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The latest medical news, analysis and reporting. (Updated periodically)

PBS NewsHour


    • Jan 5, 2022 LATEST EPISODE
    • daily NEW EPISODES
    • 7m AVG DURATION
    • 454 EPISODES


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    Latest episodes from PBS NewsHour - Health

    Unvaccinated children among those driving COVID surge in Louisiana hospitals

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 6:36

    The omicron variant now accounts for 95 percent of COVID cases in the United States. Public health officials say its effects are milder than the delta variant, but omicron's high transmissibility is still sending large numbers of people into the hospital. William Brangham has an update from one particularly hard-hit state -- Louisiana. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

    COVID surge continues to upend Americans' travel plans, return to school

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 9:02

    COVID continues to spread quickly throughout the U.S. on the first Monday of the new year, forcing airlines and businesses to limit operations as many workers are falling ill or testing positive. The surge from the omicron variant is disrupting back-to-school plans in many communities as well. Amna Nawaz reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

    Surprise medical bill ban doesn't cover some crucial elements. Here's what to know

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 5:44

    Millions of Americans have new federal protections from unexpected medical costs if they see a doctor they did not choose and who doesn't accept their insurance. For years, the price tag from surprise medical bills could range from hundreds of dollars to tens of thousands. But a new law that took effect at the start of the new year changes that. Jeffrey Brown explains. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

    Benton Harbor, Michigan, volunteers step up to deliver bottled water amid crisis

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 1, 2022 3:14

    Like Flint before it, Benton Harbor, Michigan, is in the midst of a water crisis. The water flowing through the city's pipes and into homes is not safe to consume because of the risk of lead exposure. There are more than 9,000 residents in this small community, most of them Black. More than 40% of residents live below the poverty line. But while locals wait for a long term solution, many in the Benton Harbor community are stepping up to help, including delivering bottled water door to door. Michael Hill reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

    Is it safe to gather for New Year's Eve? Here's what one doctor recommends

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 31, 2021 5:54

    The U.S. has set a new daily record by topping 580,000 new COVID cases Thursday. For the first time in the pandemic, America recorded more than two million cases in a week. It is now averaging more than 300,000 new cases a day. All of this comes as new data suggests those highly sought after rapid antigen tests may not be as effective as hoped in detecting the omicron variant. Amna Nawaz reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

    U.S. sees rise in pediatric COVID patients as WHO warns of global 'tsunami' of cases

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 8:25

    The World Health Organization is warning of a global "tsunami" of COVID cases as the omicron surge builds on the delta wave. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is reporting a significant surge in U.S. pediatric hospital admissions in the last week, particularly in Illinois, Ohio, Florida, New Jersey and New York. Amna Nawaz reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

    How prosecutors proved Ghislaine Maxwell was Epstein's 'enabler-in-chief'

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 5:20

    British socialite Ghislaine Maxwell was convicted of luring teenage girls into sexual abuse by the late Jeffrey Epstein. A federal jury in New York found her guilty on five of six counts Wednesday, after deliberating for five full days. Moira Penza, a former assistant U.S. attorney who led the prosecution in the 2019 sex trafficking conviction of cultist Keith Raniere, joins Amna Nawaz with more. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

    Understanding the new CDC guidelines for those exposed to, or suffering from, COVID-19

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021 8:46

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention now recommends a shorter isolation period for COVID-19 patients, from 10 days to five -- if asymptomatic -- followed by five days of mask wearing. The new guidance comes as the U.S. is averaging more than 230,000 new cases per day. Dr. Mati Hlatshwayo Davis, director of health at the city of St. Louis' department of health, joins Amna Nawaz with more. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

    Texas doctor reflects on the lessons and loss in 2021

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021 3:23

    As 2021 comes to a close, we take a look back at a year of immense challenge and loss -- but also a year of hope. In recent days, we reconnected with a number of our viewers and guests from the past year to hear how they handled the last 12 months, and their wishes for 2022. Tonight, we hear from a doctor in Texas. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

