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Best podcasts about isp

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Latest podcast episodes about isp

Behind Gray Walls
EP 58 - Mildred And Frank Wilcox

Behind Gray Walls

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 50:07


In this season's couple's episode, Skye and Anthony piece together the complicated stories of the Wheelers/Wilcoxes who were allegedly running a “Certified Check Racket,” and whose post-ISP exploits are far more interesting than their time inside #3234 Mildred Wilcox (Forgery) and #3235 Frank L. Wilcox (Possession of Forged Checks).

Café Con Nata
Salir del Clóset, junto a Raffa di Girólamo y Charlie Sáez

Café Con Nata

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 79:52


Es oficial, comunidad, el ISP autorizará vacunación anticovid en menores de entre 3 y 6 años de edad. Hoy en noticias nacionales, Izkia Siches renunció a la presidencia del Colegio Médico para “contribuir al proyecto liderado por Gabriel Boric”. Revisamos parte de su emocionado discurso esta mañana. Además, le dimos la bienvenida de vuelta a nuestra querida Raffa di Girólamo. Hoy hablamos sobre salir del clóset y sumamos al panel a nuestro compañero Charlie Sáez.

True Crime Garage
Flora Fire ////// 538

True Crime Garage

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 75:06


Flora Fire ////// 538 Part 1 of 1 www.TrueCrimeGarage.com         The headlines were horrific. One read - “4 sisters perish in Flora fire.” On Monday, November 21, 2016 the tiny town of Flora, Indiana woke up to a terrible tragedy. At 3:30 AM a family of five woke up in a nightmare. Unfortunately only one member of the family made it out of the house that morning. Later it was determined that the fire was intentionally set and the reason that four beautiful little girls lost their lives was arson. Now it's been five years and here in the Garage we are getting very frustrated with the handling of this case. The investigation involves multiple agencies, overseen by the Indiana State Police. An agency that we have always had a lot of faith in. But we have been told by the ISP that this investigation is a “full court press” to find justice for this family and the community. After five years that is simply hard to believe.  Beer of the Week - Light Speed by BrewDog Garage Grade - 3.5 out of 5.0  Our show - True Crime Garage “Off the Record” is available only on Stitcher Premium. For a FREE month of listening go to http://stitcherpremium.com/truecrimegarage and use promo code GARAGE Beer Fund: https://truecrimegarage.com/home See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Wrestle Talk Podcast
World of Wrestling feat. Israel Sharif Phakur and Travis Cook

Wrestle Talk Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 147:00


We joined by the executor of the Travis Cook Organization, Travis Cook. With extensive business knowledge and over two decades of professional wrestling knowledge and experience, Travis Cook has been deemed by many members of the media as “The Last Great Professional Wrestling Manager”. Travis Cook has led many professional wrestlers to championships across the country. On Wednesday, December 1 st , Travis Cook will lead his client, the SICW Classic Wrestling champion “The International Bounty Hunter” Attila Khan, into battle. This battle, however, will be for one of the most coveted prizes in the history of professional wrestling, the National Wrestling Alliance world heavyweight championship. In East Carondelet, Illinois this past Saturday, Travis Cook and Attila Khan demanded that a message be sent to the NWA world heavyweight champion Trevor Murdoch. The message was an all-out assault of “The Human Wrecking Ball” Pete Madden. What will Travis Cook have to say just fifteen days before the biggest night in the history of the Travis Cook Organization? We joined by Israel Sharif Phakur. Trained in Johnstown, Pennsylvania by “Big Time” Bill Collier and G-Raver and mentored by WWF Hall of Famer Nikolai Volkoff, Israel Sharif Phakur made his professional wrestling debut in 2008. Wrestling in such professional wrestling promotions as All or Nothing Professional Wrestling, World Domination Wrestling Alliance, and Elite Pro Wrestling Alliance, Israel Sharif Phakur has won countless championships. Over the course of his nearly thirteen years in professional wrestling, Israel Sharif Phakur has competed against such wrestlers as Shane Malice, Damien Wayne, Manchild, “Madd” Maxx Morrison, Shane Shadows, Nikolai Volkoff, and The Patriot.

Human Capital Innovations (HCI) Podcast
S27E25 - The Ticket to Impactful Cultural Change, with Mark S. Lewis

Human Capital Innovations (HCI) Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 26:09


In this HCI Podcast episode, Dr. Jonathan H. Westover (https://www.linkedin.com/in/jonathanhwestover/) talks with Mark S. Lewis about the ticket to impactful cultural change. See the video here: https://youtu.be/VwIvUG91XJk. Mark S. Lewis (https://www.linkedin.com/in/mark-s-lewis-053477/) received his BS degree in Finance from Boston College and an MBA in Marketing from Tulane. He worked for IBM for 13 years before forming Communiqué in 1994. As President, Communiqué quickly became the South's fastest growing ISP, building a client base of over 10,000 users. After Communiqué was purchased in 1997, Mark merged multiple businesses to form a new Internet Company called Orange Twine, which was chosen by the Chamber as the Rising Tide Small Business of the Year in Technology. In late 2002, Mark became President of the Louisiana Technology Council (LTC) to assist the state in technology development. In 2005 Mark was selected by the Governor's office as Technology Leader of the Year for Louisiana. He helped Louisiana rise from 49th to 32nd out of 50 states in technology employment. Mark continues to appear live (12+ years) on WWLTV's monthly program called “Digital Gumbo,” that helps promote local technology initiatives/companies in the region. In late 2012, Mark became a principal partner and then 100% owner of the consulting firm Communiqué. Mark coaches and consults entrepreneurs and small businesses for success. For the past 7 years, he moderates three CEO Round tables to help with their growth. For the past 8 years, Mark has been the Coordinator for Louisiana's largest Annual IT Symposium, specifically for CIOs, CTOs, (etc.) and their direct reports. In late 2018, Mark self-published the book, “GIVE A DAMN!–The Ticket to Cultural Change” (www.giveadamnbook.com). As a best selling author, GIVE A DAMN discusses the challenges facing society and business, what needs to be done, and how a GIVE A DAMN attitude can culturally make a difference both professionally and personally. Give a Damn has made a big difference in company cultures. Currently Mark is the CEO and Co-founder of the startup entity Evolve Media AI Corporation, a video software development company that allows users to create a single video from multiple videos of an event autonomously. Check out Dr. Westover's new book, 'Bluer than Indigo' Leadership, here: https://www.innovativehumancapital.com/bluerthanindigo. Check out Dr. Westover's book, The Alchemy of Truly Remarkable Leadership, here: https://www.innovativehumancapital.com/leadershipalchemy. Check out the latest issue of the Human Capital Leadership magazine, here: https://www.innovativehumancapital.com/hci-magazine. Ranked #6 Performance Management Podcast: https://blog.feedspot.com/performance_management_podcasts/  Ranked #6 Workplace Podcast: https://blog.feedspot.com/workplace_podcasts/  Ranked #7 HR Podcast: https://blog.feedspot.com/hr_podcasts/  Ranked #12 Talent Management Podcast: https://blog.feedspot.com/talent_management_podcasts/  Ranked in the Top 20 Personal Development and Self-Improvement Podcasts: https://blog.feedspot.com/personal_development_podcasts/  Ranked in the Top 30 Leadership Podcasts: https://blog.feedspot.com/leadership_podcasts/ --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/hcipodcast/support

