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  • 572PODCASTS
  • 8,961EPISODES
  • 13mAVG DURATION
  • 10+DAILY NEW EPISODES
  • May 20, 2022LATEST

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Latest podcast episodes about pbs newshour

PBS NewsHour - Full Show
May 20, 2022 - PBS NewsHour full episode

PBS NewsHour - Full Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 53:44


Friday on the NewsHour, investors scramble as the S&P 500 dives into bear market territory during intraday trading with fears of recession. Then, President Biden focuses on technology gaps and security during trip to Asia. Plus, New York struggles with a sharp rise in violent crime amid COVID-19, and David Brooks and Jonathan Capehart discuss the political response to the mass shooting in Buffalo. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - Segments
Investors scramble as the S&P 500 dives into bear market territory

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 5:27


Financial markets closed out the week with yet another head-spinning day, with one of the main indexes, the S&P 500, plunging for almost three hours into bear market territory, signifying a drop of 20 percent or more from its prior record. Jason Furman, an economist at the Harvard Kennedy School who served as a top adviser to President Obama, joins Judy Woodruff to discuss. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - Segments
New Wrap: CDC approves Pfizer COVID vaccine booster shots for children ages 5 to 11

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 4:40


In our news wrap Friday, children in the U.S. ages 5 to 11 began receiving their Pfizer COVID vaccine booster shots after the CDC gave its final approval, a federal judge rules COVID asylum restrictions must continue on the border, the Justice Department unveiled new efforts to combat hate crimes after the massacre in Buffalo, and Russia claims it's taken full control of the city of Mariupol. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - Segments
Biden focuses on technology gaps and security during his first trip to Asia as president

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 11:18


President Biden's trip to Asia aims to improve economic and security relations with allies in the region, with plans to introduce a new regional economic framework designed to counter China's influence. Nick Schifrin reports, and Judy Woodruff speaks with Frank Jannuzi of the Mansfield Foundation and Bonnie Glaser of the Asia program at the German Marshall Fund of the United States to learn more. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - Segments
Calls for Biden to cancel the widespread financial burden of student debt grow louder

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 9:11


President Biden has indicated he will soon announce a decision on whether he will cancel $10,000 in student debt for college graduates. It's a decision being widely anticipated but also much debated over its scope and merits. Katherine Welbeck of the Student Borrower Protection Center and Marc Goldwein of the Committee for a Responsible Federal Budget join Amna Nawaz to discuss. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - Segments
New York struggles with a sharp rise in violent crime amid COVID-19

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 8:31


After hitting near historic lows pre-pandemic, crime has been spiking in many parts of the U.S., including in the nation's most populous city. Shootings in New York City have more than doubled this year compared to the same time period in 2019. The city's new mayor has made public safety his top priority, while polls show half of New Yorkers view crime as the leading issue. Jeffrey Brown reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - Segments
Brooks and Capehart on the Buffalo mass shooting, primary results, public opinion on Roe

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 13:24


New York Times columnist David Brooks and Washington Post associate editor Jonathan Capehart join Judy Woodruff to discuss the week in politics, including the reaction to the racially motivated massacre in Buffalo, the implications of primary results as the U.S. moves toward general elections and public opinion Roe v. Wade. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - Shields and Brooks
Brooks and Capehart on the Buffalo mass shooting, primary results, public opinion on Roe

PBS NewsHour - Shields and Brooks

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 13:24


New York Times columnist David Brooks and Washington Post associate editor Jonathan Capehart join Judy Woodruff to discuss the week in politics, including the reaction to the racially motivated massacre in Buffalo, the implications of primary results as the U.S. moves toward general elections and public opinion Roe v. Wade. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

THE MEDIA BEAT
The Media Beat with David Tereshchuk – Friday May 20, 2022

THE MEDIA BEAT

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 26:32


THE MEDIA BEAT WAS FIRST COMMISSIONED IN 2004 BY TRIBUNE NEWSPAPERS FROM JOURNALIST AND MEDIA CRITIC DAVID TERESHCHUK. IT RAN AS A WEEKLY FEATURE IN TRIBUNE'S NEW YORK CITY DAILY, ‘am new york' UNTIL TERESHCHUK TOOK THE COLUMN ONLINE IN 2006. THIS WEB VERSION HAS CONTINUED EVER SINCE. Tereshchuk's media insights also appear at HUFFINGTON POST. Since 2012 his frequent television reports on ethical issues have been broadcast on the PBS program Religion and Ethics Newsweekly and on the PBS Newshour. A radio version of THE MEDIA BEAT appears every week on the NPR Connecticut station WHDD – live on Friday morning and rebroadcast over the weekend. THE MEDIA BEAT PODCASTS are available at iTunes and at WHDD's On Demand page

PBS NewsHour - Full Show
May 19, 2022 - PBS NewsHour full episode

PBS NewsHour - Full Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 53:05


Thursday on the NewsHour, the leaked Supreme Court opinion that would overturn Roe v. Wade energizes activists on both sides of the issue as new polling shows the majority of Americans disagree with where the court appears to be headed. President Biden invokes the Defense Production Act to counter a dearth of baby formula. Plus, how Russia's invasion of Ukraine could lead to a global food crisis. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - Segments
News Wrap: Biden backs Finland and Sweden's NATO bids as Senate votes to send Ukraine aid

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 4:58


In our news wrap Thursday, President Biden backs Finland and Sweden's bids to join NATO, the U.S. Senate voted to send Ukraine an additional $40 billion in military and economic aid, a grand jury indicted the white man accused of killing 10 black people at a Buffalo supermarket on a first-degree murder charge, and the Jan. 6 panel has requested an interview with Republican Rep. Barry Loudermilk. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - Segments
Most Americans support Roe v. Wade but want some restrictions on abortions, poll shows

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 5:53


The leaked draft opinion from the Supreme Court that suggests the justices may soon overturn Roe v. Wade has made abortion one of the biggest political debates of the year. On Thursday, the Oklahoma Legislature passed a near-total ban on abortion. Our new PBS Newshour/NPR/Marist poll sheds new light on Americans' views on the subject. Lisa Desjardins walks us through some of the numbers. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - Segments
Biden invokes Defense Production Act to counter dearth of baby formula

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 6:26


President Biden is under pressure on a number of fronts right now, including getting more done and showing better results that people can feel in the near future.That's particularly true when it comes to the shortage of baby formula around the country. Brian Deese, the Biden administration's director of the National Economic Council, joins Geoff Bennett to discuss some of those concerns. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - Segments
How quickly will infant formula be back on shelves?

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 5:19


The baby formula shortage in the United States has been severe for some time, with stores now missing 40 percent of their usual supplies. There have been stories of parents driving hours to find what they need, or in some cases, watering down formula. NewsHour's Ali Rogin, who has been reporting on this issue, joins Judy Woodruff to discuss. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - Segments
Russia's war in Ukraine could lead to a global food crisis

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 5:15


The U.S. on Thursday accused Russia of using food as a weapon in its war on Ukraine, and in turn, creating a global food security crisis. Ukraine grows enough food to feed 400 million people, and Ukraine and Russia together account for a third of the world's wheat exports. But Russia's invasion and blockade of Ukrainian ports are preventing exports of grain and steel. Nick Schifrin reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - World
Russia's war in Ukraine could lead to a global food crisis

PBS NewsHour - World

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 5:15


The U.S. on Thursday accused Russia of using food as a weapon in its war on Ukraine, and in turn, creating a global food security crisis. Ukraine grows enough food to feed 400 million people, and Ukraine and Russia together account for a third of the world's wheat exports. But Russia's invasion and blockade of Ukrainian ports are preventing exports of grain and steel. Nick Schifrin reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - Segments
Political scientist Ian Bremmer on the world's ability to address major global crises

