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Screaming in the Cloud
Keeping the Chaos Searchable with Thomas Hazel

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 44:43


About ThomasThomas Hazel is Founder, CTO, and Chief Scientist of ChaosSearch. He is a serial entrepreneur at the forefront of communication, virtualization, and database technology and the inventor of ChaosSearch's patented IP. Thomas has also patented several other technologies in the areas of distributed algorithms, virtualization and database science. He holds a Bachelor of Science in Computer Science from University of New Hampshire, Hall of Fame Alumni Inductee, and founded both student & professional chapters of the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM).Links:ChaosSearch: https://www.chaossearch.io TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by my friends at ThinkstCanary. Most companies find out way too late that they've been breached. ThinksCanary changes this and I love how they do it. Deploy canaries and canary tokens in minutes and then forget about them. What's great is the attackers tip their hand by touching them, giving you one alert, when it matters. I use it myself and I only remember this when I get the weekly update with a “we're still here, so you're aware” from them. It's glorious! There is zero admin overhead  to this, there are effectively no false positives unless I do something foolish. Canaries are deployed and loved on all seven continents. You can check out what people are saying at canary.love. And, their Kub config canary token is new and completely free as well. You can do an awful lot without paying them a dime, which is one of the things I love about them. It is useful stuff and not an, “ohh, I wish I had money.” It is speculator! Take a look; that's canary.love because it's genuinely rare to find a security product that people talk about in terms of love. It really is a unique thing to see. Canary.love. Thank you to ThinkstCanary for their support of my ridiculous, ridiculous non-sense.   Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by our friends at Vultr. Spelled V-U-L-T-R because they're all about helping save money, including on things like, you know, vowels. So, what they do is they are a cloud provider that provides surprisingly high performance cloud compute at a price that—while sure they claim its better than AWS pricing—and when they say that they mean it is less money. Sure, I don't dispute that but what I find interesting is that it's predictable. They tell you in advance on a monthly basis what it's going to going to cost. They have a bunch of advanced networking features. They have nineteen global locations and scale things elastically. Not to be confused with openly, because apparently elastic and open can mean the same thing sometimes. They have had over a million users. Deployments take less that sixty seconds across twelve pre-selected operating systems. Or, if you're one of those nutters like me, you can bring your own ISO and install basically any operating system you want. Starting with pricing as low as $2.50 a month for Vultr cloud compute they have plans for developers and businesses of all sizes, except maybe Amazon, who stubbornly insists on having something to scale all on their own. Try Vultr today for free by visiting: vultr.com/screaming, and you'll receive a $100 in credit. Thats v-u-l-t-r.com slash screaming.Corey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud. I'm Corey Quinn. This promoted episode is brought to us by our friends at ChaosSearch.We've been working with them for a long time; they've sponsored a bunch of our nonsense, and it turns out that we've been talking about them to our clients since long before they were a sponsor because it actually does what it says on the tin. Here to talk to us about that in a few minutes is Thomas Hazel, ChaosSearch's CTO and founder. First, Thomas, nice to talk to you again, and as always, thanks for humoring me.Thomas: [laugh]. Hi, Corey. Always great to talk to you. And I enjoy these conversations that sometimes go up and down, left and right, but I look forward to all the fun we're going to have.Corey: So, my understanding of ChaosSearch is probably a few years old because it turns out, I don't spend a whole lot of time meticulously studying your company's roadmap in the same way that you presumably do. When last we checked in with what the service did-slash-does, you are effectively solving the problem of data movement and querying that data. The idea behind data warehouses is generally something that's shoved onto us by cloud providers where, “Hey, this data is going to be valuable to you someday.” Data science teams are big proponents of this because when you're storing that much data, their salaries look relatively reasonable by comparison. And the ChaosSearch vision was, instead of copying all this data out of an object store and storing it on expensive disks, and replicating it, et cetera, what if we queried it in place in a somewhat intelligent manner?So, you take the data and you store it, in this case, in S3 or equivalent, and then just query it there, rather than having to move it around all over the place, which of course, then incurs data transfer fees, you're storing it multiple times, and it's never in quite the format that you want it. That was the breakthrough revelation, you were Elasticsearch—now OpenSearch—API compatible, which was great. And that was, sort of, a state of the art a year or two ago. Is that generally correct?Thomas: No, you nailed our mission statement. No, you're exactly right. You know, the value of cloud object stores, S3, the elasticity, the durability, all these wonderful things, the problem was you couldn't get any value out of it, and you had to move it out to these siloed solutions, as you indicated. So, you know, our mission was exactly that, transformed customers' cloud storage into an analytical database, a multi-model analytical database, where our first use case was search and log analytics, replacing the ELK stack and also replacing the data pipeline, the schema management, et cetera. We automate the entire step, raw data to insights.Corey: It's funny we're having this conversation today. Earlier, today, I was trying to get rid of a relatively paltry 200 gigs or so of small files on an EFS volume—you know, Amazon's version of NFS; it's like an NFS volume except you're paying Amazon for the privilege—great. And it turns out that it's a whole bunch of operations across a network on a whole bunch of tiny files, so I had to spin up other instances that were not getting backed by spot terminations, and just firing up a whole bunch of threads. So, now the load average on that box is approaching 300, but it's plowing through, getting rid of that data finally.And I'm looking at this saying this is a quarter of a terabyte. Data warehouses are in the petabyte range. Oh, I begin to see aspects of the problem. Even searching that kind of data using traditional tooling starts to break down, which is sort of the revelation that Google had 20-some-odd years ago, and other folks have since solved for, but this is the first time I've had significant data that wasn't just easily searched with a grep. For those of you in the Unix world who understand what that means, condolences. We're having a support group meeting at the bar.Thomas: Yeah. And you know, I always thought, what if you could make cloud object storage like S3 high performance and really transform it into a database? And so that warehouse capability, that's great. We like that. However to manage it, to scale it, to configure it, to get the data into that, was the problem.That was the promise of a data lake, right? This simple in, and then this arbitrary schema on read generic out. The problem next came, it became swampy, it was really hard, and that promise was not delivered. And so what we're trying to do is get all the benefits of the data lake: simple in, so many services naturally stream to cloud storage. Shoot, I would say every one of our customers are putting their data in cloud storage because their data pipeline to their warehousing solution or Elasticsearch may go down and they're worried they'll lose the data.So, what we say is what if you just said activate that data lake and get that ELK use case, get that BI use case without that data movement, as you indicated, without that ETL-ing, without that data pipeline that you're worried is going to fall over. So, that vision has been Chaos. Now, we haven't talked in, you know, a few years, but this idea that we're growing beyond what we are just going after logs, we're going into new use cases, new opportunities, and I'm looking forward to discussing with you.Corey: It's a great answer that—though I have to call out that I am right there with you as far as inappropriately using things as databases. I know that someone is going to come back and say, “Oh, S3 is a database. You're dancing around it. Isn't that what Athena is?” Which is named, of course, after the Greek Goddess of spending money on AWS? And that is a fair question, but to my understanding, there's a schema story behind that does not apply to what you're doing.Thomas: Yeah, and that is so crucial is that we like the relational access. The time-cost complexity to get it into that, as you mentioned, scaled access, I mean, it could take weeks, months to test it, to configure it, to provision it, and imagine if you got it wrong; you got to redo it again. And so our unique service removes all that data pipeline schema management. And because of our innovation because of our service, you do all schema definition, on the fly, virtually, what we call views on your index data, that you can publish an elastic index pattern for that consumption, or a relational table for that consumption. And that's kind of leading the witness into things that we're coming out with this quarter into 2022.Corey: I have to deal with a little bit of, I guess, a shame here because yeah, I'm doing exactly what you just described. I'm using Athena to wind up querying our customers' Cost and Usage Reports, and we spend a couple hundred bucks a month on AWS Glue to wind up massaging those into the way that they expect it to be. And it's great. Ish. We hook it up to Tableau and can make those queries from it, and all right, it's great.It just, burrr goes the money printer, and we somehow get access and insight to a lot of valuable data. But even that is knowing exactly what the format is going to look like. Ish. I mean, Cost and Usage Reports from Amazon are sort of aspirational when it comes to schema sometimes, but here we are. And that's been all well and good.But now the idea of log files, even looking at the base case of sending logs from an application, great. Nginx, or Apache, or [unintelligible 00:07:24], or any of the various web servers out there all tend to use different logging formats just to describe the same exact things, start spreading that across custom in-house applications and getting signal from that is almost impossible. “Oh,” people say, “So, we'll use a structured data format.” Now, you're putting log and structuring requirements on application developers who don't care in the first place, and now you have a mess on your hands.Thomas: And it really is a mess. And that challenge is, it's so problematic. And schemas changing. You know, we have customers and one reasons why they go with us is their log data is changing; they didn't expect it. Well, in your data pipeline, and your Athena database, that breaks. That brings the system down.And so our system uniquely detects that and manages that for you and then you can pick and choose how you want to export in these views dynamically. So, you know, it's really not rocket science, but the problem is, a lot of the technology that we're using is designed for static, fixed thinking. And then to scale it is problematic and time-consuming. So, you know, Glue is a great idea, but it has a lot of sharp [pebbles 00:08:26]. Athena is a great idea but also has a lot of problems.And so that data pipeline, you know, it's not for digitally native, active, new use cases, new workloads coming up hourly, daily. You think about this long-term; so a lot of that data prep pipelining is something we address so uniquely, but really where the customer cares is the value of that data, right? And so if you're spending toils trying to get the data into a database, you're not answering the questions, whether it's for security, for performance, for your business needs. That's the problem. And you know, that agility, that time-to-value is where we're very uniquely coming in because we start where your data is raw and we automate the process all the way through.Corey: So, when I look at the things that I have stuffed into S3, they generally fall into a couple of categories. There are a bunch of logs for things I never asked for nor particularly wanted, but AWS is aggressive about that, first routing through CloudTrail so you can get charged 50-cent per gigabyte ingested. Awesome. And of course, large static assets, images I have done something to enter colloquially now known as shitposts, which is great. Other than logs, what could you possibly be storing in S3 that lends itself to, effectively, the type of analysis that you built around this?Thomas: Well, our first use case was the classic log use cases, app logs, web service logs. I mean, CloudTrail, it's famous; we had customers that gave up on elastic, and definitely gave up on relational where you can do a couple changes and your permutation of attributes for CloudTrail is going to put you to your knees. And people just say, “I give up.” Same thing with Kubernetes logs. And so it's the classic—whether it's CSV, where it's JSON, where it's log types, we auto-discover all that.We also allow you, if you want to override that and change the parsing capabilities through a UI wizard, we do discover what's in your buckets. That term data swamp, and not knowing what's in your bucket, we do a facility that will index that data, actually create a report for you for knowing what's in. Now, if you have text data, if you have log data, if you have BI data, we can bring it all together, but the real pain is at the scale. So classically, app logs, system logs, many devices sending IoT-type streams is where we really come in—Kubernetes—where they're dealing with terabytes of data per day, and managing an ELK cluster at that scale. Particularly on a Black Friday.Shoot, some of our customers like—Klarna is one of them; credit card payment—they're ramping up for Black Friday, and one of the reasons why they chose us is our ability to scale when maybe you're doing a terabyte or two a day and then it goes up to twenty, twenty-five. How do you test that scale? How do you manage that scale? And so for us, the data streams are, traditionally with our customers, the well-known log types, at least in the log use cases. And the challenge is scaling it, is getting access to it, and that's where we come in.Corey: I will say the last time you were on the show a couple of years ago, you were talking about the initial logging use case and you were speaking, in many cases aspirationally, about where things were going. What a difference a couple years is made. Instead of talking about what hypothetical customers might want, or what—might be able to do, you're just able to name-drop them off the top of your head, you have scaled to approximately ten times the number of employees you had back then. You've—Thomas: Yep. Yep.Corey: —raised, I think, a total of—what, 50 million?—since then.Thomas: Uh, 60 now. Yeah.Corey: Oh, 60? Fantastic.Thomas: Yeah, yeah.Corey: Congrats. And of course, how do you do it? By sponsoring Last Week in AWS, as everyone should. I'm taking clear credit for that every time someone announces around, that's the game. But no, there is validity to it because telling fun stories and sponsoring exciting things like this only carry you so far. At some point, customers have to say, yeah, this is solving a pain that I have; I'm willing to pay you money to solve it.And you've clearly gotten to a point where you are addressing the needs of those customers at a pretty fascinating clip. It's bittersweet from my perspective because it seems like the majority of your customers have not come from my nonsense anymore. They're finding you through word of mouth, they're finding through more traditional—read as boring—ad campaigns, et cetera, et cetera. But you've built a brand that extends beyond just me. I'm no longer viewed as the de facto ombudsperson for any issue someone might have with ChaosSearch on Twitters. It's kind of, “Aww, the company grew up. What happened there?”Thomas: No, [laugh] listen, this you were great. We reached out to you to tell our story, and I got to be honest. A lot of people came by, said, “I heard something on Corey Quinn's podcasts,” or et cetera. And it came a long way now. Now, we have, you know, companies like Equifax, multi-cloud—Amazon and Google.They love the data lake philosophy, the centralized, where use cases are now available within days, not weeks and months. Whether it's logs and BI. Correlating across all those data streams, it's huge. We mentioned Klarna, [APM Performance 00:13:19], and, you know, we have Armor for SIEM, and Blackboard for [Observers 00:13:24].So, it's funny—yeah, it's funny, when I first was talking to you, I was like, “What if? What if we had this customer, that customer?” And we were building the capabilities, but now that we have it, now that we have customers, yeah, I guess, maybe we've grown up a little bit. But hey, listen to you're always near and dear to our heart because we remember, you know, when you stop[ed by our booth at re:Invent several times. And we're coming to re:Invent this year, and I believe you are as well.Corey: Oh, yeah. But people listening to this, it's if they're listening the day it's released, this will be during re:Invent. So, by all means, come by the ChaosSearch booth, and see what they have to say. For once they have people who aren't me who are going to be telling stories about these things. And it's fun. Like, I joke, it's nothing but positive here.It's interesting from where I sit seeing the parallels here. For example, we have both had—how we say—adult supervision come in. You have a CEO, Ed, who came over from IBM Storage. I have Mike Julian, whose first love language is of course spreadsheets. And it's great, on some level, realizing that, wow, this company has eclipsed my ability to manage these things myself and put my hands-on everything. And eventually, you have to start letting go. It's a weird growth stage, and it's a heck of a transition. But—Thomas: No, I love it. You know, I mean, I think when we were talking, we were maybe 15 employees. Now, we're pushing 100. We brought on Ed Walsh, who's an amazing CEO. It's funny, I told him about this idea, I invented this technology roughly eight years ago, and he's like, “I love it. Let's do it.” And I wasn't ready to do it.So, you know, five, six years ago, I started the company always knowing that, you know, I'd give him a call once we got the plane up in the air. And it's been great to have him here because the next level up, right, of execution and growth and business development and sales and marketing. So, you're exactly right. I mean, we were a young pup several years ago, when we were talking to you and, you know, we're a little bit older, a little bit wiser. But no, it's great to have Ed here. And just the leadership in general; we've grown immensely.Corey: Now, we are recording this in advance of re:Invent, so there's always the question of, “Wow, are we going to look really silly based upon what is being announced when this airs?” Because it's very hard to predict some things that AWS does. And let's be clear, I always stay away from predictions, just because first, I have a bit of a knack for being right. But also, when I'm right, people will think, “Oh, Corey must have known about that and is leaking,” whereas if I get it wrong, I just look like a fool. There's no win for me if I start doing the predictive dance on stuff like that.But I have to level with you, I have been somewhat surprised that, at least as of this recording, AWS has not moved more in your direction because storing data in S3 is kind of their whole thing, and querying that data through something that isn't Athena has been a bit of a reach for them that they're slowly starting to wrap their heads around. But their UltraWarm nonsense—which is just, okay, great naming there—what is the point of continually having a model where oh, yeah, we're going to just age it out, the stuff that isn't actively being used into S3, rather than coming up with a way to query it there. Because you've done exactly that, and please don't take this as anything other than a statement of fact, they have better access to what S3 is doing than you do. You're forced to deal with this thing entirely from a public API standpoint, which is fine. They can theoretically change the behavior of aspects of S3 to unlock these use cases if they chose to do so. And they haven't. Why is it that you're the only folks that are doing this?Thomas: No, it's a great question, and I'll give them props for continuing to push the data lake [unintelligible 00:17:09] to the cloud providers' S3 because it was really where I saw the world. Lakes, I believe in. I love them. They love them. However, they promote the move the data out to get access, and it seems so counterintuitive on why wouldn't you leave it in and put these services, make them more intelligent? So, it's funny, I've trademark ‘Smart Object Storage,' I actually trademarked—I think you [laugh] were a part of this—‘UltraHot,' right? Because why would you want UltraWarm when you can have UltraHot?And the reason, I feel, is that if you're using Parquet for Athena [unintelligible 00:17:40] store, or Lucene for Elasticsearch, these two index technologies were not designed for cloud storage, for real-time streaming off of cloud storage. So, the trick is, you have to build UltraWarm, get it off of what they consider cold S3 into a more warmer memory or SSD type access. What we did, what the invention I created was, that first read is hot. That first read is fast.Snowflake is a good example. They give you a ten terabyte demo example, and if you have a big instance and you do that first query, maybe several orders or groups, it could take an hour to warm up. The second query is fast. Well, what if the first query is in seconds as well? And that's where we really spent the last five, six years building out the tech and the vision behind this because I like to say you go to a doctor and say, “Hey, Doc, every single time I move my arm, it hurts.” And the doctor says, “Well, don't move your arm.”It's things like that, to your point, it's like, why wouldn't they? I would argue, one, you have to believe it's possible—we're proving that it is—and two, you have to have the technology to do it. Not just the index, but the architecture. So, I believe they will go this direction. You know, little birdies always say that all these companies understand this need.Shoot, Snowflake is trying to be lake-y; Databricks is trying to really bring this warehouse lake concept. But you still do all the pipelining; you still have to do all the data management the way that you don't want to do. It's not a lake. And so my argument is that it's innovation on why. Now, they have money; they have time, but, you know, we have a big head