Screaming in the Cloud
Managing to Balance the Unicycle with Amy Chantasirivisal

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 52:09


About AmyAmy (she/her) has spent the better part of the last 15 years in the tech start-up world, starting off as a front-end software engineer before transitioning into leadership. She has built and led teams across the software and product development spectrum, including web and mobile development, QA, operations and infrastructure, customer support, and IT.These days, Amy is building the software engineering team at EdTech startup, Unicycle, and challenging the archetype of what a tech leader should be. She strives to be a real-life success story for other leaders who believe that safe, welcoming, and equitable environments can exist in tech. Links: Unicycle: https://www.unicycle.co AmyChanta: https://twitter.com/AmyChanta TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: This episode is sponsored by our friends at Oracle Cloud. Counting the pennies, but still dreaming of deploying apps instead of "Hello, World" demos? Allow me to introduce you to Oracle's Always Free tier. It provides over 20 free services and infrastructure, networking databases, observability, management, and security.And - let me be clear here - it's actually free. There's no surprise billing until you intentionally and proactively upgrade your account. This means you can provision a virtual machine instance or spin up an autonomous database that manages itself all while gaining the networking load, balancing and storage resources that somehow never quite make it into most free tiers needed to support the application that you want to build. With Always Free you can do things like run small scale applications, or do proof of concept testing without spending a dime. You know that I always like to put asterisks next to the word free. This is actually free. No asterisk. Start now. Visit https://snark.cloud/oci-free that's https://snark.cloud/oci-free.Corey: Writing ad copy to fit into a 30 second slot is hard, but if anyone can do it the folks at Quali can. Just like their Torque infrastructure automation platform can deliver complex application environments anytime, anywhere, in just seconds instead of hours, days or weeks. Visit Qtorque.io today and learn how you can spin up application environments in about the same amount of time it took you to listen to this ad.Corey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud. I'm Corey Quinn. A famous quote was once uttered by Irena Dunn who said, “A woman without a man is like a fish without a bicycle.” Now, apparently at some point, people just, you know, looked at the fish without a bicycle thing, thought, “That was overwrought. We can do a startup and MVP it. Why do two wheels? We're going to go with one.”And I assume that's the origin story of Unicycle. My guest today is Amy Chantasirivisal who is the Director of Engineering at Unicycle. Amy, thank you for putting up with that incredibly tortured opening. But that's okay; we torture metaphors to death here.Amy: [laugh]. Thank you for having me. That was a great intro.Corey: So, you are, at the time of this recording at least, a relatively new hire to Unicycle, which to my understanding is a relatively new company. What do you folks do over there?Amy: Yes, so Unicycle is not even a year old, so a company born out of the pandemic. But we are building a product to reimagine what the digital classroom looks like. The product itself was thought up right during a time during the pandemic when it became very clear how much students and teachers are struggling with converting their experience into online platforms. And so we are trying to just bring better workflows, more efficiency into that. And right now we're starting with email, but we'll be expanding to other things in the future.Corey: I am absolutely the wrong person to ask about a lot of this stuff, just because my academic background, tortured doesn't really begin to cover it. I handle academia about as well as I handled working for other people. My academic and professional careers before I started this place were basically a patchwork of nonsense and trying to pretend I was something other than I was. You, on the other hand, have very much been someone who's legitimate as far as what you do and how you do it. Before Unicycle, you were the Director of Engineering at Wildbit, which is a name I keep hearing about and a bunch of odd places. What did you do there?Amy: [laugh]. I will have to follow up and ask what the odd places are but—so I was leading a team there of engineers that were fully distributed across the US and also in Europe. And we were building an email product called Postmark, which some of your listeners might use, and then also a couple of other smaller things like People-First Jobs and Beanstalk—not AWS's Beanstalk, but a developer repository and workflow tool.Corey: Forget my listeners for a minute; I use Postmark. That's where I keep seeing you on the invoices because it's different branding. As someone who has The Duckbill Group, but also the Last Week in AWS things, it's the brand confusion problem is very real. That does it. Sorry. Thank you for collapsing the waveform on that one. And of course, before that you were at PagerDuty, which is a company that most folks in the ops space are aware of, founded to combat the engineer's true enemy: sleep.Amy: Absolutely. It's the product that engineers love to hate, but also can't live without, to some degree. Or maybe they want to live without it, but uh… [laugh] are not able to.Corey: So, I have a standing policy on this show of not talking to folks who are not wildly over-represented—as I am—and effectively disregarding the awesome stuff that they've done professionally in favor of instead talking about, “Wow, what's it like not to be a white guy in the room? I can't even imagine such a thing. It sounds hard.” However, in your case, an awful lot of the work you have done and are most proud of centers around DEI, diversity, equity, and inclusion. Tell me about that.Amy: Absolutely. I would say that it's the work that I've spent my time focusing on in recent years, but also that I'm still learning, right, and as someone who is Asian American, and also from a middle-class socioeconomic background, I have a bunch of privileges that I still have to unpack and that show up in the way that I work every day, as well. And so just acknowledging that, you know, while I spend a lot of time on DEI, still have just barely scratched the surface on it, really, in the grand scheme of things. But what I will say is that, you know, I've been really fortunate in my career in that I started in tech 15 or so years ago, and I started at a time when it wasn't super hard for someone who has no CS degree to actually get into some sort of coding job. And so I fell into my first role; I was building HTML and CSS landing pages for a marketing team, for an ISP that was based in San Francisco.So, I was cobbling together a bunch of technical skills, and I got better and better. And then I reached this point in my career where I didn't really have a lot of mentors, and so I was like, “I don't know what's next for me.” But then I am also frustrated that it is so hard for our team to get things done. And so I took it upon myself to figure out Scrum and project management type of stuff for my team, and then made the jump into people management from there. So, people management and leadership through project management.But when I look back on my career, I think about, “Oh, if I had a mentor, would that still have been my fate? Would I have continued down this track of becoming a very senior technical person and just doing that for my whole career?” Because letting go of the code was definitely a hard, hard thing. And I was lucky enough that I really did enjoy the people and the process side of all of this. And so [laugh] this relates to DEI in the fact that there's research and everything that backs this up, but that women and women of color generally tend to get less mentorship overall and get less actionable feedback about their job performance.And you think about how that potentially compounds over time, over the course of someone's career and that may be one of the reasons why women and people of color get pushed out of tech because they're not getting the support that they need, potentially. They're not getting feedback, they're not being advocated for in meetings, and then there's also all the stuff that you can add on around microaggressions, or just aggressions period, potentially, depending on the culture of the team that you're working on. And so all of those things compounded are the types of things that I think about now when I reflect on my own career and the types of teams that I want to be building in the future.Corey: Back when I was stumbling my way through piecing my career together. I mean, as mentioned, I don't have a degree; I don't have a high school diploma, as it turns out, and—that was a surprise when I discovered midway through my 20s that the school I had graduated from wasn't accredited—but I would tell stories, and I found ways to weasel my way through and I gave a talk right around 2015 or 2016, about, “Weasel Your Way to the Top: How to Handle a Job Interview,” and looking back, I would never give that talk again. I canceled it as soon as someone pointed out something that was only obvious in hindsight, that the talk was built out of things that had worked for me. And it's easy to sit here and say that, well, I had to work for what I have; none of this was handed to me. And there's an element of truth to that, except for the part where there was nothing fighting against me as I went.There was not this headwind of a presumed need for me to have to prove myself; I am presumed competent. I sometimes say that as a white guy in tech, my failure mode is a board seat and a book deal, and it's not that far from wrong. It takes, I guess, a lot of listening and a lot of interaction with folks from wildly different backgrounds before you start to see some of these things. It takes time. So, if you're listening to this, and you aren't necessarily convinced that this might be real or whatnot, talk less, listen more. There are a lot of stories out there in the world that I think that it's not my place to tell but listen. That's how I approach it.What's interesting about your pathway into management is it's almost the exact opposite of mine, where I was craving novelty, and okay, I wanted to try and managing a team of people. Years later, in hindsight—I'm not a good manager and I know that about myself, and I explicitly go out of my way these days to avoid managing people wherever possible, for a variety of reasons, but at the time, I didn't know. I didn't know that. I wanted to see how it went.First, I had to disabuse myself of this notion that, oh, management is a promotion. It's not. It's an orthogonal skill.Amy: Yes.Corey: The thing I really learning—management or not—now, is that the higher in the hierarchy you rise, if you want to view it that way, the less hands-on work you do, which means everything that you are responsible for that—and oh, you are responsible—isn't something you can jump in and do yourself. You can only impact the outcome via influence. And that was a hard lesson to learn.Amy: Right. And there are some schools of thought, though, where you can affect the outcome by control. And that's not what I'm about. I think I'm more aligned with what you're saying in terms of, it's really the influence and the ability to clear the way for people who are smarter than you to do the things that they need to do. Just get out of their way, and remove the roadblocks, and just help give them what they need. That's really, sort of like, my overall approach. But I know that there are some folks out there who lead the opposite way of, “It's my way, and I'm going to dictate how things should be done, and really you're here to take and follow orders.”Corey: It's always fun interviewing people to manage teams. “So, why do you want to be a manager?” It's, “Oh, I want to tell people what to do.” And I have to say that as an interviewer, there is nothing that takes the pressure off nearly as well as a perfectly wrong answer. And, yes, that at least to my world, is a perfectly wrong answer to this. There aren't that many pass-fail questions, but you can fail any question if you try hard enough.Amy: [laugh]. Oh, gosh, yeah, it's true. But also, at the same time, I would say that there are organizations that are built that way. Because—all it takes is the one person who wants to tell people what to do, and then they start a company, and then they hire other people who want to tell people what to do. And so there are ways where organizations like that exist and come into being even today, I would say.Corey: The question that I have for you about engineering leadership is, back when I was an engineer, and thinking, all right, it's time for me to go ahead and try being a manager—let's be clear, I joke about it, but the actual reason I wanted to try my hand at management was that I found people problems more interesting than computer problems at that point. I still do, but these days, especially when it comes to, you know, cloud services marketing and such, yeah, generally, the technical problems are, in fact, people problems at their core. But talking to my manager friends of how do I go and transition from being an engineer into being a manager, the universal response I got at the time was, “Ehh, I don't know.” Every person I knew who'd had made that transition was in the right place at the right time, and quote-unquote, “Got lucky.”Amy: Absolutely.Corey: And then once they had management on their resume, then they could go and transition back to being an IC and then to management again. But it's that initial breakthrough that becomes a challenge.Amy: Absolutely. And I fell into it as well. I mean, I got into it, partially for selfish reasons because I was, an IC, I was doing development work, and I was frustrated, and I had teammates who were coming to me and they were frustrated about how hard it was for us to get our work done, or the friction involved in shipping code. And so I took it upon myself to say, “I think I see a pattern about why this is happening, and so I will try to solve this problem for the team.” And so that's where the Agile and Scrum thing come in, and the project management side.And then, when I was at this company—this was One Kings Lane; this was, like, the heyday of flash sales websites and stuff like that, so it was kind of a rocket ship at that time—and because we were also growing so fast and I was interviewing folks as well, I just fell into this management role of, “Well, if I'm interviewing these people, then I guess I should be [laugh] managing them, too.” And that happens for so many people, similar stories of getting into management. And I think that's where it starts to go wrong for a lot of organizations because, like you said, it's not an up-leveling; it's a changing of your role, and it requires training and learning and figuring out how to be effective as a manager. And a lot of people just stumble their way through it and make a lot of mistakes—myself included—through that process.And that becomes really troubling knowing that you can make these really big mistakes, but these mistakes that you make don't affect just yourself. It's the careers of the people that you manage as well and sort of where they're headed in their lives. And so it's troubling to think that most leaders that are out there today have not received any sort of training on how to be a good manager and how to be effective as a manager.Corey: I would agree with that wholeheartedly. It seems that in many cases, companies take the best engineer that they have on their team and promote them to manager. It's brilliant in some respects in just how short-sighted it is. You are taking a great engineer and trading them for a junior and unproven manager, and hoping for the best. And there is no training on any of these things, at least—Amy: Right.Corey: —not the companies that I ever worked at. Of course, there are ways you can learn to be a better manager; there are people who specialize in exactly this. There are companies that do exactly this. But tech has this weird thing where it just tries to solve itself from first principles rather than believing for a minute that someone might possibly have prior experience that could be useful for these things. And—Amy: Absolutely.Corey: —that was a challenge. I had a lot of terrible managers before I entered management myself, and I figured, ah, I'll do the naive thing and I'm just going to manage based upon doing the exact opposite of what those terrible managers all did. And I got surprisingly far with it, on some level. But you don't see the whole picture when you're an individual contributor who's writing code—crappy in my case—most of the time, and then only seeing the aspects of your manager that they allow you to see. They don't share—if they're any good—the constraints that they have to deal with, that they're managing expectations around the team, conflicting priorities, strategic objectives, et cetera because it's not something that gets shown to folks. So—Amy: Absolutely.Corey: —if you bias for that, in my experience you become an empathetic manager to the people on your team, but completely ineffective at managing laterally or upwards.Amy: Mm-hm, absolutely. And you know, I'm exploring this idea of further. Being at a very small company, I think allows me to do that. And exploring this idea of, does it have to be that way? Can you be transparent about what the constraints are as a leader while still caring for your team and supporting them in the ways that they need and helping them grow their careers and just being open about one of the challenges that you have in building the company?And I don't know, I feel like I have some things to prove there, but I think it's possible to achieve some sort of balance there, something better or more beyond just what exists now of having that entire leadership layer typically be very opaque and just very unclear why certain decisions are made.Corey: The hard part that extends that these to me beyond that is it's difficult to get meaningful feedback, on some level, when you're suddenly thrust into that position. I also, in hindsight, realize that an awful lot of those terrible managers that I had weren't nearly as terrible as I thought they were. I will say that being on the other side of that divide definitely breeds empathy. Now that I'm the co-owner of The Duckbill Group, and we're building out a leadership team and the rest, hiring managers of managers is starting to be the sort of thing that I have to think about.It's effectively, how do I avoid inadvertently doing end-runs around people? And oh, I'm just going to completely undermine a manager by reaching out to one of their team and retasking them on something because obviously whatever I have in mind is much more important. What could they possibly be working on that's better than the Twitter shitpost I'm borrowing them to help out with? Yeah, you learn a lot by getting it wrong, and there becomes a power imbalance that even if you try your best to ignore it—which you should not—I assure you, the person who has less power in that relationship cannot set that aside. Even when I have worked with people I consider close friends, that friendship gained some distance during the duration of their employment because there has to be that professional level of separation. It's a hard thing to learn.Amy: It's a very hard line to walk in terms of recognizing the power that you have over someone's career and the power over, you know, making decisions for them and for the team and for the company, and still being empathetic towards their personal needs. And if they're going through a tough time, but then you also know from a business perspective that X, Y, or Z needs to happen, and how do you push but not push too hard, and try to balance needs of people who are humans and have things that happen and go on sometimes, and the fact that we work in a capitalist society and we still need to make money to make the business run. And that's definitely one of the hardest things to learn, and I am still learning. I definitely don't have that figured out, but I err on the side of, let's listen to what people are saying because ultimately, I'm not going to be the one to write the code. I haven't done that in years, and also I would probably suck at it now. And so it behooves leaders to listen to the people who were doing the work and to try, to the best of their abilities in whatever role whether that's exec-level leadership or mid-level… sort of like, middle management type of stuff to do what is in your power to help set them up to succeed.Corey: I want to get back a little bit to the idea of building diverse teams. It's something that you spend an inordinate amount of time and effort on. I do too. It's one of those areas where it's almost fraught to talk about it because I don't want to sound like I'm breaking my arm by patting myself on the back here. I certainly have a hell of a lot to learn, and mostly—and I'm ashamed to admit this—I very often learn only by really putting my foot in it sometimes. And it's painful, but that is, I think, a necessary prerequisite for growth. From your perspective, what is the most challenging part of building diverse teams?Amy: I think it's that piece that you said of making the mistakes or just putting yourself in a position where you are going to be uncomfortable. And I think that a lot of organizations that I've been in talk about DEI on a very surface level in terms of, “Oh, well, you know, we want to have more candidates from diverse backgrounds in our pipelines for hiring,” and things like that. But then not really just thinking about, but how do we work as a team in a way that potentially makes retention of those folks a lot harder? And for myself, I would say that when I was earlier on in all of this in my learning, I would say that I was able to kickstart my learning by thinking about my own identity, the fact that I was often the only Asian person on my team, the only woman on my team, and then more recently, the only mom on my team. And that has happened to me so many times in my career. More often than not.And so being able to draw on those experiences and those feelings of oh, okay, no one wants to hear about my kid because everyone else is, you know, busy going out to drink or something on the weekends. And like that feeling of, you know, that not belonging, and feeling of feeling excluded from things, and then thinking about how then this might manifest for folks with different identities for myself. And then going there and learning about it, listening, doing more listening than talking, and yeah, and that's, that's really just been the hardest part of just removing myself from that equation and just listening to the experiences of other people. And it's uncomfortable. And I think a lot of people are—you have to be in the right mindset, I guess, to be uncomfortable; you have to be willing to accept that you will be uncomfortable. And I think a lot of folks maybe are not ready to do that on a personal level.Corey: The thing that galls me the most is I do try on these things, and I get it wrong a fair bit. And my mistakes I find personally embarrassing, and I strive not to repeat them. But then I look around the industry—and let's be clear, a lot of this is filtered through the unhealthy amount of time I spend on Twitter—but it seems that I'm trying and I'm failing and attempting to do better as I go, and then I see people who are just, “Nope. Not at all. In fact, we're not just going to lean into bias, we're going to build a startup around it.”And I look at this and it's at some level hard to reconcile the fact that… at first, that I'm doing badly at all, which is the easy cop-out of, “Oh, well, if that is considered acceptable on some level, then I certainly don't even have to try,” which I think is a fallacy. But further it's—I have to step beyond myself on that and just, I cannot fathom how discouraging that must be, particularly to people who are early in their careers because it looks like it's just a normal thing that everyone thinks and does that just someone got a little too loud with it. And it's abhorrent. And if people are listening to this and thinking that is somehow just entrenched, and normalized, and everyone secretly thinks that… no. I assure you it is not something that is acceptable, even in the quote-unquote, “Private white dude who started companies” gathering holes. Yeah, people articulating sentiments like that suddenly find themselves not welcome there anymore, at least in every one of those types of environments I've ever found myself in.Amy: Yeah, the landscape is shifting. It's slow, but it is shifting. And, myself on Twitter, like, I do a lot of rant-y stuff too sometimes, but despite all of that, I feel like I am ultimately an optimist because I have to be. Otherwise, I would have left tech already because every time I am faced with a job search for myself, I'm like, “Should I—is this it? Am I done in tech? Do I want to go do something else? Am I going to finally go open that bakery that I've always wanted to open?” [laugh].And so… I have to be an optimist. And I see that—even in the most recent job search I've done—have seen so many new founders and new CEOs, really, with this mindset of, “We want to build a diverse team, but we're also doing it—and we're using diversity as a foundation for what we want to build; it's part of our decision-making process and this is how we're going to hold ourselves accountable to it.” And so it is shifting, and while there are those bad actors out there still, I'm seeing a lot of good in the industry now. And so that's why I stick around; that's why I'm still here.Corey: I want to actually call something out as concrete here because it's easy for me to fall into the trope of just saying vague things. I'll be specific about something, give us a good example. We've done a decent job, I think, of hiring a diverse team, but—and this is a problem that I see spread across an awful lot of companies—as you look at the leadership team, it gets a lot wider and a lot more male. And that is an inherent challenge. In our particular case, my business partner is someone who I've been close friends with for a decade.I would not be able to start a business with someone I didn't have that kind of relationship with just because your values have to be aligned or there's trouble down the road. And beyond that, it winds up rapidly, on some level, turning into what appears to be a selection bias. When you're trying to hire senior leaders, for example, there's a prerequisite to being a senior leader, which is embodied in the word senior, which implies tenure of having spent a fair bit of time in an industry that is remarkably unfriendly in a lot of different ways to a lot of different people. So, there's a prerequisite of being willing to tolerate the shit for as long as it takes to get to that level of seniority, rather than realizing at any point as any of us can, there are easier jobs that don't have this toxicity inherent to them and I'll go do that instead. So, there's a tenure question; there's a survivorship bias question.And I don't have the answers to any of this, but it's something that I'm seeing, and it's one of those once you see it, you can't unsee it any more moments. At least for me.Amy: Yeah, absolutely.Corey: Please tell me I'm not the only person who see [laugh]—who is encountering these problems. Like, “Wow, you just sound terrible.” Which might very well be a fair rejoinder here. I'm just trying to wrap my head around how to think about this properly.Amy: Yeah. I mean, this is why I was saying that I am very optimistic about [laugh] new companies that are coming—like, up-and-coming these days, new startups, primarily, because you're right that a lot of people just end up quitting tech before they get to that point of experience and seniority, to get into leadership. I mean, obviously, there's a lot of bias and discrimination that happens at those leadership levels, too, but I will say that, you know, it's both of those things. There are also more things on top of that. But this is why I'm like, so excited to see people from diverse backgrounds as founders of new companies and why I think that being able to be in a position to potentially either help fund, or advocate, or sponsor, or amplify those types of orgs, I think is where the future is that because ultimately, I think a lot of the established companies that are out there these days, it's going to be really hard for them to walk back on what their leadership team looks like now, especially if it is a sizable leadership team and they're all white men.Corey: Yeah. I'm going to choose to believe we say sizable leadership team that it's also not—we're talking about the horizontal scaling that happens to some of us, especially during a pandemic as we continue to grow into our seats. You're right, it's a problem as well, where you can cut a bit of slack in some cases to small teams. It's, “Okay, we don't have any Black employees, but we're three people,” is a lot more understandable-slash-relatable than, “We haven't hired any Black people yet and we're 3000 people.” One of those is acceptable—or at least understandable, if not acceptable—the other is just completely egregious.Amy: Yes. And I think then the question that you have to ask if you're looking at, you know, a three-person company, or [laugh] I guess, like in my case, I was looking at the seven-person company, is that, “Okay. There are currently no Black people on your team. And why is that?” And then, “What are you doing to change that? And how are you going to make sure that you're holding ourselves accountable to it?”Because I think it's easy to say, “Oh, you know, the first couple of hires were people we just worked with in the past, and they just happened to, you know, look like us and whatnot.” And then you blink becau—and you do that a handful of times, and you blink, and then suddenly you have a team of 25 and there are no people of color on your team. And maybe you have, like, one woman on the team or something. And you're like, “Huh. That's strange. I guess we should think about this and figure out what we can do.”And then I think what ends up happening at that point is that there are so many already established behaviors, and cultural norms, and things like that, that have organically grown within a team that are potentially not welcoming towards people from different backgrounds who have different backgrounds. So, you go and attempt to hire someone who is different, and they come in, and they're just sort of like, “This is how you work? I don't feel like I belong here.” And then they don't stay, and then they leave. And then people sit there and scratch their heads like, “Oh, what did we do wrong?” And, “I don't get it.”And so there's this conversation, I think, in the industry of like, “Oh, it's a pipeline problem, and if we were just able to hire a lot of people from diverse backgrounds, the problem is solved.” Which really isn't the case because once people are there and at your company, are they getting promoted at the same rate as white men? Are they staying with the company for as long? And who's in leadership? And how are you working to break down the biases that you may have?All those sorts of things, I think, generally are not considered as part of all of this DEI work. Especially when, in my experience in startups, the operational side of all that is so immature a lot of the times, just not well developed that deeper thought process and reflection doesn't really happen.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by something new. Cloud Academy is a training platform built on two primary goals. Having the highest quality content in tech and cloud skills, and building a good community the is rich and full of IT and engineering professionals. You wouldn't think those things go together, but sometimes they do. Its both useful for individuals and large enterprises, but here's what makes it new. I don't use that term lightly. Cloud Academy invites you to showcase just how good your AWS skills are. For the next four weeks you'll have a chance to prove yourself. Compete in four unique lab challenges, where they'll be awarding more than $2000 in cash and prizes. I'm not kidding, first place is a thousand bucks. Pre-register for the first challenge now, one that I picked out myself on Amazon SNS image resizing, by visiting cloudacademy.com/corey. C-O-R-E-Y. That's cloudacademy.com/corey. We're gonna have some fun with this one!Corey: I do my best to have these conversations in public as frequently as is practical for me to do, just because I admit, I get things wrong. I say things that are wrong and I'm doing a fair bit of learning in public around an awful lot of that. Because frankly, I can withstand the heat, if it comes down to someone on Twitter gets incredibly incensed by something I've said on this podcast, for example. Because it isn't coming from a place of ill intent when someone accuses me of being ableist or expressing bias. My response is generally to suppress the initial instinctive flash of defensiveness and listen and ask.And that is, even if I don't necessarily agree with what they're saying after reflection, I have to appreciate on some level the risk-taking inherent in calling someone out who is in my position where, if I were a trash fire, I could use the platform to turn it into, “All right. Now, let's go hound the person that called me out.” No. I don't do that, full stop. If I'm going to harass people, it's going to be—not people, despite what the Supreme Court might tell us—but it's going to be a $2 trillion company—one in particular—because that's who I am and that's how I roll.Whenever I get a DM—which I leave open because I have the privilege to do that—from folks who are early career who are not wildly over-represented, I just have to stop and marvel for a minute at the level of risk-taking inherent to that because there is risk to that. For me, when I DM people, the only risk I feel like I'm running at any given point is, “Are they going to think that I'm bothering them? Oh, the hell with it. I'm adorable. They'll love me.” And the fact that I'm usually right is completely irrelevant to that. There's just that sense of I don't really risk a damn thing in the grand scheme of things compared to the risk that many people are taking just living who they are.Amy: Yeah. And someone DMs you and you suppress that initial sort of defensiveness: I would say that that is an underrated skill. [laugh].Corey: Well, a DM is a privilege, too. A call in—Amy: Yes.Corey: —is deeply appreciated; no one owes it to me. I often will get people calling me out on Twitter and I generally stop and think about that; I have a very close circle of friends who I trust to be objective on these things, and I'll ask them, “Did I get this wrong?” And very often the answer is yes. And, “Well, I thought the joke was funny and I spent time building it.” “Yeah, but if people hear a joke I'm making and feel bad about it, then is it really that good of a joke or should I try harder?” It's a process, and I look back at who I was ten years ago and I feel a sense of shame. And I believe that if anyone these days doesn't, either they were effectively a saint, or they haven't grown.Amy: Yes.Corey: And that's my personal philosophy on this stuff, anyway.Amy: Yeah, absolutely. And that growth is so important. And part of that growth really is being able to suppress your desire to make it about you, [laugh] right? That initial, “Oh, I did something bad,” or, “I'm a horrible person because I said this thing,” right? It's not about you, there's, like, the impact that you had on someone else.And I've been giving this some thought recently, and I—you know, I also similarly have a group of trusted friends who I often talk about these things with, and you know, we always kind of check ourselves in terms of, did we mess something up? Did we, you know, put our foot in our mouths? Stuff like that. And think what it really comes down to is being able to say, “Maybe I did something wrong and I need to suppress that desire to become defensive and put up walls and guard and protect myself from feeling vulnerable, in order to actually learn and grow from this experience.”Corey: It's hard to do, but it's required because I—Amy: Extremely, yes.Corey: —used to worry about, “Ohh, what if I get quote-unquote, ‘canceled?'” well, I've done a little digging into this and every notable instance of this I can find is when someone is called out for something crappy, they get defensive, and they double-down and triple-down and quadruple-down, and they keep digging a hole nice and deep to the point where no one with a soul can really be on their side of this issue, and now they have a problem. I have never gotten to that point because let's be honest with you, there are remarkably few things I care that passionately about that I'm going to pick those fights publicly. The ones that I do, I am very much on the other side [laugh] of those issues. That has not been a realistic concern.I used to warn every person here before I hired them—to get this back to engineering management—that there was a risk that I could have a bad tweet and we don't have a company anymore. I don't give that warning anymore because I no longer believe that it's true.Amy: Mm-hm. Mm-hm. I also wonder about, in general, because of the world that we live in, and our history with white supremacy and oppression and all those things, I also wonder if this skill of being able to self-reflect and be uncomfortable and manage your own reaction and your emotions, I wonder if that's just a thing that white people generally haven't had a lot of practice for because of the inherent privileges that are afforded to white people. I wonder if a lot of this just stems from the fact that white people get to navigate this world and not get called out, and thus don't have this opportunity to exercise this skill of holding on to that and listening more than talking.Corey: Absolutely agree. And it gets piled on by a lot of folks, for example—I'll continue to use myself as an example in this case—I live in San Francisco. I would argue that I'm probably not, “In tech,” quote-unquote, the way that I once was, but I'm close enough that there's no discernible difference. And my social circle is as well. Back before I entered tech, I did a bunch of interesting jobs, telemarketing to pay the bills, I was a recruiter for a while, I worked construction a couple of summers.These days, everyone that I engage with for meaningful periods of time is more or less fairly tech adjacent. It really turns into a one-sided perspective. And I can sit here and talk about what folks who are not living in the tech bubble should be doing or how they should think about this, but it's incredibly condescending, it's incredibly short-sighted, and fails to appreciate a very different lived experience. And I can remind myself of this now, but that lack of diversity and experience is absolutely something where it feels like the tech bubble, especially for those folks in this bubble who look a lot like me, it is easy to fall into a pattern of viewing ourselves as the modern aristocracy where we deserve the nice things that we have, and the rest. And that's a toxic pattern. It takes vigilance to avoid it. I'm not saying I get it right all the time, by a landslide, but ugh, the perils of not doing that are awful.Amy: Agreed. And it shows up, you know, getting back to the engineering manager and leadership and org building piece of things, that shows up even in the way that we talk about career development and career ladders, for those of us in tech, and software engineering specifically for me, where we've kind of like come up with all these matrices of job levels, and competencies, all that, and humans just are so vastly different. Every person is an individual, and yet we talked about career ladders and how to advance your career in this two-dimensional matrix. And, like, how does that actually work, right?And I've seen some good career ladders that account for a larger variety of competencies than just, “Can you code?” And, “What are your system design skills?” And, “Do you understand distributed systems?” And so on and so forth, but I think a lot gets left behind and gets left on the table when it comes to thinking about the fact that when you get a group of people together working on some sort of common cause or a product, that there's so much more to the dynamic than just the writing of the code. It's how do you work with each other? How do you support each other? How do you communicate with each other? And then all my glue work—that is what I call it—like, the glue work that goes into a successful team and building products, a lot of that is just not captured in the way that we talk about career development for folks. And it's just incredibly two-dimensional, I think.Corey: One last question that I have for you before we wrap the episode here is, you spend a lot of time focusing on this, and I have some answers, but I'm very interested to hear yours instead because I assure you, the world hears enough from me and people who look like me, what is the biggest mistake that you see companies making in their attempts to build diverse teams?Amy: I would say that there's two major things. One is that there have been a lot of orgs in my own past that think about diversity, equity, inclusion as a program and not a mindset that everyone should be embracing. And that manifests itself into, sort of like, this secondary problem of stopping at the D part of D, E, and I. That's the whole, “We're going to hire a bunch of people from different backgrounds and then just we're going to stop with that because we've solved the problem.” But by not adopting that mindset of the equity, the inclusion, and also the welcoming and the belonging piece of things internally, then anyone that you hire who comes in from those marginalized or minority backgrounds is not going to want to stay long-term because they don't feel like they fit in, they don't feel like they belong.And so, it becomes this revolving door of you hire in people and then those people leave after some amount of time because they're not getting what they need out of either the role or for themselves personally in terms of just emotional support, even. And so I would say that's the problem that I see is not a numbers game—although the metrics and the numbers help hold you accountable—but the metrics and the numbers are not the end goal. The end goal is really around the mindset that you have in building the org and the way that people behave. And the way that you work together is really core to that.Corey: What I tend to see on the other side is the early intake funnels. People will reach out to me sometimes, “Hey, do you know any diverse speakers we can hire to do a speaking engagement here?” It doesn't… work that way. There's a lot more to it than that. It is not about finding people who check boxes, it is not about quote-unquote, “Diversity hires.”It's about—at least in my experience—structuring job ads, for example, in ways that are not coded—unconsciously in most cases, but ehh—that are going to resonate towards folks who are in certain cultures and not in others. It's about being more equitable. It's about understanding that not everyone is going to come across in a job interview as the most confident person in the room. Part of the talk that I gave on how to handle job interviews, there was a strong section in it on salary negotiation. Well, turns out when I do it, I'm an aggressive hard-charger and they like that, whereas if someone who is not male does that, well, in that case, they look like they're being difficult and argumentative and pushy and rising above their station. It was awful.One of the topics I'm most proud of was the redone version of that talk that I gave with a friend, Sonia Gupta, who has since left tech because of how shitty it is, and that was a much better talk. She was a former attorney who had spent time negotiating in much higher-stakes situations.Amy: Yeah.Corey: And it was terrific to see during the deconstruction and rebuilding of that talk, just how much of my own unconscious bias had crept in. It's, again, I look back at the early version of those talks and I'm honestly ashamed. It wasn't from ill will, but it's always impact over intent as far as how this has potentially made things worse. It's, if nothing else, if I don't say the right things when I should speak up, that's not great, but I always prefer that to saying things that are actively harmful. So—Amy: Absolutely.Corey: —it's hard. I deserve no sympathy for this, to be clear. It is incumbent upon all of us because again, as mentioned, my failure mode is a non-issue in the world compared to the failure mode for folks for against whom the deck has been stacked unfairly for a very long time. At least, that's how I see it.Amy: Right. And that's why I think that it's important for folks who are in positions of power to really reflect on—even operationally, right, you were mentioning your job ads, and how to structure that to include more inclusive language, and just doing that for everything, really, in the way that you work. How do decisions get made? And by whom? And why? How do you structure things like compensation? Even, like, how do you do project planning, right?Even in my own reflections, now when I think back towards Scrum and Agile and all of that, I think that the base foundation of all of that was like was good, but then ultimately the implementation of how that works at most companies is problematic in a lot of ways as well. And then to just be able to reflect and really think about all of your processes or policies—all of that—and bring that lens of equity, really, equity and inclusion to those things, and to really dig deep and think about how those things might manifest and affect people from different backgrounds in different ways.Corey: So, before we wrap, something that I think you… are something of an empathetic party on is when I see companies in the space who are doing significant DE&I initiatives, it seems like it's all flash; it feels like it's all sizzle, no steak to appropriate a phrase from the country of Texas. Is that something that you see, too?Amy: I do think that it is pretty common, and I think it's because that's… that's the easy route. That's the easy way to do it because the vanity metrics, and the photo of the team that is so diverse, and all these things that show up on a marketing website. I mean, there—it's, like, a signal for someone, potentially, who might be considering a job at your company, but ultimately the hard work that I feel like is not happening is really in that whole reflecting on the way you do business, reflecting on the way that you work. That is the hard work and it requires a leadership team to prioritize it, and to make time for it, and to make it really a core principle of the way that you build an org., and it doesn't happen enough, by far, in my opinion.Corey: It feels like it's an old trope of the company that makes a $100,000 donation and then spends $10 million dollars telling the world about it, on some level. It's about, “Oh, look at us, we're doing good things,” as opposed to buckling down and doing the work. Then the actual work falls to folks who are themselves not overrepresented as unpaid emotional labor, and then when the company still struggles with diversity issues, those people catch the blame. It's frustrating.Amy: Yeah. And as an organization, if you have the money to donate somewhere, that's great, but it can't just stop at that. And a lot of companies will just stop at that because it's the optics of, “Oh, well, we spent x millions of dollars and we've helped out this nonprofit or this charity or whatnot.” Which is great that you're able to do that, but that can't be it because then ultimately, what you have internally and within your own company doesn't improve for people from those backgrounds.Corey: I want to thank you for taking so much time to chat with me about these things. Some of these topics are challenging to talk about and finding the right forum can be difficult, and I'm just deeply appreciative that you were able to clear enough time to have that chat with me today.Amy: Yeah, thank you for having me. I mean, I think it's important for us to recognize, even between the two of us that, I mean, obviously, you as a white man have benefited a lot in this space, and then even myself as, you know, that model minority whole thing, but growing up very adjacent to white people and just being ingrained in that culture and raised in that culture, you know, that we have those privileges and there's still parts of the conversation, I think, that are not captured by [laugh] by the two of us are the nuances as well, and so just recognizing that. And it's just a learning process. And I think that everyone could benefit from just realizing that you'll never know everything. And there's always going to be something to learn in all of this. And yes, it is hard, but it's something that is worthwhile to strive for.Corey: Most things worthwhile are. If people want to learn more about who you are, how you think about these things, potentially consider working with you, et cetera. Where can they find you?Amy: So, I am on Twitter. I am the queen of very, very long threads, I should just start a blog or something, but I have not. But in any case, I'm on Twitter. I am AmyChanta, so @A-M-Y-C-H-A-N-T-A.Our website is unicycle.co, if you're thinking about applying for a role, and working with me, that would be awesome. Or just, you know, reach out. I'd also just love to network with anyone, even if there's not an open position now. I just, you know, build that relationship and maybe there will be in the future. Or if not at Unicycle, then somewhere else.Corey: And we will, of course, put links to that in the [show notes 00:48:13]. Thank you so much, once again. I appreciate your time.Amy: Thanks for having me.Corey: Amy Chantasirivisal, Director of Engineering at Unicycle. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, whereas if you've hated this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice along with a comment pointing out that it's not about making an MVP of a bicycle that turns into a unicycle so much as it is work-life balance.Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

ShopTalk » Podcast Feed
487: Chaos Monkeys, Images Missing at ISP Level, Modern Image Handling, The Manager’s Path

ShopTalk » Podcast Feed

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 62:29


Parenting life update, redundancy for leaves, using a chaos monkey, images not showing up based on ISP, modern image handling workflow options, and discussing The Manager's Path.

Firewalls Don't Stop Dragons Podcast
Spooky Security Stories

Firewalls Don't Stop Dragons Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 66:23


There were lots of scary computer security and privacy stories in the news this week, coinciding nicely with Halloween. We'll start off with an unfortunate new cybersecurity term: killware. This is software whose end result is actual physical harm to human beings, including death. Sadly, this is now a thing. And I don't know about you, but Mark Zuckerberg's vision of the future (the "metaverse") is pretty damn scary, too. In other news: a hacker seems to have stolen the government identity information for every person in Argentina; a New York Times journalist explains how his iPhone has been hacked multiple times by the NSO Group and what he does to protect himself (and his sources); the FBI, the Secret Service and other "like-minded countries" seem to have finally taken down the REvil ransomware gang for good; Facebook has changed its name to "Meta"; link previews in chat apps can actually cause serious security and privacy problems; Delta Airlines and UK schools are normalizing the use of facial recognition for mundane purposes; your ISP is collecting tons of information about you in the US because we let them; and finally, I demystify and debunk the "dangers" of QR codes. Article Links Killware: What You Need to Know https://adamlevin.com/2021/10/15/killware-what-you-need-to-know/Hacker steals government ID database for Argentina's entire population https://therecord.media/hacker-steals-government-id-database-for-argentinas-entire-population/ NYT journalist describes his iPhone being hacked, and the precautions he now takes https://9to5mac.com/2021/10/25/nyt-journalist-describes-his-iphone-being-hacked-and-the-precautions-he-now-takes/ FBI, others crush REvil using ransomware gang's favorite tactic against it https://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/2021/10/fbi-others-crush-revil-using-ransomware-gangs-favorite-tactic-against-it/ Facebook changes its name to Meta: https://www.inc.com/jason-aten/5-things-mark-zuckerberg-said-about-his-plan-for-metaverse-that-should-make-you-very-worried.html Link Previews in Popular Messaging Apps May Lead to Security Vulnerabilities https://www.macrumors.com/2020/10/26/link-previews-may-lead-to-security-vulnerabilities/ Delta Air Lines partners with TSA PreCheck to launch biometrics-based bag drops https://finance.yahoo.com/news/delta-air-lines-partners-tsa-164655619.html UK schools are using facial recognition to take pupils' lunch money https://www.theverge.com/2021/10/18/22732330/uk-schools-facial-recognition-lunch-payments-north-ayrshire Location Data Firm Got GPS Data From Apps Even When People Opted Out https://www.vice.com/en/article/5dgmqz/huq-location-data-opt-out-no-consent Internet service providers have so much data on you https://www.protocol.com/policy/isp-ftc-data Beware QR Code… Articles: https://firewallsdontstopdragons.com/beware-qr-code-articles/  Further Info Only ONE DAY LEFT to snag your challenge coin!! The promotion ends at 11pm Eastern Time on Tuesday, November 2nd! https://firewallsdontstopdragons.com/my-challenge-coins-are-back/ Become a Patron! https://www.patreon.com/FirewallsDontStopDragons Would you like me to speak to your group about security and/privacy? http://bit.ly/Firewalls-SpeakerGenerate secure passphrases! https://d20key.com/#/

Into Tomorrow With Dave Graveline
Weekend of October 29, 2021 – Hour 1

Into Tomorrow With Dave Graveline

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 30, 2021 42:30


Tech News and Commentary Dave and the team discuss wireless earbuds from Palm, Facebook’s earnings call and defense of the company, and more. Alan in Ackerman, Mississippi listens on SuperTalk 100.9 and asked: “How do I get my ISP to keep me from being hacked on a slow speed of less than 2mbps download internet […]

Screaming in the Cloud
The Mayor of Wholesome Twitter with Mark Thompson

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 41:18


About MarkMark loves to teach and code.He is an award winning university instructor and engineer. He comes with a passion for creating meaningful learning experiences. With over a decade of developing solutions across the tech stack, speaking at conferences and mentoring developers he is excited to continue to make an impact in tech. Lately, Mark has been spending time as a Developer Relations Engineer on the Angular Team.Links:Twitter: https://twitter.com/marktechson TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by our friends at Vultr. Spelled V-U-L-T-R because they're all about helping save money, including on things like, you know, vowels. So, what they do is they are a cloud provider that provides surprisingly high performance cloud compute at a price that—while sure they claim its better than AWS pricing—and when they say that they mean it is less money. Sure, I don't dispute that but what I find interesting is that it's predictable. They tell you in advance on a monthly basis what it's going to going to cost. They have a bunch of advanced networking features. They have nineteen global locations and scale things elastically. Not to be confused with openly, because apparently elastic and open can mean the same thing sometimes. They have had over a million users. Deployments take less that sixty seconds across twelve pre-selected operating systems. Or, if you're one of those nutters like me, you can bring your own ISO and install basically any operating system you want. Starting with pricing as low as $2.50 a month for Vultr cloud compute they have plans for developers and businesses of all sizes, except maybe Amazon, who stubbornly insists on having something to scale all on their own. Try Vultr today for free by visiting: vultr.com/screaming, and you'll receive a $100 in credit. Thats v-u-l-t-r.com slash screaming.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by something new. Cloud Academy is a training platform built on two primary goals. Having the highest quality content in tech and cloud skills, and building a good community the is rich and full of IT and engineering professionals. You wouldn't think those things go together, but sometimes they do. Its both useful for individuals and large enterprises, but here's what makes it new. I don't use that term lightly. Cloud Academy invites you to showcase just how good your AWS skills are. For the next four weeks you'll have a chance to prove yourself. Compete in four unique lab challenges, where they'll be awarding more than $2000 in cash and prizes. I'm not kidding, first place is a thousand bucks. Pre-register for the first challenge now, one that I picked out myself on Amazon SNS image resizing, by visiting cloudacademy.com/corey. C-O-R-E-Y. That's cloudacademy.com/corey. We're gonna have some fun with this one!Corey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud. I'm Corey Quinn. Anyone who has the misfortune to follow me on Twitter is fairly well aware that I am many things: I'm loud, obnoxious, but snarky is most commonly the term applied to me. I've often wondered, what does the exact opposite of someone who is unrelentingly negative about things in cloud look like? I'm here to answer that question is lightness and happiness and friendliness on Twitter, personified. His Twitter name is @marktechson. My guest today is Mark Thompson, developer relations engineer at Google. Mark, thank you for joining me.Mark: Oh, I'm so happy to be here. I really appreciate you inviting me. Thanks.Corey: Oh, by all means. I'm glad we're doing these recordings remotely because I strongly suspect, just based upon the joy and the happiness and the uplifting aspects of what it is that you espouse online that if we ever shook hands, we'd explode as we mutually annihilate each other like matter and antimatter combining.Mark: Feels right. [laugh].Corey: So, let's start with the day job; seems like the easy direction to go in. You're a developer relations engineer. Now, I've heard of developer advocates, I've heard of the DevRel term, a lot of them get very upset when I refer to them as ‘devrelopers', but that's the game that we play with language. What is the developer relations engineer?Mark: So, I describe my job this way: I like to help external communities with our products. I work on the Angular team, so I like to help our external communities but then I also like to work with our internal team to help improve our product. So, I see it as helping as a platform, as a developer relations engineer. But the engineer part is, I think, is important here because, at Google, we still do coding and we still write things; I'm going to contribute to the Angular platform itself versus just only giving talks or only writing blog posts to creating content, they still want us to do things like solve problems with the platform as well.Corey: So, this is where my complete and abject lack of understanding of the JavaScript ecosystem enters the conversation. Let's be clear here, first let me check my assumptions. Angular is a JavaScript framework, correct?Mark: Technically a TypeScript framework, but you could say JavaScript.Corey: Cool. Okay, again, this is not me setting you up for a joke or anything like that. I try to keep my snark to Twitter, not podcast because that tends to turn an awful lot into me berating people, which I try to reserve for those who really have earned it; they generally have the word chief somewhere in their job title. So, I'm familiar with sort of an evolution of the startups that I worked at where Backbone was all the rage, followed by, “Oh, you should never use Backbone. You should be using Angular instead.”And then I sort of—like, that was the big argument the last time I worked in an environment like that. And then I see things like View and React and several other things. At some point, it seems like, pick a random name out of the air; if it's not going to be a framework, it's going to be a Pokemon. What is the distinguishing characteristic or characteristics of Angular?Mark: I like to describe Angular to people is that the value-add is going to be some really incredible developer ergonomics. And when I say that I'm thinking about the tooling. So, we put a lot of work into making sure that the tooling is really strong for developers, where you can jump in, you can get started and be productive. Then I think about scale, and how your application runs at scale, and how it works at scale for your teams. So, scale becomes a big part of the story that I tell, as well, for Angular.Corey: You spend an awful lot of time telling stories about Angular. I'm assuming most of them are true because people don't usually knowingly last very long in this industry when they just get up on stage and tell lies, other than, “This is how we do it in our company,” which is the aspirational conference-ware that we all wish we ran. You're also, according to your bio, which of course, is always in the [show notes 00:04:16], you're an award-winning university instructor. Now, award-winning—great. For someone who struggled mightily in academia, I don't know much about that world. What is it that you teach? How does being a university instructor work? I imagine it's not like most other jobs where you wind up showing up, solving algorithms on a whiteboard, and they say, “Great, can you start tomorrow?”Mark: Sure. So, when I was teaching at university, what I was teaching was mostly coding bootcamps. So, some universities have coding bootcamps that they run themselves. And so I was a part of some instructional teams that work in the university. And that's how I won the Teaching Excellence Award. So, the award that I won actually was the Distinguished Teaching Excellence Award, based on my performance at work when I was teaching at university.Corey: I want to be clear here, it's almost enough to make someone question whether you really were involved there because the first university, according to your background that you worked on was Northwestern, but then it was through the Harvard Extension School, and I was under the impression that doing anything involving Harvard was the exact opposite of an NDA, where you're contractually bound to mention that, “Oh, I was involved with Harvard in the following way,” at least three times at any given conversation. Can you tell I spent a lot of time dealing with Harvard grads?Mark: [laugh]. Yeah, Harvard is weird like that, where people who've worked there or gone there, it comes up as a first thing. But I'll tell the story about it if someone asks me, but I just like to talk about univer—that's why I say ‘university,' right? I don't say, “Oh, I won an award at Northwestern.” I just say, “University award-winning instructor.”The reason I say even the ‘award-winning', that part is important for credibility, specifically. It's like, hey, if I said I'm going to teach you something, I want you to know that you're in really good hands, and that I'm really going to do my best to help you. That's why I mention that a lot.Corey: I'll take that even one step further, and please don't take this as in any way me casting aspersions on some of your colleagues, but very often working at Google has felt an awful lot like that in some respects. I've never seen you do it. You've never had to establish your bona fides in a conversation that I've seen by saying, “Well, at Google this is how we do it.” Because that's a logical fallacy of appeal to authority in many respects. Yeah, I'm sure you do a lot of things at Google at a multinational trillion-dollar company that if I'm founding a four-person startup called Twitter for Pets might not necessarily be the same constraints that I'm faced with.I'm keenly appreciative folks who recognize that distinction and don't try and turn it into something else. We see it with founders, too, “Oh, we're a small scrappy startup and our founders used to work at Google.” And it's, “Hmm, I'm wondering if the corporate culture at a small startup might be slightly different these days.” I get it. It does resonate and it carries weight. I just wonder if that's one of those unexamined things that maybe it's time to dive into a bit more.Mark: Hmm. So, what's funny about that is—so people will ask me, what do I do? And it really depends on context. And I'll usually say, “Oh, I work for a company on the West Coast,” or, “For a tech company on the West Coast.” I'll just say that first.Because what I really want to do is turn the conversation back to the person I'm talking to, so here's where that unrelenting positivity kind of comes in because I'm looking at ways, how can I help boost you up? So first, I want to hear more about you. So, I'll kind of like—I won't shrink myself, but I'll just be kind of vague about things so I could hear more about you so we're not focused on me. In this case, I guess we are because I'm the guest, but in a normal conversation, that's what I would try to do.Corey: So, we've talked about JavaScript a little bit. We've talked about university a smidgen. Now, let me complete the trifecta of things that I know absolutely nothing about, specifically positivity on Twitter. You have been described to me as the mayor of wholesome Twitter. What is that about?Mark: All right, so let me be really upfront about this. This is not about toxic positivity. We got to get that out in the open first, before I say anything else because I think that people can hear that and start to immediately think, “Oh, this guy is just, you know, toxic positivity where no matter what's happening, he's going to be happy.” That is not the same thing. That is not the same thing at all.So, here's what I think is really interesting. Online, and as you know, as a person on Twitter, there's so many people out there doing damage and saying hurtful things. And I'm not talking about responding to someone who's being hurtful by being hurtful. I mean the people who are constantly harassing women online, or our non-binary friends, people who are constantly calling into question somebody's credibility because of, oh, they went to a coding bootcamp or they came from self-taught. All these types of ways to be really just harmful on Twitter.I wanted to start adding some other perspective of the positivity side of just being focused on value-add in our interactions. Can I craft this narrative, this world, where when we meet, we're both better off because of it, right? You feel good, I feel good, and we had a really good time. If we meet and you're having a bad time, at least you know that I care about you. I didn't fix you. I didn't, like, remove the issue, but you know that somebody cares about you. So, that's what I think wholesome positivity comes into play is because I want to be that force online. Because we already have plenty of the other side.Corey: It's easy for folks who are casual observers of my Twitter nonsense to figure, “Oh, he's snarky and he's being clever and witty and making fun of big companies”—which I do–And they tend to shorthand that sometimes to, “Oh, great. He's going to start dunking on people, too.” And I try mightily to avoid that it's punch up, never down.Mark: Mm-hm.Corey: I understand there's a school of thought that you should never be punching at all, which I get. I'm broken in many ways that apparently are entertaining, so we're going to roll with that. But the thing that incenses me the most—on Twitter in my case—is when I'll have something that I'll put out there that's ideally funny or engaging and people like it and it spreads beyond my circle, and then you just have the worst people on the internet see that and figure, “Oh, that's snarky and incisive. Ah, I'm like that too. This is my people.”I assure you, I am not your people when that is your approach to life. Get out of here. And curating the people who follow and engage with you on Twitter can be a full-time job. But oh man, if I wind up retweeting someone, and that act brings someone who's basically a jackwagon into the conversation, it's no. No-no-no.I'm not on Twitter to actively make things worse unless you're in charge of cloud pricing, in which case yes, I am very much there to make your day worse. But it's, “Be the change you want to see in the world,” and lifting people up is always more interesting to me than tearing people down.Mark: A thousand percent. So, here's what I want to say about that is, I think, punching up is fine. I don't like to moderate other people's behavior either, though. So, if you'd like punching up, I think it'd be funny. I laugh at jokes that people make.Now, is it what I'll do? Probably not because I haven't figured out a good way for me to do it that still goes along my core values. But I will call out stuff. Like if there's a big company that's doing something that's pretty messed up, I feel comfortable calling things out. Or when drama happens and people are attacking someone, I have no problem with just be like, “Listen, this person is a stand-up person.”Putting myself kind of like… just kind of on the front line with that other person. Hey, look, this person is being attacked right now. That person is stand-up, so if you got a problem them, you got a problem with me. That's not the same thing as being negative, though. That's not the same thing as punching down or harming people.And I think that's where—like I say, people kind of get that part confused when they think that being kind to people is a sign of weakness, which is—it takes more strength for me to be kind to people who may or may not deserve it, by societal standards. That I'll try to understand you, even though you've been a jerk right now.Corey: Twitter excels at fomenting outrage, and it does it by distancing us from being able to easily remember there's a person on the other side of these things. It is ways you're going to yell at someone, even my business partner in a text message. Whenever we start having conversations that get a little heated—which it happens; business partnership is like a marriage—it's oh, I should pick up the phone and call him rather than sending things that stick around forever, that don't reflect the context of the time, and five years later when I see it, I feel ashamed." I'm not here to advocate for other people doing things on Twitter the way that I do because what I do is clever, but the failure mode of clever in my case is being a complete jerk, and I've made that mistake a lot when I was learning to do it when my audience was much smaller, and I hurt people. And whenever I discovered that that is what happened, I went out of my way, and still do, to apologize profusely.I've gotten relatively good at having to do less of those apologies on an ongoing basis, but very often people see what I'm doing and try to imitate what they're seeing; it just comes off as mean. And that's not acceptable. That's not something that I want to see more of in the world. So, those are my failure modes. I have to imagine the only real failure mode that you would encounter with positivity is inadvertently lifting someone up who turns out to be a trash goblin.Mark: [laugh]. That and I think coming off as insincere. Because if someone is always positive or a majority of the time, positive, if I say something to you, and you don't know me that actually mean it, sincerity is incredibly hard to get over text. So, if I congratulate you on your job, you might be like, “Oh, he's just saying that for attention for himself because now he's being the nice guy again.” But sincerity is really, really hard to convey, so that's one of the failure modes is like I said, being sincere.And then lifting up people who don't deserve to be lifted up, yeah, that's happened before where I've engaged with people or shared some of their stuff in an effort to boost them, and find out, like you said, legit trash goblin, like, their home address is under a bridge because they're a troll. Like, real bad stuff. And then you have back off of that endorsement that you didn't know. And people will DM you, like, “Hey, I see that you follow this person. That person is a really bad person. Look at what they're saying right now.” I'm like, “Well, damn, I didn't know it was bad like that.”Corey: I've had that on the podcast, too, where I'll have a conversation with someone and then a year or so later, they'll wind up doing something horrifying, or something comes to light and the rest, and occasionally people will ask, “So, why did you have that person on this show?” It's yeah, it turns out that when we're having a conversation, that somehow didn't come up because as I'm getting background on people and understanding who they are and what they're about in the intake questionnaire, there is not a separate field for, “Are you terrible to women?” Maybe there should be, but that's something that it's—you don't see it. And that makes it easy to think that it's not there until you start listening more than you speak, and start hearing other people's stories about it. This is the challenge.As much as I aspire at times to be more positive and lift folks up, this is the challenge of social media as it stands now. I had a tweet the other day about a service that AWS had released with the comment that this is fantastic and the team that built it should be proud. And yeah, that got a bit of engagement. People liked it. I'm sure it was passed around internally, “Yay, the jerk liked something.” Fine.A month ago, they launched a different service, and my comment was just distilled down to, “This is molten garbage.” And that went around the tech internet three times. When you're positive, it's one of those, “Oh, great. Yeah, that's awesome.” Whereas when I savage things, it's, “Hey, he's doing it again. Come and look at the bodies.” Effectively the rubbernecking thing. “There's been a terrible accident, let's go gawk at it.”Mark: Right.Corey: And I don't quite know what to do with that because it leads to the mistaken and lopsided impression that I only ever hate things and I don't think that a lot of stuff is done well. And that's very much not the case. It doesn't restrict itself to AWS either. I'm increasingly impressed by a lot of what I'm seeing out of Google Cloud. You want to talk about objectivity, I feel the same way about Oracle Cloud.Dunking on Oracle was a sport for me for a long time, but a lot of what they're doing on a technical and on a customer-approach basis in the cloud group is notable. I like it. I've been saying that for a couple of years. And I'm gratified the response from the audience seems to at least be that no one's calling me a shill. They're saying, “Oh, if you say it, it's got to be true.” It's, “Yes. Finally, I have a reputation for authenticity.” Which is great, but that's the reason I do a lot of the stuff that I do.Mark: That is a tough place to be in. So, Twitter itself is an anomaly in terms of what's going to get engagement and what isn't. Sometimes I'll tweet something that at least I think is super clever, and I'm like, “Oh, yeah. This is meaningful, sincere, clever, positive. This is about to go bananas.” And then it'll go nowhere.And then I'll tweet that I was feeling a depression coming on and that'll get a lot of engagement. Now, I'm not saying that's a bad thing. It's just, it's never what I think. I thought that the depression tweet was not going to go anywhere. I thought that one was going to be like, kind of fade into the ether, and then that is the one that gets all the engagement.And then the one about something great that I want to share, or lifting somebody else up, or celebrating somebody that doesn't go anywhere. So, it's just really hard to predict what people are going to really engage with and what's going to ring true for them.Corey: Oh, I never have any idea of how jokes are going to land on Twitter. And in the before times, I had the same type of challenge with jokes in conference talks, where there's a joke that I'll put in there that I think is going to go super well, and the audience just sits there and stares. That's okay. My jokes are for me, but after the third time trying it with different audiences and no one laughs, okay, I should keep it to myself, then. Other times just a random throwaway comment, and I find it quoted in the newspaper almost. And it's, “Oh, okay.”Mark: [laugh].Corey: You can never tell what's going to hit and what isn't.Mark: Can we talk about that though? Like—Corey: Oh, sure.Mark: Conference talking?Corey: Oh, my God, no.Mark: Conference speaking, and just how, like—I remember one time I was keynoting—well I was emceeing and I had the opening monologue. And so [crosstalk 00:17:45]—Corey: We call that a keynote. It's fine. It is—I absolutely upgrade it because people know what you're talking about when you say, “I keynoted the thing.” Do it. Own it.Mark: Yeah.Corey: It's yours.Corey: So, I was emcee and then I did the keynote. And so during the keynote rehearsals—and this is for all the academia, right, so all these different university deans, et cetera. So, in the practice, I'm telling this joke, and it is landing, everybody's laughing, blah, blah, blah. And then I get in there, and it was crickets. And in that moment, you want to panic because you're like, “Holy crap, what do I do because I was expecting to be able to ride the wave of the laughter into my next segment,” and now it's dead silent. And then just that ability to have to be quick on your feet and not let it slow you down is just really hard.Corey: This episode is sponsored by our friends at Oracle HeatWave is a new high-performance accelerator for the Oracle MySQL Database Service. Although I insist on calling it “my squirrel.” While MySQL has long been the worlds most popular open source database, shifting from transacting to analytics required way too much overhead and, ya know, work. With HeatWave you can run your OLTP and OLAP, don't ask me to ever say those acronyms again, workloads directly from your MySQL database and eliminate the time consuming data movement and integration work, while also performing 1100X faster than Amazon Aurora, and 2.5X faster than Amazon Redshift, at a third of the cost. My thanks again to Oracle Cloud for sponsoring this ridiculous nonsense.Corey: It's a challenge. It turns out that there are a number of skills that are aligned but are not the same when it comes to conference talks, and I think that is something that is not super well understood. There's the idea of, “I can get on stage in front of a bunch of people with a few loose talking points, and just riff,” that sort of an improv approach. There's the idea of, “Oh, I can get on stage with prepared slides and have presenter notes and have a whole direction and theme of what I'm doing,” that's something else entirely. But now we're doing video and the energy is completely different.I've presented live on video, I've done pre-recorded video, but in either case, you're effectively talking to the camera and there is no crowd feedback. So, especially if you'd lean on jokes like I tend to, you can't do a cheesy laugh track as an insert, other than maybe once as its own joke. You have to make sure that you can resonate and engage with folks, but there are no subtle cues from the audience like half the front row getting up and walking out. You have to figure out what it is that resonates, what it is that doesn't, why people should care. And of course, distinguishing and differentiating between this video that you're watching now and the last five Zoom meetings that you've been on that look an awful lot the same; why should you care about this talk?Mark: The hardest thing to do. I think speaking remotely became such a big challenge. So, over time it became a little easier because I found some of the value in it, but it was still much harder because of all the things that you said. What became easier was that I didn't have to go to a place. That was easier.So, I could take three different conference talks in a day for three different organizations. So, that was easier. But what was harder, just like you said, not being able to have that energy of the crowd to know when you're on point because you look for that person in the audience who's nodding in agreement, or the person who's shaking their head furiously, like, “Oh, this is all wrong.” So, you might need to clarify or slow down or—you lose all your cues, and that's just really, really hard. And I really don't like doing video pre-recorded talks because those take more energy for me than they do the even live virtual because I have to edit it and I have to make sure that take was right because I can't say, “Oh, excuse me. Well, I meant to say this.”And I guess I could leave that in there, but I'm too much of a—I love public speaking, so I put so much pressure on myself to be the best version of myself at every opportunity when I'm doing public speaking. And I think that's what makes it hard.Corey: Oh, yeah. Then you add podcasts into the mix, like this one, and it changes the entire approach. If I stumble over my words in the middle of a sentence that I've done a couple of times already, on this very show, I will stop and repeat myself because it's easier to just cut that out in post, and it sounds much more natural. They'll take out ums, ahs, stutters, and the rest. Live, you have to respond to that very differently, but pre-recorded video has something of the same problem because, okay, the audio you can cut super easily.With video, you have to sort of a smear, and it's obvious when people know what they're looking at. And, “Wait, what was that? That was odd. They blew a take.” You can cheat, which is what I tend to do, and oh, I wind up doing a bunch of slides in some of my talks because every slide transition is an excuse to cut because suddenly for a split second I'm not on the camera and we can do all kinds of fun things.But it's all these little things, and part of the problem, too, with the pandemic was, we suddenly had to learn how to be A/V folks when previously we had the good fortune slash good sense to work with people who are specialist experts in this space. Now it's, “Well, I guess I am the best boy grip today,” whate—I'm learning what that means [laugh] as we—Mark: That's right.Corey: —continue onward. Ugh. I never signed up for this, but it's the thing that happens to you instead of what you plan on. I think that's called life.Mark: Feels right. Feels right, yeah. It's just one of those things. And I'm looking forward to the time after this, when we do get back to in-person talks, and we do get to do some things. So, I have a lot of hot takes around speaking. So, I came up in Toastmasters. Are you familiar with Toastmasters at all?Corey: I very much am.Mark: Oh, yeah. Okay, so I came up in Toastmasters, and for people at home who don't know, it's kind of like a meetup where you go and you actually practice public speaking, based on these props, et cetera. For me, I learned to do things like not say ‘um' and ‘ah' on stage because there's someone in the room counting every time you do it, and then when you get that review at the end when they give you your feedback, they'll call that out. Or when you say ‘like you know,' or too many ‘and so', all these little—I think the word is disfluencies that you use that people say make you sound more natural, those are things that were coached out with me for public speaking. I just don't do those things anymore, and I feel like there are ways for you not to do it.And I tweeted that before, that you shouldn't say ‘um' and ‘ah' and have someone tell me, “Oh, no, they're a natural part of language.” And then, “It's not natural and it could freak people out.” And I was like, “Okay. I mean, you have your opinion about that.” Like, that's fine, but it's just a hot take that I had about speaking.I think that you should do lots of things when you speak. The rate that you walk back and forth, or should you be static? How much should be on your slides? People put a lot of stuff on slides, I'm like, “I don't want to read your slides. I'd rather listen to you use your slides.” I mean, I can go on and on. We should have another podcast called, “Hey, Mark talks about public speaking,” because that is one of my jams. That and supporting people who come from different paths. Those two things, I can go on for hours about.Corey: And they're aligned in a lot of respects. I agree with you on the public speaking. Focusing on the things that make you a better speaker are not that hard in most cases, but it's being aware of what you're doing. I thought I was a pretty good speaker when I had a coach for a little while, and she would stand there, “Give just the first minute of your talk.” And she's there and writing down notes; I get a minute in and it's like, “Okay, I can't wait to see what she doesn't like once I get started.” She's like, “Nope. I have plenty. That will cover us for the next six weeks.” Like, “O…kay? I guess she doesn't know what she's doing.”Spoiler she did, in fact, know what she was doing and was very good at it and my talks are better for it as a result. But it comes down to practicing. I didn't have a thing like Toastmasters when I was learning to speak to other folks. I just did it by getting it wrong a lot of times. I would speak to small groups repeatedly, and I'd get better at it in time.And I would put time-bound on it because people would sit there and listen to me talk and then the elevator would arrive at our floor and they could escape and okay, they don't listen to me publicly speaking anymore, but you find time to practice in front of other folks. I am kidding, to be clear. Don't harass strangers with public speaking talks. That was in fact a joke. I know there's at least one person in the audience who's going to hear that and take notes and think, “Ah, I'm going to do that because he said it's a good idea.” This is the challenge with being a quote-unquote, “Role model” sometimes. My role model approach is to give people guidance by providing a horrible warning of what not to do.Mark: [laugh].Corey: You've gone the other direction and that's kind of awesome. So, one of the recurring themes of this show has been, where does the next generation come from? Where do we find the next generation of engineer, of person working in cloud in various ways? Because the paths that a lot of us walked who've been in this space for a decade or more have been closed. And standing here, it sounds an awful lot like, “Oh, go in and apply for jobs with a firm handshake and a printed copy of your resume and ask to see the manager and you'll have a job before dark.”Yeah, what worked for us doesn't work for people entering the workforce today, and there have to be different paths. Bootcamps are often the subject of, I think, a deserved level of scrutiny because quality differs wildly, and from the outside if you don't know the space, a well-respected bootcamp that knows exactly what it's doing and has established long-term relationships with a number of admirable hiring entities in the space and grifter who threw together a website look identical. It's a hard problem to solve. How do you view teaching the next generation and getting them into this space, assuming that that isn't something that is morally reprehensible? And some days, I wonder if exposing this industry to folks who are new to it isn't a problem.Mark: No, good question. So, I think in general—so I am pro bootcamp. I am pro self-taught. I was not always. And that's because of personal insecurity. Let's dive into that a little bit.So, I've been writing code since I was probably around 14 because I was lucky enough to go to a high school to had a computer science program on the south side of Chicago, one school. And then when I say I was lucky, I was really lucky because the school that I went to wasn't a high resource school; I didn't go to a private school. I went to a public school that just happened that one of the professors from IIT, also worked on staff a few days a week at my school, and we could take programming classes with this guy. Total luck. And so I get into computer science that way, take AP Computer Science in high school—which is, like, the pre-college level—then I go into undergrad, then I go into grad school for computer science.So, like, as traditional of a path that you can get. So, in my mind, it was all about my sweat equity that I had put in that disqualified everybody else. So, Corey, if you come from a bootcamp, you haven't spent the time that I spent learning to code; you haven't sweat, you haven't had to bleed, you haven't tried to write a two's complement algorithm on top of your other five classes for that semester. You haven't done it, definitely you don't deserve to be here. So, that was so much of my attitude, until—until—I got the opportunity to have my mind completely blown when I got asked to teach.Because when I got to asked to teach, I thought, “Yeah, I'm going to have my way of going in there and I'm going to show them how to do it right. This is my chance to correct these coding bootcampers and show them how it goes.” And then I find these people who were born for this life. So, some of us are natural talents, some of us are people who can just acquire the talent later. And both are totally valid.But I met this one student. She was a math teacher for years in Chicago Public Schools. She's like, “I want a career change.” Comes to the program that I taught at Northwestern, does so freaking well that she ends up getting a job at Airbnb. Now, if you have to make her go back four years at university, is that window still open for her? Maybe not.Then I meet this other woman, she was a paralegal for ten years. Ten years as a paralegal was the best engineer in the program when I taught, she was the best developer we had. Before the bootcamp was over, she had already gotten the job offer. She was meant for this. You see what I'm saying?So, that's why I'm so excited because it's like, I have all these stories of people who are meant for this. I taught, and I met people that changed the way I even saw the rest of the world. I had some non-binary trans students; I didn't even know what pronouns were. I had no idea that people didn't go by he/him, she/her. And then I had to learn about they and them and still teach you code without misgendering you at the same time, right because you're in a classroom and you're rapid-fire, all right, you—you know, how about this person? How about that person? And so you have to like, it's hard to take—Corey: Yeah, I can understand async, await, and JavaScript, but somehow understanding that not everyone has the pronouns that you are accustomed to using for people who look certain ways is a bridge too far for you to wrap your head around. Right. We can always improve, we can always change. It's just—at least when I screw up async, await, I don't make people feel less than. I just make—Mark: Totally.Corey: —users feel that, “Wow, this guy has no idea how to code.” You're right, I don't.Mark: Yeah, so as I'm on my soapbox, I'll just say this. I think coding bootcamps and self-taught programs where you can go online, I think this is where the door is the widest open for people to enter the industry because there is no requirement of a degree behind this. I just think that has just really opened the door for a lot of people to do things that is life-changing. So, when you meet somebody who's only making—because we're all engineers and we do all this stuff, we make a lot of money. And we're all comfortable. When you meet somebody where they go from 40,000 to 80,000, that is not the same story for—as it is for us.Corey: Exactly. And there's an entire school of thought out there that, “Oh, you should do this for the love because it is who you are, it is who you were meant to be.” And for some people, that's right, and I celebrate and cherish those folks. And there are other folks for whom, “I got into tech because of the money.” And you know what?I celebrate and cherish those folks because that is not inherently wrong. It says nothing negative about you whatsoever to want to improve your quality of life and wanting to support your family in varying ways. I have zero shade to throw at either one of those people. And when it comes to which of those two people do I want to hire, I have no preference in either direction because both are valid and both have directions that they can think in that the other one may not necessarily see for a variety of reasons. It's fine.Mark: I wanted to be an engineering manager. You know why? Not because I loved leadership; because I wanted more money.Corey: Yes.Mark: So, I've been in the industry for quite a long time. I'm a little bit on the older side of the story, right? I'm a little bit older. You know, for me, before we got ‘staff' and ‘principal' and all this kind of stuff, it was senior software engineer and then you topped out in terms of your earning potential. But if you wanted more, you became a manager, director, et cetera.So, that's why I wanted to be a manager for a while; I wanted more money, so why is my choice to be a manager more valuable than those people who want to make more money by coming into engineering or software development? I don't think it is.Corey: So, we've talked about positivity, we've talked about dealing with unpleasant people, we've talked about technology, and then, of course, we've talked about getting up on soapboxes. Let's tie all of that together for one last topic. What is your position on open-source in cloud?Mark: I think open-source software allows us to do a lot of incredible things. And I know that's a very light, fluffy, politically correct answer, but it is true, right? So, we get to take advantage of the brains of so many different people, all the ideas and contributions of so many different people so that we can do incredible things. And I think cloud really makes the world more accessible in general because—so when I used to do websites, I had to have a physical server that I would have to, like, try to talk to my ISP to be able to host things. And so, there was a lot of barriers to entry to do things that way.Now, with cloud and open-source, I could literally pick up a tool and deploy some software to the cloud. And the tool could you open-source so I can actually see what's happening and I could pick up other tools to help build out my vision for whatever I'm creating. So, I think open-source just gives a lot of opportunity.Corey: Oh, my stars, yes. It's even far more so than when I entered the field, and even back then there were challenges. One of the most democratizing aspects of cloud is that you can work with the same technologies that giant companies are using. When I entered the workforce, it's, “Wow, you're really good with Apache, but it seems like you don't really know a whole lot about the world of enterprise storage. What's going on with that?”And the honest answer was, “Well, it turns out that on my laptop, I can compile Apache super easily, but I'm finding it hard, given that I'm new to the workforce, to afford a $300,000 SAN in my garage, so maybe we can wind up figuring out that there are other ways to do it.” That doesn't happen today. Now, you can spin something up in the cloud, use it for a little bit. You're done, turn it off, and then never again have to worry about it except over in AWS land where you get charged 22 cents a month in perpetuity for some godforsaken reason you can't be bothered to track down and certainly no one can understand because, you know, cloud billing.Mark: [laugh].Corey: But if that's the tax versus the SAN tax, I'll take it.Mark: So, what I think is really interesting what cloud does, I like the word democratization because I think about going back to—just as a lateral reference to the bootcamp thing—I couldn't get my parents to see my software when I was in college when I made stuff because it was on my laptop. But when I was teaching these bootcamp students, they all deployed to Heroku. So, in their first couple of months, the cloud was allowing them to do something super cool that was not possible in the early days when I was coming up, learning how to code. And so they could deploy to Heroku, they could use GitHub Pages, you know like, open-source still coming into play. They can use all these tools and it's available to them, and I still think to me that is mind-blowing that I would have to bring my physical laptop or desktop home and say, “Mom, look at this terminal window that's doing this algorithm that I just did,” versus what these new people can do with the cloud. It's like, “Oh, yeah, I want to build a website. I want to publish it today. Publish right now.” Like, during our conversation, we both could have probably spent up a Hello World in the cloud with very little.Corey: Well, you could have. I could have done it in some horrifying way by using my favorite database: DNS. But that's a separate problem.Mark: [laugh]. Yeah, but I go to Firebase deploy and create a quick app real quick; Firebase deploy. Boom, I'm in the cloud. And I just think that the power behind that is just outstanding.Corey: If I had to pick a single cloud provider for someone new to the field to work with, it would be Google Cloud, and it's not particularly close. Just because the developer experience for someone who has not spent ten years marinating in cloud is worlds apart from what you're going to see in almost every other provider. I take it back, it is close. Neck-and-neck in different ways is also DigitalOcean, just because it explains things; their documentation is amazing and it lets people get started. My challenge with DigitalOcean is that it's not thought of, commonly, as a tier-one cloud provider in a lot of different directions, so the utility of learning how that platform works for someone who's planning to be in the industry for a while might potentially not get them as far.But again, there's no wrong answer. Whatever interests you, whenever you have to work on, do it. The obvious question of, “What technology should I learn,” it's, “Well, the ones that the companies you know are working with,” [laugh] so you can, ideally, turn it into something that throws off money, rather than doing it in your spare time for the love of it and not reaping any rewards from it.Mark: Yeah. If people ask me what should they use it to build something? And I think about what they want to do. And I also will say, “What will get you to ship the fastest? How can you ship?”Because that's what's really important for most people because people don't finish things. You know, as an engineer, how many side projects you probably have in the closet that never saw the light of day because you never shipped. I always say to people, “Well, what's going to get you to ship?” If it's View, use View and pair that with DigitalOcean, if that's going to get you to ship, right? Or use Angular plus Google Cloud Platform if that's going to get you to ship.Use what's going to get you to ship because—if it's just your project you're trying to run on. Now, if it's a company asking me, that's a consulting question which is a different answer. We do a much more in-detail analysis.Corey: I want to thank you so much for taking the time to speak with me about, honestly, a very wide-ranging group of topics. If people want to learn more about who you are, how you think, what you're up to, where can they find you?Mark: You can always find me spreading the love, being positive, hanging out. Look, if you want to feel better about yourself, come find me on Twitter at @marktechson—M-A-R-K-T-E-C-H-S-O-N. I'm out there waiting for you, so just come on and have a good time.Corey: And we will, of course, throw links to that in the [show notes 00:36:45]. Thank you so much for your time today.Mark: Oh, it's been a pleasure. Thanks for having me.Corey: Mark Thompson, developer relations engineer at Google. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, whereas if you've hated this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice along with an angry, deranged comment that you spent several weeks rehearsing in the elevator.Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

Govcon Giants Podcast
109: Molly Mayhew - Taking momentous leaps from the military to starting her own business

Govcon Giants Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 61:24


Today's podcast guest Molly Mayhew is the founder and President of Mayhew Technology Solutions, a small business systems integrator supporting customers in the federal, state and local marketplace. She began Her career in the US Air Force as an Information Systems specialist, where she was introduced to the world of government contracting from the buyer perspective. Post-military, Mayhew was a leading member of the team who received the 1999 Tinker AFB Business Management Award, and the 2001 Air Force Productivity Excellence Award. Mayhew also was Verizon's South Area B2B Sales ICON winner in both 2013 and 2014. Molly was a Subject Matter Expert and program manager for a $35 million DoD communications platform consolidation that centralized operations at Andrews Air Force Base and integrated several systems and communications programs. After years of working as BD Manager, Sr. Account Exec, Strategic Mgr, Sales Mgr of Government sales for multiple entities she decided it was time to take the leap on her own. In 2017 she founded Mayhew Technology Solutions (MTS).  MTS provides installation services for fiber optic, telecommunications, ISP, OSP, physical security, low voltage, audiovisual systems, and network management and operations services. They also have additional services that include facilities support, all other business support, consultation, analysis, design, and turn-key deployment, long-term service and maintenance, and temporary staffing services. MTS's contracting expertise spans the federal, state, municipal and commercial market places.  On today's show you will hear how your skills from the military to private sector like Verizon and Graybar to being a mother are all transferable. You will learn how Molly came to the realization that it was time to make the leap and why she decided to do it now. Tune in for this upcoming episode with our latest Giant, Molly Mayhew.

Last Week in Local: Local Search, SEO & Marketing Update from LocalU

Join Carrie and Mike as they talk about how ratings and reviews affect local SEO, what's new at Amazon, review carousels in local finder results, Tesco's first checkout-free store, and more!Mike's Links:Amazon Logistics now ships more US parcels than FedEx: Pitney Bowes - https://www.supplychaindive.com/news/amazon-logistics-volume-fedex-ups-postal-service-pitney-bowes/608409/Amazon launches in-store pickup option for items from local businesses - https://www.cnbc.com/2021/10/21/amazon-launches-in-store-pickup-option-for-items-from-local-businesses.htmlAmazon Goes BOPIS, ISP Secret Surveillance, Apple Bites Snap - https://www.nearmedia.co/amazon-goes-bopis-isp-surveillance-apple-bites-snap/FTC_staff_report on lack of mobile ISP privacy - https://www.ftc.gov/system/files/documents/reports/look-what-isps-know-about-you-examining-privacy-practices-six-major-internet-service-providers/p195402_isp_6b_staff_report.pdfLindsey Gamble - Instagram testing search by photo feature - https://twitter.com/lindseygamble_/status/1451948325087948807?s=12How Many Leads Does Google My Business (GMB) Drive? - https://www.sterlingsky.ca/leads-google-my-business/Webinar: The Local SEO Firehose | The State of Local Search in 2022 - https://webinars.duda.co/the-state-of-local-search-2022Carries links:A Tale of Two Panels: Knowledge Panels and Google My Business for Colleges & Universities - Brandon Schmidt - https://localu.org/knowlege-panels-gmb-colleges-universities/Tesco opens ‘GetGo' their first checkout-free store, this one in High Holborn, central London.  - Steve Collinge - https://twitter.com/insightdiysteve/status/1450425782136836096?s=21How ratings and reviews impact local SEO - Ben Fisher - https://www.semrush.com/blog/local-seo-rankings/Google My Business Crowd Attributes For LGBTQ+ Friendly & Transgender Safespace Barry Schwartz - https://www.seroundtable.com/google-my-business-crowd-lgbtq-friendly-transgender-safespace-32287.html (via Claire, Andrew Bullimore, and Joy on Twitter)Review carousels popping up in the last few days in local finder results - Damian Rollison - https://twitter.com/damianrollison/status/1450955332503564299

Packet Pushers - Full Podcast Feed
IPv6 Buzz 087: How Merit Network Used Carrots Over Sticks To Drive IPv6 Adoption

Packet Pushers - Full Podcast Feed

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 50:40


Merit Network is a non-profit ISP that provides network and security services for universities, K-12 schools, libraries, and other educational communities in Michigan. On today's IPv6 Buzz we speak with Lola Killey, Infrastructure and Research Support Analyst, about how Merit encouraged IPv6 adoption and what other institutions can learn from that effort. The post IPv6 Buzz 087: How Merit Network Used Carrots Over Sticks To Drive IPv6 Adoption appeared first on Packet Pushers.

Packet Pushers - IPv6 Buzz
IPv6 Buzz 087: How Merit Network Used Carrots Over Sticks To Drive IPv6 Adoption

Packet Pushers - IPv6 Buzz

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 50:40


Merit Network is a non-profit ISP that provides network and security services for universities, K-12 schools, libraries, and other educational communities in Michigan. On today's IPv6 Buzz we speak with Lola Killey, Infrastructure and Research Support Analyst, about how Merit encouraged IPv6 adoption and what other institutions can learn from that effort. The post IPv6 Buzz 087: How Merit Network Used Carrots Over Sticks To Drive IPv6 Adoption appeared first on Packet Pushers.

The DotCom Magazine Entrepreneur Spotlight
Rickey White, Founder, Start Inboxing, A DotCom Magazine Exclusive Interview

The DotCom Magazine Entrepreneur Spotlight

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 29:31


About Rickey White and Start Inboxing: Experienced Deliverability Professional with a demonstrated history of working in the internet industry. Skilled in Reputation Management, Analytical Skills, Industry Best Practices, and well versed Can Spam and CASL. Strong communicator and thought leader. Formerly of Fuquay-Varina, NC, Rickey now resides in Orlando, FL, home of Start Inboxing, LLC. With over 12 years of experience in email deliverability he is well respected in the deliverability community. His experience includes 2 years as a deliverability expert with Merkle as well as employment with Maropost, iContact, and Contactology. Within his roles Rickey executed client vetting, deliverability consulting, reputation management and managing all ISP relations for over 9 years. He was also the lead on developing and implementing new deliverability tools to scale the monitoring and detection of issues for clients. Rickey specializes in successfully leading teams of consultants and analysts, while specializing in managing sending reputation for their high profiled clients. He is an active participant and certified facilitator in the M3AAWG working group. He is a proud father of three and has a passion for FPV Drone Racing. His other hobbies include R/C cars, trucks, boats, and fishing. When Rickey isn't facilitating, parenting, or enjoying his hobbies, he is looking for ways to grow his brand. He loves molding new talent and exploring new aspects of his industry.

Command Control Power: Apple Tech Support & Business Talk

Topics: -Joe has to troubleshoot his own internet connection with the ISP. -GoNetSpeed appears to be a new provider in the Fairfield County area in CT. https://gonetspeed.com -Jerry has some challenges connecting routers that auto config to an Altice modem/router from Optimum Online. -One of Sam's clients decided to upgrade their ISP service without involving his team. -Changing the all in one modem/router solutions can be extremely frustrating. -Another one of Sam's clients was down after the wiring consultant installed new equipment. It turned out to be oversight but it required a Saturday visit. -Upgrading from Mojave to Big Sur is enough of an issue where there is a MacAdmins channel dedicated to it. (Channel: Mojave-Upgrade-Problem). -Jerry has joined the Apple Silicon bandwagon. -Has anybody else seen performance issues on Apple Silicon that requires a restart?

Explicador
Combustíveis. "Cabe ao Governo fazer ajuste"

Explicador

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 21:22


Afonso Arnaldo, fiscalista da Deloitte, analisa Imposto sobre Produtos Petrolíferos. E explica por que a taxa de carbono pesa no ISP. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Craig Peterson's Tech Talk
How Many Times Per Week Are You Being Cyber Attacked? From Where? How? Why?

Craig Peterson's Tech Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 84:46


How Many Times Per Week Are You Being Cyber Attacked? From Where? How? Why? We've got a new study out showing that North American organizations, businesses, and others, are being hit with an average of 497 cyber attacks per week, right here in the good old USA. [Following is an automated transcript] This is a study by checkpoint software technologies. Checkpoint, I used, oh my gosh. It would have been back in the nineties back then. They were one of the very first genuine firewall companies. And it was a system that I was putting in place for my friends over at troopers. I think it was New England telephone. It might've been Verizon by then. I can't even remember, man. [00:00:41] It's been a little while, but it was, a system we were using in front of this massive system that I designed, I made the largest internet property in the world. At that time called big yellow. It morphed into super pages. It might be familiar with. But it was me and my team that did everything. We built the data center out. [00:01:05] We wrote all of the software. Of course they provided all of the yellow pages type listing so we can put it all in. And we brought it up online and we were concerned. Well, first of all, You know, I've been doing cyber security now for over 30 years. And at this point in time, they wanted something a little more than my home grown firewall. [00:01:29] Cause I had designed and written one in order to protect this huge asset that was bringing in tens of millions of dollars a year to the phone company. So they said, Hey, listen, let's go ahead and we'll use checkpoint and get things going. We did, it was on a little, I remember it was a sun workstation. If you remember those back in the. [00:01:52] And it worked pretty well. I learned how to use it and played with it. And that was my first foray into kind of what the rest of the world had started doing, this checkpoint software, but they've continued on, they make some great firewalls and other intrusions type stuff, detection and blocking, you know, already that I am a big fan, at least on the bigger end. [00:02:17] You know, today in this day and age, I would absolutely use. The Cisco stuff and the higher end Cisco stuff that all ties together. It doesn't just have the fire power firewall, but it has everything in behind, because in this day and age, you've got to look at everything that's happening, even if you're a home user. [00:02:37] And this number really gets everybody concerned. Home users and business users is. Businesses are definitely under bigger attacks than home users are. And particularly when we're talking about businesses, particularly the bigger businesses, the ones that have a huge budget that are going to be able to go out and pay up, you know, a million, $10 million ransom. [00:03:05] Those are the ones that they're after and this analysis. Point software who does see some of those attacks coming in, showed some very disturbing changes. First of all, huge increases in the number of cyber attacks and the number of successful ransoms that have been going on. And we're going to talk a little bit later, too, about where some of those attacks are coming from, and the reason behind those attack. [00:03:36] According to them right now, the average number of weekly attacks on organizations globally. So far, this year is 40% higher than the average before March, 2020. And of course that's when the first lockdowns went into effect and people started working from home in the U S the. Increase in the number of attacks on an organizations is even higher at 53%. [00:04:07] Now you might ask yourself why, why would the U S be attacked more? I know you guys are the best and brightest, and I bet it, I don't even need to say this because you can figure this out yourself, but the us is where the money is. And so that's why they're doing it. And we had president Biden come out and say, Hey, don't attack the. [00:04:27] well, some of those sectors are under khaki for more after he said that then before, right. It's like giving a list to a bad guy. Yeah. I'm going to be gone for a month in June and yeah, there won't be anybody there. And the here's the code to my alarm. Right. You're you're just inviting disaster checkpoints. [00:04:49] Also showing that there were more. Average weekly attacks in September 21. That's this September than any time since January, 2020. In fact, they're saying 870 attacks per organization globally per week. The checkpoint counted in September was double the average in March, 2020. It's kind of funny, right? [00:05:14] It's kind of like a before COVID after COVID or before the Wu Han virus and after the Wu Han virus, however, we might want to know. So there are a lot of attacks going on. Volume is pretty high in a lot of different countries. You've heard me say before some of my clients I've seen attack multiple times a second, so let's take a second and define the attack because being scanned. [00:05:40] I kind of an attack, the looking to see, oh, where is there a device? Oh, okay. Here's a device. So there might be a home router. It might be your firewall or your router at the business. And then what it'll do is, okay, I've got an address now I know is responding, which by the way is a reason. The, we always configure these devices to not respond to these types of things. [00:06:04] And then what they'll do is they will try and identify it. So they'll try and go into the control page, which is why you should never have when. Configuration enabled on any of your routers or firewalls, because they're going to come in and identify you just on that because all of a sudden them brag about what version of the software you're running. [00:06:26] And then if it's responding to that, they will try and use a password. That is known to be the default for that device. So in a lot of these devices, the username is admin and the password is admin. So they try it and now off they go, they're running. Some of these guys will even go the next step and we'll replace the software. [00:06:52] In your router or firewall, they will replace it so that it now directs you through them, everything you are doing through them. So they can start to gather information. And that's why you want to make sure that the SSL slash TLS. That encryption is in place on the website. You're going to, so if you go to Craig peterson.com right now, my website, I'm going to go there myself. [00:07:22] So if you go to Craig peterson.com, you're going to notice that first of all, it's going to redirect you to my secure site and it doesn't really matter. You won't see it. Okay. But you are there because if he. Typically at the left side of that URL bar where it says, Craig peterson.com. You'll see, there's a little lock. [00:07:44] So if you click that lock, it says connection is secure. Now there's a lot more we could go into here. But the main idea is even if your data is being routed through China or. Both of which have happened before many tens of thousands, hundreds of thousands of time times. I'm not even sure of the number now. [00:08:06] It's huge. Even if your data is being routed through them, the odds are, they're not going to see anything. That you are doing on the Craig Peterson site. Now, of course you go into my site, you're going to be reading up on some of the cybersecurity stuff you can do. Right. The outages what's happened in the news. [00:08:27] You can do all of that sort of thing on my side, kind of, who cares, right? Um, but really what you care about is the bank, but it's the same thing with the bank. And I knew mine was going to be up there. And when everybody just check it out anyway, so. So the bad guys, then do this scan. They find a web page log in. [00:08:47] They try the default log in. If it works, the Le the least they will do is change. What are called your DNS settings. That's bad because changing your DNS settings now opens you up to another type of attack, which is they can go ahead. And when your browser says, I want to go to bank of america.com. It is in fact, going to go out to the internet, say is bank of America, the bad guys. [00:09:18] Did, and they will give you their bank of America site that looks like bank of America feels like bank of America. And all they're doing is waiting for you to type into your bank of America, username and password, and then they might redirect you to the. But at that point, they've got you. So there are some solutions to that one as well, and Firefox has some good solutions. [00:09:44] There are others out there and you had to have those that are in the works, but this is just an incredible number. So here's what I'm doing, right. I have been working for weeks on trying to figure out how can I help the most people. And obviously I needed to keep the lights on, right? I've got to pay for my food and gas and stuff, but what I'm planning on doing and what we've sketched out. [00:10:10] In fact, just this week, we got kind of our final sketch out of it is we're going to go ahead and have a success path for cyber security. All of the basic steps on that success path will be. Okay. So it will be training that is absolutely 100% free. And I'll do a deeper dive into some of these things that I'm doing that I'm doing right now here on the radio, because you can't see my desktop. [00:10:40] It's hard to do a deep dive and it's open to anybody, right? If you're a home user or if you're a business user, all of the stuff on that free. Is going to help you out dramatically. And then after that, then there'll be some paid stuff like a membership site. And then obviously done for you. If the cybersecurity stuff is just stuff that you don't want to deal with, you don't have the time to deal with. [00:11:05] You don't want to learn, because believe me, this is something that's taken me decades to learn and it's changing almost every day. So I understand if you don't want to learn it to. That is the other option. I'll give you, which is done for you, which we've been doing now for over 20, 30 years. Stick around. [00:11:25] We'll [00:11:25] So which sectors are economy are being hacked? I mentioned that in the last segment, but yeah, there are some problems and the sectors that president Biden lined out laid out are, are the ones that are under, even more attack after his message. [00:11:42] 497 cyber attacks per week. On average here in the US, that is a lot of attacks. And we started explaining what that meant so that we talked about the scan attacks that are automated and some person may get involved at some point, but the automated attacks can be pretty darn automated. Many of them are just trying to figure out who you are. [00:12:09] So, if it shows up, when they do that little scan that you're using a router that was provided by your ISP, that's a big hint that you are just a small guy of some sort, although I'm shocked at how many bigger businesses that should have their own router, a good router, right. A good Cisco router and a really good next generation firewall. [00:12:34] I'm shocked at how many don't have those things in place, but when they do this, That's the first cut. So if you're a little guy, they'll probably just try and reflash your router. In other words, reprogram it and change it so that they can start monitoring what you're doing and maybe grab some information from. [00:12:56] Pretty simple. If you are someone that looks like you're more of a target, so they connect to your router and let's say, it's a great one. Let's say it's a Cisco router firewall or Palo Alto, or one of those other big companies out there that have some really good products. Uh, at that point, they're going to look at it and say, oh, well, okay. [00:13:18] So this might be a good organization, but when they get. To it again, if when access has turned on wide area, access has turned down, that router is likely to say, this is the property of, uh, Covina hospital or whatever it might be, you know? And any access is disallowed authorized access only. Well, now they know. [00:13:42] Who it is. And it's easy enough just to do a reverse lookup on that address. Give me an address anywhere on the internet. And I can tell you pretty much where it is, whose it is and what it's being used for. So if that's what they do say they have these automated systems looking for this stuff it's found. [00:14:02] So now they'll try a few things. One of the first things they try nowadays is what's called an RDP attack. This is a remote attack. Are you using RDP to connect to your business? Right? A lot of people are, especially after the lockdown, this Microsoft. Desktop protocol has some serious bugs that have been known for years. [00:14:25] Surprisingly to me, some 60% of businesses have not applied those patches that have been available for going on two years. So what then button bad guys will do next. They say, oh, is there a remote desktop access? Cause there probably is most smaller businesses particularly use that the big businesses have a little bit more expensive, not really much more expensive, but much better stuff. [00:14:51] You know, like the Cisco AnyConnect or there's a few other good products out there. So they're going to say, oh, well, okay. Let's try and hack in again. Automate. It's automated. No one has to do anything. So it says, okay, let's see if they patch, let's try and break in a ha I can get in and I can get into this particular machine. [00:15:14] Now there's another way that they can get into their moat desktop. And this apparently has been used for some of the bigger hacks you've heard about recently. So the other way they get in is through credential stuff. What that is is Hey, uh, there are right now some 10 billion records out on the dark web of people's names, email addresses, passwords, and other information. [00:15:43] So, what they'll do is they'll say, oh, well this is Covina hospital and it looks it up backwards and it says, okay, so that's Covina hospital.org. I have no idea if there even is a Gavino hospital, by the way, and will come back and say, okay, great. So now let's look at our database of hacked accounts. Oh, okay. [00:16:04] I see this Covina hospital.org email address with a password. So at that point they just try and stuff. Can we get in using that username and password that we stole off of another website. So you see why it's so important to be using something like one password, a password generator, different passwords on every site, different usernames on every site, et cetera, et cetera. [00:16:29] Right. It gets pretty important per te darn quickly. So now that they're in, they're going to start going sideways and we call that east west in the biz. And so they're on a machine. They will see what they can find on that machine. This is where usually a person gets some. And it depends in historically it's been about six days on average that they spend looking around inside your network. [00:17:00] So they look around and they find, oh yeah, great. Here we go. Yep. Uh, we found this, we found that. Oh, and there's these file server mounts. Yeah. These SMB shares the, you know, the Y drive the G drive, whatever you might call it. So they start gaining through those and then they start looking for our other machines on the network that are compromised. [00:17:23] It gets to be really bad, very, very fast. And then they'll often leave behind some form of ransomware and also extortion, where that extort you additionally, for the threat of releasing your data. So there, there are many other ways they're not going to get into them all today, but that's what we're talking about. [00:17:43] Mirman, we're talking about the 500 cyber attacks per week against the average. North American company. So we have seen some industry sectors that are more heavily targeted than others. Education and research saw an 60% increase in attacks. So their education and I've tried to help out some of the schools, but because of the way the budgets work and the lowest bidder and everything else, they, they end up with equipment. [00:18:17] That's just totally misconfigured. It's just shocking to me. Right. They buy them from one of these big box online places. Yeah. I need a, a Cisco 10, 10. And I need some help in configuring it and all, yeah, no problems or we'll help you. And then they sell it to the school, the school installs it, and it is so misconfigured. [00:18:38] It provides zero protection, uh, almost zero, right. It provides almost no protection at all. And doesn't even use the advanced features that they paid for. Right. That's why, again, don't buy from these big box. Guys just don't do it. You need more value than they can possibly provide you with. So schools, 1500 attacks per week research companies, again, 1500 attacks per week, government and military. [00:19:10] Entities about 1100 weekly attacks. Okay. That's the next, most highest attacked. Okay. Uh, health care organizations, 752 attacks per week on average. Or in this case, it's a 55% increase from last year. So it isn't just checkpoints data that I've been quoting here. That, that gives us that picture. There are a lot of others out there IBM's has Verizon's has all of these main guys, and of course in the end, They've got these huge ransoms to deal with. [00:19:50] Hey, in New Hampshire, one of the small towns just got nailed. They had millions of dollars stolen, and that was just through an email trick that they played in. K again. I T people, um, I I've been thinking about maybe I should put together some sort of coaching for them and coaching for the cybersecurity people, even because there's so much more that you need to know, then you might know, anyways, if you're interested in any of this. [00:20:22] Visit me online. Craig peterson.com/subscribe. You will get my weekly newsletter, all of my show notes, and you'll find out about these various trainings and I keep holding. In fact, there's one in most of the newsletters. Craig peterson.com. Craig Peterson, S O n.com. Stick around. [00:20:43] We've been talking about the types of attacks that are coming against us. Most organizations here in north America are seeing 500 cyber attacks a week, some as many as 1500. Now, where are they coming from? [00:21:00] Whether they're scanning attacks, whether they're going deeper into our networks and into our systems who are the bad guys and what are they doing? Microsoft also has a report that they've been generating, looking at what they consider to be the source of the attacks. Now we know a lot of the reasons I'm going to talk about that too, but the source is an interesting way to look at. [00:21:29] Because the source can also help you understand the reason for the attacks. So according to dark reading, this is kind of an insider, a website you're welcome to go to, but it gets pretty darn deep sometimes, but they are showing this stats from Microsoft, which you can find online that in the last year rush. [00:21:53] Has been the source of 58% of the cyber cat tax. Isn't that amazing now it's not just the cyber attacks. I, I need to clarify this. It's the nation state cyber tech. So what's a nature's nation state cyber attack versus I don't know, a regular cyber attack. Well, the bottom line is a nation state cyber attack is an attack that's occurring and is actually coordinated and run by and on behalf of a nation state. [00:22:31] Uh, So Russia at 58% of all nation state attacks is followed by North Korea, 23% Iran, 11% China, 8%. Now you probably would have thought that China would be. Right up there on that list, but Russia has 50% more of the nation state cyber attacks coming from them than from China. And then after China is south Vietnam, Viet, or I should say South Korea, Vietnam, and Turkey, and they all have less than 1%. [00:23:14] Now, this is this new pool of data that Microsoft has been analyzing. And it's part of this year's Microsoft digital defense report, and they're highlighting the trends in the nation state threat cyber activity hybrid workforce security. Disinformation and your internet of things, operational technology and supply chain security. [00:23:35] In other words, the whole gambit before, before all of this, now the data is also showing that the Russian nation state attacks are increasingly effective, calming from about a 21% successful compromise rate last year to 32%. So basically 50% better this year at effectiveness there, Russians are also targeting more government agencies for intelligence gathering. [00:24:10] So that jumped from 3% of their victims last year to 53%. This. And the Russian nation state actors are primarily targeting guests who us, right? The United States, Ukraine and the United Kingdom. Now this is all according to the Microsoft data. So why has Russia been attacking us? Why is China been attacking us and why the change this. [00:24:38] Well, Russia has been attacking us primarily to rent some us it's a cash cow for them just like oil and gas. They are making crazy money. Now that president Biden has made us dependent on foreign oil supplies. It's just insanity and even dependent on. Gas coming from other places. Well guess where the number one source of gases now for Europe and oil it's Russia. [00:25:08] So we are no longer going to be selling to Europe. Russia is so they're going to be making a lot of money off of. But before then they were actually counted on ransomware to help fund the Russian federal government, as well as of course, these Russian oligarchs, these people who are incredibly rich that have a substantial influence on the government. [00:25:33] Don't if you're wondering who they might be, just think of people like, oh, I don't know. Bill gates and, uh, w who are on the, some of the other big guys, you know, Tim cook, uh, Amazon's Jeff bayzos Elon Musk, right? Those are by my definition and looking it up in the dictionary, they are all a. They get exemptions to laws. [00:25:58] They get laws passed that, protect them. In fact, most of regulations actually protect these big companies and hurt small companies. So I would call them oligarchs and that's the same sort of thing in Russia in Russia. Okay. They probably have a little bit more underhanded stuff than these guys here do, but that's what Russia has been. [00:26:21] China has been continually going after our national secrets, national defense, the largest database of DNA of Americans DNA, of course, is that unique key. If you will building block for all of us, that's what DNA is. And the largest database of all of that uniquely identifying information is in. China stole from the office of personnel management records of a federal employees, their secret clearance, all of their background check information who was spoken with, what did they have to say? [00:27:03] And on and on. So China has been interested in infiltrating our businesses that provide things to the military and the military themselves and the federal state, and even the local governments that's who they've been targeting. And that's why there's 8% number might seem small. Although, as I just mentioned this year, Russia moved, moved dramatically. [00:27:30] They used to be about 3% of their attacks or against the government agencies. And now it's 53%. So Russia. And China are going after our national secrets and they can use them in a cold war, which as I've said, I think the first shots of the third world war have been fired. And frankly, they're all cyber, it's all online and Russia. [00:27:57] Isn't the only nation state actor who's changing its approaches here as espionage is the most common goal amongst all nation state groups as of this year. Tivity of hackers reveals different motivations in Iran, which quadrupled its targeting of Israel. Surprise, surprise. Over the last year. And Iran has been launching destructive attacks, things that will destroy power, power plants, et cetera, and North Korea, which is targeting cryptocurrency companies for profit. [00:28:29] So they're stealing these various crypto coins again, funding their government. So it's, it's a problem. Absolute problem. Government sectors are some of the most targeted 48%. These NGOs non-government organizations that act kind of a quasi government functions and think tanks are 31%. Uh, and Microsoft, by the way, has been alerting customers of nation, state attack, attack attempts. [00:29:01] Guess how many this year that they had to warn about 20,500 times in the past three years. So that's a lot and Microsoft is not a company that's been out there at the front lines. It never has been it's in behind. So to have them come out and say, this is. And okay, by the way, your stolen username and password run for a buck per thousand, and it's only gonna take you hundreds of hours to get it all cleared up. [00:29:32] Isn't that nice spear fishing for a hire can cost a hundred to a thousand dollars per successful account takeover and denial of service attacks are cheap from protected sites, roughly $300. Per month. And if you want to be ransomware king, it's only going to cost you 66 bucks upfront 30% of the profit. [00:29:54] Okay. Craziness. Hey, visit me online. Sign up Craig, peter.com/subscribe. [00:30:03] I had an interesting mastermind meeting this week. There's six of us. We're all business owners and it opened my eyes pretty dramatically because one of the members got hacked, but that's not what I really want to emphasize. [00:30:20] This whole cybersecurity thing gets pretty complicated, pretty quickly. And a friend of mine who is in one of my mastermind groups had a real problem. And the here's here's what went on. We'll call him Walt for back of a letter, lack of a better name since that is his name. [00:30:40] And he doesn't mind me sharing this with you. Walt has a very small business that he and his wife run, and they have a couple of contractors that help out with some things, but his business is very reliant on advertising and primarily what he does is Facebook advertising. Now I've been talking for two years, I think in this mastermind group about cyber security and the fact that everyone needs good cyber security. [00:31:13] And he always just kind of pole hum to, uh, wow. You know, and it's just too complicated for me. I got to thinking for a, you know, a bit, really a few weeks, what does he mean to complicated? Cause there's some basic things you can do. So this week on Tuesday, I was on our mastermind groups meeting and I explained, okay, so here's what happened to Walt. [00:31:42] He had $40,000 stolen, which by the way, it's a lot of money for a teeny tiny husband wife company. And. Uh, well, here's what we did. He, we helped them. We got the FBI involved and, you know, with our direct ties, cause we work with them on certain types of cases and he got back every dime, which is just totally unheard of. [00:32:06] But um, without going into all of the details there, I spent a problem. 1520 minutes with the whole group and the mastermind explaining the basics of cyber security. And that really kind of woke me up, frankly, because of their responses. Now these are all small business owners and so they're making pretty decent money. [00:32:31] In fact, every one of them and they all have some contractors and some employees all except for Walt and his wife, they had just have contractors and. I had two completely different responses from two members of this group that no. Let me tell you this was really eye opening for me. And this is why you might've heard me in the first segment talking about this, but this is why I have really changed my view of this stuff, this cybersecurity stuff, because I explained. [00:33:08] If you're using things like Norton antivirus or McAfee, antivirus, or really any of them, even the built-in Microsoft defender this year, those standard antivirus system. I have only been able to catch about 30% of the malware out there, 30%, you know, that's like having a house and you've got a security guard posted out front. [00:33:39] He's armed, he's ready to fight. And yet all of your windows are open and all of your doors are unlocked. And all someone has to do is crawl in the side window because that guy that's posted up front, he's not going to be able to stop. So 30% effectiveness. And of course, Walt had all of the basic stuff. [00:33:59] He thought he was good enough. It's not worth spending time or money doing any of this. And of course it turned out to be well worth the time and money if he had done it. But he has a friend who has contacts and, and made things happen for him. So I guess he's kind of, kind of lucky in that regard, but I explained that and I said, do you know the, the way you. [00:34:21] To go. If you're a small business, it's about $997 a month for a small business, with a handful of employees to get the type of security you really need. There's going to catch. 90 something 98%. Maybe if, if things go well of the stuff going on, in other words, you don't just have an armed guard at the front door. [00:34:46] You've got all the windows closed and blocked and the doors closed and locked as well. So yeah, somebody can still get in, but they got to really want to get in and risk getting caught. So that's kind of the analogy that I used now. One of the members of my. Of my mastermind thought, well, okay. Cause you're just being Frank with me. [00:35:09] Right? We're all friends. She said, well, initially I thought, oh Craig, I'm going to have to have you help out with stuff here. Cause my, you know, I'm concerned about my security. I make some good money. Uh, she's the one that has employee. She has a million dollar plus a year business and she wants to keep it safe. [00:35:26] But then she. Uh, you know, but, but you know, you were talking about all of this Norton and stuff and that it doesn't work. So I, I just, I don't have any hope. And that's when the another member jumped in and this other member said, well, Uh, oh, that's not what I got at all. I got the, the normal off the shelf stuff that you buy that you're going to get from Amazon, or you're going to get from PC connection or wherever that stuff is not going to work, but there is stuff that does, but it's only professional stuff. [00:36:02] You can only get it from professionals that are trained in certified. Which is the right message. Right. That was the message I was trying to relay. Yeah. Don't try and do it yourself because you can't even get the right tools that you need. That is frankly a problem. So that really got me to think. In, in a very big way, because here are two people that have heard me talk about cybersecurity and their eyes probably glazed over, but now their eyes, I know at least one of these ladies definitely glazed over. [00:36:36] So I've come to the realization that sometimes I. A little too deep into things. And although I can explain it quite well to many people, sometimes people glaze over and I get emails from you guys saying kind of the same thing. I really appreciate it. I don't understand a lot of what you're saying, Craig, but thanks for being there. [00:36:59] Listen to you every week here on the radio. Uh, then that's good. That's reassuring, but now I've come to realize a few things. One is. The I've got to be a lot clearer in my messaging, because even when talking to my friends, it is a little bit overwhelming for them sometimes. Right. And then the next thing is everybody needs help because you're being lied to. [00:37:29] Right. How are people getting ransomware? If the stuff that they're buying work. Maybe it's just me, but I think there's a disconnect there. So a lot of you guys have gone out and you've hired people and I want to spend just a few minutes right now, going through some red flags that you need to be looking out for in vendor security assessment. [00:37:56] Now I'm putting one together. As well, right yet another one. Uh, and what I'm trying to do is help you out, right? This is not as sales tool. It is trying to help you figure out where you're at. I'm putting together a webinar that I'm going to be holding these what I'm calling bootcamps, where I go through and show you exactly how to do the basic steps that you need to do in order to be safe on. [00:38:25] Okay. If an online, all that means is your, is plugged in, right. Okay. It doesn't mean you're going out and doing a lot of stuff out there on the internet just means it's connected. So those are going to be coming out. I will send an email out as soon as all of that. Stuff's ready. Cause. Absolutely free. And these assessments, I have the basic one that you can do yourself. [00:38:47] It's a self-assessment. And then I have the more advanced ones that I do that are five grand. Okay. So you've got to be a decent sized business for this to make sense where we look for all of the security problem. On all of your computers and your networks, and then give you a list of things you need to do and how to do them. [00:39:10] Okay. So it's well worth it for them, but if you're a very small company and you're trying to do some of this yourself, I want to help you. So that's what these boot camps are going to be all over. And also what the scorecard is going to be all about. So that's coming up, but here are some good red flags and an assessment. [00:39:30] I found this again on dark reading. This is kind of an insider website for those of us in the cybersecurity business, but, um, How can you verify the information that vendors are giving you about their own cybersecurity posture? We've heard in the news and I've talked about them all year, this year, and for years past. [00:39:56] That are we're vendors can be our worst nightmare because some of these hacks come in through our vendors. So you've got yourself, a cybersecurity company. How do you know if they are really telling you the truth? And man, is that hard for you to know? Right. You're going to ask him questions and the salesmen are going to say, oh yeah, yeah, yeah. [00:40:21] That's why we don't have salesmen. Right. We have engineers. You talk to me, you might talk to my son or my daughter, people who have been doing this with me, who I have trained and helped out. So this guy who wrote the article and there's this on attributed, I don't see an attribution on here on this page. [00:40:41] I definitely want to give him, probably I heard is John Babinec wrote this thing and he is a principle threat hunters. What he calls himself over at net and rich. So he says, here's what you got to do. And if you're trying to be cost-effective, he puts it in. What I call an ed month clause. And one of these days I'll tell you that story, but he calls it a validity check question so that an honest vendor would tell you, no, they don't do X and give you a good reason why they don't like it's not cost effective. [00:41:17] It's outside of a reasonable risk model. Does that make sense to you? So when you're trying to evaluate a vendor, who's going to be doing your cyber security put in one of these validity checks put in one of these questions. It doesn't really matter to you, but it's something that would be very hard for one of these cybersecurity companies to do. [00:41:42] And maybe it doesn't fit the risk model that you have. I think it's just absolutely brilliant. Probably one of the better ways when you're trying to evaluate an MSSP as cybersecurity managed or otherwise provider stick in something like that. So you have a red flag that just stands out for you. All right. [00:42:04] Make sure you are registered online. Craig Peter sohn.com/subscribe. So you can find out about all of these trainings coming up. [00:42:17] If you've never heard of the Carrington event, I really hope, frankly, I really, really do hope we never have to live through one of these. Again, there is a warning out there right now about an internet apocalypse that could happen because of the Sun. [00:42:34] Solar storms are something that happens really kind of all of the time. The sun goes through solar cycles. About every seven years, there are longer cycles as well. You might know. I have an advanced class amateur radio license I've had for a long time, and we rely a lot when we're dealing with short wave on the solar cycle. [00:42:59] You see what happens is that the sun charges, the atmosphere. You see that if you've ever seen the Northern light, that is. Part of the Sunzi missions, hitting our magnetic field and kind of getting sucked into the core of the earth, if you will, as they get caught in that field. And the more charged the atmosphere is, the more bounce you get. [00:43:24] That's what we call it bounce. And the reason us hams have all these different frequencies to use is because of the battle. We can go different frequencies with different distances, I should say, using different frequencies. So think about it right now. You've got the earth and I want to talk from Boston to Chicago. [00:43:47] For instance, I know about how many miles it is, and I have to figure out in the ionosphere up in the higher levels of the atmosphere, what frequency. To use in order to go up into the atmosphere, bounce back, and then hit Chicago. That's the idea. It's not quite as simple or as complex in some ways, as it sounds, a lot of people just try different frequencies and a lot of hams just sit there, waiting for anybody anywhere to talk to, particularly if they are. [00:44:20] It's really quite fun. Now what we're worried about, isn't so much just the regular solar activity. We get worried when the sun spots increase. Now, the solar cycle is what has primary image. On the temperature on earth. So no matter what, you might've heard that isn't your gas, guzzling car or a diesel truck that causes the Earth's temperature to change. [00:44:49] Remember the only constant when it comes to the Earth's temperature has been changed over the millions of years. We had periods where the earth was much warmer than it is now had more common that carbon dioxide in the atmosphere than it does now had less. In fact, right now we are at one of the lowest levels of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere in earth, long, long. [00:45:15] So the sun, if you might remember, comes up in the morning, warms things up, right? And then it cools down. When the sun disappears at nighttime, it has a huge impact. It's almost exclusively the impact for our temperatures. If there's other things too, for instance, eruption can spew all to hold a lot of carbon dioxide. [00:45:40] In fact, just one, just Mount St. Helens wanted erupted, put more carbon dioxide into the atmosphere than man has throughout our entire existence. Just to give you an idea, right? So these alarms that are out there, uh, you know, come on, people. Really, and now we're seeing that in, uh, this last year we had a 30% increase in the ice cap up in the, in, up in the north, up in Northern Canada, around the polls. [00:46:12] Uh, we also had some of these glaciers growing. It was so funny. I saw an article this year, or excuse me, this week that was showing a sign that was at one of our national parks. And it said this glacier will have disappeared by 2020. Of course it hasn't disappeared. In fact, it has grown now and it's past 2020. [00:46:34] Anyhow, the sun has a huge impact on us in so many ways. And one of the ways is. Well, something called a coronal mass ejection. This is seriously charged particles. That tend to be very, very directional. So when, when it happens, when there's one of these CMS coronal, mass ejections, it's not just sending it out all the way around the sun everywhere. [00:47:02] It's really rather concentrated in one. One particular spot. Now we just missed one not too long ago. And let me see if I can find it here. Just mast, a cm E near miss. Here we go. There a solar super storm in July, 2012, and it was a very, very close shave that we had most newspapers didn't mention it, but this could have been. [00:47:33] AB absolutely incredible. We'd be picking up the pieces for the next 50 years. Yeah. Five, zero years from this one particular storm. And what happens is these, these solar flares, if you will, are very, very extreme, they CME. You're talking about x-rays extreme UV, ultraviolet radiation, reaching the earth at the speed of light ionizes, the upper layers of atmosphere. [00:48:02] When that happens, by the way, it hurts our communications, but it can also have these massive effects where it burns out saddle. And then causes radio blackouts, GPS, navigation problems. Think about what happened up in Quebec. So let me just look at this call back, uh, hit with an E and yeah, here we go. And March 13th, 1989. [00:48:33] Here we go. Here's another one. Now I remembered. And this is where Quill back got nailed. I'm looking at a picture here, which is, uh, looking at the United States and Canada from the sky and where the light is. And you can see Quebec is just completely black, but they have this massive electrical blackout and it's becomes. [00:48:57] Of this solar storm. Now they, these storms that I said are quite directional, depending on where it hits and when it hits things can get very, very bad. This particular storm back in 1989 was so strong. We got to see their Rora Borealis, the Northern lights as far south, as Florida and cue. Isn't that something, when we go back further in time to this Carrington event that I mentioned, you could see the Northern lights at the equals. [00:49:35] Absolutely amazing. Now the problem with all of this is we've never really had an internet up online. Like we have today when we had one of the storms hit. And guess what we're about to go into right now, we're going into an area or a time where the sun's going to be more active, certainly on this, this 11 year cycle and possibly another bigger cycle too, that we don't really know much about. [00:50:07] But when this hit us back in the 1850s, what we saw was a, uh, a. Telegraph system that was brought to its knees. Our telegraphs were burned out. Some of the Telegraph buildings were lit. They caught on fire because of the charges coming in, people who were working the telegraphs, who are near them at the time, got electric shocks or worse than that. [00:50:34] Okay. 1859 massive Carrington event compass needles were swinging wildly. The Aurora Borealis was visible in Columbia. It's just amazing. So that was a severe storm. A moderate severity storm was the one that hit in Quebec here, knocked out Quebec, uh, electric. Nine hour blackout on Northeast Canada. What we think would happen if we had another Carrington event, something that happened to 150 years ago is that we would lose power on a massive scale. [00:51:13] So that's one thing that would happen. And these massive transformers that would likely get burned out are only made in China and they're made on demand. Nobody has an inventory. So it would be at least six months before most of the country would get power back. Can you believe that that would be just terrible and we would also lose internet connectivity. [00:51:39] In fact, the thinking that we could lose internet connectivity with something much less than a severe storm, maybe if the Quebec power grid solar, a massive objection here. Maybe if that had happened, when. The internet was up. They might have burned out internet in the area and maybe further. So what we're worried about is if it hits us, we're going to lose power. [00:52:07] We're going to lose transformers on the transmission lines and other places we're going to lose satellites and that's going to affect our GPS communication. We're going to lose radio communication, and even the undersea cables, even though they're now no longer. Regular copper cables. It's now being carried of course, by light in pieces of glass. [00:52:32] The, those cables need to have repeaters about every 15 miles or so under underwater. So the power is provided by. Copper cables or maybe some other sort of power. So these undersea cables, they're only grounded at extensive intervals, like hundreds or thousands of kilometers apart. So there's going to be a lot of vulnerable components. [00:52:59] This is all a major problem. We don't know when the next massive. Solar storm is going to happen. These coronal mass ejections. We do know they do happen from time to time. And we do know it's the luck of the draw and we are starting to enter another solar cycle. So be prepared, everything. Of course, you're listening to Craig Peterson, cybersecurity strategist. [00:53:28] If you'd like to find out more and what you can do, just visit Craig peterson.com and subscribe to my weekly show notes. [00:53:39] Google's got a new admission and Forbes magazine has an article by Zach Dorfman about it. And he's saying you should delete Google Chrome now after Google's newest tracking admission. So here we go. [00:53:55] Google's web browser. Right? It's been the thing for people to use Google Chrome for many years, it's been the fastest. Yeah, not always people kind of leapfrog it every once in a while, but it has become quite a standard. Initially Microsoft is trying to be the standard with their terrible browser and yeah, I to Exploder, which was really, really bad and they have finally completely and totally shot it in the head. [00:54:29] Good move there on their part. In fact, they even got rid of their own browser, Microsoft edge. They shot that one in. They had to, I know I can hear you right now saying, oh, Craig, I don't know. I just use edge browser earlier today. Yeah. But guess what? It isn't edge browser. It's actually Google Chrome. The Microsoft has rebranded. [00:54:52] You see the guts to Google Chrome are available as what's called an open source project. It's called chromium. And that allows you to take it and then build whatever you want on top of. No, that's really great. And by the way, Apple's web kit, Kat is another thing that many people build browsers on top of and is part of many of these browsers we're talking about right now, the biggest problem with the Google Chrome. [00:55:22] Is they released it so they could track you, how does Google make its money? Well, it makes us money through selling advertising primarily. And how does it sell advertising if it doesn't know much or anything about you? So they came out with the Google Chrome browser is kind of a standard browser, which is a great. [00:55:43] Because Microsoft, of course, is very well known for not bothering to follow standards and say what they have is the actual standard and ignoring everybody else. Yeah. Yeah. I'm picking on Microsoft. They definitely deserve it. Well, there is what is being called here in Forbes magazine, a shocking new tracking admission from. [00:56:05] One that has not yet made headlines. And there are about what 2.6 billion users of Google's Chrome worldwide. And this is probably going to surprise you and it's frankly, Pretty nasty and it's, I think a genuine reason to stop using it. Now, as you probably know, I have stopped using Chrome almost entirely. [00:56:31] I use it when I have to train people on Chrome. I use it when I'm testing software. There's a number of times I use it, but I don't use. The reality is the Chrome is an absolute terror. When it comes to privacy and security, it has fallen way behind its rivals in doing that. If you have an iPhone or an iPad or a Mac, and you're using safari, apple has gone a long ways to help secure your. [00:57:09] Well, that's not true with Chrome. In fact, it's not protecting you from tracking and Dave up data harvesting. And what Google has done is they've said, okay, well, we're going to get these nasty third party cookies out of the whole equation. We're not going to do that anymore. And what they were planning on doing is instead of knowing everything specifically. [00:57:34] You they'd be able to put you in a bucket. So they'd say, okay, well you are a 40 year old female and you are like driving fast cars and you have some kids with a grandkid on the way, and you like dogs, not cats, right? So that's a bucket of people that may be a few hundred or maybe up to a thousand. As opposed to right now where they can tell everything about you. [00:58:04] And so they were selling that as a real advantage because they're not tracking you individually anymore. No, we're putting you in a bucket. Well, it's the same thing. Right. And in fact, it's easier for Google to put you in a bucket then to track everything about you and try and make assumptions. And it's easier for people who are trying to buy ads to place in front of you. [00:58:28] It's easier for them to not have to kind of reverse engineer all of the data the Google has gathered in instead of. To send this ad to people that are in this bucket and then that bucket. Okay. It makes sense to you, but I, as it turns out here, Google has even postponed of that. All right. They really have, they're the Google's kind of hiding. [00:58:54] It's really what's going on out there. Uh, they are trying to figure out what they should do, why they should do it, how they should do it, but it's, it's going to be a problem. This is a bad habit. The Google has to break and just like any, anybody that's been addicted to something it's going to take a long time. [00:59:16] They're going to go through some serious jitters. So Firefox is one of the alternatives and to Google Chrome. And it's actually a very good one. It is a browser that I use. I don't agree with some of the stuff that Mozilla and Firefox does, but again, right. Nobody agrees on everything. Here's a quote from them. [00:59:38] Ubiquitous surveillance harms individually. And society Chrome is the only major browser that does not offer meaningful protection against cross cross site tracking and Chrome will continue to leave users unprotected. And then it goes on here because. Uh, Google response to that. And they admit that this massive web tracking out of hand and it's resulted in, this is a quote from Google and erosion of trust, where 72% of people feel that almost all of what they do online is being. [01:00:19] By advertisers, technology firms or others, 81% say the potential risks from data collection outweigh the benefit by the way, the people are wrong. 72% that feel almost all of what they do on online is being tracked. No, no. The answer is 100% of what you do is probably being tracked in some way online. [01:00:41] Even these VPN servers and systems that say that they don't do log. Do track you take a look at proton mail just last week. Proton mail it's in Switzerland. Their servers are in Switzerland. A whole claim to fame is, Hey, it's all encrypted. We keep it safe. We don't do logging. We don't do tracking, uh, guess what they handed over the IP addresses of some of the users to a foreign government. [01:01:10] So how can you do that? If you're not logging, if you're not tracking. Yeah, right. They are. And the same thing is true for every paid VPN service I can think of. Right. So how can Google openly admit that their tracking is in place tracking everything they can, and also admit that it's undermining our privacy and. [01:01:38] Their flagship browser is totally into it. Right? Well, it's really, it's gotta be the money. And Google does not have a plan B this anonymized tracking thing that they've been talking about, you know, the buckets that I mentioned, isn't realistic, frankly. Uh, Google's privacy sandbox is supposed to Fitbit fix it. [01:02:00] I should say. The, the whole idea and the way it's being implemented and the way they've talked about it, the advertisers on happy. So Google's not happy. The users are unhappy. So there you go. That's the bottom line here from the Forbes article by Zach Dorfman, delete Google Chrome. And I said that for a long time, I do use some others. [01:02:27] I do use Firefox and I use. Which is a fast web browser, that some pretty good shape. Hey, if you sign up for my show's weekly newsletter, not only will you get all of my weekly tips that I send to the radio hosts, but you will get some of my special reports that go into detail on things like which browser you shouldn't be using. [01:02:52] Sign up right now. Craig peterson.com. [01:02:57] Many businesses have gone to the cloud, but the cloud is just another word for someone else's computer. And many of the benefits of the cloud just haven't materialized. A lot of businesses have pulled back and are building data centers again. [01:03:14] The reason I mentioned this thing about Microsoft again, and the cloud is Microsoft has a cloud offering. [01:03:23] It's called Microsoft Azure. Many people, many businesses use it. We have used it with some of our clients in the past. Now we have some special software that sits in front of it that helps to secure. And we do the same thing for Amazon web services. I think it's important to do that. And we also use IBM's cloud services, but Microsoft is been pitching for a long time. [01:03:51] Come use our cloud services and we're expecting here probably within the next month, a big announcement from Microsoft. They're planning on making it so that you can have your desktop reside in Microsoft's cloud, in the Azure cloud. And they're selling really the feature of it doesn't matter where you are. [01:04:17] You have your desktop and it doesn't matter what kind of computer you're on. As long as you can connect to your desktop, using some just reasonable software, you will be able to be just like you're in front of a computer. So if you have a Chromebook or a Mac, Or a windows or tablet, whatever, and you're at the grocery store or the coffee shop or the office, you'll be able to get it, everything, all of your programs, all your files. [01:04:47] And we, Microsoft will keep the operating system up to date for you automatically a lot of great selling points. And we're actually looking into that. Not too heavily yet. We'll give them a year before we really delve into it at all. Cause it takes them a while to get things right. And Microsoft has always been one that adds all kinds of features, but most of the time, most of them don't work and we can, we can document that pretty easily, even in things like Microsoft. [01:05:18] Well, the verge is now reporting that Microsoft has warned users of its as your cloud computing service, that their data has been exposed online for the last two years. Yeah, let me repeat that in case you missed it, you, uh, yeah. I'm I'm I might've misspoken. Right. Uh, let me see, what does it say? It says, um, users of Azure cloud competing service. [01:05:48] So that's their cloud. Microsoft's big cloud. Okay. Um, their data has been. Exposed online. Okay. So that means that people could get the data, maybe manipulate the data that sort of exposed means for the last two years. Are you kidding me? Microsoft is again, the verge. Microsoft recently revealed that an error in its Azure cosmos database product left more than 3,300 as your customers data. [01:06:24] Completely exposed. Okay guys. So this, this, this is not a big thing, right? It can't possibly be big thing because you know who uses Azure, right. Nobody uses a zer and nobody uses hosted databases. Come on, give me a break. Let me see, what else does this have to say? Oh, okay. It says that the vulnerability was reported, reportedly introduced into Microsoft systems in 2019, when the company added a data visualization feature called Jupiter notebook to cosmos DB. [01:06:59] Okay. Well, I'm actually familiar with that one and let's see what small companies let's see here. Um, some Azure cosmos DB clients include Coca Cola. Liberty mutual insurance, Exxon mobile Walgreens. Hmm. Let me see. Could any of these people like maybe, maybe Liberty mutual insurance and Walgreens, maybe they'd have information about us, right. [01:07:26] About our health and social security numbers and account numbers and credit cards. Names addresses. Right, right. That's again, why I got so upset when these places absolutely insist on taking my social security number, right? It, it, first of all, when it was put in place, the federal government guaranteed, it would never be used for anything other than social security. [01:07:53] And the law even said it could not be used for anything other than social security. And then the government started expanding it. Right. And the IRS started using it. To track all of our income and you know, that's one thing right there, the government computers, they gotta be secure. Right. All of these breaches we hear about that. [01:08:12] Can't be true. Uh, so how about when the insurance company wants your personal information? Like your social security number? What business is it of? There's really no. Why do they have to have my social security number? It's a social security number. It's not some number that's tattooed on my forehead. [01:08:36] That's being used to track me. Is it this isn't a socialist country like China is, or the Soviet union was right. It's not socially. So why are they tracking us like that? Walgreens? Why do they need some of that information? Why does the doctor that you go to that made the prescription for Walgreens? Why do they need that information? [01:09:00] And I've been all over this because they don't. Really need it. They want, it makes their life easier, but they don't really need it. However, it exposes us. Now, if you missed the email, I sent out a week ago, two weeks ago now, I guess. You missed something big because I, in my weekly newsletter went through and described exactly what you could do in order to keep your information private. [01:09:35] So in those cases where websites asking for information that they don't really need, right? You don't want to lie, but if they don't really need your real name, why you're giving them your real name? Why do you use a single email address? Why don't you have multiple addresses? Does that start make sense to you guys? [01:09:54] And now we find out that Microsoft Azure, their cloud services, where they're selling cloud services, including a database that can be used online, a big database, uh, 3,300 customers looks like some of them are actually kind of big. I don't know. ExxonMobil pretty big. Yeah. I think so. Walgreens, you think that that might be yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah. [01:10:22] Y. Why are we trusting these companies? You know it, if you have a lot of data, a lot of customers, you are going to be a major target of nation states to hack you and bat just general hackers, bad guys. But you're also, if, if you've got all this information, you've also got to have a much higher level of security than somebody that doesn't have all of that information. [01:10:52] Does that make sense too? Did I say that right? You don't need the information and, and I've got to warn anybody that's in a business, whether you're a business owner or you're an employee, do not keep more data than you need the new absolutely need to run your company. And that includes data about your customers. [01:11:16] And maybe, maybe it's even more specifically data about your customer. Because what can happen is that data can be stolen and we just found. That? Yes, indeed. It could have been, it was exposed Microsoft the same. We don't know how much it was stolen. If anything was stolen. Um, yeah, Walgreens. Hey, I wonder if anyone's going to try and get some pain pills illegally through, uh, this database hack or a vulnerability anyways. [01:11:47] All right, everyone. Stick around. We'll be back. Of course, you listening to Craig Peterson. I am a cybersecurity strategist for business, and I'm here to help you as well. You can ask any question any time, uh, consumers are the people I help the most, you know, I wish I got a dime for every time I answered a question. [01:12:09] Just email me@craigpeterson.com me@craigpeterson.com and stick around. [01:12:18] Whether or not, you agree with the lockdown orders that were put in place over this COVID pandemic that we had. Uh, there are some other parts of the world that are doing a lot more. [01:12:34] Australia has, I don't know. I think that they went over the deep end. The much, the same thing is true right next door to them. [01:12:45] And I am looking at a report of what they are doing with this new app. Uh, you might be aware that both apple and Google came out with an application programming interface. That could be used for contract tack tracking, contact tracking. There you go. Uh, it wasn't terribly successful. Some states put some things in place. [01:13:13] Of course you get countries like China. I love the idea because heaven forbid you get people getting together to talk about a Tannen square remembrance. Now you want to know who all of those people were, who were in close proximity, right? So, you know, good for China a while, as it turns out, Australia is putting something in place they have yet another COVID lockdown. [01:13:39] They have COVID quarantine orders. Now I think if you are sick, you should stay on. I've always felt that I, you know, I had 50 employees at one point and I would say, Hey, if you're sick, just stay home. Never required a doctor's note or any of that other silliness, come on. People. If someone's sick, they're sick and let them stay home. [01:14:04] You don't want to get everybody else in the office, sick and spread things around. Right. Doesn't that just kind of make sense. Well, they now in Australia, don't trust people to stay home, to get moving. Remember China, they were, they were taking welders and we're going into apartments in anybody that tested positive. [01:14:22] They were welding them into their apartment for minimum of two weeks. And so hopefully they had food in there and they had a way to get fresh water. Australia is not going quite that far, but some of the states down under. Using facial recognition and geolocation in order to enforce quarantine orders and Canada. [01:14:47] One of the things they've been doing for very long time is if you come into the country from out of the country, even if you're a Canadian citizen, you have to quarantine and they'll send people by your house or you have to pay to stay for 10 days in a quarantine hope. So you're paying the course now inflated prices for the hotel, because they're a special quarantine hotel. [01:15:14] You have to pay inflated prices to have food delivered outside your door. And that you're stuck there for the 10 days, or if you're at home though, they, you know, you're stuck there and they'll send people by to check up on you. They'll make phone calls to check up on you and. They have pretty hefty find. [01:15:36] Well, what Australia has decided to do is in Australia is Charlene's even going from one state to another state are required to prove that they're obeying a 14 day quarantine. And what they have to do is have this little app on their phone and they, the app will ping them saying, prove it. And then they have to take a photo of themselves with geo location tag on it and send it up via the app to prove their location. [01:16:15] And they have to do all of that within 15 minutes of getting the notification. Now the premier of the state of south Australia, Steven Marshall said we don't tell them how often or when on a random basis, they have to reply within 15 minutes. And if you don't then a police, officer's going to show up at the address you're supposed to be at to conduct an in-person check. [01:16:43] Very very intrusive. Okay. Here's another one. This is a, an unnamed government spokesperson who was apparently speaking with Fox news quote. The home quarantine app is for a selected cohort of returning self Australians who have applied to be part of a trial. If successful, it will help safely ease the burden of travel restrictions associated with the pandemic. [01:17:10] So there you go. People nothing to worry about. It's just a trial. Uh, it will go away. Uh, just like, uh, for instance, income tax, as soon as rule, number one is over, it will be removed and it will never be more than 3% and it will only apply to the top 1% of wage-earners. So there you go. Right. And we all know that world war one isn't over yet. [01:17:34] Right. So that's why they still have it in somehow. Yeah, some of the middle class pays the most income tax. I don't know. Interesting. Interesting. So there you go. Little news from down under, we'll see if that ends up happening up here. News from China, China has, uh, China and Russia have some interesting things going on. [01:17:55] First of all, Russia is no longer saw. Country, they kind of are. They kind of aren't, they are a lot freer in many ways than we are here in the United States. Of course, China, very heavily socialist. In fact, they're so socialists, they are communist and China. And Russia both want their kids to have a very good education in science, engineering, and mathematics. [01:18:23] Not so much on history, not so much on, on politics. Right. But definitely heavy on the, on the sciences, which I can see that makes all the sense. I think everybody should be pretty heavily on the science. Well, according to the wall street journal this week, gamers under the age of 18 will not be allowed to play online games between 8:00 PM and 9:00 PM on Friday, Saturdays and Sundays. [01:1