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 8:03


With Russia's invasion of Ukraine, the pandemic, climate crisis and extreme political polarization, the dangers currently facing the world are stark. A new book, "The Power of Crisis: How Three Threats - and Our Response - Will Change the World," delves into those topics. Author Ian Bremmer, who runs the Eurasia Group, a global risk research and consulting firm, joins Judy Woodruff to discuss. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - World
Political scientist Ian Bremmer on the world's ability to address major global crises

PBS NewsHour - World

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 8:03


With Russia's invasion of Ukraine, the pandemic, climate crisis and extreme political polarization, the dangers currently facing the world are stark. A new book, "The Power of Crisis: How Three Threats - and Our Response - Will Change the World," delves into those topics. Author Ian Bremmer, who runs the Eurasia Group, a global risk research and consulting firm, joins Judy Woodruff to discuss. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - Segments
Cultural divisions and political entrenchment transform evangelical voting bloc

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 7:08


The Supreme Court's leaked draft opinion to overturn Roe v. Wade has brought the intersection of politics and religion to the forefront, including in the Evangelical Church. The Atlantic's Tim Alberta recently delved into these issues in his recent article, "How Politics Poisoned the Evangelical Church." He joins Amna Nawaz to discuss the church's swing to the hard right. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - Segments
MerleFest celebrates music from the Appalachian region and boosts the local economy

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 8:15


MerleFest has been a mainstay on the music circuit since 1988. People flock to the foothills of the Blue Ridge Mountains in North Carolina each year to celebrate music of the Appalachian region, which has helped the local economy. Jeffrey Brown went to take a look for our arts and culture series, "CANVAS." PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - Full Show
May 18, 2022 - PBS NewsHour full episode

PBS NewsHour - Full Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 53:00


Wednesday on the NewsHour, consequential general election matchups are set as candidates endorsed by former President Trump have mixed results. Then, the massacre in Buffalo highlights the ongoing issue of mass shooters obtaining their weapons legally. Plus, a new report details the many security failings that led to the rapid collapse of the Afghan security forces. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - World
News Wrap: Omicron variant drives spike in U.S. COVID-19 cases

PBS NewsHour - World

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 5:09


In our news wrap Wednesday, COVID cases are spiking as federal health officials call for indoor mask mandates, Russia released video of Ukrainian soldiers abandoning the Azovstal steel plant, the U.S. embassy reopened in Kyiv, Finland and Sweden handed in their applications to join NATO, and a former Minneapolis police officer pleaded guilty to a manslaughter charge in George Floyd's death. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - Segments
News Wrap: Omicron variant drives spike in U.S. COVID-19 cases

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 5:09


In our news wrap Wednesday, COVID cases are spiking as federal health officials call for indoor mask mandates, Russia released video of Ukrainian soldiers abandoning the Azovstal steel plant, the U.S. embassy reopened in Kyiv, Finland and Sweden handed in their applications to join NATO, and a former Minneapolis police officer pleaded guilty to a manslaughter charge in George Floyd's death. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - Segments
Breaking down the primary results and what they mean for midterm elections

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 11:25


On Tuesday, the busiest primary day so far of the 2022 midterm elections, there were mixed results for Republican candidates endorsed by former President Trump. And for Democrats, several races provided the first true test of what the party's message will be. Lisa Desjardins reports, and David Wasserman of The Cook Political Report, and Errin Haines of The 19th, join Judy Woodruff to discuss. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - Segments
Abortion access becomes central issue in Pennsylvania's race for governor

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 9:44


Abortion access is now a key issue in races across the U.S. after news the Supreme Court is on the verge of overturning Roe v. Wade. But the stakes are especially high in Pennsylvania, where two candidates with sharply divided stances on the issue will face off for governor in an election that may determine abortion law in the state. Lisa Desjardins reports on how the issue is shaking up the race. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - Segments
Buffalo massacre highlights how mass shooters are able to obtain weapons legally

