Podcasts about IOT

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  • 4,057PODCASTS
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    Best podcasts about IOT

    Show all podcasts related to iot

    Latest podcast episodes about IOT

    IoT For All Podcast
    Tips for Accelerating Your IoT Solution | Blues Wireless' Brandon Satrom

    IoT For All Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later May 26, 2022 23:20


    Brandon begins by introducing himself, Blues Wireless, and specific use cases and verticals of Blues. He then discusses where companies should put their focus to accelerate the progress of their solution. Ryan and Brandon then talk about roadblocks in connectivity and LoRa based applications. They wrap up the podcast with a high-level conversation around the biggest challenges in the industry for 2022.Brandon Satrom is the VP of Experience Engineering at Blues Wireless. He is an unabashed lover of IoT, the web, mobile, and an avid tinkerer. Brandon loves to talk about sensors and circuits, microcontrollers, open source, robots, and whatever new shiny tool or technology has distracted him from that other thing he was working on. Before Blues Wireless, Brandon worked as Head of Developer Relations for Particle. He also has a BBA and MIS from Baylor University.

    Over the Air — IoT, Connected Devices, & the Journey
    Q&A with Rob Tiffany Part 1: 5G, CBRS, Edge, IIoT & Agile

    Over the Air — IoT, Connected Devices, & the Journey

    Play Episode Listen Later May 26, 2022 30:18


    In this episode of Over the Air - IoT, Connected Devices, & the Journey, Ryan Prosser, CEO of Very is joined by Rob Tiffany, Managing Director at Digital Insights and Bill Flaherty, Director of Hardware Engineering at Very. In this Q&A session, they discuss the vast potential of CBRS and Enterprise 5G for industrial innovation in distributed environments. They investigate how much the impact of 5G will be determined by its use cases and degree of relevance, determined by the requirements of an IoT endpoint and application. Because 5G has potential to access more spectrum, it enhances overall bandwidth and allows a large number of IoT devices to connect.

    Thanks For Visiting
    165. Double Your Bookings with This STR Listing Strategy

    Thanks For Visiting

    Play Episode Listen Later May 26, 2022 49:04


    How can you ethically list your large rental twice to make the most of a bigger property? In Sarah's example, we split a fourplex in two by installing quality door locks on the two upstairs bedrooms, and listing the property twice: one listing with 4 bedrooms for 8 guests, and the other with 2 bedrooms for 4 guests. With this setup, you can still make the most of your property based on the time of year and local events, by prioritizing the larger listing and making the smaller version unavailable. Then, open up the small listing on select dates or for last-minute bookings. To get the most out of this type of multiple listing (also called a parent-child listing): Offer a lower cleaning fee on the smaller listing version Avoid automatically-locking door locks Be sure there aren't major amenities behind the locked door(s), like a WiFi router or fire extinguisher Link your calendar for both listings in Airbnb so that when it gets booked, it automatically blocks off dates for the alternate listing* Flex your pricing based on booking traffic to get the most out of both listings and avoid orphan nights Set expectations so that guests booking the smaller version of the listing are aware of the restricted area But, don't forget to upsell the larger listing for guests that book and who may be interested in the extra space Remember: we're not advising that you list your same home twice. Platforms like Airbnb use property addresses to help cut down on duplicate listings and prevent spam. Be sure that your two listings are unique and have different check-in instructions to avoid issues with Airbnb. *Note: things change, and Airbnb may change the calendar sync functionality in the future Resources: Our preferred Schlage lock for this setup: https://amzn.to/39zKIPR (https://amzn.to/39zKIPR) Visit https://thanksforvisiting.me/workshop (https://thanksforvisiting.me/workshop) to watch our Hosting Business Mastery Method workshop! #STRShareSunday: https://instagram.com/twistedleafcabin (https://instagram.com/twistedleafcabin) Thanks for Visiting is produced and published by http://crate.media/ (Crate Media). Mentioned in this episode: Join us LIVE on June 21 for a Q&A Annette & Sarah will be hosting a short-term rental workshop with a LIVE Q&A for everyone in the Thanks For Visiting community. We'll be discussing the three mistakes that were holding us back; but now we're rocking our 7-figure hosting business, buying more real estate, and have finally achieved the flexible lifestyle we've been working towards. https://thanksforvisiting.captivate.fm/jun-21-workshop (Sign up for June's Workshop now at ThanksForVisiting.me/Workshop) Check out our favorite property care app! Breezeway's best-in-class tools help you automate, coordinate, and communicate detailed work at each of your properties, so you can deliver the best experience to guests and homeowners. Breezeway integrates with over thirty Property Management Software systems and IoT devices, meaning you can easily harness property data from your entire tech stack to build stronger programs for scheduling, quality assurance, guest texting, owner reporting, and much more. Best yet, TFV listeners will receive free implementation when you decide to make Breezeway a part of your hosting business operational strategy! https://thanksforvisiting.captivate.fm/breezeway-may-22 (Visit Breezeway.io/TFV to learn more.)

    Back2Basics: Reconnecting to the essence of YOU
    E155: Kirk Byles - Pioneering to make a difference

    Back2Basics: Reconnecting to the essence of YOU

    Play Episode Listen Later May 26, 2022 23:42


    Learn more about Kirk at:  (1) Kirk Byles | LinkedInAbout Free Wave:For nearly three decades, we've connected the unconnected with a reliable ecosystem of edge intelligent radios and solutions — manufactured in the U.S. — to optimize the extreme edge of remote industrial operations. We enable high-fidelity data capture, analysis, control, and automation via a scalable IIoT platform purpose built for the harshest, remote environments in the world. A joint venture with ModuSense makes global innovation agility and turn-key industrial IoT edge solutions a reality, accelerating our ability to bring fully integrated, plug and play IIoT solutions to the market quickly and cost-effectively. With deployments in 39 countries, and a legacy of solving thousands of customer challenges across multiple industries, we can help transform and future-proof your operation now. Visit freewave.com to get started.

    Over The Edge
    The Value of IoT and Automation in the Real World with Rob Tiffany, Executive Director at the Moab Foundation, and Founder and Managing Director at Digital Insights

    Over The Edge

    Play Episode Listen Later May 25, 2022 53:44


    Today's episode features an interview between Matt Trifiro and Rob Tiffany, Executive Director at the Moab Foundation, and Founder and Managing Director at Digital Insights. A bestselling author and frequent keynote speaker, Rob serves on multiple boards and is routinely ranked as one of the top IoT experts and influencers in the world by Inc Magazine, Onalytica and other outlets.In this episode we delve deep into how Rob went from a life of driving submarines, to being self taught in technology, and eventually becoming a leader in the world of IoT. Rob explains the value of IoT and the best ways to sell and explain it to the average person in real world terms, so they understand how embracing technology can save them time and money. Finally, Rob talks about how edge computing, IoT, and automation can be used to help with sustainability around the globe.---------Key Quotes:“All that R&D and the rise of arm based processors are making things smaller that we would not have ever built. The chips, the sensors, the technology at a low cost - if it wasn't for this mega trend of smartphones forcing us down that path. And so a side effect of all this work, and you know how things like the most expensive version of the thing you make is the first version. And then it gets cheaper and cheaper. Well, IOT,  the thing part of it, the device side of it, benefited from the whole planet going all in on smartphones.”“When I talk about IOT and value, I try to stay away from saying AI and things like that. And I say, there is so much value just doing the stupid stuff, the low hanging fruit. I think we oftentimes do our customers a disservice because I hear people say IOT and AI in the same sentence over and over again. And I go, you know what, you really need to get in your car and I need you to drive to Omaha, Nebraska. I need you to drive to St. Louis. I need you to go to Oklahoma City, and I need you to meet real people who are just trying to get their job done. And they have no idea about your neural nets and stuff like that. And they don't understand it. And I think we scare customers. It turns out what my experience, not only at building Azure IT, but even more importantly building Lumata industrial IoT at Hitachi; I'd say that first 10 to 20% of value, whatever that means, saving money, making money that comes from the easy stuff. It really does. Just being connected, just not having to visit simple KPIs, simple thresholding; like stuff that manufacturers have done for a million years. It turns out that's the most of the value.”"So my big recommendation to the world is start to crawl before you run. Do the basics, because it turns out you might get tons of value that you never realized just by doing the easy stuff first. Don't feel pressured to do something you don't even understand."“When you talk about poverty, it turns out most poverty and hunger are related to farming. They are all correlated. Most of the poorest people in the world are in farming, and they're also starving. So when you can start knowing, remotely knowing in real time and doing it low cost out there where it happens, and then combined with automation, what's the action I'm going to take to make this better for someone, right? There's so much you can do. It's mind boggling.”---------Show Timestamps:(01:12) Time in the Navy(03:25) Getting started in technology(04:06) Getting started in Visual Basic(04:29) Getting started in IoT Career(10:17) Defining the Internet of Things(15:77) Connection between IoT and Smartphones(17:33) Power of Wireless and IoT(19:09) Briefing others on IoT while at Microsoft(21:36) IoT and Value (25:05) Edge Computing(33:08) Alternatives to on premise equipment(34:49) Automation strategy (43:49) What makes edge harder than the cloud?(44:31) Edge, IoT, and Sustainability (47:50) Digital Twins--------Sponsor:Over the Edge is brought to you by Dell Technologies to unlock the potential of your infrastructure with edge solutions. From hardware and software to data and operations, across your entire multi-cloud environment, we're here to help you simplify your edge so you can generate more value. Learn more by visiting DellTechnologies.com/SimplifyYourEdge for more information or click on the link in the show notes.--------Links:Follow Matt on TwitterConnect with Rob on TwitterConnect with Rob on LinkedInwww.CaspianStudios.comRob's Website and Podcast

    Residential Tech Talks
    Episode 98: The Future of IOT Tech with Avi Rosenthal

    Residential Tech Talks

    Play Episode Listen Later May 24, 2022 55:13


    On this week's podcast, Avi Rosenthal joins us from Ashburn, VA, where is the managing partner of Bluesalve Partners, a company launched three and half years ago to help start-ups as well as established companies manage the Internet of Things business landscape. Through their deep connections with manufacturers, dealers, retailers, and users, Bluesalve and its team of consultants help clients with the insights and resources needed to develop, market, and manufacture products and services for the IoT Industry. Avi has held leadership roles throughout the IoT industry, including Nortek, Legrand, Evolve, and Superna. He also recently returned from the Integrated Systems Europe convention in Barcelona, Spain, where he caught up with some of the most important companies in home tech. Today's episode of Residential Tech Talks is brought to you by Shelly WiFi Relays by Allterco | Smart home devices designed and developed to provide solutions tailored to your needs.  Go to https://shelly.cloud and make IoT simple!

    IoT For All Podcast
    The Future of Tracking Assets & People | Deeyook's Gideon Rottem

    IoT For All Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later May 24, 2022 30:27


    They begin by discussing Deeyook and their role in the industry and the use cases they focus on. They also talk about the challenges companies in IoT are encountering before getting into a conversation about how Wi-Fi fits into indoor asset tracking. Gideon and Ryan wrap up the podcast with a high-level conversation around the future of asset tracking and exciting things to be on the lookout for from Deeyook.Gideon Rottem co-founded location-technology startup Deeyook in 2019 and has served as its CEO ever since. He has more than 20 years of experience as an entrepreneur and CEO of Lucid Voice, Extricom, and Allied Telesis. Before that, he worked in a law firm in Washington, D.C., and served for four years as Deputy Antitrust Commissioner. He holds a bachelor's degree in economics from The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, a master's degree in international economics from The Fletcher School in Boston, and a J.D. from Georgetown University in Washington.

    MLM Success Stories Podcast
    MLM SS 291: How The World's First Trillionaire Will Be Made And Why You Should Care.

    MLM Success Stories Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later May 24, 2022 84:49


    The main theme of this podcast is a simple truth that will not be understood by the masses until it is too late.   “Block Chain Technology, Decentralized Finance and the crypto space is providing opportunities to entrepreneurs that didn't even exist a couple of years ago & most people don't even know exist today.” They provide set and forget passive income opportunities unlike any the world has ever seen, and the opportunity to make a lifetime income in a few years.   In this session Mr. Calvert will share with you passive income opportunities in what he calls the gizmo and gadgets crypto category.  He is not talking about specific cryptocurrencies but plug and play devices that can create ongoing monthly passive income for you each and every month.   One of these devices is in the pre-beta phase at the time of this recording and he feels offers entrepreneurs more upside income poenitentia than any opportunity he has seen in his life. A true win for the customer, the affiliate, and the company that could only be available because of the block chain technology that is available today.   Make sure you subscribe to this channel and turn on bell notifications so you can be notified when next week part two of this session drops where Dale will reveal the crypto category the worlds first Trillionaire will emerge from.   Websites Referenced in this session:   The crypto gadget that will allow some entrepreneurs to go from $0.00 to ONE MILLION DOLLARS in 12 months.  https://dalecalvert.com/loop-tv   Top 10 Agricultural Trends & Innovations for 2022 ( IOT #1 ) https://cmgcrypto.com/2022/05/21/iot-agriculture     The Top 5 Plug & Play Crypto Mining Opportunities 1) The Helium Plug and Play Mining Opportunity with Dale's CMG Ihub Global Team  http://www.cmgihubteam.com   2) NODLE Mine the NODL token with your cell phone. https://cmgcrypto.com/2022/04/19/nodle   3) DEEPER CONNECT MINI VPN https://cmgcrypto.com/2022/01/07/deeper-mining   4) Hivemapper Dashcam https://cmgcrypto.com/2022/01/07/deeper-mining   5) RevoFi Rev Token Mining https://cmgcrypto.com/2022/03/10/revofi

    Futurized
    Managing Remote Work Presence

    Futurized

    Play Episode Listen Later May 24, 2022 49:19


    Futurized goes beneath the trends to track the underlying forces of disruption in tech, policy, business models, social dynamics and the environment. I'm your host, Trond Arne Undheim (@trondau), futurist, author, investor, and serial entrepreneur. Join me as I discuss the societal impact of deep tech such as AI, blockchain, IoT, nanotech, quantum, robotics, and synthetic biology, and tackle topics such as entrepreneurship, trends, or the future of work. On the show, I interview smart people with a soul: founders, authors, executives, and other thought leaders, or even the occasional celebrity. Futurized is a bi-weekly show, preparing YOU to think about how to deal with the next decade's disruption, so you can succeed and thrive no matter what happens. Futurized—conversations that matter. In episode 154of the podcast, the topic is: Managing Remote Work Presence . Our guest is Alexander Embiricos, CEO & co-founder, Remotion. In this conversation, they talk about: What is presence in the workplace? How to manage remote presence? How can digital tools help? Why we need more remote work. If you're new to the show, seek particular topics, or you are looking for a great way to tell your friends about the show, which we always appreciate, we've got the episode categories. Those are at Futurized.org/episodes. They are collections of your favorite episodes organized by topic, such as Entrepreneurship, Trends, Emerging Tech, or The Future of Work. That'll help new listeners get a taste of everything that we do here, starting with a topic they are familiar with, or want to go deeper in. The host of this podcast, Trond Arne Undheim, Ph.D is the author of Health Tech: Rebooting Society's Software, Hardware and Mindset--published by Routledge in 2021, Future Tech: How to Capture Value from Disruptive industry Trends--published by Kogan Page in 2021, Pandemic Aftermath: how Coronavirus changes Global Society and Disruption Games: How to Thrive on Serial Failure (2020)--both published by Atmosphere Press in 2020, Leadership From Below: How the Internet Generation Redefines the Workplace by Lulu Press in 2008. For an overview, go to Trond's Books at Trondundheim.com/books At this stage, Futurized is lucky enough to have several sponsors. To check them out, go to Sponsors | Futurized - thoughts on our emerging future. If you are interested in sponsoring the podcast, or to get an overview of other services provided by the host of this podcast, including how to book him for keynote speeches, please go to Store | Futurized - thoughts on our emerging future. We will consider all brands that have a demonstrably positive contribution to the future. Before you do anything else, make sure you are subscribed to our newsletter on Futurized.org, where you can find hundreds of episodes of conversations that matter to the future. I hope you can also leave a positive review on iTunes or in your favorite podcast player--it really matters to the future of this podcast. Thanks so much, let's begin.   Trond's takeaway The pandemic triggered changes in the workplace and now the durability of those changes are being tested. Both managers and employees need to ask themselves how to achieve desired presence and impact in their workplace and working lives. Some of it might be best achieved by being together in person, other needs can be satisfied by simply being together remotely. Work is usually about achieving something together. What that means is changing but there is no reason to think the dust is settled on this issue yet. Thanks for listening. If you liked the show, subscribe at Futurized.org or in your preferred podcast player, and rate us with five stars. If you like this topic, you may enjoy other episodes of Futurized, such as episode 150, Rogue Waves of Change with Futurist Jonathan Brill author of the recent book also called Rogue Waves, episode 124, Cultural Agility with Prof. Paula Caligiuri], or episode 113, Tech in Tomorrow's Learning Organizations with Michael Leckie, author of The Heart of Transformation]. Hopefully, you'll find something awesome in these or other episodes. If so, do let us know by messaging us, we would love to share your thoughts with other listeners. Futurized is created in association with Yegii, the insight network. Yegii lets clients create multidisciplinary dream teams consisting of a subject matter experts, academics, consultants, data scientists, and generalists as team leaders. Yegii's services include speeches, briefings, seminars, reports and ongoing monitoring. You can find Yegii at Yegii.org. Please share this show with those you care about. To find us on social media is easy, we are Futurized on LinkedIn and YouTube and Futurized2 on Instagram and Twitter: Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/futurized2/ Twitter (@Futurized2): https://twitter.com/Futurized2 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Futurized-102998138625787 LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/futurized YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/Futurized Podcast RSS: https://feed.podbean.com/www.futurized.co/feed.xml See you next time. Futurized—conversations that matter.

    The Logistics of Logistics Podcast
    Beyond the Data with William Sandoval

    The Logistics of Logistics Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later May 23, 2022 45:33


    Beyond the Data with William Sandoval William Sandoval and Joe Lynch discuss beyond the data. William is the Senior Vice President of Product Management and Strategy at PowerFleet Inc., a wireless IoT company that provides solutions to the industrial, logistics and vehicle markets. About William Sandoval William Sandoval serves as senior vice president of product management & strategy for PowerFleet, leading PowerFleet's product management, program management, and product marketing teams while providing strategic direction to drive innovative products and solutions. Sandoval has over 25 years of experience leading product strategy, technological innovation, and product development execution. About PowerFleet PowerFleet (NASDAQ: PWFL) is a leading global provider of wireless IoT and M2M solutions for securing, controlling, tracking, and managing high-value enterprise assets such as industrial trucks, tractor trailers, containers, cargo, and vehicle and truck fleets. PowerFleet is the result of the combination of I.D. Systems, Pointer Telocation Ltd., and Cellocator on October 3, 2019, when I.D. Systems acquired Pointer Telocation Ltd. and rebranded as PowerFleet Inc. PowerFleet provides a complete technology suite that delivers telematics, asset tracking, freight visibility, and driver behavior. Their solutions include an FMCSA-compliant ELD system, trailer/ container/ chassis GPS tracking, automated driver workflow, refrigeration command and control, cargo visibility and status, driver navigational assistance, and robust fleet management. Their two-way refrigerated solution integrates into Thermo King™ and Carrier™, and their suite of tracking devices include wireless sensors, photographic cargo imaging, and environmental status. PowerFleet is headquartered in Woodcliff Lake, New Jersey, with offices located around the globe, and a technology innovation center in Israel. The Company's patented technologies address the needs of organizations to monitor and analyze their assets to increase efficiency and productivity, reduce costs, and improve profitability. Key Takeaways: Beyond the Data William Sandoval is the Senior Vice President - Product Management & Strategy of PowerFleet, a wireless IoT firm that provides critical actionable information that powers unified operations throughout organizations. In the podcast interview, William and Joe discussed beyond the data, which describes the changes William has seen in the tracking management business. Not so long ago, companies with assets like trucks, trailers, containers, freight, etc. were thrilled to have tracking solutions that told them where their assets were. In the interview, William explained that cost-effective tracking is just table stakes, a bare minimum requirement. Companies like PowerFleet are moving beyond tracking to data collection and data analytics. Data analytics is focused on extracting insights from data, ideally business insights that will enable companies to make more money. In the interview, William described the 4 types of data analytics: Descriptive analytics provides historical information (valuable) Diagnostic analytics provides real-time information (more valuable) Predictive analytics provides information on what may happen (even more valuable) Prescriptive analytics provides information on what you should do in the future to avoid problems/take advantage of  opportunities (most valuable) Increasingly, customers of PowerFleet are looking for predictive and prescriptive analytics that enable them to better manage their assets, save money, while maximizing productivity and profit. PowerFleet (NASDAQ: PWFL) is a leading global provider of wireless IoT and machine-to-mobile (M2M) solutions for securing, controlling, tracking, and managing high-value enterprise assets such as industrial trucks, tractor trailers, containers, cargo, and vehicle and truck fleets. PowerFleet transforms the way organizations manage mobile business assets — like forklifts, cargo trailers, and connected cars. Our technologies control, track, analyze, and optimize hundreds of thousands of these assets all over the world. PowerFleet help organizations be safer, improve efficiency, and cut costs. Learn More About Beyond the Data William's LinkedIn PowerFleet LinkedIn PowerFleet Lean Solutions Group Contact Us FreightWaves The Logistics of Logistics Podcast If you enjoy the podcast, please leave a positive review, subscribe, and share it with your friends and colleagues. The Logistics of Logistics Podcast: Google, Apple, Castbox, Spotify, Stitcher, PlayerFM, Tunein, Podbean, Owltail, Libsyn, Overcast Check out The Logistics of Logistics on Youtube

    Culture of Innovation
    Skyler Stewart: Cultivating an Innovative Mindset – All Things IoT and AI | S1 Ep. 14

    Culture of Innovation

    Play Episode Listen Later May 23, 2022 28:40


    Join Nancy Ridge Founder of Ridge Innovative and Skyler Stewart, leader of AI+IoT of Epic iO, for a captivating conversation around Cultivating an Innovative Mindset. Nancy is honored to introduce Skyler Stewart. Skyler has been successful for the last 19+ years in building national and global channel partner sales organizations in the wireline, wireless, Voice, Data, and Cloud industries. He has served in various channel sales and executive leadership roles for successful start-ups that included such notable telecom companies as Stewart Electric & Communications, Mountain Telecommunications Inc. now Eschelon Telecom and Integra Telecom. Prior to that, he served as Channel Chief at Telesphere overseeing all Indirect Channel Sales nationally, and was instrumental in the expansion of the Indirect Channel, which was then acquired by Vonage Business in 2015. Currently, he serves as the head of AI+IoT for Epic iO leading a team of experts making a safer, smarter, & more connected world for smart cities across the country. In addition to being the recipient of numerous performance and President's Club Awards during his career, Skyler specializes in customizing solutions for large enterprise customers seeking a superior solution, ranging from Security, AI, IoT, UCaaS, CCaaS, CPaaS, SDWan, and various other SaaS services. While away from the office, Skyler enjoys spending time with his wife and two boys while seeking ways to fulfill his need for speed. Prior to his professional telecom career, Skyler raced motocross professional around the globe. Index: 00:52 – Introduction of Skyler Stewart and his Background 03:25 – Cultivating an Innovative Mindset; Definition of IoT 06:00 – Solving Business Problems; Core Pillars 07:58 – How can we put the concept of billions of connections and the metadata into our lives? 09:57 – Seeing applications everywhere; projected rate of adoption 13:27 – Countering resistance; Profitability 15:15 – The mindset and seeing the applications everywhere 18:49 – Solving for customer experience and reducing costs 21:15 – AI notifications immediately 23:19 – Customer and Employee Experience; Culture of Caring 25:28 – What innovation would you most like to see gain adoption? Helpful Links – Epic iO – https://epicio.com/ If you enjoyed this podcast, be sure to subscribe to us on Soundcloud for more episodes and write us a review! Share this episode with anyone interested in unconventional ideas. Do you have questions, comments, insight on the topics discussed today? Send an email to support@ridgeinnovative.com with Subject: “Culture of Innovation S1 E14”! Follow Us On: iTunes: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/culture-of-innovation/id1537650821 Website: https://ridgeinnovative.com Twitter: https://twitter.com/nancy_ridge LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/nancy-ridge-085988a YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCjEMawW6iUoDcQDjvtKTBzA Soundcloud: https://soundcloud.com/culture-of-innovation Release Date: 24 May 2022

    The Startup Junkies Podcast
    MyCelium Changing the NWA Network

    The Startup Junkies Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later May 23, 2022 30:43


    On this episode of Startup Junkies, hosts Jeff Amerine, Caleb Talley, and Davis McEntire talked with Rishi Mittal, an entrepreneur who founded Mycelium Networks in Northwest Arkansas which deploys and operates decentralized wireless networks. After teaming up with a friend to mine Bitcoin in 2011, Rishi and his friend had to stop a few months after they started due to the amount of power they were using. Though his time with this project was short, Rishi learned a lot about how to start and run a venture, and he found a passion for blockchain, cryptocurrency, and the whole decentralized world. Throughout the show, Jeff, Caleb, Davis, and Rishi discussed Rishi's history and interest in blockchain and how his company, Mycelium, is setting up its own IoT network all over Northwest Arkansas, applying it to the blockchain, and creating a new type of internet architecture.  Thanks for tuning in! Show Notes: (1:27) Origin Story (8:30) More about Mycelium (12:47) Applications Running on It (15:50) Onboarding Others (19:52) The Game of Growing (23:30) Paying the Bills and the Team (26:15) The Future of Mycelium (27:28) Advice to Younger Self and Closing Remarks   Links: Jeff Amerine Caleb Talley Davis McEntire Rishi Mittal Mycelium Networks   Quotes: “...All of a sudden there was this network of computers decentralized all over the globe that managed and maintained the system as opposed to having a central authority or, you know, a meeting behind closed doors to do that.” Rishi Mittal, (4:06)   “The best way to look at IoT is we're really trying to build an information super sidewalk…where we don't need that high bandwidth, those real-time streaming applications…but we do need to send reliable information over long distances. And for that, you can use something kind of like a dedicated sidewalk for smaller bandwidth items.” Rishi Mittal, (11:11)   “The mission of Mycelium networks is to accelerate the world's adoption of decentralized networks. And we started with Helium, we're starting in Northwest Arkansas, and we're just going to take it from there.” Rishi Mittal, (12:35)   “You're literally running over a low band sidewalk. Your batteries last longer, you can get those sensors really, really tiny and really, really cheap. So you could essentially deck out whatever you want with tracking or humidity sensors, or temperature sensors, whether it's setting up a deer camp or tracking your dog or testing the heat of your soil for your rose garden…just really anything you can think of. And a lot of these solutions can be implemented for under $20.” Rishi Mittal, (13:43) ”We just want to build. You know, we just want to bring more networks to Northwest Arkansas and open up the space here.” Rishi Mittal, (23:15)

    JS Party
    The third year of the third age of JS

    JS Party

    Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 60:10


    In 2020, Shawn (swyx) Wang wrote: Every 10 years there is a changing of the guard in JavaScript. I think we have just started a period of accelerated change that could in thge future be regarded as the Third Age of JavaScript. We're now in year three of this third age and Swyx joins us to look back at what he missed, look around at what's happening today, and look forward at what might be coming next.

    Industrial IoT Spotlight
    EP 130 - Bringing IT DevOps best practices to the IoT - Francois Baldassari, CEO, Memfault

    Industrial IoT Spotlight

    Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 45:28


    In this episode, we discuss the shift away from historical device design to today's environment of affordable low-power computers and machine learning at the edge. We also explore the change in the industry towards subscription business models and what that means for both software and hardware developers in terms of life-cycle expectations, security best practices and analytics needs.  Our guest today is Francois Baldassari, CEO of Memfault. Memfault empowers teams to act proactively by enabling them to deploy OTA firm updates, remotely debug and continuously monitor their fleet of connected devices at scale. IoT ONE is an IoT focused research and advisory firm. We provide research to enable you to grow in the digital age. Our services include market research, competitor information, customer research, market entry, partner scouting, and innovation programs. For more information, please visit iotone.com

    IoT For All Podcast
    Hardware's Role in Successful IoT Deployments | aconno's Thomas Hollwedel

    IoT For All Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 20:59


    The podcast begins with a background on aconno and areas the company puts its focus on. Thomas then discusses the role of hardware and whether he suggests custom or off-the-shelf solutions. He also discusses how hardware fits with in-house software and challenges he's seen in the space. Ryan and Thomas wrap up the podcast with a discussion on how to approach IoT education and whether companies need internal technical employees to integrate IoT.Thomas Hollwedel is a founder, investor, consultant, trainer, and senior manager in the industry sector. He has experience in various industries (telecommunications, automotive, real estate, media) and companies of different sizes (startups, mid-sized companies, corporates). As a digital expert, his particular strength is his ability to mediate between the technology and marketing worlds to find the best, most pragmatic solution.

    Thanks For Visiting
    164. Getting Scrappy to Start Investing in Real Estate with Dr. Erin Hudson

    Thanks For Visiting

    Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 51:10


    Dr. Erin Hudson went from being in private practice to moving into single-family investment properties, short-term rentals, and then jumped into the multifamily space and is making big waves! She is one of five founding partners of Quattro Capital, which is an equity real estate firm that buys apartments ranging from 30 units to 250 units. Erin is also a licensed financial professional and helps others create their own family bank to fund their real estate transactions. She is on a mission to help women kick fear to the curb and step out in courage. We discuss how she got started in the early stages of investing, finding the grit and determination needed to be successful no matter the cost, and getting resourceful with what you have in order to get started. To learn more, and for the complete show notes, visit: https://thanksforvisiting.me (thanksforvisiting.me) Resources: http://www.thequattroway.com/ (thequattroway.com) LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/dr-erin-hudson-550904a/ (linkedin.com/in/dr-erin-hudson-550904a) Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/erin.c.hudson (facebook.com/erin.c.hudson) Visit thanksforvisiting.me/workshop to watch our Hosting Business Mastery Method workshop! #STRShareSunday: https://www.instagram.com/theblankfarmhouse/ (@theblankfarmhouse) Thanks for Visiting is produced and published by http://crate.media/ (Crate Media). Mentioned in this episode: Join us LIVE on May 17 for a Q&A Annette & Sarah will be hosting a short-term rental workshop with a LIVE Q&A for everyone in the Thanks For Visiting community. We'll be discussing the three mistakes that were holding us back; but now we're rocking our 7-figure hosting business, buying more real estate, and have finally achieved the flexible lifestyle we've been working towards. https://thanksforvisiting.captivate.fm/apr-26-workshop (Sign up for May's Workshop now at ThanksForVisiting.me/Workshop) Check out our favorite property care app! Breezeway's best-in-class tools help you automate, coordinate, and communicate detailed work at each of your properties, so you can deliver the best experience to guests and homeowners. Breezeway integrates with over thirty Property Management Software systems and IoT devices, meaning you can easily harness property data from your entire tech stack to build stronger programs for scheduling, quality assurance, guest texting, owner reporting, and much more. Best yet, TFV listeners will receive free implementation when you decide to make Breezeway a part of your hosting business operational strategy! https://thanksforvisiting.captivate.fm/breezeway-may-22 (Visit Breezeway.io/TFV to learn more.)

    Peggy Smedley Show
    Textiles Go Circular

    Peggy Smedley Show

    Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 14:27


    Only about 15% of used clothes and other textiles in the United States get reused or recycle. The rest head straight to the landfill or incinerator. Peggy talks about how to address this, citing research in a new report about how to facilitate a circular economy for textiles. She also discusses: The biggest hurdles facing the textile industry. What can be done to address these hurdles. Actions that businesses can take now to move to a more circular economy. peggysmedleyshow.com  (5/17/22 - 771) IoT, Internet of Things, Peggy Smedley, artificial intelligence, machine learning, big data, digital transformation, cybersecurity, blockchain, 5G, cloud, sustainability, future of work, podcast This episode is available on all major streaming platforms. If you enjoyed this segment, please consider leaving a review on Apple Podcasts.

    Peggy Smedley Show
    The Cost of Building Decarbonization

    Peggy Smedley Show

    Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 27:27


    Peggy and Kim Cheslak, director of codes, New Buildings Institute, discuss a new study on building decarbonization. She says one of the primary questions is: what does it cost? Thus, it went into the study with two primary goals: to confirm or disprove the theory that electrifying buildings saves or costs homeowners or building owners money over time and to also look at the societal benefits of electrifying buildings. They also discuss: If an all-electric building is less expensive to build, own, and operate. If there are concerns about the grid and variability across the country. How building codes intersect. newbuildings.org  (5/17/22 - 771) IoT, Internet of Things, Peggy Smedley, artificial intelligence, machine learning, big data, digital transformation, cybersecurity, blockchain, 5G, cloud, sustainability, future of work, podcast, Kim Cheslak, New Buildings Institute This episode is available on all major streaming platforms. If you enjoyed this segment, please consider leaving a review on Apple Podcasts.

    Peggy Smedley Show
    Adaptable

    Peggy Smedley Show

    Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 15:41


    Peggy and Alexa Carlin, Women Empower X, talk about her new book Adaptable. She says she has gone through a number of challenges that are very related in the sense that we all go through so many challenges—and there is a time where we can either let our obstacles stop us or fuel us forward. They also discuss: How to show other women that they can do it. How to share obstacles and have the courage to do so. The importance of showing others that we are not alone. alexacarlin.com (5/17/22 - 771) IoT, Internet of Things, Peggy Smedley, artificial intelligence, machine learning, big data, digital transformation, cybersecurity, blockchain, 5G, cloud, sustainability, future of work, podcast, Alexa Carlin, Women Empower X This episode is available on all major streaming platforms. If you enjoyed this segment, please consider leaving a review on Apple Podcasts.

    Over The Edge
    The ‘Machine Economy' and the Future of Automation, with Rex St. John, Founder of Taroko Technology

    Over The Edge

    Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 50:18


    This episode features an interview between Matt Trifiro and Rex St. John, founder of Taroko Technology. Rex has spent the last decade building developer and innovator ecosystems at Intel, Arm, and NVIDIA. He recently resigned to work full time in Web3 to organize communities and developer programs. While at NVIDIA, Rex built the global software ecosystem for NVIDIA Jetson. At Arm, he built global developer relations programs for IoT and Edge. While working for Intel, Rex was the lead developer on many projects and built the Global developer ecosystem and GTM for Edge AI, Robotics, Drones, IoT, Industrial, and Embedded Systems. On his YouTube channel, Rex shares knowledge, analysis and insights about the future of hardware, software and crypto technology. He received his education from the Isenberg School of Management, UMass Amherst and is on the advisory boards for Silicon Valley Robotics and Dronecode.In this episode, Rex tells us how he got his start in video game technology and then decided to learn to program and code on his own. He turned that into a career of coding, software development consulting, and technical evangelism. Rex provides his views on the evolution and adoption of Edge computing and IoT, including how kubernetes is helping to drive transformation. He also delves into the future of what he calls the ‘Machine Economy' - where hardware, cryptocurrency, blockchain, and the metaverse may work in tandem to ensure continued efficiencies and support for business operations and security. Rex also raises the importance of improving the environmental impact of cryptocurrency and blockchain, and advancements in democracy, social engagement, and community. ---------Key Quotes:“I do think people get tired of hearing about IOT and the conversation has to change. And then ultimately, it's driven by the workloads and the profitability. If people aren't investing, then the innovations are going to move slower. And then if the workloads aren't there, then it's not a justified innovation. So, I think right now it feels very much like edge computing is on the rise.”“Shifting everything from manual allocation to the biggest thing I think is just shifting all compute resources to an open economy, where you can list anything on the network and get paid to put that on. I think that's going to have a very profound and massive impact on the computer industry at the very least.”---------Show Timestamps:(02:29) Getting Started in Technology(04:00) Evolution of Edge Computing and IoT (06:45) Electrical IMP and Particle(08:22) Internet Connectivity and Rise of Edge Computing(10:00) Latest Trends in IoT and Kubernetes(13:30) Kubernetes Driving Transformation(16:00) Orchestration(18:10) Machines Operating Machines(18:55) Principles of Web3 and Security(21:00) Intersection of Security with Web3, IoT, and Edge(22:30) Cryptocurrency, Helium Mining, and Device Networks(24:00) Demand for Hardware and maintaining efficiencies (26:20) Market Based Scheduling (28:40) Metaverse Rental GPU Market(29:40) Proof of Work and Proof of Stake(32:00) Improving Environmental Impact from Cryptocurrency and Blockchain(35:00) Machine Economy and Carbon Credits(36:36) Carbon Accountability (39:25) Doughnut Index / Doughnut Fund(43:30) Views on Regulation(46:45) Technology Breakthroughs(47:25) Innovations in Democracy, Social Engagement, and Community--------Sponsor:Over the Edge is brought to you by Dell Technologies to unlock the potential of your infrastructure with edge solutions. From hardware and software to data and operations, across your entire multi-cloud environment, we're here to help you simplify your edge so you can generate more value. Learn more by visiting DellTechnologies.com/SimplifyYourEdge for more information or click on the link in the show notes.--------Links:Follow Matt on TwitterConnect with Rex on TwitterConnect with Rex on LinkedInWatch Rex's Videos on YouTubeVisit Rex's Websitewww.CaspianStudios.comRex's Book Recommendations:Third Pillar Capitalism Without CapitalSovereign Citizen

    Leaders in Cleantech
    Janelle Wang, Acton – 95

    Leaders in Cleantech

    Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 36:57


    What's it all about? eScooters, eBikes, last mile solutions and all things Micro-mobility. Great to see how design thinking and innovation applies not just to technology, but to company cultures and business models. This week I talk about the challenges and opportunities for micro-mobility and mobility as a service across cities in various parts of the world, and how building an innovative company culture has helped Acton grow rapidly and globally. About Janelle Wang:  Co-Founder and CEO of Acton, Janelle is a Designer turned Entrepreneur with 15 years of Strategic Planning, New Category Creation & Design Thinking for Fortune 500s to Start Ups, bringing breakthrough Innovation and Sustainability to reality. She is leading the charge to help shape a new, more efficient, vibrant and livable urban environment. She holds 50+ patents in micromobility and sustainability solutions. Janelle has an M.S. in Industrial Design from Purdue University. Janelle was selected as one of “19 Influential Women In Mobility” in 2019, she was awarded Female CEO of the Year in 2016, and has been featured in WSJ, FastCompany, CNN, VOGUE, BBC, and more.. About Acton: ACTON, headquartered in Silicon Valley, offers Mobility-as-a-Service (MaaS) solution packages from multimodal vehicles to advanced IoT to move people and goods efficiently & intelligently. ACTON partners with automakers, cities, ride-share operators, and private property owners. Together, we make our cities better places to live. ACTON is unique in its range of mobility solutions on offer. ACTON has won numerous awards and has been featured in various media, internationally. ACTON creates excellence in riding dynamics, safety, serviceability, ease of use, design aesthetics, and sustainability. With over 100 patents, more than 100 cities globally, tens of millions of rides, ACTON is leading the way. Social links:  Janelle Wang on LinkedIn: (61) Janelle Wang | LinkedIn Acton website: ACTON | Supercharging City 3.0 | California Acton on LinkedIn: (61) ACTON: Overview | LinkedIn Acton on Instagram: ACTON (@actonallday) • Instagram photos and videos About Hyperion Cleantech Group: Hyperion Cleantech Group is the holding company for businesses focused exclusively in cleantech talent acquisition, retention, leadership development. working with some of the most innovative cleantech companies in the world, helping to find extraordinary talent to enable their growth and success. Partnering with leading cleantech VCs, as well as directly with founders and entrepreneurs in the sector. With our clients we are transforming business and growing a strong and prosperous cleantech economy. We work across EMEA and NORAM, with teams based in the UK, Germany and the US. EPISODE LINKS Acton's latest acquisition hints at the future of docked micromobility Acton's latest acquisition hints at the future of docked micromobility – TechCrunch Made to Stick: Why Some Ideas Survive and Others Die Made to Stick: Why Some Ideas Survive and Others Die: Chip Heath, Dan Heath: 8601410083830: Books: Amazon.com Good to Great: Why Some Companies Make the Leap...And Others Don't Amazon.com: Good to Great: Why Some Companies Make the Leap...And Others Don't (Audible Audio Edition): Jim Collins, Jim Collins, HarperAudio: Audible Books & Originals Follow us online, write a review (please) or subscribe I'm very keen to hear feedback on the podcast and my guests, and to hear your suggestions for future guests or topics. Contact via the website, or Twitter. If you do enjoy the podcast, please write a review on iTunes, or your usual podcast platform, and tell your cleantech friends about us. That would be much appreciated. Twitter https://twitter.com/Cleantechleader Facebook https://www.facebook.com/DavidHuntCleantechGuide Instagram https://www.instagram.com/davidhuntcleantech/

    Reflect Forward
    Why Being a CEO is Not About You w/ Dermot O'Shea

    Reflect Forward

    Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 36:14


    Guest: Dermot O'Shea is an entrepreneur that has jointly founded and run Taoglas for over 18 years and grown it to more than 425 workers with ten global locations and over $100M revenue in sales per year. Dermot is a recognized thought leader in the IoT industry and is also accredited with creating "The best IoT party" and networking event every year at MWC Americas. When not selling Taoglas, Dermot enjoys outdoor activities and spending time with his wife and three sons. Dermot also serves on the board of Alpha Antennas and the Board of Trustees of La Jolla Country Day School. Dermot and his wife Ciara set up unityforukraine.net, a nonprofit to help protect Ukraine civilians in the war. So far, Unityforukraine.net have sent over $100,000 worth of essential equipment to help their friends and colleagues - civilians - in Ukraine. Episode in a Tweet: Being a CEO is not about you; sometimes, it's about taking the backseat and letting others lead. Quick Background: Dermot O'Shea learned the hard way that leading isn't about being the most intelligent person in the room or always being in the spotlight. After years of dealing with the stress a hard-charging leader brings, Dermot realized that he would be happier and a better leader when he let other people shine. So, he stepped back and made room for others. In this very candid interview, Dermot and I talk about how imposter syndrome forces you to overcompensate and how to get over insecurities as a CEO. He also talks about his journey as an entrepreneur and how betting on himself paid off even though it seems risky. Dermot shares his passion for the Internet of Things (IoT) space and how he and his partner built a $100M company. I'm confident you'll love this vulnerable and honest conversation with Dermot O'Shea. How to Find Dermot: https://www.linkedin.com/in/dermotoshea/ https://www.taoglas.com/

    IoT For All Podcast
    Picking the Right Tech for Your IoT Solution | TensorIoT's Shahan Krakirian & Joseph Melendez

    IoT For All Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 24:39


    The podcast opens up with Shahan and Joseph talking about TensorIoT and the use cases of their work before getting into how and when TensorIoT joins a company's IoT journey. They then discuss picking the right tech for your solution and how it can fit into a business without overhauling company processes. Ryan, Shahan, and Joseph wrap up the podcast with a conversation about the importance of the cloud in IoT applications and when edge computing or hybrid solutions may be more applicable.Shahan Krakirian helps the Product Team to develop and refine TensorIoT products. His favorite part of the job: "Many jobs are repetitive – mine is not. We're constantly challenged (and growing) in an ever-changing environment, but always given the support to excel." Outside of work, Shahan enjoys rock climbing.Joseph Melendez is a software engineer leading the IoT team. He's dedicated to addressing customer needs, working in multiple programming languages, having expertise in Amazon Web Services, and hands-on experience with the hardware needed to bring their vision to life. Driven to learn from new experiences continuously and eager to address questions and concerns in the ever-changing tech landscape. He graduated from the California State Polytechnic University, Pomona, with a major in Computer Engineering and a minor in Mathematics.

    WIIM Radio
    Meet My Business Coach

    WIIM Radio

    Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 68:17


    This week we're chatting with Sel Watts, Jessy's business coach. Sel is an HR Professional, Business & People Leader, Speaker, and seasoned entrepreneur. Sel started her career in HR over 20 years ago and launched her first business wattsnext Group in 2007 with the vision to disrupt the HR industry and create great workplaces across the globe. wattsnext is based in Brisbane and New York and partners with Founders & CEO's of small to medium businesses and fast growth startups to create high performing and engaged teams and cultures. Sel has developed and led her own team of HR professionals, supporting them to not only be successful within wattsnext but to continue to advance their careers and personal lives beyond wattsnext, which has led to the launch of her most recent business The HR Linc. The HR Linc is a membership and community created to disrupt and advance the professional development of sole charge HR professionals in the small to medium business sector. Our mission is to elevate HR to have a valued seat at the table whilst connecting and growing our members through experiential learning. Sel has also been able to fuel her entrepreneurial flame by undertaking other start-ups including IoT firm zzoota which is currently kicking big goals in its space. Sel sits on the Board of Entrepreneurs Organization New York Chapter and was a Board member of the Australia Israel Chamber of Commerce. As a self-confessed personal development addict, she have gained her knowledge from hundreds of hours of coaching, mentoring, courses, workshops, travel, reading, conferences, & networking gatherings. The Unconventional Life vlog is Sel's way of sharing her journey of expanding her brands globally, chasing a dream and living a ‘no plan b' life. She is passionate about people choosing the life they really want and gives value to her audience through her vulnerable and engaging style. Sel also allocates time to coaching Founders, CEO's and startup entrepreneurs. She is known for her progressive and real approach to HR and her raw and honest shares of her experience as a Leader. Sel is a mother to three sons who are learning a lot about resilience, gratitude, never settling and striving for their dreams with everything they have! You can learn more about Sel's background, experience, many ventures, and accomplishments here. Want to join WIIM's Collective? Check out our website: http://www.iamwiim.com/join Don't forget to follow us on Instagram: http://www.instagram.com/iamwiim --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/wiim/support

    Residential Tech Talks
    Episode 97: Showroom Redesign Insights from Premier's Jason Barth

    Residential Tech Talks

    Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 44:45


    On this week's podcast, Jason Barth joins us from Carmel, Indiana, where he is owner, CEO, and lead designer of the Premier Group, a residential and commercial integration firm that he co-founded with two college friends back in 1999. Premier has a beautiful showroom in the Indiana Design Center that was completely renovated during the 2020 COVID-19 lockdown. Jason has experienced some firsts with new AV products over the past two years and his team pulled off an impressive showroom renovation that is worthy of discussion during the podcast. Today's episode of Residential Tech Talks is brought to you by Shelly WiFi Relays by Allterco | Smart home devices designed and developed to provide solutions tailored to your needs.  Go to https://shelly.cloud and make IoT simple!

    Human Capital Innovations (HCI) Podcast
    S36E2 - Emerging Trends with Distributed Teams in the Future of Work, with Cory Hyme

    Human Capital Innovations (HCI) Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 37:34


    In this HCI Podcast episode, Dr. Jonathan H. Westover talks with Cory Hyme about emerging trends with distributed teams in the future of work. See the video here: https://youtu.be/mrGTAKWWbKQ. Cory Hymel (https://www.linkedin.com/in/cory-hymel/) leads all things Web3 as the Director of Blockchain at Gigster, a company dedicated to helping businesses develop software applications with the speed of a startup, coupled with the quality and expertise of the most innovative global talent. Cory also manages academic partnerships to help further research into distributed teams and the future of work. Cory's career started with providing enterprise strategy to large enterprises in the early days of the iPhone. He then moved into hardware development to help bring innovative IoT platforms to market.  Please leave a review wherever you listen to your podcasts! Get 3 months of GUSTO free when you run your first payroll, at Gusto.com/hci Check out the HCI Academy: Courses, Micro-Credentials, and Certificates to Upskill and Reskill for the Future of Work! Check out the LinkedIn Alchemizing Human Capital Newsletter. Check out Dr. Westover's book, The Future Leader. Check out Dr. Westover's book, 'Bluer than Indigo' Leadership. Check out Dr. Westover's book, The Alchemy of Truly Remarkable Leadership. Check out the latest issue of the Human Capital Leadership magazine. Ranked #5 Workplace Podcast Ranked #6 Performance Management Podcast Ranked #7 HR Podcast Ranked #12 Talent Management Podcast Ranked in the Top 20 Personal Development and Self-Improvement Podcasts  Ranked in the Top 30 Leadership Podcasts Each HCI Podcast episode (Program, ID No. 592296) has been approved for 0.50 HR (General) recertification credit hours toward aPHR™, aPHRi™, PHR®, PHRca®, SPHR®, GPHR®, PHRi™ and SPHRi™ recertification through HR Certification Institute® (HRCI®). Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    Cyber Security Inside
    96. The Cybersecurity of IoT: Protecting Our Systems

    Cyber Security Inside

    Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 27:53


    In this episode of Cyber Security Inside, Camille and Tom get to chat with Malcolm Harkins, Chief Security & Trust Officer at Epiphany Systems, and Rob Bathurst, Co-Founder & Chief Technology Officer at Epiphany Systems about the Internet of Things and thinking like attackers to protect systems. The conversation covers: -  How the systems in a building physically can be a vulnerability in an organization's systems. -  How thinking like an adversary and what their goals might be is the key to protecting your systems the best you can. -  How complex Internet of Things systems are, and ideas on how to protect them. -  The difference between vulnerability and exploitability, and how to look at both. ...and more. Don't miss it!   The views and opinions expressed are those of the guests and author and do not necessarily reflect the official policy or position of Intel Corporation. Here are some key takeaways: -  The Internet of Things, or IoT, enables a lot of capabilities, but also creates a lot of security issues. To adjust for this, we have to change the way industry views security. -  Everything is connected to technology and networks now, from air conditioning regulation to elevators, it is all connected and inside of a network. Securing that system is incredibly important, because it is now about peoples' safety inside the building. -  It might be easier for an attacker to go after these systems than the computers and servers inside the buildings. For example, at a large sporting event, if you own the stadium, you own the event. -  To learn how to protect a building or an organization, you have to work backwards by thinking about how somebody might disrupt that building. You can then work on protecting it with that information. This is tricky when you have many different parties in a space with different goals and access levels. -  At a stadium, for example, you have food vendors, the entertainment, and more. They all need access to process credit cards, access for fans to tweet, etc. So do you put them on your internal network or on an outside network? Assessing the threat is an important part of this decision. -  This is similar to threat modeling, but with an extra complexity with the IoT systems and the interacting networks. If one vulnerability in one area could take down an entire operation, it is a big deal that requires a lot of consideration. Even removing one system, like the elevator system, can create panic and shut down an entire operation. -  To really start to secure these systems, you need to think like the people trying to take them down. Take a good look at your organization, your business, and ask yourself: if I were an adversary, where would I go for maximum disruption? -  There are differences between enterprise and IoT, including IoT having less visibility and more complexity because it is nested. The connectivity of everything is deep, and protecting a perimeter isn't as realistic in IoT as it is in enterprise. -  Coming together as a team to talk about security and what could potentially happen is one of the best ways to create a defensive understanding. We can't stay in our small silos with this connectivity - we have to talk to each other and expand the reach of each of our scopes. -  It is impossible to prevent every attack. That's why it is important to identify the goal of the attacker and evaluate your system based on that information. It is more about managing the cumulative impact and reducing it. -  When looking at something like Log4j, you need to look at where the maximum impact to your business is and address the vulnerability there. Otherwise, you might cripple the enterprise because of the effort and time put into testing, checking, and remediating areas that aren't as critical. -  Exploits apply to more than just vulnerabilities, and vulnerabilities are not just flaws in software or hardware. It is all about the adversary's ability to take advantage of either. And they don't just apply to single technical conditions, but the relationship between them. -  A way to think about this is to relate it to fire prevention. You can't prevent every fire ever from occurring in your building. But you can have smoke detectors, sprinklers, fire doors, and ways to call the fire department. And the more protections you have in place, the faster you can isolate the problem and resume operations, rather than the whole building going down. Proactivity is important!   Some interesting quotes from today's episode: “If you look at a building, most people just think of it as a shell with glass and doors and floors. And when you really look at it, it really is a connection of different systems. In most modern buildings because of energy regulation and things they get for LEED certification (basically how efficient their building is) they put in automated control systems for their furnaces, their boilers, their air conditioning units, elevators, power systems, access control.” - Rob Bathurst   “Think of the recent ransomware trend where organizations have been impacted and they've been held hostage. In some cases, it might be easier for an attacker to, in essence, attack and exploit the building and create that ransomware event rather than just all the PCs and servers.” - Malcolm Harkins   “You have to understand the way an adversary or somebody might disrupt that building, that organization, the people within it. And based on those objectives, based on those goals, you can kind of work backwards and say, how do I protect those systems?” - Rob Bathurst   “What might seem like an obscure vulnerability that could be exploited in one area could actually take down the entirety of an operation. Shut down the elevator system, turn off the fire life safety system, shut down the heating and air conditioning… Think of the chaos that would create.” - Malcolm Harkins   “People naturally want to think good thoughts. They want to be positive. They want to do the best for the places they work. And that sometimes keeps them from thinking: oh, if X, Y, Z went down, the whole place would fall apart. Because that's the place they work. But what we try and tell people is that's the mentality you need to be able to start to understand how to more properly architect and defend yourself.” - Rob Bathurst   “That's how the bad folks go from an initial foothold, that toehold, by popping one thing. And then all of a sudden navigating their way through the daisy chain of connections, to the moment of material impact.” - Malcolm Harkins   “When you look at things at a: what are we trying to do? We're not trying to stop all things all the time forever, because it's just an impossible task. The environment is too dynamic, everything else is going on. What we're trying to do is we're trying to limit the attacker's opportunity at the moments of greatest weakness.” - Rob Bathurst   “You can build a strategy, as Malcolm pointed out, to reduce the exploitable paths. And for the ones you can't reduce, create resilience, create friction as we typically call it, so that you are aware the adversary is trying something or that you're able to block it.” - Rob Bathurst   “You can be vulnerable, but not be exploitable. You could have an exploit happen again at a laptop or a pinpoint device, but that doesn't mean your organization is exploitable to a material event.” - Malcolm Harkins   “When you build the building, you have a building inspector, you have a fire marshal, you have people come around and check it and evaluate it, and make sure it's up to code. And we don't have that kind of same rigidity in the security space.” - Rob Bathurst

    Enterprise Podcast Network – EPN
    Future of weather forecasting using IoT sensors and machine learning

    Enterprise Podcast Network – EPN

    Play Episode Listen Later May 14, 2022 9:45


    Carlos Gaitan, the CEO and Co-founder of Benchmark Labs a leading provider of AI & IoT-driven weather forecasting solutions for the agriculture, energy, and insurance sectors joins Enterprise Radio. The post Future of weather forecasting using IoT sensors and machine learning appeared first on Enterprise Podcast Network - EPN.

    The Logistics of Logistics Podcast
    The Smart Warehouse With Dan Gilmore

    The Logistics of Logistics Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 64:35


    Want to know how you can deploy a smart warehouse for your business? Today's guest is Dan Gilmore of Softeon, a company that provides a full suite of flexible and robust end-to-end supply chain software solutions to deliver success. He joins Joe Lynch to talk about the idea and technology behind their system. They discuss some of the big trends impacting warehouses, e-commerce, and retail. From labor shortages to automation, Dan enlightens on the benefits of WMS and WES for any business. Tune in to better understand the perks of this new smart technology for optimizing your business! The Smart Warehouse With Dan Gilmore Our topic is the smart warehouse with my friend Dan Gilmore. How's it going, Dan? It's great. I'm happy to be here. I'm glad I'm finally getting to interview you. Please introduce yourself, your company, and where you are calling from. I'm a Chief Marketing Officer of a supply chain software company called Softeon. Our company is headquartered in Reston, Virginia, outside of Dallas Airport. I happen to be in the Dayton/Cincinnati, Ohio area. What does Softeon do? It's a supply chain software company, primarily a supply chain execution. The company was founded in 1999. Our first customer all the way back then was the L'Oreal, and we proceeded to build out a suite of solutions that were brought in deep capability. That includes warehouse management systems, and all the stuff that goes around warehouse management systems including labor and resource management, slotting optimization, and yard management. A newer thing which we will get into because it's critical to what's happening in terms of the smart warehouse is something called warehouse execution systems, which have been around for a while but gained prominence in the last couple of years as a way to optimize and orchestrate order fulfillment level at a capability that's beyond even very good tier ones. This category of stuff is called distributed order management, which has to do with the optimal sourcing of products based on customer commitments as well as network capacities constraints in how do I get the lowest cost alternative that meets the customer needs? It's a very prominent in omnichannel commerce. It is almost essential in retail but we are having a lot of B2B type of successes in distributed order management as well. There are some other things that could give a flavor to what we do. You started well before eCommerce was a thing. Do you still support stores and that kind of warehousing? Traditional WMS type of capabilities for retailers, would largely be store replenishment. Now, we are moving into eCommerce fulfillment. Many retailers are also looking to have a lot of activity at the store level, whether that's buying online, pick up in-store, curbside pickup or store fulfillment. We've got some solutions there, both in terms of the distributed order management that I referenced. It is the tool going that says, “The best place to fulfill this order from based on the time commitments as well as inventory availability, labor availability, etc. is store 3, 4, 5, 6, 7,” and then have the ability to first identify where it's the right location. That could be obviously a DC, a third-party facility or something like that. The first word is the best place to source it from, and if it's a store, we have a store module that facilitates the inventory transactions, picking transactions, and shipping at a store level. That became a thing. Target is one of those companies that if you buy something online from them, they are more likely to ship from their stores these days. I have seen and the figure keeps rising. The whole market has changed. The more high-tech feel and touch, the less back-breaking work and less bending over and lifting heavy cases. It's like 80% or 90%. Let's say 90%. That's the number I had in my mind too. They are doing them from the store, which is incredible. Before we get into all that, tell us a little bit about you. Where did you grow up and go to school? Give us some career highlights and bullet points before you join Softeon. I'm an Ohio guy. My whole life, I grew up in Akron, Cleveland area, and then got a job with NCR after grad school. I got an MBA from the University of Akron. I got a job at NCR that was here in Dayton. I was a Product Manager in charge of barcode and data collection. The way serendipity works, I moved from barcode data collection systems to wireless systems and then got into WMS. I was into consulting for a while. I have done a lot of marketing in the space. I was also Chief Marketing Officer at the Red Prairie before it got acquired by JDA and became ultimately Blue Yonder. Earlier in my life, I spent a couple of years implementing WMS, a couple of major projects down here in the Cincinnati area that helped me learn a lot about how the technology works and what's good and less good. Notably, in 2003, I started a publication called Supply Chain Digest, which changed the face of online supply chain and logistics, news, and coverage. I still keep a light hand on it. I still write a column once a week still for Supply Chain Digest. I have read that. I wrote a lot of blog posts in the past. When you are a writer, I have joked that “My research is a little different than a professor's research, I Google.” You start to realize which publications have good content when you are a blogger. The bar is a little lower for a blogger than it is for somebody who is writing in a publication. I would say, “Supply Chain Digest always had good stuff.” When and why did you join Softeon? It has been a few years now. I had done a little bit of side consulting with Softeon before joining, and I was impressed with the breadth and depth of the software and the number of innovative capabilities, but as important as that is, lots of companies have good software. We think we've got leading-edge software but the approach to customers and success - I have never seen a company that consistently puts its own interests behind its customers on a regular basis. We are not going to let anything get in the way of a successful implementation. That's a direct record that's unequal in the marketplace. It's the care and concern for success at the customer level and not looking at everything through a lens of only professional services hours if I can sell or something like that. It was a different attitude. It intrigued me, and plus, the company needed some help in the marketing area to get that message out. The combination of those factors led me to join Softeon. Our topic is the smart warehouse. Obviously, things have changed quite a bit in this business. Talk about some of the big trends that are out there that are impacting warehousing, eCommerce, and retail. It impacts everybody. Most of the audience is going to say they are living this or these are big surprises but it's nice to still put it all in context, the growing distribution labor shortage and there's a shortage of manufacturing. It's very acute. Everywhere you go, that's what you hear about the turnover levels, retention, and even with the greatest rising substantially. That's everyone's concern. After about a decade of very flat wage growth in warehousing and distribution until a few years ago, now, all of a sudden, the costs are taken off. Amazon has over $20 an hour with attractive signing bonuses in many parts of the country. They now offer parental leave for twenty weeks. I saw it on TV. That would be a very attractive benefit. That's the advantage. Target announced that they were raising their wage in both stores and distribution centers, not all markets but in some markets, by $24 an hour. That's $48,000 a year, and assume there's probably some overtime in there, whatever husband and wife are making up, for example. They are working at a Target DC in those markets, you could be pulling in $100,000 a year for a family, which is not bad money. [caption id="attachment_7940" align="aligncenter" width="600"] The Smart Warehouse: With the e-commerce-driven cycle time pressure, it's unbelievable how fast you can get products these days.[/caption]   This has come up on my show a few times. I'm getting too old for that kind of work, and I can't walk 10 miles a day but if I had a choice, we need to make that job easier. We are going to get to that because this is what technology does. It also makes the job more attractive when they can say, “I go to that job, and I'm learning all this cool technology.” If you can bring somebody in, there's a different feeling when I get to wear all that high-tech gear and use high-tech systems and say, “I'm part of the supply chain,” as opposed to, “I'm a strong back, walk 5 miles a day and nobody gives a crap about me.” There are no questions about that. It's going to be both in terms of the shortage of labor and, second, building to attract people into this career. Now the whole market has changed, that more high-tech feel and touch, less back-breaking work, less bending over and lifting heavy cases, and all the kinds of things to go on and work for a long time. You are spot-on on that dynamic. If we have a shortage, that means the people we do have to be more efficient. The way they can be more efficient is with tech. That's one big trend going on. What's another big trend? There's a bunch in there that interrelated as well. Obviously, the eCommerce-driven cycle time pressure. If you look ay Amazon over your tablet, it's unbelievable how fast you can get products these days, even somewhat obscure products not that long ago, I need a new power cord for my HP computer. Somehow Amazon was able to deliver that the next day. I'm like, “Probably, they have this cable in someplace that they can get it to me one day.” Think of all the thousands of cables that are out there, and they've got mine. The cycle time pressure in that both are in terms of getting the order process from when it drops into the DC and out the door. Obviously, companies are also moving distribution facilities closer to the customer, so the transportation part of the journey is cut down as well. They will remember the specific numbers. It's Home Depot that is building 170 or 180 different local fulfillment centers that are being the largely cross-dock type of facilities that bring bulky items in and get them right to the customer in addition to the big giant warehouses that they already have. It's a fact of life. Eventually, we will teleport or whatever the product from the warehouse because it seems like we are reaching the Laws of Physics there that it can't be here any faster but maybe we will find a way. I remember, many years ago, I was working on a digital marketing project. I was helping this distribution center, nice, concise in Chicago land Peoria. They said we are one-day shipping to 65% of the population of the US. That was always what Indiana, Illinois, and there are so many DCs down in Ohio can always make that claim, and that was good enough. If you said, “I have a DC in the Midwest that can get me to the Eastern Coast, and I have one out West, that was good enough.” We are not seeing that anymore. We are going to get increasingly where same-day delivery becomes a fact of life rather incredible. Amazon and others talk about getting it down to 2 hours or 30 minutes. That's what Target is doing, not with those DCs. We think we will get to Walmart doing some of the same. What's another trend? Obviously, because we are calling the session, we are going to talk about the smart and also the future but it's largely here nowadays. We've got smart everything. We've got smart houses, cars, refrigerators, and toothbrushes even. I saw that a couple of years ago. I'm not sure if it's exactly taken off the map but to monitor how often you brush your teeth. What does it mean? Primarily, it's talked about internet connectivity and some analytics around that. The least examples are John Deere, Caterpillar or companies of that kind, putting sensors and other IoT types of devices on their equipment out in the field so they can get a sense of how people are actually using it. They can do predictive maintenance on it. They could say, “Your guys aren't using the equipment as effectively as they could if they changed their techniques.” It's certainly timely. If we are going to almost start things where it's time for the smart warehouse too but we will get into for the rest of the broadcast era left different than more internet connectivity, sensors, and things like that. That can be part of it but it is a small part of it. The bottom line of it is we are entering a new era of where all soccer technologies that are, in fact, much smarter than we have ever had before. I have argued publicly for a couple of years now that we had about twenty years of relatively incremental progress in WMS technology. I used this in speeches before but a few years ago, I was cleaning up my office and running the holidays as I often do when I found an RFP from a major food company for a WMS circuit in 2003. I looked through that and I thought, “This doesn't look all that different than the RFPs we are seeing in 2019, 2020 or whatever year we are looking at that.” I looked at it and said, “The big difference is not in the functionality being asked for. It's that now, a lot of that functionality is, in fact, core product, configurable product than maybe a lot of it had to be achieved through customizations.” That's probably true. Same-day delivery has just become a fact of life. The fundamental way of where WMS operates didn't change all that much give or take from 2000 to 2020 or somewhere in that range. Now, with the smart technologies that we are talking about, they are brought by the world's execution systems in working with WMS, I talked about before. This is a new ball game, and it was going to be fun for the rest of the people here to talk about this. You throw in a new term there. You said warehouse execution system. Those have been around for a while but they are now becoming the norm. It's becoming very prominent, and then the value is starting to be recognized. What is it? A couple of three companies had the belief and correctly, for most of the WMS systems did not care enough about equipment throughput and utilization. We wound up with big peaks and valleys, and anybody have been in a district distribution center, even a busy one. You have seen it where there are all kinds of activity at the beginning and the middle of the wave, then as the wave starts to dissipate even on a big, expensive, huge sortation system, you've got a relatively small number of boxes moving around, waiting for that wave and everything to close out. You said wave. Does that mean the orders come in waves? Yeah. The work is released in what is called pick waves. That's based on any number of different attributes. It could be the carrier schedule, value-added processing that needs to be done or workload balancing across the different pick areas of the company. You organize the work against various attributes that constitute a block of work that's typically referred to as a wave. I know I've got all these trucks that are going to show up and they are taking different orders, so maybe I'm working to that order that's going to fill up that truck. The problem, to your point, is we've got already may be a shortage of headcount in there. Now when we have waves, I'm not being efficient because I've got too much work at one moment and then not enough at another. The whole goal of WMS of what we're talking about with the smart warehouse is overcoming, I mean, obviously, you've got to plan and execute based on the workforce that you have here, and we will talk about that. Having a warehouse management system that gives me stuff was great in the past but you are saying, “I will help you with a WES or Warehouse Execution System. I'm going to help you manage the flow.” Manage the flow work and the resource utilization, and then new ways. Part of that still ties into that interest in level loading or making the flow of goods across an automation system more smooth and consistent because if you can do that, there are a couple of things. First off, the total throughput of the system is likely to be better. Second, if it's a new facility, you could probably get by with a smaller sorter because you are going to be able to utilize it more consistently over a block of time, a shift or over what you want to look at it there. The other breakthrough that Softeon said is that the WES tends its roots and level loading of the automation and better utilization there. The WES works extremely well, even in non-automated facilities or lightly automated facilities. [caption id="attachment_7941" align="aligncenter" width="600"] The Smart Warehouse: The fundamental way a warehouse operates didn't change all that much from 2000 to 2020. But now, with smart technologies, this is a new ball game.[/caption]   As a matter of fact, one of our leading customers did a press release a couple of years back that talked about 50% productivity gain from implementing WES or Warehouse Execution Systems on top of existing Softeon WMS, and doing that in a totally manual environment. Everything is part of a system. You can have a sortation system, goods to person system or put wall system or whatever. It's got a certain capacity, throughputs, inputs, and outputs. Twenty workers walked around on a three-level case pick module. There are systems too. They have inputs, outputs, throughput, and expectations. The one big difference is that with a more manual system, you can throw more bodies at it up to the point of diminishing returns and gain through the port from that area, whereas a heavily automated system is rate as its rating. You are not going to do a whole lot to affect that. Throughput is everything, whether you are a plant, a freight broker or a warehouse. The stuff that goes out the door and that we can charge for is what we want to do. Having a warehouse management system is great. I know there are certain warehouses. Probably the old ones still don't even have that. You are saying to be as efficient and effective as you need to be in the market, you need a warehouse execution system that gets me the flow and that throughput. It may not be for everybody, and there are certain things you can do. We could take your core WMS and add some select capabilities from a full-blown WES if a modest level of that kind of automation is necessary. It's not necessarily for one, and I don't want to position it that way but it's certainly something that you want to take a look at as you get to where you've got a significant number of workers. Even smaller operations, things like the automated release of work to the floor without the human being need needing to be involved, that's going to be attractive even for a mid-size operation. The first thing we need is we need to get into this. WMS is given. You said that there was an incremental improvement for many years. Now, you are starting to see big improvements that may be driven by the market that needed big improvements in recent years. Part of that is this WES. What else is there that's part of that smart warehouse? There's a whole bunch of stuff. First, as a reminder, the automation because automation is tied to the labor shortage. Even a couple of years ago, it was very common to talk to DC managers or logistics executives, and automation wasn't necessarily very high on the radar. Nowadays, almost close to 100% of the companies we talked to, even smaller companies, are looking at automation of some kind. That could be big automation where you've got traditional sortation systems but can be very large, goods to person systems, those kinds of things. There's also a lot of interest in lighter, more flexible, and less expensive technology things like what are called put walls. What's a put wall? In great simplicity, it is a technique or a structure, which is a module with a series of cubby holes or slots. In one of these modules, we have 1 customer that has 80 of these modules. What you do is you pick the orders, then when you come to the put wall, you distribute the order to the different orders that need that product. I batch pick the product. I bring it either mechanically or manually to the put wall. Typically, a series of lights says, “This company wall number 3 here and needs 1 of the skews. Put wall in. This one needs 2 that skew you put two in. This one needs 1 put 1 in.” That process repeats itself until all of the items for a given order are complete within that cubbyhole. That's called putting. That's why it's called a put wall because you are taking the order in back, and then you are putting it into the put wall. Around the backside, lights will turn on that indicate, “This cubbyhole is now complete.” The operator comes up and touches a button typically. That starts the printing of the label in any shipping documentation that's required in the orders packed, shipped, and off you go. It provides a tremendous amount of productivity. It's very flexible. You can start small. We had one customer that started with a 1-foot wall module, then added 8 or 9 more because they liked it, then they added 20 more because they really liked it, and did this all over a couple of three-year types of the period there. For any kind of piece picking, especially of soft goods but other types of products as well but often driven not only by eCommerce with any kind of heavy piece picking operation can be a great solution but you've got to have the right software to do it. You've got that big like almost a shelf you said like cubbies on that I'm putting a product through it. Maybe I walked over, and I got 10 different sweaters, 10 sweaters that are all the same, and this cubby gets one. As I do that, I'm scanning it or it recognizes that it's in there. It's informing the other side of the cubby when the order is complete. It needs two sweaters and a pair of shoes. That's just one more way. What do you call this? Technology is only part of it. The other piece of the cubby that walking up to that, I could be putting those in bins in the old days but this is putting that on steroids. The bottom line is we are entering a new era where all technologies are, in fact, much smarter than we've ever had before. It was just a new way of doing it. There are a lot of people who talk about this in terms of optimizing materials and handling systems because getting this right is not a trivial task. I don't want to steal all my thunder from later on but the ability to rapidly turn these put walls and cubbyholes are the whole key to the success. If it's taking you a long time to do that, you are not getting the throughput that you required and probably wasting your time and money but if you can rapidly turn those by making sure the inventory gets there on time and efficient execution on both sides of the wall, then you've got something that can drive a lot of productivity. I don't know what the number is. There are quite a few customers now that are using put walls. When we would go out to some new customers, we've got some videos to show them an operation, and they are interested in seeing how this works. It's the technology along with mobile robots that you are going to see, any eCommerce but any kind of piece picking as well, you are going to see a lot of adoption. I'm an automotive guy originally. When you used to go through a plant, you would see people doing lifting heavy things when I first started, crouching down and doing functions that were hard on the body. Maybe it's not hard on 1 day, 1 week or 1 month but over 1 year, you are going to have a bad back, shoulders or knees. The same thing happens in these DCS or the warehousing. This automation you are talking about is making it easier on the workers, which means, “Hopefully, I will be able to keep my workers healthy and make that job again more attractive.” One time, I talked to a VP of logistics at Sherwin-Williams, the paint company. He noted that on the manufacturing side of the operation, they were always having people retire, and during retirement, little parties were almost taken. He said, “There was no one that ever retired from the distribution side.” That's because the heavy worker is picking cases of paint as a young man's job. As people got older, they couldn't do that work anymore. People are obviously rethinking that for the aging factor, and then there's another factor, “How do I make the work easier so I can have somebody in their 50s and 60s continuing to do this at distribution center job?” If you gave me a choice to go work in an old school warehouse, go deliver food or deliver groceries, I'm going to do the grocery delivery. I can make decent money, sit in my car, and I don't have to hurt my back, or knees or walk 5 miles a day. We have to make these jobs more attractive or we are not going to be able to keep and get good people. This automation is of such interest to the jobs now that we become more technicians and less of an order pickers. Besides a put wall, what's some other automation you are seeing out there? The automated mobile robots, economists mobile robots or AMRs. There's a huge interest in that. One of the interesting things is that in both put walls and mobile robots, you are seeing a lot of adoption and interest by a third-party logistics companies. This makes the point. In the past, 3PLs were very reluctant to do any kind of heavy automation because they couldn't sync the return on investment with the contracts that they had from the shipper. If the shipper can pay off that equipment, it's going to take 5, 7 or whatever years, and the shippers only keep you where 2 or 3-year contract, the risk of automation is too great in these other kinds of systems. It includes things like voice, picks the lights, and smart cards. They are all connected in some ways. Those kinds of systems can be put in for much less expense, much lower risk, and be incrementally adapted. You can start with three mobile robots and see how you like it, then we have seven more later on or whatever until you get to the optimal point for your operation. The fact that 3PLs are making this kind of investment as a whole new phenomenon and it speaks to the way you can incrementally get into the technology and the high level of payback that they are seeing because we were very strong in the third-party logistics arena, as an aside, so we are seeing it very closely. The number of 3PLs that are interested in this mid-range of lighter picking systems, not heavy automation but it's often somewhat newer technologies. It speaks to the changes we are seeing out there in the marketplace. Those are robots. Depending on the facility, they are not necessarily always replacing people. I talked to the CEO or president of DHL. He says, “We thought we would be replacing people with robots. The more robots we add to a facility, the more work we end up getting for that facility. We ended up hiring more people.” Everyone has a shortage. Job is going unfilled. If the robots are taking some of that slack but very few case studies of people that are adopting these technologies, they are still looking for people who have been able to be on. [caption id="attachment_7942" align="aligncenter" width="600"] The Smart Warehouse: WES (Warehouse Execution System) will help manage the flow of work and resource utilization.[/caption]   What's another thing we need for that smart warehouse? Let's get into it in some more detail. We talked about some of the core software components, things like warehouse management systems and warehouse execution systems. A platform for integrating this automation with both heavy and/or traditional and newer age capabilities. There are some enabling technologies, things like rules engines, simulation and some other things. The core world's operations excellence is still the foundation. How do I get that right? That typically involves traditional WMS-type capabilities. What does that mean? What defines a warehouse management system versus an inventory system is the pervasive use of mobile terminals, barcode scanning, wireless RF devices or whatever term you want to use there, and then a lot of system directed activity, this whole notion of task management and task monitoring, where the system is orchestrating the different traditional paths of put away, receiving put away, picking replenishment, etc., and support for multiple strategies around that. We have lots of different picking method options, different replenishment strategies that I can use, and things that have been around for a while like slotting optimization, detailed labor management, labor reporting, and things like that. The foundation is core operations excellence. That's what everyone should strive to get to but nowadays, there's no ability to take that even further in terms of different types of capabilities that we think are defining what we are calling the smart warehouse. You used a term there that was an integration platform. What am I integrating? You were integrating primarily different materials handling technologies. That can be things we have had for a wall that conveyor transport and sortation. It can be some of these newer technologies like robots and put walls. The key is, “How do I optimize the flow so I don't have these islands of automation that are all doing their own thing.” I talked to somebody in the apparel industry. They have a very large and highly automated facility somewhere down in the Atlanta area. It's 1 million or 2 million square feet. They are seeing their throughput from that building after huge investments over the years and over time. They are seeing the throughput decline. What's happening, he believed, is that the business keeps changing. They keep having all these new requirements in terms of how an order needs to be processed. What they do is they keep building new wave types. We talked about wave planning before. Now they are up to like 70 or 80 different wave types. Every time there's another problem, wave fight number 82 if that solves our problem, it's not solving the problem. Part of the reason is that the system is not looking holistically across the facility and seeing how I can optimize the flow of work as a whole, not as an individual subsystem. That's part of what we are talking about here with the smart warehouse. That's the thing that traditional WMS has not done. That integration platform means I can connect all the tools and all the different systems I'm using all connect easily through that integration as opposed to the old way, which is a standalone $100,000 integration with expensive people who have to code. That's certainly part of it. It's managing the flow of work across that. I'm getting hit myself again but for example, you can have some scenarios where I have different paths for an order to be fulfilled. One of the paths and the most efficient for certain orders is maybe a group of put wall models. Let's say put wall area, for whatever reason, starts to be congested. All of a sudden, there's a big backup on the conveyor feeding into the put wall area. The system is going to automatically recognize that. For some time, route orders away from the put wall into manual cart picking, which takes them to the packing station, the same packing area where the put wall automotive leads. When the congestion is clear, then the system automatically reroutes that work back to the put walls again. Now you are looking at only the plain integration but in monitoring the flow of work that's happening and making real-time decisions accordingly. I'm an automotive guy, and we had all of those years. We used the term smart factories, and it was the same thing. How do we increase throughput? What can happen is you can end up with a local optimum where some guys are building a big stack of inventory and does nobody any good? What does all that excess inventory doing for me? What makes more sense is to say, “We are going to get this, so there's a flow to it. We are not building up too much inventory. There are no bottlenecks.” This is the same thing. What you are talking about here is, “How do I arrange my people so I don't have these guys sitting around because they already finished while these guys are in a congested area?” The core world's operations excellence is still the foundation. The term flow manufacturing came out of exactly what you are talking about there and was largely developed initially in the automotive industry. We are talking about the same thing. Now we are talking about flow distribution instead of flow manufacturing but the fundamental concepts, more of a pull-based system were being worked on capacities and constraints, more concerned with the total flow of goods and not what's happening in one individual area. All those are very consistent, whether you're looking at the principles that were established earlier in manufacturing or what's being applied here in distribution. I'm going to assume that at one time, the WMS, a big selling point would be, “We will tell you where your inventory is at,” That was probably a big step up. You go, “It does that. Now I'm going to tell you how that inventory moves off of your shelves and out the door and how you bring new inventory.” It's amazing. We still see quite a few every week, we see somebody that's a calling or emailing in, and then we talked to him. It turns out they don't have that real-time visibility of the inventory because they are using some kind of paper-based system or something, and sometimes these are even good size companies. In general, anybody that's implemented a tier-1 or tier-2 level, even WMS shouldn't have that real-time inventory visibility in doing that. It gets into that operations excellence and problem but that's the foundation, “I got to know what I got and where it is by lot, batch, serial number or whatever attribute is important for your operation or combination of attributes.” That's the foundation, but now, we are saying, “How do we optimize on top of that and get more product out the door and lower cost?” It requires investment. Having a WMS tell me, “Here is the information but it's not enough anymore.” To your point, we need all of this to get there. You asked me about some of the components of the smart warehouse, and I talked about it from a product category perspective, but now, I'm talking about it more from a philosophical or a functional view. One of the key foundations is constraining condition awareness, “What's happening in my building? What's happening with the flow of goods?” One of the things that first got me to understand WES in a deeper way is this notion that it's always-on listening and monitoring the environment. If you think about a traditional WMS, it's more sequential-oriented, “I receive the product. I put it away. I replenished pick sites. I do the picking. I take it to pack or evaluated services. I put it in this receiving staging. I get it shipping staging. I get it out the door all very good then the delivered.” A lot of companies don't have that. Organizing and automating all of that are big steps forward but we need to take it to the next level. If you think about this notion, the system is always on monitoring throughput and flow. There are certain rates and throughput that I'm expecting. I need to be able to have a flexible set of dashboards supported by event alerts and notifications. If there's a problem that says, “Here's what's happening across.” However, I wanted to find it in the area, I can define an area as a case picking module or as a whole three-level case pick module. I see that as one unit, and I want to know what the throughput is there. Maybe I want to see it at each level of that pick module. I can see it more gradually. What's nifty about this is that new level of visibility, the activity, throughput, bottlenecks, alerts, and corrective action automated, increasingly automated, if there are bottlenecks. That provides a nice set of real-time dashboards of looking stuff where people can see what's happening, “I have these many orders pending here that's already been completed. Here's how many are in picking,” or all of that level of detail. To understand what's going on here with the smart warehouse is, the system is using that same data that's being exposed to managers and supervisors that's what it's using to make decisions as well. I decided that example of being aware of the backup that's happening in the put wall and automatically, for some time, routing work around that until the congestion is cleared. That's what's different now about this visibility and activity monitoring. Being able to flexibly do that however you want to define a processing area could be evaluated services. It could be peace picking and all these things. Obviously, now the design is at these different flows throughout the facility are in sync. I'm not getting old backed up and packing, which is causing problems way back, picking and replenishment because I haven't automated the visibility and the flow, release in a way that's going to be cognizant and aware that I've got a problem here and, “Here's what I need to do about it for some time until we are adjusting. We are just taking action to solve the problem.” You sent me a PowerPoint and I have this here. It's got that real-time configurable dashboard. It's been a while since I have seen somebody had me a piece of paper but somebody handed me a piece of paper that had 40 columns. It was like an Excel spreadsheet or something, maybe a spin out of a system. It had so much, I looked at it and I was like, “What am I supposed to do with this?” I liked the idea of being able to configure it for those KPIs that I care about. [caption id="attachment_7943" align="aligncenter" width="600"] The Smart Warehouse: One of the things that got me to understand WES in a deeper way is this notion that it's always on, listening and monitoring the environment.[/caption]   I don't want to measure everything. That's just me. Tell me the 4, 5 or 7 things that matter that tells me my warehouse is moving in the right direction, and that things are working well. It says, “Orders with issues.” I also love the idea that I don't find out about the issues in next week's report. I find out about them in real-time. The point that you made is a nice transition to this notion of another component. We talked about the real-time visibility of capacities, constraints, the conditions up there, and the always-on nature of the WES. Now, we have talked about looking at a table of 40 rows of information or whatever. It's all in the past. It brings up a point there, which is even with higher-end WMS, this is one of the learnings and insights that we have. There's still a tremendous amount of decision-making that is being done by human beings. As the manager, whoever you were talking about there in your example, staring at a 40-row spreadsheet or whatever, you see the same thing nowadays of managers and supervisors staring at computer screens, trying to figure out what the right thing to do next. Here's the reality. Every time you do that, first off, you introduce some latency into the system because it takes time to look at those different screens, think about it, make decisions, and scribble some things down on a piece of paper to remind you this needs to be taken care of or whatever. In most cases, there's no way a human being can make the optimal decision in the same way that a computer can. Even if you are a smart guy or girl, there's just too much data and too much to try to process at one time. Part of the capabilities of the smart WMS is the much more advanced software-based decision-making. Things like order batch optimization, given block of orders, “What's the best way to most effectively execute that on the software floor?” What we think is absolutely huge is this notion of the autonomous warehouse, as a term of Gartner is used, and others have used it as well but it talks about being able to automatically release work without the need for a wave planner, inventory expediters or all the kind of people that you see often involved in these decisions about what work to do when. Work relation on a variety of attributes, things like the order of priority, the inventory and resource availability, what kind of optimization opportunities are there? The bigger the order pool and more optimization opportunities you have because they are more data or conditions to be optimized but you can't hold on so long. You are not getting the throughput out through your cutoff time. This is a huge one. It's sophisticated. Whereas now, at 4:00 or 5:00, when the UPS, FedEx or whatever truck is leaving, you often see, and we have made commitments to the eCommerce is going to ship, you see a certain amount of chaos going around, trying to figure out all the orders that need to go on that truck, have been on the trucking and what to do about it. What we are talking about here is we are saying, “This is the work. We know how long it's going to take to pick and transport those orders to the shipping dock.” The work is going to automatically release itself. At the beginning of the day, we are more concerned about optimization. We still got a lot of decent amount of time, so we can focus on doing it the most efficient we can but as you go throughout the day, that needle starts to change from the focus on efficiency and cost to efficiency on customer service and making sure that those items are on there. The system does that automatically. It's configured to take those into consideration. Now those orders are getting on the trucks automatically without the chaos and the difficulty that's going on out there. This is a step-change capability here. We are talking about a system that is self-learning and in optimal how releases work. This is another concept we have had in distribution software before, and this is what defines what works on the smart warehouse. I had a boss in the past when I was young, I remember I sent an Excel spreadsheet to him, and it told a story. He's pulled me into his office and said, “This is a great Excel spreadsheet. I have to go through here and come to the same conclusion you did.” I go, “It's easy.” He goes, “No. When you send me this Excel spreadsheet, send me a recommendation. I don't want to have to come to a conclusion. That's your job. Show me that you attach the data back up but give me a recommendation.” I feel the same take way about running a warehouse, “Don't make me figure it out myself. Give me an alert that says, ‘This is a problem. This is how many orders are at risk. This is how many orders need to get on that truck that isn't done yet.'” To show you a simple example. Still, a lot of people, especially for eCommerce, are doing manual cart picking. I may have a cart that's got a certain configuration 3x3 or 4x4. What I mean by a 3x3 would be 3 shelves that each have room for 3 cartons each. I have nine total orders that I'm working on there. Most companies that we see do that are doing it with paper picking or pick by label or something. There's some attempt to do that more efficiently but something as simple as cart picking. The smart warehouse can take it to a whole new level. First off, you've got to get this order pool that's out there and at any one period. I'm probably going to have done some cartonization logic there to determine what should go in what box, especially with a multi carton order. In most cases, there's no way a human being can make the optimal decision in the same way that a computer can. Even if you're really smart, there's just too much data to process at one time. If you are shipping, for example, you don't want to put perfume in the same carton as payroll because of the obvious contamination that c