Podcasts about Miami Herald

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American daily newspaper

  • 753PODCASTS
  • 1,407EPISODES
  • 44mAVG DURATION
  • 5WEEKLY NEW EPISODES
  • May 25, 2022LATEST
Miami Herald

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Best podcasts about Miami Herald

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Latest podcast episodes about Miami Herald

The Michael Sartain Podcast
Dylan Ratigan - The Michael Sartain Podcast

The Michael Sartain Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 25, 2022 138:55


Dylan Ratigan (Twitter: @DylanRatigan) is the former host of the Dylan Ratigan show on MSNBC and the former host of CNBC's Fast Money and Closing Bell. Dylan was a contributor to the Huffington post and was a corporate finance editor at Bloomberg. He was a former contributor to ABC News and his articles have appeared in The New York Times, The Washington Post, The Miami Herald and Chicago Tribune. Dylan is also the author of the NYT best seller “Greedy Bastards.” Dylan is currently the co-host of the Truth or Skepticism podcast on the TastyTrade financial network Michael's Men of Action program is a Master's course dedicated to helping people elevate their social lives by building elite social circles and becoming higher status. Click the link below to learn more: https://go.moamentoring.com/i/2 Subscribe on Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/user/MichaelSartain Listen on Apple Podcast: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/the-michael-sartain-podcast/id1579791157 Listen on Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/2faAYwvDD9Bvkpwv6umlPO?si=8Q3ak9HnSlKjuChsTXr6YQ&dl_branch=1 Filmed at Sticky Paws Studios: https://m.youtube.com/channel/UComrBVcqGLDs3Ue-yWAft8w 0:00 Intro 1:22 Work ethic 2:01 Starting at Bloomberg 3:09 Writing headlines 5:40 **Credibility of financial news 8:30 **You believe someone know something 10:41 *I'm not like all these other guys 12:01 Cryptocurrency 14:01 William Jennings Bryant 16:13 Bull corn 18:19 *A new paradigm 19:56 Dodge coin 20:27 **Crypto is a Speculative asset 22:26 Pose nude for NFT 23:16 ***crypto is unadulterated bullshit 23:48 2011 rant 25:03 The Enron crash 30:22 Introduction to corporate malfeasance 31:14 **Appearance on Oprah Winfrey 32:04 ***September 11 35:37 Fame brain 37:45 2008 financial crisis 44:47 ***No one went to jail 46:12 Lance Armstrong 46:36 Golden parachutes 46:57 **Corporations acting as sociopaths 48:22 Incentives 49:13 ** Lenient risk policy 51:17 Hairless murder apes 53:50 Political discussions are pointless 55:34 A few people will control most of the resources in every system 56:44 **Both political parties are corrupt 58:06 The American tax code 1:04:42 *American people being extracted 1:09:09 Identity politics 1:10:50 ***Knife fight in the street 1:13:36 Jingoism, Propaganda 1:17:00 Running for congress 1:18:29 ***Indictment of Dylan Ratigan 1:21:07 Money in politics, Rank choice voting, Distributive finance 1:25:05 Relationship with Tom Sosnoff, truth or skepticism 1:28:43 *Why do they ignore Tom Sosnoff? 1:36:19 *Threatening to financial institutions 1:38:22 Tom Sosnoff: Where did you get your amazing memory from? 1:39:19 **Tony Battista: What is your opinion on marriage? 1:41:03 Romeo and Juliet 1:43:28 *Difference between love and marriage 1:44:42 The Millionaire Next-Door 1:45:33 Dylan Ratigan for president: tech monopolies 1:55:15 Petroleum, Bill Mahr 2:04:01 Federal legalization of marijuana 2:05:45 Inflation and the Fed Rate 2:08:03 Quantum teleportation 2:12:51 Truth or Skepticism 2:13:26 Sugar at Solomon Brothers 2:16:47 Outro

The Tony Kornheiser Show
“Sand will never let you forget it”

The Tony Kornheiser Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 25, 2022 62:46


Tony opens the show by commenting on the school shooting in Uvalde Texas, and he also talks about a dental problem he had to deal with. Greg Cote of the Miami Herald calls in to talk about the Heat / Celtics series, and also about raised expectations for the Dolphins, Pat Forde of Sports Illustrated calls in to talk about Rich Strike's improbable win at the Derby, and he also talks about the the war of words between Nick Saban and Jimbo Fisher, and Tony closes out the show by opening up the Mailbag. Songs : Ava Anderson “Last Call” ; “Tennessee” Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Collapse: Disaster in Surfside
Episode 12: The Lives Lived and Lost

Collapse: Disaster in Surfside

Play Episode Listen Later May 25, 2022 48:07


On the morning of the collapse, at an emergency editorial meeting, before they even knew the scale of the loss of life, the editors at the Miami Herald made a commitment to write a full obituary of every single person who died in this unthinkable tragedy. In the twelfth and final episode of Collapse: Disaster in Surfside, we honor the memory of the victims of one of the worst structural failures in history, and hear from the editors and writers who carefully compiled 98 life stories, as well as the life story of the community of Champlain Towers South, which vanished in an instant.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

The Chills at Will Podcast
Episode 124 with Robin Peguero, Exciting New Voice, Legal Insider, and Crafter of the Exciting and Evocative Thriller, With Prejudice

The Chills at Will Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 24, 2022 59:56


Episode 124 Notes and Links to Robin Peguero's Work        On Episode 124 of The Chills at Will Podcast, Pete welcomes Robin Peguero, and the two discuss, among other topics, Robin's early writing and reading influences, Pete and Robin's shared love for, and awe of, Gabriel Garcia Marquez, Robin's experience in government and law that have influenced his worldviews and writing, and the background, real-life parallels, and themes featured in Robin's With Prejudice.      An Afro-Latino and the son of immigrants, Robin Peguero graduated from Harvard College and Harvard Law School. He has written for the Miami Herald, the Harvard Crimson, and the Harvard Law Review, and he served as a press spokesman in the U.S. House and as a speechwriter in the U.S. Senate before becoming a lawyer. He is currently a U.S. House investigative counsel working on domestic terrorism. Buy With Prejudice by Robin Peguero   Shelf Awareness: Interview with Robin Peguero   The Big Thrill: “Up Close: Robin Peguero”       At about 1:30, Robin describes the festivities for the first week of publication, describes the feeling as “surreal,” and talks about his    At about 3:00, Robin gives background on his childhood relationship with language and literature and growing up in Hialeah, outside of Miami   At about 5:35-a Natalie Lima shout out!   At about 6:10, Robin details his early reading favorites and the background for his early writing, in “creating a world and making it how [you] want it to exist”   At about 7:45, Robin responds to Pete's wondering about moments of discovery and influence on his road to writing, including how Garcia Marquez and Faulkner's work influenced and inspired, and Robin's time on the school newspaper   At about 11:50, Pete and Robin commiserate on the difficulty of The Sound and the Fury   At about 12:20, Robin details his love of Marquez's work, including his blockbuster and iconic novels    At about 13:15, Robin describes some early birthday parties that were perfect for a literary teenage crowd, and his friend as his “first beta reader”   At about 14:50, Robin talks about early jobs in government, and how his experience with the “slow-moving” government entities affected his worldview and his move to law    At about 17:10, Robin details his experience with the defense and prosecution sides of the criminal justice, all the while writing on the side   At about 18:20, Robin traces the journey of the book from origin to publication    At about 19:35-21:32, Robin summarizes the book with an “elevator pitch” and emphasizes the importance of the jury in the legal system   At about 21:35-25:03, Robin discusses the significance of the book's title   At about 25:20, Robin responds to Pete's questions about his views of the criminal justice    At about 26:25, Robin details a finding about the death penalty that comes from less of a value of Black lives   At about 29:40, Pete highlights strengths of book and outlines some main characters and their views of the pragmatic issues of jury selection   At about 30:50, Robin discusses the intriguing and powerful character of Sandy as an archetype of the legal profession, and how    At about 34:15, Robin and Pete discuss the relationship between opposing lawyers, collegiality (or lack thereof) among the competing lawyers, and Robin's experience with these issues   At about 37:35, Robin responds to Pete's compliments about his seamless dialogue and balance of legal jargon and common speech to capture a wide audience    At about 40:35, Robin compares the legal system as represented in TV and movies to the real legal system, with Defending Jacob as one that he references as sufficiently realistic   At about 42:30, Robin discusses the mechanics of the backstories and past/present tense as used in his book   At about 44:40, Pete lays out the backstories of several important characters, and emphasizes the understated character of Gabriel Soto, the case's defendant    At about 46:15, Robin discusses the unfortunate way in which the defendant and victim sometimes become “wallpaper” and responds to Pete's wondering about victim Melina Mora and double standards regarding women as victims   At about 52:00, Pete homes in on important flashback scenes, particularly regarding Melina Mora   At about 53:10, the two highlight effusive blurbs from Scott Turow and Harlan Coben and Robin talks about genre and how the book will be classified/marketed   At about 54:10, Pete asks about future projects for Robin   At about 56:20, Pete highlights a realistic and intriguing character from the book   At about 57:45, Robin highlights social media and contact info, and shouts out Books and Books as one of many great places to buy his book     You can now subscribe to the podcast on Apple Podcasts, and leave me a five-star review. You can also ask for the podcast by name using Alexa, and find the pod on Stitcher, Spotify, and on Amazon Music. Follow me on IG, where I'm @chillsatwillpodcast, or on Twitter, where I'm @chillsatwillpo1. You can watch other episodes on YouTube-watch and subscribe to The Chills at Will Podcast Channel. Please subscribe to both my YouTube Channel and my podcast while you're checking out this episode.  This is a passion project of mine, a DIY operation, and I'd love for your help in promoting what I'm convinced is a unique and spirited look at an often-ignored art form. The intro song for The Chills at Will Podcast is “Wind Down” (Instrumental Version), and the other song played on this episode was “Hoops” (Instrumental)” by Matt Weidauer, and both songs are used through ArchesAudio.com.     Please tune in for Episode 125 with Jamil Jan Kochai, the author of 99 Nights in Logar (Viking, 2019), a finalist for the Pen/Hemingway Award for Debut Novel and the DSC Prize for South Asian Literature. He was born in an Afghan refugee camp in Peshawar, Pakistan, but he originally hails from Logar, Afghanistan. His short stories and essays have appeared in The New Yorker, The New York Times, Los Angeles Times, Ploughshares, and The O. Henry Prize Stories 2018. Currently, he is a Stegner Fellow at Stanford University.      The episode will air on May 31. 

La Ventanita
Sef Gonzalez, "Burger Beast" food blogger, Crackers restaurant owner

La Ventanita

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 59:27


Sef is the original Miami food blogger.  As Burger Beast, he's been reviewing burgers and comfort food restaurants inside and outside of Miami since 2008. He's become Miami's advocate for the every-man diner. His Burger Beast Approved stickers adorn many of Miami-Dade County's beloved institutions — but no fancy places, by design. He's an author – surprise, a book about burgers. He's started a dearly departed Burger Museum. He bottles his own burger sauces and recently he became a bona fide restaurant owner, of Crackers Southern Dining in Miami Springs. He talks burgers, wrestling, food truck and horror movies with Miami Herald food editor Carlos Frías and Miami.com editor Amy Reyes. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Book Dreams
Ep. 106 - A Murder, a Private Investigator, and Her Search for Justice, with Ellen McGarrahan

Book Dreams

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 35:30


Ellen McGarrahan was a young reporter at the Miami Herald when she volunteered to witness the execution of Jesse Tafero, who'd been convicted of killing two police officers. That execution went horrifically awry, and watching it changed the course of Ellen's life. She left journalism, became a private investigator, and reinvestigated the murders attributed to Jesse Tafero, in an effort to determine whether she'd witnessed the execution of an innocent man. Ellen details her reexamination of the crime, and the surprising evidence she uncovered, in Two Truths and a Lie: A Murder, a Private Investigator, and Her Search for Justice, an Edgar Award finalist, a New York Times Book Review Editor's Choice, and one of Marie Claire's 10 Best True Crime Books of the Year. In this episode of Book Dreams, Ellen talks with Julie and Eve about the reasons that Jesse Tefaro's execution “began to really feel like a haunting”; the forces that drove her to put her life on hold 25 years after his death to re-examine the crime that two noted death penalty scholars and many others believed he hadn't committed; and the investigative skills she used to uncover evidence that goes far beyond what was revealed by the criminal justice system. Ellen McGarrahan is the author of Two Truths and a Lie: A Murder, a Private Investigator, and Her Search for Justice. She worked for 10 years as an investigative reporter and staff writer at newspapers, including The Village Voice, The Miami Herald, and SF Weekly. In 1996, she began working as a private detective and has since founded a private investigation agency. Find us on Twitter (@bookdreamspod) and Instagram (@bookdreamspodcast), or email us at contact@bookdreamspodcast.com. We encourage you to visit our website and sign up for our newsletter for information about our episodes, guests, and more. Book Dreams is a part of Lit Hub Radio and the Podglomerate network, a company that produces, distributes, and monetizes podcasts. For more information on how The Podglomerate treats data, please see our Privacy Policy. Since you're listening to Book Dreams, we'd like to suggest you also try other Podglomerate shows about literature, writing, and storytelling like Storybound and The History of Literature. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Collapse: Disaster in Surfside
Episode 11: No Action Taken

Collapse: Disaster in Surfside

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 39:25


The Miami Herald's investigative team unearths an exclusive story in the eleventh episode of Collapse: Disaster in Surfside. Large cracks in massive planters on the pool deck were noticed by the Champlain Towers' building manager, who alerted the structural engineer in charge of repairing the building for its 40-year certification—but nothing was done. Experts interviewed by the Herald say it was a missed warning sign —a fatal misdiagnosis—and that had emergency action been taken, 98 lives may not have been lost. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

The Chills at Will Podcast
Episode 123 with Zach Harper: Hilarious and Perceptive Hoopshead, Multitalented Host and Writer of Podcasts like CinePhobe, Radio Host, and Basketball Writer at The Athletic

The Chills at Will Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 67:59


Episode 123 Notes and Links to Zach Harper's Work       On Episode 123 of The Chills at Will Podcast, Pete welcomes Zach Harper, and the two discuss, among other topics, Zach's “taking the leap” in leaving a previous job to write professionally about basketball, his versatility in writing and podcasting about sometimes disparate topics, how he watches basketball differently now, interesting stories involving him and interesting people, his lifelong zeal for hoops and great sportswriting, how basketball and sports should be fun, and “good” bad movies.    Zach Harper is a Staff Writer for The Athletic, covering the NBA. Zach joined The Athletic after covering the NBA for ESPN.com, CBS Sports, and FRS Sports since 2009. He also hosts radio for SiriusXM NBA and SiriusXM Mad Dog Sports Radio.   Listen to CinePhobe   Featured Writing by Zach Harper on Muck Rack   Featured Writing by Zach Harper for The Athletic At about 2:00, Pete gives poor Zach a tough and random question as Pete    At about 3:35, Pete asks about Chris Paul's legacy and Zach gives his thoughts on his place in today's NBA and NBA history   At about 6:15, Zach talks about Patrick Beverley's recent comments and his    At about 7:20, Zach discusses his ideas of team fandom as a sportswriter and his childhood fandom for the Minnesota Timberwolves   At about 10:30, Pete and Zach discuss the propensity for predictions and rankings and the like and Zach's perspective on them   At about 13:20, Zach responds to Pete's questions about the connection between the fairly-new openness of the sports betting scene   At about 16:50, Zach gives background on his journey that took him from the court of appeals to starting a basketball website and the road to professional writing    At about 19:05, Zach gives background on his reading and writing background, as well as his overall relationship with language and sportswriting from great publications like Slam and Sports Illustrated   At about 20:40, Zach details his affinity for the “inside” stories that he has heard from cohosts-former players like Sam Mitchell   At about 21:10, Pete and Zach reminisce about great ads from the Slam Magazine days   At about 22:00, Zach responds to Pete's questions about cohost Rick Mahorn    At about 23:05, Zach highlights an article in SÍ about Greg Maddux that changed his perspective on sports and athletes    At about 25:00, Pete gives Zach room to give his own scouting report on his hoops skills-present and past   At about 28:50, Pete shouts out a winning basketball team from Sacramento (hint: it's not the Kings)   At about 29:30, Zach shouts out Tom Ziller, Kelly Dwyer, and the Basketball Jones, among others as role models and inspirations as he got started writing about basketball    At about 31:10, Zach talks about being open to learning and Kevin Arnowitz and Henry Abbott their mentorship in linking Zach with True Hoop   At about 33:45, The Daily Dime is referenced as a place where Zach's hard work helped him further his career   At about 34:20, Zach describes his “baptism by fire” in being fairly new to ESPN when “The Decision” happened   At about 35:20, Zack explains the surrealism of working for ESPN   At about 37:40, Pete asks Zach about “personas” that may come with working in so many different media, including writing and podcasting  about basketball and cohosting the movie podcast, Cinephobe   At about 42;25, Pete and Zach focus on a series of articles from the summer of 2021 for The Athletic, and Zach responds to Pete's questions about surprising/disappointing teams from 2021-2022   At about 44:20, Zach uses the surprising and fun Memphis Grizzlies team to make a larger point about trash talk and fun in the league    At about 46:10, Pete picks the greatest dunk of all-time   At about 48:45, Pete and Zach discuss ideas of the NBA as a distraction, and specifically the scenario    At about 50:45, Zach describes the situation where he and Amin Elhassan went on the air with very little notice after the Bucks and Magic boycotted a game in the aftermath of the Jacob Blake murder   At about 52:45, Pete and Zach highlight the greatness of Amin Elhassan    At about 54:30, Zach charts the ethos and origins of Cinephobe   At about 57:00, in discussing the Rocky IV Cinephobe episode, Carl Weathers is given his just due     At about 58:40, Zach highlights the way the podcast views The Room    At about 59:50, Zach “fantasizes” about future projects, and shouts out inspiring ideas from friend Ian Karmel   At about 1:02:00, Zach responds to Pete's questions regarding how he watches basketball now that he writes about the game as a professional   At about 1:04:25, Zach gives his NBA Finals predictions   At about 1:05:15, Zach outlines his radio and audio episode info, as well as his social media    You can now subscribe to the podcast on Apple Podcasts, and leave me a five-star review. You can also ask for the podcast by name using Alexa, and find the pod on Stitcher, Spotify, and on Amazon Music. Follow me on IG, where I'm @chillsatwillpodcast, or on Twitter, where I'm @chillsatwillpo1. You can watch other episodes on YouTube-watch and subscribe to The Chills at Will Podcast Channel. Please subscribe to both my YouTube Channel and my podcast while you're checking out this episode.  This is a passion project of mine, a DIY operation, and I'd love for your help in promoting what I'm convinced is a unique and spirited look at an often-ignored art form. The intro song for The Chills at Will Podcast is “Wind Down” (Instrumental Version), and the other song played on this episode was “Hoops” (Instrumental)” by Matt Weidauer, and both songs are used through ArchesAudio.com.    Please tune in for Episode 124 with Robin Peguero. An Afro-Latino and the son of immigrants, he graduated from Harvard College and Harvard Law School. He has written for the Miami Herald, the Harvard Crimson, and the Harvard Law Review, and he served as a press spokesman in the U.S. House and as a speechwriter in the U.S. Senate before becoming a lawyer. He is currently a U.S. House investigative counsel working on domestic terrorism.    The episode will air on May 24. 

First News with Jimmy Cefalo
05-13-22 A Tough Road for the Dolphins

First News with Jimmy Cefalo

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 4:19


Armando Salguero is a longtime reporter and columnist for the Miami Herald who is now Senior NFL Writer for Outkick.Com *Follow him on Twitter: @ArmandoSalguero

What You're Craving
63. The Key Elements Necessary for Healing Your Relationship with Food, From the OG of the Food Addiction Movement with Dr. Marty Lerner

What You're Craving

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 43:57


Today's episode calls for a pencil and notepad as Molly and Dr. Marty Lerner dig deep into the psychological relationship we have with food and how it affects us. Dr. Lerner, being a pioneer in the field of food addiction, starts off by talking about his foundations in research of eating disorders and food addiction and then his transition to the treatment of the individuals suffering from these diseases.  Molly and Dr. Lerner give us some key takeaways that Dr. Lerner has gleaned from his food addiction research. First, the two discuss a three-stage process of what tends to happen when individuals begin avoiding food triggers: at first, doing it to be “good,” then it simply becomes easier, finally it becomes more comfortable and a preference. This leads to the conversation of SMERF– an acronym that Dr. Lerner notes should not just be for those that suffer from food addiction, but for anyone in general that simply wants to live a better lifestyle.  Tune in! Episode Quotes “The whole gist of breaking up with sugar or finding what your biological triggers are and avoiding them is clearing the pathway so that you can start to make radical changes in your relationship with life.” –Dr. Marty Lerner “Recovery isn't about feeling good all the time. It's about doing good, not feeling good.” –Dr. Marty Lerner Key Highlights The importance of differentiating between eating disorders and food addiction; When we avoid our biological food triggers, it can lead to a lasting change that will become easier and a preference; Hard work is the only way any form of recovery can take root in our lives; As a society, we often overthink and underdo; Using SMERF to improve any lifestyle: Spirituality, Meditation, Exercise, Rest, and Food Plan; Your ego is not your amigo– when relapse or a slip happens, our ego or shame often get in the way and we are afraid to ask for help; About Marty Lerner, PhD Dr. Marty Lerner is the Executive Director of the Milestones in Recovery Eating Disorders Program located in Cooper City, FL. A graduate of Nova Southeastern University, Dr. Lerner is a licensed and board certified clinical psychologist who has appeared on numerous national television and radio programs that include The NPR Report, 20/20, Discovery Health and ABC's Nightline, as well as having authored several articles related to eating disorders in professional publications, national magazines and newspapers including USA Today, The Wall Street Journal, New York Times, Miami Herald, Orlando and Hollywood Sun-Sentinels.  Connect with Marty Lerner, PhD His free eBook is available at: https://www.milestonesprogram.org/ About Molly Carmel Molly is a leading addiction and eating disorder therapist and the founder of the Beacon Program, which offers individual and group solutions to help people break free from their destructive relationships with food and dieting. She is also the author of ‘Breaking up with Sugar' and the host of ‘What You're Craving' Podcast. Connect with Molly Want to spend MORE time together? Me too! Here are all the ways: Instagram: @mollycarmel Facebook: Molly Carmel YouTube: Molly Carmel Free Mini Masterclass: mollycarmel.com/signup Breaking Up with Sugar Course: molly-carmel.mykajabi.com/buws-course Breaking Up with Sugar Facebook Group: facebook.com/groups/buwsbook Monthly Group Coaching: mollycarmel.com/coaching-with-molly Weekly IntenSati Spiritual Fitness Class: mollycarmel.com/intensati

Combos Court
Episode 364 - Heat's Professionalism, Biggest Heat Concerns Vs. Sixers?, Hero, and More

Combos Court

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022 24:51


Wes Goldberg (The Ringer, Miami Herald, Locked on Heat) joins in to talk about the current Heat vs Sixers series and much more! Find Wes on Twitter @WCGolberg Find Combo on Instagram @OneTwoCombo

Locked On Heat - Daily Podcast On The Miami Heat
SPECIAL: Inside Tyler Herro's Leap From Sophomore Slump to Sixth Man of the Year

Locked On Heat - Daily Podcast On The Miami Heat

Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2022 22:58


How did Tyler Herro go from a sophomore slump campaign and the subject of trade rumors, to making a big third-year leap and becoming the first Miami Heat player to win the NBA's Sixth Man of the Year award? On this special narrative episode based on Wes Goldberg's Miami Herald feature, we take you inside the making of the Heat's biggest star, the secret super power that fuels him and what comes next. Support Us By Supporting Our Sponsors! PrizePicks Check out PrizePicks.com and use promo code: “NBA” or go to your app store and download the app today. PrizePicks is daily fantasy made easy! Built Bar Built Bar is a protein bar that tastes like a candy bar. Go to builtbar.com and use promo code “LOCKED15,” and you'll get 15% off your next order. BetOnline BetOnline.net has you covered this season with more props, odds and lines than ever before. BetOnline – Where The Game Starts! Rock Auto Amazing selection. Reliably low prices. All the parts your car will ever need. Visit RockAuto.com and tell them Locked On sent you. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

La Ventanita
Jenny Lorenzo, Cuban "Abuelita" actor, YouTube host

La Ventanita

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 66:19


Jenny Lorenzo became “Miami famous” when the actor put on a gray wig, turned on her grandmother's Cuban accent and became everyone's Abuela in YouTube videos. Viral fame ensued. Lorenzo, born in Kendall, a graduate of the University of Miami's theater and arts program, became an internet sensation. You've seen her hilarious skits, starring the opinionated gray-haired Abuela and a host of other characters, including your judgemental tía. The characters she creates come from tapping into her Miami experience. She lovingly pokes fun at the inter-generational conflicts between Cuban immigrants and their Cuban-American progeny. She speaks about breaking out of the Miami mold — even about how she became vegan, but still eating her beloved Cuban food — with La Ventanita co-hosts Carlos Frias, the Miami Herald food editor, and Amy Reyes, editor of Miami.com. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Slow Baja
Sandra Dibble Foreign Correspondent And Host Of The Border City Podcast

Slow Baja

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 29, 2022 59:58


Sandra Dibble is a veteran reporter who worked as a Tijuana-based foreign correspondent for the San Diego Union-Tribune for 28 years. She earned a master's degree in Journalism from Columbia University and worked at The Miami Herald for nearly a decade. Dibble was part of a team awarded the Pulitzer Prize in national reporting for uncovering the Reagan administration's clandestine support of the Nicaraguan Contras. She wrote about Oaxaca, Mexico, for The National Geographic. She hosts the Border City Podcast for the Union-Tribune. "Border City: A podcast about beauty, violence and belonging in Tijuana from a journalist who spent more than 25 years reporting at the border. In this eight-part podcast, Dibble introduces listeners to Tijuana the way she was introduced to it — through the news stories she covered but also through her personal connections in the city's cultural community and her friendships with ordinary Tijuanenses." -The San Diego Union-Tribune Border City is available wherever you find podcasts. Follow Sandra Dibble on Twitter Follow Sandra Dibble on Instagram Follow Sandra Dibble on Facebook

Longform
Polk Award Winners: Daniel Chang

Longform

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 28, 2022 19:21


Daniel Chang covers health care for the Miami Herald. Along with Carol Marbin Miller, he won the George Polk Award for "Birth & Betrayal," a series co-published with ProPublica that exposed the consequences of a 1988 law designed to shelter medical providers from lawsuits by funding lifelong care for children severely disabled by birth-related brain injuries. “I think that someone on the healthcare beat looks for stories from the perspective of patients, people who want or need to access the healthcare system and for different reasons cannot. It's a pretty complicated system and it's difficult for most people to understand how their health insurance works — and that's if they have health insurance. If they don't, there is a whole other system they have to go through. What you look for is access issues and accountability for that.” This is the latest in a week-long series of conversations with winners of this year's George Polk Awards in Journalism. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Locked On Canes - Daily Podcast On Miami Hurricanes Football & Basketball
Which Miami Hurricanes Transfer Player Will Have The Biggest 2022 Impact?

Locked On Canes - Daily Podcast On Miami Hurricanes Football & Basketball

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 28, 2022 31:22


The Miami Hurricanes now have the 9th ranked transfer class in the entire country. Mario Cristobal's team most recently added Maryland defensive tackle Darrell Jackson to a list of players who appear ready to be big time rotation players if not starters at The U. Other big names added include West Virginia defensive lineman Akheem Mesidor, UCLA linebacker Caleb Johnson, UCLA edge rusher Mitchell Agude, USC defensive lineman Jacob Lichtenstein and Ole Miss running back Henry Parrish. Host Alex Donno reads your tweets to @LockedOnCanes about which of these additions will help the Hurricanes on the field most in the upcoming football season. Plus, with the NFL draft starting on Thursday, April 28th, Donno describes his low expectations for how many Hurricanes will be taken. Safety Bubba Bolden and WR Charleston Rambo appear to be the only two players guaranteed to be selected. In which rounds should they be taken? Alex analyzes some revealing quotes from LifeWallet CEO John Ruiz on how his businesses are benefiting from the amount of money he is investing into Name, Image and Likeness (NIL) for Miami Hurricanes student athletes. Earlier this year, Ruiz pledged $10 in NIL for this season and followed up with the Miami Herald's Barry Jackson on how things are progressing. Support Us By Supporting Our Sponsors! Built Bar Built Bar is a protein bar that tastes like a candy bar. Go to builtbar.com and use promo code “LOCKED15,” and you'll get 15% off your next order. BetOnline BetOnline.net has you covered this season with more props, odds and lines than ever before. BetOnline – Where The Game Starts! Rock Auto Amazing selection. Reliably low prices. All the parts your car will ever need. Visit RockAuto.com and tell them Locked On sent you. Athletic Greens Athletic Greens is going to give you a FREE 1 year supply of immune-supporting Vitamin D AND 5 FREE travel packs with your first purchase. All you have to do is visit athleticgreens.com/COLLEGE. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Mass Tort News LegalCast
Crisis Management & Media Training for Lawyers

Mass Tort News LegalCast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 26, 2022 45:17


George Haj is a Pulitzer-Prize winning editor who founded Haj Media in 2017. Haj Media is a strategic communications firm focusing on crisis communications, media relations, and litigation support for law firms and corporate clients. Prior to launching his own consulting firm, George spent three decades working in some of the nation's largest news organizations. He has deep roots in the media industry and connections with reporters and editors in a range of publications across the country. George worked as executive business editor at the Miami Herald and then was a top editor at the Houston Chronicle. He also served as editorial director of ALM Media, where he directed a global newsroom of more than 100 journalists and oversaw iconic brands including The American Lawyer and National Law Journal. He can be reached at george@hajmedia.com. Find him on Twitter, LinkedIn, and at hajmedia.com.    Remember to subscribe and follow us on social media…   LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/mass-tort-news Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/masstortnewsorg Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/masstortnews.org

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for April 23, 2022 is: askance • uh-SKANSS • adverb Askance means "with disapproval or distrust" or "with a side-glance."   // The children looked askance at their mother when she suggested they turn off their electronic devices and go play outside in the nice weather. See the entry > Examples: "'Sometimes not being authentic to the region is a good thing.' … [chef] Klime Kovaceski, who also prefers dried pasta to fresh, understands that some purists might look askance at his methods." — Connie Ogle, The Miami Herald, 3 Mar. 2022 Did you know? Askance, which etymologists believe may have been influenced by askew, comes from Middle English forms such as askaunce, a-skans, a-skaunces, meaning variously "in such a way that," "as if," "as if to say," and "artificially" or "deceptively." The word was first used in English in the 16th century with the meaning "sideways" or "with a sideways glance," and writers over the years have used the suggestion of someone looking askance at something to express a number of feelings from disapproval and distrust to jealousy.

No Reason
Ep 131 Who Killed Slow Dancing, Jizzle DJs With The Box, Man Gets 90 C-19 Shots to Sell ID Cards, PPP Hitman Snitches On Himself

No Reason

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 21, 2022 71:49


Thank you for tuning into No Reason Podcast episode 131 with Nola J. aka Chocolate Blonde featuring Don Suave'.   Links to this week's articles: https://www.tmz.com/2022/04/08/jussie-smollett-drops-song-after-jail-release-sings-about-court-case/ (Jussie Smollett Drops New Song After Jail Release, Addresses Court Case) https://balleralert.com/profiles/blogs/florida-teen-dead-after-friends-take-turns-shooting/ (Florida Teen Dead After Friends Take Turns Shooting One Another With Body Armor On) https://www.clickorlando.com/news/local/2022/04/11/florida-woman-placed-boy-in-dryer-making-him-go-round-and-round-officials-say/ (Florida woman placed boy in dryer, making him go ‘round and round,' officials say) https://balleralert.com/profiles/blogs/attorney-charged-with-four-counts-of-attempted-murder/ (Florida Personal Injury Attorney Charged With Four Counts of Attempted Murder After Mowing Down Pedestrians Because of ‘Voices' in Her Head) https://mtonews.com/jamaican-woman-excused-from-jury-duty-told-judge-i-need-to-spend-time-w-sugar-daddy (Jamaican Woman EXCUSED From Jury Duty: Told Judge 'I Need To Spend Time w/ Sugar Daddy'! - MTO News) https://www.miamiherald.com/news/state/florida/article259945915.html (Large alligator found in bedroom of newly built Florida home | Miami Herald) https://www.complex.com/life/florida-woman-lied-being-related-to-teen-died-amusement-park-gofundme-removes-scam-pages (Woman Allegedly Lied About Being Related to Teen Who Died at Amusement Park | Complex) https://balleralert.com/profiles/blogs/florida-hitman-says-another-day-in-the-office-after-killing/ (Video Shows Alleged Florida Hitman Counting PPP Money He Received for Killing TSA Officer: “Another Day in the Office” [Video]) https://balleralert.com/profiles/blogs/texas-school-district-will-move-to-4-day-schedule/ (Texas School District Will Move to a 4-Day Schedule Due to Shortage of Teachers) https://balleralert.com/profiles/blogs/two-new-jersey-inmates-pregnant-by-trans/ (Two New Jersey Inmates Pregnant by Trans Inmate at State Prison for Women) https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-10711431/California-cops-blast-Disney-tunes-Toy-Story-Mulan-Encanto-outside-homes.html (California cops play copyrighted DISNEY songs during arrests in bid to stop videos going viral | Daily Mail Online) https://balleralert.com/profiles/blogs/texas-man-attacked-roommate-with-a-stick-after-argument-about-what-mosquitos-look-like/ (Texas Man Attacked Roommate With A Stick After Argument About What Mosquitoes Look Like) https://www.barstoolsports.com/blog/3413216/a-company-is-offering-to-pay-someone-dollar20hour-to-sit-at-home-and-watch-porn-all-day (A Company Is Offering To Pay Someone $20/Hour To Sit At Home And Watch Porn All Day | Barstool Sports) https://balleralert.com/profiles/blogs/texas-middle-teacher-resigns-after-putting-hand-sanitizer/ (Texas Middle Teacher Resigns After Putting Hand Sanitizer On Student's Hands And Lighting Them On Fire During Science Experiment; Student Suffers Third-Degree Burns) https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-10699733/Momma-bear-two-cubs-completely-destroys-punches-way-North-Carolina-familys-car.html (Momma bear with two cubs completely destroys and punches her way out of North Carolina family's car | Daily Mail Online) https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-10700055/USSS-agents-Biden-Kamalas-probed-fake-DHS-agents-showered-gifts.html (Stash of rifles, passports, visas and sham uniforms found in 'fake' DHS agents' DC apartment | Daily Mail Online) https://balleralert.com/profiles/blogs/german-man-gets-90-covid-19-vaccination-shots/ (Man Gets 90 COVID-19 Vaccination Shots Allegedly To Sell The Vaxx Cards) https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-10695925/Crazed-woman-attacks-couple-Samurai-SWORD-refuse-threesome.html (Crazed woman attacks couple with Samurai SWORD after they 'refuse to have threesome'  | Daily Mail Online)...

Zināmais nezināmajā
Kara tribunāli vēsturē

Zināmais nezināmajā

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 20, 2022 49:00


Notiekošais Ukrainā ir kara noziegumi. To norāda daudzi eksperti, analizējot baisās slepkavības, ko pret ukraiņu tautu vērš Krievijas karaspēks. Taču, vai šādi noziegumi vienmēr rezultējas ar sodu,  vai noziedznieki, kas nogalina, izvaro, spīdzina un zog, saņems sodu vai tomēr paliks nesodīti? Kā šādus noziegumus vai izpētīt vidē, kur ir uz soļa ir ložu šāviņi un bumbu sprādzieni? Kā darbojas kara tiesas, kas ir kara noziegumi un ko par kara tribunāliem var lasīt 20. gadsimta vēstures lappusēs, skaidro Rīgas Stradiņa universitātes profesors Uldis Ķinis. Humors kara laikā Ar smiekliem pret vardarbību – to zinām jau no Jaroslava Hašeka grāmatas par krietno kareivi Šveiku. Otrā pasaules kara laikā par Hitleru un Musolīni atļāvās paņirgāties komiķis Čārlijs Čaplins, izveidojot komēdiju „Lielais diktators”. Tagad Ukrainas kara laikā ik dienu sociālajos tīklos tiek pārsūtīti neskaitāmi joki par Putinu un Krievijas armiju. Karš nav smieklīgs, ciešanas, bads nāve – tas nav nekas jautrs, bet tad kāpēc šādās smagās situācijas cilvēki atrod laiku un veidu kā pasmieties par apkārt notiekošo?   Skaidro RSU psihosomatiskās medicīnas un psihoterapijas klīnikas galvenais ārsts, psihoterapeits Ernests Pūliņš-Cinis. Viņš norāda, ka spēja pasmieties pašam  par sevi un notiekošo raksturo cilvēka emocionālo briedumu. Intervija notika pāris dienas pirms kreiseris „Moskva” tika nogremdēts Melnajā jūrā, un tagad interneta vidē klīst joki par to, kā zivis vai nāriņas brīnās kāpēc  tik dārga īres maksa nogrimušajā kuģī. Atbilde: „Nu tā  taču ir Maskava!” Savukārt Odesā dzimušais dzejnieks Iļja Kaminskis, laikraksta „Miami Herald” elektroniskajā  versijā šī gada 22. martā raksta šādi: „Šis ironiskais, bieži vien tumšais humors nosaka Ukrainas pretošanās kultūru. Odesā tas palīdzēja cilvēkiem izdzīvot padomju laikos. Humors ir daļa no mūsu pretestības."

Locked On Canes - Daily Podcast On Miami Hurricanes Football & Basketball
Miami Hurricanes Top 5 Surprises In Spring Football 2022

Locked On Canes - Daily Podcast On Miami Hurricanes Football & Basketball

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 19, 2022 28:06


The Miami Hurricanes football team had a handful of players who were flying under the radar who really popped and performed well in the 2022 spring game. Running backs like Thad Franklin and Devon Perry took advantage of extended playing time with Jaylen Knighton and Don Chainey unavailable due to injury. Cornerback DJ Ivey looked like a lockdown CB in the game. Host Alex Donno also discusses a couple transfer portal players who have made an impact so far, along with true freshman early enrollee Cyrus Moss, who has looked tremendous at defensive end despite being undersized coming out of highschool. Donno also reviews some comments about more players needed in the portal from Miami Herald reporter Barry Jackson, and interesting comments made by Miami quarterback Tyler Van Dyke about his receivers dropping a handful of deep passes in the spring game. Support Us By Supporting Our Sponsors! Built Bar Built Bar is a protein bar that tastes like a candy bar. Go to builtbar.com and use promo code “LOCKED15,” and you'll get 15% off your next order. BetOnline BetOnline.net has you covered this season with more props, odds and lines than ever before. BetOnline – Where The Game Starts! Rock Auto Amazing selection. Reliably low prices. All the parts your car will ever need. Visit RockAuto.com and tell them Locked On sent you. Athletic Greens Athletic Greens is going to give you a FREE 1 year supply of immune-supporting Vitamin D AND 5 FREE travel packs with your first purchase. All you have to do is visit athleticgreens.com/COLLEGE. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

The Point to Point Hockey Podcast
Historic Panthers Offense & Hockey Allen Iverson w/ David Wilson (Miami Herald) - Episode 65

The Point to Point Hockey Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 19, 2022 38:16


David Wilson of the Miami Herald makes his first appearance on Panther Pourri to give his thoughts on:- Who on the Panthers is kind of like Allen Iverson- Spencer Knight winning NHL games before turning 21- The historic Panthers offense - What's on the line in the last 7 games Make sure to follow him at @DBWilson2 and read him in the Miami Herald.https://www.miamiherald.com/profile/220990480

La Ventanita
Karla Hoyos, World Central Kitchen, Miami chef

La Ventanita

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 14, 2022 57:45


Karla Hoyos has spent six weeks in Poland, on the border with Ukraine, cooking 12,000 meals a day for evacuees of the Russian invasion with chef José Andrés' nonprofit World Central Kitchen. On the April 17 episode of La Ventanita, the Miami Herald food podcast, Hoyos, a Miami chef with two upcoming South Florida restaurants, shares a first-hand account of feeding families who are fleeing the Ukraine-Russian war, with Miami Herald food editor Carlos Frías and Miami.com editor Amy Reyes. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

What Next | Daily News and Analysis
Disney vs. DeSantis

What Next | Daily News and Analysis

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 13, 2022 26:45


Florida Governor Ron DeSantis and the Walt Disney Company are at odds over a controversial Florida law dubbed “don't say gay,” which would limit instruction on sexual orientation and gender identity in public schools. While DeSantis is a big supporter of the legislation, Disney's CEO Bob Chapek eventually came out against it, vowing to work to repeal the law and setting up a showdown between the governor and the entertainment giant. Guest: Mary Ellen Klas, Capitol bureau chief for the Miami Herald in Tallahassee, Florida. If you enjoy this show, please consider signing up for Slate Plus. Slate Plus members get benefits like zero ads on any Slate podcast, bonus episodes of shows like Slow Burn and Dear Prudence—and you'll be supporting the work we do here on What Next. Sign up now at slate.com/whatnextplus to help support our work. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Slate Daily Feed
What Next: Disney vs. DeSantis

Slate Daily Feed

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 13, 2022 26:45


Florida Governor Ron DeSantis and the Walt Disney Company are at odds over a controversial Florida law dubbed “don't say gay,” which would limit instruction on sexual orientation and gender identity in public schools. While DeSantis is a big supporter of the legislation, Disney's CEO Bob Chapek eventually came out against it, vowing to work to repeal the law and setting up a showdown between the governor and the entertainment giant. Guest: Mary Ellen Klas, Capitol bureau chief for the Miami Herald in Tallahassee, Florida. If you enjoy this show, please consider signing up for Slate Plus. Slate Plus members get benefits like zero ads on any Slate podcast, bonus episodes of shows like Slow Burn and Dear Prudence—and you'll be supporting the work we do here on What Next. Sign up now at slate.com/whatnextplus to help support our work. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Trumpcast
What Next: Disney vs. DeSantis

Trumpcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 13, 2022 26:45


Florida Governor Ron DeSantis and the Walt Disney Company are at odds over a controversial Florida law dubbed “don't say gay,” which would limit instruction on sexual orientation and gender identity in public schools. While DeSantis is a big supporter of the legislation, Disney's CEO Bob Chapek eventually came out against it, vowing to work to repeal the law and setting up a showdown between the governor and the entertainment giant. Guest: Mary Ellen Klas, Capitol bureau chief for the Miami Herald in Tallahassee, Florida. If you enjoy this show, please consider signing up for Slate Plus. Slate Plus members get benefits like zero ads on any Slate podcast, bonus episodes of shows like Slow Burn and Dear Prudence—and you'll be supporting the work we do here on What Next. Sign up now at slate.com/whatnextplus to help support our work. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Tech Chef, Restaurant, Hospitality and Hotel Technology Business Podcast
TCP050: Growth Strategy with Abe Ng from Sushi Maki

The Tech Chef, Restaurant, Hospitality and Hotel Technology Business Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 12, 2022 27:42


Welcome to The Tech Chef! This is your host, Skip Kimpel coming to you from the https://restaurantleadership.com/ (Restaurant Leadership Conference) here in the desert of Arizona.  If this is your first time joining, you have found the industry's most popular podcast related to the restaurant, hotel and hospitality industry. Make sure you don't miss a show by subscribing to this show using your favorite podcast software or app. And for all of you that are returning to hear what I have to say this week, well, welcome back! Today I have a well-known South Florida operator on the show, https://www.linkedin.com/in/abe-ng-9a2936/ (Abe Ng), who is the founder and CEO of https://www.sushimaki.com/ (Sushi Maki) – South Florida's award-winning leader in innovative Japanese cuisine serving fresh, premium quality food throughout Miami Dade, Broward and Palm Beach County. In this role, he oversees the strategic development and management of the 25 locations owned and operated under the Sushi Maki and Canton Chinese brand names, and is a partner with Whole Foods Markets for sushi stations in the South Florida Region stores. A Miami native, Ng serves on various boards, including the Greater Miami Convention and Visitor Bureau, National Christian Foundation, Big Brothers Big Sisters Miami, the Cornell University Hospitality Entrepreneurship Advisory Board, City to City Miami and the Florida Restaurant Association. Abe was recognized as one of the Miami Herald's 20 Under 40 and the South Florida Business Journal's 40 Under 40. Abe was recently honored as Ultimate CEO by the South Florida Business Journal and was a regional finalist for the Ernst & Young Entrepreneur of the Year award. In 2018, Sushi Maki was awarded Whole Foods Market Supplier of the year for the Florida Region. If you are ever in South Florida or simply flying through the Miami airport, make sure you try Sushi Maki for some really quality food. My wife and I went just the other night before this trip and was, once again, impressed by the flavor profiles and freshness of what we ordered. How To Contact MeWebsite: https://skipkimpel.com/ (https://SkipKimpel.com) (all archived shows and show notes will be posted here) Website: https://constrata.io/ (https://ConStrata.io) Instagram: https://instagram.com/skipkimpel (https://instagram.com/skipkimpel) Twitter: https://twitter.com/skipkimpel (https://twitter.com/skipkimpel) Facebook:  https://www.facebook.com/skipkimpel1/ (https://www.facebook.com/skipkimpel1/) TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@skipkimpel (https://www.tiktok.com/@skipkimpel) LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/skipkimpel/ (https://www.linkedin.com/in/skipkimpel) LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/constrata-consulting (https://www.linkedin.com/company/constrata-consulting) You can also hear all these new episodes on the ConStrata website at https://my.captivate.fm/ConStrata.io (ConStrata.io) Email me at skip.kimpel@constrata.io Next Weeks ShowNext week I have https://www.linkedin.com/in/chadhornboston/ (Chad Horn) from https://devour.restaurant/ (Devour) on the show. This, for sure, is an episode you don't want to miss as we will be talking about blockchain for the restaurant industry. Very unique interview with somebody that has a wealth of knowledge on the subject matter. We will talk Web 3.0, blockchain, NFTs, cyrpto currency, the metaverse and so much more. I can't wait to share this one with you!

South Florida High School Sports Radio
Walt Villa, with Larry Blustein 4-11-22

South Florida High School Sports Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 11, 2022 8:47


Walt Villa, Miami Herald

El hilo
‘No digas gay': las escuelas como campo de batalla en Estados Unidos

El hilo

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 8, 2022 21:50


El estado de Florida aprobó una ley que limita las conversaciones sobre orientación sexual y la identidad de género en las escuelas primarias públicas. Ha sido apodada por sus críticos como “Don't say gay” o “No digas gay”. Esta ley permite que, si los padres no están de acuerdo con lo que se les enseña a sus hijos sobre estos temas, puedan incluso demandar al distrito escolar. Pero Florida no es el único estado que está impulsando iniciativas para limitar lo que se enseña en las escuelas. Esta semana, Ana Ceballos, periodista del Miami Herald, nos explica de qué se trata “No digas gay” y qué hay detrás de este movimiento nacional de padres y legisladores conservadores.Suscríbete a nuestro boletín para recibir enlaces con información complementaria sobre los episodios de El hilo. Además incluimos otras noticias esenciales desde Latinoamérica. Lo recibirás todos los viernes en la mañana. Suscríbete aquí.El hilo es un proyecto de Radio Ambulante Estudios y VICE News. Producir el episodio de cada semana implica una investigación rigurosa y un trabajo constante con un equipo comprometido de 11 personas. Para seguir adelante necesitamos tu apoyo. Haz una donación hoy, tu contribución hará toda la diferencia. ¡Gracias!Síguenos en Twitter @elhilopodcast See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Overtime With Stein
Episode 30: Dolphins and Lakers talk with Daniel Oyefusi of the Miami Herald

Overtime With Stein

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 8, 2022 36:27


On this episode, Stein is joined by Miami Herald Dolphins beat reporter Daniel Oyefusi. Stein and Daniel start by talking about new Dolphins head coach Mike McDaniel and the Tyreek Hill trade (1:05-8:30). After, both guys transition to the Dolphins other free agent signings and look towards the NFL Draft (8:45-20:50). To conclude the episode, Stein and Daniel discuss the most intriguing moves of the NFL offseason and Daniel lets out his frustration about the Los Angeles Lakers struggles this season (21:10-35:10).

La Ventanita
Val Chang, Itamae chef and co-owner

La Ventanita

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 7, 2022 53:41


Val Chang was just 6 when her father left her and her older brother in their grandmother's care in Peru and came to find work in Miami as a sushi chef. When the Changs reunited in Miami nine years later, it was the start of a long journey together that led to all three being named James Beard Award nominees in 2022 for the restaurant they started as a family, Itamae — which also brought them national acclaim. Val tells co-hosts Carlos Frias, the Miami Herald food editor, and Amy Reyes, editor of Miami.com, why Peruvian food is the best (all Peruvians will say this), why Inca Kola is the best Latin soda (another a Peruvian hot take) and how Japanese and Chinese cuisine influences her food and cooking. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Takeaway
Why Miami Herald and El Nuevo Herald Employees Staged a Virtual Walk Out

The Takeaway

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 7, 2022 8:20


Last week, members of the One Herald Guild, made up of employees of the Miami Herald and El Nuevo Herald newspapers, staged a virtual walkout. The action was taken to express frustration at McClatchy, the parent company of the newspaper, with whom One Herald Guild has been negotiating a labor contract for over two years. One of the biggest points of contention are the sharp pay disparities between El Nuevo Herald reporters and their English-reporting counterparts at The Miami Herald. The Takeaway speaks with Miami Herald Capitol Bureau Chief and One Herald Guild co-chair Mary Ellen Klas about the ongoing negotiations.

The Takeaway
Why Miami Herald and El Nuevo Herald Employees Staged a Virtual Walk Out

The Takeaway

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 7, 2022 8:20


Last week, members of the One Herald Guild, made up of employees of the Miami Herald and El Nuevo Herald newspapers, staged a virtual walkout. The action was taken to express frustration at McClatchy, the parent company of the newspaper, with whom One Herald Guild has been negotiating a labor contract for over two years. One of the biggest points of contention are the sharp pay disparities between El Nuevo Herald reporters and their English-reporting counterparts at The Miami Herald. The Takeaway speaks with Miami Herald Capitol Bureau Chief and One Herald Guild co-chair Mary Ellen Klas about the ongoing negotiations.

Leonard Lopate at Large on WBAI Radio in New York
INVESTIGATIVE JOURNALIST BOB HENNELLY

Leonard Lopate at Large on WBAI Radio in New York

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 5, 2022 54:05


Before working at WNYC, investigative journalist and regular contributor Bob Hennelly was national affairs correspondent for Pacifica Network News. His written work has appeared in the New York Times, the Village Voice, the Christian Science Monitor, the Miami Herald, the Detroit Free Press along with dozens of other magazines and newspapers. His work has been featured on 60 Minutes and C-Span's America and the Courts. In this installment of Leonard Lopate at Large on WBAI, Bob weighs in on New York City's new mayor and the people he is bringing into his administration along with other issues he is currently reporting on in the Tri-State area.

Bat Flips And Nerds
Episode 268 - 2022 NL East Preview

Bat Flips And Nerds

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 1, 2022 91:34


In the first of our 2022 season previews, we're joined by: - Ashland of the Mansplaining Baseball Everywhere podcast to chat Braves- Jordan McPherson of the Miami Herald on the Marlins- Anthony DiComo of MLB.com on the Mets- Ellen Adair on the Phillies- Jesse Dougherty of the WaPo on the Nats

The Epstein Chronicles
A Look back: The Deposition is Finally Unsealed

The Epstein Chronicles

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 1, 2022 29:40


The wait for the sealed documents to become public is over. The 465 page deposition has been released and we dive into it with an article from the Miami Herald.(commercial at 17:07)To contact me:Bobbycapucci@protonmail.comsource:https://www.miamiherald.com/news/state/florida/article246624308.html

Beyond The Horizon
A Look back: The Deposition is Finally Unsealed

Beyond The Horizon

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 1, 2022 29:40


The wait for the sealed documents to become public is over. The 465 page deposition has been released and we dive into it with an article from the Miami Herald.(commercial at 17:07)To contact me:Bobbycapucci@protonmail.comsource:https://www.miamiherald.com/news/state/florida/article246624308.html

The Tony Kornheiser Show
“10 Earned”

The Tony Kornheiser Show

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 31, 2022 60:34


Tony opens the show by talking about the US Men's soccer team losing a match but still qualifying for the World Cup, and he also talks about a rough afternoon for the Nats. Miami Herald columnist Greg Cote calls in to talk about what's going on with the Heat, the Dolphins trading for Tyreek Hill, and the fallout from the Brian Flores lawsuit, Jason La Canfora of CBS Sports phones in to talk about Bruce Arians sudden retirement, and some of the bigger free agency moves and trades from around the NFL, and Tony closes out the show by opening up the Mailbag. Songs : Dan Bern “Krzyzewski” ; Norwegian Soft Kitten “Full Moon Raging” Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Holding Court with Patrick McEnroe
March Madness and Tennis with Michelle Kaufman on Holding Court with Patrick McEnroe

Holding Court with Patrick McEnroe

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 31, 2022 55:48


March Madness and Tennis with Michelle Kaufman on Holding Court with Patrick McEnroeMichelle Kaufman is an American  sportswriter and columnist for the Miami Herald. She writes a column every Sunday on sports, focusing on soccer in particular. She also covers tennis, Olympic sports and college and professional sports. She previously worked at the Detroit Free Press and St. Petersburg Times.

PBS NewsHour - Segments
How Florida's 'Don't Say Gay' law regulates school lessons on gender, sexual orientation

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 30, 2022 7:12


A controversial new law went into effect in Florida this week. Coined by opponents as the "Don't Say Gay" bill, it forbids instruction on sexual orientation and gender identity for kindergarten through third grade. But those who oppose the bill say it doesn't protect parents, it just harms children. Ana Ceballos, a reporter for the Miami Herald, joins John Yang to discuss. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - Politics
How Florida's 'Don't Say Gay' law regulates school lessons on gender, sexual orientation

PBS NewsHour - Politics

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 30, 2022 7:12


A controversial new law went into effect in Florida this week. Coined by opponents as the "Don't Say Gay" bill, it forbids instruction on sexual orientation and gender identity for kindergarten through third grade. But those who oppose the bill say it doesn't protect parents, it just harms children. Ana Ceballos, a reporter for the Miami Herald, joins John Yang to discuss. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

Collapse: Disaster in Surfside
Episode 4: From Rescue to Recovery

Collapse: Disaster in Surfside

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 30, 2022 37:27


Despite round-the-clock search teams since the collapse of Champlain Towers South, there have not been any signs of life from the rubble. Conditions in the debris are getting more difficult and dangerous with each passing day. In the fourth episode of Collapse: Disaster in Surfside we're still in the private briefing room as families wait in anguish for word of their loved ones. The heartbreaking shift from search and rescue to search and recovery is made and President Biden arrives to support and mourn with the families, behind closed doors. We also hear from the Miami Herald's investigative team as they start to turn up clues about what went wrong at Champlain Towers South. Why did the building come down? Who's responsible? And are others in danger? Narrated by journalist Paul Beban. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Midnight Train Podcast
What Are the Archives of Terror?

Midnight Train Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 28, 2022 93:53


Support the show and receive bonus episodes by becoming a Patreon producer over at: www.themidnighttrainpodcast.com  Archives of terror Archivos del Terror were found on december 22, 1992 by a lawyer and human rights activist, strange how those two titles are in the same sentence, Dr. Martín Almada, and Judge José Agustín Fernández. Found in a police station in the suburbs of Paraguay known as Asunción.   Fernandez was looking for files on a former prisoner. Instead, stumbled across an archive describing the fates of thousands of Latin Americans who had been secretly kidnapped, tortured, and killed by the security services of Argentina, Bolivia, Chile, Paraguay, and Uruguay with the help of our friendly neighborhood CIA. Known as Operation Condor.   “Operation Condor was a U.S. backed campaign of political repression and state terror involving intelligence operations and assassination of opponents.”   Let's go back a ways toward the beginning. One day, a young guy, wanted to fuck up the world and created the CIA. JK… but not really.   So we go back to 1968 where General Robert W. Porter said that "in order to facilitate the coordinated employment of internal security forces within and among Latin American countries, we are ... endeavoring to foster inter-service and regional cooperation by assisting in the organization of integrated command and control centers; the establishment of common operating procedures; and the conduct of joint and combined training exercises."   According to former secret CIA documents from 1976, plans were developed among international security officials at the US Army School of the Americas and the Conference of American Armies in the 1960s and early 1970s to deal with perceived threats in South America from political dissidents, according to American historian J. Patrice McSherry. "In early 1974, security officials from Argentina, Chile, Uruguay, Paraguay, and Bolivia convened in Buenos Aires to prepare synchronized attacks against subversive targets," according to a declassified CIA memo dated June 23, 1976.   Following a series of military-led coups d'états, particularly in the 1970s, the program was established: General Alfredo Stroessner took control of Paraguay in 1954 General Francisco Morales-Bermúdez takes control of Peru after a successful coup in 1975 The Brazilian military overthrew the president João Goulart in 1964 General Hugo Banzer took power in Bolivia in 1971 through a series of coups A military dictatorship seized power in Uruguay on 27 June 1973 Chilean armed forces commanded by General Augusto Pinochet bombed the presidential palace in Chile on 11 September 1973, overthrowing democratically elected president Salvador Allende A military dictatorship headed by General Jorge Rafael Videla seized power in Argentina on 24 March 1976   According to American journalist A. J. Langguth, the CIA organized the first meetings between Argentinian and Uruguayan security officials regarding the surveillance (and subsequent disappearance or assassination) of political refugees in these countries, as well as its role as an intermediary in the meetings between Argentinian, Uruguayan, and Brazilian death squads.   According to the National Security Archive's documentary evidence from US, Paraguayan, Argentine, and Chilean files, "Founded by the Pinochet regime in November 1975, Operation Condor was the codename for a formal Southern Cone collaboration that included transnational secret intelligence activities, kidnapping, torture, disappearance, and assassination." Several persons were slain as part of this codename mission. "Notable Condor victims include two former Uruguayan legislators and a former Bolivian president, Juan José Torres, murdered in Buenos Aires, a former Chilean Minister of the Interior, Bernardo Leighton, and former Chilean ambassador Orlando Letelier and his 26-year-old American colleague, Ronni Moffitt, assassinated by a car bomb in downtown Washington D.C.," according to the report.   Prior to the formation of Operation Condor, there had been cooperation among various security services with the goal of "eliminating Marxist subversion." On September 3, 1973, at the Conference of American Armies in Caracas, Brazilian General Breno Borges Fortes, the chief of the Brazilian army, urged that various services "expand the interchange of information" in order to "fight against subversion."   Representatives from Chile, Uruguay, and Bolivia's police forces met with Alberto Villar, deputy chief of the Argentine Federal Police and co-founder of the Triple A killing squad, in March 1974 to discuss collaboration standards. Their purpose was to eliminate the "subversive" threat posed by Argentina's tens of thousands of political exiles. Bolivian immigrants' bodies were discovered at rubbish dumps in Buenos Aires in August 1974. Based on recently revealed CIA records dated June 1976, McSherry corroborated the kidnapping and torture of Chilean and Uruguayan exiles living in Buenos Aires during this time.   On General Augusto Pinochet's 60th birthday, November 25, 1975, in Santiago de Chile, heads of the military intelligence services of Argentina, Bolivia, Chile, Paraguay, and Uruguay met with Manuel Contreras, commander of the Chilean secret police, to officially establish the Plan Condor. General Rivero, an intelligence officer in the Argentine Armed Forces and a former student of the French, devised the concept of Operation Condor, according to French writer Marie-Monique Robin, author of Escadrons de la death, l'école française (2004, Death Squads, The French School).   Officially, the targets were armed groups (such as the MIR, the Montoneros or the ERP, the Tupamaros, etc.) based on the governments' perceptions of threats, but the governments expanded their attacks to include all types of political opponents, including their families and others, as reported by the Valech Commission, which is known as The National Commission on Political Imprisonment and Torture Report. The Argentine "Dirty War," for example, kidnapped, tortured, and assassinated many trade unionists, relatives of activists, social activists such as the founders of the Mothers of the Plaza de Mayo, nuns, university professors, and others, according to most estimates.   The Chilean DINA and its Argentine counterpart, SIDE, were the operation's front-line troops from 1976 forward. The infamous "death flights," which were postulated in Argentina by Luis Mara Menda and deployed by French forces during the Algerian War (1954–62), were widely used. Government forces flew or helicoptered victims out to sea, where they were dumped to die in premeditated disappearances. According to reports, the OPR-33 facility in Argentina was destroyed as a result of the military bombardment. Members of Plan Condor met in Santiago, Chile, in May 1976, to discuss "long-range collaboration... [that] went well beyond intelligence exchange" and to assign code names to the participating countries. The CIA acquired information in July that Plan Condor participants planned to strike "against leaders of indigenous terrorist groups residing overseas."   Several corpses washed up on beaches south of Buenos Aires in late 1977 as a result of extraordinary storms, providing evidence of some of the government's victims. Hundreds of newborns and children were removed from women in prison who had been kidnapped and later disappeared; the children were then given to families and associates of the dictatorship in clandestine adoptions. According to the CIA, Operation Condor countries reacted positively to the concept of cooperating and built their own communications network as well as joint training programs in areas like psychological warfare.    The military governments in South America were coming together to join forces for security concerns, according to a memo prepared by Assistant Secretary of State for Latin America Harry W. Shlaudeman to Kissinger on August 3, 1976. They were anxious about the growth of Marxism and the consequences it would have on their dominance. This new force worked in secret in the countries of other members. Their mission: to track out and murder "Revolutionary Coordinating Committee" terrorists in their own nations and throughout Europe.Shlaudeman voiced fear that the members of Operation Condor's "siege mindset" could lead to a wider divide between military and civilian institutions in the region. He was also concerned that this would further isolate these countries from developed Western countries. He argued that some of these anxieties were justified, but that by reacting too harshly, these countries risked inciting a violent counter-reaction comparable to the PLO's in Israel.   Chile and Argentina were both active in using communications medium for the purpose of transmitting propaganda, according to papers from the United States dated April 17, 1977. The propaganda's goal was to accomplish two things. The first goal was to defuse/counter international media criticism of the governments involved, and the second goal was to instill national pride in the local population. "Chile after Allende," a propaganda piece developed by Chile, was sent to the states functioning under Condor. The paper, however, solely mentions Uruguay and Argentina as the only two countries that have signed the deal. The government of Paraguay was solely identified as using the local press, "Patria," as its primary source of propaganda. Due to the reorganisation of both Argentina's and Paraguay's intelligence organizations, a meeting scheduled for March 1977 to discuss "psychological warfare measures against terrorists and leftist extremists" was canceled.   One "component of the campaign including Chile, Uruguay, and Argentina envisages unlawful operations beyond Latin America against expatriate terrorists, primarily in Europe," according to a 2016 declassified CIA study titled "Counterterrorism in the Southern Cone." "All military-controlled regimes in the Southern Cone consider themselves targets of international Marxism," the memo stated. Condor's fundamental characteristic was highlighted in the document, which came to fruition in early 1974 when "security officials from all of the member countries, except Brazil, agreed to establish liaison channels and to facilitate the movement of security officers on government business from one country to the other," as part of a long-tested "regional approach" to pacifying "subversion." Condor's "initial aims" included the "exchange of information on the Revolutionary Coordinating Junta (RCJ), an organization...of terrorist groups from Bolivia, Uruguay, Chile, Argentina, and Paraguay" with "representatives" in Europe "believed to have been involved in the assassinations in Paris of the Bolivian ambassador to France last May and a Uruguayan military attache in 1974." Condor's primary purpose, according to the CIA assessment, was to eliminate "top-level terrorist leaders" as well as non-terrorist targets such as "Uruguayan opposition figure Wilson Ferreira, if he should travel to Europe, and some leaders of Amnesty International." Condor was also suspected by the CIA of being "involved in nonviolent actions, including as psychological warfare and a propaganda campaign" that used the media's power to "publicize terrorist crimes and atrocities." Condor also urged citizens in its member countries to "report anything out of the norm in their surroundings" in an appeal to "national pride and national conscience." Another meeting took place in 1980, and Montensero was apprehended. The RSO allegedly promised not to kill them if they agreed to collaborate and provide information on upcoming meetings in Rio.   So, after all of this mumbo jumbo, let's recap.    50,000 people were killed, 30,000 disappeared, and 400,000 were imprisoned, according to the "terror archives."  A letter signed by Manuel Contreras, the chief of Chile's National Intelligence Directorate (DINA) at the time, inviting Paraguayan intelligence personnel to Santiago for a clandestine "First Working Meeting on National Intelligence" on November 25, 1975, was also uncovered. The presence of intelligence chiefs from Argentina, Bolivia, and Uruguay at the meetings was also confirmed by this letter, indicating that those countries were also involved in the formulation of Operation Condor. Colombia, Peru, and Venezuela are among the countries named in the archives as having collaborated to varying degrees by giving intelligence information that had been sought by the security agencies of the Southern Cone countries. Parts of the archives, which are presently housed in Asunción's Palace of Justice, have been used to prosecute former military officers in some of these countries. Those records were used extensively in Spanish judge Baltasar Garzón's prosecution against Chilean General Augusto Pinochet. Baltasar Garzón interviewed Almada twice after he was a Condor victim.   "[The records] represent a mound of shame and lies that Stroessner [Paraguay's ruler until 1989] used to blackmail the Paraguayan people for 40 years," Almada said. He wants the "terror archives" to be listed as an international cultural site by UNESCO, as this would make it much easier to get funds to maintain and protect the records.   In May 2000, a UNESCO mission visited Asunción in response to a request from the Paraguayan government for assistance in registering these files on the Memory of the World Register, which is part of a program aimed at preserving and promoting humanity's documentary heritage by ensuring that records are preserved and accessible.   Now that we are all caught up, let's talk about a few noteworthy events. First we go to Argentina.   Argentina was ruled by military juntas from 1976 until 1983 under Operation Condor, which was a civic-military dictatorship. In countless incidents of desaparecidos, the Argentine SIDE collaborated with the Chilean DINA. In Buenos Aires, they assassinated Chilean General Carlos Prats, former Uruguayan MPs Zelmar Michelini and Héctor Gutiérrez Ruiz, and former Bolivian President Juan José Torres. With the support of Italian Gladio operator Stefano Delle Chiaie and Nazi war criminal Klaus Barbie, the SIDE aided Bolivian commander Luis Garca Meza Tejada's Cocaine Coup (see also Operation Charly). Since the release of secret records, it has been revealed that at ESMA, there were operational units made up of Italians who were utilized to suppress organizations of Italian Montoneros. Gaetano Saya, the Officer of the Italian stay behind next - Operation Gladio, led this outfit known as "Shadow Group." The Madres de la Square de Mayo, a group of mothers whose children had vanished, began protesting every Thursday in front of the Casa Rosada on the plaza in April 1977. They wanted to know where their children were and what happened to them. The abduction of two French nuns and other founders of the Mothers of the Plaza de Mayo in December 1977 drew worldwide notice. Their corpses were later recognized among the deceased washed up on beaches south of Buenos Aires in December 1977, victims of death planes.   In 1983, when Argentina's democracy was restored, the government established the National Commission for Forced Disappearances (CONADEP), which was chaired by writer Ernesto Sabato. It gathered testimony from hundreds of witnesses about regime victims and known atrocities, as well as documenting hundreds of secret jails and detention sites and identifying torture and execution squad leaders. The Juicio a las Juntas (Juntas Trial) two years later was mostly successful in proving the crimes of the top commanders of the numerous juntas that had composed the self-styled National Reorganization Process. Most of the top officers on trial, including Jorge Rafael Videla, Emilio Eduardo Massera, Roberto Eduardo Viola, Armando Lambruschini, Ral Agosti, Rubén Graffigna, Leopoldo Galtieri, Jorge Anaya, and Basilio Lami Dozo, were convicted and sentenced to life in prison.   Following these trials, Ral Alfonsn's administration implemented two amnesty laws, the 1986 Ley de Punto Final (law of closure) and the 1987 Ley de Obediencia Debida (law of due obedience), which ended prosecution of crimes committed during the Dirty War. In an attempt at healing and reconciliation, President Carlos Menem pardoned the junta's leaders who were serving prison sentences in 1989–1990.   Due to attacks on American citizens in Argentina and revelations about CIA funding of the Argentine military in the late 1990s, and despite an explicit 1990 Congressional prohibition, US President Bill Clinton ordered the declassification of thousands of State Department documents relating to US-Argentine relations dating back to 1954. These documents exposed American involvement in the Dirty War and Operation Condor.   Following years of protests by the Mothers of the Plaza de Mayo and other human rights organizations, the Argentine Congress overturned the amnesty legislation in 2003, with the full support of President Nestor Kirchner and the ruling majority in both chambers. In June 2005, the Argentine Supreme Court deemed them unlawful after a separate assessment. The government was able to resume prosecution of crimes committed during the Dirty War as a result of the court's decision.    Enrique Arancibia Clavel, a DINA civil agent who was charged with crimes against humanity in Argentina in 2004, was sentenced to life in prison for his role in the death of General Prats. Stefano Delle Chiaie, a suspected Italian terrorist, is also said to have been involved in the murder. In Rome in December 1995, he and fellow extreme Vincenzo Vinciguerra testified before federal judge Mara Servini de Cubra that DINA operatives Clavel and Michael Townley were intimately involved in the assassination. Judge Servini de Cubra demanded that Mariana Callejas (Michael Townley's wife) and Cristoph Willikie, a retired Chilean army colonel, be extradited in 2003 because they were also accused of being complicit in the murder. Nibaldo Segura, a Chilean appeals court judge, declined extradition in July 2005, claiming that they had already been prosecuted in Chile.   Twenty-five former high-ranking military commanders from Argentina and Uruguay were charged on March 5, 2013, in Buenos Aires with conspiring to "kidnap, disappear, torture, and kill" 171 political opponents throughout the 1970s and 1980s. Former Argentine "presidents" Jorge Videla and Reynaldo Bignone, both from the El Proceso era, are among the defendants. Prosecutors are relying on declassified US records collected by the National Security Archive, a non-governmental entity established at George Washington University in Washington, DC, in the 1990s and later.   On May 27, 2016, fifteen former military personnel were found guilty. Reynaldo Bignone was sentenced to 20 years in prison. Fourteen of the remaining 16 defendants were sentenced to eight to twenty-five years in prison. Two of the defendants were found not guilty.  A lawyer for the victims' relatives, Luz Palmás Zalda, claims that "This decision is significant since it is the first time Operation Condor's existence has been proven in court. It's also the first time former Condor members have been imprisoned for their roles in the criminal organization."    Anyone wanna go to Brazil?   In the year 2000, President Fernando Henrique Cardoso ordered the publication of some military documents related to Operation Condor. There are documents proving that in that year, attorney general Giancarlo Capaldo, an Italian magistrate, investigated the "disappearances" of Italian citizens in Latin America, which were most likely caused by the actions of Argentine, Paraguayan, Chilean, and Brazilian military personnel who tortured and murdered Italian citizens during Latin American military dictatorships. There was a list containing the names of eleven Brazilians accused of murder, kidnapping, and torture, as well as several high-ranking military personnel from other countries involved in the operation.   "(...) I can neither affirm nor deny because Argentine, Brazilian, Paraguayan, and Chilean soldiers [military men] will be subject to criminal trial until December," the Magistrate said on October 26, 2000.   According to the Italian government's official statement, it was unclear whether the government would prosecute the accused military officers or not. As of November 2021, no one in Brazil had been convicted of human rights violations for actions committed during the 21-year military dictatorship because the Amnesty Law had protected both government officials and leftist guerrillas.   In November 1978, the Condor Operation expanded its covert persecution from Uruguay to Brazil, in an incident dubbed "o Sequestro dos Uruguaios," or "the Kidnapping of the Uruguayans." Senior officials of the Uruguayan army crossed the border into Porto Alegre, the capital of the State of Rio Grande do Sul, with the permission of the Brazilian military administration. They kidnapped Universindo Rodriguez and Lilian Celiberti, a political activist couple from Uruguay, as well as her two children, Camilo and Francesca, who are five and three years old.   The unlawful operation failed because an anonymous phone call notified two Brazilian journalists, Veja magazine reporter Luiz Cláudio Cunha and photographer Joo Baptista Scalco, that the Uruguayan couple had been "disappeared." The two journalists traveled to the specified address, a Porto Alegre apartment, to double-check the facts. The armed men who had arrested Celiberti mistook the journalists for other political opposition members when they came, and they were arrested as well. Universindo Rodriguez and the children had already been brought to Uruguay under the table.   The journalists' presence had exposed the secret operation when their identities were revealed. It was put on hold. As news of the political kidnapping of Uruguayan nationals in Brazil made headlines in the Brazilian press, it is thought that the operation's disclosure avoided the death of the couple and their two young children. It became a worldwide embarrassment. Both Brazil's and Uruguay's military governments were humiliated. Officials arranged for the Celibertis' children to be transported to their maternal grandparents in Montevideo a few days later. After being imprisoned and tortured in Brazil, Rodriguez and Celiberti were transferred to Uruguayan military cells and held there for the next five years. The couple were released after Uruguay's democracy was restored in 1984. They confirmed every element of their kidnapping that had previously been reported.   In 1980, two DOPS (Department of Political and Social Order, an official police unit in charge of political repression during the military administration) inspectors were found guilty of arresting the journalists in Lilian's apartment in Porto Alegre by Brazilian courts. Joo Augusto da Rosa and Orandir Portassi Lucas were their names. They had been identified as participants in the kidnapping by the media and Uruguayans. This occurrence confirmed the Brazilian government's active involvement in the Condor Operation. Governor Pedro Simon arranged for the state of Rio Grande do Sul to legally recognize the Uruguayans' kidnapping and compensate them financially in 1991. A year later, President Luis Alberto Lacalle's democratic government in Uruguay was encouraged to do the same.   The Uruguayan couple identified Pedro Seelig, the head of the DOPS at the time of the kidnapping, as the guy in charge of the operation in Porto Alegre. Universindo and Llian remained in prison in Uruguay and were unable to testify when Seelig was on trial in Brazil. Due to a lack of proof, the Brazilian cop was acquitted. Later testimony from Lilian and Universindo revealed that four officers from Uruguay's secret Counter-Information Division – two majors and two captains – took part in the operation with the permission of Brazilian authorities. In the DOPS headquarters in Porto Alegre, Captain Glauco Yanonne was personally responsible for torturing Universindo Rodriquez. Universindo and Lilian were able to identify the Uruguayan military men who had arrested and tortured them, but none of them were prosecuted in Montevideo. Uruguayan individuals who committed acts of political repression and human rights violations under the dictatorship were granted pardon under the Law of Immunity, which was approved in 1986. Cunha and Scalco were given the 1979 Esso Prize, considered the most significant prize in Brazilian journalism, for their investigative journalism on the case.  Hugo Cores, a former political prisoner from Uruguay, was the one who had warned Cunha. He told the Brazilian press in 1993: All the Uruguayans kidnapped abroad, around 180 people, are missing to this day. The only ones who managed to survive are Lilian, her children, and Universindo.   Joo "Jango" Goulart was the first Brazilian president to die in exile after being deposed. On December 6, 1976, he died in his sleep in Mercedes, Argentina, of a suspected heart attack. The true cause of his death was never determined because an autopsy was never performed. On April 26, 2000, Leonel Brizola, Jango's brother-in-law and former governor of Rio de Janeiro and Rio Grande do Sul, claimed that ex-presidents Joo Goulart and Juscelino Kubitschek (who died in a vehicle accident) were assassinated as part of Operation Condor. He demanded that an investigation into their deaths be launched. On January 27, 2008, the newspaper Folha de S.Paulo published a report featuring a declaration from Mario Neira Barreiro, a former member of Uruguay's dictatorship's intelligence service. Barreiro confirmed Brizola's claims that Goulart had been poisoned. Sérgio Paranhos Fleury, the head of the Departamento de Ordem Poltica e Social (Department of Political and Social Order), gave the order to assassinate Goulart, according to Barreiro, and president Ernesto Geisel gave the permission to execute him. A special panel of the Rio Grande do Sul Legislative Assembly concluded in July 2008 that "the evidence that Jango was wilfully slain, with knowledge of the Geisel regime, is strong."   The magazine CartaCapital published previously unreleased National Information Service records generated by an undercover agent who was present at Jango's Uruguayan homes in March 2009. This new information backs up the idea that the former president was poisoned. The Goulart family has yet to figure out who the "B Agent," as he's referred to in the documents, might be. The agent was a close friend of Jango's, and he detailed a disagreement between the former president and his son during the former president's 56th birthday party, which was sparked by a brawl between two employees. As a result of the story, the Chamber of Deputies' Human Rights Commission agreed to look into Jango's death.   Later, Maria Teresa Fontela Goulart, Jango's widow, was interviewed by CartaCapital, who revealed records from the Uruguayan government confirming her accusations that her family had been tracked. Jango's travel, business, and political activities were all being watched by the Uruguayan government. These data date from 1965, a year after Brazil's coup, and they indicate that he may have been targeted. The President Joo Goulart Institute and the Movement for Justice and Human Rights have requested a document from the Uruguayan Interior Ministry stating that "serious and credible Brazilian sources'' discussed an "alleged plan against the former Brazilian president."   If you thought it wasn't enough, let's talk about Chile. No not the warm stew lie concoction you make to scorn your buddy's stomach, but the country.   Additional information about Condor was released when Augusto Pinochet was detained in London in 1998 in response to Spanish magistrate Baltasar Garzón's request for his extradition to Spain. According to one of the lawyers requesting his extradition, Carlos Altamirano, the leader of the Chilean Socialist Party, was the target of an assassination attempt. He said that after Franco's funeral in Madrid in 1975, Pinochet contacted Italian neofascist terrorist Stefano Delle Chiaie and arranged for Altamirano's murder. The strategy didn't work out. Since the bodies of victims kidnapped and presumably murdered could not be found, Chilean judge Juan Guzmán Tapia established a precedent concerning the crime of "permanent kidnapping": he determined that the kidnapping was thought to be ongoing, rather than having occurred so long ago that the perpetrators were protected by an amnesty decreed in 1978 or the Chilean statute of limitations. The Chilean government admitted in November 2015 that Pablo Neruda may have been murdered by members of Pinochet's administration.   Assassinations   On September 30, 1974, a car bomb killed General Carlos Prats and his wife, Sofa Cuthbert, in Buenos Aires, where they were living in exile. The Chilean DINA has been charged with the crime. In January 2005, Chilean Judge Alejandro Sols ended Pinochet's case when the Chilean Supreme Court denied his request to strip Pinochet's immunity from prosecution (as chief of state). In Chile, the assassination of DINA commanders Manuel Contreras, ex-chief of operations and retired general Ral Itturiaga Neuman, his brother Roger Itturiaga, and ex-brigadiers Pedro Espinoza Bravo and José Zara was accused. In Argentina, DINA agent Enrique Arancibia Clavel was found guilty of the murder.   After moving in exile in Italy, Bernardo Leighton and his wife were severely injured in a botched assassination attempt on October 6, 1975. Bernardo Leighton was critically injured in the gun attack, and his wife, Anita Fresno, was permanently crippled. Stefano Delle Chiaie met with Michael Townley and Virgilio Paz Romero in Madrid in 1975 to plan the murder of Bernardo Leighton with the help of Franco's secret police, according to declassified documents in the National Security Archive and Italian attorney general Giovanni Salvi, who led the prosecution of former DINA head Manuel Contreras. Glyn T. Davies, the secretary of the National Security Council (NSC), said in 1999 that declassified records indicated Pinochet's government's responsibility for the failed assassination attempt on Bernardo Leighton, Orlando Letelier, and General Carlos Prats on October 6, 1975.   In a December 2004 OpEd piece in the Los Angeles Times, Francisco Letelier, Orlando Letelier's son, claimed that his father's killing was part of Operation Condor, which he described as "an intelligence-sharing network employed by six South American tyrants of the time to eliminate dissidents."   Letelier's death, according to Michael Townley, was caused by Pinochet. Townley admitted to hiring five anti-Castro Cuban exiles to set up a booby-trap in Letelier's automobile. Following consultations with the terrorist organization CORU's leadership, including Luis Posada Carriles and Orlando Bosch, Cuban-Americans José Dionisio Suárez, Virgilio Paz Romero, Alvin Ross Daz, and brothers Guillermo and Ignacio Novo Sampoll were chosen to carry out the murder, according to Jean-Guy Allard. The Miami Herald reports that Luis Posada Carriles was there at the conference that decided on Letelier's death as well as the bombing of Cubana Flight 455.   During a public protest against Pinochet in July 1986, photographer Rodrigo Rojas DeNegri was burned alive and Carmen Gloria Quintana received significant burns. The case of the two became known as Caso Quemados ("The Burned Case"), and it drew attention in the United States because Rojas had fled to the United States following the 1973 coup. [96] According to a document from the US State Department, the Chilean army set fire to both Rojas and Quintana on purpose. Rojas and Quintana, on the other hand, were accused by Pinochet of being terrorists who lit themselves on fire with their own Molotov cocktails. Pinochet's reaction to the attack and killing of Rojas, according to National Security Archive analyst Peter Kornbluh, was "contributed to Reagan's decision to withdraw support for the regime and press for a return to civilian rule."   Operación Silencio   Operación Silencio (Operation Silence) was a Chilean operation that removed witnesses from the country in order to obstruct investigations by Chilean judges. It began about a year before the "terror archives" in Paraguay were discovered. Arturo Sanhueza Ross, the man accused of assassinating MIR leader Jecar Neghme in 1989, departed the country in April 1991.    According to the Rettig Report, Chilean intelligence officers were responsible for Jecar Neghme's killing. Carlos Herrera Jiménez, the man who assassinated trade unionist Tucapel Jiménez, flew out in September 1991. Eugenio Berros, a chemist who had cooperated with DINA agent Michael Townley, was led by Operation Condor agents from Chile to Uruguay in October 1991 in order to avoid testifying in the Letelier case. He used passports from Argentina, Uruguay, Paraguay, and Brazil, prompting suspicions that Operation Condor was still active. In 1995, Berros was discovered dead in El Pinar, Uruguay, near Montevideo. His corpse had been mangled to the point where it was hard to identify him by sight.   Michael Townley, who is now under witness protection in the United States, recognized linkages between Chile, DINA, and the incarceration and torture camp Colonia Dignidad in January 2005. The facility was founded in 1961 by Paul Schäfer, who was arrested and convicted of child rape in Buenos Aires in March 2005. Interpol was notified about Colonia Dignidad and the Army's Bacteriological Warfare Laboratory by Townley. This lab would have taken the place of the previous DINA lab on Via Naranja de lo Curro, where Townley collaborated with chemical assassin Eugenio Berros. According to the court reviewing the case, the toxin that allegedly murdered Christian-Democrat Eduardo Frei Montalva could have been created at this new lab in Colonia Dignidad. Dossiê Jango, a Brazilian-Uruguayan-Argentine collaboration film released in 2013, accused the same lab in the alleged poisoning of Brazil's deposed president, Joo Goulart.   Congressman Koch   The Condor Years: How Pinochet and His Allies Brought Terrorism to Three Continents was released in February 2004 by reporter John Dinges. He reported that in mid-1976, Uruguayan military officers threatened to assassinate United States Congressman Edward Koch (later Mayor of New York City). The CIA station commander in Montevideo had received information about it in late July 1976. He advised the Agency to take no action after finding that the men were inebriated at the time. Colonel José Fons, who was present at the November 1975 covert meeting in Santiago, Chile, and Major José Nino Gavazzo, who led a team of intelligence agents working in Argentina in 1976 and was responsible for the deaths of over 100 Uruguayans, were among the Uruguayan officers.   Koch told Dinges in the early twenty-first century that CIA Director George H. W. Bush informed him in October 1976 that "his sponsorship of legislation to cut off US military assistance to Uruguay on human rights concerns had prompted secret police officers to 'put a contract out for you'." Koch wrote to the Justice Department in mid-October 1976, requesting FBI protection, but he received none. It had been more than two months after the meeting and the assassination of Orlando Letelier in Washington. Colonel Fons and Major Gavazzo were sent to important diplomatic postings in Washington, D.C. in late 1976. The State Department ordered the Uruguayan government to rescind their appointments, citing the possibility of "unpleasant publicity" for "Fons and Gavazzo."  Only in 2001 did Koch learn of the links between the threats and the position appointments.   Paraguay The US supported Alfredo Stroessner's anti-communist military dictatorship and played a "vital supporting role" in Stroessner's Paraguay's domestic affairs. As part of Operation Condor, for example, Lieutenant Colonel Robert Thierry of the United States Army was deployed to assist local workers in the construction of "La Technica," a detention and interrogation center. La Technica was also renowned as a torture facility. Pastor Coronel, Stroessner's secret police, washed their victims in human vomit and excrement tubs and shocked them in the rectum with electric cattle prods. They decapitated Miguel Angel Soler [es], the Communist party secretary, with a chainsaw while Stroessner listened on the phone. Stroessner asked that tapes of inmates wailing in agony be presented to their relatives.   Harry Shlaudeman defined Paraguay's militarized state as a "nineteenth-century military administration that looks nice on the cartoon page" in a report to Kissinger. Shlaudeman's assessments were paternalistic, but he was correct in observing that Paraguay's "backwardness" was causing it to follow in the footsteps of its neighbors. Many decolonized countries regarded national security concerns in terms of neighboring countries and long-standing ethnic or regional feuds, but the United States viewed conflict from a global and ideological viewpoint. During the Chaco War, Shlaudeman mentions Paraguay's amazing fortitude in the face of greater military force from its neighbors. The government of Paraguay believes that the country's victory over its neighbors over several decades justifies the country's lack of progress. The paper goes on to say that Paraguay's political traditions were far from democratic. Because of this reality, as well as a fear of leftist protest in neighboring countries, the government has prioritized the containment of political opposition over the growth of its economic and political institutions. They were driven to defend their sovereignty due to an ideological fear of their neighbors. As a result, many officials were inspired to act in the interest of security by the fight against radical, communist movements both within and beyond the country. The book Opération Condor, written by French writer Pablo Daniel Magee and prefaced by Costa Gavras, was published in 2020. The story chronicles the life of Martin Almada, a Paraguayan who was a victim of the Condor Operation.   The Peruvian Case   After being kidnapped in 1978, Peruvian legislator Javier Diez Canseco announced that he and twelve other compatriots (Justiniano Apaza Ordóñez, Hugo Blanco, Genaro Ledesma Izquieta, Valentín Pacho, Ricardo Letts, César Lévano, Ricardo Napurí, José Luis Alvarado Bravo, Alfonso Baella Tuesta, Guillermo Faura Gaig, José Arce Larco and Humberto Damonte). All opponents of Francisco Morales Bermudez's dictatorship were exiled and handed over to the Argentine armed forces in Jujuy in 1978 after being kidnapped in Peru. He also claimed that declassified CIA documents and WikiLeaks cable information account for the Morales Bermudez government's ties to Operation Condor.   Uruguay   Juan Mara Bordaberry declared himself dictator and banned the rest of the political parties, as was customary in the Southern Cone dictatorships of the 1970s. In the alleged defense against subversion, a large number of people were murdered, tortured, unjustly detained and imprisoned, kidnapped, and forced into disappearance during the de facto administration, which lasted from 1973 until 1985. Prior to the coup d'état in 1973, the CIA served as a consultant to the country's law enforcement institutions. Dan Mitrione, perhaps the most well-known example of such cooperation, had taught civilian police in counterinsurgency at the School of the Americas in Panama, afterwards renamed the Western Hemisphere Institute for Security Cooperation.   Maybe now we can talk about the U.S involvement? The U.S never gets involved in anything so this might be new to some of you.   According to US paperwork, the US supplied critical organizational, financial, and technological help to the operation far into the 1980s. The long-term hazards of a right-wing bloc, as well as its early policy recommendations, were discussed in a US Department of State briefing for Henry Kissinger, then Secretary of State, dated 3 August 1976, prepared by Harry Shlaudeman and titled "Third World War and South America." The briefing was an overview of security forces in the Southern Cone. The operation was described as a joint effort by six Latin American countries (Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Paraguay, and Uruguay) to win the "Third World War" by eliminating "subversion" through transnational secret intelligence operations, kidnapping, torture, disappearance, and assassination. The research begins by examining the sense of unity shared by the six countries of the Southern Cone. Kissinger is warned by Shlaudeman that the "Third World War" will trap those six countries in an ambiguous position in the long run, because they are trapped on one side by "international Marxism and its terrorist exponents," and on the other by "the hostility of uncomprehending industrial democracies misled by Marxist propaganda." According to the report, US policy toward Operation Condor should “emphasize the differences between the five countries at all times, depoliticize human rights, oppose rhetorical exaggerations of the ‘Third-World-War' type, and bring potential bloc members back into our cognitive universe through systematic exchanges.” According to CIA papers from 1976, strategies to deal with political dissidents in South America were planned among international security officials at the US Army School of the Americas and the Conference of American Armies from 1960 to the early 1970s. "In early 1974, security officials from Argentina, Chile, Uruguay, Paraguay, and Bolivia convened in Buenos Aires to arrange synchronized attacks against subversive targets," according to a declassified CIA memo dated June 23, 1976. Officials in the United States were aware of the situation.   Furthermore, the Defense Intelligence Agency revealed in September 1976 that US intelligence services were well aware of Operation Condor's architecture and intentions. They discovered that "Operation Condor" was the covert name for gathering intelligence on "leftists," Communists, Peronists, or Marxists in the Southern Cone Area. The intelligence services were aware that the operation was being coordinated by the intelligence agencies of numerous South American nations (including Argentina, Paraguay, Uruguay, and Bolivia), with Chile serving as the hub. Argentina, Uruguay, and Chile, according to the DIA, were already aggressively pursuing operations against communist targets, primarily in Argentina.   The report's third point reveals the US comprehension of Operation Condor's most malevolent actions. "The development of special teams from member countries to execute out operations, including killings against terrorists or sympathizers of terrorist groups," according to the paper. Although these special teams were intelligence agency operatives rather than military troops, they did work in structures similar to those used by US special forces teams, according to the study. Operation Condor's preparations to undertake probable operations in France and Portugal were revealed in Kissinger's State Department briefing - an issue that would later prove to be immensely contentious in Condor's history.   Condor's core was formed by the US government's sponsorship and collaboration with DINA (Directorate of National Intelligence) and other intelligence agencies. According to CIA papers, the agency maintained intimate ties with officers of Chile's secret police, DINA, and its leader Manuel Contreras.  Even after his role in the Letelier-Moffit killing was discovered, Contreras was kept as a paid CIA contact until 1977. Official requests to trace suspects to and from the US Embassy, the CIA, and the FBI may be found in the Paraguayan Archives. The military states received suspect lists and other intelligence material from the CIA. In 1975, the FBI conducted a nationwide hunt in the United States for persons sought by DINA.   In a February 1976 telegram from the Buenos Aires embassy to the State Department, intelligence said that the US was aware of the impending Argentinian coup. According to the ambassador, the Chief of the Foreign Ministry's North American desk revealed that the "Military Planning Group" had asked him to prepare a report and recommendations on how the "future military government can avoid or minimize the sort of problems the Chilean and Uruguayan governments are having with the US over human rights issues." The Chief also indicated that "they" (whether he is talking to the CIA or Argentina's future military dictatorship, or both) will confront opposition if they start assassinating and killing people. Assuming this is so, the envoy notes that the military coup will "intend to carry forward an all-out war on the terrorists and that some executions would therefore probably be necessary." Despite already being engaged in the region's politics, this indicates that the US was aware of the planning of human rights breaches before they occurred and did not intervene to prevent them. "It is encouraging to note that the Argentine military are aware of the problem and are already focusing on ways to avoid letting human rights issues become an irritant in US-Argentine Relations." This is confirmation.   Professor Ruth Blakeley says that Kissinger "explicitly expressed his support for the repression of political opponents" in regards to the Argentine junta's continuous human rights violations.  When Henry Kissinger met with Argentina's Foreign Minister on October 5, 1976, he said, ” Look, our basic attitude is that we would like you to succeed. I have an old-fashioned view that friends ought to be supported. What is not understood in the United States is that you have a civil war. We read about human rights problems but not the context. The quicker you succeed the better ... The human rights problem is a growing one. Your Ambassador can apprise you. We want a stable situation. We won't cause you unnecessary difficulties. If you can finish before Congress gets back, the better. Whatever freedoms you could restore would help.”   The démarche was never provided in the end. According to Kornbluh and Dinges, the decision not to deliver Kissinger's directive was based on Assistant Secretary Harry Shlaudeman's letter to his deputy in Washington, D.C., which stated: "you can simply instruct the Ambassadors to take no further action, noting that there have been no reports in some weeks indicating an intention to activate the Condor scheme."   President Bill Clinton ordered the State Department to release hundreds of declassified papers in June 1999, indicating for the first time that the CIA, State, and Defense Departments were all aware of Condor. According to a 1 October 1976 DOD intelligence assessment, Latin American military commanders gloat about it to their American colleagues. Condor's "joint counterinsurgency operations" sought to "eliminate Marxist terrorist activities," according to the same study; Argentina developed a special Condor force "structured much like a US Special Forces Team," it said. According to a summary of documents disclosed in 2004, The declassified record shows that Secretary of State Henry Kissinger was briefed on Condor and its "murder operations" on August 5, 1976, in a 14-page report from [Harry] Shlaudeman [Assistant Secretary of State]. "Internationally, the Latin generals look like our guys," Shlaudeman cautioned. "We are especially identified with Chile. It cannot do us any good." Shlaudeman and his two deputies, William Luers and Hewson Ryan, recommended action. Over the course of three weeks, they drafted a cautiously worded demarche, approved by Kissinger, in which he instructed the U.S. ambassadors in the Southern Cone countries to meet with the respective heads of state about Condor. He instructed them to express "our deep concern" about "rumors" of "plans for the assassination of subversives, politicians and prominent figures both within the national borders of certain Southern Cone countries and abroad."   Kornbluh and Dinges come to the conclusion that "The paper trail is clear: the State Department and the CIA had enough intelligence to take concrete steps to thwart the Condor assassination planning. Those steps were initiated but never implemented." Hewson Ryan, Shlaudeman's deputy, subsequently admitted in an oral history interview that the State Department's treatment of the issue was "remiss." "We knew fairly early on that the governments of the Southern Cone countries were planning, or at least talking about, some assassinations abroad in the summer of 1976. ... Whether if we had gone in, we might have prevented this, I don't know", In relation to the Letelier-Moffitt bombing, he remarked, "But we didn't."   Condor was defined as a "counter-terrorism organization" in a CIA document, which also mentioned that the Condor countries had a specific telecommunications system known as "CONDORTEL."  The New York Times released a communication from US Ambassador to Paraguay Robert White to Secretary of State Cyrus Vance on March 6, 2001. The paper was declassified and disseminated by the Clinton administration in November 2000 as part of the Chile Declassification Project. General Alejandro Fretes Davalos, the chief of staff of Paraguay's armed forces, told White that the South American intelligence chiefs engaged in Condor "kept in touch with one another through a United States communications installation in the Panama Canal Zone that covered all of Latin America."   According to reports, Davalos stated that the station was "employed to coordinate intelligence information among the southern cone countries". The US was concerned that the Condor link would be made public at a time when the killing of Chilean former minister Orlando Letelier and his American aide Ronni Moffitt in the United States was being probed."it would seem advisable to review this arrangement to insure that its continuation is in US interest." White wrote to Vance. "Another piece of increasingly weighty evidence suggesting that U.S. military and intelligence officials supported and collaborated with Condor as a secret partner or sponsor." McSherry rebutted the cables. Furthermore, an Argentine military source told a U.S. Embassy contact that the CIA was aware of Condor and had played a vital role in establishing computerized linkages among the six Condor governments' intelligence and operations sections.   After all this it doesn't stop here. We even see France having a connection. The original document confirming that a 1959 agreement between Paris and Buenos Aires set up a "permanent French military mission" of officers to Argentina who had participated in the Algerian War was discovered in the archives of the Quai d'Orsay, the French Ministry of Foreign Affairs. It was kept at the offices of the Argentine Army's chief of staff. It lasted until 1981, when François Mitterrand was elected President of France. She revealed how the administration of Valéry Giscard d'Estaing secretly coordinated with Videla's junta in Argentina and Augusto Pinochet's tyranny in Chile.   Even Britain and West Germany looked into using the tactics in their own countries. Going so far as to send their open personnel to Buenos Aires to discuss how to establish a similar network.  MOVIES   https://www.imdb.com/search/keyword/?keywords=military-coup&sort=num_votes,desc&mode=detail&page=1&title_type=movie&ref_=kw_ref_typ https://islandora.wrlc.org/islandora/object/terror%3Aroot https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Archives_of_Terror https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Operation_Condor https://www.bbc.com/news/magazine-20774985 https://nsarchive2.gwu.edu/NSAEBB/NSAEBB239d/index.htm

united states american president new york city europe school washington france law state french new york times washington dc government italy spanish italian army movement western spain chief dc congress brazil conference rome political fbi mayors argentina nazis portugal terror memory mothers chile colombia madrid bush ambassadors rio senior cia venezuela official latin peru south america agency mayo secretary brazilian clinton americas latin america mart square north american founded human rights rodriguez palace janeiro officer interior chamber found hundreds buenos aires bill clinton panama archives congressional bolivia immunity uruguay ruiz communists los angeles times latin american sul koch internationally rub davies mir unesco state department officials ley kidnappings south american george washington university plaza veja fourteen departamento wikileaks marxist us department marxism assuming rojas paraguay jk prosecutors rio grande embassies peruvian justice department foreign affairs dod united states army argentine world war iii chilean amnesty international guti madres caracas erp argentinian interpol el proceso valent contreras juicio patria op ed cunha porto alegre miami herald assistant secretary condor folha counterterrorism montevideo molotov opr allende pinochet tapia pablo neruda henry kissinger us state department bolivian marxists brazilians us embassy us ambassador west germany deputies national intelligence asunci mitterrand kissinger foreign minister coru plo women in prison quai human rights commission magistrate augusto pinochet uruguayan giscard national commission jango goulart geisel barreiro almada fons defense intelligence agency sequestro social order rso jujuy curro altamirano paraguayan foreign ministry clavel townley dirty wars fernando henrique cardoso colonia dignidad videla costa gavras pacho casa rosada dops seelig klaus barbie operation gladio french ministry carlos menem operation condor state henry kissinger security cooperation letelier davalos baltasar garz national security archive luiz cl southern cone algerian war national security council nsc ernesto sabato marie monique robin paul sch brizola torture report general augusto pinochet panama canal zone in buenos aires french school cubra alfredo stroessner kornbluh political imprisonment peter kornbluh carlos altamirano nestor kirchner uruguayans castro cuban argentine dirty war argentine congress your ambassador
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