Podcast appearances and mentions of John Yang

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  • 26PODCASTS
  • 247EPISODES
  • 9mAVG DURATION
  • 5WEEKLY NEW EPISODES
  • Oct 14, 2021LATEST

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Best podcasts about John Yang

Latest podcast episodes about John Yang

PBS NewsHour - Segments
Benton Harbor's water has had excess lead for years. Residents are only now receiving help

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 6:39


Residents in Michigan's Benton Harbor -- a predominantly Black city -- have been advised to only use bottled water for things like cooking and bathing due to lead contamination. The warning comes just a few years after Flint's water crisis was discovered. But this is not a new discovery. Benton Harbor has detected elevated levels of lead in its water supply for years. John Yang reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - Health
Benton Harbor's water has had excess lead for years. Residents are only now receiving help

PBS NewsHour - Health

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 6:39


Residents in Michigan's Benton Harbor -- a predominantly Black city -- have been advised to only use bottled water for things like cooking and bathing due to lead contamination. The warning comes just a few years after Flint's water crisis was discovered. But this is not a new discovery. Benton Harbor has detected elevated levels of lead in its water supply for years. John Yang reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - Segments
2 reasons why Boston Marathon bomber case is being heard in the Supreme Court

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 5:20


With all nine justices back in the courtroom Wednesday, the U.S. Supreme Court heard oral arguments in the case of the Boston Marathon bomber Dzhokhar Tsarnaev's death sentence, eight years after the attack. John Yang reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - Health
Rural U.S. hospitals stretched thin after nurse shortage exacerbated by the pandemic

PBS NewsHour - Health

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 7:41


Nursing shortages are impacting healthcare workers and hospitals across the United States. In just the past few days, nurses and other workers in Southern California and Oregon authorized a potential strike against provider Kaiser Permanente. Staffing shortages are part of those disputes. John Yang reports from South Florida on how shortages are affecting hospitals there. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - Segments
Rural U.S. hospitals stretched thin after nurse shortage exacerbated by the pandemic

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 7:41


Nursing shortages are impacting healthcare workers and hospitals across the United States. In just the past few days, nurses and other workers in Southern California and Oregon authorized a potential strike against provider Kaiser Permanente. Staffing shortages are part of those disputes. John Yang reports from South Florida on how shortages are affecting hospitals there. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - Supreme Court
Supreme Court resumes in-person arguments with abortion, guns, religious freedom on agenda

PBS NewsHour - Supreme Court

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 7:01


The Supreme Court returned to the courtroom Monday morning to hear its first oral arguments of the new term in-person. The cases set for argument this term could make it one of the most contentious in many years. Marcia Coyle, chief Washington correspondent for The National Law Journal, was one of the two dozen reporters in the courtroom and joins John Yang with more. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - Segments
Supreme Court resumes in-person arguments with abortion, guns, religious freedom on agenda

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 7:01


The Supreme Court returned to the courtroom Monday morning to hear its first oral arguments of the new term in person. The cases set for argument this term could make it one of the most contentious in many years. Marcia Coyle, chief Washington correspondent for The National Law Journal, was one of the two dozen reporters in the courtroom and joins John Yang with more. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - Segments
Here's what contributed to the extinction of ivory-billed woodpecker, 22 other species

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 5:07


The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service proposed moving 23 animals and plants off the endangered species list, declaring them extinct. Perhaps the most well-known of the species deemed gone forever is the ivory-billed woodpecker. These extinctions are part of an accelerating crisis driven by human actions. John Yang and Tierra Curry, a senior scientist at the Center for Biological Diversity, discuss. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - World
Here's what contributed to the extinction of ivory-billed woodpecker, 22 other species

PBS NewsHour - World

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 5:07


The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service proposed moving 23 animals and plants off the endangered species list, declaring them extinct. Perhaps the most well-known of the species deemed gone forever is the ivory-billed woodpecker. These extinctions are part of an accelerating crisis driven by human actions. John Yang and Tierra Curry, a senior scientist at the Center for Biological Diversity, discuss. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - Science
Here's what contributed to the extinction of ivory-billed woodpecker, 22 other species

