right? Wendy Betts  20:05  Exactly. It's free. That's freely available. As I said, we would like to work in partnerships. But that's not necessary. Any individual can go to the Google Play Store now and download it and start using it. We do have written instruction guides on our website, we have a short video on how to use it and some other resources that are available. Todd Landman  20:25  Great. And then I guess my final set of questions really is about how this evidence connects to what we've say different photographic evidence you made passing reference to the use of satellite imagery, which has been a very powerful tool, I think the company planet takes a picture of the entire surface of the Earth every 24 hours with its sort of flocks of satellites, then they have the system, if one satellite goes down, they can easily replace another one within the flock. And they have tremendous number of images that are very high resolution, and I should say an increasing resolution. But that's one version of what you can see from space, as it were. And what you're saying is in the hands of users and defenders, you have almost a citizen science ground truthing that can take place as well. Are there any efforts to coordinate between your organisation and some of these providers of satellite imagery, if asked to do so? You mentioned the forced deportations or the destruction of houses. The Special Rapporteur on adequate housing, for example. So you could see satellites, just, you know, images before and after a village is destroyed. But equally, you could triangulate that with your users on the ground, saying, Here's a house being destroyed, I'm hiding in a bush filming this right now is that sort of partnership and, you know, sort of holistic approach being developed in your organisation? Wendy Betts  21:38  So we have certainly used satellite footage in some of our analyses in that Ukraine one about shelling is a key example. That case we didn't establish a partnership, we used what was publicly available that we can access to help go back and look at the dates and locations of the photos we have and then go back and look at satellite footage. And we use that primarily to determine when the attack actually took place. So we have photos dated as to when they were taken. But that doesn't necessarily give you the date of when the attack was. So we use satellite footage a lot to help determine Okay, well, this building looked intact on this date, and certainly looks more like the photo that we have on this date. And then that way, we were able to determine at what point the attack probably took place. We've also worked with another organisation that was doing an investigation of environmental damage in a different location. And in that case, they were able to get the latitude and longitude of the event that they were looking at using the app. And then they were able to get historic and current satellite footage for that location to be able to trace the trends of what was happening there. So they were looking at some environmental damage. So you can help see the change in the environment based on what you're seeing in the satellite photos. That being said, there's certainly the ability to work with satellite providers to help target so I think if you're setting out to do an investigation, and you know, you're going to be in certain places at a certain time and you need some of those satellites pointed at those locations. I think those type of partnerships are indeed possible. We haven't engaged with any of those at the moment because again, we tend to be led by our human right defender users and what they want to investigate. But I think there are organisations that are engaging in those types of partnerships. Todd Landman  23:19  That's great. That's very clear in your explanation. And then I suppose a follow up question would be you've been an operation now since 2015, you've had seven years of footage coming in and the secure servers and you've supplied images to cases, can you tell us the story of success, you know, it has been successful prosecutions in your mind from a legal perspective where you think that eyeWitness has made a definitive contribution to the outcome of those cases? Wendy Betts  23:44  Absolutely. So as I mentioned, we've launched the app in 2015. And we're looking at atrocity crime. So going back to your earlier point about the long arc of justice in these crimes, we have to kind of bear that in mind at what point they might actually go to trial. So we've provided a significant amount of information to investigations at different stages of the process. And so not all of those have gone to trial yet. But indeed, we did collaborate on a case that has gone to trial and resulted in a conviction. And this was a project that we did in partnership with WITNESS, which is a group based in Brooklyn, and with TRIAL International, which is an organisation based in Switzerland, who does strategic litigation. And we then all three of us partnered with a human rights defender group on the ground in the Democratic Republic of Congo. And in that case, they were investigating a massacre that took