Podcasts about Johns Hopkins University

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Private research university in Baltimore, Maryland

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  • Jan 19, 2022LATEST

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Best podcasts about Johns Hopkins University

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Latest podcast episodes about Johns Hopkins University

Cincinnati Edition
New study shows promise for treating COVID-19 patients with convalescent plasma

Cincinnati Edition

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 20:20


Researchers at Johns Hopkins University find convalescent plasma reduces hospitalizations by 54% in COVID-19 patients.

Christopher Titus Podcast
The Days Of Omicron

Christopher Titus Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 15, 2022 116:16


Dr. Eric Feigl-Ding is an epidemiologist and health economist and a Senior Fellow at the Federation of American Scientists in Washington DC, and Chief Health Economist for Microclinic International. He was previously a faculty and researcher at Harvard Medical School and Harvard Chan School of Public Health between 2004-2020, and an epidemiologist at the Brigham and Women's Hospital. In January 2020, he was recognized in the media as one of the first to alert the public on the pandemic risk of COVID-19. He focuses his efforts on analyzing COVID-19 trends, stop COVID-19 misinformation, advocate for public health, and improve health policy. Dr. Feigl-Ding's work focuses on the intersection of public health and public policy. He also currently works on social-network based behavioral interventions for prevention, drug safety, diabetes/obesity prevention, and public health programs in the US and globally. He has further expertise in designing and conducting randomized trials, systematic reviews, public health programs, and improving health policy. He was noted in his role as a whistleblower and leader of a key two-year-long investigation into the controversial drug safety and risk data of Vioxx®, Celebrex®, and Bextra® that drew FDA and national attention. Highlighted and express-published in JAMA, as corresponding joint-first author, he was also recognized for his role in the New York Times, and in the book Poison Pills: The Untold Story of the Vioxx Drug Scandal. A childhood survivor and cancer prevention advocate, he was called one of the ‘Facebook philanthropists‘, founding the 6 million member online Campaign for Cancer Prevention, featured in Newsweek magazine in 2007. In total online reach, he previously directed disease prevention advocacy platforms with over 10 million members on Facebook Causes. He led the first ever direct-to-science online crowdfunding initiative, fundraising over $500,000 (median public donation $15) for medical research, led a partnership with Brigham and Women's Hospital, and featured in the New York Times in 2009. In the aftermath of the Flint Water Crisis, he founded the first geo-social network and public alert system for drinking water toxic contamination, as featured in WIRED. He established the Toxin Alert Drinking Water Database with 500,000-locations nationwide for informing the public about water hazards in communities. For his work, he was awarded the 2017 Mark V. Anderson Leadership Award from Sigma Chi Foundation. Previously, during the 2014 Ebola pandemic, he led a team to co-develop one of the first mobile contact-tracing applications for infectious disease outbreaks. The project was shelved after lack of interest in pandemic prepardness technology. His early contact-tracing app's contributions lived on to inform the later designs of contact tracing apps developed during the COVID-19 outbreak. He has published in leading journals, including the New England Journal of Medicine, Journal of the American Medical Association, The Lancet, and more. His 150+ publications have received 85,000 citations (H-Index 81). As a Web of Science Highly Cited Researcher, he was ranked in 2018 as among the Top 1% of all scientists worldwide, and named among the 186 top cited scholars across Harvard University. Altogether, his competitively awarded projects as PI/Director have received over $10 million in funding. A World Economic Forum Global Shaper, he has chaired committees for the Health Directorate of the European Commission, advised the World Health Organization, Denmark Ministry of Health, and served as a member of the Global Burden of Disease Project. He also advised and successfully convinced the C-suite leaders of a major Fortune 100 food/beverage company to adopt the WHO health recommendations for added sugars. He has also advised many governors, state legislators, members of Congress, and other world leaders. Dr. Feigl-Ding graduated from The Johns Hopkins University with Honors in Public Health and Phi Beta Kappa. He then completed his dual doctorate in epidemiology and his doctorate in nutrition separately, as the youngest graduate to complete his dual doctoral programs at age 23 from Harvard SPH. Concurrently with his postdoctoral fellowship at Harvard SPH, he studied medicine at Boston University School of Medicine for several years, until he left BUSM to become faculty at Harvard Medical School. Teaching at Harvard for over 15 years, he has advised and mentored two dozen students and lectured in more than a dozen graduate and undergraduate courses, for which he received the Derek Bok Distinction in Teaching Award from Harvard College.  

SharkPreneur
766: Disrupting Asset Management with Stephen Mathai-Davis

SharkPreneur

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022 18:44


Disrupting Asset Management Stephen Mathai-Davis, Q.ai   – The Sharkpreneur podcast with Seth Greene Episode 766 Stephen Mathai-Davis   Stephen Mathai-Davis, CFA, CQF is the Founder and CEO of Q.ai, a Forbes company. He is a full-stack data scientist and recognized as an expert in the application of artificial intelligence and advanced quantitative strategies to global public markets. Most recently, he was recognized as part of the Top 100 in Finance by the Top 100 Finance Magazine and has been shortlisted as one of the top CEOs of 2021 by the Silicon Review. He was recently called one of the Top 100 in Tech from Johns Hopkins University for 2021. Under Stephen's leadership, Q.ai is taking on the $25+ trillion fund management industry by launching the first AI-powered investment management app. Since its launch in March 2021, Q,ai has received significant attention, including being the #1 Product on Product Hunt while winning the FinTech Breakthrough Award for Best Retail Investment Platform in 2021 and the AI Breakthrough award for the Best Deep Learning Platform in 2021. Stephen launched his first startup in 2018, Quantamize, a leading retail investing website bringing AI-powered investment research to the retail investor market in the US. Stephen designed the AI-powered models which ranked and scored 10,000+ stocks globally along with advanced thematic portfolio strategies. In addition, Stephen also built top-performing advanced AI trading strategies for both US-listed ETFs and Options. Under Stephen's leadership, Quantamize became known as a leader in AI investing and, in November 2019, Forbes Media acquired Quantamize. Stephen is a seasoned trader, securities analyst and macro portfolio strategist with over 15 years of experience in institutional investment management. He's been quoted and interviewed in numerous financial media including Cheddar TV, Forbes, CNBC, Fox Business, Business Insider, Yahoo Finance, Nasdaq, Benzinga, Entrepreneur, Fortune, Inc and more.   Listen to this illuminating Sharkpreneur episode with Stephen Mathai-Davis about disrupting asset management.   Here are some of the beneficial topics covered on this week's show: - How there are more options in micro-investing than there are with big investments. - Why your investing options are limited if you have thousands of dollars to invest. - How the Fin-Tech revolution has been going on for 10 years, but they are still in the early stages. - How Fin-Tech has changed investing and what that means for you as an investor.   Connect with Stephen: Guest Contact Info Instagram @triqtriathlon Facebook facebook.com/TriqTriathlon LinkedIn linkedin.com/company/triq-triathlon Links Mentioned: Triq.ai   Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The EdUp Experience
378: Disruptive Innovation - with Dr. John Porter, President of Lindenwood University

The EdUp Experience

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2022 45:00


We welcome YOU back to America's leading higher education podcast, The EdUp Experience! It's YOUR time to #EdUp In this episode, President Series #129, YOUR guest is Dr. John Porter, President at Lindenwood University, YOUR host is Dr. Joe Sallustio, aka, THE Voice of Education, & YOUR special guest co-host is Lisa Honaker, Managing Director of Sales for FedEx Office (Eastern US). In this incredible episode, John talks about the business of education in a way that we don't hear often. Coming from a 33-year technology career, John has helped transition Lindenwood to embrace a service culture that is responsive to students, embraces disruptive innovation, and invests in the future. Hear John talk about Lindenwood GLOBAL, and why he has teamed up with our own Dr. Joe Sallustio to reimagine the future of Lindenwood University. John also discuss his newly formed merger and acquisition team! Too many insights to miss in this episode - grap those headphones. Dr. John R. Porter is Lindenwood University's 23rd president, a role he assumed in July 1, 2019. Porter worked for 33 years for IBM, the last 15 in senior management, and has also served as a board member in higher education and as an adjunct instructor and visiting professor. Immediately prior to starting his current role, he served as vice president of services for a premier IBM Business Partner--Gulf Business Machines in Dubai. He has served as a member of the Board of Trustees at Evangel University, from which he holds a bachelor's degree. He has an MBA from Washington University in St. Louis and has earned a Doctor of Education degree from Johns Hopkins University. Thank YOU so much for tuning in. Join us on the next episode for YOUR time to EdUp! Connect with YOUR EdUp Team - Elvin Freytes & Dr. Joe Sallustio ● Learn more about what others are saying about their EdUp experience ● Join YOUR EdUp community at The EdUp Experience! ● YOU can follow us on Facebook | Instagram | LinkedIn | Twitter | YouTube Thank YOU for listening! We make education YOUR business! --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/edup/message

MTR Podcasts
Zeke Cohen

MTR Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2022 48:33


Brief summary of episode:Zeke Cohen has represented the First District on the Baltimore City Council since 2016.Zeke grew up in Northampton, Massachusetts, the son of a social worker and a psychiatrist. Zeke's belief that "community comes first" was inspired by his mother's stories of marching for Civil Rights and registering voters during the Mississippi Freedom Summer. After graduating from Goucher College, Zeke taught in West Baltimore and, as a teacher, was awarded the Elizabeth Lawrence Prize for Excellence. He attained a Master's Degree in Public Policy from Johns Hopkins University. Zeke started his nonprofit, The Intersection, to help young people learn community organizing and civic leadership.  He ran for office with the belief that democracy only works when everyone has a voice in the process.In July 2019, Zeke introduced the Elijah Cummings Healing City Act, making Baltimore the first city in the country to comprehensively legislate trauma-responsive care. The bill, which was signed into law in February 2020, and the movement that propelled it forward were created to help Baltimore heal from our enduring legacies of trauma, racism and violence.In April 2019, Zeke sponsored the Gender-Inclusive Single-User Restroom bill, which helps ensure our city is safe and welcoming for all communities by requiring all single-user restrooms to have gender-inclusive signage. It was the first bill in Baltimore's history to be signed at a Pride Parade.In 2018, Zeke introduced the Transparency in Lobbying Act. The law tightens restrictions on lobbyists and requires lobbying disclosure forms to be posted online.Zeke and his staff work tirelessly to deliver world-class constituent services and to provide transparency throughout the process. Since entering office in 2016, his office has resolved over 2800 separate constituent requests for assistance. These include requests for help resolving water billing disputes, removing abandoned boats from vacant lots, and expediting the repair of broken streetlights. Zeke believes in the power of organized communities and in the past two years, his office created community-driven task forces on the topics of transportation and public safety.The Truth In This ArtThe Truth In This Art is a podcast interview series supporting vibrancy and development of Baltimore & beyond's arts and culture.Mentioned in this episodeBaltimore City CouncilTo find more amazing stories from the artist and entrepreneurial scenes in & around Baltimore, check out my episode directory.Stay in TouchNewsletter sign-upSupport my podcastShareable link to episode★ Support this podcast ★

Precisione: The Healthcast
Tapping into the Vagus Nerve

Precisione: The Healthcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 7, 2022 37:14


Guest Name and Bio: Dr. Peter Staats Dr. Staats was founder of the Division of Pain Medicine at Johns Hopkins University, where he was the director for 10 years. In that capacity he was the first academic anesthesiologist with surgical privileges and one of the youngest division chiefs at that University. Dr. Staats is internationally recognized for his work in developing and implementing minimally invasive and non invasive procedures for chronic pain, and other medical disorders. He is currently Chief Medical Officer of National Spine and Pain Centers, the largest network of pain physicians in the United States, Co Founder and Chief Medical Officer of electroCore the leader in non-invasive neuromodulation, a medical advisor for Survivorcorp and the Wounded Warrior Project Dr. Staats received his medical degree from the University of Michigan Medical School in Ann Arbor and completed his residency and fellowship training at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. He was the founding chair of the American Society of Anesthesiologists task force on chronic pain, is a past President of the North American Neuromodulation Society, American Society of Interventional Pain Physicians, New Jersey Society of Interventional Pain Physicians, and the Southern Pain Society. He is currently President of the World Institute of Pain and continues to serve as Chief Medical Officer for National Spine and Pain Centers, the largest network of pain physicians in the United States. Dr. Staats has written or co-edited 14 books and over 450 articles, abstracts, monographs, and book chapters on pain medicine in publications that include the Journal of the American Medicine Association, Pain, Anesthesiology, Lancet Neurology and the Journal of Clinical Oncology. His work has been highlighted on Good Morning America, CBS Evening News, Newsweek, and CNN. He has lectured extensively nationally and internationally. He has received numerous awards including the physician of the year and the lifetime achievement awards from the New York, New Jersey, and West Virginia branches of the American Society of Interventional Pain Physicians, Best Doctors in America, Top Doctors, and New Jersey Top Doctor, and the lifetime achievement awards from the American Society of Interventional Pain Physicians, the American Society of Pain and Neuroscience and the North American Neuromodulation society. What you will learn from this episode: 1) What is the vagus nerve and why is it important 2) How can the vagus nerve impact inflammation 3) What is the role of vagus nerve stimulation in Covid-19 4) What is wrong with current methods of pain management 5) How you can treat recurrent headaches via the vagus nerve How to learn more about our guest: www.ElectroCore.com https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Peter_Staats Please enjoy, share, rate and review our podcast and help us bring the message about precision health care to the world!