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 7:13


New York Gov. Kathy Hochul took steps Wednesday to strengthen the state's "red flag" law after an accused gunman in the Buffalo massacre bought the weapon used in the attack despite being held for a mental health evaluation last year. Hamline University criminal justice professor Jillian Peterson, a forensic psychologist and co-founder of The Violence Project, joins John Yang to discuss. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - World
Government watchdog report details Taliban's rapid takeover in Afghanistan

PBS NewsHour - World

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 7:04


Taliban fighters last year swept through Afghanistan and seized the capital in a matter of weeks. How they were able to do so and why the Afghan military collapsed so quickly has been debated ever since. A government watchdog on Wednesday released the first U.S. report on what happened. Special Inspector General for Afghanistan Reconstruction John Sopko joins Nick Schifrin to discuss. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - Segments
Government watchdog report details Taliban's rapid takeover in Afghanistan

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 7:04


Taliban fighters last year swept through Afghanistan and seized the capital in a matter of weeks. How they were able to do so and why the Afghan military collapsed so quickly has been debated ever since. A government watchdog on Wednesday released the first U.S. report on what happened. Special Inspector General for Afghanistan Reconstruction John Sopko joins Nick Schifrin to discuss. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - Segments
Soccer players on U.S. men's and women's national teams get pay equity for the first time

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 5:29


The U.S. Soccer Federation announced a historic deal Wednesday to ensure equal pay between the men's and women's players. U.S. soccer became the first national team to equalize pay and bonuses in the sport, including for World Cup play. Briana Scurry, a two-time Olympic gold medalist, 1999 World Cup champion and author of the forthcoming book, "My Greatest Save," joins Geoff Bennett to discuss. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - Segments
New exhibit chronicles work of late painter Barkley Hendricks and his use of the camera

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 5:18


Barkley L. Hendricks was a contemporary American painter who made pioneering contributions to Black portraiture and conceptualism. Special correspondent Jared Bowen of GBH Boston takes us to an exhibit of his work at Brandeis University's Rose Art Museum, and shows us how Hendricks used the camera as what he called his "mechanical sketchbook." It's part of our arts and culture series, "CANVAS." PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

AmiTuckeredOut
Arun Venugopal Discusses The Two Faces Of Our Country

AmiTuckeredOut

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 47:42


Arun Venugopal is an American journalist and a Senior Reporter in the Race & Justice Unit at WNYC. He covers news regarding race, immigration, gender, and identity in the United States.We discuss our personal experiences growing up Indian-American in Houston, TX,  when he started reflected on these experiences while critiquing ideas of Asian-American exceptionalism in the United States, how the Model Minority myth may have evolved, and his favorite conversations while hosting WNYC's Micropolis series.We also touch upon the fear white working -class Americans still have, the idea of replacement theory,  and the political and cultural consciousness of the South Asian diaspora in the United States.He talks to me about his perfect NYC day, the time he experienced heartbreak, who he would like to collaborate with, and good old fashion Indian uncle jokes.Arun has appeared on PBS Newshour, On the Media and Studio 360, and has been published in The Guardian, The Wall Street Journal and Salon. He also frequently serves as an emcee and moderator of panel discussions on race, religion, and identity issues and has been a guest host of NPR's "Fresh Air.".  Arun serves as the regular fill-in host of the station's "U.S. of Anxiety" program. 