place in 2012 in two different villages in eastern DRC. And local human rights defenders were able to use the app based on training that they received from WITNESS on filming a crime scene, and to help put it into a case that TRIAL International was helping to build and they were able to use the app to go back and collect photos that helped to actually authenticate footage that was taken contemporaneously with the massacre. But that hadn't been stored in a way to protect the chain of custody. So they were able to go back and take footage of some of the same scarring injuries on the victims to demonstrate that the ones taken at the time, were accurate, and able to take photos of the mass grave, which could be used to help determine the number of bodies based on its dimensions and how that matched up with the reports of the number of people who had been killed, and with the photos that have been taken at the time of the burials. So all of this footage was entered into evidence by the prosecutor in the case, and was accepted by the court and was noted in the judgement about the power of the footage. And indeed, the two militia leaders were convicted of crimes against humanity. Todd Landman  25:51  Right. So that's a real success story, I had the pleasure of visiting WITNESS in Brooklyn back in 2011. And I recall that it's funny when you enter their offices, they sort of have a timeline of tech sitting in their front room, you know, cameras from ages ago, up to the latest stuff, and they're very, very good at training people how to represent human rights in a slightly different way that you do it. But working together, obviously has produced a great benefit. Now, it's that timeline of tech that interests me. And my final question is that, you know, technology continues to advance at an exponential rate. And what do you see for the future in this space? What would you like to do that you can't do yet, but you think will be possible in a few years time with respect to the technology that you've been working with and developing? Wendy Betts  26:32  That's a great question. There's so many exciting things that can happen with technology. I mean, there's already it's not even in the future, it's looking at virtual reality and using that for juries to kind of put them in the place of the crime scene. And that's all based on taking a number of photos and videos that can then be put through the algorithm to be transformed into virtual reality. There's the idea of being able to take 3D photo and video that you might be able to broadcast into the courtroom. I think the interesting component of that, though, is can the courts keep up? I think the courts now are trying to determine how to best handle digital evidence that's coming out of this flood of footage over the last 10 years. So I'm not sure we're ready to start talking about how we handle 3D images that are captured on a mobile phone. Todd Landman  27:20  Yeah, absolutely. And, you know, like DNA suddenly emerged as a new thing that, you know, transformed the legal profession in terms of solid evidence about whether somebody was actually present at a crime scene, and you could re litigate cases for many years ago, you've put your finger on that challenge between the advance of technology and the ability for legal entities to keep up and courts to keep up there have to be determinations around what is an acceptable piece of evidence. And that's a very interesting challenge for the future. But you've given us so much to think about here. And I think there is this fear of technology as a fear of manipulation of images. There's also the fear of cracking an encrypted storage of these images. But you have given us assurances and confidence in the technology that you developed the way that you've partnered with organisations to help you store this information. And then, of course, this chain of custody, the chain of evidence which is unbroken, and the ways in which these images really do contribute to, as you call it, the long arc of justice. So it's a very interesting conclusion to reach, at least at this stage, in listening to you and talking about how this form of technology which is in the palm of our hands, gives us the power in the palm of our hands to defend human rights in such interesting ways. And in my view, shows us that the digital transformation and technological advance we're seeing in the world can make a positive contribution to positive social change. So Wendy Betts has just leaves me to thank you very, very much for sharing your thoughts with us today on The Rights Track. Wendy Betts  28:45  Thanks so much for having me. It was a great conversation. Christine Garrington  28:49  Thanks for listening to this episode of The Rights Track podcast, which was presented by Todd Landman and produced by Chris Garrington of Research Podcasts with funding from 3di. You can find a full transcript of this episode on the website at www.RightsTrack.org together with useful links to content mentioned in the discussion. Don't forget to subscribe wherever you listen to your podcasts to access future and earlier episodes.   Additional Links: eyeWitness app  