Inside Out Health with Coach Tara Garrison
DR. JOSEPH ANTOUN - Prolon and the Fasting Mimicking Diet with the CEO

Inside Out Health with Coach Tara Garrison

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 7, 2022 59:55


Dr. Joseph Antoun is CEO & Chairman of the Board of L-Nutra and Member of the Forbes Business Development Council. He's the former CEO of Health Systems Reform, a boutique consultancy aimed at improving public health by reforming health systems, management, and delivery. Prior to that, he was Director of Health Policy at the University of Chicago, Editor in Chief of the Journal of Health Systems and Reform and head of Business Development for Eli Lilly & Co.  He completed his studies in Public Policy at Harvard University, in Public Health at Johns Hopkins University, and his Doctorate in Medicine and Masters' in Medical and Biological Sciences at Saint Joseph University. In this episode, Dr. Antoun tells the story of how L-Nutra's groundbreaking 5-day ProLon diet is a revolutionary new way to approach nutrition and health – by periodically fasting with food.  Check out Dr. Joseph Antoun's site here: https://l-nutra.com/ Upgraded Formulas - Inside Out Health Podcast Special Offers: Click HERE for the Upgraded Formulas Hair Test Kit Special Offer Click HERE for the Upgraded Formulas Main Site & Get 15% OFF  Everything with Coupon Code: INSIDEOUT15 Ready to enhance your metabolism? Learn about my Keto In & Out system HERE. Want one on one coaching? Learn more about it HERE. Click here for info on my Higher Retreat in Zion National Park: Beethewellness.com/experiences/higher

The FOX News Rundown
Supreme Court To Weigh In On Vaccine Mandates

The FOX News Rundown

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 7, 2022 31:55


The Supreme Court will hear challenges to President Biden's Coronavirus vaccine mandates that would cover about 100 million Americans. One mandate covers employees of large businesses. The other would impact health care workers. The Biden Administration says they're both necessary to cope with the pandemic. Opponents accuse the White House of government overreach. Shannon Bream, anchor of FOX News at Night and FOX News Chief Legal Correspondent, breaks down the legal arguments for both sides and how the recent surge in COVID cases could actually hurt the Biden Administration's case. The FDA has approved the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 booster for children ages 12 to 17 and the CDC recently revised isolation times for those testing positive for COVID-19, but now many anxiously await what the future holds for schools, students, and hospitals in the face of the Omicron variant. Johns Hopkins University infectious disease specialist Dr. Amesh Adalja joins to break down why schools should remain open given the tools we have to protect students and teachers, confusion surrounding shifting guidelines, and what Omicron means for the next stage of the pandemic. Don't miss the good news with Tonya J. Powers. Plus, commentary by FOX News Senior Meteorologist Janice Dean.

The News with Shepard Smith
Omicron Surge, Travel Chaos & Prince Andrew Hearing

The News with Shepard Smith

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 49:37


The U.S. reported a pandemic record of more than 1 million new infections on Monday, according to data compiled by Johns Hopkins University. NYU professor and epidemiologist Dr. Celine Gounder discusses the recent Covid spike and whether we're paying too much attention to the number of infections. CNBC's Kate Rogers reports on the live events and arts industry, and how the pandemic has impacted its ability to survive financially. CNBC's Steve Liesman reports on the Great Resignation, as a record 4.5 million workers left their jobs in November. CNBC's Eunice Yoon reports on Beijing's efforts to contain Covid a month before the Olympic games are scheduled to begin. NBC legal analyst Danny Cevallos discusses the sexual assault case against Britain's Prince Andrew and his legal team's efforts to have the case thrown out. Plus, the House committee investigating the Jan. 6th insurrection has asked Fox host Sean Hannity to testify. And former President Trump cancels his Thursday press conference on the first anniversary of the Capitol riot.

Daily News Brief
Daily News Brief for Wednesday, January 5th 2022

Daily News Brief

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 16:12


Daily News Brief for Wednesday, January 5th 2022 Happy New Year! It is good to be back in the studio, after a busy Christmas break. During our time off, we actually were in the studio several times working on our 2022 show production, and every year we hope to continue to bring you better and better content along with a better show experience. We hope our shows bless you, and as they do, we ask that you share them, pass them along, and join our club or become a corporate sponsor to support our efforts. We are fighting legacy media that is just about hell-bent on destroying anything that resembles Christian culture and influence, so please support us as we fight, laugh and feast in 2022.   Before I bring you Senator Rand Paul's New Year Resolution, Pastor Wilson's reasons for the 2020 rigged elections, and more, I want to you make you aware of CrossPolitic's New Saint Andrews Scholarship for women! Last year we released our first scholarship for men, and as promised, we now bring you our scholarship for freshmen women: God has blessed CrossPolitic enormously, particularly through our club members, and we have committed ourselves to blessing others. We want to give back some of what we've been given. Fight Laugh Feast New St. Andrews College Women's Scholarship: Beginning Fall 2022 In the interest of promoting a hard-hitting, thoroughly biblical education for life, CrossPolitic Studios is very excited to present: The Fight Laugh Feast “Beastmode Homemaker” Scholarship for qualified first year female students who have been accepted to New St. Andrews College. This scholarship will fund almost half a young woman's annual tuition for four years. Because CrossPolitic wants to encourage young women to prepare themselves to take dominion and be fruitful through beastmode homemaking this scholarship is specifically offered to qualified young women. How to be considered for the Fight Laugh Feast “Beastmode Homemaker” Scholarship: 1. Apply to New St. Andrews College and receive official notification that you have been accepted. 2. Write a short essay (~1000) words explaining why you are the woman to receive this scholarship. This essay should be thoughtful, good humored, feminine, and well-written. The essay should include reasons how you believe a New St. Andrews College education will equip you to live for Jesus and defy the enemies of God. The essay should be sent to %%%% Address, Moscow, Idaho. All applications for the Fight Laugh Feast Scholarship must be received by February 1. 3. The CrossPolitic wives (Annie, Sharron, and Jenny) will review all applications and if there is a worthy applicant, we will schedule an interview with up to the top three candidates, and the CrossPolitic Guys will announce the winner of the scholarship on a CrossPolitic Show with great fanfare sometime by April 1st of the year prior to the student's entrance to the college. 4. The scholarship is for full-time, matriculating first year females (as defined by God and old-fashioned biology) at New St. Andrews College (because they know biology better than the Supreme Court) and automatically renews for up to four years. The scholarship is contingent on remaining such a student in good standing (academically, morally), and living like a faithful Christian in our community. The scholarship may be revoked at any time by the CrossPolitic gods, should a young woman prove to be unworthy of this honor. How are your New Year's Resolutions going? Have you joined our club as part of your New Year Resolutions? Well Senator Rand Paul is making some pretty easy new year resolutions, by quitting big tech. In his oped in the Washington titled: My New Year's resolution: I'm quitting YouTube He says he wants to get rid of toxic relationships: “I have come to the realization that my relationship with YouTube is dysfunctional. Sure, I can get millions of views. But why should I allow anonymous “fact-checkers” to censor my fully sourced, fact-based content? They don't want to challenge or debate me with opposing views, they just want my silence.” He goes on to say: “Many in Congress, on the Left and the Right, want to break up or regulate Big Tech, but few of these loud voices have actually stepped up and quit using Big Tech. So today, I announce that I will begin an exodus from Big Tech. I will no longer post videos on YouTube unless it is to criticize them or announce that viewers can see my content on rumble.com. Why begin with YouTube? Because they're the worst censors. Any time I state that cloth masks do not stop the virus from spreading, as in this Denmark study, Florida school comparison, and Vietnamese study, YouTube deletes the video. I always cite studies and scientific sources such as those listed here, but instead of allowing free and open debate with others who might argue flaws in those studies or cite opposing ones, YouTube simply silences me.” In his followup press release, Senator Paul says: “As a libertarian leaning Senator, I think private companies have the right to ban me if they want to, however, those of us who believe that truth comes from disputation and that the marketplace of ideas is a prerequisite for innovation should shun the close-minded censors and take our ideas elsewhere, which is exactly what I'm doing.” Over the last year, YouTube has continued to wage its dangerous, anti-progress of science war against free speech, choosing to act in lockstep with government and ban videos posted by Dr. Paul that dared to contradict the government's position. These videos included conversations with journalists where he discussed the efficacy of masks, particularly cloth masks, and a video explaining the science behind why cloth masks don't work.” I am glad to see public figures, like Senator Rand Paul and Joe Rogan, take a stand against big tech. I think over the years, social media will be come more and more decentralized as more and more alternative options pop-up, and we hope, through the Fight Laugh Feast Network, that we can build massive community of like-minded Christians we can lock arms with, encourage each other, and build Christian communities throughout the US. As Elon Musk said “twitter is not real”, and there is a funny truth he is getting there, and so what we want to see is real Christian communities popup that are antifragile, they love Jesus, and know how to Fight Laugh and Feast like Christians. Pastor Doug Wilson recently wrote a blog post titled: “An Election With More Rigging Than a Five-Masted Clipper Ship”, and while you should read the whole post (linked to in your notes in our app), here is a meaty snippet that I don't want you to miss about the Trump presidency and the 2020 rigged election: “This whole sorry business started with the presidential campaign in 2016, and the surprise election of Trump. Under Obama, our national intelligence community targeted and illegally spied on the Trump campaign. Rigged. No one who did that is currently in jail. Rigged. Bogus opposition research sponsored by the Clinton campaign was picked up by the FBI, knowing it to be bogus, and yet it was used to hamstring the Trump administration for years. Rigged. Hillary cooked up the Russian collusion story and the media bought it big time. Rigged. Hillary claimed that the election was stolen from her without accusations that she was undermining democratic norms, and yet Trump is accused when he said the same thing. Rigged. And what Hillary said was false and what Trump said was true, and these are strange words. Rigged. After the 2016 election, the titans of Big Tech vowed to do everything in their power to prevent the same thing from happening in 2020, and they were good on their word. Rigged. Canceling accounts, banning ads, banning stories, and shadow banning through algorithms. Rigged. Millions of dollars (“Zuck bucks”) were poured into efforts to change election laws and procedures all over the country, without an opportunity to institute safeguards for the new systems. Rigged. Third party partisan groups were given oversight of election processes. Rigged. Deadly riots happened all over the country, with promises of many more if Trump won again. Rigged. The COVID panic provided the perfect opportunity to alter standard procedures for the sake of “safety,” including how close to the counting poll watchers could get. Rigged. Because of this deadly virus we had to have new procedures (like mail-in voting) right away. Rigged. Lawsuits brought to challenge common sense things like signature verification. Rigged. Courts refusing to hear the inevitable complaints on the merits, preferring to dodge responsibility by appealing to “process” or “standing.” Rigged. This craven rejection of responsibility went up to and included SCOTUS. Rigged. Illegal changes made to voting deadlines by secretaries of state, instead of legally by the state legislatures. Rigged.” Dime Payments: Dime Payments is a Christian owned processing payment business. Every business needs a payment process system, so please go to https://dimepayments.com/flf and sign your business up. Working with them supports us. They wont cancel you, like Stripe canceled President Trump. They wont cancel you, like Mailchimp canceled the Babylon Bee. Check them out. At least have a phone call and tell them that CrossPolitic sent you. Go to https://dimepayments.com/flf. Remember our interview with Jeff Drubin and Davis Younts, JAG lawyer, that we did several months ago regarding Navy Seals dealing with the forced vax mandates? Well, according to Fox News: “Judge Reed O'Connor, the U.S. District Court Judge for the Northern District of Texas, issued the stay in response to a lawsuit filed by First Liberty Institute in November on behalf of 35 active-duty SEALs and three reservists seeking a religious exemption”. Judge O'Connor, from Texas, did I mention that, said in his ruling: “"The Navy service members in this case seek to vindicate the very freedoms they have sacrificed so much to protect. The COVID-19 pandemic provides the government no license to abrogate those freedoms. There is no COVID-19 exception to the First Amendment. There is no military exclusion from our Constitution." General Council for First Liberty Institute Mike Berry, who is re "Forcing a service member to choose between their faith and serving their country is abhorrent to the Constitution and America's values…Punishing SEALs for simply asking for a religious accommodation is purely vindictive and punitive. We're pleased that the court has acted to protect our brave warriors before more damage is done to our national security." Pentagon spokesman John Kirby, when asked about the stay said: "We are aware of the injunction and are reviewing it.” The forced vax cases are from over, so be in prayer for what is going on. In a lot of ways, this is not only an attack on our nation's constitution, but the courts do not shutdown Biden's mandates, it will open up the door for all sorts of government shenanigans. You think forced vaccinations are bad, just wait for the forced sterilization of faithful Christians because your kids are a threat to demos, I mean democracy. U.S. reports over 1 million new daily Covid cases as omicron surges According to CNBC, are they a legit news service, well nevermind they are mostly quoting John Hopkins, so I will proceed. A new COVID record. Over one million new daily COVID cases! CNBC says: “A total of 1,082,549 new coronavirus cases were reported Monday, according to data compiled by Johns Hopkins University, as the highly infectious omicron variant continues to spread throughout the country. The new daily tally brings the total number of cases confirmed in the U.S. since the start of the pandemic to 56,189,547. In total, the virus has caused at least 827,748 deaths across the country.” Can we talk about “with” or “from” yet. How about the efficacy of the vaccine? Or that masks dont work? We will infact, but you have to tune into our Mid-week Fix tonight at 7pm PAC. Yes we are back, and can't wait to bring you our new year of shows, live events, conference, and more to you in 2022. We have lots of plans, but we only want God to build our house, unless we labor in vain. Closing This is Gabriel Rench with Crosspolitic News. Support Rowdy Christian media by joining our club at fightlaughfeast.com, downloading our App, and head to our annual Fight Laugh Feast Events. With your partnership, together we will fight outdated and compromised media, engage news and politics with the gospel, and replace lies and darkness with truth and light. Go to fightlaughfeast.com to take all these actions. Have a great day. Lord bless

Squawk Pod
One Million Cases & Four Counts of Fraud

Squawk Pod

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 27:59


Theranos founder Elizabeth Holmes was found guilty on four of eleven charges in her criminal fraud trial; CNBC's Scott Cohn breaks down the jury's verdict and the life that now awaits Holmes. The U.S. reported a record 1 million cases of new Covid infections on Monday, according to data compiled by Johns Hopkins University. The record single-day total may be due in part to delayed reporting from over the holiday weekend. Dr. Kavita Patel, former White House health policy director and fellow at the Brookings Institution, discusses the latest numbers and testing strategies in the U.S. Plus, BlackBerry is finally retiring its iconic hardware. Once a status symbol in the C-suite, BlackBerry phones are officially a relic after the 20+ year journey from two-way pagers to BBM. In this episode:Dr. Kavita Patel, @kavitapmdScott Cohn, @ScottCohnTVBecky Quick, @BeckyQuickAndrew Ross Sorkin, @andrewrsorkinMike Santoli, @michaelsantoliKatie Kramer, @Kramer_Katie

Catalyzing Computing
Medical Applications for AI and Robotics with Gregory D. Hager (Part 1)

Catalyzing Computing

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 37:35


Khari Douglas interviews Gregory D. Hager, a professor of computer science at Johns Hopkins University and the founding director of the Johns Hopkins Malone Center for Engineering in Healthcare. In this episode, Hager discusses tactile perception, the founding of the Malone Center, and data privacy.