PBS NewsHour - Science

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 5:07


The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service proposed moving 23 animals and plants off the endangered species list, declaring them extinct. Perhaps the most well-known of the species deemed gone forever is the ivory-billed woodpecker. These extinctions are part of an accelerating crisis driven by human actions. John Yang and Tierra Curry, a senior scientist at the Center for Biological Diversity, discuss. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - Health
New York hospitals, nursing homes offer vaccine incentives and brace for staff shortages

PBS NewsHour - Health

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 7:15


New York became the first U.S. state to require all healthcare workers to get a COVID-19 vaccine -- or face being fired. And the governor's office reported more than 90% of 450,000 hospital and nursing home staff and other healthcare workers have now received at least one shot. But, as John Yang reports, many hospitals are bracing for staff shortages if they have to lay off unvaccinated workers. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - Segments
New York hospitals, nursing homes offer vaccine incentives and brace for staff shortages

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 7:15


New York became the first U.S. state to require all healthcare workers to get a COVID-19 vaccine -- or face being fired. And the governor's office reported more than 90% of 450,000 hospital and nursing home staff and other healthcare workers have now received at least one shot. But, as John Yang reports, many hospitals are bracing for staff shortages if they have to lay off unvaccinated workers. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - Health
Inmates released to home confinement during pandemic fear 'devastating' reincarceration

PBS NewsHour - Health

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 8:14


Since the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic, the Justice Department has released more than 30,000 non-violent inmates to home confinement to try to limit the virus' spread in prison. But, as John Yang reports for our ongoing "Searching for Justice" series, some of these men and women could be forced to return to prison once the pandemic ends. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - Segments
Inmates released to home confinement during pandemic fear 'devastating' reincarceration

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 8:14


Since the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic, the Justice Department has released more than 30,000 non-violent inmates to home confinement to try to limit the virus' spread in prison. But, as John Yang reports for our ongoing "Searching for Justice" series, some of these men and women could be forced to return to prison once the pandemic ends. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - Segments
Facebook probe looks at how the company handles its 'negative side effects'

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2021 7:32


The social media giant Facebook is the subject of a Wall Street Journal investigative series out this week that highlights the ways in which Facebook handles -- or doesn't handle -- a range of issues across its vast digital empire including misinformation and violent content. John Yang spoke with Jeff Horwitz, the series' lead reporter, to learn more. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - Segments
Brooks and Capehart on the anniversary of 9/11, the politics of vaccinations

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2021 13:02


New York Times columnist David Brooks and Washington Post columnist Jonathan Capehart join John Yang to discuss the week in politics, including the anniversary of 9/11, the politics of vaccinations and California's recall election. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - Shields and Brooks
Brooks and Capehart on the anniversary of 9/11, the politics of vaccinations

PBS NewsHour - Shields and Brooks

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2021 13:02


New York Times columnist David Brooks and Washington Post columnist Jonathan Capehart join John Yang to discuss the week in politics, including the anniversary of 9/11, the politics of vaccinations and California's recall election. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - Politics
Brooks and Capehart on the anniversary of 9/11, the politics of vaccinations

PBS NewsHour - Politics

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2021 13:02


New York Times columnist David Brooks and Washington Post columnist Jonathan Capehart join John Yang to discuss the week in politics, including the anniversary of 9/11, the politics of vaccinations and California's recall election. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - Segments
Teens facing off at U.S. Open final create 'fairy tale moment' for tennis fans

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2021 5:30


Saturday's U.S. Open women's singles championship match will be a fairy tale ending no matter who wins. The finalists are 19-year-old Leylah Fernandez, of Canada, and 18 -year-old Emma Raducanu, of Britain, both of whom were relatively unknown just a couple of weeks ago. Stacey Allaster, the U.S. Open tournament director, joins John Yang to discuss. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - Segments
NYC's first responders reflect on the trauma of both 9/11 and COVID-19

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2021 9:01


For our endeavor to mark the 20th anniversary of the Sept. 11 attacks, John Yang spoke to first responders and medical workers who have lived and worked through both the attacks and have also more recently seen the mass trauma from COVID-19 in the city that was the epicenter of both: New York. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - Health
New York's 9/11 first responders are battling a new kind of mass trauma

PBS NewsHour - Health

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2021 9:01


For our endeavor to mark the 20th anniversary of the Sept. 11 attacks, John Yang spoke to first responders and medical workers who have lived and worked through both the attacks and have also more recently seen the mass trauma from COVID-19 in the city that was the epicenter of both: New York. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - Politics Monday
Tamara Keith and Amy Walter on child tax credit, abortion