    Why the CDC reduced COVID quarantine time despite omicron's spread

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2021 9:28

    The omicron variant of the coronavirus has upended plans to put the pandemic behind us. Instead, average daily U.S. COVID infections are up 80 percent in two weeks. Hospitals are hunkering down, and the White House is scrambling to respond. Yet the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention issued new guidance, cutting quarantine time for the infected in half -- to five days. Stephanie Sy reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

    COVID-19 spreads holiday misery, as canceled flights strand thousands on Christmas Eve

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 24, 2021 3:05

    The COVID-19 pandemic is once again upending holiday plans around the world, from halting air travel to scaling back festive celebrations. All this as new infections in the U.S. have spiked 55 percent in the last two weeks alone, largely due to the highly contagious omicron variant. Stephanie Sy has our report. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

    Why a judge rejected a settlement with the Sackler family for their role in opioid crisis

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 24, 2021 5:55

    Experts link a record number of overdoses this year from black market opioids back to the original marketing and distribution of legal opioids made by Purdue Pharma, the company owned by the Sackler family that made OxyContin. Last week, a federal judge overturned a $4.5 billion settlement that had been reached between the company, the Sacklers and local governments. William Brangham reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

    Americans face COVID testing lags ahead of holidays: 'We're very, very far behind'

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2021 9:43

    The new coronavirus variant is driving a surge of COVID-19 cases in the United States. Omicron is now present in all 50 states - just three weeks after it was first detected in the U.S. It has raised questions and concerns about heightened transmissibility of the variant, its severity, and the lack of available testing, especially during the holiday season. Stephanie Sy and Judy Woodruff report. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

    Frustrated health workers dread expected rise in COVID hospitalizations: 'We're exhausted'

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2021 10:45

    A new Centers for Disease Control and Prevention report found 2020's death toll was worse than previously reported -- finalized at nearly 3.4 million people. It also forewarned that 2021 is expected to surpass 2020's record number of deaths by at least 15,000. COVID-19 has become the country's third highest killer -- only behind heart disease and cancer. Judy Woodruff takes a closer look. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

    What Hartford has learned in its fight to raise Black vaccination rates

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2021 8:57

    About 72 percent of Americans have received at least one dose of a COVID-19 vaccine. During much of the vaccine rollout, Hispanic and Black Americans have been less likely to get vaccinated. The gap between white and Hispanic Americans has largely closed, but the vaccination rate for the Black community still lags significantly behind. Kaiser Health News correspondent Sarah Varney reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

    Biden vows to ramp up testing, boost other health systems in response to omicron wave

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021 3:38

    President Joe Biden is out with new plans and new appeals to control the spread of COVID-19. He spelled them out Tuesday as the new omicron variant sweeps largely unchecked across the country. White House correspondent Yamiche Alcindor reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

    Dr. Walensky on the omicron variant, testing, vaccines and mask rules

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021 8:11

    President Joe Biden is out with new plans and new appeals to control the spread of COVID-19. He spelled them out Tuesday as the new omicron variant sweeps largely unchecked across the country. Dr. Rochelle Walensky, director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, joins Judy Woodruff to expand on the president's plan. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

    Virus resurgence in Europe triggers new restrictions amid vocal opposition

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021 7:05

    Governments across Europe are scrambling to slow the spread of omicron. In the Netherlands, a full lockdown has been ordered. In neighboring Germany, citizens are being told to cancel big New Years Eve parties. But authorities are often being met with pushback amid growing frustration over restrictions. Special correspondent Trent Murray reports from Berlin. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

    'This chair gives me my life back' : Disabled passengers beg airlines to handle with care

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021 4:04

    Millions of Americans are traveling this week for the holidays. But for passengers with disabilities, the challenges of air travel can be significantly heightened. People continue to report embarrassing security pat downs, damaged and even lost mobility devices. In July alone, there were 834 reported incidents of damaged wheelchairs or scooters -- an average of 28 a day. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

    Vaccines reduce hospitalizations, but slow testing and rapid omicron spread worry experts

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2021 10:20

    The rapid and relentless spread of COVID-19 in the midst of a new variant of the coronavirus is leading to growing alarm just ahead of the holidays. Omicron infections are exploding amid a shortage of testing, and governments are imposing new restrictions. Stephanie Sy reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

    Dr. Collins reflects on career at NIH, COVID response effort, work on genome sequencing

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2021 9:05

    Judy Woodruff speaks to Dr. Francis Collins, who is retiring from his role as director of the National Institutes of Health after more than a decade, about his career. He warned that the U.S. may face a million COVID cases a day this winter if it doesn't take precautions. Before he became NIH director, he was known for his work on genetics and helped map the finished sequence of the human genome. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

    Why the U.S. is lagging behind in rapid COVID-19 testing

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 18, 2021 5:21

    With the holidays approaching and the omicron variant surging in some parts of the U.S., demand for rapid and at-home COVID-19 tests is higher than ever, and the wait at large PCR test sites can be several hours in some places. ProPublica reporter Lydia Depillis joins Hari Sreenivasan to discuss why the tests are so hard to find in the U.S., and the Biden administration's plans for ramping up supply. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

    South Africa reels under omicron wave amid vaccine lag, pans 'rushed' travel ban

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2021 6:32

    As the omicron variant sends a fourth wave of patients to hospitals across South Africa, leaders across the continent are pointing fingers at wealthy nations. Those countries, they say, could have helped prevent the latest variant had vaccines been distributed more equitably. And, as special correspondent Michael Baleke reports, related travel bans feel like punishment in many countries. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

    As the holiday season nears, concerns of a resurgent virus are growing

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 9:22

    From Broadway to Britain, COVID-19 is spreading new fears, forcing new shutdowns and prompting people to wonder when it will all end. And experts warn omicron is likely to become the dominant strain in the U.S. William Brangham reports on the latest, and speaks with Dr. Eric Topol, founder and director of the Scripps Research Translational Institute, to take a deeper look. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

    Why a website with explicit directions for suicide remains active

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 8:33

    Suicide is the second-leading cause of death among young Americans, and most websites about suicide are aimed at prevention. But a New York Times investigation looks into one that provides information and directions for how to die. Gabriel Dance and Megan Twohey, reporters who worked on the investigation, join Amna Nawaz to discuss their findings. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

    What we know about the severity of omicron and possibility of 'triple whammy' this winter

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2021 5:09

    As the omicron variant is spreading rapidly, top federal health officials warn it could bring a massive wave of new infections to the United States as early as January. There are now confirmed cases of omicron in at least 36 states. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates the new variant represents about three percent of positive U.S. cases. John Yang reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

    How officials, 'everyday heroes' are supporting recovery efforts in Kentucky

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2021 6:19

    The death toll has reached 74 in Kentucky, three nights after a swarm of tornadoes struck. For a closer look at how officials in the state are dealing with all of this, Judy Woodruff speaks to Jacqueline Coleman, the state's lieutenant governor. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

    Older Americans make up a majority of COVID deaths. They are falling behind on boosters

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2021 5:53

    The United States is approaching a grim milestone of the pandemic, as the nationwide death toll approaches 800,000. The vast majority of those deaths are among the elderly -- people 65 and up make up 75 percent of all COVID-19 deaths in the U.S. Now there are concerns about their risks increasing once again, and nursing home residents are among some of the most vulnerable. Amna Nawaz reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

    Do safe drug consumption sites save lives? Here's what we know about NYC's new venture

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2021 8:24

    Since last spring, more than 100,000 Americans have died of drug overdoses -- many caused by the opioid, fentanyl. Officials are searching for solutions to try to save lives, including setting up authorized centers where people can use illegal drugs under supervision. William Brangham and his team were granted rare access to two brand new sites in New York City -- the first of their kind in America. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

    Despite strong vaccination rate, Vermont sees COVID spike amid booster shot lag

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2021 6:17

    As the country braces for the unknowns of the new omicron variant, the delta variant is still overwhelming parts of the United States. Some states in the Northeast and Midwest have seen sustained record-breaking case numbers. William Brangham reports on how it's hitting Vermont. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

    Why PFAS are so impervious, and who is most at risk from the forever chemicals

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2021 7:27

    The new infrastructure law contains $10 billion for cleaning up drinking water that has been contaminated by a specific group of man-made chemicals. But problems with "forever chemicals" go back decades, and are located in many places around the U.S. Miles O'Brien looks at the impact they've had in one community in New Hampshire, and how the U.S. Air Force is now dealing with its past use of them. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

    Sen. Thune: Vaccine mandates will have 'countereffect,' must be overturned to save jobs

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2021 7:12

    The U.S. Senate will vote Wednesday evening on repealing President Joe Biden's vaccine mandate for businesses with 100 or more employees. The measure is expected to pass with support from Democrats Joe Manchin and Jon Tester. But the bill faces an uphill battle in the Democrat-controlled House. Sen. John Thune, the second-highest ranking Republican in the Senate, joins Judy Woodruff with more. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

    Could omicron lead to more breakthrough COVID cases? Here's what we know

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2021 8:28

    For the first time in nearly two months, the United States is averaging more than 100,000 new coronavirus cases daily. Roughly one-third of states have also now detected the new omicron variant. John Yang reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

    VA Sec. McDonough on benefits for veterans exposed to burn pits, preventing vet suicide

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2021 9:25

    President Joe Biden has vowed to improve veterans' access to health care, prevent their suicide, and specifically provide benefits to those exposed to toxic air through burn pits while serving in the military. Nick Schifrin talks to Denis McDonough, the veterans affairs secretary, about those goals and how former service members have responded to the administration's efforts. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

    NIH director on the spread of the omicron variant amid the ongoing pandemic

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2021 7:38

    Maryland, Nebraska and Pennsylvania are the latest states reporting cases of the new omicron variant in the U.S., while it has now spread to more than 40 nations worldwide. And the CDC director said Friday the omicron variant could become the dominant COVID strain in the U.S. this winter. Dr. Francis Collins, director of the National Institutes of Health, joins Judy Woodruff to discuss. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

    U.S. launches new effort to fight omicron variant's spread with 'science and speed'

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 5:17

    The United States' COVID-19 watch has turned up more cases of the omicron variant Thursday. They appeared as President Joe Biden unveiled new initiatives on vaccines, masking and treatment. White House correspondent Yamiche Alcindor reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

    Does South Africa's COVID uptick signal greater threat from omicron? Here's what we know

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 6:14

    While we don't know whether the omicron variant will lead to more severe cases of COVID-19, its ability to spread is becoming clearer. Cases in South Africa are spiking at the fastest rate since the pandemic began, and European officials said their modeling found that omicron would likely be responsible for more than half of their cases this winter. William Brangham looks at the global picture. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

    U.S. to release new rules for foreign travelers amid growing concerns over omicron variant

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 2:20

    The first case of the omicron variant of the coronavirus was detected in the U.S. Wednesday -- a discovery most health officials had said was inevitable. A case was confirmed in San Francisco, California, on the eve of new requirements for travelers arriving in the U.S. William Brangham reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

    What early evidence tells us about omicron, and how it may affect need for booster shots

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 6:41

    The first case of COVID-19 from the omicron variant in the U.S. was in a person who had been vaccinated, but hadn't received a booster. Dr. Fauci said it was a mild infection, and none of the traveler's close contacts have tested positive. While many have said this was just a matter of time, it begs many questions. William Brangham has more with Michael Osterholm of the University of Minnesota. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

    India extends door-to-door vaccine campaign as omicron variant worries officials

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 5:42

    The trajectory of omicron infections is being watched closely in India, where the official death toll from COVID-19 is approaching half a million. The true toll is likely much higher. Memories are still fresh of the devastation caused by the delta variant last spring. Special correspondent Fred de Sam Lazaro reports on efforts to combat the new variant. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

    Vaccinated Americans reflect on breakthrough infections, 'infuriating' anti-vaccine views

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 5:17

    Even as Americans are trying to prepare for omicron, many parts of the country are still reeling from the delta variant. More Americans died of COVID this year than in 2020, despite the wide availability of free vaccines. The pandemic's lingering, deadly grip has left many frustrated. We hear from viewers about how the continued spread of the virus has impacted them. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

    Will the omicron variant require a new vaccine? An expert weighs in

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 8:17

    A growing number of countries are reporting cases of the coronavirus' omicron variant, and many are mandating travel bans. Meanwhile, advisors to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration have now endorsed drug maker Merck's pill to treat COVID-19 in high-risk adults. All of this comes as public health officials are emphasizing the need for global cooperation. Nick Schifrin reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

    How the world is responding to the omicron variant

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 3:24

    A growing number of nations imposed travel restrictions Monday to try to slow the spread of the new coronavirus variant, omicron. The moves came as more cases of the variant were confirmed internationally. But some warned the travel bans -- including those imposed by the U.S.-- would not be effective and could even be counterproductive. White House correspondent Yamiche Alcindor reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

    Dr. Fauci on vaccine efficiency against omicron variant, travel ban, testing and more

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 7:23

    Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases at the National Institutes of Health, and the president's chief medical advisor, joins Judy Woodruff to discuss the U.S. plan to respond to the new omicron variant of the coronavirus. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

    How unresolved grief could haunt children who lost a parent or caregiver to COVID

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 9:25

    The number of U.S. deaths from COVID-19 has surpassed 775,000. But left behind are tens of thousands of children -- some orphaned entirely -- after their parents or a grandparent who cared for them died. In this report co-produced with the NewsHour, Kaiser Health News correspondent Sarah Varney looks at the risks these grieving children face to their well-being, both in the short and long term. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

    'A no holds-barred Elder': How one man is helping to heal his Indigenous community

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2021 7:40

    Donald Prince is a counselor and the former Executive Director of the Arctic Indigenous Wellness Foundation. In this first-person story, he shares past experiences with violence, justice, and addiction. Being a father and writing poetry were crucial steps towards healing. His story is part of a series told by Indigenous people from Yellowknife, Canada, in partnership with the Global Reporting Centre. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

    COVID-19 vaccines and children: What you need to know

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 27, 2021 7:53

    Millions of children over five across America have been vaccinated against the coronavirus - advancing the fight against the pandemic. Still, parents have concerns about potential side effects and possible booster shots. Dr. Sallie Permar, pediatrician-in-chief at New York Presbyterian hospital and chair of the pediatric department at Weill-Cornell Medical Center joins. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

    Alarm grows after emergence of new omicron COVID-19 variant. Here's what you need to know

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 9:43

    A newly emerged variant of the coronavirus known as "omicron" is causing widespread concern. First discovered in South Africa, it's now been detected in multiple nations, including Europe and Israel. Many nations including the U.S. are considering travel bans to try and contain the variant. Dr. Ashish Jha, dean of Brown University's School of Public Health, joins William Brangham to discuss. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

    Rising grocery prices put pressure on millions of Americans already facing food insecurity

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 6:19

    On this day, when Americans traditionally gather with friends and family to celebrate the bounty of food, there are still many in this country struggling to feed themselves. According to the U.S.D.A, almost 15 percent of families with kids in the U.S. suffer from what's known as food insecurity. As the pandemic continues and prices rise, Amna Nawaz has a closer look. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

    Vaccinating minority communities remains a challenge amid rise in COVID cases

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 6:56

    Since the Food and Drug Administration granted emergency authorization of the Pfizer COVID vaccine for children ages 5 to 11, more than two million children have been vaccinated. Public health officials are highlighting the importance of providing vaccines to low income and minority communities that have been hit hardest by COVID. Stephanie Sy visited one of those communities in Phoenix, Arizona. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

    E.U. braces for tough winter as citizens protest COVID restrictions

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 6:37

    A stark warning from outgoing German Chancellor Angela Merkel on the fourth wave of COVID-19 sweeping her country: It's "worse than anything we've seen," she said Monday. Winter is coming across Europe, and with it a spike in infections and a spike in anger at reinstated restrictions to slow the spread. Special correspondent Trent Murray reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

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