The Ecommerce Opportunity by Chase Dimond
Winning Tactics for iOS15 Email Marketing with Jimmy Kim From Sendlane

The Ecommerce Opportunity by Chase Dimond

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 20:28


We cover the email marketing strategy for 2021 on What to Actually Do as an Email Marketer for iOS15.Jimmy Kim, the Founder and CEO of Sendlane, a top email marketing platform, shares his winning tactics for iOS15 Email Marketing.Here are the six things you can do as a marketer to prepare and adapt:1. Consider Double Opt-in or Confirmed emailYes, I know your # subscribers will be cut in half.Yes, I know that it will hurt the experienceYes, I know that… (ENTER 500 other reasons)But now let me tell you WHY.The laws are evolving and changing. You know about GDPR, CASL, CCPA… but do you know about: VCDPA, CPA, or NP law! Those passed recently, and it's continuing to create rules by the state on HOW you can communicate with customers, especially if your business is at scale. You'd be shocked how much better everything is when you email the people that confirm their next email from you.2. Segment data Creating a segment of active, engaged users - aka people who have opened or clicked an email in the last X days... is your go-to the segment you use most.That's great, but it simply will not work anymore. Instead, you will have to start expanding your mind and get creative.ideas: Revenue-based + Subscription based segmentationClick and revenue/event-based segmentation Website Visits or Any other recent signalsSegment based on audience preferences 3. Learn how to use the “other metrics” Bounces, spam complaints, unsubscribes are all “other metrics” you barely pay attention to right now.But when you can't identify an open rate, you need to start thinking about it differently. Spam complaints and bounces will matter even more - ESP's flying a little blind, and so are you. There's going to be knee-jerk reactions to a high bounce rate (over 2%) and spam complaints over 0.1%. Remember, Google already doesn't report back direct spam complaints to the email as Yahoo and AOL do.  4. A/B testing subject lines are deadSay goodbye to basic A/B split testing; it's now useless. Enter Multivariate testing. You will need to test a lot more content primarily focused on CTA to improve CTR with the end goal of revenue.Experiment like crazy and keep testing. 5. Segment by ISPISP = Internet Service ProviderAnd you need to start drilling down all your different ISP's to learn more about how each segment is reacting and adjust for it. It's time to care. 6. And the most obvious one… CONTENT MATTERSIf you've been copying and pasting your last campaigns or borrowing from others, the day has come that content is essential. The rise of copywriters, especially direct response copywriters, will start to appear. SELLING with words is real, and it's going to be the make or break point for your marketing efforts. Full article from Sendlane here: https://www.sendlane.com/blog/ios-15-email-marketingVisit Sendlane here: https://www.sendlane.com/Feel free to reach out to Jimmy directly with any questions: jkim at sendlane.com (turn the at into an @ when you go to email him)Podcast listeners can take advantage of a special 25% off The Ultimate BFCM Email Marketing Playbook.This link should auto apply the discount code: https://chasedimond.gumroad.com/l/bfcm-playbook/podcast

Hacker History Podcast
The history of Gianluca Varisco

Hacker History Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 35:45


Hacker History sits down with Gianluca Varisco and learns about his story. He started out in 90s working on micro computers. We learn how he got into secuirty, started an ISP. Learned about Linux and open source. Eventually lands at Red Hat, gets into encrypted VOIP in the very early days. Gianluca spends time in […]

The Tech Guy (Video HD)
Leo Laporte - The Tech Guy: 1836

The Tech Guy (Video HD)

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 166:19


Streaming video services overseas, where is my email stored? Logging into Windows without passwords, why is my phone battery swollen? Can passwords be compromised on a public hotspot? Adjusting the in-call volume in an Android phone, connecting a phone to your TV, Leo talks with Sam Abuelsamid, Chris Marquardt, Rod Pyle, and more of your calls! Host: Leo Laporte Guests: Sam Abuelsamid, Chris Marquardt, and Rod Pyle Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/the-tech-guy. Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit For detailed show notes, visit techguylabs.com. Sponsors: udacity.com/TWiT offer code TWIT75 userway.org/twit wealthfront.com/techguy

The Tech Guy (Video HI)
Leo Laporte - The Tech Guy: 1836

The Tech Guy (Video HI)

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 166:19


Streaming video services overseas, where is my email stored? Logging into Windows without passwords, why is my phone battery swollen? Can passwords be compromised on a public hotspot? Adjusting the in-call volume in an Android phone, connecting a phone to your TV, Leo talks with Sam Abuelsamid, Chris Marquardt, Rod Pyle, and more of your calls! Host: Leo Laporte Guests: Sam Abuelsamid, Chris Marquardt, and Rod Pyle Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/the-tech-guy. Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit For detailed show notes, visit techguylabs.com. Sponsors: udacity.com/TWiT offer code TWIT75 userway.org/twit wealthfront.com/techguy

The Tech Guy (MP3)
Leo Laporte - The Tech Guy: 1836

The Tech Guy (MP3)

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 165:32


Streaming video services overseas, where is my email stored? Logging into Windows without passwords, why is my phone battery swollen? Can passwords be compromised on a public hotspot? Adjusting the in-call volume in an Android phone, connecting a phone to your TV, Leo talks with Sam Abuelsamid, Chris Marquardt, Rod Pyle, and more of your calls! Host: Leo Laporte Guests: Sam Abuelsamid, Chris Marquardt, and Rod Pyle Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/the-tech-guy. Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit For detailed show notes, visit techguylabs.com. Sponsors: udacity.com/TWiT offer code TWIT75 userway.org/twit wealthfront.com/techguy

The Tech Guy (Video LO)
Leo Laporte - The Tech Guy: 1836

The Tech Guy (Video LO)

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 166:19


Streaming video services overseas, where is my email stored? Logging into Windows without passwords, why is my phone battery swollen? Can passwords be compromised on a public hotspot? Adjusting the in-call volume in an Android phone, connecting a phone to your TV, Leo talks with Sam Abuelsamid, Chris Marquardt, Rod Pyle, and more of your calls! Host: Leo Laporte Guests: Sam Abuelsamid, Chris Marquardt, and Rod Pyle Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/the-tech-guy. Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit For detailed show notes, visit techguylabs.com. Sponsors: udacity.com/TWiT offer code TWIT75 userway.org/twit wealthfront.com/techguy

All TWiT.tv Shows (Video HI)
The Tech Guy 1836

All TWiT.tv Shows (Video HI)

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 166:19


Streaming video services overseas, where is my email stored? Logging into Windows without passwords, why is my phone battery swollen? Can passwords be compromised on a public hotspot? Adjusting the in-call volume in an Android phone, connecting a phone to your TV, Leo talks with Sam Abuelsamid, Chris Marquardt, Rod Pyle, and more of your calls! Host: Leo Laporte Guests: Sam Abuelsamid, Chris Marquardt, and Rod Pyle Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/the-tech-guy. Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit For detailed show notes, visit techguylabs.com. Sponsors: udacity.com/TWiT offer code TWIT75 userway.org/twit wealthfront.com/techguy

All TWiT.tv Shows (MP3)
The Tech Guy 1836

All TWiT.tv Shows (MP3)

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 165:32


Streaming video services overseas, where is my email stored? Logging into Windows without passwords, why is my phone battery swollen? Can passwords be compromised on a public hotspot? Adjusting the in-call volume in an Android phone, connecting a phone to your TV, Leo talks with Sam Abuelsamid, Chris Marquardt, Rod Pyle, and more of your calls! Host: Leo Laporte Guests: Sam Abuelsamid, Chris Marquardt, and Rod Pyle Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/the-tech-guy. Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit For detailed show notes, visit techguylabs.com. Sponsors: udacity.com/TWiT offer code TWIT75 userway.org/twit wealthfront.com/techguy

All TWiT.tv Shows (Video LO)
The Tech Guy 1836

All TWiT.tv Shows (Video LO)

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 166:19


Streaming video services overseas, where is my email stored? Logging into Windows without passwords, why is my phone battery swollen? Can passwords be compromised on a public hotspot? Adjusting the in-call volume in an Android phone, connecting a phone to your TV, Leo talks with Sam Abuelsamid, Chris Marquardt, Rod Pyle, and more of your calls! Host: Leo Laporte Guests: Sam Abuelsamid, Chris Marquardt, and Rod Pyle Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/the-tech-guy. Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit For detailed show notes, visit techguylabs.com. Sponsors: udacity.com/TWiT offer code TWIT75 userway.org/twit wealthfront.com/techguy

All TWiT.tv Shows (Video HD)
The Tech Guy 1836

All TWiT.tv Shows (Video HD)

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 166:19


Streaming video services overseas, where is my email stored? Logging into Windows without passwords, why is my phone battery swollen? Can passwords be compromised on a public hotspot? Adjusting the in-call volume in an Android phone, connecting a phone to your TV, Leo talks with Sam Abuelsamid, Chris Marquardt, Rod Pyle, and more of your calls! Host: Leo Laporte Guests: Sam Abuelsamid, Chris Marquardt, and Rod Pyle Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/the-tech-guy. Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit For detailed show notes, visit techguylabs.com. Sponsors: udacity.com/TWiT offer code TWIT75 userway.org/twit wealthfront.com/techguy

Radio Leo (Video HD)
The Tech Guy 1836

Radio Leo (Video HD)

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 166:19


Streaming video services overseas, where is my email stored? Logging into Windows without passwords, why is my phone battery swollen? Can passwords be compromised on a public hotspot? Adjusting the in-call volume in an Android phone, connecting a phone to your TV, Leo talks with Sam Abuelsamid, Chris Marquardt, Rod Pyle, and more of your calls! Host: Leo Laporte Guests: Sam Abuelsamid, Chris Marquardt, and Rod Pyle Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/the-tech-guy. Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit For detailed show notes, visit techguylabs.com. Sponsors: udacity.com/TWiT offer code TWIT75 UserWay.org/twit wealthfront.com/techguy

Radio Leo (Audio)
The Tech Guy 1836

Radio Leo (Audio)

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 165:32


Streaming video services overseas, where is my email stored? Logging into Windows without passwords, why is my phone battery swollen? Can passwords be compromised on a public hotspot? Adjusting the in-call volume in an Android phone, connecting a phone to your TV, Leo talks with Sam Abuelsamid, Chris Marquardt, Rod Pyle, and more of your calls! Host: Leo Laporte Guests: Sam Abuelsamid, Chris Marquardt, and Rod Pyle Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/the-tech-guy. Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit For detailed show notes, visit techguylabs.com. Sponsors: udacity.com/TWiT offer code TWIT75 userway.org/twit wealthfront.com/techguy

Nueva Vida 97.7FM
Nos visita Benjamín Nieves de ISP y nos habla de la seguridad alimentaria por la posible escasez de

Nueva Vida 97.7FM

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 7:03


Nos visita Benjamín Nieves de ISP y nos habla de la seguridad alimentaria por la posible escasez de alimentos. 787-786-9241

Crónica Estéreo
04/10 - Tests, vacunas y variantes: El balance del ISP de la pandemia

Crónica Estéreo

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 21:19


En un mundo donde la confianza en las instituciones decae, una muy específica adquirió un protagonismo inédito en medio de la lucha contra el covid 19: el Instituto de Salud Pública. Después de asumir la primera tarea de establecer cuál era la tecnología adecuada para diagnosticar el covid 19, el organismo debió hacerse cargo a continuación de una tarea crucial: organizar el proceso de revisión y aprobación de las vacunas. Con una atención pública inédita sobre cada uno de sus procedimientos, el ISP optó por abrir sus reuniones y deliberaciones al público. Hoy conversamos con su director subrogante, Heriberto García.

Rene Ritchie
iPhone 13 Speed — The TRUTH About A15 & Apple Silicon

Rene Ritchie

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 21:34


How is iPhone 13 faster... with longer battery life??☎️ SAVE on cell with http://rene.ting.com and get a $25 service credit!2 Avalanche high-performance cores. 4 Blizzard high-efficiency cores. Up to 5 Graphics Cores. 16 Neural Engine Cores. Double the system cache to keep it all fed. But, increasingly, it's the non-big compute core features that are the most interesting: New image signal processor, ISP, including Smart HDR4. New video encode and decode blocks, including hardware acceleration for ProRes 422 video. New display engine for up to 120Hz adaptive refresh. New always-on touch co-processor to adapt that refresh in real-time. All with the best battery life ever delivered on an iPhone… and maybe, just maybe, our first glimpse at what might be coming for M2 and the next generation of Apple Silicon Macs.This the A15 Bionic deep dive!See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Q & A Presents: Maui Online! – Hawaii's Only Computer Talk Show!

Got a router? Yes you do! Routers 101 Whether or not you know it, its part of your home network. Maybe its built into the modem you got from your ISP or its a separate piece of hardware. Regardless, its something you need to take care of, and we talk about that!

This Week in Amateur Radio
PODCAST: This Week in Amateur Radio #1178

This Week in Amateur Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 25, 2021


PODCAST: This Week in Amateur Radio Edition #1178 Release Date: September 25, 2021 Here is a summary of the news trending This Week in Amateur Radio. This week's edition is anchored by Terry Saunders, N1KIN, Dave Wilson, WA2HOY, Don Hulick, K2ATJ, Fred Fitte, NF2F, Will Rogers, K5WLR, Eric Zittel, KD2RJX, George Bowen, W2XBS, and Jessica Bowen, KC2VWX. Produced and edited by George Bowen, W2XBS. Running Time: 1:35:08 Download Podcast here: https://bit.ly/TWIAR1178 Trending headlines in this week's bulletin service: 1. IARU Region 1 Monitoring System Says Radio France International Splatter Untenable 2. Home Computing Pioneer Sir Clive Sinclair Passes 3. Radio Amateurs on Standby Following La Palma Volcanic Eruption 4. The 2021 ARRL Simulated Emergency Test, SET Is Just Ahead 5. Clear Frequencies Requested For Possible Nicaragua Earthquake Traffic 6. Registration Opens For USA Amateur Radio Direction Finding Championships 7. ARRL And RSGB Announce Joint Events To Celebrate Centenary Of Ham Radio Transatlantic Success - Part One 8. ARRL And RSGB Announce Joint Events To Celebrate Centenary Of Ham Radio Transatlantic Success - Part Two 9. Open Source Amateur Satellite Work Not Subject To Export Administration Regulation 10. Upcoming ARRL Learning Network Webinars 11. International Amateur Radio Union Region 3 Considers Significant Expansion Of HF Digital Segments 12. Single Side Band Was Slow To Catch On As A Ham Radio Mode 13. Children At Children's National Hospital In Washington Contact The Space Station 14. Night Sky Pollution Is Blamed On Satellite Constellations Research Claims 15. Hamfests Are occurring Again, But With Cautions In Place 16. National Hurricane Conference Video Is Now Available On YouTube 17. International Amateur Radio Union Region One Honors Amateurs Contributions 18. Locally Owned Radio Shack In Smyrna Is Forced To Close 19. 39th Annual AMSAT Space Symposium 20. Radio amateurs on the island of Bonaire set up a new club 21. Special Event station celebrates 60th Anniversary of The Antarctic Treaty 22. International DX Association (INDEXA) will support the 3Y0J DXpedition to Bouvet Island 23. PACIFICON 2021 Pacific Division Convention is announced 24. Central Arizona DX Association will activate K7UGA former callsign of Senator Barry Goldwater 25. A brief history of amateur radio foxhunting and upcoming events 26. Glow Worm is a new web attack making the rounds. 27. The best and the worse ways to learn morse code 28. Superheterodyne receiver design retrospective video now available Plus these Special Features This Week: * Technology News and Commentary with Leo Laporte, W6TWT, talks about bringing back forums, Leo also will tell us how Google is in the process of shutting down it's wide area ISP experiment called Project Loon. And, he will tell us about a railroad system in Northern China that is running on the now expired Adobe Flash. * Working Amateur Radio Satellites with Bruce Paige, KK5DO - AMSAT Satellite News * Tower Climbing and Antenna Safety w/Greg Stoddard KF9MP, will talk about The Sudden Stop, continued. * Foundations of Amateur Radio with Onno Benschop VK6FLAB, tells us why we need more glue in our hobby. * Weekly Propagation Forecast from the ARRL * Bill Continelli, W2XOY - The History of Amateur Radio. Bill returns with another edition of The Ancient Amateur Archives, this week, Bill takes a look at the 1927 Radio Act which formally ends anarchy on the AM Broadcast Bands, and formalizes amateur radio. ----- Website: https://www.twiar.net Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/groups/twiari/ Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/twiar RSS News: https://twiar.net/?feed=rss2 iHeartRadio: https://bit.ly/iHeart-TWIAR Spotify: https://bit.ly/Spotify-TWIAR TuneIn: https://bit.ly/TuneIn-TWIAR Automated: https://twiar.net/TWIARHAM.mp3 (Static file, changed weekly) ----- Visit our website at www.twiar.net for program audio, and daily for the latest amateur radio and technology news. Air This Week in Amateur Radio on your repeater! Built in identification breaks every 10 minutes or less. This Week in Amateur Radio is heard on the air on nets and repeaters as a bulletin service all across North America, and all around the world on amateur radio repeater systems, weekends on WA0RCR on 1860 (160 Meters), and more. This Week in Amateur Radio is portable too! The bulletin/news service is available and built for air on local repeaters (check with your local clubs to see if their repeater is carrying the news service) and can be downloaded for air as a weekly podcast to your digital device from just about everywhere, including Acast, Deezer, iHeart, iTunes, Google Play, Spotify, TuneIn, Stitcher, iVoox, Blubrry, Castbox.fm, Castro, Feedburner, gPodder, Listen Notes, OverCast, Player.FM, Pandora, Podcast Gang, Podcast Republic, Podchaser, Podnova, and RSS feeds. This Week in Amateur Radio is also carried on a number of LPFM stations, so check the low power FM stations in your area. You can also stream the program to your favorite digital device by visiting our web site www.twiar.net. Or, just ask Siri, Alexa, or your Google Nest to play This Week in Amateur Radio! This Week in Amateur Radio is produced by Community Video Associates in upstate New York, and is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License. If you would like to volunteer with us as a news anchor or special segment producer please get in touch with our Executive Producer, George, via email at w2xbs77@gmail.com. Also, please feel free to follow us by joining our popular group on Facebook, and follow our daily feed on Twitter! Thanks to FortifiedNet.net for the server space!

Café Con Nata
Todxs a escuchar el nuevo disco de Belencha

Café Con Nata

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 82:59


Atenta, monada, que se está registrando el número de casos nuevos más alto en un mes y en paralelo el ISP acaba de confirmar que la variante Denta ya es la que predomina en el país. En noticias desde la Convención: se aprobó la enmienda para permitir renuncia de Rojas Vade y cuatro convencionales abandonaron Pueblo Constituyente, la ex Lista del Pueblo. En otras noticias, hoy celebramos que "La cordillera de los sueños" de Patricio Guzmán representará a Chile en los Goya y puedes verla gratis en ONDAMEDIA. Este viernes, además, recibimos a Belencha para hablar de su nuevo disco. Conversamos sobre sus años ligada al folclor, el rescate de la tradición, su amistad con Gepe y lanzarse sola a sus propias canciones.

Call It Like I See It
This is Your Society on Social Media; Also, Making Sense of Huge Changes in Average Height

Call It Like I See It

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 53:33


James Keys and Tunde Ogunlana take a look at some of the revelations in the “Facebook files” series being published by the Wall Street Journal consider how our humanity in impacted by social media in ways that have serious effects on society (01:41).  The guys also react to recent research on changes in the average heights of various societies (40:54). The Facebook Files (WSJ)Leaks just exposed how toxic Facebook and Instagram are to teen girls and, well, everyone (The Guardian)From Instagram's Toll on Teens to Unmoderated ‘Elite' Users, Here's a Break Down of the Wall Street Journal's Facebook Revelations (Time)Wall Street Journal's Facebook Files series prompts comparisons to Big Tobacco (CNN)Facebook says WSJ allegations are 'mischaracterizations,' confer 'false motives' (Reuters)Why does world's tallest populace seem to be getting shorter? (The Guardian)

This Week in Enterprise Tech (Video HD)
TWiET 461: Are Clouds NFINIT? - Microsoft says you can stop using passwords, the hidden cost of cloud storage with NFINIT

This Week in Enterprise Tech (Video HD)

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 18, 2021 68:05


Does Adam Selipsky have to worry about the AWS exodus? OMIGOD: a new OMI vulnerability for Azure services ISPs try to stop ban on exclusive wiring deals between providers and landlords Man gets 12 years in prison for unlocking nearly 2 million AT&T phones Is it time to go without passwords? Microsoft thinks so. Jeremy Fitzpatrick, VP of sales for NFINIT talks about the hidden cost of cloud storage. Hosts: Louis Maresca, Brian Chee, and Curt Franklin Guest: Jeremy Fitzpatrick Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/this-week-in-enterprise-tech. Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Sponsors: nureva.com/twit akamai.com/enterprise Compiler - TWIET

This Week in Enterprise Tech (MP3)
TWiET 461: Are Clouds NFINIT? - Microsoft says you can stop using passwords, the hidden cost of cloud storage with NFINIT

This Week in Enterprise Tech (MP3)

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 18, 2021 67:46


Does Adam Selipsky have to worry about the AWS exodus? OMIGOD: a new OMI vulnerability for Azure services ISPs try to stop ban on exclusive wiring deals between providers and landlords Man gets 12 years in prison for unlocking nearly 2 million AT&T phones Is it time to go without passwords? Microsoft thinks so. Jeremy Fitzpatrick, VP of sales for NFINIT talks about the hidden cost of cloud storage. Hosts: Louis Maresca, Brian Chee, and Curt Franklin Guest: Jeremy Fitzpatrick Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/this-week-in-enterprise-tech. Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Sponsors: nureva.com/twit akamai.com/enterprise Compiler - TWIET

This Week in Enterprise Tech (Video HI)
TWiET 461: Are Clouds NFINIT? - Microsoft says you can stop using passwords, the hidden cost of cloud storage with NFINIT

This Week in Enterprise Tech (Video HI)

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 18, 2021 68:05


Does Adam Selipsky have to worry about the AWS exodus? OMIGOD: a new OMI vulnerability for Azure services ISPs try to stop ban on exclusive wiring deals between providers and landlords Man gets 12 years in prison for unlocking nearly 2 million AT&T phones Is it time to go without passwords? Microsoft thinks so. Jeremy Fitzpatrick, VP of sales for NFINIT talks about the hidden cost of cloud storage. Hosts: Louis Maresca, Brian Chee, and Curt Franklin Guest: Jeremy Fitzpatrick Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/this-week-in-enterprise-tech. Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Sponsors: nureva.com/twit akamai.com/enterprise Compiler - TWIET

This Week in Enterprise Tech (Video LO)
TWiET 461: Are Clouds NFINIT? - Microsoft says you can stop using passwords, the hidden cost of cloud storage with NFINIT

This Week in Enterprise Tech (Video LO)

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 18, 2021 68:05


Does Adam Selipsky have to worry about the AWS exodus? OMIGOD: a new OMI vulnerability for Azure services ISPs try to stop ban on exclusive wiring deals between providers and landlords Man gets 12 years in prison for unlocking nearly 2 million AT&T phones Is it time to go without passwords? Microsoft thinks so. Jeremy Fitzpatrick, VP of sales for NFINIT talks about the hidden cost of cloud storage. Hosts: Louis Maresca, Brian Chee, and Curt Franklin Guest: Jeremy Fitzpatrick Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/this-week-in-enterprise-tech. Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Sponsors: nureva.com/twit akamai.com/enterprise Compiler - TWIET

All TWiT.tv Shows (Video HI)
This Week in Enterprise Tech 461: Are Clouds NFINIT?

All TWiT.tv Shows (Video HI)

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 18, 2021 68:05


Does Adam Selipsky have to worry about the AWS exodus? OMIGOD: a new OMI vulnerability for Azure services ISPs try to stop ban on exclusive wiring deals between providers and landlords Man gets 12 years in prison for unlocking nearly 2 million AT&T phones Is it time to go without passwords? Microsoft thinks so. Jeremy Fitzpatrick, VP of sales for NFINIT talks about the hidden cost of cloud storage. Hosts: Louis Maresca, Brian Chee, and Curt Franklin Guest: Jeremy Fitzpatrick Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/this-week-in-enterprise-tech. Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Sponsors: nureva.com/twit akamai.com/enterprise Compiler - TWIET

All TWiT.tv Shows (Video LO)
This Week in Enterprise Tech 461: Are Clouds NFINIT?

All TWiT.tv Shows (Video LO)

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 18, 2021 68:05


Does Adam Selipsky have to worry about the AWS exodus? OMIGOD: a new OMI vulnerability for Azure services ISPs try to stop ban on exclusive wiring deals between providers and landlords Man gets 12 years in prison for unlocking nearly 2 million AT&T phones Is it time to go without passwords? Microsoft thinks so. Jeremy Fitzpatrick, VP of sales for NFINIT talks about the hidden cost of cloud storage. Hosts: Louis Maresca, Brian Chee, and Curt Franklin Guest: Jeremy Fitzpatrick Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/this-week-in-enterprise-tech. Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Sponsors: nureva.com/twit akamai.com/enterprise Compiler - TWIET

All TWiT.tv Shows (MP3)
This Week in Enterprise Tech 461: Are Clouds NFINIT?

All TWiT.tv Shows (MP3)

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 18, 2021 67:46


Does Adam Selipsky have to worry about the AWS exodus? OMIGOD: a new OMI vulnerability for Azure services ISPs try to stop ban on exclusive wiring deals between providers and landlords Man gets 12 years in prison for unlocking nearly 2 million AT&T phones Is it time to go without passwords? Microsoft thinks so. Jeremy Fitzpatrick, VP of sales for NFINIT talks about the hidden cost of cloud storage. Hosts: Louis Maresca, Brian Chee, and Curt Franklin Guest: Jeremy Fitzpatrick Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/this-week-in-enterprise-tech. Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Sponsors: nureva.com/twit akamai.com/enterprise Compiler - TWIET

All TWiT.tv Shows (Video HD)
This Week in Enterprise Tech 461: Are Clouds NFINIT?

All TWiT.tv Shows (Video HD)

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 18, 2021 68:05


Does Adam Selipsky have to worry about the AWS exodus? OMIGOD: a new OMI vulnerability for Azure services ISPs try to stop ban on exclusive wiring deals between providers and landlords Man gets 12 years in prison for unlocking nearly 2 million AT&T phones Is it time to go without passwords? Microsoft thinks so. Jeremy Fitzpatrick, VP of sales for NFINIT talks about the hidden cost of cloud storage. Hosts: Louis Maresca, Brian Chee, and Curt Franklin Guest: Jeremy Fitzpatrick Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/this-week-in-enterprise-tech. Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Sponsors: nureva.com/twit akamai.com/enterprise Compiler - TWIET

I Scream Parlor
Episode 47: Messiah of Evil (1973)

I Scream Parlor

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2021 67:51


Arletty, played by Marianna Hill, searches for her father in this 1973 horror film. Director Willard Huyck brings up the undead to the shores of Malibu much to the horror of its residents. Keep up with all things ISP: https://www.iscreampodcast.com/

Café Con Nata
Pancito salva el día

Café Con Nata

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2021 81:28


Está difícil despertar en este país, pero lo hacemos siempre con una sonrisa, y un buen #CaféconNata cargadito de noticias y canciones. Hoy hablamos de las nuevas cifras a la baja del Coronavirus en Chile y la vacunación autorizada por el ISP para les niñez mayores de 6 años. En un mundo paralelo, abogados de militares en retiro se querellan contra el ministro de Justicia por no permitir a presos condenados por crímenes de lesa humanidad acceder al indulto conmutativo por covid 19, a propósito de brote de contagio y muertes en Punta Peuco. Hoy, además, Pancito salva el día. Con el corazón siempre adelante hicimos un panel de amigas donde conocimos las diferencias entre el Tinder en Santiago y sus diferencias con el de región.

SBS Spanish - SBS en español
Noticias SBS Spanish | 7 de septiembre 2021

SBS Spanish - SBS en español

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2021 10:28


El Instituto de Salud Pública (ISP) de Chile aprobó el empleo de la vacuna china Sinovac contra el covid-19 para niños entre seis y doce años, mientras el 86% de la población objetivo ya completó su inmunización.

Café Con Nata
Tener hijxs o no (y el miedo a la decisión equivocada). Junto a Raffa di Girólamo

Café Con Nata

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2021 83:05


En el capítulo de hoy te traemos diversas noticias pandémicas. Partimos contándote de un posible caso Delta en un colegio de Biobío, donde 31 alumnos y 5 profesores ya son contactos estrechos. En paralelo, la vacunación a niñxs y adolescentes entró en recta final porque la Cenabast pidió al ISP autorizar el uso de Sinovac. Por otro lado, un estudio demostró que los anticuerpos aumentaron 15 veces tras una dosis de refuerzo con AstraZeneca. Aplausos. En otros temas nacionales, hablamos sobre los pronósticos de la inflación en Chile, que terminaría este 2021 en 5,7%. Y en un nuevo momento de la sección "Ayúdeme usted compadre", comentamos el nombramiento de Mariana Aylwin como encargada de derechos humanos de la campaña de Sichel. Como cada jueves, hoy tuvimos una nueva Terapia Grupal con Raffa di Girólamo, donde hablamos sobre la opción de tener hijxs o no, y de cómo a veces nos abrumamos y nos angustiamos, solo por el miedo a tomar la decisión equivocada.

Free Talk Live
Free Talk Live 2021-08-20

Free Talk Live

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 21, 2021 121:29


Nurses protest against mandatory vaccine :: Denmark abolishes all Covid measures :: Alberta declares Covid over :: Government pays snitches in Bitcoin :: Who decides what laws are unjust :: New Hampshire now has Education Freedom Accounts :: Forcing an ISP into censorship :: Major ticketing venues to require vax :: 2021-08-20 Captain Kickass, Ian, Chris