    A Vivir Que Son Dos Días
    Universidad Pontificia Bolivariana desarrolla pintura que amplifica las señales de WiFi

    A Vivir Que Son Dos Días

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 13:52


    A Vivir Que Son Dos Días
    Universidad Pontificia Bolivariana desarrolla pintura que amplifica las señales de WiFi

    A Vivir Que Son Dos Días

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 13:53


    Mark Romero Music Podcast
    E223: Are You Deserving Of Life's Blessings?

    Mark Romero Music Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 7:27


    In this week's episode, Mark shares how your sense of deserving can greatly impact the goodness that you open to in your life. Perhaps you've done things in the past or been exposed to obsolete teachings that have said you're unworthy of life's blessings. Nothing can be farther than the truth! You need to clear this old energy to truly open your sense of deserving, and embody the energy of deserving within yourself. The more you embody this state of being, the more life will share its beautiful bounty with you. ––––––––––––––––– The Ultimate Harmonized Your Life Solution was created to help you overcome the negative effects of stressful experiences from your past and build resistance to future stressors by using high-frequency music and energy healing. Through this system of healing, you will have a solution for reducing the external energetic disruption to your personal biofield from either being near cell towers, WiFi equipment, computers and other tech within your space. You will also have an incredible solution for releasing non-supportive internal beliefs as well as support for fully restoring harmony within your personal biofield. Have you had a great experience with The Ultimate Harmonized Life Solution? Let us know in the comments below! Learn more about ‘The Ultimate Harmonized Life Solution' here: https://markromeromusic.com/harmonized. ––––––––––––––––– Want to test the music for yourself? Get instant access to complimentary high-vibration healing music that'll instantly shift you into a greater sense of peace, clarity and radiant bliss! https://markromeromusic.com/gift ––––––––––––––––– Are you looking to be a part of a supportive community? Humanity is going through a huge awakening process, so imagine connecting with like-minded souls and feeling a sense of belonging. Imagine having access to powerful healing processes to help you thrive–emotionally, physically and spiritually. And imagine feeling empowered with your decisions, having the courage to pursue your dreams and feeling a sense of inner peace and serenity. All this is possible when you become a member of Living In Harmonic Alignment! https://www.harmonicalignment.community #soundhealingmusic #harmonicalignment #healingfrequencies

    Mac Geek Gab (Enhanced AAC)
    You Can Dangle Your Dongle

    Mac Geek Gab (Enhanced AAC)

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 83:00


    Did you know that macOS will tell you which Wi-Fi channel you should use on your router? How about that you can type in specific start and end times for iPhone calendar appointments? How about seeing the wireless charging draw of your iPhone? You will after you listen to just […]

    BarCode
    The Futurist with Pablos Holman

    BarCode

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 70:02


    Pablos Holman is a notorious hacker, inventor, entrepreneur and technology futurist who thinks differently to solve the world's biggest problems by inventing new technology. At The Intellectual Ventures Lab, he has worked on a brain surgery tool, a machine to suppress hurricanes, 3D food printers, and a laser that can shoot down mosquitos – part of an impact invention effort to eradicate malaria with Bill Gates. Previously, Pablos helped build spaceships with Jeff Bezos at Blue Origin, the world's smallest PC, 3D printers at Makerbot, artificial intelligence agent systems, and the Hackerbot (a robot that can steal passwords on a Wi-Fi network). Pablos' TED talks have been watched over 30+ million times (his first TEDx talk, from 2012, has over 20 million views).We discuss his origin story, the Cypherpunk era, Bitcoin volatility, the future of crypto and blockchain, human created protocols, 3D Printing, hackers in product development, hacking time, technology for World Peace, and more. Danny Boy revolutionizes the “Flux Incapacitator”.Support the show

    The Tech Guy (MP3)
    Leo Laporte - The Tech Guy: 1906

    The Tech Guy (MP3)

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 26, 2022 150:20


    What equipment should I start with to do live video streams? Is it a problem if someone is using my YouTube TV service (knowingly) in a different location constantly? Issues with Adobe Premiere after a Windows 10 update and what could be causing that problem. How to verify an email account with an old phone number? WiFi or ethernet connection for streaming video content? Is there any potential problem accepting random friend requests on Facebook? Plus, conversations with Sam Abuelsamid, Chris Marquardt, Rod Pyle, and Dick DeBartolo on a rare Sunday appearance. Netflix to add a lower-cost ad-supported tier. Amazon is developing a feature to synthesize a person's voice through short audio clips to put in deceased relatives into your Amazon Echo? Average U.S internet household uses a record average of 6 over-the-top streaming services. What equipment should I get to start doing video livestreams? Sam Abuelsamid and the Ford Driving Dynamic Lab. YouTube TV & managing locations. A Windows 10 update is causing issues with Adobe Premiere. Is it worth updating to Windows 11 from Windows 10 currently? What can a caller do to verify a Yahoo email account through a phone number they no longer use? Chris Marquardt and used film cameras. Should you have an ethernet connection for streaming video content, or is WiFi sufficient enough? Suggested email services for easy use. Is there a hazard to accepting a plethora of random Facebook friend requests? Rod Pyle and the Jovian Vortex Hunter program & the 5-planet planetary alignment! Dick DeBartolo and the Kodak Reelz Digitizer Converter. Host: Leo Laporte Guests: Sam Abuelsamid, Chris Marquardt, Rod Pyle, and Dick DeBartolo Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Show notes and links for this episode are available at: https://twit.tv/shows/the-tech-guy/episodes/1906 Download or subscribe to this show at: https://twit.tv/shows/the-tech-guy Sponsors: wealthfront.com/techguy cachefly.com

    The Tech Guy (Video HI)
    Leo Laporte - The Tech Guy: 1906

    The Tech Guy (Video HI)

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 26, 2022 151:03


    What equipment should I start with to do live video streams? Is it a problem if someone is using my YouTube TV service (knowingly) in a different location constantly? Issues with Adobe Premiere after a Windows 10 update and what could be causing that problem. How to verify an email account with an old phone number? WiFi or ethernet connection for streaming video content? Is there any potential problem accepting random friend requests on Facebook? Plus, conversations with Sam Abuelsamid, Chris Marquardt, Rod Pyle, and Dick DeBartolo on a rare Sunday appearance. Netflix to add a lower-cost ad-supported tier. Amazon is developing a feature to synthesize a person's voice through short audio clips to put in deceased relatives into your Amazon Echo? Average U.S internet household uses a record average of 6 over-the-top streaming services. What equipment should I get to start doing video livestreams? Sam Abuelsamid and the Ford Driving Dynamic Lab. YouTube TV & managing locations. A Windows 10 update is causing issues with Adobe Premiere. Is it worth updating to Windows 11 from Windows 10 currently? What can a caller do to verify a Yahoo email account through a phone number they no longer use? Chris Marquardt and used film cameras. Should you have an ethernet connection for streaming video content, or is WiFi sufficient enough? Suggested email services for easy use. Is there a hazard to accepting a plethora of random Facebook friend requests? Rod Pyle and the Jovian Vortex Hunter program & the 5-planet planetary alignment! Dick DeBartolo and the Kodak Reelz Digitizer Converter. Host: Leo Laporte Guests: Sam Abuelsamid, Chris Marquardt, Rod Pyle, and Dick DeBartolo Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Show notes and links for this episode are available at: https://twit.tv/shows/the-tech-guy/episodes/1906 Download or subscribe to this show at: https://twit.tv/shows/the-tech-guy Sponsors: wealthfront.com/techguy cachefly.com

    All TWiT.tv Shows (MP3)
    The Tech Guy 1906

    All TWiT.tv Shows (MP3)

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 26, 2022 150:20


    What equipment should I start with to do live video streams? Is it a problem if someone is using my YouTube TV service (knowingly) in a different location constantly? Issues with Adobe Premiere after a Windows 10 update and what could be causing that problem. How to verify an email account with an old phone number? WiFi or ethernet connection for streaming video content? Is there any potential problem accepting random friend requests on Facebook? Plus, conversations with Sam Abuelsamid, Chris Marquardt, Rod Pyle, and Dick DeBartolo on a rare Sunday appearance. Netflix to add a lower-cost ad-supported tier. Amazon is developing a feature to synthesize a person's voice through short audio clips to put in deceased relatives into your Amazon Echo? Average U.S internet household uses a record average of 6 over-the-top streaming services. What equipment should I get to start doing video livestreams? Sam Abuelsamid and the Ford Driving Dynamic Lab. YouTube TV & managing locations. A Windows 10 update is causing issues with Adobe Premiere. Is it worth updating to Windows 11 from Windows 10 currently? What can a caller do to verify a Yahoo email account through a phone number they no longer use? Chris Marquardt and used film cameras. Should you have an ethernet connection for streaming video content, or is WiFi sufficient enough? Suggested email services for easy use. Is there a hazard to accepting a plethora of random Facebook friend requests? Rod Pyle and the Jovian Vortex Hunter program & the 5-planet planetary alignment! Dick DeBartolo and the Kodak Reelz Digitizer Converter. Host: Leo Laporte Guests: Sam Abuelsamid, Chris Marquardt, Rod Pyle, and Dick DeBartolo Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Show notes and links for this episode are available at: https://twit.tv/shows/the-tech-guy/episodes/1906 Download or subscribe to this show at: https://twit.tv/shows/all-twittv-shows Sponsors: wealthfront.com/techguy cachefly.com

    All TWiT.tv Shows (Video LO)
    The Tech Guy 1906

    All TWiT.tv Shows (Video LO)

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 26, 2022 151:03


    What equipment should I start with to do live video streams? Is it a problem if someone is using my YouTube TV service (knowingly) in a different location constantly? Issues with Adobe Premiere after a Windows 10 update and what could be causing that problem. How to verify an email account with an old phone number? WiFi or ethernet connection for streaming video content? Is there any potential problem accepting random friend requests on Facebook? Plus, conversations with Sam Abuelsamid, Chris Marquardt, Rod Pyle, and Dick DeBartolo on a rare Sunday appearance. Netflix to add a lower-cost ad-supported tier. Amazon is developing a feature to synthesize a person's voice through short audio clips to put in deceased relatives into your Amazon Echo? Average U.S internet household uses a record average of 6 over-the-top streaming services. What equipment should I get to start doing video livestreams? Sam Abuelsamid and the Ford Driving Dynamic Lab. YouTube TV & managing locations. A Windows 10 update is causing issues with Adobe Premiere. Is it worth updating to Windows 11 from Windows 10 currently? What can a caller do to verify a Yahoo email account through a phone number they no longer use? Chris Marquardt and used film cameras. Should you have an ethernet connection for streaming video content, or is WiFi sufficient enough? Suggested email services for easy use. Is there a hazard to accepting a plethora of random Facebook friend requests? Rod Pyle and the Jovian Vortex Hunter program & the 5-planet planetary alignment! Dick DeBartolo and the Kodak Reelz Digitizer Converter. Host: Leo Laporte Guests: Sam Abuelsamid, Chris Marquardt, Rod Pyle, and Dick DeBartolo Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Show notes and links for this episode are available at: https://twit.tv/shows/the-tech-guy/episodes/1906 Download or subscribe to this show at: https://twit.tv/shows/all-twittv-shows Sponsors: wealthfront.com/techguy cachefly.com

    Radio Leo (Audio)
    The Tech Guy 1906

    Radio Leo (Audio)

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 26, 2022 150:20


    What equipment should I start with to do live video streams? Is it a problem if someone is using my YouTube TV service (knowingly) in a different location constantly? Issues with Adobe Premiere after a Windows 10 update and what could be causing that problem. How to verify an email account with an old phone number? WiFi or ethernet connection for streaming video content? Is there any potential problem accepting random friend requests on Facebook? Plus, conversations with Sam Abuelsamid, Chris Marquardt, Rod Pyle, and Dick DeBartolo on a rare Sunday appearance. Netflix to add a lower-cost ad-supported tier. Amazon is developing a feature to synthesize a person's voice through short audio clips to put in deceased relatives into your Amazon Echo? Average U.S internet household uses a record average of 6 over-the-top streaming services. What equipment should I get to start doing video livestreams? Sam Abuelsamid and the Ford Driving Dynamic Lab. YouTube TV & managing locations. A Windows 10 update is causing issues with Adobe Premiere. Is it worth updating to Windows 11 from Windows 10 currently? What can a caller do to verify a Yahoo email account through a phone number they no longer use? Chris Marquardt and used film cameras. Should you have an ethernet connection for streaming video content, or is WiFi sufficient enough? Suggested email services for easy use. Is there a hazard to accepting a plethora of random Facebook friend requests? Rod Pyle and the Jovian Vortex Hunter program & the 5-planet planetary alignment! Dick DeBartolo and the Kodak Reelz Digitizer Converter. Host: Leo Laporte Guests: Sam Abuelsamid, Chris Marquardt, Rod Pyle, and Dick DeBartolo Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Show notes and links for this episode are available at: https://twit.tv/shows/the-tech-guy/episodes/1906 Download or subscribe to this show at: https://twit.tv/shows/radio-leo Sponsors: wealthfront.com/techguy cachefly.com