PBS NewsHour - Full Show
May 17, 2022 - PBS NewsHour full episode

PBS NewsHour - Full Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 53:40


Tuesday on the NewsHour, President Biden grieves with families of those killed in the mass shooting in Buffalo, calling out the attack as terrorism inspired by the "poison" of white supremacy. Then, Ukrainian fighters leave a steel plant in the city of Mariupol. Also, Russia's invasion of Ukraine threatens its decades-long partnership with NASA and the future of the International Space Station. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - Segments
In Buffalo, Biden condemns 'poison' of white supremacy

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 7:12


President Biden offered both consolations and a call to reject racism, extremism and white supremacy Tuesday during a visit to Buffalo. The president delivered his remarks less than 72 hours after a white supremacist allegedly shot 13 people, killing 10, in an attack on African Americans in the city. Special correspondent Cat Wise reports from Buffalo. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - Segments
News Wrap: FDA approves Pfizer's COVID-19 booster for children age 5 to 11

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 5:26


In our news wrap Tuesday, the FDA authorized Pfizer's low-dose COVID booster for kids 5 to 11 years old, China restricted more Beijing residents to their homes to help control a small outbreak, U.S highway deaths shot up last year after a lull during the pandemic, and Congress held its first hearing in half a century on unidentified aerial phenomena. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - Segments
Observers eye Trump endorsements in key primary races

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 4:32


Voters cast ballots today for primary races in key states across the country, and observers are keeping a close eye on how endorsements by former President Trump may help or harm candidates in these hotly contested races. NewsHour's political correspondent Lisa Desjardins joins Judy Woodruff to discuss. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - Segments
Ukrainian fighters leave Mariupol steel plant

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 4:41


The battle for Mariupol appears to be over, after hundreds of Ukrainian soldiers on Tuesday surrendered from their final holdout. The city has suffered one of Europe's bloodiest battles since World War II. And now, Russia appears to hold the entire Ukrainian port city, its largest gain of the war. Nick Schifrin has the story. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - Segments
Grappling with grief as U.S. COVID deaths surpass 1 million

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 7:14


It's impossible to fully convey the staggering toll of COVID-19, with the number of deaths in the U.S. from the virus equal to losing the entire populations of Boston and Pittsburgh. But numbers describe just one part of this and the lives it has impacted. Ed Yong, of The Atlantic, who has been writing about the COVID-19 for more than two years, joins Judy Woodruff to discuss. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - Segments
Russia's invasion of Ukraine jeopardizes the future of the International Space Station

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 8:19


NASA is aiming to expand its astronaut launches from U.S. soil. Boeing is set for a test launch this week of its small spacecraft to the International Space Station. Russia and America have long been partners on the space station, but the invasion of Ukraine has led to new tensions and questions about the future. Miles O'Brien has our report about the rhetoric versus the reality. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - Segments
Why the GOP has a history of attracting populist views

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 7:09


If history is any guide, Republicans are poised to retake control of the House of Representatives after this year's midterm elections. But a battle is underway within the GOP about its beliefs and its future. Matthew Continetti, author of the new book, "The Right: The Hundred-Year War for American Conservatism," joins Amna Nawaz to discuss. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - Segments
How seeing negative stereotypes of Asian Americans can affect mental health

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 3:28


The month of May is dedicated to both Asian American Pacific Islander heritage and mental health awareness. The youth mental health podcast "On Our Minds," which is part of Student Reporting Labs network, takes a look at the toll Asian American stereotypes take on teen mental health and well being. Podcast host Faiza Ashar delves into the topic with student filmmaker Mabelen Bonifacio. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - Segments
Remembering the victims of the mass shooting in Buffalo

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 4:24


After 10 people were killed last weekend in a mass shooting in Buffalo, we take a moment to reflect on their lives and the legacies they leave behind. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

In The Thick
The Rise of Anti-Asian Hate

In The Thick

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 30:29


Julio is joined by Jason Wu, public defender at the Legal Aid Society's Harlem Community Law Office, and Tiffany Diane Tso, freelance writer, editor, and co-founder of the Asian American Feminist Collective. They reflect on the rise in hate crimes targeting different Asian American communities, and how to build community safety beyond policing. They also get into the opportunity for multiracial solidarity in light of the increasing white supremacist violence in this country. ITT Staff Picks: “A year after the shootings, many additional attacks on Asian Americans have continued across the country, something activists view as part of the long tradition of violence and discrimination against Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders woven through the nation's history,” by Frances Kai-Hwa Wang for PBS Newshour in April 2022. In this analysis of data from AAPI Data and Momentive, professors Janelle Wong and Sara Sadhwani found that “all racial groups experienced a hate crime over the first months of 2022 at very similar rates to one another.” “In interviews with more than a dozen community members — from shopkeepers to long term residents and elected officials — one particular sentiment coursed through the interviews: The systems that were supposed to protect people — from homeless people to the elderly and women — have failed Chinatown,” writes Lam Thuy Vo in this piece for Documented. Photo credit: AP Photo/Yuki Iwamura

PBS NewsHour - Full Show
May 16, 2022 - PBS NewsHour full episode

PBS NewsHour - Full Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 53:54


Monday on the NewsHour, Buffalo residents grapple with grief and trauma after the mass shooting that police say was motivated by racism. Then, the ambassadors of Finland and Sweden discuss the future of security in Europe following their requests to join NATO. Plus, as the number of COVID-19 deaths hits 1 million in the U.S., a highly transmissible subvariant threatens to prolong the pandemic. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - Segments
Buffalo mourns as details emerge about gunman's plans for second attack

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 5:25


Federal authorities are investigating the massacre in Buffalo as a potential hate crime. Law enforcement officials also reported Monday that the accused gunman had planned to continue his shooting spree at another location if he had escaped. That news came as communities in Buffalo mourned the losses from an attack that claimed 10 lives. All were black. Special correspondent Cat Wise reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - Segments
How America can respond to white nationalist violence

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 10:26


This attack in Buffalo in a predominantly Black neighborhood, like too many before it, is leading to another period of conversation and self-examination for some on questions of race, white supremacy and extremist ideology. Eric Ward, of the Southern Poverty Law Center, and Jelani Cobb, the next dean of the Columbia Journalism School, join Judy Woodruff to discuss for our series, "Race Matters." PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - Segments
New Wrap: Shooting at California church driven by hate for Taiwan, police say

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 4:57


In our new wrap Monday, police in southern California have charged a Las Vegas man with murder and attempted murder in a Sunday shooting at a church that left one person dead and five wounded, President Biden is redeploying U.S. troops to Somalia, McDonald's says it will exit Russia, and the Supreme Court allows political candidates to lend money to their own campaigns and then get repaid. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - Segments
Finland, Sweden ambassadors discuss the push to join NATO and future of security in Europe

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 9:29


Russia's invasion of Ukraine has prompted a major shift in public opinion in Finland and Sweden, with support for joining NATO recently surging in both countries. Meanwhile, Russian President Putin said the expansion of NATO infrastructure would trigger a response. Karin Olofsdotter, Swedish ambassador to the U.S., and Mikko Hautala, Finnish ambassador to the U.S., join Judy Woodruff to discuss. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - Segments
Why the fight against COVID appears to have stalled in the U.S.

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 6:52


The CDC on Monday formally confirmed today that COVID-19 deaths in the U.S. have surpassed 1 million. That's roughly the American death toll in the Civil War and World War II combined. It's the highest reported death toll of any country, and comes as cases are again on the rise. Dr. Eric Topol, founder and director of the Scripps Research Translational Institute, joins William Brangham to discuss. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - Segments
Tamara Keith and Amy Walter on the Buffalo shooting and the dangers of racist conspiracy theories

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 8:24


NPR's Tamara Keith and Amy Walter of the Cook Political Report with Amy Walter join Lisa Desjardins to discuss the latest political news, including the response of political leaders after the attack in Buffalo, the move of white "replacement theory" to the mainstream, and upcoming primary elections. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - Segments
Young playwrights use the theater to confront the trauma of gun violence

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 6:49


In 2021, more than 1,500 children and teenagers in the United States were killed by gunfire. Activists across the country are working to shed light on that issue through a series of plays written and performed by young adults, many of whom have had direct experience with gun violence. Jeffrey Brown has the story for our arts and culture series, "CANVAS." PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders