Podcasts about Fund

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  • 6,468PODCASTS
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  • May 19, 2022LATEST

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Best podcasts about Fund

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Latest podcast episodes about Fund

Tipping Point With Zach Yentzer
Tucson Industrial Development Authority launches Essential Workers Housing Fund; Candidate for Governor Matt Salmon talks the issues.

Tipping Point With Zach Yentzer

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 51:06


Zach talks with Dre Thompson, CEO of the Tucson IDA about the launch of the new Essential Workers Housing Fund in Tucson. Then, Republican candidate for Governor Matt Salmon comes on to talk about housing, inflation, education spending, the Arizona budget surplus and what to do with it, and his Operation Copper Shield plan to address his concerns about border security.

DREAM CHASERS | Interviews with the Future
REM 20: Ben Fraser - Invest Like A Billionaire

DREAM CHASERS | Interviews with the Future

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 41:47


When today's guest started doing research on the portfolios of billionaires, he discussed something pretty shocking…He discovered the vast majority of ultra-wealthy and institutional investors have more than 50% of their wealth in private equity and private real estate while most of the rest of the population has 95%-100% of their investments in public paper assets, mostly stocks. With the amount of attention the stock market gets in the news and even in TV commercials, this is not a surprise. However, most people don't realize that real estate is not only reserved for billionaires anymore and there are many ways for you to get involved, such as investing with private fund managers like Aspen Funds!Ben Fraser is one of the hosts of the Invest Like a Billionaire podcast, where he is dedicated to educating investors on how they can model their portfolios after the most successful people of our time. Ben is the VP of Finance at Aspen Funds, a private fund manager that operates real estate funds for investors looking to diversify outside of Wall Street. In today's episode, we discuss…what distressed mortgage notes are and how Aspen Funds discovered their benefits.The differences between growth and income funds. How Ben raises capital for Aspen Funds and how he organizes the capital stacks.How the managers at Aspen Funds analyze the macroeconomic environment when deciding what investments to offer their clients.If you want a glimpse into the time-tested wealth-building strategies of the billionaires and how they can work for you, today's episode is an excellent place to start!Keep Making Milestones, Ben MalechIf you want to learn more about the Ben, you can find him at:LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/benwfraser/Aspen Funds: https://aspenfunds.us/Invest Like a Billionaire Podcast: https://aspenfunds.us/podcast/ To learn more about Ben (the host), connect with him through:Ben's Website: https://benmalech.com/Ben's LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/benjamin-malech/Ben's email: benmalech@carswell.ioResources Mentioned:The Hands-off Investor - Brian Burke

Daily Crypto Report
"a16z launches $600M gaming industry fund" May 19, 2022

Daily Crypto Report

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 3:08


Today's blockchain and cryptocurrency news Brought to you by watchthiscards.com Bitcoin is up 1% at $29,402 Ethereum is up 1% at $1953 and Binance Coin is up 1% at $299 A16z launches a $600M fund focused on the gaming industry. UST bag holders and cash-outs come forward. South Korea re-instates "Grim Reaper" Financial Crimes unit to look at Terraform Labs. Miners in new York state face down regulatory uncertainty.

Radio HM
¿Qué santo es hoy?: San Urbano I y San Pedro Celestino V (19 de mayo)

Radio HM

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 3:52


San Urbano I fue Papa durante ocho años, en los cuales dio importantes decretos eclesiásticos. Dispuso que solo los obispos administrasen el sacramento de la Confirmación. Fue el primero que introdujo el uso de patenas, cálices y vasos sagrados de plata para la Misa. Su martirio tuvo lugar el año 230, imperando Alejandro Severo. San Pedro Celestino V nació en Italia. Se dedicó totalmente a la oración y a la penitencia. Fundó la Orden de los Celestinos, que se unió después a los benedictinos. En 1294 fue elegido Papa, tomando el nombre de Celestino V. A los cinco meses renunció al pontificado y fue recluido por temor a un cisma. Allí vivió como un simple monje, una vida de oración, soledad y penitencia, hasta su muerte en mayo de 1296.

JIJI English News-時事通信英語ニュース-
Saudi Arabia's Wealth Fund Acquires 5 Pct Stake in Nintendo

JIJI English News-時事通信英語ニュース-

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022


Saudi Arabia's Public Investment Fund has acquired a 5.01pctstake in Nintendo Co. for about 410 billion yen, the sovereign wealth fund said in a filing made Wednesday.

Sew-organised-style
About Love Binti

Sew-organised-style

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 20:03


In April Elle and Suzan talked about Sewing Machine Magic. Today they tell us about Love Binti, which is where Sewing Machine Magic is a part of. Fund raising for the programs run by Love Binti are needed to help run their local programs to help the local communities raise their living standards. They're currently fund raising for sewing menstral pads. SewOver50 intersects with all communities. SewOver50 where we are so over ageism. Make sure you listen to your SewOver50 friends in our SewOver50 podcast archive. Sew Organised Style features people who freely support the sewing community. You're welcome to be a podcast guest by contacting us via DM on Instagram. If you are able, consider supporting this podcast through our patreon account. Every podcast is free.

AWM Insights Financial and Investment News
Finding the 10x Fund in Venture |AWM Insights #110

AWM Insights Financial and Investment News

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 21:41


There are around 2,000 venture capital firms managing about 4,000 funds. It's a small market in the grand scheme, but many aren't worth investing in. The return difference between the top 25% and bottom 25% is staggering. This is a game of professionals. It's no different than elite athletes competing at the highest level in professional sports. The same separation of talent exists in the venture capital arena. Investors with the best access look for 5x or more in returns. What else does it take besides capital to invest in venture? Are you an accredited investor or a qualified purchaser? Are you investing as an individual or an LLC? Are you making directs, allocating to funds, or even diversifying into a fund of funds strategy? Justin and Brandon give you the details on how the whole process works. Have questions for an upcoming episode? Want to get free resources, book giveaways, and AWM gear? Want to hear about when we release new episodes? Text “insights” or the lightbulb emoji (

Rich Zeoli
Every Single Vote Matters in Elections (Full Zeoli Show 05-18-22)

Rich Zeoli

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 190:00


6:04-NEWS 6:08-Republican primary for Senator of Pennsylvania is too-close-to-call  6:25-Closed primary elections  6:37-Blue light glasses are a total scam  6:42-Zeoli's election day tradition  7:02-NEWS 7:06-Pope Francis takes a shot of tequila to help his knee pain.  7:10-Psychologist Jordan Peterson does not find a plus-sized swimsuit model beautiful.  7:35-Doug Mastriano wins the GOP gubernatorial primary for Pennsylvania. The Senate race is still too close to call between Dr. Oz and Dave McCormick.  7:42-The most impactful states determining control of the Senate 7:45 CUT SHEET | Fauci can't say if it was worth it to shut schools down | Gayle King wonders how it could possibly be safe not wearing a mask on a plane | Biden gets the FDA mixed up | Elon Musk: the path to power is the path to the teleprompter |  Biden's promoted website to help parents with formula doesn't exactly work | Pelosi might want an indictment for the baby formula shortage |  8:10-PA Election Day update 8:18-Republican voters are energized for the general election  8:21-NEWS 8:38-Democrats may regret going up against a candidate like Mastriano  8:52- You're racist if you're white and watch sports  9:02-NEWS 9:05- Captain John Hoyte joined Rich to discuss the 25th annual Survivor's Fund at the FOP Lodge 5 to benefit the families of fallen officers in the city of Philadelphia.  9:13-Governor Murphy declares state of emergency on baby formula shortage  9:25-Small, rural towns are offering free housing for their remote work  9:29-Get ready for higher water rates in Pennsylvania  9:37-Elon Musk isn't sure if there are aliens out there  9:43- CUT SHEET | Las Vegas mom has mic cut off during school board meeting | The View compares parents at school board meetings to the Buffalo shooter | Biden tells a story of spreading the wealth | Climate Change Czar John Kerry wants us to go net zero carbon even faster  9:55-Final Thoughts Photo: Getty Images

Rich Zeoli
Parent Outrage at School Board Meetings Does Not Equate to Racism

Rich Zeoli

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 51:26


9:02-NEWS 9:05- Captain John Hoyte joined Rich to discuss the 25th annual Survivor's Fund at the FOP Lodge 5 to benefit the families of fallen officers in the city of Philadelphia.  9:13-Governor Murphy declares state of emergency on baby formula shortage  9:25-Small, rural towns are offering free housing for their remote work  9:29-Get ready for higher water rates in Pennsylvania  9:37-Elon Musk isn't sure if there are aliens out there  9:43- CUT SHEET | Las Vegas mom has mic cut off during school board meeting | The View compares parents at school board meetings to the Buffalo shooter | Biden tells a story of spreading the wealth | Climate Change Czar John Kerry wants us to go net zero carbon even faster  9:55-Final Thoughts Photo by: Octavio Jones / Stringer

Colloquium
Life-Changing Innovations in the Space Industry with Daniel Kleinmann

Colloquium

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 31:34


Daniel Kleinmann is an early-stage venture investor at the Explorer 1 Fund. He invests in companies that are fundamental to the success of the new space economy.  Listen in! Key Highlights: [00:01 - 17:14] Get to Know the Space Industry The first wave of the space economy was started in 2017 when SpaceX achieved reusability with its launch vehicles. This opened up the doors to send more assets into space, which has resulted in experts believing there will be 150,000 satellites in orbit by the year 2057.  The second wave of the space economy is focused on building infrastructure and orbit to support all the volume of satellites and assets up there. This includes developing refueling hubs for satellites, data relay systems, and moving things around in space. Daniel discusses timelines and points out that there are already some investments in place, as well as opportunities for new investment in space infrastructure and applications.  . [17:15 - 26:39] Insider Updates and Space Travel Facts The lunar economy is something to be excited about. NASA is going back to the moon at the end of this year, and there's the human landing system in place. There are a number of factors that contribute to the high price of space launches, including geopolitical tensions and the need for reliable and reusable vehicles. Additionally, the new space economy is producing a number of talented entrepreneurs, and there are a variety of geographies where private investments in space are being made.  [26:40 - 29:38] Stepping into the Space Industry A big misconception about getting into the industry is thinking that it will take too long and too much capital to establish a space industry.  It's important to have the right mix of technical and investing backgrounds to be able to tackle the space industry. The timing for establishing a space industry is ripe with opportunity.  [29:39 - 31:35] Closing Segment Reach out to be educated and be up-to-date with what's happening in the new space economy. Key Quote: “[In the space industry], being the provider isn't always the most efficient thing to do, and becoming a customer was a lot better.” - Daniel Kleinmann “Timelines are probably the most important thing when you're investing in a brand new economy.” - Daniel Kleinmann Connect with Daniel: Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/daniel-kleinmann-67a3a4a7/ (https://www.linkedin.com/in/daniel-kleinmann-67a3a4a7/)  Twitter: https://twitter.com/DanielKleinman4 (@DanielKleinman4) Connect with me onhttps://www.linkedin.com/in/brian-c-adams/ ( LinkedIn)! LIKE, SUBSCRIBE, AND LEAVE US A REVIEW on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, or whatever platform you listen on. Thank you for tuning in and Stay Tuned for the Next Episode COMING SOON!

The Smart Real Estate Coach Podcast|Real Estate Investing
Episode 352: Thriving in All Markets, with Chris Prefontaine

The Smart Real Estate Coach Podcast|Real Estate Investing

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 30:22


Chris is the best-selling author of Real Estate on Your Terms: Create Continuous Cash Flow Now, Without Using Your Cash or Credit. He's also the founder of SmartRealEstateCoach.com and the Smart Real Estate Coach Podcast. Chris has been in real estate for over 25 years. His experience includes the construction of over 100 single-family and duplex homes (mostly in the 1990s and selectively to date), has owned a Realty Executives Franchise (Massachusetts 1994-2000) as broker/owner, which maintained high per-agent standards and eventually sold to Coldwell Banker in 2000. The 2000s included coaching ½ million and higher REALTORs® in order to scale & automate their business throughout the US and Canada. He also participated (and still does selectively) in doing condo conversions (multi-family homes to condos) and “raise the roof” projects (converting single-family ranches to colonials in growth neighborhoods). Chris has been a big advocate of constant education and participates regularly in high-end mastermind groups, as well as consults with private mentors. He runs his own buying and selling businesses with his family team, which buys 2-5 properties monthly, so they're in the trenches every single week. They also help clients do the same thing around the country. Chris and his family team have done over 80 million in real estate transactions. They mentor, coach, consult, and actually partner with students around the country (by application only) to do exactly what they do. What you will learn in this episode: Why the strategy you employed last month might not work this month Lessons from the Wicked Start Summit — including the exclusive associate content How to plan for and achieve your big real estate goals to be successful in all markets The key factors that allow you to pivot and thrive in any market Why proactive entrepreneurs have a YouTube routine How you can be part-time in real estate and still achieve amazing success How to create income by obsessing over needle movers rather than the focus killers Why new real estate investors need to commit to a minimum of 3 years to maximize their chances of success How to become a transaction engineer who can structure deals in any climate Additional resources: Join the Wicked Smart Sit Down https://smartrealestatecoach.com/events Follow Chris and Zach on Clubhouse to learn even more about deal structures and how to get 3 paydays from your real estate investments. If you're looking to secure some lines of credit for your business, check out Fund and Grow – Visit the Resource page at https://www.smartrealestatecoach.com/resources Schedule a FREE Strategy Call: www.SmartRealEstateCoach.com/action SmartRealEstateCoachPodcast.com/webinar SmartRealEstateCoachPodcast.com/termsbook SmartRealEstateCoachPodcast.com/ebook SmartRealEstateCoach.com/QLS Smart Real Estate Coach Podcast Sponsor: Paul G. Dion CPA, CTC

The Community Cats Podcast
When Pets Fly with Marta Negro, Founder of Help the Dog Fly

The Community Cats Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 26:18


“So I think it's really important when you start something that you really feel part of it and you have the feeling that you really want to talk about it all of the time.” This episode is sponsored in part by Humane Network, Doobert, and Maddie's Fund. Marta Negro, a lifelong pet lover and avid traveler, faced a difficult task when the COVID pandemic forced her to return home to Spain without her dog. Fortunately, she was able to find a flight volunteer who could reunite her with her dog. Following this experience, Marta recognized the need for this service on a grander scale, which prompted her to develop the platform Help the Dog Fly. This service connects individuals trying to get their pet home with transport volunteers. In her conversation with Stacy, Marta provides details about the behind-the-scenes work. She also shares the organization's values, some of the challenges as a new organization, and her goals for Help the Dog Fly's future. To learn more about Help the Dog Fly, visit their Facebook, Instagram, or website. If you enjoyed this episode, check out our interview with Chris Roy, pilot, and creator of Doobert.com in episode 131.

Michigan's Big Show
* Tori Sachs, Executive Director of the Michigan Freedom Fund

Michigan's Big Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 11:01


Public Hearing
ARPA Supports the Worcester Jobs Fund with Jeff Turgeon

Public Hearing

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 28:00


Part 6/9 from our mini-season: ARPA Funding in WorcesterWe are back with another episode of our ARPA Funding in Worcester mini-series of Public Hearing. This week's guest Jeff Turgeon, Executive Director of Mass Hire, continues the conversation to discuss how ARPA dollars can be used to provide funding for business assistance programs such as the Worcester Job Fund. These resources will be able to help employee's and employers recover from the COVID-19 pandemic as well as assist folks with the cost of necessary training courses in order for them to obtain jobs or positions that require a little bit more formal training. Want to learn more about resources that are available through Mass Hire? Check out the resource page on their website!Learn more about how Worcester plans to spend ARPA dollars on the City website.Public Hearing is a podcast from Action! by Design about our home city of Worcester, Massachusetts and the people we should be listening to—residents, artists, activists, community leaders, storytellers, and those most impacted by issues facing our city. Our mission is to cultivate community through equity, inclusion, and design, and that work starts at home.Want to be the first to listen to new episodes? Tune in Wednesdays at 6pm on WICN 90.5FM, Worcester's only NPR affiliate station. Not in the Worcester area? No worries, you can listen live at WICN.org

The Second Phase Podcast - Personal Branding & Brand Marketing and Life Strategies for Success for Female Entrepreneurs
What you need to know to find financial resources to fund your business idea

The Second Phase Podcast - Personal Branding & Brand Marketing and Life Strategies for Success for Female Entrepreneurs

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 29:41


How can you fund your business as a new entrepreneur? There are resources available to you if you are willing to create a road map for your business upfront. If you don't have money to start the business of your dreams, there are financial resources available to help you fund your business. One of the most common objections to hiring a business coach is money. People often say things like "I need more clients first", "I can't afford it yet", "I have to talk to my husband", and the list goes on. But oftentimes, it isn't a lack of money it is a lack of being resourceful. When people are resourceful and come up with the money it shows great trust in themselves and the process, and that they are ready and willing to do what it takes to build the business and respond to their calling. The difference between men and women and how they tap into financial resources to fund their businesses No one needs to take extraordinary measures as there are options that may be a little uncomfortable, but not dramatic. Men, in general, are bigger risk-takers. They are willing to have a half-baked idea and jump right in. On the other hand, women like to be prepared upfront. Completely set and know for sure that the business is going to work. The question becomes, how much risk are you willing to take. A lot of the discomfort from the financial side is not having enough information. The information you need is the specific details of the products and services you will be offering. Conceptual details like how the product or service will be delivered, what the product or service looks like, what they feel like, how is the supplier, who is the target audience, etc. Likewise, you need to develop financial projections. It doesn't matter if this is service-based with little upfront investment or something more complex. Without the financial projections, your idea seems even scarier. It is important to know how much it will take to launch your business. Similarly, you need to know how long it will take to generate revenue. And, it is important to have an expectation of what the early months in your business will look like in terms of money going out versus money coming in. We don't know what we don't know when starting a business When you are starting a business, the best thing you can do is take advantage of the knowledge that consultants and coaches offer. They can help you plan ahead and ensure you have all of your plans in place. We don't know what we don't know. Having someone to guide you and help you build processes saves time and money throughout the course of your business. Diane shared a quote from a documentary, The Biggest Little Farm, "There's never enough time to do it right, but there's always enough time to do it over." In the end, if you don't do it right the first time, you are going to have to spend the money anyway. It makes more sense to pay it upfront and do things right instead of losing precious time in your business. Coming up with a plan to be prepared to pitch to investors to help fund your business Start with a road map or a business model canvas. Diana's road map is simplified from the model canvas. The road map addresses the conceptual items and the financial piece. If you have a framework, then you have an operating blueprint. Whether growth is fast or slow, you want to plan for it because you want to know what you are aiming for. Look at your plan every year and evaluate if you are where you want to be or doing what you want to be doing. Doing so will help you make a course correction if necessary. The overall road map will help you identify if you need financial assistance. If you have a plan in writing, you will come off as more prepared and professional and taken seriously by those you pitch for funding. Outside funding sources include your spouse, other family members, a business partner, savings accounts, stock, selling items, etc. Listen to episode 112 with Maureen Borzacchiello. Clarification on when women could sign for a business loan with a man co-signing: The Women's Business Ownership Act of 1988 allowed women to get a business loan without a male co-signer. Since 1972, the number of women-owned businesses has increased by 31 times. Also, please note that this interview was recorded before the interest rates started to escalate. Funding resources for business owners Traditional funding resources are bank loans or investors. However, now people are crowdfunding, identifying your target to raise money for your business. This is basically pitching your idea to the people that would have an interest in it. KJ Blattenbauer used Kickstarter to start her business, Pretty PepTalks. When you build the foundation first and invest upfront, even if borrowing money, you will be set up for success long-term. Jenny Kassan does something even more targeted to help you fund your business. She helps people use crowdfunding. Her book is Raise Capital on Your Own Terms: How to Fund Your Business without Selling Your Soul. The key is starting with a plan that is both conceptual and financial. About Diane Tarshis Diane helps people build businesses that are conducive to happiness. She helps anyone with a business idea and the desire to thrive and succeed, even if they are not, particularly business savvy. Diane guides people through everything from time/task management, financial projections, and investment, all the way to a launch strategy to get their service out to the public. She is especially interested in helping women, BIPOC, and middle-aged entrepreneurs who have great business ideas but are often overlooked or discouraged from starting a business. Diane's business is called Start-Up Distillery. Learn more about and connect with Diane: Website LinkedIn Twitter  Coupon code: Robyn, available through August 17th, 2022. If you are interested in building a strong foundation for long-term success and would like to learn about my Purpose to Results™ Method, download my free eBook today.

Superwomen with Rebecca Minkoff
Learning to Dance in the Rain: Arian Simone of Fearless Fund

Superwomen with Rebecca Minkoff

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 28:37


Arian Simone has the kind of infectious, feel-good attitude that makes it impossible to stay in a funk. It's almost necessary to have that sort of approach when you're working to change the numbers in venture capital funding. Arian's company, Fearless Fund, invests in businesses founded by women of color, a group that receives less than 1% (!!!) of all VC funding, despite the high percentage of founders who fall into this category. Never one to shrink from a challenge, Arian knew early on in her entrepreneurial journey that she would someday become the type of investor she was looking for. Her potent potion of gratitude, conviction and confidence has opened doors where others would surely fear to go. Now, through Fearless Fund, Arian supports the goals and determination of fellow women of color, creating jobs, wealth and legacy one founder at a time. Thanks for listening! Don't forget to order Rebecca's new book, Fearless: The New Rules for Unlocking Creativity, Courage, and Success. Follow Superwomen on Instagram. Check out Arian's books on Amazon! Fearless Faith + Hustle: 21 Day Devotional Journey My Fabulous & Fearless Journey The Fearless Money Mindset: Broke Doesn't Scare Me Social Media @fearless.fund @ariansimone --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/superwomen/support

#MenschMahler - Die Podcast Kolumne - podcast eins GmbH

220517PCAha! Das Ratespiel. Mensch Mahler am 17.05.2022„Es ist ein Ratespielzeit“, sagt der Joja zum Großvater und zeigt ihm stolz seinen neuesten Schatz vom Sperrmüll. Es ist ein altes, blau emailliertes Sieb mit einem Stiel, der ganz oben ein Loch hat. An vielen Stellen kommt schon der Rost durch den Emaille-Überzug, aber da, wo er noch heil ist, glänzt er blaugesprenkelt. Der Großvater kratzt sich nachdenklich an der Stirn. „Das ist diesmal ein ganz besonders schweres Rätsel“, sagt er, „aber ich will es versuchen, so wie ich es immer versuche. Also, ist es ein alter, löchriger Ritterhelm?“ „Falsch“, kräht der Joja, „ganz falsch“. „Hmmh – ist es ein neumodisches Gerät, um damit Wasser aus der Regentonne zu schöpfen?“ Der Joja strahlt vor Vergnügen. „nein, nein“, sagt er „rate weiter!“ „Na gut, dann ist es bestimmt ein Nest für kleine Spatzen.“ „Wieder falsch“, freut sich Joja. „Du hast noch eine Chance. Da überlegt der Großvater so lange, dass der Joja schon ganz kribbelig wird. Schließlich sagt er mit fester Stimme: „Ich hab's! Das ist die Krone für einen Maulwurfshügel, richtig?“ Der Joja biegt sich vor Lachen. „Ach Großvater“, sagt er, „leider bist Du heute nicht der Ratekönig.“ „Ja was ist es denn dann?“ ruft der Großvater ratlos. „Ich gebe auf. Bitte verrate mir die Lösung!“ „Komm!“ Der Joja zieht den Großvater in den alten Schuppen. Dort steigt er auf eine Kiste und hängt seinen Fund an einen Nagel, mitten vor das kleine Fensterchen. „Jetzt müssen wir warten“, sagt er, und sie setzen sich gemeinsam auf den Hackklotz. Sie warten und warten. Dann geschieht es: die Abendsonne scheint durch das Fenster, Plötzlich tanzen kleine Lichtbündel und Stäubchen durch den Raum. Das sieht so schön aus, dass der Großvater den Arm um Joja legt, und dieser kuschelt sich fest an ihn. „Siehst Du jetzt endlich, was es ist“, sagt er nach einer Weile und flüstert: „Es ist ein Sonnensieb“. „Aha“, antwortet der Großvater „jetzt, wo du es sagst, sehe ich es natürlich auch!“ Und lächelnd wischt er sich ein Stäubchen aus dem Augenwinkel.Eine Alltags-Wunder-Geschichte von Angelika Wolff. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Real College Podcast
Passage of Time

Real College Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022


In this episode of Real College Podcast we unpack the passage of time with the assistance of reporter Brandon Wetterlin and spoken word, as well as bid a fond farewell to beloved host Casey McCabe!

Don't Fund Generosity With Debt

"The MoneyWise Minute" on Oneplace.com

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 1:00


Rob West offers Biblical wisdom on how to be generous with your money. To support this ministry financially, visit: https://www.oneplace.com/donate/1090/29

John Mathews Show
Carl Foote - Magical Memory Tour 2022 | #012

John Mathews Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 28:44


In this episode, I talk with retiree, Carl Foote. He pedaled across the United States back in 1972 at the age of 19 years old. That trip took him from New Jersey to Oregon. We hear about this incredible journey as he reflects back through his memories that were captured in the journal he wrote in as he was traveling. If that's not enough, Carl is planning to do it again. It is now 50 years later and he is 69 years old. This time, he is doing it for a cause. Carl will ask, "What do your favorite food, your favorite music and your extended family all have in common?" Spoiler alert!!! They all create memories. Every year 500,000 people who will be diagnosed with Alzheimer's Disease will have these memories stolen from them. Carl's ride titled appropriately "Magical Memory Tour 2022" will follow the same route that his original ride took him through. He is looking to raise $3,000,000, yes three million dollars, to benefit the Cure Alzheimer's Fund. Follow his journey on Facebook or Instagram under Magical Memory Tour 2022. You can donate at http://curealz.org/giving/donate where 100% of your donation goes to Alzheimer's research. Podcast Sponsor: I am my own sponsor of this podcast. If you know someone who has children or grandchildren ages 2 to 7 years old, please tell them about my children's book. It's all about optimism, positivity and happiness. Isn't that what we truly want our children and grandchildren to hear about? I believe it is. My book is available on Amazon in paperback or Kindle. Find it by searching Jimmy the Jackrabbit: A Trip to the Grocery Store by John E Mathews. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/jemathews2/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/jemathews2/support

Anaesthesia Coffee Break
LIVE MCQ session with Dr Stan #1

Anaesthesia Coffee Break

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 72:44


Great work Stan and all our live viewers!These MCQs were from the BMJ https://www.onexamination.com/products/frca-primaryPlease support us on our Patreonhttps://www.patreon.com/anaesthesiaAll proceeds will go to Fund a Fellow to help train anaesthetists in developing countries whilst acknowledging the work it takes to keep creating this educational resource.If you enjoyed this content please like and subscribePlease post any comments or questions below. Check out www.anaesthesiacollective.com and sign up to the ABCs of Anaesthesia facebook group for other content.Any questions please email lahiruandstan@gmail.comDisclaimer: The information contained in this video/audio/graphic is for medical practitioner education only. It is not and will not be relevant for the general public.Where applicable patients have given written informed consent to the use of their images in video/photography and aware that it will be published online and visible by medical practitioners and the general public.This contains general information about medical conditions and treatments. The information is not advice and should not be treated as such. The medical information is provided “as is” without any representations or warranties, express or implied. The presenter makes no representations or warranties in relation to the medical information on this video. You must not rely on the information as an alternative to assessing and managing your patient with your treating team and consultant. You should seek your own advice from your medical practitioner in relation to any of the topics discussed in this episode' Medical information can change rapidly, and the author/s make all reasonable attempts to provide accurate information at the time of filming. There is no guarantee that the information will be accurate at the time of viewingThe information provided is within the scope of a specialist anaesthetist (FANZCA) working in Australia.The information presented here does not represent the views of any hospital or ANZCA.These videos are solely for training and education of medical practitioners, and are not an advertisement. They were not sponsored and offer no discounts, gifts or other inducements. This disclaimer was created based on a Contractology template available at http://www.contractology.com.

Silicon Carne, un peu de picante dans la Tech
Faire grandir la start-up économie

Silicon Carne, un peu de picante dans la Tech

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 71:04


On estime que les startups contribuent au PIB mondial à hauteur de 3.8 trilliards de dollars par an. Aux États-Unis, leur contribution en terme de création d'emplois et de croissance économique est disproportionnée par rapport au reste de l'économie. Bien que les startups ne représentent qu'environ 10 % des entreprises américaines, elles sont à l'origine de plus de 20 % de la création d'emplois au cours d'une année type. Alors oui, la plupart des startups échouent, mais quand elles survivent leur contribution est nettement plus élevée que les entreprises traditionnelles. Alors comment développer la Startup Economy, c'est la question qu'on se pose dans Silicon Carne cette semaine. ---Nos invités: Pierre Gaubil et François Paulus

Acquisitions Anonymous
Searching with a thesis with search fund investor Steve Ressler - Acquisitions Anonymous Episode 94

Acquisitions Anonymous

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 45:28


Michael Girdley (@Girdley) & Bill D'Alessandro (@BillDA), are joined by Steve Ressler (@steveressler) to talk about best practices when running a search, his search fund The Brydon Group, buying opportunities in the SMB space, what do the best search funders do, top CEO's skills,  and more.-----Thanks to our sponsors:* https://Cloudbookkeeping.com - Cloudbookkeeping specializes in bookkeeping solutions for everyone from start-ups to mature businesses. Check them out & mention our podcast.-----* Do you love Acquanon and want to see our smiling faces? Subscribe to our Youtube channel.* Do you enjoy our content? Rate our show!* Follow us on Twitter @acquanon Learnings about small business acquisitions and operations.-----Show Notes:(01:09) - Cloudbookkeeping.com(2:20) - What do the more intelligent search funders do to pitch you?(4:14) - What are good reasons to do a search fund?(6:24) - How would you segment the search fund prototype?(8:29) - How can you tell if a senior executive will be an operative one?(11:22) - What do you look for in a searcher?(14:14) - Tell us about the Brydon Group and what you're doing (19:40) - What's the profile you look for? What type of deals do you look for?(21:40) - How do you structure deals? What about the financing?(25:08) - How do you think about debt for this kind of search? How does the equity side work?(28:34) - What do you look for in a searcher?(33:52) - Why do you go for $2 to $5 MM EBITDA range deals?(36:47) - Where are the winds blowing in the private markets?(38:45) - Do you think that Covid put pressure on the sellers, burnout syndrome, that kind of stuff?(42:04) - What are the craziest things you've seen from searchers?-----Links:* https://www.linkedin.com/in/ressler/ * https://www.brydon.com/for-searchers * steve@brydon.com -----Additional episodes you might enjoy:#87 Yelp is not evil! Building a business using digital CAC - Featuring Johnny Robinson from Orange Window Cleaning#86 Rocketship your business with... Twitter?! - JK Molina gives a Twitter Masterclass#79 What do Investors want? - Dig into an investor's mind with Bradford Hardin#75 SBA Loan Secrets with Heather Endresen, expertise from a Billion-Dollar

Daily Detroit
Going beyond the credit score to fund Black business (ft. Nimaj Driscoll)

Daily Detroit

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 14:42


The reality is there's a lot of inequity in our American system. It's been there since our founding. Sure, improvements have been made, but we're nowhere near there yet. And you can see it in our region, too.  Short of a massive federal program to truly begin to level out the metaphorical playing field on a number of levels for African Americans and other groups, to help get wealth into communities, start businesses, and more — the work has to be done where it can. One of those areas is with access to loans. Nimaj Driscoll - a Detroit Native with CDC Small Business Finance, a nonprofit that's more flexible than a bank - joins me today to talk about a new program that doesn't involve traditional credit scoring to get Black entrepreneurs access to what they need to compete. And they're already at work in the community. More: https://cdcloans.com/activate-detroit/ If this is your first time meeting the show, don't forget to follow us on Apple Podcasts or wherever you download your favorite podcasts.

The 1853 Podcast
1853 Podcast -- 2021-22 -- Episode No. 28

The 1853 Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 14:23


Political science research by seniors Grant Miller (top, left) and Matt Datlof (top, right) and professor Andre Audette (top center); juniors Shay Hafner (bottom, left) and Ally Clay talk about being accepted into the prestigious Fund for American Studies summer program (interview begins at 9:50).

Giant Robots Smashing Into Other Giant Robots
422: Verge HealthTech Fund with Joseph Mocanu

Giant Robots Smashing Into Other Giant Robots

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 36:52


Joseph Mocanu is Co-founder and Managing Director of Verge HealthTech Fund, which invests globally in seed-stage healthcare technology startups relevant to emerging Asia that focus on disease prevention and management, digital therapies, and health system efficiency. Chad talks with Joseph about the healthcare landscape in different places of the world, funding criteria for companies, and how the pandemic has changed prospects for the fund and the market in general. Verge HealthTech Fund (https://www.vergehc.com/) Follow Verge HealthTech Fund on LinkedIn (https://www.linkedin.com/company/verge-healthtech-fund-i/). Follow Joseph on Twitter (https://twitter.com/jmocanu) or LinkedIn (https://www.linkedin.com/in/jmocanu/). Follow thoughtbot on Twitter (https://twitter.com/thoughtbot) or LinkedIn (https://www.linkedin.com/company/150727/). Become a Sponsor (https://thoughtbot.com/sponsorship) of Giant Robots! Transcript: CHAD: This is the Giant Robots Smashing Into Other Giant Robots Podcast, where we explore the design, development, and business of great products. I'm your host, Chad Pytel, and with me today is Joseph Mocanu, Co-founder and Managing Director of Verge HealthTech Fund, which invests globally in seed-stage healthcare technology startups relevant to emerging Asia that focus on disease prevention and management, digital therapies, and health system efficiency. Joseph, thank you for joining me. JOSEPH: Thanks so much, Chad, for having me. CHAD: So you have been focused on emerging Asia healthtech for a little while both at Verge HealthTech Fund, and prior to that, how did you get involved in this space? JOSEPH: I wish I had a really cool, deliberate story that made it sound like it was a smooth transition from point A to point B. But I simply have to owe it to an opportunity to transfer to the region through my old employer which is Oliver Wyman, a global management consultancy. So I joined this consultancy in 2011 after doing my Ph.D. and MBA really to understand how to be a better investor, which, again, sounds a little bit backwards. But I had worked at a hedge fund in China just after my MBA, and I learned that they use management consulting techniques to add value to their portfolio companies. And I thought that's a great skill to learn. And it'd be great to even learn it in English and doing it in healthcare 100% of the time. So I had joined Oliver Wyman in 2011 in Toronto office back home, where I spent a lot of my life. And they asked me one day if I wanted to transfer to the Singapore office to help start healthcare over there. And when I went to Singapore, of course, it's this futuristic city, really well planned. It's got a lot of fine names and a reputation globally of being a modern cosmopolitan place to do business. Some people refer to it as Asia-lite. But the surrounding areas have a lot of issues when it comes to their health systems. I knew this from an academic perspective, having studied about the region before moving to Singapore but seeing it firsthand was a completely different experience. At the time, I was working for primarily pharmaceutical clients, helping them with market access and other commercially relevant activities. And they were faced with a fundamental challenge of trying to sell their product, which was usually placed in the premium category to markets that had difficulty affording this. And not only did it have difficulty affording this, it had difficulty in delivering it as well as in using the product appropriately, making sure it gets to the patients when it's needed at the right time, at the right dose. And so they were looking for partners. They were looking for partners on the ground that could assist with this delivery education, the technology, and the financing around it as well. Now, there was a real shortage of said partners on the ground. At the same time, there were also insurance companies that wanted to expand their business. They also realized that the policies tended to be a bit simple, and they tended to resemble one another across competitors. And also, to manage increasing claims, they had a tendency to increase the premium that they charged. This was not possible to do indefinitely. And at some point, they needed to actually manage the medical conditions, which you're probably seeing more and more of in the U.S. and in Western markets, less so of in this part of the world. And then lastly, you had conglomerates and investors who said, "Hey, we hear healthcare is going to be a pretty hot field. How do we get started? How do we invest?" And all of this basically set me on a mission of target hunting. And during the course of this, well, I met a lot of interesting companies, a lot of them really, really early in their journey and really too small for any of my clients to find a meaningful way to engage with them. And unfortunately, they couldn't get to the point where they are relevant and large enough to engage with without a lot of capital. This is where, you know, you'd have a nice investment ecosystem coming in to fill in the gaps. This, unfortunately, did not really exist at the time. And I had the hubris of thinking that I could do something about it by being an angel investor and starting to support these founders directly, which, thankfully, seemed to work to a certain degree. It worked to the point where one day, I woke up, and I realized I had 13 angel investments, 9 of which were in healthcare technology, and not a lot of money left in my bank account to do other things with. CHAD: Uh-oh. [laughs] JOSEPH: Yeah. And at the same time, I also realized that the work that those founders are doing is a whole lot more impactful than me sitting up until 3:00 o'clock in the morning every night writing PowerPoint slides or begging analysts to write the PowerPoint slides that would more or less sit and collect dust on my clients' shelves for various reasons. So I came to the realization that I need to do this full time. I didn't have, you know, $10 million in my pocket as reference to spending all my money on angel investments. So I realized that I have to use other people's money, and the way to do that is to join a fund. Now, the problem with that idea is that there weren't any funds that were doing this, like really, really early investing in healthtech companies in the region that was really geared to helping solve some of these really big access challenges. So then I realized I had to start a VC fund that did this and only this. So that's really kind of a long-winded introduction as to how I got started with this. CHAD: Yeah, I want to come back to the process of actually starting a VC fund in a bit. But I'm curious, were the companies that you were doing angel investment in and now doing seed-stage investment in do they tend to be local companies, or do they tend to be international companies that are planning to solve a problem locally? JOSEPH: It's funny you ask that. At the beginning, they were local. Well, actually, if I really were to take a step back, the very first angel investment I made was for a mentee, and she was based in Toronto. But I'd say that the first true angel investment I made, you know, it was in Singapore, first and foremost, because I was there. And then I started branching out. I started making investments in the Philippines. I started looking at companies in Taiwan and other parts. And actually, that opened my eyes to the fact that there may be other companies around the world that are trying to solve a problem that may not necessarily be in my own backyard. So I started to, you know, cheekily, I sent my wife to tech conferences around the world. And she herself is an entrepreneur from the tech industry; hardware was her specialty. And we started identifying companies from all over the world. And the second angel investment where I was the very first investor was actually from a company in South Africa with similar challenges. So the things that we saw as major health system deficiencies or maybe shortages in infrastructure and human capital were very much true not just in Southeast Asia but in a lot of parts of the world. And we noticed that while there were different reasons for why they ended up in that position, the outcome was similar. CHAD: I'm not sure that everyone listening has a good sense of what the healthcare landscape actually looks like in these different places of the world. So let's take insurance, for example; what is the insurance landscape, generally speaking, in Southeast Asian countries? JOSEPH: So, in Southeast Asia, we do have insurers. I mean, private insurance is certainly there. But it's just not -- CHAD: Do most companies have public insurance, too, like universal healthcare? JOSEPH: That depends on which country you're in. Now, the one interesting thing about our entire region is that they've all committed to universal healthcare coverage. I would say that the implementation thereof has been heterogeneous; let's put it that way. Out of Southeast Asian countries that are not Singapore, I'd say that Thailand probably has the strongest public healthcare system. And in fact, they even do health technology assessments, which is really looking at the true cost-effectiveness of a new intervention versus what's currently done in practice to make decisions as to whether they're going to pay for it. And they cover a pretty high percentage of their population with this. And then there are other places where the financing mechanisms are in place, but you don't necessarily have the doctors or the hospitals where they need to be to address the needs of the population. Still, we are dealing with places that are not fully urbanized. And in fact, a good deal of the population is still working on the pharm, basically. One of the other complexities of our region is that just between the Philippines and Indonesia, which together has a combined population of 380 million at least, maybe it's 390 now, you've got 25,000 islands, and not all of those islands tend to hold major tier-one cities, even though they can hold a lot of people. And if there is one thing about healthcare that seems to be a universal truth is that highly skilled workers like to live in the rich cities. CHAD: And so what I'm hearing is that on an individual island, if there's not a major city there, the access to the actual healthcare might be really limited. JOSEPH: That is exactly it. CHAD: In these economies in these countries, it's typical to have private insurance layered on top. But the pharmas probably aren't doing that, right? JOSEPH: Oh, no, no, unfortunately not. There are some pilots of trying to do co-ops or collective insurance or micro-insurance policies. But again, when you look at the amount of premium that they could pay in, the kind of coverage they get is pretty basic. CHAD: So, how does that landscape influence the solutions that startups are creating? JOSEPH: Well, first and foremost, you've got to try to get some sort of mechanism by which you can seek care without having to travel too much. And I think that concept is extremely familiar to all of us thanks to the global pandemic that I hope we're coming out of right now, although there's always a new strain surprising us. The idea of basic telemedicine is one that can have a great deal of impact in these populations. But even before that, just understanding the importance of healthcare, like, what the concept of healthcare is, what the concept of the modern medical system is, is something that a fair number of people never really had awareness of. And I'll call out an example country, and I try not to call out too many examples. But Indonesia did a really good job of educating people about the concept of healthcare when they promoted their universal healthcare coverage. Even if they didn't have the ability to deliver it as well as they wanted to or as widespread as they wanted to, at least they got people paying attention to this concept called health. So awareness is really the first step. The second challenge is all right, so you know health exists. When do you know when you need it? Where are you going to find a doctor? How do you know if a doctor is even good? And how do you know that the products that you're going to get are appropriate? So there are so many challenges that you have to face when you are in a lack of access situation. CHAD: I assume you're getting pitched on a lot of ideas coming to your fund, a lot of startups. Correct me if that's wrong. [laughs] JOSEPH: No, no, that's absolutely true. So one of the blessings and curses of being one of the very few super early-stage healthtech venture funds out there is that there aren't many of us out there. And when we started...let's just put it this way, if I could find a fund that was doing what I wanted to do, I would have sent my CV in, and I couldn't. And starting a fund was basically the last thing I wanted to do, having never worked at a VC before or ever raised money in my life before. So I still think that we are the only truly global impact-oriented seed - I hate the term pre-seed, but I'll use it because of the audience's familiarity with it- investment fund out there right now for healthtech. So by virtue of that, we do see a lot of companies. CHAD: So what are some of the criteria? JOSEPH: So I'd say some of the criteria that we look for is number one, are you solving a real problem? And we define a real problem by the breadth of the problem, like, how many people are suffering from it or how systemic is this problem if it's an infrastructural one? And depth being how severe is this problem: is it life or death, or is it a minor inconvenience? So first and foremost, it's got to be solving a real problem. Second, it's really around the team. You need a lot of clinical, technical, and commercial experience in order to pull off a healthtech startup successfully. And even before that, we want to understand why are you doing this? Because this is not easy. I'd say on a scale of 1 to 10, doing a startup is like an eight, and then doing a healthtech startup is like an 11. It's slow; it's technical, it's regulated, it's super risky. And health systems are very pathway-dependent in the intent to not have many things in common with one another. So it is really, really hard. So we want to know the motivation. Are you going to stick through the thick and thin, or are you doing this healthtech startup because you think healthtech is cool or hot this particular period in the market cycle? So that's another criterion. Another criterion is, well, what's your edge? I mean, okay, you can have a great team, and I think that is definitely a prerequisite. You can solve a problem. But do you have something that could make sure that you are going to be competitive and remain competitive? CHAD: Given the barriers to market entry that you just outlined, do most of the companies that you're investing in have any sort of traction already in the market, or where are they in the product development or business development cycle? JOSEPH: I'm going to give the ultimate cop-out answer of it depends. CHAD: [laughs] Yeah. JOSEPH: But I will qualify that by saying it depends on whether it's hardware or software, and it depends whether it's regulated or non-regulated. So if you are a software company that's unregulated so, what does this mean? It could be like a marketplace. It could be health education. It could be some telemedicine in a loosely regulated market. We'd really like to see user traction. We'd really like to see revenue even. However, if you're a device company and you need to get FDA before you can earn a single dollar, we're okay with it being a science experiment or a prototype on the table as long as the science part of it has been de-risked. So if we know that the fundamental scientific principles are sound, then we're willing to take the productization and regulatory risk because we've been through this journey ourselves. CHAD: And also, you said a team is really important, so if it's a team that has never gone through that before, that's less attractive than a team that has done it before, I assume. JOSEPH: Yeah, absolutely. However, one of the challenges is that outside of the U.S., certain European markets in Israel, it's really difficult to find a team that's gone through the entire medical device development process before. So you are going to rely heavily on your professional service providers, consultants, advisors, other investors who've done this before. And as long as you have at least a path to getting to a point where you can unlock and utilize that expertise, that's okay. But if you don't, then that's a really, really big risk. Mid-Roll Ad I wanted to tell you all about something I've been working on quietly for the past year or so, and that's AgencyU. AgencyU is a membership-based program where I work one-on-one with a small group of agency founders and leaders toward their business goals. We do one-on-one coaching sessions and also monthly group meetings. We start with goal setting, advice, and problem-solving based on my experiences over the last 18 years of running thoughtbot. As we progress as a group, we all get to know each other more. And many of the AgencyU members are now working on client projects together and even referring work to each other. Whether you're struggling to grow an agency, taking it to the next level and having growing pains, or a solo founder who just needs someone to talk to, in my 18 years of leading and growing thoughtbot, I've seen and learned from a lot of different situations, and I'd be happy to work with you. Learn more and sign up today at thoughtbot.com/agencyu. That's A-G-E-N-C-Y, the letter U. CHAD: Earlier, you said FDA. FDA is a United States thing. Do most countries in Southeast Asia have a local regulatory agency like the FDA that things need to be approved through? JOSEPH: Yep, every single one. The question is, what's the process to go through that? Generally speaking, the FDA, as well as the European equivalent, which is the CE Mark, are used as predicates in order to kind of shortcut the process, make it go a little bit faster. Because then you don't have to create a bunch of new work or get the local regulator to really try to do things that they're unfamiliar with. CHAD: You said it's fairly rare for teams to have concrete experience doing that in the local market. Does that mean that most of these markets have been served by, I don't know, large companies previously? JOSEPH: Yeah, and still are. A fair number of emerging markets don't even have the manufacturing capability to even do local production, so they require a lot of importation. I'd say that this is a different case when it comes to generic pharmaceuticals and maybe vaccines and some consumables. But complex devices and biologics are generally manufactured in more developed markets or larger economies. CHAD: Yeah. Well, you mentioned the pandemic, and I'm curious how the pandemic has changed either your prospects for the fund but also the market in general. JOSEPH: I would say, again, it's both a blessing and a curse. So during the start of the pandemic, there was a great deal of societal and economic uncertainty around where are we going to be as a species in six months? And I remember early 2020; it was kind of these Hollywood movies that would paint this kind of semi-apocalyptic picture of where we're going to end up. And as a consequence, people really puckered up and stopped investing in things. I would say that the other side of it is now much of the world understands what it's like to not have access to quality healthcare or even access to healthcare. You see people not going to the hospital for things that they ought to and then suffering the consequences at home, like, let's say, not going for that heart checkup, and then you having a heart attack at home and passing when you otherwise wouldn't have. Or even cancer patients having to delay their therapy because the hospital is just too full. So this concept of telemedicine which has always been resisted by both the payers and providers for being infeasible, or inaccurate, or impossible to fund properly, suddenly had to be done. And the concept of telemedicine is fairly old. I mean, how else would you treat your astronauts in space in the '60s if they got sick? So this is something that NASA thought of and invented and implemented, you know, decades and decades ago. And finally, this came forward. And I was pleasantly surprised to see...and again, I'll quote the U.S. here where The Center for Medicare & Medicaid Services or CMS actually reimbursed a bunch of remote procedure codes, which is pretty amazing. And I think that was opening Pandora's Box. There's no going back from that. So I think telemedicine is absolutely here to stay. And the real challenge now is really how to make it more user-friendly, how to improve it, how to improve the decisions that come from it. I really don't think it's going back. And as a consequence of this, it's really benefited a lot of our startups that were trying to build this remote-connected future anyway. CHAD: Has there also been an influx of those kinds of startups? JOSEPH: Absolutely. I would say that there has been a veritable Cambrian explosion of startups where everyone and their uncle is starting a healthtech startup as well as a healthtech fund. I see a lot of new funds coming up promising to invest in this space. So I think it's good in that there's going to be a lot of really new ideas, and hopefully, it's going to improve the standard of care for everyone around the world. But at the same time, it is creating a lot of noise, and it's becoming increasingly difficult to filter through that. CHAD: Do the solutions tend to be local? I guess the nature of my question was, you know, like messaging apps. [laughs] Different countries have different popular messaging apps. What do you see as the penetration of different telemedicine solutions in the different countries? Do you think it's going to be, oh, you know, this is popular in this country? Or do you think it's possible for one company to come in and really have a significant impact in the market across multiple markets? JOSEPH: Yeah, I think it's eventually going to be the latter. So at the start, you do see that you have your national champions. And like instant messaging apps, it's kind of like a 90-10 rule where the number 1 player takes 90% of the market, number 2 takes most of what's left, and then number 3 player caters to some niche or another. And I see two competing forces here; one is, yes, there may be a big player like Babylon or Crew who comes in and rolls up everything backed by heaps of capital. But the other thing could also be that all the health systems start saying, "You know what? Why are we working with an external company? Why don't we just develop all these capabilities ourselves and then keep the patient captive?" And you are starting to see middleware providers who are basically providing that telemedicine layer, white-labeling it, or giving API access to the providers themselves, the legacy providers themselves, and then allowing them to do that. And I actually saw this statistic...I don't know how accurate it was, but I saw a chart in the U.S. that white-labeled or internal telemedicine consults exceeded the number of Teladoc consultations, which is the largest platform in the U.S., at some point last year. CHAD: I'm wondering, do you know if Teladoc uses Twilio? JOSEPH: I really should know the answer to that question, but unfortunately, I do not. CHAD: Because my sense is the real winner in this game might be companies like Twilio because I think everyone is using them. [laughs] JOSEPH: That makes a ton of sense. So when we do look at some investments, we actually want to invest in middleware because why duke it out to be the platform when you're the utility provider? CHAD: So let's turn our attention to the actual creation of the fund. And I know you just opened your second fund last month, right? JOSEPH: Actually, this month. I mean, last month was the paperwork, but it takes time for stuff to get approved. CHAD: Yeah, fair enough. So you already said actually starting a fund was, I think you said, the last thing on earth that you wanted to do. Why was that the last thing you wanted to do? JOSEPH: Frankly, it was a whole lot more uncertainty than I was prepared to handle at the time. And I was either blessed or cursed with this momentary clarity of purpose where I knew with all my being that this is what I wanted to do with myself for, if not the rest of my life, a very long time. And the only alternative, or rather the only choice to pursue this at the time, was really starting a fund. So that's what I had to do, right? CHAD: And how large was the first fund? JOSEPH: It was pretty small; it was $7.6 million, which in local currency equates to a nice number of just above 10 million sings. CHAD: And where did you...I'm going to ask where that ended up coming from. But in terms of the mechanics of actually starting a fund, what did that look like? JOSEPH: Well, it depends on each market. But typically, what happens is you need to first have permission from the regulator in order to actually start and run a fund. So in Singapore, you need to apply for a venture capital fund management license from the Monetary Authority of Singapore. That's what had to be done first, and we got that approved in a pretty good time, actually. I think we might have captured a lull period because now, with all the funds coming out, I've heard the queue is months long in some cases. And then came the business of incorporating the fund itself and then starting to draft all the legal paperwork, the conditions, the private memorandum or prospectus, depending on which geography and how regulated you are, that you show around to investors once they've expressed interest in learning substantially more details about your fund beyond what a simple PowerPoint deck or a casual coffee conversation can yield. And then you start collecting commitments, and then you start collecting the money. And at some point, you have enough money to say, all right, we'll do a close or first close, and that then gives you permission to start deploying that money into investments. And some funds they'll only do one close, some funds will do a first close, and then a final close when they get the rest of the money in or some money committed and then calling the rest of it to come in. Or some will do multiple closes just so that they have the ability to keep deploying continuously while they're doing this fundraising process. And in our case, we were doing rolling closes. So we would close every few months, and we'd continue to deploy. And by the time we finished fundraising, we actually already had nine companies out of the 15 that we have in our portfolio done. So it really depends on all sorts of different factors, which we probably don't have that much time to get into. And I risk perhaps putting my foot in my mouth and misspeaking if I give too many examples. CHAD: [laughs] When it comes to starting a fund, how cookie-cutter is it? Or do you find yourself having to create everything from scratch, all the legal documents, whatever platform you might be...or access you might be giving to the people who are contributing to the fund? JOSEPH: I'd say, again, it depends where you are. I think in the U.S. and especially with the advent of great service providers platforms like AngelList and Assure, it is super cookie-cutter. In our part of the world, I still think it's somewhat cookie-cutter, but we got a little too cute. CHAD: [chuckles] JOSEPH: We thought, okay, it's our first time doing a fund. I've been an LP in other funds. What did I wish I had as an LP? And as a consequence, we introduced some hurdle rates of tiered carry, and even zero carry if we don't hit a certain return. And all that really did was just create more questions from the investors. So we should have probably done it as cookie-cutter as possible in hindsight. CHAD: So I often hear from founders who talk about how it's important to have a VC fund behind you that you agree with, and want to work with, and are excited about, and that can be value additive. Do you need, as someone raising a fund, do you need to consider things like that or other things when it comes to the people you're taking money from the fund? JOSEPH: Absolutely. Maybe knock on wood here, but our relative inexperience when starting a fund probably selected out all the folks who might not have gotten along with us anyway. And the fact that we're pretty straightforward and direct with what we want to do in our objectives probably helped with that selection process as well on the positive side. But I absolutely, absolutely can recommend having that alignment of values and mission with those who are on the journey with you for a good decade. It's like getting married, right? CHAD: Yeah. Well, so when you're planning a fund and thinking about time horizons, is a decade what you're thinking about? JOSEPH: Yeah, all things considered. So our fund lifetime was eight years from final close. But still, it takes time to raise the fund and plan the fund, and you have people that are on board even before the fund begins. So it is a decade-long relationship, at least. And then some of the larger funds because they want to have a longer investment period, will push that out even further where they're going to be a 10-year fund from final close. And if you have enough of your portfolio that hasn't exited yet but still has some value to be uncovered, you may ask your investors to extend the fund life even further. So this is a supremely long relationship that you have. And aside from evergreen funds that don't have a fund lifetime, I think this is about as long as it gets, although I have seen some people float the idea of a 20-year fund or a 50-year fund, but that's really not widely practiced. I think five years is the fastest I've seen, and ten seems to be the average. CHAD: Where did that first fund come from? How did you drum up the interest and decide who would be a part of it? JOSEPH: It's really the folks who have known me the longest or worked with me. So you know how they say when you're raising money for a startup, you get it from the three F's, Friends, Family, and Fools? For funds and for first-time fund managers, I think it's a pretty analogous group of people, although I don't think we have any fools. CHAD: [laughs] JOSEPH: And, unfortunately, don't have family either. So it's really all friends, old co-workers, old clients, and then the people that they introduced us to. There were some serendipitous moments where people liked what I said at a conference, or we asked a tough question. And people asked, "Well, how can you ask such a tough question?" Then they got to know us and then decide to invest from there. But majority of it was just introductions, warm introductions. We never did any cold emails. CHAD: Have there been any exits in the first fund? JOSEPH: Not just yet. We do come in as either the first or second investor in these companies. So there is quite a long journey that we expect before we, you know, see some exits. There may be some this year. But if I look back at my angel investments, there was only real serious talk of an exit at the six-year mark for one of the companies that's doing really well. And even that exit turned out to be just another, you know, the investor changed their mind, and instead of buying the company, they decided to just invest more money into it. So this is a long journey. CHAD: Yeah, definitely. Did that make putting together the second fund any harder, or is that what everyone expects? JOSEPH: I am cautiously optimistic because we're still so early in our journey that the only folks we've really spoken with are the ones who invested in our first fund or passed on our first fund because they don't back first-time fund managers. They come to expect that your second fund is built on the momentum of the first fund. And it's really your third fund that's built on the exit and actual realized track record of your first fund. CHAD: That makes sense. What do you think is next for Verge HealthTech? JOSEPH: Well, first things first, we got to get started with the second fund and see if we can build something to scale. I mean, the first fund was an experiment. It was a small fund, you know. Could we build the world's seed-stage global impact healthtech fund on basically a shoestring? And the second fund is now let's take everything that we wish we had for the first fund and scale it up so bigger initial ticket sizes because we want to own more, the ability to follow on properly, the ability to do more deals, which requires a much bigger team which we now have. As well as to go back and support the winners of our first fund as well as some of the companies that maybe we made a mistake on and passed but still have a strong enough relationship to revisit and get them on the next round or the round after that, or just new companies that the market has moved. You know, the area that we might have been really interested in at the seed stage is now a pre-A stage or an A stage. So that's really what we want to do with the second one. And it would be amazing to see where this goes. I'm thrilled that we actually have, well, I think, one of the best healthtech investment teams in the world; maybe I'm slightly biased with this. CHAD: [laughs] JOSEPH: And I'm excited to see what we can do together. CHAD: That's great. Well, I wish you the best. And I really appreciate you for stopping by and sharing with us. If folks want to follow along with you or get in touch with you, where are the best places for them to do that? JOSEPH: Probably LinkedIn is the best way to do it. Also, I have a blog on Medium, which I'm sure can be linked in the show notes. I've been really bad...I've been traveling intensely in the past half-year. But I promise my next blog post will be interesting. CHAD: [laughs] JOSEPH: Because I just got back from Rwanda and Saudi Arabia, which are two very, very different countries, however, with a great emphasis on improving healthcare, especially on the digital side. CHAD: Well, that's exciting. So folks definitely can find the links for that in the notes, which you can find the notes; you can subscribe to the show and a full transcript of the episode at giantrobots.fm. If you have questions or comments, email us at hosts@giantrobots.fm. And you can find me on Twitter at @cpytel. This podcast is brought to you by thoughtbot and produced and edited by Mandy Moore. Thanks for listening, and see you next time. ANNOUNCER: This podcast was brought to you by thoughtbot. thoughtbot is your expert design and development partner. Let's make your product and team a success. Special Guest: Joseph Mocanu.

Off Stage and On The Air

      Listen to the Show Right Click to Save GuestsDiverse Space Dance Systema, Axioma, Delemma!What We Talked About Tony Nominations Paradise Square I'd be a soldier Adriana DeBose to host Pulitzer Prize for fat ham Into the Woods Palace theatre lifted 30' Dear Evan Hansen Lampika Covid Surge Summer/Fall (?) Thornton Wilder Documentary to stream Actor's Fund changes name Jesse Williams Leaked pics.. Take me out Patti LuPone yelling   Thank you to Dean Johanesen, lead singer of "The Human Condition" who gave us permission to use "Step Right Up" as our theme song, so please visit their website.. they're good! (that's an order)  

zoom performance dance theater musical actor dark normal broadway opera fund priority stuart palace pulitzer prize signature accent msonormal compatibility colorful times new roman dear evan hansen human condition calibri koop moulton patti lupone cambria math style definitions worddocument shiro saveifxmlinvalid ignoremixedcontent punctuationkerning breakwrappedtables dontgrowautofit trackmoves msonormaltable trackformatting lidthemeother snaptogridincell wraptextwithpunct useasianbreakrules lidthemeasian x none mathpr latentstyles deflockedstate right click centergroup latentstylecount showtunes donotpromoteqf subsup undovr brkbin brkbinsub mathfont smallfrac dispdef lmargin rmargin defjc wrapindent allowpng intlim narylim defunhidewhenused defqformat defpriority defsemihidden lsdexception locked qformat latentstyles semihidden unhidewhenused table normal name title name normal name strong name emphasis name intense quote name light shading name dark list accent name light list name colorful shading accent name light grid name colorful list accent name medium shading name colorful grid accent name medium list name medium grid name subtle emphasis name dark list name intense emphasis name colorful shading name subtle reference name colorful list name intense reference name colorful grid name book title name default paragraph font name light shading accent name bibliography name subtitle name light list accent name toc heading name light grid accent name revision name table grid name list paragraph name placeholder text name quote name no spacing step right up systema tony nominations name e light accent dark accent colorful accent name list name date name plain text name salutation name table list name table 3d name body text first indent name table contemporary name note heading name table elegant name block text name table professional name document map name table subtle name normal indent name table web name balloon text name list bullet name normal web name table theme name list number name normal table name plain table name closing name no list name grid table light name signature name outline list name grid table name body text name table simple name body text indent name table classic name list continue name table colorful name message header name table columns name list table axioma msonospacing relyonvml name mention name hashtag name unresolved mention what we talked about scheps name smart link dean johanesen
Natixis Insights
Q1 2022 Update: Vaughan Nelson Mid Cap Fund

Natixis Insights

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 11:58


Dennis Alff, Senior Portfolio Manager and Dan Hughes, Client Portfolio Manager and both of Vaughan Nelson, review and discuss recent market trends, fund performance, and portfolio positioning.

ALL MARINE RADIO - Podcasts
THE ALL MARINE RADIO HOUR: Grant Newsham discusses the Philippine election; Rep Luria’s criticism of US Navy shipbuilding & former Japan PM Abe is prodding Japan to fund it’s defense

ALL MARINE RADIO - Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 94:12


Grant Newsham is a senior research fellow at the Japan Forum for Strategic Studies, a senior research fellow at the Center for Security Policy, and a retired United States Marine Officer. He was the first US Marine liaison officer to the Japan Ground Self Defense force and was instrumental in promoting the JSDF's initial moves […]

MLM-PIRE
175: How to fund your BIG WHY by putting your MLM money to work with Wendy Lee

MLM-PIRE

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 32:14


Wendy is back on the show, ya'll, and she brings straight FIRE on this episode!    Wendy is a powerhouse in the network marketing profession. She loves showing women how to walk in financial freedom so they can change the world!    We had an AWESOME convo and I know you will love every minute as we get super transparent about money goals, mindset, and funding your big WHY.    Learn more about working with Wendy!  www.wendyleeonline.com

ResearchPod
Financing our anthropocene

ResearchPod

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 14:05


 The 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) of the UN set out the aims of ensuring the future of life on Planet Earth is clean, healthy, and rich in biodiversity. However, reaching these goals is expensive, requiring around an additional $5 Trillion per year over the next 15–20 years. So the question now is: How to finance our Future? The Tao of Finance initiative from the World Academy of Arts and Sciences proposes outside-the-box solutions to generate the funds needed, utilising distributed digital technologies and innovative approaches to finance. Read more about the Tao of Finance at the WAAS website, or read the book ‘Financing Our Future: Unveiling a Parallel Digital Currency System to Fund the SDGs and the Common Good'.

Climate Connections
Prairie Island Indian Community uses nuclear waste fund for net-zero carbon goal

Climate Connections

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 1:31


The tribe plans to install solar panels, make energy efficiency upgrades, and retrofit buildings to run on electricity. Learn more at https://www.yaleclimateconnections.org/

The Smart Real Estate Coach Podcast|Real Estate Investing
Episode 351: Obtaining Easy to Access Business Funding, with Ari Page

The Smart Real Estate Coach Podcast|Real Estate Investing

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 19:10


In 2009, Ari Page took over as CEO of Fund&Grow. Ari is a business credit specialist with a passion for people, a penchant for new ideas, and the ability to implement them. Ari's background has enabled him to use the power of the group to leverage individual competencies in order to better benefit his clients and grow a stronger, more cohesive company. One of Ari's core competencies is creating powerful new strategies to circumvent the many roadblocks that so many businesses face in an economy where banks are hesitant to lend to the average American business. In the competitive financial services industry, Ari and his team have excelled at delivering an incredibly powerful business-credit-building program that far exceeds the typical service and reputation of the industry. What you will learn in this episode: Why real estate investors need to have easy access to unsecured funding What process investors typically go through to get business credit If you need good personal credit to get approved for business credit What Ari has to say about obtaining funding during the Wicked Smart Summit What is the credit card stacking process, and how long does the process take If business credit shows up on your personal credit file The number one thing that small businesses can do to be successful Resources: https://smartrealestate.com/fundandgrow LinkedIn: linkedin.com/in/ari-page-business-credit-expert-73546835 Twitter: https://twitter.com/CC_Builders https://twitter.com/AriPage Additional Resources: Follow Chris and Zach on Club House to learn even more about deal structures and how to get 3 paydays from your real estate investments. If you're looking to secure some lines of credit for your business, check out Fund and Grow – Visit the Resource page at https://smartrealestatecoach.com/resources Schedule a FREE Strategy Call: SmartRealEstateCoach.com/action Register for our free masterclass: www.SmartRealEstateCoach.com/mastersclass Real Estate on Your Terms by Chris Prefontaine SmartRealEstateCoach.com/webinar SmartRealRstateCoach.com/ebook SmartRealEstateCoach.com/QLS Smart Real Estate Coach Podcast Sponsor: Paul G. Dion CPA, CTC    

Bankless
Betting the Fund on the Merge | Hal Press, North Rock Digital

Bankless

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 99:24


What happens when a guy becomes so convicted on ETH that he bets HIS ENTIRE FUND on the Ethereum Proof-of-Stake merge? How much alpha is there in the All Core Devs calls? How should YOU play the merge?  Hal Press of North Rock Digital joins us as we discuss how to value tokens, and how to trade the biggest moment in crypto history. ------  OPOLIS | Sign Up to Get 1000 $WORK and 1000 $BANK https://bankless.cc/Opolis ------  SUBSCRIBE TO NEWSLETTER:          https://newsletter.banklesshq.com/   ️ SUBSCRIBE TO PODCAST:                 http://podcast.banklesshq.com/   ------ BANKLESS SPONSOR TOOLS:  ️ ARBITRUM | SCALED ETHEREUM https://bankless.cc/Arbitrum  ACROSS | BRIDGE TO LAYER 2 https://bankless.cc/Across  ALTO IRA | TAX-FREE CRYPTO https://bankless.cc/AltoIRA  AAVE V3 | LEND & BORROW CRYPTO https://bankless.cc/aave ️ MAKER DAO | THE DAI STABLECOIN  https://bankless.cc/MakerDAO   BRAVE | THE BROWSER NATIVE WALLET https://bankless.cc/Brave ------ Topics Covered: 0:00 Intro 7:00 What Sets ETH Apart 18:09 Revenue and Cost 24:50 DeFi Utility 31:00 Blockchain Expenses 35:45 Inflating and Revenue 39:48 Supply and Demand 45:56 ETH vs Alt Layer 1s 56:06 Will the Price Lag? 1:03:36 Who Leads the Market? 1:05:35 Modeling Ethereum 1:11:45 ETH Staking Numbers 1:20:00 Wen Merge? 1:30:18 Trading the Merge 1:35:50 Closing ------ Resources: Hal Press: https://twitter.com/NorthRockLP?s=20&t=ZONa4ZJl5kcxbE43zFZKBg Crypto Fees: https://cryptofees.info/ Nillion: https://www.nillion.com/ The Ethereum Thesis: https://twitter.com/NorthRockLP/status/1484926691990556675?s=20&t=ZONa4ZJl5kcxbE43zFZKBg ----- Not financial or tax advice. This channel is strictly educational and is not investment advice or a solicitation to buy or sell any assets or to make any financial decisions. This video is not tax advice. Talk to your accountant. Do your own research. Disclosure. From time-to-time I may add links in this newsletter to products I use. I may receive commission if you make a purchase through one of these links. Additionally, the Bankless writers hold crypto assets. See our investment disclosures here: https://newsletter.banklesshq.com/p/bankless-disclosures 

The Irish Tech News Podcast
Using DeFi to fund impact infrastructure projects

The Irish Tech News Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 34:01


Jillian Godsil talks with Stanley Boots, a man of many hats from Zoo Keeper, to Lawyer to Crypto Advocate and co founder of Silta Finance - a company funding impact projects by crowd funding with cryptocurrency Stanley Boots is a co-founder of Silta Finance, the DeFi bridge to a sustainable future. He is also a co-founder of Frontier Law & Advisory, an advisory firm in the project finance and infrastructure sectors. Stanley has 23 years legal experience in project finance, renewable energy and infrastructure development mainly in Southeast Asia. He was previously an renewable energy and infrastructure lawyer with DLA Piper and Hogan Lovells. Stanley is a well-known voice in Vietnam's PPP development. Linkedin Twitter

The Option Genius Podcast: Options Trading For Income and Growth

Hey, it's Allen again, from Option Genius. And today I learned something that I want to share with you. Over this weekend, this past weekend, I attended virtually a conference. And it was an investment conference on basically it was on funds. So how to, it was for people who want to have a fund like hedge fund or a real estate fund or crypto fund at all, there's so many different types of funds. And so they put all the people together in a room and they had speakers come and talk about the different things that they're doing and how you can do it, and how you can get investors to give you money and how you can build your track record and all this kind of stuff. So currently, I am thinking about doing that. And so I went there, and one of the speakers was a guy by the name of John Pennington, you can look him up John Pennington, he's probably a billionaire, or if not, he's worth several 100 million dollars. About a year ago, he took his company public, they were a fund, they were a real estate fund. So they were using investors to give them money. And then he would go out and buy real estate and do loans and stuff like that. And they made it to build it up pretty good—several billions of dollars of assets. And then they took the company public. And he was the I believe he was the president or the co-founder, one of them and then he retired. So now he has a lot of time on his hands. But he's still a very smart guy, because you don't build up a company and go public, you know, and make millions or millions of dollars if you're not a smart guy. So he took the stage. And he talked about a couple of different things. One of the things he talked about was he what he calls the Bitcoin cage. Now, I want to give him complete credit for this because I hadn't thought about this. This is his thing. I don't know if he got it from somewhere else. But he brought this in spoken to everybody. And it was very interesting. So I'm telling you this not because we're going to be making money, I will not be selling options on Bitcoin or anything like that. But I want to also show you how other people think and how when you're investing, you need to be looking two or three steps down the road, to really understand what is going on in the markets. It's not just hey, I want to buy this stock is gonna go up and sell puts because it's going up. Yes, that's just kind of what we do. Right, simplicity wise, but long term, we have to also know what's going on. So Ray Dalio, the guy who has the biggest hedge fund in the world is another guy, he has written several books. And he's been talking a lot about the reserve currency, as the dollar is currently the reserve currency of the world, meaning that most of the trade around the world is done in dollars. So that's very, very, very, very, very important for the United States. And if they stopped being the reserve currency, the dollar stops being the reserve currency, it's going to be very negative for our economy, our country, our debts, borrowing money, all that stuff, taxes are gonna go up all kinds of crazy stuff is gonna happen. And at this point, China really wants their currency to be the reserve currency. They don't want the dollar, they don't like the dollar anymore, and Russia is trying to get everybody off the dollar, as well. So it's gonna be interesting, the next 1520 years, see what happens with that, but call him John, John Pennington, the guy who's talking. According to him, the Fed-its main mandate there number one mandate is to keep the dollar the reserve currency. That's what he says is that their most important goal, their most important objective is to do that. Now a few years ago, nobody ever heard of Bitcoin, right? But bitcoin is billed as a currency is that's where it's supposed to be used to buy stuff with itself stuff with it, right now, because of the US tax laws, it's not really a currency, right? Because you pay taxes on it, every time you sell it, every time you buy something, you paying taxes, you got to record all that stuff, that's crazy. So until they get rid of that, it's never really going to be a true currency. But still people are using it to buy stuff with. And so it's gaining more and more traction. And it's unregulated by any government. So that's the appeal to it, right? And there's no one government that can take away your Bitcoin or and they actually found ways they can, but technically, you're not supposed to do that. And so the federal government, obviously, you know, there'll be the they got smart people that work in there, they'd be like, well, you know, this Bitcoin thing, it might take over as the reserve currency of the world, and they're going to replace the dollar, that's not gonna be a good thing. And so the Fed is thinking, okay, so how do we stop that? How do we not allow that? So before I tell you how they did that, let me give you a little bit more background. In the 2000s JP Morgan was manipulating the price of gold. Yes. JP Morgan, the bank was manipulating the entire gold market. So they were keeping prices within the range that they wanted to they were not letting go up nine where they say you can look this up and they were fined by the s&c. You know people found out about it, they were fined about it. And, you know, most people didn't even hear about it, they were fined a billion dollars, because of their manipulation. And this went on for nine years. So that's a lot of manipulation. And JP Morgan, you know, it's a big bank. But if you compare it, the resources that they have to the Fed, it's nothing, because they only have a certain amount of cash and serve on a market cap that they can tap into news, the Fed can print money as much as they want. They like unlimited supply of cash. And over the last several years, they've been printing, printing printing, and I'm sure nobody knows where all that money that the printing went to. So I'm sure the Fed has, you know, taken some of that money and done other things with it. That was just a footnote somewhere. Oh, yeah, $50 billion, went to this program over here. Nobody knows what it is. Right? And so John, he made the inference that if JP Morgan can manipulate and control the gold market, gold market is 10 times with Bitcoin, it's, it's way bigger than Bitcoin. Really even greater than that. I mean, it might be more than 10 times larger than Bitcoin at this point. So if JP Morgan with limited resources can manipulate a market 10 times bigger than Bitcoin, it means the reason that a fed with unlimited resources could easily manipulate the Bitcoin market. Make sense? Do you see what I'm going on here? I'm trying to connect the dots here. So what John was saying is that the Fed is manipulating the Bitcoin. And they bought up a lot of Bitcoin when it was at lower prices. And now as it gets higher and higher, they are selling the Bitcoin that they have. So they're keeping a lid on prices, because we had a lot of people mentioning later, oh, yeah, Bitcoin should be at 100,000, it should be valid should be at 200,000. Because every day, there's less and less Bitcoin out there. It's been mined. So it's, it's not like there's an unlimited supply, eventually, they'll stop making it. But that supply, that's the amount of mining that they're doing is becoming less and less and less. So basically, all a bit, most of the Bitcoin is already out there. There's a small percentage of it, that needs to be mined yet. But people lose their Bitcoin all the time, people put their money in their wallet, and then the guy dies. And nobody knows where their bitcoins just gone, where it can be stolen or hacked. And there's so much Bitcoin has been lost just because people forget their passwords. So the supply of Bitcoin is going down, that shouldn't be sending the prices up just by itself, but it's not. And so John is saying that the Fed is purposely keeping the price down, because they don't want interest in Bitcoin. If Bitcoin prices got super sky high, everyone's gonna be buying it, everyone's gonna start using it, all that stuff, they don't want that to happen. And so they're purposely keeping prices down. And what they what they're trying to do is most of the people who trade Bitcoin who buy bitcoin, they're doing technical analysis, right, so they look at the charts and the Bitcoin chart is going up, they're gonna start buying and holding, and if the charge is going down, then they're gonna leave it alone or sell. And so the Fed wants to create a chart of Bitcoin where it's slowly, slowly, slowly, lower highs, lower highs, lower highs, very bearish looking chatter, so that the people avoid Bitcoin and move on to something else invest in something else. And so Bitcoin eventually falls out of favor. Now they can do this for the next 15-20 years. People live on Bitcoin rises. It's crazy, but it's very possible. Now, is this accurate? Is this going to happen? The Fed really doing this? You might be thinking, Oh, conspiracy theory, conspiracy theory meaning, right, maybe that's what it is. But it makes sense. Is it doable? Yes. Is it in the favor of the Fed to do that? And the US government, if not the Fed and the US government or somebody else, you know, that wants to keep the dollar as a reserve currency? Yes, it is in their favor. And Bitcoin becomes the world's reserve currency. Whoa, big shocks all around the world, especially in the United States. So it was just eye opening to me to even hear that see is like, wow, okay, you know, this is some next not just next level thinking, this is like four stories up thinking, right? This is the kind of stuff that these guys talk about, think about. And it's like playing investing is like playing chess, right? You don't just think one or two moves ahead, you got to think 1520 moves. That's how the Masters do it, then the grandmasters they think, like 30 moves ahead. So that's how they become grandmasters. So this is the way people think on Wall Street and how they obviously there has, you know, I mean, I don't even know JP Morgan was manipulating gold prices. I didn't know that but they people know about it. And if that's possible, then there's a whole bunch of other things that are possible as well. They shouldn't be done. But they are being done. And if the government is doing it, then all bets are off because nobody's gonna go to jail eludes me, we're gonna find out about it. Probably. Right? So that is the Bitcoin cage. I know, we didn't talk about options or trading or anything like that. But, you know, I just wanted to put it out there and be like, hey, look, there's other ways to think. And you can't just look at one thing and be like, okay, Bitcoin, yeah, it's gonna go up because of XYZ. Well, there are other factors involved. So you got to look at all the offshoots as well. And when you make your investment thesis, so, you know, whatever you're investing in, look at all the different angles, think about it, you know, talk to other people that might have contrary views to what you're thinking. If you're if you're a Bitcoin bold, then talk to people who think bitcoins going to zero. You know, Warren Buffett said that Charlie Munger says that, why are these guys idiots? No, they're pretty smart. But they have reasons. So find out what those reasons are and then find out why and listen to it and keep an open mind. And then head yourself. Always head yourself. So yes, I still own Bitcoin. I'm hoping it goes 200,000. But this talk did keep me from buying more. So we'll see what happens. Right? We'll see what happens. He might be right, he might be totally off but if Bitcoin doesn't go up 200,000 over the next 10 years, then we'll know that he was right. Be crazy if he was anyway. So that's it for this episode. I'll talk to you guys soon. Bye.

Tech Nest: The Real Estate and Tech Show
Fully Digital Fund Transfers in Real Estate with Earnnest CRO, Russell Smith

Tech Nest: The Real Estate and Tech Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 66:39


More about Earnnest and RussellEarnnest is how money moves in real estate! We are a digital payments company based in Greenville, South Carolina. We are the industry leader in digital earnest money payments - free for agents, free for escrow holders - and also offer a full payment suite for all payment occasions - agent fee billing, commission disbursements, lease payments, etc.Russell Smith serves as Earnnest's Chief Revenue Officer, leading all marketing, sales, and customer success efforts for the digital payments leader. Prior to joining Earnnest, Russell held multiple go-to-market roles at HouseCanary, RealScout, and Trulia. He was named as a 2020 HousingWire Rising Star and is a NAR REACH Mentor. Russell lives in Napa, California with his wife and son. Follow Russell on Twitter Connect with Russell on LinkedIn Follow Earnnest on Twitter Check out Earnnest

Scroll Down: True Stories from KYW Newsradio
Big shifts in higher education: 'Young people don't feel prepared to fund college'

Scroll Down: True Stories from KYW Newsradio

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 11:54


New research from Junior Achievement and Citizens Bank that shows young people are worried about their financial futures, specifically paying for college. More than two-thirds of those surveyed said that rising higher education costs have affected their plans for what to do after high school, more than a quarter say they are now only considering state schools, and about one in ten say they are looking at a two-year degree as opposed to a four-year degree. We wanted to dig into what these findings mean, so we caught up with Stephanie Gambone, President & CEO of Junior Achievement of Southeastern Pennsylvania. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices