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Latest episodes from PBS NewsHour - Health

Abandoned oil and natural gas wells pollute the environment across Louisiana

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 5:03

Tens of thousands of abandoned oil and natural gas wells sit idle across the United States. Known as orphan wells, they pose significant dangers to nearby residents and the environment after being ignored or forgotten by the companies who drilled them. States and taxpayers are often left to clean them up. Roby Chavez, who has been reporting on this from Louisiana, joins Stephanie Sy to discuss. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

News Wrap: Pompeo meets with the Jan. 6 committee

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 6:13

In our news wrap Tuesday, former Secretary of State Mike Pompeo met with the Jan. 6 panel, former President Trump and his former Vice President Pence wage another proxy battle in Wisconsin, Kenya held national elections, President Biden signed the CHIPS Act into law, Serena Williams announced plans to retire from tennis, and legendary Motown songwriter and producer Lamont Dozier has died. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

Residents in the Southwest struggle with the health effects of nuclear ore extraction

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 9:40

Residents of the Southwest including many Indigenous people have for years been exposed to high levels of radiation from uranium extraction and refining, a toxic legacy from the Cold War's weapons program and nuclear power generation. Stephanie Sy reports in partnership with investigative news outlet ProPublica on a community's fight for survival and to hold a company and government accountable. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

News Wrap: Cease-fire takes effect in Gaza after days of violent conflict

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 7, 2022 2:32

In our news wrap Sunday, a cease-fire in Gaza has gone into effect after days of Israeli strikes and militant counterattacks, the U.S. Senate passed a sprawling bill to fight climate change and lower healthcare costs, Biden cleared from isolation at the White House after a second negative COVID test, and China carried out military drills near Taiwan for the fourth day in a row. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

How the Inflation Reduction Act aims to lower drug costs

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 7, 2022 5:48

48 million Americans get prescription drugs through Medicare Part D, but Medicare has had no ability to negotiate prices. A provision in the Inflation Reduction Act would change that in some cases. The bill would also cap out-of-pocket drug costs for Medicare recipients. Stacy Dusetzina from the Vanderbilt University School of Medicine joins Lisa Desjardins to discuss. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

As monkeypox cases rise, so do concerns about disparate access to care

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 6, 2022 6:53

Now a declared national emergency, monkeypox continues to spread in the U.S. with cases doubling in the past week. Concerns are growing over disparities in access to testing, vaccines and treatment for vulnerable communities. Gregg Gonsalves, an epidemiologist from the Yale School of Public Health, joins Lisa Desjardins to discuss. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

Democrats move closer to sweeping tax, climate change and health care bill

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 2:46

Senate Democrats are one step closer to passing a sweeping tax, climate change, and health care bill now that Arizona Sen. Kyrsten Sinema voiced her support. The last Democratic holdout agreed to vote for the package after party leaders altered some of its tax proposals, giving Democrats enough votes to pass the Inflation Reduction Act as midterm elections approach. Lisa Desjardins reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

Congress tries to cap insulin costs as diabetics ration supplies

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 6:20

There is another proposal that could make it into the Senate budget deal that would cap the cost of insulin. More than 7 million Americans with diabetes use insulin and about 1 million put an enormous amount of their paycheck toward that medication. We spoke to some of those who are affected by this crucial medicine's high prices and how a legislative proposal could impact their lives. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

How a new national emergency declaration could slow the spread of monkeypox

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 6:06

With more than 7,000 cases reported in the U.S, the Biden administration has declared monkeypox a public health emergency. The declaration announced Thursday comes after the administration endured weeks of criticism for its response to this outbreak. Dr. Jay Varma, director of the Cornell Center for Pandemic Prevention and Response at Weill Cornell Medicine, joins William Brangham to discuss. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

News Wrap: Biden administration declares monkeypox a public health emergency

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 5:43

In our news wrap Thursday, the Biden administration declared a public health emergency over monkeypox as the number of U.S. cases passed 6,600, President Biden tests positive for COVID for a sixth consecutive day, China retaliates in a dispute over Taiwan, Puerto Rico's former governor was arrested in a federal corruption case, and Taliban officials deny knowing al-Qaida's leader was in Kabul. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

'Under the Skin' delves into systemic racism and its toll on health

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 7:49

Health disparities among different racial groups remain a major problem in the United States, one that was magnified during the height of the pandemic, but has been part of American history since its earliest days. A new book called "Under the Skin" looks at the causes for that. Author Linda Villarosa joins Amna Nawaz to discuss. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

News Wrap: Indiana Rep. Jackie Walorski, aides killed in a car crash

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 5:20

In our news wrap Wednesday, Republican Rep. Jackie Walorski of Indiana was killed in a car crash along with two young aides, President Biden signed an executive order to help women who cross state lines for abortions, the U.S. began annual military drills with Indonesia, the Senate moved to admit Finland and Sweden to NATO, and the WHO reports COVID's total global count of cases fell. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

After a long battle, veterans celebrate PACT Act's passage. But the war goes on for many

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 8:37

After a week of delay and debate in Congress, President Biden on Monday will sign legislation that makes it easier for veterans to get VA benefits after becoming sick from exposure to toxins in war zones. But it has been a very long and frustrating road for veterans. Nick Schifrin looks at the PACT Act and the families who have paid a heavy price. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

Local health authorities race to contain the highly contagious monkeypox virus

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022 7:08

The monkeypox outbreak continues to grow faster than many initially expected. Nearly 6,000 cases have been reported in the U.S. since May and three states have issued emergency declarations over the outbreak in the last week. New York City Health Commissioner Dr. Ashwin Vasan joins Stephanie Sy to discuss efforts to contain the virus in one of the country's epicenters. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

News Wrap: Pelosi begins Asian tour with stop in Singapore

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022 3:12

In our news wrap Monday, Nancy Pelosi begins Asian tour in Singapore amid reports that she plans to make a stop in Taiwan, Texas man tied to a far-right militia sentenced to seven years in federal prison in Jan. 6 probe, thousands of Iranian-backed protesters filled the streets of Baghdad, and President Biden continues isolating after his COVID case rebounded. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

Sen. Jon Tester discusses roadblocks for a bill to help veterans exposed to burn pits

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022 8:14

Lawmakers on Capitol Hill have long been working to pass the PACT Act, a key bill that would expand health care access to veterans exposed to toxic burn pits. But what was supposed to be easy passage on a bipartisan measure has turned into political football over spending. Democratic Sen. Jon Tester of Montana, who chairs the Senate Veterans' Affairs Committee, joins Judy Woodruff to discuss. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

Kansas becomes first state to hold a vote on abortion rights after Roe reversal

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022 9:22

After the Supreme Court struck down the national right to abortion access in June, the issue was returned to states, which have since implemented a patchwork of protections, restrictions or total bans. Abortion rights will now be on the ballot in at least five states this year. Ali Rogin reports from Kansas, the first state holding a vote since the end of Roe. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

Amazon's acquisition deal with One Medical raises patient privacy concerns

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 31, 2022 5:19

In a nearly $4 billion deal, Amazon plans to buy One Medical, a primary care group with nearly 200 locations across the country. Privacy advocates are voicing concerns about Amazon controlling people's online purchase data as well as their health care records. Erin Brodwin, health tech reporter at Axios, joins Geoff Bennett to discuss. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

Early America's complicated history with abortion access

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 31, 2022 6:47

The Supreme Court decision overturning Roe v. Wade relied heavily on the argument that, in Justice Samuel Alito's words, "a right to abortion is not deeply rooted in the nation's history and traditions." Paul Solman takes a look at that history, as part of our continuing coverage of America after Roe. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

News Wrap: More victims of deadly floods found in Kentucky, Appalachia

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 30, 2022 3:57

In our news wrap Saturday, catastrophic flash floods across eastern Kentucky and wider Appalachia have killed at least 25 people, President Biden tests positive for COVID again in a rare rebound case, protestors storm Iraq's parliament for the second time this week, Pope Francis contemplates early retirement due to physical ailments, and New York declares a state of emergency over monkeypox. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

Texas woman describes ordeal with state abortion law after miscarriage

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 30, 2022 6:23

When Marlena Stell suffered a miscarriage last year in Texas, she says she begged her doctor for help but instead was forced to go for weeks with fetal remains inside of her because of strict anti-abortion laws. It's a story that could become more common after Roe v. Wade was overturned. She joins Geoff Bennett to discuss. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

How millions of Americans suffering from long COVID can find support

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 30, 2022 7:07

Millions of Americans are suffering from long COVID, according to the U.S. Census Bureau, with symptoms ranging from mild to debilitating. Dr. Monica Verduzco-Gutierrez, chair of the Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation at the University of Texas Health San Antonio, and Karyn Bishof, founder of the COVID-19 Longhauler Advocacy Project, join Geoff Bennett to discuss. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

News Wrap: Stifling heat persists across Pacific Northwest

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2022 5:47

In our new wrap Friday, extreme heat in the Pacific Northwest kept temperatures at or above 100 degrees again with extreme condition expected through the weekend, another major inflation gauge is pointing to price hikes for some time to come, Exxon-Mobil and Chevron reported record profits, and shelling in the eastern Donetsk region killed scores of Ukrainian prisoners of war. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

How a potential Senate deal could lower health care costs for millions of Americans

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2022 6:01

For the first time, the U.S. government could have the power to negotiate prices for some of the costliest drugs covered under Medicare. The proposed legislation would also help Medicare recipients by imposing penalties against drug manufacturers who raise prices too quickly and removing some copay requirements. Julie Rovner of Kaiser Health News joins Laura Barrón-López to discuss. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

News Wrap: House Democrats back bill to boost U.S. semiconductor industry

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2022 4:17

In our news wrap Thursday, House Democrats back $280 billion bill to bolster the U.S. semiconductor industry, parts of Appalachia faced flash flooding after days of rain, the Pacific Northwest heat wave persists, Russian said there no agreement yet on a prisoner swap, President Biden spoke with China's president Xi Jinping about Taiwan, and Jet Blue agrees to by Spirit Airlines for $3.8 billion. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

Baby formula remains scarce despite efforts to boost supply

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2022 7:26

The nationwide baby formula shortage is now in its sixth month. Despite tons of imports and domestic production rebounding, formula supplies are still low for parents across the United States. Amna Nawaz reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

An epidemiologist answers viewers' questions about COVID-19

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2022 7:44

More than two years into the pandemic, most Americans have returned to a sense of some normalcy. But the virus is still disrupting daily life in the U.S. with more than 130,000 per day and deaths on the rise. We reached out to viewers about their latest questions on COVID-19. Katelyn Jetelina, an epidemiologist with the University of Texas, joins Judy Woodruff to provide some answers. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

News Wrap: Manchin, Schumer reach deal to address health care, climate change, the deficit

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2022 6:47

In our news wrap Wednesday, West Virginia Sen. Joe Manchin announced an agreement with Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer on legislation for health care costs, climate change, deficit reduction and more. Also, President Biden left isolation after testing negative for COVID, the WHO urged precautions for monkeypox, and two former Minneapolis police officers were sentenced in George Floyd's death. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

Compelling new evidence tracks COVID's origin to Wuhan market

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2022 6:36

From the start of the pandemic, scientists have tried to determine exactly where and how the novel coronavirus spread to humans. New studies conclude the virus first emerged from a live-animal market in Wuhan, China. One of the authors of a study, Angela Rasmussen, a virologist at University of Saskatchewan's Vaccine and Infectious Disease Organization, joins William Brangham to discuss. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

New Wrap: Ukraine to resume grain exports after Russian assault on port city of Odesa

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 25, 2022 4:16

In our news wrap Monday, Ukraine will resume exporting grain under an agreement with Russia despite weekend missile attack on the port of Odesa, President Biden's COVID symptoms are almost completely resolved, Pope Francis made a historic apology in Canada for abuse at Indigenous schools, the Justice Department filed a lawsuit against major poultry producers, and actor Paul Sorvino died at 83. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

Epidemiologists warn of critical moment to contain monkeypox

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 25, 2022 10:35

Vaccinations against the monkeypox virus are picking up in the U.S., but access and speed of delivery remain issues as cases spread. This comes as the World Health Organization declared monkeypox a global health emergency. We spoke to Americans who've been exposed and have struggled to get the vaccine, and Gregg Gonsalves of the Yale School of Public Health joins Amna Nawaz to discuss. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

Virginity testing persists in Mongolia despite condemnation

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 25, 2022 5:52

As a debate continues in the U.S over reproductive rights, teenage girls in the Republic of Mongolia are fighting for the right not to be subjected to so-called "virginity tests" in schools. The practice was officially banned by the government last year but it continues nevertheless. Stephanie Sy reports in collaboration with the Global Press Journal. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

News Wrap: Pope to ask forgiveness for historical abuse of Native children in Canada

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 24, 2022 2:49

In our news wrap Sunday, Pope Francis landed in Canada, where he will ask forgiveness from Indigenous communities for historical abuses of Native children at residential schools once run by the Catholic Church. Also, President Biden's physician says his COVID symptoms continue to improve, a volcano on Japan's southernmost island erupted, and Jonas Vingegaard won the Tour de France. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

News Wrap: WHO calls monkeypox virus a global emergency

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 23, 2022 3:00

In our news wrap Saturday, the WHO announced the monkeypox virus has now reached more than 70 countries and should be treated as a global emergency, two Americans were killed in Ukraine's eastern Donbas region while elsewhere Russia targeted Odesa, doctors say President Biden most likely contracted the BA-5 variant, and a raging wildfire near Yosemite triggered widespread evacuations. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

Advocates push for federal approval of over-the-counter contraceptive

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 22, 2022 6:47

The House on Thursday passed a bill guaranteeing women the right to buy and use contraceptives without restrictions, though its path in the Senate is unclear. But many advocates say it's time to codify such protections into federal law and give women access to an over-the-counter contraceptive without a prescription. Dr. Jennifer Villavicencio joins Amna Nawaz to discuss. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

News Wrap: Biden tests positive for COVID, experiences mild symptoms

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2022 6:01

In our news warp Thursday, President Biden gets COVID for the first time, U.S. heat indexes hit triple digits, Italy's prime minister resigned after the ruling coalition fell apart, House passes a bill to protect contraception access, a former Minneapolis police officer is sentenced for his role in George Floyd's death, and a scientific group warns the monarch butterfly is an endangered species. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

Calls for climate action grow as heat waves envelop the U.S. and Europe

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 20, 2022 3:03

Heat waves at home and abroad this week are fueling new appeals for action on climate change. President Biden addressed the issue Wednesday, as large swaths of the United States and Europe spent another day in dangerously high temperatures. Geoff Bennett reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

What cities can do to prepare for rising temperatures

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 20, 2022 5:52

As global temperatures continue to rise, so do heat-related deaths. Some U.S. cities are feeling the effects of high-temperature emergencies right now, including in Phoenix, Arizona. The city created the first publicly funded office to focus on the problem caused by higher temperatures. David Hondula, director of Phoenix's Office of Heat Response and Mitigation, joins Stephanie Sy with more. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

A Brief But Spectacular take on ending period poverty

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 20, 2022 3:26

Lynette Medley is the founder and CEO of No More Secrets Mind Body Spirit Inc., a comprehensive sexual health and awareness organization. Based in Philadelphia, Medley and her team started by delivering menstrual products door-to-door, and have since established a groundbreaking menstrual hub. She offers her Brief But Spectacular take on ending period poverty. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

Why overdose deaths spiked among people of color during the pandemic

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2022 6:49

A CDC report finds overdose deaths rose significantly for people of color from 2019 to 2020. The synthetic opioid fentanyl is largely to blame, combined with a disruption in treatment and prevention programs during the pandemic. Dr. Edwin Chapman, who specializes in treating addiction, joins John Yang to discuss. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

Doctors worry abortion laws will hinder treatment of patients in life-or-death situations

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2022 7:21

Three weeks after the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade, doctors in states with abortion bans have struggled to figure out how to care for patients with high-risk pregnancies, including miscarriages, and are worried about being prosecuted for performing some procedures. Dr. David Hackney, a maternal fetal medicine specialist based in Ohio, joins Amna Nawaz to discuss. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

News Wrap: Russia pounds Ukraine with heavy shelling as the civilian death toll rises

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 18, 2022 3:48

In our news wrap Monday, Russia continued its campaign of heavy shelling in Ukraine that killed more civilians as Russian President Putin remained defiant over western sanctions, the acting president of Sri Lanka declared a state of emergency that gave him broad power even as protesters demand his resignation, and several large Chinese cities are rolling out new mass COVID testing. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

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