start.Corey: I remembered last year at re:Invent they released a, shall we say, significant change to S3 that it enabled read after write consistency, which is awesome, for again, those of us in the business of misusing things as databases. But for some folks, the majority of folks I would say, it was a, “I don't know what that means and therefore I don't care.” And that's fine. I have no issue with that. There are other folks, some of my customers for example, who are suddenly, “Wait a minute. This means I can sunset this entire janky sidecar metadata system that is designed to make sure that we are consistent in our use of S3 because it now does it automatically under the hood?” And that's awesome. Does that change mean anything for ChaosSearch?Thomas: It doesn't because of our architecture. We're append-only, write-once scenario, so a lot of update-in-place viewpoints. My viewpoint is that if you're seeing S3 as the database and you need that type of consistency, it make sense of why you'd want it, but because of our distributive fabric, our stateless architecture, our append-only nature, it really doesn't affect us.Now, I talked to the S3 team, I said, “Please if you're coming up with this feature, it better not be slower.” I want S3 to be fast, right? And they said, “No, no. It won't affect performance.” I'm like, “Okay. Let's keep that up.”And so to us, any type of S3 capability, we'll take advantage of it if benefits us, whether it's consistency as you indicated, performance, functionality. But we really keep the constructs of S3 access to really limited features: list, put, get. [roll-on 00:20:49] policies to give us read-only access to your data, and a location to write our indices into your account, and then are distributed fabric, our service, acts as those indices and query them or searches them to resolve whatever analytics you need. So, we made it pretty simple, and that is allowed us to make it high performance.Corey: I'll take it a step further because you want to talk about changes since the last time we spoke, it used to be that this was on top of S3, you can store your data anywhere you want, as long as it's S3 in the customer's account. Now, you're also supporting one-click integration with Google Cloud's object storage, which, great. That does mean though, that you're not dependent upon provider-specific implementations of things like a consistency model for how you've built things. It really does use the lowest common denominator—to my understanding—of object stores. Is that something that you're seeing broad adoption of, or is this one of those areas where, well, you have one customer on a different provider, but almost everything lives on the primary? I'm curious what you're seeing for adoption models across multiple providers?Thomas: It's a great question. We built an architecture purposely to be cloud-agnostic. I mean, we use compute in a containerized way, we use object storage in a very simple construct—put, get, list—and we went over to Google because that made sense, right? We have customers on both sides. I would say Amazon is the gorilla, but Google's trying to get there and growing.We had a big customer, Equifax, that's on both Amazon and Google, but we offer the same service. To be frank, it looks like the exact same product. And it should, right? Whether it's Amazon Cloud, or Google Cloud, multi-select and I want to choose either one and get the other one. I would say that different business types are using each one, but our bulk of the business isn't Amazon, but we just this summer released our SaaS offerings, so it's growing.And you know, it's funny, you never know where it comes from. So, we have one customer—actually DigitalRiver—as one of our customers on Amazon for logs, but we're growing in working together to do a BI on GCP or on Google. And so it's kind of funny; they have two departments on two different clouds with two different use cases. And so do they want unification? I'm not sure, but they definitely have their BI on Google and their operations in Amazon. It's interesting.Corey: You know its important to me that people learn how to use the cloud effectively. Thats why I'm so glad that Cloud Academy is sponsoring my ridiculous non-sense. They're a great way to build in demand tech skills the way that, well personally, I learn best which I learn by doing not by reading. They have live cloud labs that you can run in real environments that aren't going to blow up your own bill—I can't stress how important that is. Visit cloudacademy.com/corey. Thats C-O-R-E-Y, don't drop the “E.” Use Corey as a promo-code as well. You're going to get a bunch of discounts on it with a lifetime deal—the price will not go up. It is limited time, they assured me this is not one of those things that is going to wind up being a rug pull scenario, oh no no. Talk to them, tell me what you think. Visit: cloudacademy.com/corey,  C-O-R-E-Y and tell them that I sent you!Corey: I know that I'm going to get letters for this. So, let me just call it out right now. Because I've been a big advocate of pick a provider—I care not which one—and go all-in on it. And I'm sitting here congratulating you on extending to another provider, and people are going to say, “Ah, you're being inconsistent.”No. I'm suggesting that you as a provider have to meet your customers where they are because if someone is sitting in GCP and your entire approach is, “Step one, migrate those four petabytes of data right on over here to AWS,” they're going to call you that jackhole that you would be by making that suggestion and go immediately for option B, which is literally anything that is not ChaosSearch, just based upon that core misunderstanding of their business constraints. That is the way to think about these things. For a vendor position that you are in as an ISV—Independent Software Vendor for those not up on the lingo of this ridiculous industry—you have to meet customers where they are. And it's the right move.Thomas: Well, you just said it. Imagine moving terabytes and petabytes of data.Corey: It sounds terrific if I'm a salesperson for one of these companies working on commission, but for the rest of us, it sounds awful.Thomas: We really are a data fabric across clouds, within clouds. We're going to go where the data is and we're going to provide access to where that data lives. Our whole philosophy is the no-movement movement, right? Don't move your data. Leave it where it is and provide access at scale.And so you may have services in Google that naturally stream to GCS; let's do it there. Imagine moving that amount of data over to Amazon to analyze it, and vice versa. 2020, we're going to be in Azure. They're a totally different type of business, users, and personas, but you're getting asked, “Can you support Azure?” And the answer is, “Yes,” and, “We will in 2022.”So, to us, if you have cloud storage, if you have compute, and it's a big enough business opportunity in the market, we're there. We're going there. When we first started, we were talking to MinIO—remember that open-source, object storage platform?—We've run on our laptops, we run—this [unintelligible 00:25:04] Dr. Seuss thing—“We run over here; we run over there; we run everywhere.”But the honest truth is, you're going to go with the big cloud providers where the business opportunity is, and offer the same solution because the same solution is valued everywhere: simple in; value out; cost-effective; long retention; flexibility. That sounds so basic, but you mentioned this all the time with our Rube Goldberg, Amazon diagrams we see time and time again. It's like, if you looked at that and you were from an alien planet, you'd be like, “These people don't know what they're doing. Why is it so complicated?” And the simple answer is, I don't know why people think it's complicated.To your point about Amazon, why won't they do it? I don't know, but if they did, things would be different. And being honest, I think people are catching on. We do talk to Amazon and others. They see the need, but they also have to build it; they have to invent technology to address it. And using Parquet and Lucene are not the answer.Corey: Yeah, it's too much of a demand on the producers of that data rather than the consumer. And yeah, I would love to be able to go upstream to application developers and demand they do things in certain ways. It turns out as a consultant, you have zero authority to do that. As a DevOps team member, you have limited ability to influence it, but it turns out that being the ‘department of no' quickly turns into being the ‘department of unemployment insurance' because no one wants to work with you. And collaboration—contrary to what people wish to believe—is a key part of working in a modern workplace.Thomas: Absolutely. And it's funny, the demands of IT are getting harder; the actual getting the employees to build out the solutions are getting harder. And so a lot of that time is in the pipeline, is the prep, is the schema, the sharding, and et cetera, et cetera, et cetera. My viewpoint is that should be automated away. More and more databases are being autotune, right?This whole knobs and this and that, to me, Glue is a means to an end. I mean, let's get rid of it. Why can't Athena know what to do? Why can't object storage be Athena and vice versa? I mean, to me, it seems like all this moving through all these services, the classic Amazon viewpoint, even their diagrams of having this centralized repository of S3, move it all out to your services, get results, put it back in, then take it back out again, move it around, it just doesn't make much sense. And so to us, I love S3, love the service. I think it's brilliant—Amazon's first service, right?—but from there get a little smarter. That's where ChaosSearch comes in.Corey: I would argue that S3 is in fact, a modern miracle. And one of those companies saying, “Oh, we have an object store; it's S3 compatible.” It's like, “Yeah. We have S3 at home.” Look at S3 at home, and it's just basically a series of failing Raspberry Pis.But you have this whole ecosystem of things that have built up and sprung up around S3. It is wildly understated just how scalable and massive it is. There was an academic paper recently that won an award on how they use automated reasoning to validate what is going on in the S3 environment, and they talked about hundreds of petabytes in some cases. And folks are saying, ah, S3 is hundreds of petabytes. Yeah, I have clients storing hundreds of petabytes.There are larger companies out there. Steve Schmidt, Amazon's CISO, was recently at a Splunk keynote where he mentioned that in security info alone, AWS itself generates 500 petabytes a day that then gets reduced down to a bunch of stuff, and some of it gets loaded into Splunk. I think. I couldn't really hear the second half of that sentence because of the sound of all of the Splunk salespeople in that room becoming excited so quickly you could hear it.Thomas: [laugh]. I love it. If I could be so bold, those S3 team, they're gods. They are amazing. They created such an amazing service, and when I started playing with S3 now, I guess, 2006 or 7, I mean, we were using for a repository, URL access to get images, I was doing a virtualization [unintelligible 00:29:05] at the time—Corey: Oh, the first time I played with it, “This seems ridiculous and kind of dumb. Why would anyone use this?” Yeah, yeah. It turns out I'm really bad at predicting the future. Another reason I don't do the prediction thing.Thomas: Yeah. And when I started this company officially, five, six years ago, I was thinking about S3 and I was thinking about HDFS not being a good answer. And I said, “I think S3 will actually achieve the goals and performance we need.” It's a distributed file system. You can run parallel puts and parallel gets. And the performance that I was seeing when the data was a certain way, certain size, “Wait, you can get high performance.”And you know, when I first turned on the engine, now four or five years ago, I was like, “Wow. This is going to work. We're off to the races.” And now obviously, we're more than just an idea when we first talked to you. We're a service.We deliver benefits to our customers both in logs. And shoot, this quarter alone we're coming out with new features not just in the logs, which I'll talk about second, but in a direct SQL access. But you know, one thing that you hear time and time again, we talked about it—JSON, CloudTrail, and Kubernetes; this is a real nightmare, and so one thing that we've come out with this quarter is the ability to virtually flatten. Now, you heard time and time again, where, “Okay. I'm going to pick and choose my data because my database can't handle whether it's elastic, or say, relational.” And all of a sudden, “Shoot, I don't have that. I got to reindex that.”And so what we've done is we've created a index technology that we're always planning to come out with that indexes the JSON raw blob, but in the data refinery have, post-index you can select how to unflatten it. Why is that important? Because all that tooling, whether it's elastic or SQL, is now available. You don't have to change anything. Why is Snowflake and BigQuery has these proprietary JSON APIs that none of these tools know how to use to get access to the data?Or you pick and choose. And so when you have a CloudTrail, and you need to know what's going on, if you picked wrong, you're in trouble. So, this new feature we're calling ‘Virtual Flattening'—or I don't know what we're—we have to work with the marketing team on it. And we're also bringing—this is where I get kind of excited where the elastic world, the ELK world, we're bringing correlations into Elasticsearch. And like, how do you do that? They don't have the APIs?Well, our data refinery, again, has the ability to correlate index patterns into one view. A view is an index pattern, so all those same constructs that you had in Kibana, or Grafana, or Elastic API still work. And so, no more denormalizing, no more trying to hodgepodge query over here, query over there. You're actually going to have correlations in Elastic, natively. And we're excited about that.And one more push on the future, Q4 into 2022; we have been given early access to S3 SQL access. And, you know, as I mentioned, correlations in Elastic, but we're going full in on publishing our [TPCH 00:31:56] report, we're excited about publishing those numbers, as well as not just giving early access, but going GA in the first of the year, next year.Corey: I look forward to it. This is also, I guess, it's impossible to have a conversation with you, even now, where you're not still forward-looking about what comes next. Which is natural; that is how we get excited about the things that we're building. But so much less of what you're doing now in our conversations have focused around what's coming, as opposed to the neat stuff you're already doing. I had to double-check when we were talking just now about oh, yeah, is that Google cloud object store support still something that is roadmapped, or is that out in the real world?No, it's very much here in the real world, available today. You can use it. Go click the button, have fun. It's neat to see at least some evidence that not all roadmaps are wishes and pixie dust. The things that you were talking to me about years ago are established parts of ChaosSearch now. It hasn't been just, sort of, frozen in amber for years, or months, or these giant periods of time. Because, again, there's—yeah, don't sell me vaporware; I know how this works. The things you have promised have come to fruition. It's nice to see that.Thomas: No, I appreciate it. We talked a little while ago, now a few years ago, and it was a bit of aspirational, right? We had a lot to do, we had more to do. But now when we have big customers using our product, solving their problems, whether it's security, performance, operation, again—at scale, right? The real pain is, sure you have a small ELK cluster or small Athena use case, but when you're dealing with terabytes to petabytes, trillions of rows, right—billions—when you were dealing trillions, billions are now small. Millions don't even exist, right?And you're graduating from computer science in college and you say the word, “Trillion,” they're like, “Nah. No one does that.” And like you were saying, people do petabytes and exabytes. That's the world we're living in, and that's something that we really went hard at because these are challenging data problems and this is where we feel we uniquely sit. And again, we don't have to break the bank while doing it.Corey: Oh, yeah. Or at least as of this recording, there's a meme going around, again, from an old internal Google Video, of, “I just want to serve five terabytes of traffic,” and it's an internal Google discussion of, “I don't know how to count that low.” And, yeah.Thomas: [laugh].Corey: But there's also value in being able to address things at much larger volume. I would love to see better responsiveness options around things like Deep Archive because the idea of being able to query that—even if you can wait a day or two—becomes really interesting just from the perspective of, at that point, current cost for one petabyte of data in Glacier Deep Archive is 1000 bucks a month. That is ‘why would I ever delete data again?' Pricing.Thomas: Yeah. You said it. And what's interesting about our technology is unlike, let's say Lucene, when you index it, it could be 3, 4, or 5x the raw size, our representation is smaller than gzip. So, it is a full representation, so why don't you store it efficiently long-term in S3? Oh, by the way, with the Glacier; we support Glacier too.And so, I mean, it's amazing the cost of data with cloud storage is dramatic, and if you can make it hot and activated, that's the real promise of a data lake. And, you know, it's funny, we use our own service to run our SaaS—we log our own data, we monitor, we alert, have dashboards—and I can't tell you how cheap our service is to ourselves, right? Because it's so cost-effective for long-tail, not just, oh, a few weeks; we store a whole year's worth of our operational data so we can go back in time to debug something or figure something out. And a lot of that's savings. Actually, huge savings is cloud storage with a distributed elastic compute fabric that is serverless. These are things that seem so obvious now, but if you have SSDs, and you're moving things around, you know, a team of IT professionals trying to manage it, it's not cheap.Corey: Oh, yeah, that's the story. It's like, “Step one, start paying for using things in cloud.” “Okay, great. When do I stop paying?” “That's the neat part. You don't.” And it continues to grow and build.And again, this is the thing I learned running a business that focuses on this, the people working on this, in almost every case, are more expensive than the infrastructure they're working on. And that's fine. I'd rather pay people than technologies. And it does help reaffirm, on some level, that—people don't like this reminder—but you have to generate more value than you cost. So, when you're sitting there spending all your time trying to avoid saving money on, “Oh, I've listened to ChaosSearch talk about what they do a few times. I can probably build my own and roll it at home.”It's, I've seen the kind of work that you folks have put into this—again, you have something like 100 employees now; it is not just you building this—my belief has always been that if you can buy something that gets you 90, 95% of where you are, great. Buy it, and then yell at whoever selling it to you for the rest of it, and that'll get you a lot further than, “We're going to do this ourselves from first principles.” Which is great for a weekend project for just something that you have a passion for, but in production mistakes show. I've always been a big proponent of buying wherever you can. It's cheaper, which sounds weird, but it's true.Thomas: And we do the same thing. We have single-sign-on support; we didn't build that ourselves, we use a service now. Auth0 is one of our providers now that owns that [crosstalk 00:37:12]—Corey: Oh, you didn't roll your own authentication layer? Why ever not? Next, you're going to tell me that you didn't roll your own payment gateway when you wound up charging people on your website to sign up?Thomas: You got it. And so, I mean, do what you do well. Focus on what you do well. If you're repeating what everyone seems to do over and over again, time, costs, complexity, and… service, it makes sense. You know, I'm not trying to build storage; I'm using storage. I'm using a great, wonderful service, cloud object storage.Use whats works, whats works well, and do what you do well. And what we do well is make cloud object storage analytical and fast. So, call us up and we'll take away that 2 a.m. call you have when your cluster falls down, or you have a new workload that you are going to go to the—I don't know, the beach house, and now the weekend shot, right? Spin it up, stream it in. We'll take over.Corey: Yeah. So, if you're listening to this and you happen to be at re:Invent, which is sort of an open question: why would you be at re:Invent while listening to a podcast? And then I remember how long the shuttle lines are likely to be, and yeah. So, if you're at re:Invent, make it on down to the show floor, visit the ChaosSearch booth, tell them I sent you, watch for the wince, that's always worth doing. Thomas, if people have better decision-making capability than the two of us do, where can they find you if they're not in Las Vegas this week?Thomas: So, you find us online chaossearch.io. We have so much material, videos, use cases, testimonials. You can reach out to us, get a free trial. We have a self-service experience where connect to your S3 bucket and you're up and running within five minutes.So, definitely chaossearch.io. Reach out if you want a hand-held, white-glove experience POV. If you have those type of needs, we can do that with you as well. But we booth on re:Invent and I don't know the booth number, but I'm sure either we've assigned it or we'll find it out.Corey: Don't worry. This year, it is a low enough attendance rate that I'm projecting that you will not be as hard to find in recent years. For example, there's only one expo hall this year. What a concept. If only it hadn't taken a deadly pandemic to get us here.Thomas: Yeah. But you know, we'll have the ability to demonstrate Chaos at the booth, and really, within a few minutes, you'll say, “Wow. How come I never heard of doing it this way?” Because it just makes so much sense on why you do it this way versus the merry-go-round of data movement, and transformation, and schema management, let alone all the sharding that I know is a nightmare, more often than not.Corey: And we'll, of course, put links to that in the [show notes 00:39:40]. Thomas, thank you so much for taking the time to speak with me today. As always, it's appreciated.Thomas: Corey, thank you. Let's do this again.Corey: We absolutely will. Thomas Hazel, CTO and Founder of ChaosSearch. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn, and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast episode, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, whereas if you've hated this episode, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice along with an angry comment because I have dared to besmirch the honor of your homebrewed object store, running on top of some trusty and reliable Raspberries Pie.Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

IT Visionaries
Time Plus Data Equals Efficiency with Paul Dix, the Founder and CTO of InfluxData and the Creator of InfluxDB

IT Visionaries

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 36:04


If the topic of databases is brought up to certain people, their eyes may gloss over. But if that happened, that would be because they just don't know the awesome power of databases. Data can be valuable but only if it is contextualized, and time is an extremely relevant aspect to consider when analyzing huge amounts of data. Paul Dix, the founder and CTO of InfluxData and the Creator of InfluxDB, explains how a time series database can help provide that temporal contextual information to promote efficiencies.Main TakeawaysTime Contextualizes Data: Data has value only when it is placed in context and then the information gleaned from it is applied into actionable items. Time is a key factor to provide a basis for understanding information. A time series database, iike InfluxDB, can provide this sort of context for server and IoT device monitoring. This info can then be applied to track performance and increase efficiency.Failure Becomes Opportunity: Sometimes it's hard to see how a win can come from a loss, and most people try their very best to avoid losing. But the reality is that learning is happening when something is being created, and the knowledge that's gained in the creative process has nothing to do with the outcome of a given project. To ultimately be successful, the lesson is to take what's been learned and then keep pivoting until the product and the market are aligned and the timing is right.Evolving Engineering: Technology is always advancing rapidly. Therefore, even a successful product will require adaptations to meet new challenges. Accepting the reality of the high rate of change and, therefore, the need to constantly adjust accordingly will position a company in the best position to succeed.IT Visionaries is brought to you by the Salesforce Platform - the #1 cloud platform for digital transformation of every experience. Build connected experiences, empower every employee, and deliver continuous innovation - with the customer at the center of everything you do. Learn more at salesforce.com/platform

IoT For All Podcast
Insight-Driven Strategy with IoT | Eigen Innovations' Scott Everett

IoT For All Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 25:21


In this episode, Eigen Innovations Co-Founder and CEO Scott Everett joins us to discuss the role IoT plays in driving decision-making based on insights, rather than data. Scott speaks to the raw data produced by machine learning and AI technologies and what needs to be done to convert that data into actionable insights truly capable of changing daily workflow. Scott shares the challenges he's seen working to educate customers on how IoT solutions and AI works and what advice he has for companies who have been struggling with those same challenges.Scott also shares his experience developing the Eigen Innovations platform and what he's learned introducing it to customers, as well as the approach he takes in generating meaningful data for customers.Scott has dedicated his entire career to consulting in engineering and quality control applications. He co-founded Eigen Innovations in 2012 and has been working since that time to bring state-of-the-art technology to the factory floor, specializing in advanced industrial vision and machine learning. Scott is based in Fredericton, New Brunswick, Canada, and spends the majority of his time working with the product development team to evolve Eigen's AI-enabled solutions as well as pitching the solution to Tier 1 manufacturers around the globe. He's also in the process of completing his PhD studies in Mechanical Engineering.Interested in connecting with Scott? Reach out to him on Linkedin!About Eigen Innovations: Eigen Innovations supports and enhances quality assurance in industrial manufacturing with its unique AI-enabled industrial vision platform. Currently honing in on the automotive sector, Eigen tech has been deployed in several Tier 1 automotive supplier plants across multiple applications (plastic welding, glass soldering, windshield adhesive, etc.).Key Questions and Topics from this Episode:(01:02) Intro to Scott(03:56) What is vision data?(05:20) Introduction to Eigen Innovations(07:25) How do you approach conversations about transforming companies from being data-driven to analysis or insight-driven? Do you ever experience pushback against those ideas and how do you handle that?(11:41) How do you educate companies on IoT and what it can do for them? Do you have advice for other companies that are struggling with that?(14:16) What were the biggest challenges over the course of developing the platform and introducing it to customers?(20:28) What's your approach to generating data that actually changes a customer's workflow?

Elevated Environments
Journey to the Future of the Workplace: Introducing Elevated Environments

Elevated Environments

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 19:55


In this episode:Introduction to the Elevated Environments app and its capabilities (1:20)Introducing episode guests Erin McDannald and Victoria Fields (1:43)Erin's discussion of the history and mission behind Elevated Environments (2:44)Victoria's perspective on the relationship between the COVID-19 pandemic and the Elevated environments app (4:25)How Elevated Environments opens the doors to remote work and accessible work spaces (6:34)Erin shares her thoughts on how Environments and Lighting Environments expanded their company footprints in the midst of the pandemic (7:05)News of Elevated Environments' recent “Future Focus” award (9:24)Inspiring the metaverse: Environments' desire to offer virtual metaverse spaces (10:52)Building the metaverse: Environments' plans to offer metaverse spaces to Elevated Environments app customers (13:10)Invitation to schedule an Elevated Environments demo (16:30)Environments' desire to use the metaverse as a tool for workplace accessibility and why this is important (16:48)Dispelling the myth or fear of being “locked into” the metaverse: how the metaverse is built to connect openly (17:43) Closing remarks and contact information (18:52) Thank you for listening! Questions, comments, or just want to say hi? Drop us a line at hello@environments.tech, we would love to hear from you.  Click here to learn more about Environments and Elevated Environments.

Firewalls Don't Stop Dragons Podcast
My Debit Card Was Hacked

Firewalls Don't Stop Dragons Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 68:11


Credit cards are more secure than debit cards. I've said this in my book, my podcast, my blog and my seminars. Credit card transactions are loans - you're not out any money if a fraudulent charge comes through (assuming you or the credit card company catches it first). With debit cards, any fraud activity will actually take your money from your account - it's gone and you have to convince your bank to give it back. And so, I almost never use my debit card. And yet, I was still hacked. My card wasn't stolen or cloned with a skimmer. The number wasn't leaked in a hack. The bad guys somehow managed to guess my card number. And then they got clever and drained my bank account. I'll give you the details today and give you some pointers for avoiding being bitten the same way I was. In other news: bad guys have come up with some very clever ways to drain your bank accounts using Zelle and text messages; they've also used similar techniques to disable the Find My feature on stolen iPhones; Apple is suing Israeli hacking company NSO Group over their Pegasus spyware; attackers apparently don't try guessing passwords longer than about 10 characters; GoDaddy admits to a major breach, but in a dumb way; there's a nasty new Windows bug that was give up by an upset security researcher; there's a powerful IoT malware that appears to be lurking on the internet; Microsoft Windows is doing some shady stuff to force you to use Edge browser and give up your data; and Vizio makes more money off your TV data than off the TV itself. Article Links The ‘Zelle Fraud' Scam: How it Works, How to Fight Back https://krebsonsecurity.com/2021/11/the-zelle-fraud-scam-how-it-works-how-to-fight-back/ iPhone thieves are using this trick to disable Find My on stolen devices https://www.imore.com/iphone-thieves-are-using-trick-disable-find-my-stolen-devices Apple sues NSO Group for attacking iPhones with Pegasus spyware https://www.theverge.com/2021/11/23/22798917/apple-nso-group-spyware-pegasus-cybersecurity-research Apple will alert users exposed to state-sponsored spyware attacks https://appleinsider.com/articles/21/11/25/apple-will-alert-users-exposed-to-state-sponsored-spyware-attacks Attackers don't bother brute-forcing long passwords https://therecord.media/attackers-dont-bother-brute-forcing-long-passwords-microsoft-engineer-says/ GoDaddy admits to password breach: check your Managed WordPress site! https://nakedsecurity.sophos.com/2021/11/23/godaddy-admits-to-password-breach-check-your-managed-wordpress-site/ New Windows zero-day with public exploit lets you become an admin https://www.bleepingcomputer.com/news/microsoft/new-windows-zero-day-with-public-exploit-lets-you-become-an-admin/ This mysterious malware could threaten millions of routers and IoT devices https://www.zdnet.com/article/this-mysterious-malware-could-threaten-millions-of-routers-and-iot-devices/ Microsoft Enables Edge Sync By Default, Hoovering Up Your Data in the Process https://www.extremetech.com/computing/329162-microsoft-enables-edge-sync-by-default-hoovering-up-your-data-in-the-process?source=Computing Vizio is making more money selling your data than it is selling TVs https://knowtechie.com/vizio-is-making-more-money-selling-your-data-than-it-is-selling-tvs/ My Debit Card Was Hacked: https://firewallsdontstopdragons.com/my-debit-card-was-hacked/ Further Info HUGE sale on my book! 9.99/6.99: https://link.springer.com/book/10.1007/978-1-4842-6189-7Give Thanks and Donate https://firewallsdontstopdragons.com/give-thanks-donate/ Best & WorstBecome a Patron! https://www.patreon.com/FirewallsDontStopDragons Would you like me to speak to your group about security and/privacy? http://bit.ly/Firewalls-SpeakerGenerate secure passphrases! https://d20key.com/#/ 

Data And Analytics in Business
E83 - Steven Tye - The Data in Your Water - Smart Water Metering

Data And Analytics in Business

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2021 57:10


What is Smart Water Metering and what does it mean for sustainability across Australia? Is this the future of water conservation? Enter into the movement of smart cities and have a look into a brighter future - one step at a time - with Steven Tye. Meet Steven Tye Steven's Role as a Smart Water Utilities Leader at Tyeware Steven Tye has been the Owner, Director, and Solutions Consultant at Tyeware for the past 14 years and counting. He has been involved in smart metering projects since 2011 and has experience working with over 50 water utilities on smart metering pilots and rollouts. Tyeware is an internationally recognized digital water metering & IoT solutions provider leading Australia's IoT revolution in smarter water solutions for agriculture. Data Science in Smart Water Metering Solution They developed the MiWater and MyH2O systems for Mackay Regional Council and now partner with Taggles Systems for the Australian and international commercialisation of this software suite. MiWater processes, interprets and integrates data received from Automated Meter Infrastructure (AMI) to give utilities control and oversight over their water infrastructure, from the largest networks down to individual services. MiWater has assisted in identifying leaks totaling six billion litres of water, in turn, saving residents of the Mackay region hundreds of dollars every year. In addition, MiWater assisted in regulating water consumption among the town's population, allowing the Mackay Regional Council to reach its goal of reducing annual water consumption by 10%. Customer Experience and Telemex More recently, Tyeware has developed "Telemex", an industry-first integrated CRM, demand management and customer portal for water irrigation schemes. It includes the full management of water allocations, titles, transfers and changeovers, as well as meter management, scheme management and automated notifications. At the heart of Telemex is a customer portal used by water customers to lodge, manage and visualise the impact of water orders. Telemex builds on Tyeware's expertise and innovation across the Australian water industry to cultivate water sustainability through customer-centric solutions. Data Analytics and Smart Water In this exclusive analytics podcast episode, Steven shares: His entrepreneurial journey and experience in growing a software business What a smart water metering solution is and why it plays a vital role in solving climate change Real-life examples of how utilities, local governments, and agriculture businesses use the solution in their own businesses The type of data collected for these solutions How analytics is used to identify water leakages and plans for infrastructure development How he started his journey in developing smart water metering solutions The challenges and advice in applying data analytics with a digital water metering solution If you are in a C-suite position, working for a utility company or local council, and find yourself intrigued about how data science can assist you with infrastructure planning and engaging with your customers, this is the episode you do not want to miss out on. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/analyticsshow/message

Doing CX Right‬ Podcast
15. Steven van Belleghem: Doing Customer & Employee Experience Right In The Digital Age

Doing CX Right‬ Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2021 33:21


What is the future of Customer Experience, Employee Experience and Marketing in the digital age? Steven Van Belleghem, global thought leader and author, explains the influence of new technologies (AI, 5G, Iot…) on customer experience, and the human role in a world of automation (i.e. how to delight customers with an empathetic human touch). You'll also hear how the latest technology can solve business challenges if applied right, and leadership advice to thrive in 2022 and beyond.

The Tech Blog Writer Podcast
1797: Casting off the Legacy Technology Shackles With Couchbase

The Tech Blog Writer Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2021 28:23


Chris Harris from Couchbase joins me in a conversation about the challenges that businesses continue to face with legacy technology. Using the database industry as a case in point, we discuss how business' legacy arrangements hinder their chances of being competitive in the post-COVID, digital-first world. Chris argues that reliance on legacy database technology such as Oracle is holding them back from achieving their digital goals. We also talk about cloud and IoT to AI, and even 5G calls for a much higher level of data agility than legacy databases can provide. In Chris' view, one of the key reasons businesses struggle to move away from legacy tech is skills; often and companies lack the resources to adopt more modern alternatives that are better suited to meeting digital transformation requirements. Finally, Chris offers his thoughts on where he sees the database industry moving next, looking at emerging technologies that businesses increasingly demand, such as edge computing or real-time analytics, and explaining how the database industry is evolving to support them. At Couchbase, they believe data is at the heart of the enterprise. They empower developers and architects to build, deploy, and run their mission-critical applications. Many of the world's largest enterprises rely on Couchbase to power the core applications their businesses depend on.

Second in Command: The Chief Behind the Chief
Ep. 189 – Armis Security Co-Founder & CTO, Nadir Izrael

Second in Command: The Chief Behind the Chief

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 27, 2021 42:52


Our guest today is the Co-Founder & CTO of Armis Security, Nadir Izrael. Nadir guides the technology vision behind Armis to protect unmanaged and IoT devices. He co-founded the company in 2015 with its CEO, Yevgeny Dibrov. Prior to Armis, Nadir worked at Google as a senior software manager. Before Google, Nadir spent six years […] The post Ep. 189 – Armis Security Co-Founder & CTO, Nadir Izrael appeared first on COO Alliance.

Changelog Master Feed
From engineering to product (JS Party #203)

Changelog Master Feed

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 65:36


Liana Leahy tells Amal and KBall all about her journey from software engineer to product manager. Along the way we learn what a PM does, how to be great at it, how to know if it's for you, why the role is in such demand these days, and much more. - It's UNIX, I know this!

Asset Champion Podcast | Physical Asset Performance, Criticality, Reliability and Uptime

Terrence O'Hanlon is a successful business leader with deep knowledge and experience in reliability and asset management including digital twins, IoT and digitalization. His work developing Uptime Elements Reliability Framework and Asset Management System as a Cultural Change Management Methodology has been used by thousands of organizations and he is co-author of “10 Rights of Asset Management”, a popular industry standard for Asset Lifecycle Management. Mike Petrusky asks Terrence about the origins of his passion for reliability and they explore the importance of language and the need to clearly define industry terms. In part one of their discussion, Mike and Terry exchange inspirational quotes, discuss music and share updates about the future of asset management and reliability conferences in 2021. Connect with Terrence on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/reliabilityweb/ Learn more about ReliabilityWeb: https://reliabilityweb.com/ Discover books and other resources: https://reliabilityweb.com/bookstore Connect with Mike on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/mikepetrusky/ Learn more about the iOFFICE Asset Division and explore more interviews at: https://www.assetchampion.com/ Share your thoughts with Mike via email: podcast@iOFFICECORP.com  

Programming Electronics Academy Podcast
EP 035 iot and Anvil with Ian Davies

Programming Electronics Academy Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 29:23


On today's episode, we chat with Ian Davies the Founder of Anvil. Ian joins us to share his expertise using anvil and Arduino-based IoT projects for plenty of great applications. You can find a transcript of the conversation here: https://bit.ly/3cOAABn Anvil Website: https://anvil.works/?utm_source=podcast:pea Other Links & Recources: Raspberry Pi Zero W APA102c LED strips Sonoff Wifi power switches Tasmota firmware USB programmer for Arduino Buy access to all our courses now - For a limited time just 19USD per month with a 30 day satisfaction or your money back "No Hassle" guarantee! https://bit.ly/3xllpd ***About Us:*** This Arduino lesson was created by Programming Electronics Academy.  We are an online education company who seeks to help people learn about electronics and programming through the ubiquitous Arduino development board. ***We have no affiliation whatsoever with Arduino LLC, other than we think they are cool.***

Peggy Smedley Show
5G and Your Business

Peggy Smedley Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 14:49


Peggy talks about how 5G is set to change the course of business, as it is estimated 5G-enabled innovations are expected to contribute $1.5 trillion by the end of this decade. She explains that there are big opportunities to be had here, but that businesses need to understand how 5G is going to shape enterprises in the months ahead. She also discusses: Six opportunities to advance your 5G strategy. What needs to happen next Several big questions to consider as you move forward. peggysmedleyshow.com  (11/23/21 - 747) IoT, Internet of Things, Peggy Smedley, artificial intelligence, machine learning, big data, digital transformation, cybersecurity, blockchain, 5G cloud, sustainability, future of work, podcast

Peggy Smedley Show
A Sustainability Journey

Peggy Smedley Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 32:31


Ron Gonen, founder and CEO, Closed Loop Partners, shares his sustainability journey with Peggy and how he got involved in the circular economy. He describes his introduction to sustainability as one where in hardship oftentimes you find great opportunities. They also discuss: The greatest scam in America that many believe being sustainable and being green is a nice aspiration, but it costs money, when actually the exact opposite is true. Who is the beneficiary of a circular economy. The importance of local manufacturing in the United States. closedlooppartners.com  (11/23/21 - 747) IoT, Internet of Things, Peggy Smedley, artificial intelligence, machine learning, big data, digital transformation, cybersecurity, blockchain, 5G cloud, sustainability, future of work, podcast, Ron Gonen, Closed Loop Partners

Peggy Smedley Show
The Digital Supply Chain

Peggy Smedley Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 16:19


Peggy and Hernan Saenz, global head, performance improvement practice, Bain, talk about digital supply chain and supply-chain traceability and why it is important to the future of business. He looks back and talks about how we perfected linear supply chains, but at the same time we created very brittle and brown supply chains. They also discuss: If we cannot see our supply chains, we cannot manage them. Three massive movements in the market today. The key ingredients to traceability. bain.com (11/23/21 - 747) IoT, Internet of Things, Peggy Smedley, artificial intelligence, machine learning, big data, digital transformation, cybersecurity, blockchain, 5G cloud, sustainability, future of work, podcast, Hernan Saenz, Bain

JSA Podcasts for Telecom and Data Centers
Data Movers Podcast With MetTel's Max Silber: IoT, 5G, Mobility and the Best Steak in NYC

JSA Podcasts for Telecom and Data Centers

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 36:30


MetTel's VP of IoT & Mobility, Max Silber, takes a deep dive into IoT, automation, and the importance of cybersecurity as we prepare for 5G in this impactful Data Movers episode. From top IoT trends and predictions to the misconceptions about 5G, Max lends his expertise while providing listeners with his career highlights. During the conversation, he also gives insight into MetTel's Smart Warehouse and MaaS (Mobility as a Service) offering and how it is helping to eliminate organizational complexity and costly infrastructure investments. A podcast enthusiast and producer himself, Max gives us a closer look at his own podcast, Techie and the Blonde, formed alongside his wife during the pandemic. In true New Yorker fashion, Max tells us where to grab the best steak (hint: it's in Brooklyn) and why he roots for the G-men over the Jets. This exciting episode is not to be missed! If you are interested in learning more about the people behind our industry's top headlines, this podcast is for you!Follow Jaymie at @jscotto and Evan at @evankirstelSUBSCRIBE to JaymieScottoTV for the latest Telecom News: https://www.youtube.com/JaymieScottoTVHOMEPAGE: http://www.jsa.netLIKE JaymieScottoTV on FACEBOOK:  https://www.facebook.com/JaymieScottoandAssociatesFOLLOW JaymieScottoTV on TWITTER: https://twitter.com/jsatv

USU Career Studio
Bonus Friday Face-to-Face with Sixto Cabrera: Electrical Engineering

USU Career Studio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 21:52


This week, Marissa met with Sixto Cabrera, USU alum and Senior Electrical Engineer at Vivint. Join them as they discuss Sixto's unique educational timeline, a day in the life of an electrical engineer, setting healthy work boundaries in a high-demand job, and examples of Sixto's most meaningful work. Sixto is an experienced electronics engineer with professional experience in hardware design for a wide range of applications including embedded, IoT, RF, digital/analog circuits, and power electronics. He also has skills in programming/scripting languages such as C and C++, Python, R, MATLAB and Verilog. He is currently working as a Senior Electrical Engineer at Vivint. Learn more about and connect with Sixto by visiting his LinkedIn profile.

Digital Planet
Smart speakers used in gaslighting

Digital Planet

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 45:24


IoT devices like smart speakers and networked heating controls are increasingly being used by perpetrators of domestic violence – for instance by changing the temperature the heating is set to or the music that the victim listens too, remotely. Julia Slupska from the Oxford Internet Institute will be discussing these new findings at the Shameless! Festival of Activism Against Sexual Violence in London. She joins us on the show. A possible alternative to GPS? We have relied on GPS for location services for almost 30 years, but it's vulnerable to inaccuracy and attack. Professor Zak Kassas from the University of California, Irvine, explains his proposal for its replacement, harnessing the power of increasingly abundant low earth orbit communication satellites like SpaceX's Starlink. Mapping sea cucumbers using drones Sea cucumbers aren't the flashiest creatures on Australia's great barrier reef, and they have long been understudied and poorly understood. But Dr Karen Joyce, co-founder of GeoNadir wants your drone footage to help learn more to help map the animals and their habitats. The programme is presented by Gareth Mitchell with expert commentary from Bill Thompson. Studio Manager: Bob Nettles Producer: Ania Lichtarowicz (Image: Man setting home gadgets via smartphone. Credit: ismagilov/Getty Images)

Control Amplified
How HART transcends physical layer constraints

Control Amplified

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 24:47


Ethernet-APL technology is an important technology milestone, enabling a new high performance paradigm of digital field communications for the process industries. But from a practical perspective, there are millions of analog 4-20 mA instruments installed around the world, and growing. No one will be tearing them out anytime soon. Further these analog devices are joined by a growing number of wireless monitoring instruments that are helping to realize the industrial IoT ambitions of process manufacturers around the world. So. how can all these devices coexist and work together tomorrow and for decades to come? Peter Zornio, chief technology officer for Emerson's Automation Solutions business, joins Keith Larson to discuss the role that HART will play. Learn more about Emerson: https://www.emerson.com/global Read the transcript: https://www.controlglobal.com/podcasts/control-amplified/how-hart-transcends-physical-layer-constraints 

Over the Air — IoT, Connected Devices, & the Journey
A Smart Approach for Doing Firmware Right

Over the Air — IoT, Connected Devices, & the Journey

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 20:53


Nobody gets firmware right the first time. It's a hard truth in the IoT space. Many developers of smart products trip up at this step in their journey. It's not just the initial development that's difficult either. As the product evolves, you need to constantly improve the experience—without breaking things in the process. Alan Vardon, Director - Smart Home Division at Globe Electric, is well-versed in the trials and tribulations of firmware development, and he's learned a few lessons along the way. In this episode, we discuss: Transitioning an established company to the smart home space The importance of initial and continuous testing with firmware The challenges of working with firmware Never miss an episode of Over The Air by subscribing wherever you listen to podcasts. Listening on a desktop & can't see the links? Just search for Over the Air in your favorite podcast player.

Radio Free HPC Podcast
Top500, Quantum, And SC

Radio Free HPC Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021


In this episode of RadioFreeHPC, the crew discusses the new Top500 list, Atos' Quantum Learning Machine, and a few SC tidbits. RadioFreeHPC is produced by the greater Columbus Dungeons and Dragons team, led by Kevin, Lord High Dungeon Master and Slayer of the Wasteland. Meeting Tuesday and Thursday afternoons in Kevin's Mom's basement. Cookies and… Read More »Top500, Quantum, And SC

Augmented - the industry 4.0 podcast
How 5G Enables Manufacturing

Augmented - the industry 4.0 podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 35:19


In episode 69 of the podcast, the topic is: How 5G Enables Manufacturing. Our guests are Rowan Högman, Head of 5G Industry Collaboration, Ericsson (@twitter) and Jeff Travers, Customer Success Lead - Dedicated Networks, Ericsson.In this conversation, we talk about a new Ericsson report on how 5G Enables Manufacturing (Ericsson Industry Lab). We explore some surprising findings, discuss industry trends, as well as the current and future use cases as wireless networks take another step towards being trusted on the shop floor and they muse on the ultimate impact of 5G.  Augmented is a podcast for industrial leaders, process engineers and shop floor operators, hosted by futurist Trond Arne Undheim (@trondau), presented by Tulip (@tulipinterfaces), the frontline operations platform.Trond's takeaway 5G isn't just another generation wireless networks, it is a game changer for trust, reliability, and industrial performance at the edge, that last mile which fixed broadband has struggled with. What remains to be seen is how widespread the rollout will be and, of course, how innovative industry will be in making use of the new network.Thanks for listening. If you liked the show, subscribe at Augmentedpodcast.co or in your preferred podcast player, and rate us with five stars. If you liked this episode, you might also like episode 44, No-code for IoT in the Cloud, episode 21, The Future of Digital in Manufacturing or episode 25, Industrial Tracking: Drones, Warehouses and Theme Parks. Hopefully, you'll find something awesome in these or other episodes. If so, do let us know by messaging us, we would love to share your thoughts with other listeners. The Augmented podcast is created in association with Tulip, connected frontline operations platform that connects the people, machines, devices, and the systems used in a production or logistics process in a physical location. Tulip is democratizing technology and empowering those closest to operations to solve problems. Tulip is also hiring. You can find Tulip at Tulip.co. Please share this show with colleagues who care about where industry and especially industrial tech is heading. To find us on social media is easy, we are Augmented Pod on LinkedIn and Twitter, and Augmented Podcast on Facebook and YouTube:LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/augmentedpodFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/AugmentedPodcast/Twitter: https://twitter.com/AugmentedPodYouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC5Y1gz66LxYvjJAMnN_f6PQAugmented--industrial conversations that matter. See you next time. 

Innovation Talks
EIM vs PPM

Innovation Talks

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 36:01


Mike Bauer is Sopheon's Chief Product Officer, responsible for Sopheon's product vision and roadmap, overseeing product marketing, user experience, and product management. He has more than 30 years of experience building and leading cross-functional teams and organizations to bring new products and companies to market. He has worked across industries focusing on enterprise software, data communications, connected products/IoT, sensor analytics, marketing automation, Big Data, IT, and embedded systems. He has a Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering degree from Ohio State University and a Master of Business Administration degree from Harvard Business School. Mike joins me today to discuss Enterprise Information Management (EIM) and Professional Properties Management (PPM). He shares insights from relearning product innovation and lifecycle management, including core roles that exist regardless of the product. Mike explores aspirational roles and decision-making across portfolio, project, product, strategy, and ideation. He defines EIM and PPM, revealing their differences and similarities. Mike also offers career advice for people looking to enter product management and highlights where he thinks the professionals will be in five years. “The notion of product management is becoming a much more specific term.” - Mike Bauer This week on Innovation Talks: How Mike got into innovation and product management with Hewlett-Packard Using the “jobs-to-be-done” framework and taking a step back to relearn product innovation and lifecycle management The core innovation and product jobs: aspiration, product portfolio management, project and resource management, and idea management Informed stakeholder and decision making roles across strategy, portfolio, products, projects, and ideas Defining Enterprise Innovation Management and Professional Properties Management How product management is becoming a professional career Mike's career advice for people entering product and project management Where project management will be in five years and unlocking the different ways to go to market Resources Mentioned: innov8rs conference: EIM Versus PPM: Aren't They on The Same Team? Connect with Mike Bauer: Sopheon Mike Bauer on LinkedIn This Podcast is brought to you by Sopheon Thanks for tuning into this week's episode of Innovation Talks. If you enjoyed this episode, please subscribe and leave a review wherever you get your podcasts. Apple Podcasts | TuneIn | GooglePlay | Stitcher | Spotify | iHeart Be sure to connect with us on Facebook, Twitter, and LinkedIn, and share your favorite episodes on social media to help us reach more listeners, like you. For additional information around new product development or corporate innovation, sign up for Sopheon's newsletter where we share news and industry best practices monthly! The fastest way to do this is to go to sopheon.com and click here.

Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)
Combining AI and IoT to Drive Digital Processes with Whirlpool and McDermott CIOs

Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 22:22


613: In a panel from our recent Metis Strategy Digital Symposium in September, Vagesh and Danielle speak with Metis Strategy's Michael Bertha in a conversation about combining AI and IoT to drive digital processes. Danielle shares how IoT and AI fit into Whirlpool's four strategic imperatives and each technology's role in enabling partnerships and product innovations. Vagesh details what opportunities McDermott sees with IoT and AI in its business model and the company's use of digital twins. Finally, both executives share how digital twins can produce business value, unique customer insights, and product learnings.

The Digital Supply Chain podcast
Supply Chain Visibility And Sustainability - A Chat With Sony's Erik Lund

The Digital Supply Chain podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 28:38


Supply Chain visibility and sustainability are two of the most important topics in supply chain today. So when I came across Sony Visilion's Head of IoT Tracking Erik Lund I knew I had to get him on the podcast. Fortunately he was delighted to join and we had a great discussion about IoT tracking and the visibility implications of that, and we also talked about the sustainability implications of seeing the data associated with your shipments.As usual, I learned loads, and I hope you do too...Oh, and this is one of the first podcast episodes that I have created chapters for. If you find them useful, do let me know (tom.raftery@sap.com) and I'll make the effort to do it more often!If you have any comments/suggestions or questions for the podcast - feel free to leave me a voice message over on my SpeakPipe page or just send it to me as a direct message on Twitter/LinkedIn. Audio messages will get played (unless you specifically ask me not to).If you want to learn more about how to juggle sustainability and efficiency mandates while recovering from pandemic-induced disruptions, meeting growth targets, and preparing for an uncertain future, check out our Oxford Economics research report here.And don't forget to check out the 2021 MPI research on Industry 4.0 to find out how to increase productivity, revenues, and profitability for your operations. This global study examines the extent to which manufacturers deploy Industry 4.0 in their business and the benefits it brings.And if you liked this show, please don't forget to rate and/or review it. It makes a big difference to help new people discover it. Thanks.And remember, stay healthy, stay safe, stay sane! 

Cybersecurity 101 with Joe and Larry
Episode 20 - The 25th Anniversary of DDoS with Pankaj Gupta from Citrix

Cybersecurity 101 with Joe and Larry

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 38:26


In this episode we discuss the 25th anniversary of the first DDoS (Distributed Denial of Service) and why this cybersecurity threat is a tricky one to solve.  00:00 to 2:00 Intro to Pankaj Gupta (@PankajOnCloud,CITRIX) Pankaj leads product and solutions marketing and go to market strategy for cloud, application delivery and security solutions at Citrix. He advises CIOs and business leaders for technology and business model transitions. In prior roles at Cisco, he led networking, cybersecurity and software solution marketing. 2:20 The 25th anniversary of the first Denial of Service attack against Panix, an Internet Service Provider (1996) (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Denial-of-service_attack#Distributed_attack) 25 years later, the largest DDoS attack ever recorded targeted  Russian ISP Yandex (https://www.cpomagazine.com/cyber-security/russian-internet-giant-yandex-wards-off-the-largest-botnet-ddos-attack-in-history/). Pankaj notes how this was exactly 25 years later to the month. 3:15 What is a DDoS Attack? 1) Connection overload 2) Volumetric like ICMP flood 3) Application Layer  5:20 Coinminer as an example of Denial of Service when CPU is exhausted 6:00 Why are we still talking about DDoS 25 years later? Pankaj states that they are now easier than ever to perform.  7:00 Larry asks about the connection between ransomware and DDoS 9:00 Pankaj describes how the motivation for DDoS has shifted from hacktivism to financial motivation  9:30 Joe asks how much it costs for an attacker to operate  10:00 Pankaj explains that unskilled attackers with access to the Dark web can orchestrate attacks 11:45 Joe discusses how many attackers target healthcare despite how this hurts people 12:45 Pankaj discusses that while federal laws exist, very few are prosecuted for DDoS attacks. 13:50 Larry asks whether businesses are paying the ransom  14:15 Pankaj says paying the ransom is never recommended. Instead, Pankaj recommends investing in DDoS protection solutions 15:25 Joe asks whether tools exist to quantify costs for downtime to justify the expense of DDoS prevention solutions.  16:30 Pankaj explains how it is not just the economic impact of downtime that is to be factored into the equation but also the damage to reputation by losing customer's trust.  17:30 Pankaj describes three trends that will cause DDoS attacks to increase in the future (things will get worse rather than better). This is due to increased bandwidth for 5G, exponential growth of IoT devices, and the improved computation power.  18:30 What is IoT? (Internet of Things). This is any device that has an internet connection such as a Nanny Camera, home router, or NEST Thermostat. Bad actors exploits vulnerabilities to transform these devices into a “BOT Network” that the attackers can then use in mass quantity against a single target. This forms the source for the DDoS attacks. All of these devices combined will send packets to the victim website.  20:50 What solutions exist for DDoS? Joe explains how he has solved DDoS historically using services from CloudFlare.  22:00 Joe explains how he configured DDoS protection by configuring DNS, and the weakness when attackers discover the direct IP using OSINT 23:15 Joe asks Pankaj how does Citrix compare with competitors  23:35 Pankaj describes four key criteria when selecting a DDoS solution. 1) The solution should protect against a variety of types of DDoS attacks 2) Can the solution scale? As DDoS attacks increase in size 20% Year over Year (it's expected to be 3 terabits). 3) The advantage of a cloud-based solution is that it can auto-scale in bandwidth whereas an on-premises DDoS solution cannot guard against bandwidth saturation.  25:50 Joe asks Pankaj if Citrix uses its own data centers (does it have exposures if data centers like Google, Amazon or Microsoft). Pankaj describes the Citrix solution as having the scale to handle 12 terabits of scrubbing across multiple points of presence (pop).  29:00 Pankaj describes two types of DDoS solutions, Always-ON, or On-Demand.  If you are an e-commerce website then Always-on may make more sense even though it costs more than on-demand because every minute that you cannot sell your products will lose money.  31:00 DDoS attacks can be a diversion tactic to distract IT and SECOPS teams so that the attackers can perform other types of attacks such as financial fraud (Wire Fraud, SWIFT, etc) 32:40 Larry asks: What is the difference between a buffer overflow and DDoS? Pankaj explains that a buffer overflow could be used as a type of DDoS since it could impact the availability of the service. 34:00 Joe describes how DDoS strikes at the heart of one of the three components of the CIA Triad “Confidentiality, Integrity, and Availability.”  35:00 For businesses interested in learning more about Citrix solutions, Pankaj recommends using this contact form on the Citrix website: https://www.citrix.com/contact/form/inquiry/ 36:30 Joe asks what market is Citrix chasing: Small Business, Mid-Market or Enterprise? Pankaj responds that all businesses need DDoS protection, and how cloud-based solutions are easier to implement.   

The Top Entrepreneurs in Money, Marketing, Business and Life
How this SaaS Raised $2.4m Crowdfunding at $10m Valuation

The Top Entrepreneurs in Money, Marketing, Business and Life

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2021 17:56


Software increases IOT bandwidth 4x

Changelog Master Feed
Sophie is the bomb diggity (JS Party #202)

Changelog Master Feed

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 67:17


This week we are joined by Sophie Alpert, Head of Engineering at Humu, and former lead of the React Core team, to discuss her experience on being a very early adopter, contributor, and eventually maintainer of React. In her 4+ years on the Core team, she went from supporting a new niche OSS UI library to supporting a project used by millions of developers around the world. Join us to hear about this epic journey, as well as Sophie's thought's on some common critiques and misconceptions of React.

Microwave Journal Podcasts
Frequency Matters, Nov 19: 5G/IoT Issue Products, Industry News/Events

Microwave Journal Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 7:42


Microwave Journal Editors Pat Hindle and Gary Lerude cover the Nov 5G and IoT issue products, industry news on research/5G news, and online events in Dec. Sponsored by Pasternack.

TRXL
‘Out of Sight, Out of Mind‘, with Boris Rapoport, Alex Osenenko; Sponsored by ArchIT

TRXL

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 49:43


Special guests Boris Rapoport and Alex Osenenko of ArchIT join the podcast to talk about to talk about the security and privacy aspects of IoT devices when deploying them inside our practices and on the client side, cybercrimes and other threats targeting the weakest link (people), the enormous rise in attacks including phishing and ransomware, particularly over the last 2 years due to the remote work situation, and what everyone can and should do today as their first line of defense to address the top 3 risk areas threatening our day-to-day security.LinksArchIT's Free eBookArchIT's Design Under Influence BlogMore TRXL Podcast episodesCheck out my other podcast too: ArchispeakMy YouTube channelConnect with EvanTwitterLinkedInInstagramYouTubeEmail

The Irish Tech News Podcast
Why Economists are Often Wrong about Bitcoin, David Palmer, Vodafone

The Irish Tech News Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 30:20


The Intersection of the Economy of Things and the Economy of Crypto Tokens, and Why Economists are Often Wrong about Bitcoin with David Palmer, Vodafone David Palmer is a digital visionary and global platform innovator. He is the Vodafone Business lead for Blockchain technology, and he has been key to exploring the application of blockchain to telecoms and wider business. David is an expert on the convergence of digital technologies and new business models, and he is currently exploring the opportunities associated with IoT, Blockchain and Metaverse. Jamil Hasan is a crypto and blockchain focused podcast host at the Irish Tech News and spearheads our weekend content “The Crypto Corner” where he interviews founders, entrepreneurs and global thought leaders. Prior to his endeavors into the crypto-verse in July 2017, Jamil built an impressive career as a data, operations, financial, technology and business analyst and manager in Corporate America, including twelve years at American International Group and its related companies. Since entering the crypto universe, Jamil has been an advisor, entrepreneur, investor and author. His books “Blockchain Ethics: A Bridge to Abundance” (2018) and “Re-Generation X” (2020) not only discuss the benefits of blockchain technology, but also capture Jamil's experience on how he has transitioned from being a loyal yet downsized former corporate employee to a self sovereign individual. With over ninety podcasts under his belt since he joined our team in February 2021, and with four years of experience both managing his own crypto portfolio and providing crypto guidance and counsel to select clients, Jamil continues to seek opportunities to help others navigate this still nascent industry. Jamil's primary focus outside of podcast hosting is helping former corporate employees gain the necessary skills and vision to build their own crypto portfolios and create wealth for the long-term.

Smart Firefighting
Episode 102: First Responder Smart Tracking (FRST) Challenge with Sonny Kirkley

Smart Firefighting

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 36:58


Hello Smart Firefighting Community! Welcome to another episode of covering real world innovations via interviews with fire service and technology industry experts that empower YOU to develop your very own Smart Firefighting strategy! CALLING ALL INNOVATORS!! Have you heard of the FRST challenge yet? In this episode: - What is the FRST challenge? - How to leverage the community to crowdsource the best innovation - Why you shouldn't be afraid to fail SFF got to hear from innovator, entrepreneur and designer Sonny E. Kirkley who is the Director of User Experience for Crisis Technologies Innovations Lab (CTIL). With extensive experience managing complex projects and programs, he enjoys taking an idea from a concept to development and working with stakeholders on effective implementation. Much of his career has been focused on learning technologies and implementing programs in diverse settings (e.g., Fortune 100 to K- schools), while Kirkley particularly enjoys working with emerging technologies such as augmented reality, mixed reality, AI and IoT. CTIL is hosting the first-ever First Responder Smart Tracking (FRST) Challenge, a national series of competitions for companies, entrepreneurs and students to find the best solution for indoor 3D tracking for first responders. The competition is focused on smart, accurate, in-building location tracking for first responders since tracking has been a big issues for first responders for a long time with no such technologies currently available. Connect with Sonny: LinkedIn | Twitter Follow FRST Challenge: LinkedIn | Twitter | Facebook Episode Resources: - CTIL Competition Details - Competition contact email: info@frstchallenge.com Join our SFF Community! Head to www.smartfirefighting.com to discover how SFF accelerates innovation for emergency responders, to find out when our next event is or review our curated resources! Facebook | Instagram | Twitter | LinkedIn

The Internet of Things Podcast - Stacey On IoT
Episode 347: McKinsey reevaluates IoT’s impact

The Internet of Things Podcast - Stacey On IoT

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 62:42


This week's show has a lot of big numbers starting with $12.6 trillion, which is at the upper end of what McKinsey believes the economic impact from IoT will be by 2030. We cover the latest report, which is a reassessment of McKinsey's famous 2015 report on the IoT that said it would be worth … Continue reading Episode 347: McKinsey reevaluates IoT's impact The post Episode 347: McKinsey reevaluates IoT's impact appeared first on IoT Podcast - Internet of Things.

Light Reading Podcasts
KORE Wireless CEO: Looking beyond the IoT hype

Light Reading Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 9:03


ICYMI: From our coverage of Mobile World Congress Los Angeles in October, here's a short interview with KORE Wireless President and CEO Romil Bahl. Bahl talks to Light Reading's Kelsey Ziser about the challenge of managing IoT devices, and he shares a use case where KORE is working with Dexcom to improve health monitoring systems for diabetes patients.  Bahl also discusses KORE's approach to IoT security in both the device and the network, and he reveals how the company is using eSIM technology to connect IoT devices globally. Making IoT management simpler, he said, is what will help the industry move beyond IoT hype to real use cases.

Peggy Smedley Show
All about the Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act

Peggy Smedley Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 13:51


Peggy discusses the Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act, taking a closer look at the deal. She says businesses all across the globe are still grappling with all the disruption left in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic and asks if we are prepared to rebuild our infrastructure. She also discusses: How the infrastructure deal will impact our roads and bridges. How the new legislation combines infrastructure resilience and the impacts of climate change. What this deal ultimately means for rebuilding our infrastructure in the months ahead. peggysmedleyshow.com  (11/16/21 - 746) IoT, Internet of Things, Peggy Smedley, artificial intelligence, machine learning, big data, digital transformation, cybersecurity, blockchain, 5G cloud, sustainability, future of work, podcast

Peggy Smedley Show
Waste and the Climate Crisis

Peggy Smedley Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 31:14


Peggy and Jury Gualandris, associated professor, Ivey Business School, talk about circularity and waste. He explains what waste means for the climate crisis and why it is important—both in terms of negatives and positives—saying methane is a powerful greenhouse gas with 100 years global warming potential, which is 30 times larger than CO2, and that 60% of the total food production is currently wasted in Canada, which mostly happens upstream, and yet waste also represents opportunities. They also discuss: The importance of becoming more aware of consumption expectations. Why people struggle with circularity. Three questions to consider for success. ivey.uwo.ca/sustainability/priorities/circular-economy  (11/16/21 - 746) IoT, Internet of Things, Peggy Smedley, artificial intelligence, machine learning, big data, digital transformation, cybersecurity, blockchain, 5G cloud, sustainability, future of work, podcast, Jury Gualandris, Ivey Business School

Peggy Smedley Show
The Impact of Ransomware

Peggy Smedley Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 19:27


Peggy and Gary Salman, CEO and cofounder, Black Talon Security, talk about how long businesses can be shut down from a cyberattack—and the impact of ransomware. He says it deals with hundreds of attacks and one of the biggest issues is the concept of business continuity. They also discuss: How long a business impacted from ransomware is going to be down. What typically happens following a ransomware attack. Two different types of cyberattacks. blacktalonsecurity.com (11/16/21 - 746) IoT, Internet of Things, Peggy Smedley, artificial intelligence, machine learning, big data, digital transformation, cybersecurity, blockchain, 5G cloud, sustainability, future of work, podcast, Gary Salman, Black Talon Security

Adafruit Industries
Testing out wippersnapper beta I2C sensor support

Adafruit Industries

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 0:53


Oooooh we are SO CLOSE to releasing wippersnapper I2C support! Lots of IoT platforms support analog or digital I/O - but the real stuff is in I2C sensors. We've started adding the scaffolding for I2C sensor support on the staging wippersnapper server. Here I've got a FunHouse board, connected to 'wipper, and when we go to add components there's an AHT20 part available! Next, the server requests an I2C scan to verify a valid address is on the bus, and once we create the component, two new feeds appear: one for temperature and one for humidity. Look at how fast it is to add sensors to an MQTT feed with no code whatsoever! #iot #wippersnapper #esp32 Visit the Adafruit shop online - http://www.adafruit.com ----------------------------------------- LIVE CHAT IS HERE! http://adafru.it/discord Adafruit on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/adafruit Subscribe to Adafruit on YouTube: http://adafru.it/subscribe New tutorials on the Adafruit Learning System: http://learn.adafruit.com/ -----------------------------------------

IoT For All Podcast
When is Cellular IoT Right for Your Use Case? | Kigen's Vincent Korstanje

IoT For All Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 25:29


In this week's episode of the IoT For All Podcast, Kigen CEO Vincent Korstanje joins us to talk about some of the most transformative use cases cellular IoT enables. Vincent gives his insight on some of the biggest considerations to keep in mind when determining if cellular is right for your IoT deployment - including SIM security, the differences between eSIMs and iSIM, and the biggest changes we'll see as 5G adoption continues to grow.Speaking to cellular IoT more generally, Vincent shares what he believes is actually driving the growth of the space, some of the verticals seeing the biggest changes as a result of cellular adoption, and what we can expect from the future of cellular-enabled IoT.Vincent Korstanje is CEO of Kigen, an Arm company. Vincent's mission is to make eSIM and iSIM the foundation of all connected devices, which led him to found the Kigen group in Arm in 2016. Kigen formed into a separate company in October 2020 to drive this vision to secure trillions of connected devices. Vincent worked for Arm for 22 years in which he helped build the UK's leading technology company. Before Arm, Vincent worked at TNO in compiler and security technology.

The Social-Engineer Podcast
Ep. 158 - Security Awareness Series - Don't Act Old And Other Advice with Paul Asadoorian

The Social-Engineer Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 53:59


This month, Chris Hadnagy and Ryan MacDougall are joined by Paul Asadoorian.  Paul is the founder of Security Weekly, a security podcast network. Paul spends time “in the trenches” coding in Python, testing security products and evaluating and implementing open-source software. Paul's career began by implementing security programs for a lottery company and then a large university. As Product Evangelist for Tenable Network Security, Paul also built a library of materials on the topic of vulnerability management. When not hacking IoT devices, web applications or Linux, Paul can be found researching his next set of headphones, devices for smoking meat, and e-bikes. November 15, 2021.  00:00 – Intro  Social-Engineer.com Managed Voice Phishing  Managed Email Phishing  Adversarial Simulations   Social-Engineer channel on SLACK  CLUTCH  innocentlivesfoundation.org  Human Behavior Conference  03:34 – Paul Asadoorian Intro  05:08 – How did you get started in infosec?  13:19 – When did you decide you were going to start a podcast?  24:26 – What have you learned from the guests you've had on your podcasts over all of these years?  27:00 – What is your perspective on the shifting of hacking culture in the community?  34:53 – What are the best qualities someone could have to be attractive to a potential employer in this industry?  37:14 – How do we get the younger generation to have the qualities we are not seeing?  41:38 – Who is your greatest mentor?  Laurie Baker  Stephen Northcutt @ SANS  Ed Skoudis @ SANS  46:00 – Book Recommendations  Code Girls The Phoenix Project The Unicorn Project Countdown to Zero Day The Cuckoo's Egg Cyberpunk 51:00 – Guest Wrap Up  https://securityweekly.com    www.twitter.com/securityweekly  53:31 – Outro  innocentlivesfoundation.org

Radio Free HPC Podcast
Cue The Processor Wars

Radio Free HPC Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2021


In this episode of RadioFreeHPC, Dan, Jessi, and Shahin talk AMD's big swing at NVIDIA and the concept of Metaverse. RadioFreeHPC is produced by a group of concerned helicopter mothers who don't understand why they can't have lunch with their adult kids in the clean room, and distributed in partnership with HPCwire. *Download the MP3 *… Read More »Cue The Processor Wars

The Internet of Things Podcast - Stacey On IoT
Episode 346: Three IoT acquisitions and the infrastructure bill

The Internet of Things Podcast - Stacey On IoT

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 62:09


This week's show focuses on three big deals happening in the IoT sector and a meaty enterprise IoT report. First up, we discuss ADT buying SunPro Solar for $825 million, which represents yet another deal bringing energy management to the smart home. We then talk about Level Home's acquisition, the state of smart home deals, … Continue reading Episode 346: Three IoT acquisitions and the infrastructure bill The post Episode 346: Three IoT acquisitions and the infrastructure bill appeared first on IoT Podcast - Internet of Things.

Smashing Security
251: PrawnHub, Tesla recall, and IoT luggage

Smashing Security

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 41:59


Fishing fanatics find themselves in deep water, Teslas go haywire after an update, and is there actually some good news about IoT? All this and much much more is discussed in the latest edition of the "Smashing Security" podcast by computer security veterans Graham Cluley and Carole Theriault, joined this week by Ken Munro. Visit https://www.smashingsecurity.com/251 to check out this episode's show notes and episode links. Follow the show on Twitter at @SmashinSecurity, or on the Smashing Security subreddit, or visit our website for more episodes. Remember: Follow us on Apple Podcasts, or your favourite podcast app, to catch all of the episodes as they go live. Thanks for listening! Warning: This podcast may contain nuts, adult themes, and rude language. Theme tune: "Vinyl Memories" by Mikael Manvelyan. Assorted sound effects: AudioBlocks. Special Guest: Ken Munro.

The Gary Null Show
The Gary Null Show - 11.10.21

The Gary Null Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 60:31


The Metaverse Is Big Brother in Disguise: Freedom Meted Out by Technological Tyrants   By John W. Whitehead & Nisha Whitehead November 9, 2021 “The term metaverse, like the term meritocracy, was coined in a sci fi dystopia novel written as cautionary tale. Then techies took metaverse, and technocrats took meritocracy, and enthusiastically adopted what was meant to inspire horror.”—Antonio García Martínez Welcome to the Matrix (i.e. the metaverse), where reality is virtual, freedom is only as free as one's technological overlords allow, and artificial intelligence is slowly rendering humanity unnecessary, inferior and obsolete.   Mark Zuckerberg, the CEO of Facebook, sees this digital universe—the metaverse—as the next step in our evolutionary transformation from a human-driven society to a technological one.   Yet while Zuckerberg's vision for this digital frontier has been met with a certain degree of skepticism, the truth—as journalist Antonio García Martínez concludes—is that we're already living in the metaverse.   The metaverse is, in turn, a dystopian meritocracy, where freedom is a conditional construct based on one's worthiness and compliance.   In a meritocracy, rights are privileges, afforded to those who have earned them. There can be no tolerance for independence or individuality in a meritocracy, where political correctness is formalized, legalized and institutionalized. Likewise, there can be no true freedom when the ability to express oneself, move about, engage in commerce and function in society is predicated on the extent to which you're willing to “fit in.”   We are almost at that stage now. Consider that in our present virtue-signaling world where fascism disguises itself as tolerance, the only way to enjoy even a semblance of freedom is by opting to voluntarily censor yourself, comply, conform and march in lockstep with whatever prevailing views dominate.   Fail to do so—by daring to espouse “dangerous” ideas or support unpopular political movements—and you will find yourself shut out of commerce, employment, and society: Facebook will ban you, Twitter will shut you down, Instagram will de-platform you, and your employer will issue ultimatums that force you to choose between your so-called freedoms and economic survival.   This is exactly how Corporate America plans to groom us for a world in which “we the people” are unthinking, unresistant, slavishly obedient automatons in bondage to a Deep State policed by computer algorithms.   Science fiction has become fact.   Twenty-some years after the Wachowskis' iconic film, The Matrix, introduced us to a futuristic world in which humans exist in a computer-simulated non-reality powered by authoritarian machines—a world where the choice between existing in a denial-ridden virtual dream-state or facing up to the harsh, difficult realities of life comes down to a blue pill or a red pill—we stand at the precipice of a technologically-dominated matrix of our own making.   We are living the prequel to The Matrix with each passing day, falling further under the spell of technologically-driven virtual communities, virtual realities and virtual conveniences managed by artificially intelligent machines that are on a fast track to replacing human beings and eventually dominating every aspect of our lives.   In The Matrix, computer programmer Thomas Anderson a.k.a. hacker Neo is wakened from a virtual slumber by Morpheus, a freedom fighter seeking to liberate humanity from a lifelong hibernation state imposed by hyper-advanced artificial intelligence machines that rely on humans as an organic power source. With their minds plugged into a perfectly crafted virtual reality, few humans ever realize they are living in an artificial dream world.   Neo is given a choice: to take the red pill, wake up and join the resistance, or take the blue pill, remain asleep and serve as fodder for the powers-that-be.   Most people opt for the blue pill.   In our case, the blue pill—a one-way ticket to a life sentence in an electronic concentration camp—has been honey-coated to hide the bitter aftertaste, sold to us in the name of expediency and delivered by way of blazingly fast Internet, cell phone signals that never drop a call, thermostats that keep us at the perfect temperature without our having to raise a finger, and entertainment that can be simultaneously streamed to our TVs, tablets and cell phones.   Yet we are not merely in thrall with these technologies that were intended to make our lives easier. We have become enslaved by them.   Look around you. Everywhere you turn, people are so addicted to their internet-connected screen devices—smart phones, tablets, computers, televisions—that they can go for hours at a time submerged in a virtual world where human interaction is filtered through the medium of technology.   This is not freedom. This is not even progress.   This is technological tyranny and iron-fisted control delivered by way of the surveillance state, corporate giants such as Google and Facebook, and government spy agencies such as the National Security Agency.   So consumed are we with availing ourselves of all the latest technologies that we have spared barely a thought for the ramifications of our heedless, headlong stumble towards a world in which our abject reliance on internet-connected gadgets and gizmos is grooming us for a future in which freedom is an illusion.   Yet it's not just freedom that hangs in the balance. Humanity itself is on the line.   If ever Americans find themselves in bondage to technological tyrants, we will have only ourselves to blame for having forged the chains through our own lassitude, laziness and abject reliance on internet-connected gadgets and gizmos that render us wholly irrelevant.   Indeed, we're fast approaching Philip K. Dick's vision of the future as depicted in the film Minority Report. There, police agencies apprehend criminals before they can commit a crime, driverless cars populate the highways, and a person's biometrics are constantly scanned and used to track their movements, target them for advertising, and keep them under perpetual surveillance. Cue the dawning of the Age of the Internet of Things (IoT), in which internet-connected “things” monitor your home, your health and your habits in order to keep your pantry stocked, your utilities regulated and your life under control and relatively worry-free.   The key word here, however, is control.   In the not-too-distant future, “just about every device you have—and even products like chairs, that you don't normally expect to see technology in—will be connected and talking to each other.”   By the end of 2018, “there were an estimated 22 billion internet of things connected devices in use around the world… Forecasts suggest that by 2030 around 50 billion of these IoT devices will be in use around the world, creating a massive web of interconnected devices spanning everything from smartphones to kitchen appliances.”   As the technologies powering these devices have become increasingly sophisticated, they have also become increasingly widespread, encompassing everything from toothbrushes and lightbulbs to cars, smart meters and medical equipment.   It is estimated that 127 new IoT devices are connected to the web every second.   This “connected” industry has become the next big societal transformation, right up there with the Industrial Revolution, a watershed moment in technology and culture.   Between driverless cars that completely lacking a steering wheel, accelerator, or brake pedal, and smart pills embedded with computer chips, sensors, cameras and robots, we are poised to outpace the imaginations of science fiction writers such as Philip K. Dick and Isaac Asimov. (By the way, there is no such thing as a driverless car. Someone or something will be driving, but it won't be you.)   These Internet-connected techno gadgets include smart light bulbs that discourage burglars by making your house look occupied, smart thermostatsthat regulate the temperature of your home based on your activities, and smart doorbells that let you see who is at your front door without leaving the comfort of your couch.   Nest, Google's suite of smart home products, has been at the forefront of the “connected” industry, with such technologically savvy conveniences as a smart lock that tells your thermostat who is home, what temperatures they like, and when your home is unoccupied; a home phone service system that interacts with your connected devices to “learn when you come and go” and alert you if your kids don't come home; and a sleep system that will monitor when you fall asleep, when you wake up, and keep the house noises and temperature in a sleep-conducive state.   The aim of these internet-connected devices, as Nest proclaims, is to make “your house a more thoughtful and conscious home.” For example, your car can signal ahead that you're on your way home, while Hue lights can flash on and off to get your attention if Nest Protect senses something's wrong. Your coffeemaker, relying on data from fitness and sleep sensors, will brew a stronger pot of coffee for you if you've had a restless night.   Yet given the speed and trajectory at which these technologies are developing, it won't be long before these devices are operating entirely independent of their human creators, which poses a whole new set of worries. As technology expert Nicholas Carr notes, “As soon as you allow robots, or software programs, to act freely in the world, they're going to run up against ethically fraught situations and face hard choices that can't be resolved through statistical models. That will be true of self-driving cars, self-flying drones, and battlefield robots, just as it's already true, on a lesser scale, with automated vacuum cleaners and lawnmowers.”   For instance, just as the robotic vacuum, Roomba, “makes no distinction between a dust bunny and an insect,” weaponized drones will be incapable of distinguishing between a fleeing criminal and someone merely jogging down a street. For that matter, how do you defend yourself against a robotic cop—such as the Atlas android being developed by the Pentagon—that has been programmed to respond to any perceived threat with violence?   Moreover, it's not just our homes and personal devices that are being reordered and reimagined in this connected age: it's our workplaces, our health systems, our government, our bodies and our innermost thoughts that are being plugged into a matrix over which we have no real control.   It is expected that by 2030, we will all experience The Internet of Senses (IoS), enabled by Artificial Intelligence (AI), Virtual Reality (VR), Augmented Reality (AR), 5G, and automation. The Internet of Senses relies on connected technology interacting with our senses of sight, sound, taste, smell, and touch by way of the brain as the user interface. As journalist Susan Fourtane explains: Many predict that by 2030, the lines between thinking and doing will blur. Fifty-nine percent of consumers believe that we will be able to see map routes on VR glasses by simply thinking of a destination… By 2030, technology is set to respond to our thoughts, and even share them with others… Using the brain as an interface could mean the end of keyboards, mice, game controllers, and ultimately user interfaces for any digital device. The user needs to only think about the commands, and they will just happen. Smartphones could even function without touch screens. In other words, the IoS will rely on technology being able to access and act on your thoughts.   Fourtane outlines several trends related to the IoS that are expected to become a reality by 2030: 1: Thoughts become action: using the brain as the interface, for example, users will be able to see map routes on VR glasses by simply thinking of a destination.   2: Sounds will become an extension of the devised virtual reality: users could mimic anyone's voice realistically enough to fool even family members.   3: Real food will become secondary to imagined tastes. A sensory device for your mouth could digitally enhance anything you eat, so that any food can taste like your favorite treat.   4: Smells will become a projection of this virtual reality so that virtual visits, to forests or the countryside for instance, would include experiencing all the natural smells of those places.   5: Total touch: Smartphones with screens will convey the shape and texture of the digital icons and buttons they are pressing.   6: Merged reality: VR game worlds will become indistinguishable from physical reality by 2030. This is the metaverse, wrapped up in the siren-song of convenience and sold to us as the secret to success, entertainment and happiness.   It's a false promise, a wicked trap to snare us, with a single objective: total control.   George Orwell understood this.   Orwell's masterpiece, 1984, portrays a global society of total control in which people are not allowed to have thoughts that in any way disagree with the corporate state. There is no personal freedom, and advanced technology has become the driving force behind a surveillance-driven society. Snitches and cameras are everywhere. And people are subject to the Thought Police, who deal with anyone guilty of thought crimes. The government, or “Party,” is headed by Big Brother, who appears on posters everywhere with the words: “Big Brother is watching you.”  

The Logistics of Logistics Podcast
Supply Chain: Cash or Trash with Seth Page

The Logistics of Logistics Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 71:27


Supply Chain: Cash or Trash with Seth Page Seth Page and Joe Lynch discuss supply chain: cash or trash. Seth is the COO of TroughPut.ai, an artificial intelligence (AI) supply chain pioneer that enables companies to detect, prioritize and alleviate dynamic operational bottlenecks in real-time. Webinar - Demand Planning in VUCA Times with Ali Raza About Seth Page Seth Page is a senior technology executive, 8x entrepreneur, operator and cross-border deal-making expert who seamlessly bridges the worlds of technology, operations and finance. An expert in equity investments and scaling start-ups to venture-capital backed high-growth companies and into successful exits, divestitures, and IPO trajectories. Deep, hands-on technology roots underpin over two decades of business development, operations and venture activity. Tech pioneer and founder providing deal flow origination for angels, venture capital firms, corporations and family offices in diverse yet interconnected areas including Industrial AI, IOT, Artificial Intelligence, Machine Learning, Data Science, Operations Technology, Enterprise, Telecommunications,  Security & Access Control. He has founded, funded, scaled and exited multiple start-ups for investors, including: ThroughPut.ai; DataRPM (acquired: Progress); UniKey; PV Media Group (acquired: RhythmOne / Blinkx); RayV (acquired: Yahoo); Oyster Optics (acquired: Techquity); AdOnNetwork (acquired: PVMG); Trade.com (acquired: ABM AMRO); as well as deals including Xoom.com (IPO & acquired: NBC); LendingTree (IPO & acquired: IAC); Fetchback (acquired: eBay / GSI); Samsung (acquired: mSpot); xanox (joint acquisition by Axel Springer and PubliGroupe); Litronic (acquired Pulsar & IPO), and many other transactions. Seth earned an Executive MBA with honors in International Business from the Thunderbird School of Global Management, as well as a BS in Economics and a BS in German Linguistics & Literature, both from the University of California, Irvine, as well as a scholarship to study Volkswirtschaft and Germanistik at the Georg-August-Universität in Göttingen, Germany. About ThroughPut Inc ThroughPut.ai is a Silicon Valley-based Supply Chain AI leader that puts Industrial Material Flow on Autopilot by leveraging existing Enterprise Data to achieve superior Business, Operations, Financial and Sustainability Results. ThroughPut's AI-powered Supply Chain software predicts Demand, reorients Production Capacity, reassigns Warehouse Space, and reorders Materials optimally, so businesses minimize overpromising and under-delivering. By way of ThroughPut's Supply Chain AI Orchestration software that sits on top of existing data architectures, ThroughPut improves material flow and free-cash-flow across the entire end-to-end value chain more than 5-times faster than leading contemporary solutions. The founding team is led by seasoned serial entrepreneurs with real-world AI, Supply Chain, Manufacturing, Transportation and Operational experience, from the shop-floor to the top-floor, at leading Fortune 500 Industrial Companies & pioneering Enterprise Technology companies. Key Takeaways: Supply Chain: Cash or Trash Seth Page is the COO of ThroughPut.ai, an artificial intelligence (AI) supply chain pioneer that enables companies to detect, prioritize and alleviate dynamic operational bottlenecks in real-time. In the podcast interview, Joe and Seth discuss the enormous waste in supply chains. While supply chains create all the wonderful goods and services we enjoy, they also produce a lot of waste. Approximately one-third of supply chain output is waste – it adds no value for anyone. The waste is horrible for bottom lines and the environment. According to Boston Consulting Group's recent report, 80% of greenhouse gases are created by supply chains so to improve sustainability and profitability, companies must address the waste in the supply chain. The waste occurs because supply chain data is in separate silos and decisions are made to optimize locally – not globally. In other words, each player in the supply chain makes a rational decision based on the information that they have. While that decision might be good for their organization, it might be a bad for the end-to-end supply chain. Supply chain practitioners make decisions using faulty forecasts, old assumptions, and outdated tools. ThroughPut provides an integrated view of company-wide operations by pulling data from all of your disparate systems. Throughput can identify and manage constraints to free cash flow, while meeting revenue targets with output. To make better decisions, supply chain practitioners need demand sensing with real-time intelligence that can be used to create better demand forecasts. With demand sensing, companies can easily predict near-future demand patterns to streamline the flow of materials, processes, output, and free cash flow across your integrated supply chain. Seth and the team at ThroughPut unlock operations agility and efficiency, to meet unpredictable customer demands, while creating uninterrupted flow of materials through supply chain networks. This approach minimizes waste and maximizes profitability. Learn More About Supply Chain: Cash or Trash Seth Page LinkedIn Throughput.ai The New Retail Paradigm with Ali Raza Putting Supply Chains on Autopilot with Ali Raza Webinar - Demand Planning in VUCA Times with Ali Raza The Logistics of Logistics Podcast If you enjoy the podcast, please leave a positive review, subscribe, and share it with your friends and colleagues. The Logistics of Logistics Podcast: Google, Apple, Castbox, Spotify, Stitcher, PlayerFM, Tunein, Podbean, Owltail, Libsyn, Overcast Check out The Logistics of Logistics on Youtube

Connected & Ready
5G powers a new era for IoT and edge computing, with Neha Gandhi Vijay

Connected & Ready

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 26:37


Gemma Milne talks with AT&T's Assistant VP of Strategic Alliances, Neha Gandhi Vijay, about understanding edge computing in the context of IoT and 5G, which industries and verticals AT&T is exploring opportunities with 5G and edge computing, business use cases for IoT apps, and how AT&T's partnership with Microsoft to provide cloud services is helping make it all possible.  Topics of discussionDefining edge computing in relation to IoT and 5G (02:24)The impact of edge computing on day-to-day operations and end users (04:33)Understanding network slicing (13:54)How the threat landscape for IoT, edge, and 5G differs from other environments (15:26)The impact of AI and machine learning on 5G offerings and the cybersecurity they need (17:09)The partnership between AT&T and Microsoft (18:31)The barriers to fulfilling the potential of these technologies and what people can do to overcome them (23:14) About Neha Gandhi Vijay:Neha is the Assistant Vice President of Strategic Alliances at AT&T. She leads business development and go-to-market initiatives across 5G, edge computing, and IoT with Microsoft and systems integrators. She is a passionate leader with a proven track record of driving business growth by connecting strategy to execution through strategic partnerships. While at AT&T, Neha has spent 10 years in the IoT space in multiple roles and is now helping the company drive new solutions to market with 5G and edge computing for enterprise customers. Previously, Neha worked in the healthcare and manufacturing industries in both strategic planning and operational excellence roles. Neha holds a bachelor of science degree in systems engineering from Washington University in St. Louis, a master's degree in industrial engineering from Georgia Tech, and an MBA from Emory University.  Learn more:https://www.linkedin.com/in/neha-gandhi-vijay-55148912/ Sponsor linkMicrosoft Dynamics 365 Supply Chain Management helps businesses build agile, connected, and resilient supply chains to effectively meet changing customer demand and ensure business continuity during times of disruption. Using predictive insights powered by AI and IoT, Dynamics 365 helps streamline operations to maximize efficiency, product quality, and profitability. Request a live demo today:https://aka.ms/AA8l720 Contact usEmail: connectedandready@microsoft.com Follow us on social mediaTwitter: https://twitter.com/msftdynamics365LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/showcase/microsoft-dynamicsYouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCJGCg4rB3QSs8y_1FquelBQ

Futurized
Health Tech Reboot

Futurized

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 31:16


In episode 147 of the Futurized podcast (@futurized2), the topic is: Health Tech Reboot. Today, I have no guest. Instead, I'm talking about my new book, Health Tech: Rebooting Society's Software, Hardware and Mindset. In this episode, I answer the following questions, which typically are asked of authors: Tell us a little bit about yourself and your background and how it's relevant to the topic of the book? Why did you write this book? How did you come up with the title for your book? What's your message? Who should read it? What are are people saying about your book so far? Would you read us an excerpt from the book? Can you take us through some key chapters? How long on average does it take you to write a book? What was the most challenging aspect of writing this book? How much research did you need to do for your book? Futurized goes beneath the trends to track the underlying forces of disruption in tech, policy, business models, social dynamics and the environment. I'm your host, Trond Arne Undheim (@trondau), futurist, author, investor, and serial entrepreneur. Join me as I discuss the societal impact of deep tech such as AI, blockchain, IoT, nanotech, quantum, robotics, and synthetic biology, and tackle topics such as entrepreneurship, trends, or the future of work. On the show, I interview smart people with a soul: founders, authors, executives, and other thought leaders, or even the occasional celebrity. Futurized is a bi-weekly show, preparing YOU to think about how to deal with the next decade's disruption, so you can succeed and thrive no matter what happens. Futurized—conversations that matter. If you're new to the show, seek particular topics, or you are looking for a great way to tell your friends about the show, which we always appreciate, we've got the episode categories. Those are at Futurized.org/episodes. They are collections of your favorite episodes organized by topic, such as Entrepreneurship, Trends, Emerging Tech, or The Future of Work. That'll help new listeners get a taste of everything that we do here, starting with a topic they are familiar with, or want to go deeper in. The host of this podcast, Trond Arne Undheim, Ph.D is the author of Health Tech: Rebooting Society's Software, Hardware and Mindset--published by Routledge in 2021, Future Tech: How to Capture Value from Disruptive industry Trends--published by Kogan Page in 2021, Pandemic Aftermath: how Coronavirus changes Global Society and Disruption Games: How to Thrive on Serial Failure (2020)--both published by Atmosphere Press in 2020, Leadership From Below: How the Internet Generation Redefines the Workplace by Lulu Press in 2008. For an overview, go to Trond's Books at Trondundheim.com/books At this stage, Futurized is lucky enough to have several sponsors. To check them out, go to Sponsors | Futurized - thoughts on our emerging future. If you are interested in sponsoring the podcast, or to get an overview of other services provided by the host of this podcast, including how to book him for keynote speeches, please go to Store | Futurized - thoughts on our emerging future. We will consider all brands that have a demonstrably positive contribution to the future. Before you do anything else, make sure you are subscribed to our newsletter on Futurized.org, where you can find hundreds of episodes of conversations that matter to the future. I hope you can also leave a positive review on iTunes or in your favorite podcast player--it really matters to the future of this podcast. If you like this topic, you may enjoy other episodes of Futurized, such as episode 120, Regenerative Medicine, episode 100, The Future of Medicine is Invisible, or episode 17, Pandemic Aftermath: Introduction. Hopefully, you'll find something awesome in these or other episodes. If so, do let us know by messaging us, we would love to share your thoughts with other listeners.   Futurized is created in association with Yegii, the insight network. Yegii lets clients create multidisciplinary dream teams consisting of a subject matter experts, academics, consultants, data scientists, and generalists as team leaders. Yegii's services include speeches, briefings, seminars, reports and ongoing monitoring. You can find Yegii at Yegii.org. The Futurized team consists of podcast host and sound technician Trond Arne Undheim, videographer Raul Edward D'Trewethan, and podcast marketer Nahin Israfil Hossain. Please share this show with those you care about. To find us on social media is easy, we are Futurized on LinkedIn and YouTube and Futurized2 on Instagram and Twitter: Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/futurized2/ Twitter (@Futurized2): https://twitter.com/Futurized2 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Futurized-102998138625787 LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/futurized YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/Futurized Podcast RSS: https://feed.podbean.com/www.futurized.co/feed.xml See you next time. Futurized—conversations that matter.

IoT For All Podcast
The Costs and Challenges of Scaling IoT for Success | Prescient Devices, Founder & CEO Andy Wang

IoT For All Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 27:55


In this episode of the IoT For All Podcast, Prescient Devices's Founder & CEO Andy Wang joins us to talk about the challenges companies face when scaling IoT and advice to help overcome speed bumps and roadblocks in the way. Andy also shares the factors that contribute most to successful IoT adoption.Dr. Andy Wang is a technologist and entrepreneur with over 20 years of experience. He is currently the founder and CEO of Prescient Devices, an MIT startup providing the industry-leading low-code IoT solutions platform. Previously, he was the co-founder and CTO of GTI IoT Technology, which built low-power wireless IoT systems for industrial and smart-city applications. Andy is an expert in communication systems and integrated circuit design. He graduated with a Ph.D. degree from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.Interested in connecting with Andy Wang? Reach out to him on Linkedin!About Prescient Devices: Prescient Devices, Inc (PDI) empowers enterprise engineering teams with an open ecosystem to accelerate IoT development. Focusing on delivering the next wave of innovation within manufacturing, smart buildings, energy, utilities, and intelligent transportation, PDI's distributed low-code software enables enterprise engineers, system integrators, and data scientists to build sensor-to-cloud IoT and edge computing solutions, with simplicity and scalability.Key Questions and Topics from this Episode:(02:00) Intro to Prescient Devices, Inc.(08:00) Can you share some use cases for your technology?(09:57) What are the biggest challenges for IoT companies hoping to get their deployments off the ground?(12:30) Where are the biggest costs in developing an IoT solution?(13:44) What factors contribute the most to an IoT project's success?(18:52) How do you approach educating the market on what IoT can do? How do you advise other companies to approach that topic?

Leaders in the Trenches
Leading Through Challenges with Steve Latham at Banyan Hills Technologies

Leaders in the Trenches

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 25:06


Every business goes through difficult times. Leading through challenges is part of the job. Discover the strategies that will help you be a more effective leader. Today's guest is Steve Latham, CEO and Founder at Banyan Hills Technologies. Inc Magazine ranked his company #4651 on the 2020 Inc 5000 list. Banyan Hills Technologies is an IoT company and a trusted partner for innovative software solutions. Steve gives you his strategies when leading through challenges. We look at what happens during the hard moments of leadership. This interview will help you when you are leading through challenges. Get the show notes for Leading Through Challenges with Steve Latham at Banyan Hills Technologies Click to Tweet: Listening to a fantastic episode on Growth Think Tank featuring #NourBaki with your host @GeneHammett https://bit.ly/gttSteveLatham #LeadingThroughChallenges #GeneHammettPodcast #GHepisode809 #GTTepisodes #Podcasts #IncList2021 #IoTCompany Give Growth Think Tank a review on iTunes!

IT Career Energizer
317: Always Be Learning and Don't Be Afraid To Change with Rob Rastovich

IT Career Energizer

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 32:16


In this week's show, Phil talks to Rob Rastovich, the Chief Technical Officer at ThingLogix, a provider of Internet of Things solutions, solution components and advisory services. He has been actively involved in technology for nearly 30 years including what is now known as Amazon's AWS IoT. As CTO of ThingLogix he is the chief architect behind the company's ground-breaking IoT platform that eliminates the need for code. Rob talks about the importance of continual learning and how it can advance our IT career paths. He also discusses why we must never feel boxed in by the career we choose, and why it's okay to follow our passions into other fields.   KEY TAKEAWAYS:   TOP CAREER TIP We must always be learning. The IT industry is never static, and so we must endeavour to keep abreast of what's new, and master the skills and tools that push us forward.   WORST CAREER MOMENT While working on a job, Rob accidentally deleted some invaluable information on a server. It taught him to always make sure that he is aware of the consequences of every command entered.   CAREER HIGHLIGHT The Amazon acquisition was a particular highlight. The early development of these systems were a period of experimentation and discovery, and provided much insight and motivation.   THE FUTURE OF CAREERS IN I.T The disappearing of laptops, computers and browsers, and the advancements that will replace them. The internet will become less of a service that we plug into, and something that becomes more ubiquitous – more device agnostic.   THE REVEAL What first attracted you to a career in I.T.? – After his first successful attempts at coding, Rob was hooked. What's the best career advice you received? – To go all in on ideas, and never live with any regrets. What's the worst career advice you received? – That Rob would be paid when the company went IPO. What would you do if you started your career now? –To have focused more time looking at the possibilities of cloud computing. What are your current career objectives? – Rob is focusing on stepping back from the cutting edge of innovation, and spending more time in guiding the next generation of thinkers and dreamers. What's your number one non-technical skill? – Ranching has taught Rob the value of balance. How do you keep your own career energized? – Rob is always researching and looking for the next big thing. What do you do away from technology? – Rob spends his time on his ranch, and enjoys outdoor pursuits.   FINAL CAREER TIP Rid yourself of the idea that your career path is permanent. Remain fluid, and if you find diversions that thrill you more than the path you're already on, follow your heart and diversify.   BEST MOMENTS  (6:37) – Rob - “The ability to discern and learn and absorb quickly has been the cornerstone for me” (6:50) – Rob - “That's a skill that you learn – how to learn” (15:09) – Rob – “Being on the cutting edge is fun and exciting, but it's not as profitable as being right behind that” (18:55) – Rob – “Shoot for the stars, and if you miss you'll end up on the moon”   ABOUT THE HOST – PHIL BURGESS  Phil Burgess is an independent IT consultant who has spent the last 20 years helping organizations to design, develop, and implement software solutions.  Phil has always had an interest in helping others to develop and advance their careers.  And in 2017 Phil started the I.T. Career Energizer podcast to try to help as many people as possible to learn from the career advice and experiences of those that have been, and still are, on that same career journey.   CONTACT THE HOST – PHIL BURGESS Phil can be contacted through the following Social Media platforms: Twitter: https://twitter.com/_PhilBurgess LinkedIn: https://uk.linkedin.com/in/philburgess Instagram: https://instagram.com/_philburgess Website: https://itcareerenergizer.com/contact Phil is also reachable by email at phil@itcareerenergizer.com and via the podcast's website, https://itcareerenergizer.com Join the I.T. Career Energizer Community on Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/groups/ITCareerEnergizer   ABOUT THE GUEST – ROB RASTOVICH Rob Rastovich is the Chief Technical Officer at ThingLogix, a provider of Internet of Things solutions, solution components and advisory services. He has been actively involved in technology for nearly 30 years including what is now known as Amazon's AWS IoT. As CTO of ThingLogix he is the chief architect behind the company's ground-breaking IoT platform that eliminates the need for code.   CONTACT THE GUEST – ROB RASTOVICH Rob Rastovich can be contacted through the following Social Media platforms: Twitter: https://twitter.com/thinglogix LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/rob-rastovich-1560532/ Website: https://www.thinglogix.com/