Today's Focus of Attention
US - One million Covid cases in a day

Today's Focus of Attention

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 1:34


A deluge of one million new Covid cases hit the United States last Monday 3rd of January, as reported by Johns Hopkins University. A large number of the new infections were driven by the highly contagious Omicron variant. Evidence suggests that Omicron is generally milder than Delta, less lethal, nevertheless the sheer volume of new cases follows an increase in hospitalisations, threatening the already overwhelmed health care system. Although this is an astronomical figure, experts say that this could be underestimated as many people test themselves at home and many of those results are not shared with the authorities. In a number of cases the tests are not accurate. But the main point here is that this new variant could be particularly harmful to children since paediatric admissions have reached record highs in recent days. The US government hasn't inoculated children in force, as with other age groups, making them vulnerable to the disease.

Only in Seattle - Real Estate Unplugged
#909 - CDC Faces Criticism That It's Gone From Following Science To Following CEOS

Only in Seattle - Real Estate Unplugged

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 35:42


More than a year after the vaccine was rolled out, new cases of COVID-19 in the U.S. have soared to their highest level on record at over 265,000 per day on average, a surge driven largely by the highly contagious omicron variant.New cases per day have more than doubled over the past two weeks, eclipsing the old mark of 250,000, set in mid-January, according to data kept by Johns Hopkins University.The fast-spreading mutant version of the virus has cast a pall over Christmas and New Year's, forcing communities to scale back or call off their festivities just weeks after it seemed as if Americans were about to enjoy an almost normal holiday season. Thousands of flights have been canceled amid staffing shortages blamed on the virus.https://apnews.com/article/coronavirus-pandemic-health-c69d1521b6411b6b78aae85d95165f5cSupport the show (https://www.patreon.com/seattlerealestatepodcast)

Democracy Paradox
Robert Lieberman, Kenneth Roberts, and David Bateman on Democratic Resilience and Political Polarization in the United States

Democracy Paradox

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 57:09


So, the question is how do you respond to that? If you are the party that sees itself as being on the side of democracy and on the side of maintaining democratic norms and procedures and maintaining this kind of democratic accountability, how do you respond? Do you respond in kind? Do you respond with hardball tactics of your own?Robert LiebermanA full transcript is available at www.democracyparadox.com or a short review of Democratic Resilience: Can the United States Withstand Rising Polarization?  here.Robert C. Lieberman is the Krieger-Eisenhower Professor of Political Science at Johns Hopkins University. Kenneth M. Roberts is the Richard J. Schwartz Professor of Government and Binenkorb Director of Latin American Studies at Cornell University. David A. Bateman is an associate professor in the Government Department at Cornell University. Robert and Kenneth (along with Suzanne Mettler) coedited the book Democratic Resilience: Can the United States Withstand Rising Polarization?  David is a contributor to the volume. His chapter is "Elections, Polarization, and Democratic Resilience."Key HighlightsWhy did polarization become so severe in the United States?When did pernicious polarization start in America?Is polarization the fault of just one party or both?Discussion on possible judicial reforms as a solutionCan America overcome this episode of severe polarization?Key LinksDemocratic Resilience: Can the United States Withstand Rising Polarization? by Suzanne Mettler, Robert C. Lieberman, and Kenneth M. RobertsFollow Robert C. Lieberman on Twitter @r_liebermanFollow David Bateman on Twitter @DavidAlexBatemaDemocracy Paradox PodcastCan America Preserve Democracy without Retreating from it? Robert C. Lieberman on the Four ThreatsThomas Carothers and Andrew O'Donohue are Worried About Severe PolarizationMore Episodes from the PodcastMore InformationDemocracy GroupApes of the State created all MusicEmail the show at jkempf@democracyparadox.comFollow on Twitter @DemParadox100 Books on Democracy

Jewish Philosophy with Rabbi Dr. Dovid Gottlieb

Having received his Ph.D. in mathematical logic at Brandeis University, Rabbi Dr. Dovid Gottlieb went on to become Professor of Philosophy at Johns Hopkins University. Today he is a senior faculty member at Ohr Somayach in Jerusalem. An accomplished author and lecturer, Rabbi Gottlieb has electrified audiences with his stimulating and energetic presentations on ethical and philosophical issues. In Jewish Philosophy with Rabbi Dr. Gottlieb, we are invited to explore the most fascinating and elemental concepts of Jewish Philosophy. https://podcasts.ohr.edu/ podcasts@ohr.edu

Jewish Philosophy with Rabbi Dr. Dovid Gottlieb
Relativism Multi Culturalism

Jewish Philosophy with Rabbi Dr. Dovid Gottlieb

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 54:55


Having received his Ph.D. in mathematical logic at Brandeis University, Rabbi Dr. Dovid Gottlieb went on to become Professor of Philosophy at Johns Hopkins University. Today he is a senior faculty member at Ohr Somayach in Jerusalem. An accomplished author and lecturer, Rabbi Gottlieb has electrified audiences with his stimulating and energetic presentations on ethical and philosophical issues. In Jewish Philosophy with Rabbi Dr. Gottlieb, we are invited to explore the most fascinating and elemental concepts of Jewish Philosophy. https://podcasts.ohr.edu/ podcasts@ohr.edu

World Business Report
Reconnecting America: What can the trillion dollar infrastructure bill achieve?

World Business Report

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 26:27


President Trump once described America's infrastructure as "crumbling," it's perhaps why after much wrangling, the US Congress finally approved the trillion dollar bi-partisan infrastructure bill. But what can it achieve? And is it good value for money? We'll criss-cross the United States hearing from projects hoping cash from the bill will make their visions for better connected communities a reality. In rural Alaska we meet Jan Wrentmore and Mayor Andrew Cremata who hope to bring an electric ferry to their home of Skagway,before heading south to speak with Brian Kelly chief executive of California's High Speed Rail Authority. Liz Kirkwood of the clean water campaign group FLOW explains how money from the bill could help alleviate chronic problems with antiquated and dangerous water systems in her home of Michigan, whilst Keith Baker of ReConnect Rondo, in St Paul, Minnesota hopes new infrastructure there can repair a community torn apart by previous big building projects. And Emily Feenstra of the US Society of Civil Engineers, and Steve Hanke, Professor of applied economics at Johns Hopkins University and a former adviser to the Reagan White House, tell us about America's infrastructure needs, and assess whether this bill actually helps address them. The programme is presented by the BBC's Will Bain. Audio credit: With thanks to the Rondo: Beyond the Pavement documentary team

First Draft: A Dialogue on Writing
First Draft - Alice McDermott (Returns Again!)

First Draft: A Dialogue on Writing

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 60:52


Alice McDermott is the author of several novels, including The Ninth Hour; Someone; After This; Child of My Heart; Charming Billy, winner of the 1998 National Book Award; and At Weddings and Wakes—all published by FSG. That Night, At Weddings and Wakes, and After This were all finalists for the Pulitzer Prize. Her stories and essays have appeared in The New York Times, The Washington Post, The New Yorker, Harper's Magazine, and elsewhere. For more than two decades she was the Richard A. Macksey Professor of the Humanities at Johns Hopkins University and a member of the faculty at the Sewanee Writers Conference. McDermott lives with her family outside Washington, D.C. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

TIME's Top Stories
New COVID-19 Cases in U.S. Rise to Highest Levels on Record

TIME's Top Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2021 4:25


(CHICAGO) — More than a year after the vaccine was rolled out, new cases of COVID-19 in the U.S. have soared to their highest level on record at over 265,000 per day on average, a surge driven largely by the highly contagious omicron variant. New cases per day have more than doubled over the past two weeks, eclipsing the old mark of 250,000, set in mid-January, according to data kept by Johns Hopkins University.

Healthy Children
Invisible & Imaginary Friends

Healthy Children

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021


The first time your child starts interacting with an invisible friend it can be a little worrying. But it turns out, it's much more common than you think!The first time your child starts interacting with an invisible friend it can be a little worrying. But it turns out, it's much more common than you think!Imaginary friends help build social and communication skills, imagination, and more.Joining us to talk about all kinds of magical and mystical friends, and why you most likely don't need to be worried, is Dr. Datta Munshi. Dr. Munshi is a community pediatrician with a strong interest in pediatric behavioral health. She completed her pediatric training in Philadelphia before moving to Georgia in 2001 and has worked in the urgent care setting at Children's Healthcare of Atlanta and private practice in the North Fulton, and South Forsyth area for more than 15 years. She is currently completing her Masters in Population Health Management at Johns Hopkins University and is working towards increasing collaborative and comprehensive mental healthcare for our children.

Stories of our times
Three incredible tales of scientific progress

Stories of our times

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021 31:36


As we head towards the end of 2021, we bring you some of the best episodes of the year. Today: Extraordinary scientific advances have taken place both because of Covid and despite it. We bring you three tales of human ingenuity you might have missed – and, for a change, nothing but good news. This podcast was brought to you thanks to the support of readers of The Times and The Sunday Times. Subscribe today and get one month free at: thetimes.co.uk/storiesofourtimes. This episode was first published in April 2021.Host: David Aaronovitch. Guests: - Tom Whipple, science editor, The Times. - Lindley Johnson, planetary defence officer, Nasa. - Dr Elena Adams, DART systems engineer, Johns Hopkins University. Clips: ITV, CBC, BBC, TRT World, SpaceX. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Becker’s Healthcare Podcast
Paul Christo, Associate Professor of Johns Hopkins University of Medicine, and Host of the Aches and Gains radio show on SiriusXM

Becker’s Healthcare Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2021 17:44


This episode features Dr. Paul Christo, Associate Professor of Johns Hopkins University of Medicine, and Host of the Aches and Gains radio show on SiriusXM. Here, he discusses the Fentanyl epidemic, the major problems people are currently having with chronic pain, the need for different therapies for pain treatment, and more.

Keto Answers Podcast
019: Sam Apple - How Diet Affects Cancer Growth

Keto Answers Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2021 54:02


Sam Apple is a faculty member in the Science Writing and Writing programs at Johns Hopkins University and he's the author of the book, Ravenous: Otto Warburg, the Nazis, and the Search for the Cancer-Diet Connection. He comes on the show to discuss cancer prevention strategies through dietary changes, Otto Warburg and what he got right, Otto's downfall and what he did wrong, keto for cancer prevention, if going low-carb is just as good as keto, whether meat is connected to cancer, and more. Find a breakdown of this episode below: 00:00 Introduction to the podcast 00:29 Introduction to this episode's guest, Sam Apple 04:15 What got Sam into researching about metabolism, cancer, keto, and more 07:31 Why was Otto Warburg so passionate about using keto for cancer treatment? 08:48 What led to Otto Warburg's downfall? 12:48 Did Warburg realize that nutrition was the outlet for solving cancer? 14:36 What really matters when it comes to cancer treatment and prevention 17:60 What Sam saw in the research that had him convinced that elevated glucose and insulin are causative of cancer 23:36 What makes the keto diet superior to a low carb one? Can you still get the health benefits just by being low carb?  30:23 Do you recommend people to go full keto or use a low carb approach for preventing cancer? 34:29 The most fascinating thing Sam has seen in his research 39:10 Retrospective diet studies that blame meat for causing cancer 41:24 Should people test their glucose every day?   Resources from this episode: Same Apple's website Sam Apple's Twitter and Instagram Sam Apple's latest book, Ravenous: Otto Warburg, the Nazis, and the Search for the Cancer-Diet Connection

The 365 Days of Astronomy, the daily podcast of the International Year of Astronomy 2009
Weekly Space Hangout - How We Can Clean Up Earth's Space Debris with Dr. Jake Abbott

The 365 Days of Astronomy, the daily podcast of the International Year of Astronomy 2009

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 24, 2021 63:46


https://youtu.be/BX-SICfFvB8 Host: Fraser Cain ( @fcain )Special Guest: This week we are excited to welcome Dr. Jake Abbott, director of the Telerobotics Laboratory at the University of Utah to the WSH. The proliferation of Space Debris has become an increasingly alarming reality. In fact, as recently as December 3, 2021, "The International Space Station (ISS) had to swerve away from a fragment of a U.S. launch vehicle" (source:  https://www.reuters.com/lifestyle/sci...). In a paper published in November 2021 in the science journal Nature , Jake and his research team have proposed a new method of dealing with the debris: using a series of spinning magnets to move these objects. You can read more about their proposed solution here https://attheu.utah.edu/facultystaff/....   Jake Abbott is a Professor in the Department of Mechanical Engineering and an Adjunct Professor in the School of Computing at the University of Utah, and he is the director of the Telerobotics Laboratory. He joined the University of Utah in 2008. Before coming to Utah, he spent three years in Switzerland as a postdoctoral researcher working with Brad Nelson at the Institute of Robotics and Intelligent Systems at ETH Zurich. Dr. Abbott received his Ph.D. from the Johns Hopkins University in 2005 working with Allison Okamura, his M.S. from the University of Utah in 2001, and his B.S. from Utah State University in 1999, all in Mechanical Engineering.   Jake Abbott's research has been funded by the NSF (including the CAREER Award), the NIH, NASA, the Air Force, and industry. He and his co-authors have won a number of Best Paper and Best Poster Awards at international conferences. He is currently an Associate Editor for the International Journal of Robotics Research, and was previously an Associate Editor for IEEE Transactions on Robotics.   In Jake's spare time, he's a movie buff, a foodie, and an all-around supporter of the arts and the community in Salt Lake City. Jake's wife is a flamenco dancer and instructor in Salt Lake City, and he plays guitar and sings as part of her group.   You can learn more about Jake and his research by visiting https://www.telerobotics.utah.edu/ind... and https://www.mech.utah.edu/directory/f.... Regular Guests: Dr. Nick Castle ( @PlanetaryGeoDoc ) C.C. Petersen ( http://thespacewriter.com/wp/ & @AstroUniverse & @SpaceWriter ) Pam Hoffman ( http://spacer.pamhoffman.com/ & http://everydayspacer.com/ & @EverydaySpacer ) This week's stories: - JWST & what it's going to be looking at. - A comet, 2 meteor showers, 2 contests & a citizen science project! - Crazy Pluto geology. - New information on the clouds of Venus. - Hyabusa samples.   We've added a new way to donate to 365 Days of Astronomy to support editing, hosting, and production costs.  Just visit: https://www.patreon.com/365DaysOfAstronomy and donate as much as you can! Share the podcast with your friends and send the Patreon link to them too!  Every bit helps! Thank you! ------------------------------------ Do go visit http://www.redbubble.com/people/CosmoQuestX/shop for cool Astronomy Cast and CosmoQuest t-shirts, coffee mugs and other awesomeness! http://cosmoquest.org/Donate This show is made possible through your donations.  Thank you! (Haven't donated? It's not too late! Just click!) ------------------------------------ The 365 Days of Astronomy Podcast is produced by the Planetary Science Institute. http://www.psi.edu Visit us on the web at 365DaysOfAstronomy.org or email us at info@365DaysOfAstronomy.org.

Marketplace All-in-One
Which came first, the galaxies or the stars? New space telescope may answer cosmic riddles.

Marketplace All-in-One

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 24, 2021 10:33


Many in the science community and fans of space and science in general are awaiting the launch of the James Webb Space Telescope, scheduled for Christmas Day. NASA and other space agencies have been working on this mission for more than two decades. So, what can we expect from Webb? Marketplace’s Kimberly Adams speaks with Adam Riess, a professor of astronomy and physics at Johns Hopkins University and a winner of the 2011 Nobel Prize in physics.

Marketplace Tech
Which came first, the galaxies or the stars? New space telescope may answer cosmic riddles.

Marketplace Tech

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 24, 2021 10:33


Many in the science community and fans of space and science in general are awaiting the launch of the James Webb Space Telescope, scheduled for Christmas Day. NASA and other space agencies have been working on this mission for more than two decades. So, what can we expect from Webb? Marketplace’s Kimberly Adams speaks with Adam Riess, a professor of astronomy and physics at Johns Hopkins University and a winner of the 2011 Nobel Prize in physics.

Marketplace Tech
Which came first, the galaxies or the stars? New space telescope may answer cosmic riddles.

Marketplace Tech

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 24, 2021 10:33


Many in the science community and fans of space and science in general are awaiting the launch of the James Webb Space Telescope, scheduled for Christmas Day. NASA and other space agencies have been working on this mission for more than two decades. So, what can we expect from Webb? Marketplace’s Kimberly Adams speaks with Adam Riess, a professor of astronomy and physics at Johns Hopkins University and a winner of the 2011 Nobel Prize in physics.

Weekly Space Hangout
Weekly Space Hangout: 22-DEC-2021 - Cleaning Up Earth's Space Debris with Dr. Jake Abbott

Weekly Space Hangout

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2021 58:18


This week we are excited to welcome Dr. Jake Abbott, director of the Telerobotics Laboratory at the University of Utah to the WSH. The proliferation of Space Debris has become an increasingly alarming reality. In fact, as recently as December 3, 2021, "The International Space Station (ISS) had to swerve away from a fragment of a U.S. launch vehicle" (source: https://www.reuters.com/lifestyle/science/international-space-station-swerves-dodge-space-junk-2021-12-03/). In a paper published in November 2021 in the science journal Nature , Jake and his research team have proposed a new method of dealing with the debris: using a series of spinning magnets to move these objects. You can read more about their proposed solution here https://attheu.utah.edu/facultystaff/waste-of-space/. Jake Abbott is a Professor in the Department of Mechanical Engineering and an Adjunct Professor in the School of Computing at the University of Utah, and he is the director of the Telerobotics Laboratory. He joined the University of Utah in 2008. Before coming to Utah, he spent three years in Switzerland as a postdoctoral researcher working with Brad Nelson at the Institute of Robotics and Intelligent Systems at ETH Zurich. Dr. Abbott received his Ph.D. from the Johns Hopkins University in 2005 working with Allison Okamura, his M.S. from the University of Utah in 2001, and his B.S. from Utah State University in 1999, all in Mechanical Engineering. Jake Abbott's research has been funded by the NSF (including the CAREER Award), the NIH, NASA, the Air Force, and industry. He and his co-authors have won a number of Best Paper and Best Poster Awards at international conferences. He is currently an Associate Editor for the International Journal of Robotics Research, and was previously an Associate Editor for IEEE Transactions on Robotics. In Jake's spare time, he's a movie buff, a foodie, and an all-around supporter of the arts and the community in Salt Lake City. Jake's wife is a flamenco dancer and instructor in Salt Lake City, and he plays guitar and sings as part of her group. You can learn more about Jake and his research by visiting https://www.telerobotics.utah.edu/index.php/People/JakeAbbott and https://www.mech.utah.edu/directory/faculty/jake-abbott/. **************************************** The Weekly Space Hangout is a production of CosmoQuest. Want to support CosmoQuest? Here are some specific ways you can help: ► Subscribe FREE to our YouTube channel at https://www.youtube.com/c/cosmoquest ► Subscribe to our podcasts Astronomy Cast and Daily Space where ever you get your podcasts! ► Watch our streams over on Twitch at https://www.twitch.tv/cosmoquestx – follow and subscribe! ► Become a Patreon of CosmoQuest https://www.patreon.com/cosmoquestx ► Become a Patreon of Astronomy Cast https://www.patreon.com/astronomycast ► Buy stuff from our Redbubble https://www.redbubble.com/people/cosmoquestx ► Join our Discord server for CosmoQuest - https://discord.gg/X8rw4vv ► Join the Weekly Space Hangout Crew! - http://www.wshcrew.space/ Don't forget to like and subscribe! Plus we love being shared out to new people, so tweet, comment, review us... all the free things you can do to help bring science into people's lives.

Lessons from the School of Cyber Hard Knocks

Today's guest is Avi Rubin, computer science professor at Johns Hopkins University. Poker champion, boating captain, and computer science professor?! In this episode, Avi discusses what he's teaching and researching right now, Harvard Labs, what buffer overflow is, consumer IoT and medical devices, surprises within the last few elections, his testimony before Congress, the dangers of cryptocurrency, U of Michigan football predictions, and as always, his toughest lesson learned.

Down the Wormhole
Faith, Astronomy, and Space Telescopes with Dr Jennifer Wiseman

Down the Wormhole

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2021 61:18


Episode 96 We are beyond thrilled to welcome Dr Jennifer Wiseman to the podcast today. We talk about her faith journey as well as her work in astronomy as she helps us to understand why the James Webb Space Telescope (launching this week), is going to take the Hubble to the next level. Her enthusiasm and wonder is contagious, so I hope you're ready to be inspired!    Dr Jennifer Wiseman is the Director of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) program of Dialogue on Science, Ethics, and Religion (DoSER). She is also an astrophysicist, studying the formation of stars and planetary systems using radio, optical, and infrared telescopes. She studied physics for her bachelor's degree at MIT, discovering comet Wiseman-Skiff in 1987. After earning her Ph.D. in astronomy from Harvard University in 1995, she continued her research as a Jansky Fellow at the National Radio Astronomy Observatory and as a Hubble Fellow at the Johns Hopkins University. She also has an interest in national science policy and has served as an American Physical Society Congressional Science Fellow. She has worked with several major observatories and is currently a senior astrophysicist at the Goddard Space Flight Center.  She is also a public speaker and author, and enjoys giving talks on the inspiration of astronomy and scientific discovery to schools, youth and church groups, and civic organizations. She is a Fellow of the American Scientific Affiliation and a former Councilor of the American Astronomical Society.   https://sciencereligiondialogue.org/ https://hubblesite.org/ https://www.jwst.nasa.gov/ https://roman.gsfc.nasa.gov/      Support this podcast on Patreon at https://www.patreon.com/DowntheWormholepodcast   More information at https://www.downthewormhole.com/   produced by Zack Jackson music by Zack Jackson and Barton Willis    Transcript  This transcript was automatically generated by www.otter.ai, and as such contains errors (especially when multiple people are talking). As the AI learns our voices, the transcripts will improve. We hope it is helpful even with the errors. Zack Jackson 00:05 You are listening to the down the wormhole podcast exploring the strange and fascinating relationship between science and religion.   Ian Binns 00:13 Our guest today is the director of the American Association for the Advancement of Science program of dialogue on science, ethics and religion, also known as dozer. She is also an astrophysicist studying the formation of stars and planetary systems using radio, optical and infrared telescopes. She studied physics for her bachelor's degree at MIT discovering comet Wiseman Skiff in 1987. After earning her PhD in astronomy from Harvard University in 1995, she continued her research as the Jansky fellow at the National Radio Astronomy Observatory, and as a Hubble Fellow at the Johns Hopkins University. She also has an interest in national science policy and has served as an American Physical Society congressional science fellow. She has worked with several major observatories, and is currently a senior astrophysicist at the Goddard Space Flight Center. She's also a public speaker and author and enjoys giving talks and inspiration of astronomy and scientific discovery to schools, youth and church groups, and civic organizations. She's a fellow of the American scientific affiliation, and a former Counselor of the American Astronomical Society. We're very excited to welcome Dr. Jennifer Wiseman to the show today.   Jennifer Wiseman 01:22 Thank you, it's my pleasure to join you.   Ian Binns 01:25 So, um, Jennifer, again, thank you for agreeing to come and talk, we just, you know, we've met you and I met several years ago, I know that you and Zach know each other as well. And so we kind of wanted to start off with what got you into astronomy. And then how did that grow to include your science and religion work as well,   Jennifer Wiseman 01:47 I grew up out in a rural area in Arkansas, on a family farm. And so I was just surrounded by nature growing up, we lived in a pretty area that had nearby lakes and rivers. So I enjoyed everything about the natural world, I thought we had animals of our own livestock and pets, but also lots of wildlife that I enjoyed seeing. And then I also enjoy just wandering around meadows and the streams and, you know, swimming, and kayaking, and all those kinds of things. And that made me appreciate the natural world, we also had dark night skies when I was growing up. So we could go out at night and see stars from horizon to horizon. And that is such a rare treat these days, most people live in cities or suburbs and have stray light from parking lots and stores and streets that create a glow in the sky and really drown out a lot of the beauty of seeing stars, unfortunately. But I was able to see the night sky, we would go on evening walks my parents and dogs and and I would enjoy these these regular walks. And I would imagine what it was like to, to go up where the stars are. And I would I was curious. So I think that started me out just being naturally curious about nature. And then science was a kind of a natural affinity then because science is basically the formal study of how nature works. And I had good teachers in my public schools who encouraged me in all kinds of subjects, science, mathematics, but also humanities and music. But all of that together, I think was the foundation and then Pair that with as I was growing up, there was a lot of flurry of interest about space exploration, the Voyager spacecraft, were just sending the first images back to earth, of moons around planets in our solar system, close up views we've never had before. I just thought this was fascinating. And you know, a lot of science fiction like Star Wars movies and things were starting to come out in the late 70s and 80s. And I was caught up in that too. So there was a lot of social interest in space, as well as my own natural affinity for nature. And all of that together, I think set the foundation for my interest in doing something related to the space program, but I didn't have a clue as to how to get involved in it. But thankfully, I had teachers and encouraging family and church that just encouraged me to go on and try anything I wanted. So I went on to study science.   Zack Jackson 04:42 That's beautiful.   Ian Binns 04:43 Yeah, there's a lot to take away from that. One of the things I love the most is you referred to Star Wars and Star Wars fans. Thank you for that.   Zack Jackson 04:53 genre that we've we've spent quite some time on this podcast talking about the value of science fiction and how it implants This sorts of love of cosmos in love of the world into people into children's minds. And so they grow up to great things. Yeah, that's so sorry. Go ahead. Sorry, I'm walking all over you. So I'm, I hear you say that there was a lot of support from family from, from friends and teachers and even church. Did you get any of that? That sort of feeling that science and and God are at odds that so many young Christians did as they're growing up? Did you taste any of that? Or was it all supportive?   Jennifer Wiseman 05:36 I never had any sense that there should be some kind of conflict between science and faith. In fact, quite the opposite. I grew up again, in a in a place where nature just surrounded us, it was a rural area where people had farms or they enjoy recreation on the lakes and rivers, and it was pretty and so we just naturally correlated the beauty of the natural world with our faith and our love for God, because we understood that God is the Creator, and God is responsible for the creation and called it good. So I think at a very basic level there, there really wasn't any sense of conflict, quite the opposite that science was the study of God's handiwork. And we should be grateful for that. Now, when it came to the particulars, like how do you interpret the opening verses of the biblical book of Genesis, that seems to stipulate that all of creation came into being in a few literal days and those kinds of things? You know, I think we, we probably took that rather literally in church and so forth. We didn't have any reason not to. But I think I was also given a sense of humility that our pastors and things would would tell us that God doesn't give us all the details in in Scripture that, that He's given us just enough for what we need to know to have a relationship with God, but but he's also given us mines and other tools and giving us more knowledge as time goes on. And so I think, even though I was probably schooled in a more literalistic view of Scripture growing up, I was also given a sense of humility, that there might be more to it than just what is more two more information that that God will give us than just what's written in Scripture. So I think that enabled me as I began to learn more about the scientific picture of the vast size and age of the universe and the development of life, I was able to correlate that with a humble view of scripture that God didn't give us all these details in Scripture, but delights in us using scientific knowledge to learn some of these rich details, and wow, are they Rich, I mean, the universe is not small. It's enormous, beyond our wildest imaginations, both in space and time. And I think that's something that fascinates me the most about astronomy is that it is a time machine, we can use telescopes to see out and that is equivalent to seeing back in time has taken time for the light to get to us from either planets in our solar system, or other stars or distant galaxies. And we can see how the universe has changed over time by looking back in time to distant objects in space. So I think what I did pick up growing up in terms of attention is more of a philosophical tension. I remember watching my favorite program on television, which was the cosmos program, which was a wonderful exploration of the universe. And I really admire Carl Sagan to this day, I'm so grateful for how he opened my eyes to the mysteries of the solar system and the universe beyond and introduced me to these images coming from the Voyager probes of the outer solar system, things like that. But every once in a while he and some other well, spoken scientist would interject some philosophical opinions and things that were kind of denigrating toward religion or religious faith and I picked that up even as a teenager and as a child. I couldn't quite articulate it, but I even then could sense that while I loved the Science, I didn't like some of the content Have dismissive comments I was hearing about religious faith and I, you know, I just kind of put tuck that away, in my mind kind of puzzling. Why does there have to be some kind of, of denigration of faith when you're talking about the majesties of science and, and then, of course, as I became an adult and a scientist, I realized that there is, of course, a strong difference between what the science is telling us about the natural world and how it works. And human philosophical interpretation of which there can be different opinions. And and trying to separate, you know, what is the science telling us from? What are the different human interpretations of what the natural world is telling us about human purpose and meaning, and even our beliefs and God and purpose. And I'm able to do that much better as a as an adult scientist, and to see where that wind falls, then I think a lot of folks in the public may be prepared for when they hear a scientist kind of crossing the line between talking about just the science and expressing personal philosophical views.   Zack Jackson 11:12 But I think you do so with the same sort of humility, like it spills over from, from your study of astronomy into your, into your religion and philosophy, that, like you study the stars, and you see the unbelievable fakeness. And you just can't help but let that spill over into everything that well, why would I know everything about philosophy? Why would I know everything about God, that's absurd. I don't even know everything about our solar system. There's like a certain humility, I think that comes from, from when you're really into, into that kind of science that I appreciate, I think, I think astronomy makes me a better Christian, or at least a more of a mystical one. Anyway,   Jennifer Wiseman 11:57 I think what astronomy does for me is not you know, sort of prove God or something like that, I think it's very hard to take something from the natural world and use it to prove or disprove something that isn't confined to just the natural, observable world. But what it does do, being a person of faith as I am in enrich that faith, I mean, I believe in God as the Creator and Sustainer of the universe. And when I learn more about what that universe is like, that means that my reverence for God is much deeper. I mean, it's almost scary when you think about the ages of time we're talking about in terms of our own universe, and there may be other universes too, that we don't even know anything about. And yet we read in Scripture, that the same God who's responsible for this 13 point a billion years of the universe, and its content, and its evolution, is also concerned with the lives of us and of the sparrow, you know, of the, of the individual, what we would call insignificant wife in terms of time and space, and yet God chooses to call us significant because of God's own choosing and love. And so it's that kind of, you know, the infinitely large almost, and the infinitely small, almost, that God encompasses that's very hard for me to comprehend. But it does deepen my, my reverent fear and my appreciation for the kind of God that that we read about in Scripture, and that we experience as people of faith.   Zack Jackson 13:54 So you are the director of the American, the American Association for the Advancement of Science program of dialogue on science, ethics and religion, which is a huge mouthful. Which is triple A S. dozer, you know, for those who like acronyms, which is an organization that I think every single one of our listeners, like if you if you subscribe to this podcast, and this is an organization that you would be interested in learning more about, but I would wager to guess that a lot of them have never heard of it. Can you tell us a little bit about what you do and what the organization does and what kind of resources are available, how they can connect?   Jennifer Wiseman 14:40 Sure. Okay, so so the the world's largest scientific society is the American Association for the Advancement of Science. And that organization does exactly what it sounds like it triple as advances science for the good of people around the world. So AAA is publishes a journal scientific journal called science that many have heard of, or even written scientific articles for. AAA is also advocates the good use of science in society. So, AAA is has public education programs and programs helping legislators to see how science is beneficial to people in all walks of life, triple as sponsors some programs to advocate science for advancing human rights, and to work with different components of society to make sure science is being used to the benefit of all people. One of those programs is this dialogue program called the dialogue on science, ethics and religion, or doser. It's the you can find out about it by the website as.org/doser DDoS, er doser was thought of back in the 1990s, when scientists realized that to really be effective and communicating with people, we needed to understand how important religion and faith is in people's lives. And if we're really going to interface with different communities, especially in the US, we need to recognize that people's faith identity is a very important part of their worldview. Most people identify with a religion or a religious tradition, as an important aspect of their identity, and how they get a lot of their sense of values and worldview, including how they see the world and hear and articulate science and its use in their lives and work in ministries and so forth. So if scientists are not understanding of the importance of religion and faith in the lives of most people, and if they're not able to articulate science in a way that brings people on board and listen to the values of people from faith communities, then scientists are really missing a huge chance of understanding the value of science and how it can be incorporated into the lives of our culture. So the doser program was invented back in the 1990s, to start building those relationships between scientists and religious communities. These are religious communities of all faiths, and scientists of any faith or no faith, but building a dialogue about how science is important in the lives of our people in our culture. Today, the dozer program is very active, we have several projects, one of them, I think you guys are particularly knowledgeable, that is our science for seminaries project, where we work with seminaries from across the country, and even beyond the US that are interested in, in incorporating good science into the training of future pastors and congregational leaders, because science is a part of everyone's life today. So if a church wants to serve the world in the most effective way, they need to know to how to incorporate science into their ministries, if they want to be relevant to our culture, especially for young people, they need to understand the role of science. It's not just the old arguments about science and creation and evolution. A lot of people when they think about science and religion, they immediately wonder if there's some kind of an argument about how old the the world is. And you know, there are still some very interesting questions, of course, about How did life come into being and so forth. But most faith communities now are really much more excited about talking about many other aspects of science as well like space exploration. Could there be life beyond Earth or, or more practical things? How do we incorporate good science into ministries to the poor or helping people around the world have better food better, cleaner water? How do we get the best science incorporated into the best health care practices? I mean, this is of course come to the forefront during this pandemic with COVID-19 and trying to understand the science of vaccinations and the social reality of distributing vaccine and getting people to understand and trust the science enough to become protected as best we can against the terrible disease. So all these aspects Our I think invigorating a dialogue between faith communities and scientists in our dozer program really seeks to bring scientists and faith communities into better relationship and contact. And of course, these are overlapping communities. I mean, a lot of scientists themselves are people of faith from various faith traditions. But even scientists who are not or not, for the most part, are not hostile to faith communities, they just need a better architecture for building dialogue and relationship. In fact, most scientists already of course, are interfacing with people of faith, whether they know it or not the students in their classrooms, people in their lab and so forth. And so we also hold workshops for scientists, at scientific society meetings, and at research universities to help scientists better understand the important role that faith plays in the lives of many, probably most people in the US if you look at the polls, and how to make sure that they are incorporating a respect for that faith component of people's lives when they're talking about science in their classrooms, and, and in their interface with people in their public spheres of influence. Not just to help welcome people into science, but also to help people see how science is relevant to the values they already have.   Ian Binns 21:26 So I'm curious if we can shift a little bit a UML mentioned in your bio, that you've did have done some work with Hubble, the Hubble Space Telescope, and you know, we, this is going to be versus being released, hopefully, in the same day that the new The Next Generation Space Telescope, the James Webb Space Telescope will be launched. And so can you talk to us a little bit about your work with the Hubble Space Telescope, and then maybe the distinction between Hubble that a lot of people know about and the new one, the James Webb Space Telescope and what your hopes are for that.   Jennifer Wiseman 22:02 I've had the privilege of working with many different types of telescopes throughout my astronomical career. My own research is based on the use of radio telescopes, which are these big dish shaped telescopes. My doctoral research used an array of them out in New Mexico called the Very Large Array or the VLA. In fact, you can drive out there and see the Very Large Array, southwest of Albuquerque. And with these kinds of telescopes, I've been able to study how stars form in interstellar clouds, you can peer in through the dust and see some of these regions where infant stars are forming. I've also used and worked with the Hubble Space Telescope, which is a platform that's now become very famous Hubble is a is a satellite orbiting the Earth. It's not very far above the earth just a little over 300 miles above the surface of the Earth, but it's up there to get it above the clouds. So you can get a much clearer image of objects in deep space, whether you're observing planets or stars or distant galaxies and Hubble has been operating for almost 32 years now, thanks to repeated visits from astronauts that have kept the observatory functioning by replacing cameras from time to time and repairing electronics. So so the the observatories in very good shape. We're recording this discussion right now in mid December looking forward to next week what we're anticipating as it's the launch of another very large space telescope called the James Webb Space Telescope, named after a NASA administrator who was a science supporter back in the Apollo years. This telescope will be every bit as good as Hubble in terms of getting beautiful images of space. But it will also be different from Hubble because it will be very sensitive to infrared wavelengths of light, the Hubble telescope sees visible light like our eyes can see. And even energetic light that's bluer than blue ultraviolet light, which is emitted from energetic processes in galaxies and in regions where stars are forming. Hubble can even see a little bit into the infrared part of the spectrum of light, so that's a little redder than red, which helps us to see somewhat into these interstellar clouds I mentioned where stars are still forming and planets are forming and to see very distant galaxies because as we look out into distance space, light from very distant galaxies has taken millions, sometimes billions of years to come. To us, and as it's traveling through expanding space, that light loses some of its energy, it gets shifted into what we call the reddened part of the spectrum, we get red shifted. Because it's stretched the wavelength of light, we can think of it as being stretched as they pass through expanding space to get to our telescope. And so some of those galaxies even though the light started its trip as blue eight from stars and ends up being infrared light when we receive it here, Hubble can see some of those very distant galaxies, which we're seeing as they were very far back in time when they were just infant galaxies. But some of those galaxies that light is redshift, and even beyond what Hubble can see in this new Webb Space Telescope will see infrared light much farther into the infrared part of the electromagnetic spectrum than Hubble can see. So the Webb telescope will be able to see galaxies even earlier in the history of our universe, when they were just starting to form. And that will complement the kinds of galaxies and the kinds of information that Hubble sees for us. So, you know, we talked about the universe being about 13 point 8 billion years old, which we can glean from various different types of information about the universe. We're now seeing galaxies as they were forming for Well, within that first point, eight of the 13 point 8 billion year history of the universe, we're really seeing the universe at when it was basically in its childhood, and the Webb telescope will show us proto galaxies, the very first generations of stars and gas kind of coalescing as gravity holds it together in the very first few 100,200,000,000 years of the universe after its beginning, so we're excited about that closer to home, the Webb telescope will also see into that deeper into that infrared part of the spectrum that allows us to see deeper into these nurseries of interstellar gas in our own galaxy, where stars are forming and planets are forming and disks around those stars. And to gather the Hubble Telescope, which we anticipate will keep working for quite a few more years, and the Webb telescope will provide complimentary information. For example, when we look at star forming regions, the Hubble Telescope will tell us something about emission in visible light and ultraviolet light. Webb Telescope will give us the infrared part that gives us a lot more information about what those baby stars are like as they form. And even more exciting, we're now we're now discovering that there are planets around other stars we call those exoplanets because they're outside our solar system. We can study something about their atmospheres and in their composition of those atmospheres. Hubble tells us something about the atoms and molecules that emit their light and visible wavelengths and in ultraviolet wavelengths. The Webb telescope gives us information from molecules in these exoplanet atmospheres that emit in infrared wavelengths. So then we can get a whole spectrum of information, we can know whether some of these exoplanets have water vapor, whether they have oxygen, have other kinds of things that we really want to know about exoplanets, and what they're like. So, complimentary science is the name of the game as we look forward to the James Webb Space Telescope, and we think about how it will work in complement to the Hubble Space Telescope in the coming years.   Zack Jackson 28:56 I bet you blew my mind in about seven different times in the past couple of years. So I'm not entirely sure where to go with the fact that you can point to telescope towards an exoplanet and look at the way that light passes through the tiny sliver of an atmosphere and be able to then tell what that atmosphere is made out of. That blows my mind.   Jennifer Wiseman 29:32 Well, the Hubble Space Telescope was actually the pioneer of this method of studying exoplanets. To study exoplanets, you have to be kind of like a detective because you have to use indirect methods to detect them in the first place, and even to study much about them. I mean, we would all like to simply point a camera at another planet, outside our solar system and take a nice picture But these things are really small. They are tiny objects orbiting bright things we call stars, and they get lost in the glare of the star. So astronomers have to use indirect methods to detect them to detect exoplanets. The first ones were detected not by seeing the planet, but by seeing how the star it was orbiting would wobble in its orbit. And that's because there's a gravitational mutual tug between a planet and its parent star. So even if you can't see the planet, you can see the star wobbling a little bit in its position as the planet orbits around, and they're both actually orbiting what's called the center of mass between the two. So the first exoplanets were detected by noticing stars periodically wobbling in their position, and determining from that what mass of planet, we would need to create that much of a wobble. And then the idea of transiting exoplanets was explored. That is certain planets happened to orbit their parent star in a plane that's along our line of sight as we're looking toward that star. And that means every time the planet passes in front of its parent star, it blocks out a little bit of that star light from our view. So even if we can't see the planet, we can see the starlight dimming just a little bit periodically as the planet orbits in front of it. Those transit observations were used by the Kepler space telescope, to discover hundreds of new exoplanet candidates. In fact, we have 1000s of them of systems simply by looking at the parent star and seeing them dim periodically and then doing follow up observations with other telescopes to really confirm whether or not what's causing that is, is an exoplanet. They have Hubble Telescope has taken this one step farther, which is using transits to, to study the composition of the atmospheres of some of these exoplanets. So when a planet passes in front of its parent star, not only does it block out some of the starlight, but some of the starlight passes through that outer rim of the planet's atmosphere along the outer limb on its way to as it passes through. And that atmosphere, what depending on what's in the planet's atmosphere will absorb some of that light. If there are molecules and atoms in the atmosphere, it will absorb light at very certain colors or frequencies. So a spectroscopy just can take that light and spread it out into its constituent colors, kind of like using a prism. And you can see the very particular color band where light is missing because atoms or molecules in that exoplanet atmosphere have absorbed it. And so we have, we have instruments on the Hubble Space Telescope, that are what we call spectrograph. They don't take the pretty pictures, they simply take the light and spread it out into its constituent frequencies or colors, like a prism and see where there are very particular color bands missing. And that pattern tells us what's been munched out, and that tells us what kinds of atoms or molecules are in the exoplanet atmosphere. So Hubble was the first observatory to be used to determine the composition of an exoplanet atmosphere. And now this has grown into a huge astronomical industry, if you will, of using telescopes, Hubble and other telescopes to do spectroscopic analysis of the atmospheres of exoplanets to learn something about their composition. And here, we're excited about this new webb space telescope that's going to do that as well. But in the far infrared in the sorry, in the mid infrared part of the electromagnetic spectrum, where we can do we can determine even more molecules and kinds of diagnostics that tell us more about what's in these exoplanet atmospheres. We want to know whether planets outside of our solar system are similar or different to planets inside our solar system. And of course, we'd like to know if any of them are habitable for life. We don't yet have the technology sadly to visit planets that are outside our solar system and take samples of their atmospheres or their their dirt if they have dirt or things like that, but we can observe them remotely and so that is what we're trying to perfect are these techniques of taking remote information Like the spectrum of light from an exoplanet atmosphere, and determining from that, what's in that atmosphere. And then from there we can discern whether or not there might be habitability for life. Like we know we need water for life as we know it. So could there be water on one of these exoplanets, or even signs of biological activity, we know that if we looked at Planet Earth from a distance, we would see oxygen in the atmosphere. And that's evidence of, of the work of plant life on our Earth's surface, generating oxygen, this kind of, of process photosynthesis tells us that there's an ongoing biological community, if you will, on planet Earth, otherwise, all the oxygen in the atmosphere would disappear through reactions, but the fact that we have continuing refreshed oxygen tells us that there's biological activity on our planet. If we saw oxygen, as well as other indicators in the atmospheres of other planets, that would be a clue that there might be biological activity there. So we're taking steps the Webb telescope will give us more information than Hubble and then future telescopes beyond Webb will be able to discern whether there are earth like planets with truly Earth light compositions in their atmospheres in in star systems around our galactic neighborhood. So the web is the next step in a whole series of future telescopes that astronomers are planning.   Ian Binns 36:39 That's exciting. Yeah. And I, and doing a little bit of research on James Webb and comparing it to the Hubble and and, you know, I've always been a huge fan of the Hubble Space Telescope and you know, have little models of it. Growing up when you know, I'm a huge LEGO fan, when Lego released the new space shuttle model. In the spring, the one that had Hubble with it was really exotic, so I could kind of build the space shuttle and Hubble. And so but doing those comparisons, I then saw just now the Nancy Grace Roman Space Telescope, that's in production, I guess, right? And,   Jennifer Wiseman 37:22 yes, so So the Nancy Grace Roman space telescope is named after you guessed it, Nancy Grace Roman, who was just a phenomenal pioneer in the history of NASA's foray into space astronomy, she was the first chief astronomer at NASA headquarters. And back in the 1970s, she was the one who advocated the idea of NASA building a space telescope. Now scientists had been talking about this for even decades about what you could do if you could put a telescope in space, but to actually get it implemented, required someone with a NASA headquarters to champion this idea. And she did, she got it started with a NASA Headquarters back in the 1970s. And that ended up being the Hubble Space Telescope. So she's sometimes referred to as the mother of Hubble. She passed away just recently, but she remained an active interested scientist for all of her life. So this telescope now that's being developed is named in her honor the the Roman space telescope, and it will again complement these other space telescopes, it will complement the Webb Space Telescope, which will launch sooner. And the Hubble Space Telescope, which is already operating, the Roman telescope will be an infrared telescope, you know, like the Webb telescope is, is an infrared Space Telescope. But the difference is that Roman is going to have a much wider field of view, that means it will see a much wider swath of the sky than either Hubble, or the Webb telescope can do. If, if Hubble wants to survey a wide, wider region of the sky, it has to do hundreds of little postage stamp observations and stitch it all together. And we've done that and we've done for example, a Hubble observation of a big part of the disk of the Andromeda Galaxy, which is our nearest big spiral galaxy, and we learned a lot by stitching together little postage stamp observation after observation. This is a project led by Professor Julianne del Canton and her team called the fat program which which is is spelled ph 80. But it's it's Hubble Andromeda Treasury program to look at stars in this nearby galaxy. But it's taken a long time. The Roman telescope can do this wide swath of the sky with just, you know, one exposure because it can see such a wider swath of the sky. And the other thing, the other kind of science that it's really being designed to do is to study the distribution of galaxies. Hubble's really good at looking at an individual galaxy and telling us a lot of information. But if you want to know how hundreds or 1000s of galaxies are distributed around the sky, it takes a long time, my favorite image from Hubble is called the Ultra Deep Field. I don't know if you've seen it. But it was a product of just pointing Hubble in one direction, the sky and collecting faint light over many days. And the product is this collection of little blotches of light that you might think are stars, but each one of them is actually another galaxy like like like or unlike the Milky Way each one that can contain billions of stars. And so if you imagine that extrapolated over the entire sky, you get a sense of how rich our universe is. But as wonderful as that deep field is, and you can see 1000s of galaxies, you can't get a sense of how galaxies are really distributed across wider swaths of the sky because it is a small field of view. The Roman telescope, which should be launched later, this decade, will have a wide field of view that can see how the patterns of galaxies have taken shape. Throughout cosmic history. We know that galaxies are distributed in more of a honeycomb fashion, there are regions where there aren't many galaxies, we call them, voids, voids. And then there are regions where there are kind of quite a few galaxies collected together. We know now that throughout the billions of years of cosmic history, there's been kind of a tug of war between gravity, which is trying to pull things together. And that's creating galaxies and even clusters of galaxies that are held together by their mutual gravitational pool. And something that's pushing things apart, we now know that the universe is not only expanding, but that expansion is getting faster. So something is, is kind of pushing out. And we're calling that dark energy, because we don't really know what it is, it may be some repulsive aspect of gravity. Over time, this tug of war between dark energy pushing things apart, and the matter pulling things together, through what we would call traditional gravitational pull has resulted in the distribution of galaxies that we now have today, we would like to understand that better. And the Roman Space Telescope is going to help us see how galaxies have been distributed across space throughout cosmic time. And then the Webb telescope, and the Hubble telescope can help us hone in on very specific galaxies and small clusters to give us more detail. So again, we use different observatories in complement, because they each have their own kind of unique scientific niche of what they can tell us. And together, we get a much better bigger picture of what's going on in the universe. And we also use telescopes on the ground that are getting more and more sophisticated in what they can do to complement telescopes in space. So all of these facilities work in complement.   Ian Binns 43:51 So I'm curious, Jennifer, you know, with Hubble, and you're especially bringing up the Ultra Deep Field. And before that there was so the Hubble Deep Field, and then the hobo Ultra Deep Field, right. And they were both just unbelievable. To look at. I remember when they both came out. And I cannot remember the years, obviously, but I do remember, I think the Hubble are the first one I was able to use and I was a high school science teacher. But it was just unbelievable to look at these things. Will there be with the James Webb Space Telescope? For example? Will we is there will there be an effort to kind of point it in the same direction? You know, the Hubble has been pointing out and look at either the same areas that Hubble's looked at to see what else we could get from that location. And then also to Will there be something kind of like the Hubble Ultra Deep Field with the James Webb, like, is there going to be do you know, or is that just anything is possible?   Jennifer Wiseman 44:52 Oh, absolutely. I mean, one of the main drivers for the the James Webb Space Telescope was this desire to look at the Deep feels like Hubble has done. But to be able to see galaxies that are even more distant than what Hubble can pick up the these distant galaxies, of course, we're not seeing them as they actually are right this minute, we're seeing them as they were when the light began its track from those galaxies across space, to our telescope. And for some of these galaxies in these deep fields, those galaxies are billions of what we call light years away a light year is a unit of distance is the distance that light travels in a year. So when we see a galaxy that's billions of light years away, we're seeing it as it was billions of years back in time. And as that light has traveled across space to get to our telescope, it's traveled through space that is actually expanding, that creates what we call a red shifting effect, the light that we receive is redder than it was when it started, it's its journey. And sometimes that red shifting goes all the way into the infrared part of the spectrum, even beyond what Hubble can pick up. So for these most distant galaxies, we anticipate that a lot of them are shining most of their light in, in a wavelength that's become shifted into the infrared part of the spectrum that only the Webb telescope will pick up, it will pick up galaxies and see them that that the Hubble Deep fields haven't seen so we anticipate seeing even more galaxies with the Webb telescope than Hubble has seen. And yet Hubble can see galaxies in ways that the web won't be able to see Hubble can see the ultraviolet light from the more nearby galaxies. And we can then put a picture together as how as to how galaxies have changed. Over time, by comparing those early infant galaxies at the Webb telescope, we'll pick up with the galaxies that Hubble can see brightly in ultraviolet light that won't be as bright in the infrared light that Webb can see. And then all those intermediate galaxies that we pick up, the infrared light from the Webb telescope and the visible and ultraviolet light from Hubble, and we can put all that information together to make deep feels like we've never had before. So yes, we're going to see the same deals that Hubble has seen, Webb will look at and pick up more galaxies, and then other deep fields Webb will look at. And we will we're already doing preparatory science with Hubble knowing that we want to use Webb for the things that Webb uniquely can do, and can use it in complement with what Hubble can already do. So we're already doing what we call preparatory observations. With Hubble, that makes sure that we understand everything we can about these different fields of galaxies with Hubble, so that we know just the kinds of things we want to learn with JT VST. And we use that telescope as efficiently as we can, once it gets going. You know, the Webb telescope is anticipated as we record this to be launching in late December. But it'll take several months for it to get out where it will be perched a million miles more and more from Earth. That's a lot farther away than Hubble is, but it's being put that far away from Earth to keep it very cool. So that it can pick up the faintest infrared light from these distant galaxies, and from these closer to home star forming regions. So we won't be getting science images from the web for quite a few months, as it makes this trek out into a much more distant part of space than the Hubble telescope. So we're gonna have to be patient. But I'm looking forward to those first science images coming in, in the in the middle part of 2022. If all goes well,   Zack Jackson 48:57 so when we do start to get those images, wow, if they're in the infrared, what will they look like to us humans? Will they have to be artificially colored? Or?   Jennifer Wiseman 49:09 Yes, so so the the Webb telescope will see red light that we can see. But then beyond read into the infrared that we cannot see. And the Hubble itself also sees Light We Cannot See. So Hubble picks up visible light that we can see. But Hubble's picks up ultraviolet light that we can't see and also near infrared light that we cannot see. So already with Hubble images, we have to give them colors that our eyes can see so that we can have a picture to look at. So for Hubble images, if you read carefully, it will tell you whether what you're seeing is visible light or if it's for example, near infrared light, it will be given a red hue so that you can see that part of the spectrum showing up In in the eyes, your colors your eyes can see, we usually label the things on Hubble images. So you know exactly what the color coding is. The Webb telescope images will be likewise sort of translated into colors that we can see in pictures and photographs so that the part of the infrared spectrum that is closer to visible light will be colored, a little less red, maybe even blue. And the part of the infrared spectrum that the web will pick up that's deeper into the infrared part of the spectrum will be colored, very red. And so you'll you'll see probably a, a, a legend that, you know, next to these James Webb images that tell you the range of colors that it's actually picking up and what that has been translated to in the colors that have been put into the image, it's, it's not just any color goes these, usually what happens is you try to make the color range that's on the image as close to the span of color as the actual information is, but just transferred over into a band that our eyes can see. So yes, you have to do something, or else you couldn't see it, with our eyes looking at a picture, because we can't see infrared light. And the same is already true with Hubble images that go beyond just the visible light of the spectrum.   Ian Binns 51:35 I'm just in awe. It's just, I've always loved astronomy, and you know, it's something that I've always just been passionate about. What is it that you're most excited about? And I'm sorry, I just you know, in listening to you talk about it, you may have talked some already. But with this, the Webb Space Telescope, the Nancy Grace, Roman, and telescope and all these different ones that are coming, what is it that you're most excited about with these things?   Jennifer Wiseman 52:06 I think I'm most excited about what you might call two extremes of the spacial scale of the Universe. With these new telescopes, like the the Webb Space Telescope, and then later the Roman Space Telescope. I'm excited about getting even a better understanding of how the universe we live in has become hospitable over billions of years for life, we can actually, you know, look at the earliest galaxies and compare them to galaxies, like our own Milky Way and intermediate time galaxies as well. And we can see how they've changed over these billions of years of time, we can't follow an individual galaxy as it changed. But we can look at the whole population at these different epochs of time. And we can tell that galaxies have merged together and become bigger over time we think our own Milky Way is the project product of mergers. And we can tell that stars have come and gone in these galaxies, massive stars don't live that long. And so they they produce heavier elements that we need four planets in life. As they shine, they, they they go through a process, a process called Fusion that creates heavier elements. And then when the massive stars become unstable, and run out of fuel, they explode and disperse that material into these interstellar clouds where the next generations of stars form. So we know there's been several generations of stars building upon prior generations. And all that process does is to create heavier elements that enable things like planets to form around star. So in our own galaxy, when stars are still forming, we see them forming with discs of dusty debris and planets forming around them. We know that that's only possible because of previous generations of stars in the galaxy that have created heavier elements. So as as we look at this process of the whole universe, the whole cosmos becoming more hospitable to life over eons of time, and that fascinates me and I'm excited with these new telescopes to get a greater sense of how that process has worked. And that personally feeds my, my faith, my sense of offer, how our universe has been endowed with what we need for for life and eventually the ability to have these kinds of conversations to exist and to think about our purpose and our existence and to contemplate on greater meaning. So that excites me and then much closer to home. I really am excited about observations within our solar system, I like the idea that we, with these new telescopes can also study details about planets and moons in our own solar system. And also that we're sending probes, you know, the the kind of space exploration that got me excited in astronomy in the first place. Where are these probes that humans have constructed and sent out to send back images of other planets and their moons in our solar system, I still think that's the the one of the greatest things humans have done and can do, if we put our heads together and do constructive international cooperations. And so I'm excited about probes that will go to places like Europa in our own solar system, in the coming years, that's an ice covered moon that we know has water ocean underneath, I'd like to know what what that water is like, you know, and there are missions that are already sampling the region around Jupiter, and have probed the environment of Saturn. These are things that excite me. And so I'm looking forward also to probe and telescope studies of our own solar system in the coming years. That's our own backyard. And we can learn a lot about even our own planet, by studying our sister planets in our own solar system. So those are the things I'm most excited about.   Zack Jackson 56:29 Do you think we're going to find life on Venus?   Jennifer Wiseman 56:33 Venus is harsh. Venus is is hot, and you know, really inhospitable to life as we know it. Now you can say, well, what if there's life, that's not as we know it? But, you know, we've all watched a lot of science fiction. But the trouble is, we have to know how to identify life, what is life? And so we have to start with what we know, which is life, even in the most extreme conditions on planet Earth. And, you know, what, what are they? The conditions, even the most extreme ones that in which life can thrive? There's a whole field called astrobiology right? Now, that's, that's a new field. But it's a very vibrant field where scientists are trying to understand what are the even the extreme conditions in which life can exist in our own planet Earth? And then, how would that translate to environments in space, either in interstellar space or on other planets or other star systems? And then how would we identify it as life? You know, that's really the tough question, especially if you can't go someplace physically, you can only observe remotely, how would you know that? That's that there's life there? That's a hard question in the field of astrobiology is trying to address all those questions. One of the things I like about astronomy right now is it's very interdisciplinary. It's not that you know, astronomy is separate from geology, which is separate from physics, which is separate from chemistry. No, all these things are being used together now, including biology to try to understand environments of other star systems and planets. And you know, how these conditions of stellar radiation and geology and atmospheres and chemistry work together and how that might affect even biology. So everything is very interdisciplinary now. And I just encourage people to get excited about space exploration, even if that's not your professional feel, there's so much you can learn and enjoy, even if it's not your occupation. By paying attention online, what's going on Hubble Space Telescope images are all freely available online, you can go to the website nasa.gov/hubble. And learn about it are also the galleries at Hubble site.org. And see any of these amazing images I've been talking about. The other telescopes that are large and space are on the ground also have magnificent websites with images. So you can learn a lot just by paying attention online. And I hope everybody also encourages young people to go into science fields or to realize that science is relevant to all walks of life, not just if you're thinking about becoming professional involved in space, but if you're thinking about just about anything, science is relevant to what you do. Science is relevant to our food to communications, to our health, to our exploration of oceans, and mountains, even on this planet, so I hope everybody takes a sense of time to just look around the natural world right around you. be appreciative of the wildlife and the trees and the natural world in a pretty Science as a way of studying that natural world but but keep a sense of wonder and awe. That's how I would encourage everyone to walk away from a program like this.   Zack Jackson 1:00:11 Well, thank you so much for that. Yeah. And   Ian Binns 1:00:13 I'll give a great ending.   Zack Jackson 1:00:14 I'll give a plug for we did an episode on on astrobiology back in January that you all should check out if you haven't had a chance to read Adams book. What is it living with tiny aliens? The image of God and the Anthropocene? Right, am I getting that subtitle? Right? He's not here. He's one of our CO hosts. He's not with us today to plug his own book. But thank you so much for the the wonder the all the inspirations hope. There's a lot to get excited about. Yeah, thank you.   Jennifer Wiseman 1:00:45 My pleasure. I'm glad you're interested in and I'm sure there'll be many more conversations to come have

New Books in History
Jeffrey Brooks, "The Firebird and the Fox: Russian Culture under Tsars and Bolsheviks" (Cambridge UP, 2019)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2021 40:01


Firebird and the Fox: Russian Culture under Tsars and Bolsheviks (Cambridge UP, 2019) by Jeffrey Brooks, Professor of History at Johns Hopkins University, is a summa of his lifetime study of Russian culture. In doing so, Brooks provides a needed corrective to the prior standard work, now over 50 years old. Firebird and the Fox chronicles a century of Russian artistic genius, including literature, art, music and dance, within the dynamic cultural ecosystem that shaped it. Daniel Peris is Senior Vice President at Federated Hermes in Pittsburgh. He can be reached at DanielxPeris@gmail.com or via Twitter @HistoryInvestor. His History and Investing blog and Keep Calm & Carry On Investing podcast are at https://strategicdividendinves... Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

New Books in Art
Jeffrey Brooks, "The Firebird and the Fox: Russian Culture under Tsars and Bolsheviks" (Cambridge UP, 2019)

New Books in Art

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2021 40:01


Firebird and the Fox: Russian Culture under Tsars and Bolsheviks (Cambridge UP, 2019) by Jeffrey Brooks, Professor of History at Johns Hopkins University, is a summa of his lifetime study of Russian culture. In doing so, Brooks provides a needed corrective to the prior standard work, now over 50 years old. Firebird and the Fox chronicles a century of Russian artistic genius, including literature, art, music and dance, within the dynamic cultural ecosystem that shaped it. Daniel Peris is Senior Vice President at Federated Hermes in Pittsburgh. He can be reached at DanielxPeris@gmail.com or via Twitter @HistoryInvestor. His History and Investing blog and Keep Calm & Carry On Investing podcast are at https://strategicdividendinves... Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/art

New Books Network
Jeffrey Brooks, "The Firebird and the Fox: Russian Culture under Tsars and Bolsheviks" (Cambridge UP, 2019)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2021 40:01


Firebird and the Fox: Russian Culture under Tsars and Bolsheviks (Cambridge UP, 2019) by Jeffrey Brooks, Professor of History at Johns Hopkins University, is a summa of his lifetime study of Russian culture. In doing so, Brooks provides a needed corrective to the prior standard work, now over 50 years old. Firebird and the Fox chronicles a century of Russian artistic genius, including literature, art, music and dance, within the dynamic cultural ecosystem that shaped it. Daniel Peris is Senior Vice President at Federated Hermes in Pittsburgh. He can be reached at DanielxPeris@gmail.com or via Twitter @HistoryInvestor. His History and Investing blog and Keep Calm & Carry On Investing podcast are at https://strategicdividendinves... Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in Music
Jeffrey Brooks, "The Firebird and the Fox: Russian Culture under Tsars and Bolsheviks" (Cambridge UP, 2019)

New Books in Music

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2021 40:01


Firebird and the Fox: Russian Culture under Tsars and Bolsheviks (Cambridge UP, 2019) by Jeffrey Brooks, Professor of History at Johns Hopkins University, is a summa of his lifetime study of Russian culture. In doing so, Brooks provides a needed corrective to the prior standard work, now over 50 years old. Firebird and the Fox chronicles a century of Russian artistic genius, including literature, art, music and dance, within the dynamic cultural ecosystem that shaped it. Daniel Peris is Senior Vice President at Federated Hermes in Pittsburgh. He can be reached at DanielxPeris@gmail.com or via Twitter @HistoryInvestor. His History and Investing blog and Keep Calm & Carry On Investing podcast are at https://strategicdividendinves... Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/music

New Books in Literary Studies
Jeffrey Brooks, "The Firebird and the Fox: Russian Culture under Tsars and Bolsheviks" (Cambridge UP, 2019)

New Books in Literary Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2021 40:01


Firebird and the Fox: Russian Culture under Tsars and Bolsheviks (Cambridge UP, 2019) by Jeffrey Brooks, Professor of History at Johns Hopkins University, is a summa of his lifetime study of Russian culture. In doing so, Brooks provides a needed corrective to the prior standard work, now over 50 years old. Firebird and the Fox chronicles a century of Russian artistic genius, including literature, art, music and dance, within the dynamic cultural ecosystem that shaped it. Daniel Peris is Senior Vice President at Federated Hermes in Pittsburgh. He can be reached at DanielxPeris@gmail.com or via Twitter @HistoryInvestor. His History and Investing blog and Keep Calm & Carry On Investing podcast are at https://strategicdividendinves... Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/literary-studies

New Books in Russian and Eurasian Studies
Jeffrey Brooks, "The Firebird and the Fox: Russian Culture under Tsars and Bolsheviks" (Cambridge UP, 2019)

New Books in Russian and Eurasian Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2021 40:01


Firebird and the Fox: Russian Culture under Tsars and Bolsheviks (Cambridge UP, 2019) by Jeffrey Brooks, Professor of History at Johns Hopkins University, is a summa of his lifetime study of Russian culture. In doing so, Brooks provides a needed corrective to the prior standard work, now over 50 years old. Firebird and the Fox chronicles a century of Russian artistic genius, including literature, art, music and dance, within the dynamic cultural ecosystem that shaped it. Daniel Peris is Senior Vice President at Federated Hermes in Pittsburgh. He can be reached at DanielxPeris@gmail.com or via Twitter @HistoryInvestor. His History and Investing blog and Keep Calm & Carry On Investing podcast are at https://strategicdividendinves... Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/russian-studies

Wife of Crime
The Mysterious death of Kanika Powell

Wife of Crime

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2021 44:41


On this episode I tell Russ about the crazy and mysterious death of Kanika Powell. Kanika was a young ambitious woman who held a top secret security clearance and worked for the Applied Physics Laboratory at Johns Hopkins University. With the type of job Kanika had her friends and family thought she would be protected from danger but her job may have been the very thing that led to her death.Moral of this story... there is no lesson to be learned here because Kanika did everything right and still couldn't escape her killer. Sponsors:Hydrojugwww.thehydrojug.com Promo code: CRIMEGreen Chef:www.greenchef.com/wifeofcrime10 promo code: wifeofcrime10Join the Crime Family!:www.patreon.com/wifeofcrimepod

Using the Whole Whale Podcast
276: (news) log4j Nightmare Before Nonprofit Christmas & Jobs Report

Using the Whole Whale Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021 22:41


Nonprofit news in December.   Nonprofit Job Gains Slow As Sector Approaches Pre-Pandemic Employment Levels According to data from the Center for Civil Society Studies (CCSS) at Johns Hopkins University as reported by the Nonprofit Times, nonprofit job growth slowed in November but shows that most nonprofit categories are expected to achieve near full employment by the end of the year. While nonprofits have recovered nearly 70% of lost jobs since the beginning of the pandemic, there remain approximately 485,000 missing jobs (of the initial 1.64 million lost). Nonprofit arts and entertainment organizations have seen the slowest recovery, down 13% of their jobs compared to before the pandemic. Read more ➝   What To Know About The Log4j Vulnerability  Nonprofit open-source software organization Apache Software Foundation has announced a vulnerability that, left unresolved, poses a glaring cybersecurity threat across global commercial, corporate, and government networks. The Log4j vulnerability opens up the possibility of a significant breach in the form of malware, ransomware, and other attacks. The U.S. government has been working alongside cybersecurity experts to determine next steps while Microsoft has already identified threats from suspected state-backed actors in China and Iran. Read more about how companies are addressing the problem. Read more ➝   Summary Environmental nonprofits receive just 2% of charitable dollars (Fast Company). How NFTs are helping charities and nonprofits fundraise (Denver Channel) Nonprofit Nazareth Child and Family Connection, nonprofits feel effects of 'great resignation' - Salisbury Post Foster care crisis is 'out of control' in Texas, with both children and staff in danger Letters to Santa in Braille: How a Lancaster nonprofit is helping kids who are visually impaired this Christmas (Lancaster Online)  

New Books in World Affairs
Ryan D. Griffiths, "Secession and the Sovereignty Game: Strategy and Tactics for Aspiring Nations" (Cornell UP, 2021)

New Books in World Affairs

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2021 52:30


Secession and the Sovereignty Game: Strategy and Tactics for Aspiring Nations offers a strategic theory for how secessionist movements attempt to win independence. The rules and informal practices of sovereign recognition create a strategic playing field between existing states and aspiring nations, i.e., "the sovereignty game." To win sovereign statehood, all secessionist movements have to maneuver on the same strategic playing field while varying their tactics according to local conditions. To obtain recognition, secessionist movements use tactics of electoral capture, nonviolent civil resistance, and violence. To persuade the home state and the international community, they appeal to normative arguments regarding earned sovereignty, decolonization, the right to choose, inherent sovereignty, and human rights. The book combines original data analysis, fieldwork, interviews with secessionist leaders, and case studies on Catalonia, the Murrawarri Republic, West Papua, Bougainville, New Caledonia, and Northern Cyprus Ryan Griffiths is an Associate Professor in the Department of Political Science at Syracuse University. His research focuses on the dynamics of secession and the study of sovereignty, state systems, and international orders. His most recent book is Secession and the Sovereignty Game: Strategy and Tactics for Aspiring Nations (Cornell University Press, 2021). His previous posts include the University of Sydney, Johns Hopkins University, Yale University, and the Barcelona Institute for International Studies (IBEI). He completed his PhD at Columbia University in 2010. Aditya Srinivasan assisted with this episode. Lamis Abdelaaty is an assistant professor of political science at the Maxwell School of Syracuse University. She is the author of Discrimination and Delegation: Explaining State Responses to Refugees (Oxford University Press, 2021). Email her comments at labdelaa@syr.edu or tweet to @LAbdelaaty. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/world-affairs

New Books Network
Ryan D. Griffiths, "Secession and the Sovereignty Game: Strategy and Tactics for Aspiring Nations" (Cornell UP, 2021)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2021 52:30


Secession and the Sovereignty Game: Strategy and Tactics for Aspiring Nations offers a strategic theory for how secessionist movements attempt to win independence. The rules and informal practices of sovereign recognition create a strategic playing field between existing states and aspiring nations, i.e., "the sovereignty game." To win sovereign statehood, all secessionist movements have to maneuver on the same strategic playing field while varying their tactics according to local conditions. To obtain recognition, secessionist movements use tactics of electoral capture, nonviolent civil resistance, and violence. To persuade the home state and the international community, they appeal to normative arguments regarding earned sovereignty, decolonization, the right to choose, inherent sovereignty, and human rights. The book combines original data analysis, fieldwork, interviews with secessionist leaders, and case studies on Catalonia, the Murrawarri Republic, West Papua, Bougainville, New Caledonia, and Northern Cyprus Ryan Griffiths is an Associate Professor in the Department of Political Science at Syracuse University. His research focuses on the dynamics of secession and the study of sovereignty, state systems, and international orders. His most recent book is Secession and the Sovereignty Game: Strategy and Tactics for Aspiring Nations (Cornell University Press, 2021). His previous posts include the University of Sydney, Johns Hopkins University, Yale University, and the Barcelona Institute for International Studies (IBEI). He completed his PhD at Columbia University in 2010. Aditya Srinivasan assisted with this episode. Lamis Abdelaaty is an assistant professor of political science at the Maxwell School of Syracuse University. She is the author of Discrimination and Delegation: Explaining State Responses to Refugees (Oxford University Press, 2021). Email her comments at labdelaa@syr.edu or tweet to @LAbdelaaty. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

Geeks Of The Valley
#62: The Future of Blockchain Convergence with Kenetic Capital's Jehan Chu

Geeks Of The Valley

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 19, 2021 33:56


Jehan Chu is co-Founder and Managing Partner at Kenetic, a blockchain Venture Capital and cryptocurrency trading firm based in Hong Kong. A former front-end developer, he started investing in cryptocurrency in 2013 and has invested and supported over 100 projects. Jehan founded the Ethereum HK community (2014), co-Founded the Bitcoin Association of Hong Kong (2014) and founded the Hyperledger HK community (2016). Jehan serves as co-Chairman of the Hong Kong Fintech Association Blockchain Committee, is enrolled in the Kauffman Fellows Program, is a Fellow of the Singapore University of Social Science and member of the Global Patrons Board of San Francisco Museum of Modern Art. He also sits on the Board of Para Site Art Space and is co-Founder and Board member of Social Alpha Foundation, a blockchain/social impact non-profit. Jehan holds a BA from Johns Hopkins University and MA from Hong Kong University. LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/jehanchu/ --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/geeksofthevalley/support

The Seth Leibsohn Show
December 17, 2021 - Hour 2

The Seth Leibsohn Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 18, 2021 37:05


Ken Masugi, Senior Fellow of the Claremont Institute and Adjunct Professor at Johns Hopkins University, on his piece in American Greatness, "The War We Must Fight." See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Loving Liberty Radio Network
12-17-2021 Liberty RoundTable with Sam Bushman

Loving Liberty Radio Network

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2021 109:38


Hour 1 * Guest: Chris Carlson – Without God, we can never win, With God, we can never lose, The Battle for Freedom is the Lord's, but we need to be engaged in the fight! * Fact: The world has reported more COVID-19 deaths in 2021 than in 2020, according to Johns Hopkins University data analyzed by The Wall Street Journal. More deaths from COVID in 2021 than in 2020 in the US as well. * Refugees not vaccinated because drugmakers fear injury lawsuits – Migrants fall outside legal immunity granted by countries to Big Pharma – Art Moore, WND.com – The United Nations says COVID-19 vaccine manufacturers have required that countries relieve them of any legal liability. * A Tale of Two Doctors – Robert Malone Vs. Anthony Fouci! * Meet Robert Malone, inventor of mRNA vaccine technology: I am an internationally recognized scientist/physician and the original inventor of the mRNA vaccination as a technology, DNA vaccination, and hold numerous fundamental domestic and foreign patents in the fields of gene delivery, delivery formulations, and vaccines: including for fundamental DNA and RNA/mRNA vaccine technologies. * The Malone Doctrine – A Declaration of Independence from the Decisions of Institutions that Lack Integrity. * Have you read The Book The Real Anthony Fauci? Robert F. Kennedy Jr. * What is Dr. Fouci's role in the history of AIDS? * Medical Experiments on Orphans. * Under Fouci's leadership, during the first year of the COVID-19 pandemic, the United States with 4% of the world's population, suffered 14.5% of total COVID-19 deaths. * According to an Ohio State University study, suicide rates among children rose 50% during the Fouci lockdowns. Alcoholism, child abuse, obesity, mental illness, depression, debilitating developmental delays and drug addictions are all up. * Pandemic Could Be Solved Quickly If Politics Thrown Out! – Dr. Ben Carson. * Carson: “Let's look around the world at things that work. Let's look at the fact that on the western coast of Africa, there's almost no COVID. And let's ask ourselves, why is that? And then you see, it's because they take antimalarials, particularly hydroxychloroquine. Let's study that. Let's see what's going on there. “Let's listen to these physician groups who've had incredible success with ivermectin. Let's look at the results with monoclonal antibodies. Let's look at all of these things. Let's put them all in our armamentarium so that we don't have a one-size-fits-all system.” Hour 2 * Guest: Dr. Scott Bradley – To Preserve The Nation – FreedomsRisingSun.com * FDA: The decision will broaden access to medication abortion – The federal government permanently lifted a major restriction on access to abortion pills. It will allow patients to receive the medication by mail instead of requiring them to obtain the pills in person from specially certified health providers. * Southwest Airlines CEO Gary Kelly said “masks don't add much, if anything” to slowing the spread of COVID-19 in an aircraft environment. * American Airlines CEO Doug Parker then agreed, saying “The aircraft is the safest place you can be. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/loving-liberty/support

The Thomistic Institute
10 Reasons to Oppose Legalization of Physician-Assisted Suicide | Dr. Joseph Marine, M.D.

The Thomistic Institute

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 65:48


Warning: this talk contains graphic content describing medical practice. This talk was given on October 19, 2021 at Johns Hopkins University via Zoom. For more information on upcoming events, please visit our website at www.thomisticinstitute.org About the speaker: Joseph Marine, MD, MBA, FACC, FHRS, is a board-certified clinical cardiac electrophysiologist who practices primarily at the Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore, Maryland. He is a Professor of Medicine at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and holds appointments as Vice-Director of Operations for the Division of Cardiology and Section Chief of Cardiology for Johns Hopkins Community Physicians. He trained at UC San Francisco Medical School, Brigham and Women's Hospital/Harvard Medical School, Boston University Medical Center, and Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center. Dr. Marine has lectured widely on a variety of arrhythmia topics and has served as a co-director of the American College of Cardiology (ACC) Cardiovascular Overview and Board Review Course for 10 years. He currently serves on the ACC Board of Governors and is co-editor of the ACC/HRS EP Self-Assessment Program. He also serves on other committees for the ACC, the Heart Rhythm Society, and MedChi. He is co-author of more than 130 original research and review articles and has served on writing committees for several national cardiology practice and training guidelines.

Creative Habits Podcast
Artists Talk with Educator, Author and Business owner Albert Phillips

Creative Habits Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 46:22


Albert Phillips Writer. Educator. Youth Advocate. Albert Phillips was born and raised in Baltimore, Maryland and received primary education in the Baltimore City Public Schools System. He earned an Associate of Arts in General Studies from Baltimore City Community College, a Bachelor of Science in Print Journalism from Morgan State University, and a Master of Science in Education from Johns Hopkins University. Upon graduating from Morgan State in 2013, Albert shifted his primary career passion from writing for numerous local and national publications to the development of inner-city youth. He served various roles working directly with Baltimore City youth while employed by the YMCA, Big Brothers Big Sisters, and the Choice Program. In 2015, he earned a state and national award for exemplary community service throughout Baltimore City. Albert is also founder and CEO of Free Black Mind Educational Group, a social enterprise startup that provides digital and print resources designed to empower and educate Black youth. His first self-published book, Y'all Hiring? The Black Teen's Guide to Navigating Employment was released in October 2020. Checkout his Book https://www.amazon.com/Yall-Hiring-Black-Navigating-Employment/dp/1735324701 and check out his socials https://www.instagram.com/theambitiousblackguy/ @Creativehabitspodcast on all socials --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/creative-habits/message

Coronavirus Update
CORONAVIRUS UPDATE 15DEC 2021

Coronavirus Update

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2021 10:50


Topics include Joe Rogan Interview with Dr. Peter McCullough with an exclusive report, information on vaccine efficacy from Dr. Mark Makary from Johns Hopkins University, more VAERS Data and new information on a studio from Oxford on myocarditis cases due to vaccines among people under 40. This and more on this expanded edition of the Coronavirus Update. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/james-watkins9/support

thinkfuture with kalaboukis
545 The Future Of 3D Printing with Jonah Myerberg @ Desktop Metal

thinkfuture with kalaboukis

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2021 44:23


Jonah Myerberg is a Co-founder and Chief Technology Officer at Desktop Metal where he is responsible for leading the technical direction of Desktop Metal's 3D printing solutions. Prior to joining Desktop Metal in 2015, Myerberg held senior positions with a variety of organizations focused on high-performance battery development, including Renovo Auto and Boston Impact, which he founded, and A123Systems. At A123Systems, Myerberg established and led the motorsports business unit which focused on the development of high-performance batteries. His products were adopted by the majority of Formula One teams including McLaren, Force India, Mercedes Benz, RedBull, and other high-profile motorsports teams like the Porsche 919 team which won the 24 Hours of Le Mans in 2015 and 2016. He was also a race engineer for Porsche on the 919 teams and for Mahindra Racing on their Formula E team. Myerberg earned his B.S. in Mechanical Engineering from Lehigh University and his M.S. in Mechanical Engineering and Manufacturing from Johns Hopkins University. http://desktopmetal.com --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/thinkfuture/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/thinkfuture/support

Langsam gesprochene Nachrichten | Deutsch lernen | Deutsche Welle
15.12.2021 – Langsam gesprochene Nachrichten

Langsam gesprochene Nachrichten | Deutsch lernen | Deutsche Welle

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2021 7:46


Trainiere dein Hörverstehen mit den Nachrichten der Deutschen Welle von Mittwoch – als Text und als verständlich gesprochene Audio-Datei.Deutschland hat zu wenig Corona-Impfstoffe Bundesgesundheitsminister Karl Lauterbach hat bestätigt, dass im ersten Quartal 2022 ein Mangel an Corona-Impfstoff droht. "In der Tat, wir haben zu wenig Impfstoff. Das hat viele überrascht - mich auch", sagte Lauterbach in der ARD. Er arbeite bereits an einer Lösung, erklärte er weiter. Schon zuvor hatte Lauterbach in einer Sitzung der Gesundheitsminister von Bund und Ländern deutlich gemacht, dass die Impfstoff-Mengen nicht ausreichten, um die Booster-Impfkampagne zu fahren. Dies gelte für das gesamte erste Quartal. Mehr als 800.000 Corona-Tote in den USA In den USA sind seit Beginn der Corona-Pandemie mehr als 800.000 Menschen im Zusammenhang mit einer COVID-19-Infektion gestorben. Das geht aus den Zahlen der Johns Hopkins University hervor. Kein Land hat mehr Corona-Tote registriert als die Vereinigten Staaten, in denen rund 330 Millionen Menschen leben. US-Präsident Joe Biden sprach von einem "tragischen Meilenstein" und drückte den Angehörigen der Verstorbenen sein Beileid aus. Gleichzeitig appellierte er an die Amerikaner, sich impfen zu lassen. Die USA befinden sich derzeit in der fünften Corona-Welle und verzeichnen durchschnittlich 1150 COVID-19-Todesfälle pro Tag. US-Repräsentantenhaus stimmt für Anklage gegen Trumps Ex-Stabschef Das US-Repräsentantenhaus hat den Weg für eine Anklage gegen den ehemaligen Stabschef von Ex-Präsident Donald Trump freigemacht. Mit den Stimmen der demokratischen Mehrheit wurde der Fall an den zuständigen Bundesstaatsanwalt verwiesen. Dieser muss nun entscheiden, ob er Mark Meadows wegen "versuchter Behinderung einer Untersuchung des Kongresses" anklagt. Hintergrund ist die Weigerung Meadows, vor dem Untersuchungsausschuss zur Kapitol-Erstürmung vom 6. Januar auszusagen. Meadows gilt als Kronzeuge für Trumps Rolle bei den Bemühungen, die Wahl seines Nachfolgers Joe Biden zu verhindern. Washington verklagt rechte Milizen Wegen der Erstürmung des Kapitols am 6. Januar verklagt der US-Regierungsbezirk Washington DC die zwei ultrarechten Gruppen "Proud Boys" und "Oath Keepers". Der Generalstaatsanwalt von Washington, Karl A. Racine, wirft ihnen Verschwörung vor. Sie hätten den Angriff geplant, beworben und daran teilgenommen. Radikale Anhänger des damaligen Präsidenten Donald Trump hatten das Gebäude gestürmt, als dort der Sieg des Demokraten Joe Biden bei der Präsidentschaftswahl vom 3. November zertifiziert werden sollte. Bei dem Angriff wurden fünf Menschen getötet, unter ihnen ein Polizist. In Afghanistan ist die Not am größten Auf der Liste der 20 weltweit größten humanitären Krisen des "International Rescue Committees" (IRC) belegt Afghanistan den ersten Platz. Im kommenden Jahr könnte das Land fast flächendeckend von Armut betroffen sein, erklärte die internationale Hilfsorganisation in Berlin anlässlich der Veröffentlichung der "Emergency Watchlist". Auf Platz zwei der jährlich veröffentlichten Liste steht Äthiopien, gefolgt vom Jemen, Nigeria und dem Südsudan. Auch Myanmar, Syrien und Haiti zählen laut IRC zu den bedürftigsten Ländern. Nach UN-Angaben brauchen im Jahr 2022 insgesamt 274 Millionen Menschen Hilfe. NASA-Sonde berührt als erstes Raumschiff die Sonne Nach Angaben der US-Raumfahrtbehörde NASA ist ihre Sonde "Parker Solar Probe" durch die äußere Atmosphäre der Sonne geflogen. Damit ist sie das erste Raumschiff, das diesen Stern berührt hat. Die Sonde habe in der sogenannten Sonnenkorona Partikel und Magnetfelder untersucht, teilte die NASA mit. Die Raumfahrtbehörde sprach von einem "Meilenstein", der "tiefere Einsichten in die Entstehung der Sonne und ihren Einfluss auf das Sonnensystem liefern" werde. Dadurch erhofft man sich auch ein besseres Verständnis vom Rest des Universums. Weitere Flüge durch die Sonnenkorona seien geplant. Bayern München ist wieder Herbstmeister Fußball-Bundesligist Bayern München hat sich durch ein 5:0 beim VfB Stuttgart zum 25. Mal die Herbstmeisterschaft gesichert. Die übrigen Ergebnisse vom Dienstag: Wolfsburg - Köln 2:3, Mainz - Hertha Berlin 4:0 und Bielefeld - Bochum 2:0.

The FOX News Rundown
The Cost Of Cutting Ties With China

The FOX News Rundown

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2021 27:52


On Monday, December 6th the United States announced no government official would attend the Winter Olympics in Beijing, citing China's human rights violations against the Uighur Muslims as the main concern. Just days later, China called this a smear campaign as Australia, Canada, and the UK announced they too would join this diplomatic boycott of the Beijing Olympics. Charles Payne, Host of Making Money With Charles Payne on Fox Business Network joins to discuss how the U.S. diplomatic boycott has spurred China to test its influence over corporate America, why it is important the Biden administration take a stance against China, and what economic repercussions there could be for these actions.   Omicron keeps spreading. The variant is now confirmed in more than 20 states and 60 countries and it is believed to be more contagious than past strands. But there is reason for optimism. Early research suggests it is less severe than the Delta variant and Pfizer believes a booster shot of its vaccine will offer protection. Dr. Marty Makary, Professor at Johns Hopkins University and the author of "The Price We Pay", discusses why it's possible there could be an upside to Omicron spreading so easily and he weighs in on the debate over mask and vaccine mandates.   Plus, commentary by Guy Benson, host of the Guy Benson Show.