PBS NewsHour - Politics Monday

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2021 6:55


NPR's Tamara Keith and Amy Walter of the Cook Political Report join John Yang to discuss the latest political news, including the federal increase in SNAP benefits, the child tax credit, Texas' abortion law and how it could impact midterm elections. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - Politics
Tamara Keith and Amy Walter on child tax credit, abortion

PBS NewsHour - Politics

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2021 6:55


NPR's Tamara Keith and Amy Walter of the Cook Political Report join John Yang to discuss the latest political news, including the federal increase in SNAP benefits, the child tax credit, Texas' abortion law and how it could impact midterm elections. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - Segments
Tamara Keith and Amy Walter on child tax credit, abortion

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2021 6:55


NPR's Tamara Keith and Amy Walter of the Cook Political Report join John Yang to discuss the latest political news, including the federal increase in SNAP benefits, the child tax credit, Texas' abortion law and how it could impact midterm elections. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - Health
Texas women seeking abortions after 6 weeks have few out-of-state options

PBS NewsHour - Health

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2021 5:27


In Texas, abortions have all but ended after a late-night decision from the U.S. Supreme Court that kept in effect a new state law banning the procedure once a fetal heartbeat is detected, about 6 weeks into a pregnancy. While abortion rights advocates try to figure out their next legal step, anti-abortion activists are preparing for their role as enforcers of the new law. John Yang reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - Segments
Texas women seeking abortions after 6 weeks have few out-of-state options

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2021 5:27


In Texas, abortions have all but ended after a late-night decision from the U.S. Supreme Court that kept in effect a new state law banning the procedure once a fetal heartbeat is detected, about 6 weeks into a pregnancy. While abortion rights advocates try to figure out their next legal step, anti-abortion activists are preparing for their role as enforcers of the new law. John Yang reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - Segments
Texas is using sovereign immunity to restrict abortions. Why is the Supreme Court silent?

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2021 5:13


A restrictive abortion law in Texas went into effect Wednesday after the Supreme Court failed to respond to an emergency plea to intervene before midnight. Texas has now banned most abortions after the 6th week of pregnancy. The law also empowers private citizens to file lawsuits against anyone who helps another person get an abortion, and is the most restrictive in the nation. John Yang reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - Segments
'I can't take care of you': Louisiana's Jefferson Parish struggles with rescue resources

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2021 4:32


Louisiana's Jefferson Parish has been particularly hard hit by Hurricane Ida. John Yang speaks with Parish President Cynthia Lee Sheng, who had been out surveying the damage. She said first responders still haven't reached one barrier island town in her parish, where residents are in dire need. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - Segments
Sen. Cassidy: Hurricane Ida shows need for infrastructure investment -- including broadband

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2021 5:45


Rebuilding and recovery from Hurricane Ida is going to be a long-term proposition and could be an expensive undertaking. For those whom the hurricane has displaced, basic necessities like power and water are gone, and fuel is running low. Louisiana Sen. Bill Cassidy joins John Yang to discuss relief and rebuilding efforts, and how Congress needs to invest in mitigating natural disasters. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - Segments
16 years after Hurricane Katrina, Ida takes 'significant' toll on Louisiana

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2021 14:22


Hurricane Ida tore through Southeastern Louisiana's cities and towns, flooding streets and ripping apart buildings and homes, killing at least two people. Crews are still trying to assess its full impact. Electricity remains out in New Orleans and surrounding areas for more than 800,000 customers, and it's not clear when it will be restored. John Yang begins our coverage with this report. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - Segments
What to know about the eviction moratorium as it nears expiration again

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2021 5:25


The clock is ticking away again for those who could face eviction this fall. The CDC's pandemic moratorium on evictions is set to expire in early October -- or possibly even sooner. The Biden administration is pushing states, cities, and counties to tap into more federal aid, and get it to those who need it. But as John Yang reports, new data shows those efforts are moving much slower than needed. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - World
10 days after devastating Haiti earthquake, many survivors finally get medical attention

PBS NewsHour - World

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2021 3:29


In Haiti, the death toll from this month's 7.2 magnitude earthquake continues to rise. More than 2,200 people are confirmed dead, with 344 still missing. John Yang reports on how the earthquake has led to a new set of challenges for Haitians. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - Segments
10 days after devastating Haiti earthquake, many survivors finally get medical attention

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2021 3:29


In Haiti, the death toll from this month's 7.2 magnitude earthquake continues to rise. More than 2,200 people are confirmed dead, with 344 still missing. John Yang reports on how the earthquake has led to a new set of challenges for Haitians. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - Segments
Examining the politicization of school mask mandates in Florida's Broward County

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 20, 2021 7:34


Students returned to school in a number of states this week amid a new surge of COVID cases and a fierce battle over mask mandates. Republican governors in states like Arizona and Texas have tried to stop school districts from mandating face masks, drawing sharp criticism from some parents and educators, and action from the white house. John Yang reports from Florida, the epicenter of this debate. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

Research To Practice | Oncology Videos
Gastrointestinal Cancers | Meet The Professor: Optimizing the Selection and Sequencing of Therapy for Patients with Advanced Gastrointestinal Cancers — Issue 1

Research To Practice | Oncology Videos

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 18, 2021 58:02


Featuring perspectives from Dr Kristen K Ciombor, including the following topics: Metastatic Colon Cancer Cases Introduction (0:00) A man in his late 50s with metastatic colon cancer — RAS and BRAF wild type, microsatellite stable (MSS) — Rahul Gosain, MD (2:32) A woman in her mid-60s with metastatic colon cancer — BRAF V600E mutation, high microsatellite instability — John Yang, MD (18:56) Metastatic Gastroesophageal Adenocarcinoma Cases A man in his early 70s with metastatic HER2-positive gastroesophageal junction adenocarcinoma — MSS, PD-L1 combined positive score 1 — Laurie Matt-Amaral, MD, MPH (28:47) A woman in her early 40s with metastatic gastroesophageal adenocarcinoma and a history of acute lymphocytic leukemia and melanoma — Erik J Rupard, MD (35:45) Recurrent Hepatocellular Carcinoma (HCC) Cases A man in his early 80s with recurrent, unresectable Child-Pugh A HCC — Farshid Dayyani, MD, PhD (43:47) A woman in her early 60s with recurrent Child-Pugh B HCC with liver cirrhosis and elevated AFP (alpha-fetoprotein) — Mamta Choksi, MD (49:08) Beyond the Guidelines; Key Data from HCC Trials(53:17) CME information and select publications

PBS NewsHour - Segments
Afghans fear Taliban retribution as group expands control, executes critics

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2021 6:13


The Taliban's surge is threatening major urban centers across Afghanistan. Meanwhile, the sense of panic is growing as more Afghans were granted permission to resettle in the United States. Special correspondent Jane Ferguson joins John Yang with updates on this fast-evolving situation. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - World
Afghans fear Taliban retribution as group expands control, executes critics

PBS NewsHour - World

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2021 6:13


The Taliban's surge is threatening major urban centers across Afghanistan. Meanwhile, the sense of panic is growing as more Afghans were granted permission to resettle in the United States. Special correspondent Jane Ferguson joins John Yang with updates on this fast-evolving situation. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - Segments
What Suni Lee's gymnastics gold win means to Hmong Americans

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2021 7:32


American gymnast Sunisa Lee's gold medal in gymnastics Thursday makes her the first Hmong American to participate and win in the Olympics. Lee said she trains daily for first-generation Americans and wanted to win for Hmong Americans. John Yang reports on the reaction within the Hmong American community with Bo Thao-Urabe, founder and executive director of the Coalition of Asian American Leaders. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - World
What Suni Lee's gymnastics gold win means to Hmong Americans

PBS NewsHour - World

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2021 7:32


American gymnast Sunisa Lee's gold medal in gymnastics Thursday makes her the first Hmong American to participate and win in the Olympics. Lee said she trains daily for first-generation Americans and wanted to win for Hmong Americans. John Yang reports on the reaction within the Hmong American community with Bo Thao-Urabe, founder and executive director of the Coalition of Asian American Leaders. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - Segments
What renters, landlords should expect as the federal eviction moratorium expires

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2021 6:25


Throughout most of the pandemic, Americans who are behind on their rent have been safe from evictions due to a federal moratorium imposed by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention over public health concerns. But the Supreme Court said the moratorium must expire July 31 unless Congress passes new legislation. John Yang reports on how this could affect millions of Americans. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - Segments
The 'insurmountable' weight of expectations on Simone Biles, other professional athletes

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2021 6:27


In a stunning moment at the Tokyo Olympics this morning, American athlete Simone Biles -- considered the top gymnast in the world and favored to bring home gold medals -- withdrew from the team competition. Her decision to prioritize her mental health came after her performance on the vault. John Yang discusses the pressure on Biles with Angie Fifer, a former gymnast and track and field athlete. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - Segments
Tamara Keith and Amy Walter on vaccines, infrastructure, Jan. 6 committee

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2021 9:07


NPR's Tamara Keith and Amy Walter of the Cook Political Report join John Yang to discuss the latest political news, including COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy, congressional debate on a bipartisan infrastructure deal, and the Jan. 6 Capitol insurrection investigation. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - Segments
What Americans should know about the delta variant, masks -- regardless of vaccine status

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2021 6:08


Amid the COVID-19 pandemic, U.S. life expectancy has fallen by a year and a half, the largest one-year decline since World War II. Black and Hispanic Americans were hit the hardest, dropping by almost 3 years. As the delta variant spreads and officials paint a sobering picture for Americans, especially those unvaccinated, John Yang discusses concerns with Georgetown University's Dr. Ranit Mishori. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - Segments
Who will replace Jovenel Moïse? Exploring his assassination and Haiti's future

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 9, 2021 7:32


After Haiti's President Jovenel Moïse was assassinated, Prime Minister Claude Joseph announced a 15 day state of siege. But a new prime minister appointed by Moise -- Ariel Henry -- says he's the rightful ruler. John Yang discusses the Haiti's power succession and assassination investigation with Pamela White, a former U.S. ambassador to Haiti, and Garry Pierre-Pierre, founder of The Haitian Times. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - Segments
Indigenous survivor describes her 'haunting experience' of boarding school abuse

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 8, 2021 6:31


For more than a century, native children sent to Canadian Christian boarding schools were banned from speaking their languages or practicing their traditions. Hundreds died but their families were never told and bodies never returned -- only found in unmarked graves recently. John Yang speaks to Heather Bear, vice chief of the Federation of Sovereign Indigenous Nations, about Canada's dark past. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - Segments
Understanding the Boy Scouts' sexual assault settlement and whether it's adequate

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 6, 2021 5:52


The tentative settlement between the Boy Scouts of America and its sexual abuse survivors is one of the largest in U.S. history. But the national organization had filed for bankruptcy in the winter of 2020. So just how much will survivors receive and is the settlement adequate? John Yang reports with attorney Kenneth Rothweiler, who represents about 16,000 claimants and negotiated the settlement. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - Segments
How opinions of 'the great dissenter' John Harlan influence the Supreme Court

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 2, 2021 7:22


In the Supreme Court's voting law decision Thursday, Justice Elena Kagan dissented and said the majority undermined the voting rights act by upholding Arizona's laws. John Yang looks at another justice who delivered historic dissents during the Jim Crow era, John Harlan, whose career is documented in Peter Canellos' "The Great Dissenter: The Story of John Marshall Harlan, America's Judicial Hero." PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - Segments
What the Supreme Court's decision on Arizona voting laws means for voting rights

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2021 8:44


On the final day of its term, the Supreme Court issued major decisions that put the court's 6-3 conservative majority in the spotlight, especially given the national debate on voting rights. John Yang reports with Marcia Coyle, chief Washington correspondent of The National Law Journal, and Tammy Patrick of the non-partisan Democracy Fund, who also is a former Arizona elections official. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - Segments
After years of pressure, NCAA moves to allow college athletes to make money

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2021 5:21


After years of pressure in and out of court, the NCAA moved this week to allow athletes to make money. Beginning Thursday, college athletes in the U.S. will be able to make financial deals that capitalize on their celebrity. Kevin Blackistone, an ESPN panelist, journalism professor at the University of Maryland and a sports commentator for The Washington Post, joins John Yang to discuss. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - Segments
Children with Type 1 diabetes are more likely to be depressed. COVID has made things worse

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2021 6:59


For many families of kids with diabetes, returning to normal life as states reopen is not an option. A recent study from the University of South Alabama found diabetic kids' average blood sugar levels increased during quarantine -- likely due to a change in routine, lack of exercise and increased stress. The worst outcomes were among Black and economically disadvantaged children. John Yang reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders