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  • 31mAVG DURATION
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  • Jan 23, 2022LATEST
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Best podcasts about companies

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Latest podcast episodes about companies

REI Rookies Podcast (Real Estate Investing Rookies)
Turnkey Real Estate and Scaling with Dani Lynn and Flip Robison

REI Rookies Podcast (Real Estate Investing Rookies)

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 23, 2022 34:11


Flip & Dani Lynn Robison started in real estate in 2008 as Realtors and quickly realized that real estate investing was where it needed to be. They quickly transitioned and over a decade later, they have bought and sold over 1000 properties. Today they serve as the Co-Founders and Chairmen of the Freedom Real Estate Group Family of Companies based out of Centerville, Ohio with over 40 team members and still growing. Dani Lynn is also an esteemed Forbes Real Estate Council member with numerous published articles and expert panel features. Together, they are also members of several masterminds and investment groups and partnered with national and international investor organizations. They have also been featured at speaking events around the country and numerous podcasts. Currently, their parent company, Freedom Real Estate Group, tripled its sales in 2019 from the prior year and continues to grow and manage high-volume residential flips. Starting in 2020, their team also began renovating and managing mid-size apartment complexes. Their property management team currently manages over 500 properties for investors all over the United States and around the world including Switzerland, Canada, France, England, Iran, and Japan. Connect with Dani Lynn and Flip Robison! Website: https://freedomrealestategroup.com/ (https://freedomrealestategroup.com/) Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/FreedomRealEstateGroupOhio/ (https://www.facebook.com/FreedomRealEstateGroupOhio/) YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCA1AEhMUyXuqZPLvBvhkKXQ (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCA1AEhMUyXuqZPLvBvhkKXQ) LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/freedom-real-estate-group-ohio/ (https://www.linkedin.com/company/freedom-real-estate-group-ohio/) Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/freedomrealestategroup/ (https://www.instagram.com/freedomrealestategroup/) LIKE • SHARE • JOIN • REVIEW http://reimastermind.net/?utm_medium=podcast&utm_source=bcast&utm_campaign=rei-mastermind-network?utm_medium=podcast&utm_source=bcast&utm_campaign=rei-mastermind-network?utm_medium=podcast&utm_source=bcast&utm_campaign=rei-mastermind-network?utm_medium=podcast&utm_source=bcast&utm_campaign=rei-mastermind-network (Website) https://www.patreon.com/reimastermind?utm_medium=podcast&utm_source=bcast&utm_campaign=rei-mastermind-network?utm_medium=podcast&utm_source=bcast&utm_campaign=rei-mastermind-network?utm_medium=podcast&utm_source=bcast&utm_campaign=rei-mastermind-network?utm_medium=podcast&utm_source=bcast&utm_campaign=rei-mastermind-network (Patreon) https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/rei-mastermind-network-real-estate-investing-strategies/id1227366661?utm_medium=podcast&utm_source=bcast&utm_campaign=rei-mastermind-network?utm_medium=podcast&utm_source=bcast&utm_campaign=rei-mastermind-network?utm_medium=podcast&utm_source=bcast&utm_campaign=rei-mastermind-network?utm_medium=podcast&utm_source=bcast&utm_campaign=rei-mastermind-network (Apple Podcasts) https://podcasts.google.com/feed/aHR0cDovL3JlaXJvb2tpZXMubGlic3luLmNvbS9yc3M?utm_medium=podcast&utm_source=bcast&utm_campaign=rei-mastermind-network?utm_medium=podcast&utm_source=bcast&utm_campaign=rei-mastermind-network?utm_medium=podcast&utm_source=bcast&utm_campaign=rei-mastermind-network?utm_medium=podcast&utm_source=bcast&utm_campaign=rei-mastermind-network (Google Podcasts) https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC_6OpKSfSGvgGDG1qtBQw9Q?utm_medium=podcast&utm_source=bcast&utm_campaign=rei-mastermind-network?utm_medium=podcast&utm_source=bcast&utm_campaign=rei-mastermind-network?utm_medium=podcast&utm_source=bcast&utm_campaign=rei-mastermind-network?utm_medium=podcast&utm_source=bcast&utm_campaign=rei-mastermind-network (YouTube)... Support this podcast

Money Savage
Gold Royalties Companies with Fred Bell

Money Savage

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 23, 2022 18:35


LifeBlood: We talked about gold royalty companies, gold versus crypto. The benefits of royalty companies to an investor, and how to diversify your portfolio with precious metals with Fred Bell, CEO of Elemental Royalties.  Listen to learn why investing in relationships can help get you where you want to go! You can learn more about Frederick at ElementalRoyalties.com, Twitter and LinkedIn. Thanks, as always for listening!  If you got some value and enjoyed the show, please leave us a review wherever you listen and subscribe as well.  You can learn more about us at LifeBlood.Live, Twitter, LinkedIn, Instagram, YouTube and Facebook or you'd like to be a guest on the show, contact us at contact@LifeBlood.Live.

The Brutal Truth about B2B Sales & Selling - The show focuses on Hacking the Sales Process
WHAT IS WORKING TODAY TO WIN MORE DEALS WITHOUT PRESSURE

The Brutal Truth about B2B Sales & Selling - The show focuses on Hacking the Sales Process

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 22, 2022 45:00


Here is a FAQ Video on the Courses: https://youtu.be/0F7imrzjXWs Here is a deep dive into which course is best for you: https://youtu.be/JM_jgS8M-iU   https://www.b2bRevenue.com - Get Your Free E-Book on How Companies make Decisions. FAQ: 1 YEAR ACCESS, PAY MONTHLY OR ANNUALLY NOT A SUBSCRIPTION OFFICE HOURS EVERY  OTHER WEEK VIA ZOOM. 1 HOUR GROUP Q&A. UNLIMITED 1-ON-1'S  ARE FREE AS LONG AS THEY CAN BE SHARED IN THE COURSE. 1-ON-1 ARE FULL ACCESS ON DAY ONE - NOTHING IS GATED OR TIME RELEASED. ALL CONTENT IS VIDEO BASED AND SELF PACED I RECOMMEND TAKE COURSE ONCE WITHOUT NOTES OR APPLYING IT SO YOU UNDERSTAND THE BIG PICTURE FIRST. THEN TAKE AND APPLY IT STEP BY STEP. YOU START WHEN YOU WANT AND GO AS FAST OR SLOW AS NEEDED.   Email me additional questions: briangburns@me.com     — SAMPLE EMAIL TO EXPENSE THE COURSE MGR,   I have been listening to the brutal truth about sales podcast for X months and it speaks to the issues we face.   They currently offer a course that includes video instruction, group Q&A and One-on-One coaching. I'm committed to my own personal development and would like your help in expensing the course.   It would pay for itself if I closed only one new deal of $X value.   Please let me know by Friday if I can move forward with this 1 year course.   Thanks, ME ———————————————————————————————————— Audible 30 day Free Trial: http://www.audibletrial.com/BrutalTruth     Check out my YouTube channel and watch my Free Sales/Social Selling Course. https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=MaverickMethod       Listen to The Sales Questions PodCast: https://itun.es/i67d3Ry     Listen to The B2B Revenue Leadership Show: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/b2b-revenue-leadership-show/id1174976428?mt=2     Twitter: @briangburns LinkedIn: Brian G. Burns Facebook: Brian Burns YouTube: Brian Burns SALES PODCAST

The Brutal Truth About Sales & Selling - B2B Social SaaStr Cold Calling SaaS Salesman Advanced Hacker

Here is a FAQ Video on the Courses: https://youtu.be/0F7imrzjXWs Here is a deep dive into which course is best for you: https://youtu.be/JM_jgS8M-iU   https://www.b2bRevenue.com - Get Your Free E-Book on How Companies make Decisions. FAQ: 1 YEAR ACCESS, PAY MONTHLY OR ANNUALLY NOT A SUBSCRIPTION OFFICE HOURS EVERY OTHER WEEK VIA ZOOM. 1 HOUR GROUP Q&A. UNLIMITED 1-ON-1'S ARE FREE AS LONG AS THEY CAN BE SHARED IN THE COURSE. 1-ON-1 ARE FULL ACCESS ON DAY ONE - NOTHING IS GATED OR TIME RELEASED. ALL CONTENT IS VIDEO BASED AND SELF PACED I RECOMMEND TAKE COURSE ONCE WITHOUT NOTES OR APPLYING IT SO YOU UNDERSTAND THE BIG PICTURE FIRST. THEN TAKE AND APPLY IT STEP BY STEP. YOU START WHEN YOU WANT AND GO AS FAST OR SLOW AS NEEDED.   Email me additional questions: briangburns@me.com     — SAMPLE EMAIL TO EXPENSE THE COURSE MGR,   I have been listening to the brutal truth about sales podcast for X months and it speaks to the issues we face.   They currently offer a course that includes video instruction, group Q&A and One-on-One coaching. I'm committed to my own personal development and would like your help in expensing the course.   It would pay for itself if I closed only one new deal of $X value.   Please let me know by Friday if I can move forward with this 1 year course.   Thanks, ME ———————————————————————————————————— Audible 30 day Free Trial: http://www.audibletrial.com/BrutalTruth     Check out my YouTube channel and watch my Free Sales/Social Selling Course. https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=MaverickMethod     Listen to The Sales Questions PodCast: https://itun.es/i67d3Ry     Listen to The B2B Revenue Leadership Show: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/b2b-revenue-leadership-show/id1174976428?mt=2     Twitter: @briangburns LinkedIn: Brian G. Burns Facebook: Brian Burns YouTube: Brian Burns SALES PODCAST

CEO Podcasts: CEO Chat Podcast + I AM CEO Podcast Powered by Blue 16 Media & CBNation.co
IAM1258 - CEO Helps Companies Improve Employee Experience and Organisational Performance

CEO Podcasts: CEO Chat Podcast + I AM CEO Podcast Powered by Blue 16 Media & CBNation.co

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 22, 2022 16:47


OMAR L HARRIS (Charlotte, NC, born in Pittsburgh, PA) is the founder of Intent Consulting, TYMPO.io, and EquityPulse.io, a Former GM (GSK and Allergan), Gallup Certified Strengths Coach, Speaker, Award-Winning Bestselling Author of 5 books, including "Be a J.E.D.I. Leader, Not a Boss: Leadership in the Era of Corporate Social Justice, Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion", June 25, 2021, “The Servant Leader's Manifesto”, 2020, and “Leader Board: The DNA of High-Performance Teams”, 2019). With 20+ years of global pharmaceutical executive experience building teams, Omar has worked on 4 continents (U.S., Middle East, Asia, and Latin America) for Pfizer, Merck, Schering-Plough, and more. His books and work have been featured by CNN HLN Weekend Express, Black News Channel, WPXI-TV NBC News Pittsburgh, CBS/ABC/FOX Lake Charles, The Beating Alpha Podcast, The Living Corporate Podcast, Real Leaders, Ladders, SHRM Blog, Thrive Global, CEO World Magazine, Human Capital Innovations (HCI) Podcast, VoiceAmerica, Roland Martin Unfiltered and many more. As fun facts, Omar speaks 5 languages, plays 7 instruments, and started his first company at the age of 7.  Website: omarlharris.com LinkedIn: omarlharris Facebook: omarlharris Instagram: omarl.harris Twitter: strengthsleader

Crypto Current
Institutions are Betting BIG on the Metaverse! (plus the Latest from Illuvium, Hedera and Intel) - CC Live

Crypto Current

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 22, 2022 79:14


#Bitcoin #Ethereum #NFTs It's been a BIG week in Crypto Land. Steve and Chris will break down the Institutional Investments pouring into the Metaverse, the Fortune 5 Companies shocking the space, and the first AAA Game on the Blockchain - Illuvium. Do you think they can keep it under an hour? Let's find out! *Disclaimer. Richard Carthon is the Founder of Crypto Current. All opinions expressed by members of the Crypto Current Team, Richard or his guest on this podcast are solely their opinions and do not reflect the opinions of Crypto Current. You should not treat any opinion expressed by Richard as a specific inducement to make a particular investment or follow a particular strategy but only as an expression of his opinion. This podcast is for informational purposes only. ~ Put your Bitcoin and Ethereum to work. Earn up to 12% interest back withhttps://get.tantralabs.io/earn/?utm_source=cryptocurrent&utm_medium=display&utm_campaign=advertising-display-cryptocurrent&utm_content=lp ( Tantra Labs) ~ New to crypto? Check out ourhttps://bit.ly/394YKFw ( Crypto for Beginners) Step-by-Step Guide to Crypto Investing ~ Follow us on https://bit.ly/3CPwepn (Youtube),http://bit.ly/2TRIArp ( Twitter), http://bit.ly/38yfrqo (Instagram),http://bit.ly/39DhpHi ( Facebook),http://bit.ly/38wsXL5 ( LinkedIn), & https://bit.ly/3yQ30Es (Tik Tok) ~ Want to make ~$25+ a month for FREE? Sign up to get a FREEhttps://www.emrit.io/?referral=cryptocurrent ( emrit.io Coolspot) today!  ~ Want to learn more about cryptocurrency? Check out ourhttps://bit.ly/2CbaYzw ( educational videos) today! ~ https://bit.ly/2TF3Gtb (Swan) is the easiest and most affordable way to accumulate Bitcoin with automatic recurring purchases. Start your plan today and get $10 of free Bitcoin dropped into your account. ~ Want access to cool crypto/blockchain projects that you can use immediately? Check out ourhttps://bit.ly/3eZ8J1E ( partnerships page)!  ~ Looking to attend a cryptocurrency or blockchain event? Check out ourhttps://bit.ly/2ZVCV8f ( events page)! ~ Tune in onhttps://bit.ly/2CN9bl1 ( Crypto Current TV) throughout the week for a 24/7 crypto stream on the latest action on crypto markets, news, and interviews with the industry's top experts! ~ Enjoying our podcast? Please leave us a 5 star reviewhttp://bit.ly/2Is3iJ9 ( here!) ~ Stay up to date with the latest news in cryptocurrency by opting-in to ourhttp://bit.ly/2xmkKfQ ( newsletter)! You will receive daily emails (M-S) that are personalized and curated content specific to you and your interests, powered by artificial intelligence.  ~ We were featured as one of thehttp://bit.ly/2vRAGGl ( Top 25 Cryptocurrency Podcasts) and one of thehttp://bit.ly/33cnus9 ( 16 Best Cryptocurrency Podcasts in 2020). ~ Are you an accredited investor looking to invest in cryptocurrency? Check outhttp://bit.ly/2IrKABr ( Crescent City Capita)l. ~ Earn Interest. Receive Loans. Trade Crypto. Start Today! Learn more about how you canhttps://bit.ly/38Ezc3s ( sign up for Blockfi ) ~ Want to be on our show or know someone who should?http://bit.ly/38ufSC8 ( Contact us) today! ~ We hope you are enjoying our cryptocurrency and blockchain educational content! We greatly appreciate donations, which all go directly towards creating even better educational content. Thank you for your generosity! Buy us a coffeehttp://bit.ly/2VReXsS ( here) :)

The Worldly Marketer Podcast
TWM 228: How EcoVadis Helps Companies Around the Globe Be More Sustainable w/ Emily Rakowski

The Worldly Marketer Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 22, 2022 36:38


Emily Rakowski is the Chief Marketing Officer at EcoVadis, the world's most trusted sustainability ratings provider. Launched in 2007 and headquartered in Paris, EcoVadis helps businesses reduce risk and drive performance & innovation in their supply chain by evaluating their environmental, labor & human rights, sustainable procurement, and fair-trading practices. The EcoVadis methodology, which is built on international CSR standards, covers over 200 industries across more than 160 countries. The organization now has nine offices around the globe, and it works with over 85,000 companies, including global brands such as Verizon, Johnson & Johnson, Subway, Coca Cola, Salesforce, Renault-Nissan, ING Bank, and Nokia. With a B.A. in International Relations from Stanford University and an MBA from the Kellogg Graduate School of Management, Emily has over 25 years of experience in sourcing and procurement solutions.  She spent many years in global marketing and demand management with both SAP and Ariba, and also worked in leadership roles at Ellucian, Kearney Procurement Solutions, Creative Good, and Kearney Consulting, where she managed marketing functions and consulting engagements for clients in the high technology, banking and energy industries. Now based in the greater Washington D.C. area, Emily leads a global team of professionals, who cover all aspects of EcoVadis' B2B marketing, supporting the company's annual revenue growth, and helping to drive the overall business strategy. She was also instrumental in the success of EcoVadis' $200M funding round back in January 2020. In this interview, Emily discusses the challenges of building a brand that engages stakeholders around the world and working with a globally dispersed marketing team. She also talks about the evolving language of Sustainability, and the trends she's seeing in ESG (Environmental, Social, and Corporate Governance) conscienciousness among big global brands today. Tune in!   Links: EcoVadis website EcoVadis Resources site EcoVadis on LinkedIn EcoVadis on Facebook EcoVadis on Instagram EcoVadis on Twitter Emily on LinkedIn   This episode was sponsored by the Globalization and Localization Association (GALA).

The Dom Giordano Program
Milwaukee Official Blames Car Companies for Spike in Vehicular Theft

The Dom Giordano Program

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 21, 2022 43:45


Full Hour | Today, Dom led off the Dom Giordano Program by providing updates around Krasnerland, the name he's given the new crime-ridden Philadelphia under the reign of Philadelphia District Attorney Larry Krasner. Then, Giordano reads back comments made by a local professor, an educated writer, who ignorantly offers a defense of Krasner's policies in Philadelphia. Then, Giordano discusses a story out of Milwuakee, Wisconsin, in which an Alderman placed the blame on South Korean car companies for the surge in carjackings in his city. Then, Giordano welcomes PA Representative Martina White back to the Dom Giordano Program to get her opinion on the letter sent earlier this week to the Assembly by State Senator Jake Corman calling for the impeachment of Philadelphia District Attorney Larry Krasner. First, Giordano asks Martina for her thoughts on the spike in criminality in her district, and tells of the spread of crime into suburbs surrounding her district. After that, Martina tells about a hesitancy to move forward in acting on Corman's letter, explaining that she would much prefer this be done solely in the state Senate. Giordano takes umbrage with this suggestion, explaining why he believes a hearing to be one of the most important parts of Corman's suggestion, with Martina refuting, telling that the Senate has the most expedient path to removing Krasner. (Photo by Getty Images)

The Bitboy Crypto Podcast
Why Metaverse & Crypto are the BIGGEST Opportunity in 2022 (Massive Companies Joining DAILY)

The Bitboy Crypto Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 21, 2022 37:50


On today's show, we talk about your NFT comic to a PFP on Meta and IG soon. The NYC Mayor is about to get his first Crypto paycheck. Will he degenerate out on SudaeSwap this weekend? We wrap up the show talking about the Fed releasing the CBDC report. Was it worth the wait? Around the Blockchain is your favorite Cryptocurrency show discussing Bitcoin, Ethereum, Cardano, and the top altcoins. Our four crypto experts include Joe Parys, Jayson Casper, Johnny Hopper, and Ben Armstrong. Tune in for their insightful crypto analysis!

FactSet U.S. Daily Market Preview
Financial Market Preview - Friday 21-Jan

FactSet U.S. Daily Market Preview

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 21, 2022 5:30


US equity futures are indicating a lower open as of 05:00 ET. European equity markets are lower, following broad weakness in Asia. Corporate developments are negative after Netflix guided subscriber numbers well below expectations. Bond volatility remains a feature, with yields sharply lower following rate stabilization on Wednesday. Companies mentioned: Netflix, Peloton Interactive, Apple

Generation Digital Workforce
128. Reskilling in the Digital Era

Generation Digital Workforce

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 21, 2022 19:23


Unlocking New Opportunities . As the way we work changes, employees are looking for new ways to add to their capabilities and change the way they approach work. Companies and public sector organizations are adopting automation to improve their efficiencies and enhance their customer's experiences. However, these same organizations are struggling to find employees who understand how to lead and get the most out of an automation program. Michael Marchuk talked with Lora Bucis from SAIT about how their program to reskill professionals looking to enhance their capabilities helps unlock new opportunities within their current employer, but also potential to change their role with a new job locally or globally. . Here's what we talked with Lora about: * The skills that employees need are changing quickly and how those new skills can be applied to satisfy the growing demand * Opportunities to engage in meaningful work within an automation program expand beyond the local economy * How higher-education institutions are addressing the reskilling that industry is clamoring for . To ensure that you never miss an episode of Transform NOW, be sure to subscribe!

Business Resilience Decoded
The Four Vectors of Risk – Risk Management Strategies to Follow in 2022

Business Resilience Decoded

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2022 13:33


Episode 89: The Four Vectors of Risk – Risk Management Strategies to Follow in 2022 This episode is brought to you by Fusion Risk Management, Building a More Resilient World Together. Request a demo at https://bit.ly/FusionDECODED today! I sat down with James Donnelly of M Booth Public Relations to discuss our thoughts on the unique challenges emergency managers will be facing in a post-pandemic world. Together we came up with four vectors of risk that leaders in our field should be aware of to prepare for any scenario in 2022. The four vectors of risk are top-down risks, bottom-up risks, inside-out risks, and outside-in risks. For a more in-depth explanation and discussion questions of each vector, please visit https://bit.ly/FourVectorsofRisk. In this episode, you will learn: How to approach the four vectors of risk Why there's usually a shift in leadership after a disaster Why you should have a personnel contingency plan that includes building leadership from the bottom up How to maintain a steady stream of talent at all times to be prepared for a personnel shift What employees value about the companies they work for - and how they're holding them accountable How systems, industries, and society as a whole have shifted during the pandemic and what to expect post-pandemic Resources Mentioned: M Booth Agency: https://www.mbooth.com/expertise/issues-crisis-management/ Asfalis Advisors Blog Post: https://bit.ly/FourVectorsofRisk “American companies pledged $50 billion to Black communities. Most of it hasn't materialized” – Fortune https://fortune.com/2021/05/06/us-companies-black-communities-money-50-billion/ Disaster Recovery Journal: Register for DRJ's weekly (Wednesday) webinar series: https://drj.com/webinars/up-coming/ Register for DRJ Spring 2022: Resiliency Transformed: http://www.drj.com/spring2022 Asfalis Advisors: Visit our website here: https://www.asfalisadvisors.com Apply to be a guest on the podcast: https://www.asfalisadvisors.com/decoded/ Download the 5 Step Crisis Strategy: https://www.asfalisadvisors.com/services/ Connect with the podcast! Please take part in our podcast listener survey: https://forms.gle/XDuYPcFjXaydkEXV6 Email us: podcast@drj.com Podcast website: https://drj.com/decoded/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/BRDecoded LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/showcase/business-resilience-decoded/ YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCNEIrqWlxuyDvkXB24h6Obw/videos Vanessa Mathews, host Vanessa Mathews is the founder and chief resilience officer of Asfalis Advisors, where they are focused on protecting the legacy of the leaders they serve through business resilience. Before becoming an entrepreneur, Mathews developed global crisis management and business continuity programs for government and private sector organizations to include Lowe's Companies, Gulfstream Aerospace, and the Department of Homeland Security. LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/vanessa-vaughn-mathews-mba-cbcp-70916b4b/ Book Mathews as a speaker: https://bit.ly/VanessaMathews Jon Seals, producer Jon Seals is the editor in chief at Disaster Recovery Journal, the leading magazine/event in business continuity. Seals is an award-winning journalist with a background in publication design, business media, content management, sports journalism, social media, and podcasting. LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/jonseals/ Disaster Recovery Journal: https://drj.com/

The Brutal Truth about B2B Sales & Selling - The show focuses on Hacking the Sales Process
THE SECRETS TO THIS REP STAYING ON TOP IN B2B SALES AND SELLING

The Brutal Truth about B2B Sales & Selling - The show focuses on Hacking the Sales Process

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2022 44:09


Here is a FAQ Video on the Courses: https://youtu.be/0F7imrzjXWs Here is a deep dive into which course is best for you: https://youtu.be/JM_jgS8M-iU   https://www.b2bRevenue.com - Get Your Free E-Book on How Companies make Decisions. FAQ: 1 YEAR ACCESS, PAY MONTHLY OR ANNUALLY NOT A SUBSCRIPTION OFFICE HOURS EVERY  OTHER WEEK VIA ZOOM. 1 HOUR GROUP Q&A. UNLIMITED 1-ON-1'S  ARE FREE AS LONG AS THEY CAN BE SHARED IN THE COURSE. 1-ON-1 ARE FULL ACCESS ON DAY ONE - NOTHING IS GATED OR TIME RELEASED. ALL CONTENT IS VIDEO BASED AND SELF PACED I RECOMMEND TAKE COURSE ONCE WITHOUT NOTES OR APPLYING IT SO YOU UNDERSTAND THE BIG PICTURE FIRST. THEN TAKE AND APPLY IT STEP BY STEP. YOU START WHEN YOU WANT AND GO AS FAST OR SLOW AS NEEDED.   Email me additional questions: briangburns@me.com     — SAMPLE EMAIL TO EXPENSE THE COURSE MGR,   I have been listening to the brutal truth about sales podcast for X months and it speaks to the issues we face.   They currently offer a course that includes video instruction, group Q&A and One-on-One coaching. I'm committed to my own personal development and would like your help in expensing the course.   It would pay for itself if I closed only one new deal of $X value.   Please let me know by Friday if I can move forward with this 1 year course.   Thanks, ME ———————————————————————————————————— Audible 30 day Free Trial: http://www.audibletrial.com/BrutalTruth     Check out my YouTube channel and watch my Free Sales/Social Selling Course. https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=MaverickMethod       Listen to The Sales Questions PodCast: https://itun.es/i67d3Ry     Listen to The B2B Revenue Leadership Show: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/b2b-revenue-leadership-show/id1174976428?mt=2     Twitter: @briangburns LinkedIn: Brian G. Burns Facebook: Brian Burns YouTube: Brian Burns SALES PODCAST

FactSet U.S. Daily Market Preview
Financial Market Preview - Thursday 20-Jan

FactSet U.S. Daily Market Preview

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2022 5:07


US equity futures are indicating a higher open as of 05:00 ET. European equity markets are mostly lower, following mixed Asian trade. China loan prime rate cuts overnight were mostly in line with expectations. The push to remove UK PM Johnson looks like it may have fizzled out for now. Companies mentioned: United Airlines, Uber, Chesapeake Energy

Holmberg's Morning Sickness
01-19-22 - Organ Donation Is Not Something John's Into As He Gets Set For Another Surgery Soon - Airlines Ask Cell Companies To Hold Off On 5G Rollout When John Says There's No Difference

Holmberg's Morning Sickness

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 20:00


Holmberg's Morning Sickness - Wednesday January 19, 2022

Exponential View with Azeem Azhar
Supercritical's Mission to Help Tech Reach Net Zero (with Michelle You)

Exponential View with Azeem Azhar

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 48:17


Companies of all sizes and sectors have committed to net-zero emissions targets, but getting there is not straightforward. Measuring carbon dioxide output is tricky, carbon markets are fragmented, and the quality of offsets varies hugely. Michelle You, co-founder and CEO of Supercritical, is on a mission to help companies better measure, reduce, and remove carbon emissions – and her first target is the tech sector.

Wharton FinTech Podcast
Ronen Assia, Managing Partner at Team8 -- Co-Founding Transformative Companies

Wharton FinTech Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 40:22


Gabriela Ariana Campoverde sits down with Ronen Assia, Managing Partner at Team8 Fintech Foundry, a venture fund within Team8 that partners with entrepreneurs to build companies in the fintech space. For over twenty years, Ronen has successfully merged technology and design together into useful and accessible products, and defined user experience across various devices and platforms. Most recently Ronen served as eToro's Chief Product Officer, managing product and engineering, and helped grow the company into a Fintech unicorn serving 13 million users in over 140 countries. eToro pioneered Social Investing, enabling every investor to see, follow and automatically copy the portfolios of other investors in the network. In this episode you will learn all about: - How Team8 works with fintech talent - Ronen's insights into the Isreali fintech ecosystem and global investment outlook - Blockchain innovation, NFTs and art curation - How start-up's can marry the old and new worlds of fintech - And so much more! About Ronen Assia Ronen Assia is a Managing Partner at Team8 Fintech Foundry and a Co-Founder and Executive Director at eToro, a social investing platform. Ronen currently resides in Israel and studied Product Design at the Royal College of Art and Bezalel Academy of Art and Design. About Team8 Fintech Team8 Fintech partners with entrepreneurs to co-found transformative fintech companies. For additional information on Team8 Fintech, please visit team8.vc/team8-fintech. For more FinTech insights, follow us below: Medium: medium.com/wharton-fintech WFT Twitter: twitter.com/whartonfintech Gabriela's Twitter: twitter.com/byGabyC Gabriela's LinkedIn: linkedin.com/in/gcampoverde

The Brutal Truth About Sales & Selling - B2B Social SaaStr Cold Calling SaaS Salesman Advanced Hacker

Here is a FAQ Video on the Courses: https://youtu.be/0F7imrzjXWs Here is a deep dive into which course is best for you: https://youtu.be/JM_jgS8M-iU   https://www.b2bRevenue.com - Get Your Free E-Book on How Companies make Decisions. FAQ: 1 YEAR ACCESS, PAY MONTHLY OR ANNUALLY NOT A SUBSCRIPTION OFFICE HOURS EVERY OTHER WEEK VIA ZOOM. 1 HOUR GROUP Q&A. UNLIMITED 1-ON-1'S ARE FREE AS LONG AS THEY CAN BE SHARED IN THE COURSE. 1-ON-1 ARE FULL ACCESS ON DAY ONE - NOTHING IS GATED OR TIME RELEASED. ALL CONTENT IS VIDEO BASED AND SELF PACED I RECOMMEND TAKE COURSE ONCE WITHOUT NOTES OR APPLYING IT SO YOU UNDERSTAND THE BIG PICTURE FIRST. THEN TAKE AND APPLY IT STEP BY STEP. YOU START WHEN YOU WANT AND GO AS FAST OR SLOW AS NEEDED.   Email me additional questions: briangburns@me.com     — SAMPLE EMAIL TO EXPENSE THE COURSE MGR,   I have been listening to the brutal truth about sales podcast for X months and it speaks to the issues we face.   They currently offer a course that includes video instruction, group Q&A and One-on-One coaching. I'm committed to my own personal development and would like your help in expensing the course.   It would pay for itself if I closed only one new deal of $X value.   Please let me know by Friday if I can move forward with this 1 year course.   Thanks, ME ———————————————————————————————————— Audible 30 day Free Trial: http://www.audibletrial.com/BrutalTruth     Check out my YouTube channel and watch my Free Sales/Social Selling Course. https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=MaverickMethod     Listen to The Sales Questions PodCast: https://itun.es/i67d3Ry     Listen to The B2B Revenue Leadership Show: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/b2b-revenue-leadership-show/id1174976428?mt=2     Twitter: @briangburns LinkedIn: Brian G. Burns Facebook: Brian Burns YouTube: Brian Burns SALES PODCAST

True Grit and Grace
Attitude and Determination Win with Mel Abraham

True Grit and Grace

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 68:57


Today's episode of True Grit and Grace is going to be so powerful for you if you have been wanting to start or scale a business and are trying to understand how to go about it. My guest is one of the most respected financial and entrepreneurial experts in the industry and he also has an incredible story of resilience from a cancer diagnosis.  Mel Abraham is a CPA by education but an entrepreneur by exhilaration, and Author of the #1 Bestseller, The Entrepreneur's Solution: The Modern Millionaire's Path to More Profit, Fans & Freedom. He's the founder of Thoughtpreneur TM Academy & Business Breakthrough Academy where he helps entrepreneurs bring their businesses to the world and build the lifestyle that they want. After finding a cancerous tumor in his bladder larger than a baseball in June 2019 and successfully conquering it within 18 months, Mel began to openly teach his The Affluence Blueprint TM because his cancer journey spotlighted the immediate and urgent need for entrepreneurs to find “financial liberation” and peace of mind. This is the very process and system he's used to build his business and more importantly his wealth through business that allowed him to completely shut things down to focus on what's important. Most entrepreneurs are building a financial house of cards and don't even realize it...and traditional financial advice will not work for them. As a frequent guest on some of the top shows and podcasts and through his popular programs, blog and show he shares his thought leadership around financial liberation, affluence, building businesses of impact, and freedom. He's been called an Affluence MentorTM and the “thought leader to thought leaders” and advised some of the top thought leaders of our time in their business, money matters, content creation, positioning and market influence. Mel is a committed advocate for the entrepreneurial way and provides real education to real entrepreneurs for creating a real life! After all, we are placed here to create a legacy beyond acquiring, achieving and accomplishing but by connecting at a meaningful level and impacting lives through our businesses, services and ideals each and every day. Mel has built, bought and sold numerous multimillion-dollar businesses for himself as well as his clients. He's a globally recognized thought leader, business advisor, CPA and financial expert sharing stages with a long list of Fortune 500 Companies as well as beacons in the business and personal development industry, from Arianna Huffington and Chalene Johnson to Brendon Burchard and Tony Robbins. (So yeah! You can understand why I was jumping up and down when I got to share the stage with him for the Transform U Event a few months ago!) Mel is a Certified Public Accountant with over three decades of experience as a financial expert, valuation expert and business and success strategist. Mel is regularly sought after for consulting and valuation engagements around the country such as family limited partnerships, co-tenant interest valuations, operating businesses as well as various entities. These projects have ranged from small family owned businesses to large $1.7 billion companies.   Here's what you will learn: What it was like be diagnosed with cancer and how he beat it (3:02) How to manage the fear that stems from a major illness (9:41) Why attitude and determination is essential in overcoming adversity (15:29) How friends can help you to achieve your goals (21:41) How to understand your needs versus your wants (27:23) Why putting things in order will help with peace of mind (34:38) The importance of friction in shopping (44:28) How emotion ties to shopping and using credit (52:31) What did you learn from this episode? Share on Instagram and tag us at @amberlylagomotivation and @melabraham9 so we can see!   Follow Mel: Facebook Instagram Twitter Website   Links mentioned in this episode: The Entrepreneur's Solution: The Modern Millionaire's Path to More   If you are ready to leave your mark by discovering your message and sharing it with the world, you've come to the right place!! Let's work together to build your influence, your impact, and your income! Join the tribe you have been waiting for to activate your highest potential and live the life you deserve!  Another Your Unstoppable Life Mastermind is starting soon!!! Early bird countdown starts now!  JOIN NOW and let us know you are ready for greatness! Read the "True Grit and Grace" book here and learn how you can turn tragedy into triumph!  Thank you for joining us on the True, Grit, & Grace Podcast! If you find value in today's episode, don't forget to share the show with your friends and tap that subscribe button so you don't miss an episode! You can also head over to amberlylago.com to join my newsletter and access free downloadable resources that can help you elevate your life, business, and relationships! Want to see the behind the scenes and keep the conversation going?  Head over to Instagram @amberlylagomotivation! Audible @True-Grit-and-Grace-Audiobook  Website @amberlylago.com Instagram @amberlylagomotivation Facebook @AmberlyLagoSpeaker

FactSet U.S. Daily Market Preview
Financial Market Preview - Wednesday 19-Jan

FactSet U.S. Daily Market Preview

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 4:54


US equity futures are indicating a higher open as of 05:00 ET after paring overnight losses. European equity markets are mostly higher, following broad losses in Asia. Bond yields are extending the recent move higher; US 10-year yields are at 1.89%, while the German Bund yield is positive for the first time since 2019. Companies mentioned: Zogenix, UCB, BJ's Wholesale Club, Alliance Data Systems, Capital One Financial

Greater Than Code
267: Handling Consulting Businesses and Client Loads

Greater Than Code

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 62:06


00:36 - Panelist Consulting Experience and Backgrounds * Debugging Your Brain by Casey Watts (https://www.debuggingyourbrain.com/) * Happy and Effective (https://www.happyandeffective.com/) 10:00 - Marketing, Charging, and Setting Prices * Patreon (https://www.patreon.com/) * Chelsea's Blog (https://chelseatroy.com/) * Self-Worth by Salary 28:34 - GeePawHill Twitter Thread (https://twitter.com/GeePawHill/status/1478950180904972293) - Impact Consulting * Casey's Spreadsheet - “Matrix-Based Prioritization For Choosing a Job” (https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1qVrWOKPe3ElXJhOBS8egGIyGqpm6Fk9kjrFWvB92Fpk/edit#gid=1724142346) * Interdependence (https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/interdependence) 38:43 - Management & Mentorship * Detangling the Manager: Supervisor, Team Lead, Mentor (https://dev.to/endangeredmassa/detangling-the-manager-supervisor-team-lead-mentor-gha) * Adrienne Maree Brown (https://adriennemareebrown.net/) 52:15 - Explaining Value and Offerings * The Pumpkin Plan: A Simple Strategy to Grow a Remarkable Business in Any Field by Mike Michalowicz (https://www.amazon.com/Pumpkin-Plan-Strategy-Remarkable-Business/dp/1591844886) * User Research * SPIN Selling: Situation Problem Implication Need-payoff by Neil Rackham (https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/833015.SPIN_Selling) 55:08 - Ideal Clients Reflections: Mae: The phrase “indie”. Casey: Having a Patreon to help inspire yourself. Chelsea: Tallying up all of the different things that a given position contributes to in terms of a person's needs. This episode was brought to you by @therubyrep (https://twitter.com/therubyrep) of DevReps, LLC (http://www.devreps.com/). To pledge your support and to join our awesome Slack community, visit patreon.com/greaterthancode (https://www.patreon.com/greaterthancode) To make a one-time donation so that we can continue to bring you more content and transcripts like this, please do so at paypal.me/devreps (https://www.paypal.me/devreps). You will also get an invitation to our Slack community this way as well. Transcript: CHELSEA: Welcome to Greater Than Code, Episode 267. I'm Chelsea Troy, and I'm here with my co-host, Mae. MAE: And also with us is Casey. CASEY: Hi, I'm Casey. And today's episode, we are our own guests. We're going to be talking to you about our experiences in consulting. To get this one started, how about we share what got us into consulting and what we like, don't like about it, just high-level? Chelsea, would you mind going first? CHELSEA: Sure. So I started in consulting, really in a full-time job. So for early in my programming career, I worked for several years for a company called Pivotal Labs and Pivotal Labs is chiefly, or was chiefly at the time, a software engineering consulting organization. My job was to pair program with folks from client teams, various types of clients, a lot of health insurance companies. At the time, there was a restaurant loyalty app that we did some work for. We did some work for General Motors, various clients, a major airline was also a client, and I would switch projects every three to six months. During that time employed by Labs, I would work for this client, pair programming with other pivots, and also with client developers. So that was my introduction to consulting and I think that it made the transition to consulting later, a little bit easier because I already had some consulting experience from under the Labs' umbrella. After I worked for Labs, I moved on to working at a product company for about 2 years and my experience at that product company burned me out on full-time programming for a little while. So in my last couple of months at that job, I realized that I was either going to have to take some time off, or I was going to have to find an arrangement that worked better for me for work, at least for the next little while. And for that next little while, what I decided I wanted to try to do was work part-time because I was uncomfortable with the idea of taking time off from programming completely. I felt that I was too early in my career and the skill loss would be too great if I took time off completely, but I knew I needed some space and so, I quit my full-time job. After I quit the full time—I probably should have done this before I quit the job, but I didn't—I called an organization that I had previously done some volunteer work with, with whom I discussed a job a couple of years prior, but for a couple of different reasons, it didn't work out. I said to them, “I know that you're a grant-funded organization and you rarely have the funding and capacity to bring somebody on, but just so you're aware, I like working with you. I love your product. I love the stuff that you work on. All our time working together, I've really enjoyed. So if you have an opening, I'm going to have some time available.” The director there emailed me that same day and said, “Our mobile developer put in his two weeks' notice this morning. So if you have time this afternoon, I'd really like to talk to you,” [chuckles] and that was my first client and they were a part-time client. I still work with them. I love working with them. I would consider them kind of my flagship client. But then from there, I started to kind of pick up more clients and it took off from there after that summer. I spent that summer generally working 3 days a week for that client and then spending 4 days a week lying face down in a park in the sun. That helped me recover a little bit from burnout. And then after that, I consulted full-time for about 2 years and I still consult on the side of a full-time job. So that's my story. Is anyone feeling a penchant for going next? MAE: I can go. I've been trying to think how am I going to say this succinctly. I've had at least two jobs and several club, or organization memberships, or founding, or positions since I was 16. So wherever I go, I've always been saying, “Well, I've done it these 47 ways already [laughs] even since I was a teenager.” So I've sort of always had a consulting orientation to take a broader view and figure out ways in which we can systematize whatever it is that's happening around me. Specifically for programming, I had been an administrator, like an executive leader, for many years. I just got tired of trying to explain what we as administrators needed and I just wanted to be able to build the things. I was already a really big Microsoft access person and anybody who just got a little [laughs] snarky in there knows I love Microsoft Access. It really allowed me to be able to offer all kinds of things to, for example, I was on the board of directors of my Kiwanis Club and I made a member directory and attendance tracker and all these things. Anyway, when I quit my executive job and went to code school in 2014, I did it because I knew that I could build something a lot better than this crazy Access database [laughs] that I had, this very involved ETL things going on in. I had a nonprofit that I had been involved with for 15 years at that point and I had also taken a database class where I modeled this large database that I was envisioning. So I had a bunch of things in order. I quit my full-time job and went to an income of $6,500 my first year and I hung with that flagship customer for a while and tailored my software. So I sort of have this straddling of a SaaS situation and a consulting situation. I embed into whoever I'm working with and help them in many ways. Often, people need lots of different levels of coaching, training, and skills development mixed with just a place to put things that makes sense to them. I think that's the brief version [laughs] that I can come up with and that is how I got where I am and I've gone in and out of also having a full-time job. Before I quit that I referenced the first year I worked a full-time job plus at least 40 to a 100 hours on my software to get it ready for prime time. So a lot of, a lot of work. CASEY: Good story. I don't think I ever heard these fuller stories from either of you, even though I know roughly the shape of your past. It's so cool to hear it. Thanks for sharing them. All right, I'll share about me now. So I've been a developer, a PM, and I've done a lot of design work. I've done all the roles over my time in tech. I started doing programming 10, 15 years ago, and I'm always getting burnt out everywhere I go because I care so much and we get asked to do things that seem dumb. I'm sure anyone listening can relate to this in some organization and when I say dumb, I don't use that word myself directly. I'm quoting a lot of people who would use that word, but I say either we're being asked to do things that don't make sense, aren't good ideas, or there are things that are we're being asked to do that would make sense if we knew why and it's not being communicated really well. It's poor communication. Either one, the other, or both. So after a lot of jobs, I end up taking a 3-month sabbatical and I'm like, “Whatever, I got to go. I can't deal with caring so much anymore, and I'm not willing to care less either.” So most recently, I took a sabbatical and I finished my book, Debugging Your Brain, which takes together psychology ideas, like cognitive behavioral therapy and programming ideas and that, I'm so proud of. If you haven't read it yet, please check it out. Then I went back to my job and I gave them another month where I was like, “All right, look, these are things need to change for me to be happy to work here.” Nothing changed, then I left. Maybe it's changing very slowly, but too slowly for me to be happy there, or most of these past companies. [laughs] After I left, this last sabbatical, I spent three to six months working on a board game version of my book. That's a lot of fun. And then I decided I needed more income, I needed to pay the bills, and I can totally be a tech consultant if I just deal with learning marketing and sales. That's been my… probably six months now, I've been working on the marketing in sales part, thinking a lot about it. I have a lot of support from a lot of friends. Now I consult on ways to make teams happier and more effective and that's my company name, Happy and Effective. I found it really easy to sell workshops, like diversity, equity, and inclusion workshops to HR departments. They're pretty hungry for those kinds of workshops and it's hard to find good, effective facilitators. It's a little bit harder to get companies to pay for coaching for their employees, even though a new EM would love coaching and how to be a good leader. Companies don't always have the budget for that set aside and I wish they would. I'm working with a lot of companies. I have a couple, but not as many as I'd like. And then the hardest, my favorite kind of client is when I get to embed with the team and really work on seeing what's going on me on the ground with them, and help understand what's going on to tell the executives what's happening and what needs to change and really make a big change. I've done that once, or twice and I'd love to do that more, but it's the hardest. So I'm thinking about easy, medium, hard difficulty of selling things to clients. I would actually make plenty of money is doing workshops, honestly, but I want the impact of embedding. That's my bigger goal is the impact. MAE: Yeah. I basically have used my software as a Trojan horse for [laughs] offering the consulting and change management services to help them get there because that is something that people already expect to spend some money on. That, though has been a little problematic because a few years in, they start to think that the line item in the budget is only for software and then it looks very expensive to them. Whereas, if they were looking at it as a consultant gig, it's incredibly inexpensive to them. CASEY: Yeah. It's maybe so inexpensive that it must not be a quality product that they're buying. MAE: Yes. CASEY: Put it that way implicitly. MAE: Definitely, there's also that. CASEY: When setting prices, this is a good general rule of thumb. It could be too low it looks like it'll be junk, like a dollar store purchase, or it can be too high and they just can't afford it, and then there's the middle sweet spot where it seems very valuable. They barely can afford it, but they know it'll be worth it, and that's a really good range to be in. MAE: Yeah. Honestly, for the work that I do, it's more of a passion project. I would do it totally for free, but that doesn't work for this reason you're talking about. CASEY: Yeah. MAE: Like, it needs to hurt a little bit because it's definitely going to be lots and lots of my time and it's going to be some of their time and it needs to be an investment that not hurt bad [laughs] but just be noticeable as opposed to here's a Kenny's Candy, or something. CASEY: I found that works on another scale, on another level. I do career coaching for friends, and friends of friends, and I'm willing to career coach my friends anyway. I've always been. For 10 years, I've reviewed hundreds, thousands of resumes. I've done so many interviews. I'm down to be a career coach, but no one was taking me up on it until I started charging and now friends are coming to me to pay me money to coach them. I think on their side, it feels more equitable. They're more willing to do it now that I'm willing to take money in exchange for it. I felt really bad charging friends until I had the sliding skill. So people who make less, I charge less for, for this personal service. It's kind of weird having a personal service like that, but it works out really well. I'm so happy for so many friends that have gotten jobs they're happy with now from the support. So even charging friends, like charging them nothing means they're not going to sign up for it. MAE: Yes, and often, there is a bias of like, “Oh, well, that's my friend.” [laughs] so they must not be a BFD.” CASEY: Yeah. But we are all BFDs. MAE: Exactly! How about you Chelsea? How did you start to get to the do the pricing thing? CHELSEA: Yeah, I think it's interesting to hear y'all's approaches to the marketing and the pricing because mine has been pretty different from that. But before I get off on that, one thing I do want to mention around getting started with offering personal services at price is that if it seems too large a step to offer a personal service to one person for an amount of money, one thing that I have witnessed folks have success with in starting out in this vein is to set up a Patreon and then have office hours for patrons wherein they spend 2 hours on a Sunday afternoon, or something like that and anyone who is a patron is welcome to join. What often ends up happening for folks in that situation is that people who are friends of theirs support their Patreon and then the friends can show up. So effectively, folks are paying a monthly fee for access to this office hours, which they might attend, or they might not attend. But there are two nice things about it. The first thing about it is that you're not – from a psychological perspective, it doesn't feel like charging your friends for your time with them. It feels more indirect than that in a way that can be helpful for folks who are very new to charging for things and uncomfortable with the idea. The second thing is that the friends are often much more willing to pay than somebody who's new to charging is willing to charge. So the friends are putting this money into this Patreon, usually not because they're trying to get access to your office hours, but because they want to support you and one of the nice things about Patreon is that it is a monthly amount. So having a monthly email from Patreon that's like, “Hey, you we're sending you—” it doesn't even have to be a lot. “We're sending you 40 bucks this month.” It is a helpful conditioning exercise for folks who are not used to charging because they are getting this regular monthly income and the amount is not as important as receiving the regular income, which is helpful psychological preparation for charging for things on your own, I think. That's not the way that I did it, but I have seen people be effective that way. So there's that. For me, marketing was something that I was very worried about having to do when I started my business. In fact, it was one of those things where my conviction, when I started my consulting business, was I do not want to have to sell my services. I will coast on what clients I can find and when it is no longer easy, I will just get a full-time job because selling traditionally conceptualized is not something that I enjoyed. I had a head start on the marketing element of things, that is sort of the brand awareness element of things, my reputation and the reason for that is that first of all, I had consulted at Labs for several years, which meant that every client team that I had ever worked with there, the director remembered me, the product owner remember me. So a lot of people who had been clients of Labs – I didn't actually get anybody to be a client of mine who was a client of Labs, but the individuals I had worked with on those projects who had then changed jobs to go to different companies, reached out to me on some occasions. So that was one place that I got clients from. The other place that I gotten clients from has been my blog. Before I started my business, I had already been writing a tech blog for like 4, or 5 years and my goal with the tech blog has never actually been to get clientele, or make money. My goals for the blog when I started it were to write down what I was learning so that I would remember it and then after that, it was to figure out how to communicate my ideas so that I would have an easier time communicating them in the workplace. After that, it became an external validation source so that I would no longer depend on my individual manager's opinion of me to decide how good I was at programming. Only very recently has it changed to something like, okay, now I'm good enough at communicating and good enough at tech that I actually have something to teach anybody else. So honestly, for many years, I would see the viewership on my blog and I would be like, “Who are all these people? Why are they in my house?” Like, this is weird, but I would get some credibility from that. CASEY: They don't expect any tea from me. CHELSEA: Yeah. I really hope. I don't have enough to go around, [laughs] but it did help and that's where a lot of folks have kind of come from. Such that when I posted on my blog a post about how I'm going to be going indie. I've quit my job. I didn't really expect that to go anywhere, but a few people did reach out from that and I've been lucky insofar is that that has helped me sustain a client load in a way that I didn't really expect to. There's also, I would be remiss not to mention that what I do is I sling code for money for the majority of my consulting business, at least historically and especially in the beginning was exclusively that, and there's enough of a demand to have somebody come in and write code that that helped. It also helped that as I was taking on clients, I started to niche down specifically what I wanted to work on to a specific type of client and to a specific type problem. So I quickly got to the point where I had enough of a client load that I was going to have to make a choice about which clients to accept, or I was going to have to work over time. Now, the conventional wisdom in this circumstance is to raise your rates. Vast majority of business development resources will tell you that that's what you're supposed to do in this situation. But part of my goal in creating my consulting business had been to get out of burnout and part of the reason for the burnout was that I did not feel that the work that I was doing was contributing to a cause that made me feel good about what I was doing. It wasn't morally reprehensible, but I just didn't feel like I was contributing to a better future in the way that my self-identity sort of mandated that I did. It was making me irritable and all these kinds of things. MAE: I had the same thing, yeah. CHELSEA: Yeah. So it's interesting to hear that that's a common experience, but if I were to raise my rates, the companies that were still going to be able to afford me were going to be companies whose products were not morally reprehensible, but not things that coincided with what I was trying to get out of my consulting business. So what I did instead was I said, “I'm specifically looking to work with organizations that are contributing to basic scientific research, improving access for underserved communities, and combating the effects of climate change,” and kept my rates effectively the same, but niche down the clientele to that. That ended up being kind of how I did it. I find that rates vary from client to client in part, because of what you were talking about, Casey, wherein you have to hit the right price in order to even get clients board in certain circumstances. CASEY: Right. CHELSEA: I don't know a good way to guess it. My technique for this, which I don't know if this is kosher to say, but my technique for this has been whoever reached out to me, interested in bringing me on as a consultant for that organization, I ask that person to do some research and figure out what rate I'm supposed to pitch. That has helped a lot because a lot of times my expectations have been wildly off in those circumstances. One time I had somebody say to me, this was for a custom workshop they wanted. I was like, “What should I charge?” And they were like, “I don't know, a few thousand.” I was like, “Is that $1,200? Is that $9,000? I don't know how much money that is,” and so they went back and then they came back and they were able to tell me more specifically a band. There was absolutely no way I would've hit that number accurately without that information. CASEY: Yeah, and different clients have different numbers. You setting your price standard flat across all customers is not a good strategy either. That's why prices aren't on websites so often. CHELSEA: Yeah. I find that it does depend a lot. There's similarly, like I said, a lot of my clients are clients who are contributing to basic scientific research are very often grant funded and grants funding is a very particular kind of funding. It can be intermittent. There has to be a skillset on the team for getting the grant funding. A lot of times, to be frank, it doesn't support the kinds of rates that somebody could charge hourly in a for-profit institution. So for me, it was worth it to make the choice that this is who I want to work with. I know that my rate is effectively capped at this, if I'm going to do that and that was fine by me. Although, I'm lying to say it was completely fine by me. I had to take a long, hard look in the mirror, while I was still in that last full-time job, and realize that I had become a person who gauged her self-worth by the salary that she commanded more than I was comfortable with. More than I wanted to. I had to figure out how to weaken that dependency before I was really able to go off and do my own thing. That was my experience with it. I'm curious whether y'all, well, in particular, Casey, did you find the same thing? CASEY: The self-worth by salary? CHELSEA: Yeah. CASEY: I felt that over time, yeah. Like I went from private sector big tech to government and I got a pay cut and I was like, “Ugh.” It kind of hurt a little and it wasn't even as much as I was promised. Once I got through the hiring process, it was lower than that and now I'm making way less. When I do my favorite impact thing, the board game, like if I made a board game about mental health for middle schoolers, which is something I really want to do, that makes less than anything else I could with my time. I'll be lucky to make money on that at all. So it's actually inverse. My salary is inversely proportional to how much impact I can have if I'm working anyway. So my dream is to have enough corporate clients that I can do half-time, or game impact, whatever other impact things I'm thinking about doing. I think of my impact a lot. Impact is my biggest goal, but the thing is salary hurts. If I don't have the salary and I want to live where I'm living and the lifestyle I have, I don't want to cut back on that and I don't need to, hopefully. CHELSEA: Right. CASEY: I'm hoping eventually, I'll have a steady stream of clients, I don't need to do the marketing and sales outreach as much and all those hours I kind of recoup. I can invest those in the impact things. I've heard people can do that. I think I'll get there. CHELSEA: No, I think you absolutely will. Mae, I'm curious as to your experience, because I know that you have a lot of experience with a similar calculation of determining which things are going to provide more income, which things are probably going to provide less income, and then balancing across a bunch of factors like money, but also impact, time spent, emotional drain, and all that stuff. MAE: Well, Chelsea. [laughter] I am a real merry go round in this arena. So before I became a programmer, I had a state job, I was well paid, and I was pretty set. Then I was a programmer and I took huge pay cut because I quit. I became a programmer when I was 37 years old. So I already had a whole career and to start at the beginning and be parallel with 20-year-old so it's not just like my salary, but also my level and my level of impact on my – and level of the amount of people who wanted to ask me for my advice [laughs] was significantly different. So like the ego's joking stopped and so when you mentioned the thing about identity. Doing any kind of consulting in your own deal is a major identity reorganization and having the money, the title, the clout, and the engagement. Like a couple years, I have spent largely alone and that is very different than working at a place where I have colleagues, or when I live somewhere and have roommates. But I have found signing up for lots and lots of different social justice and passion project things, and supporting nonprofits that I believe in. So from my perspective, I'm really offering a capacity building grant out of my own pocket, my own time, and my own heart and that has been deeply rewarding and maybe not feel much about my identity around salary. Except it does make me question myself as an adult. Like these aren't the best financial decisions to be making, [chuckles] but I get enough out of having made them that it's worth it to me. One of the things probably you were thinking of, Chelsea, we worked together a little bit on this mutual aid project that I took on when the pandemic started and I didn't get paid any dollars for that and I was working 18 hours a day on it, [chuckles] or something. So I like to really jump in a wholeheartedly and then once I really, really do need some dollars, then I figure something else out. That is kind of how I've ebbed and flowed with it. But mostly, I've done it by reducing my personal overhead so that I'm not wigged about the money and lowering whatever my quality-of-life spending goals [chuckles] are. But that also has had to happen because I have not wanted to and I couldn't get myself to get excited about marketing of myself and my whole deal. Like I legit still don't have a website and I've been in operation now since 2014 so that's a while. I meet people and I can demonstrate what it is and I get clients and for me, having only a few clients, there's dozens of people that work for each one. So it's more of an organization client than a bunch of individuals and I can't actually handle a ton. I was in a YCombinator thing that wanted me to really be reporting on income, growth rates, and all of these number of new acquisition things, and it just wasn't for me. Those are not my goals. I want to make sure that this nonprofit can help more people this year and that they can get more grant money because they know how many people they helped and that those people are more efficient at their job every day. So those are harder to measure. It's not quite an answer to your question, [laughs] but I took it and ran a little. CHELSEA: No, I appreciate that. There is a software engineer and a teacher that I follow on Twitter. His name is GeePawHill. Are y'all familiar with GeePawHill? MAE: No. CHELSEA: And he did a thread a couple of days ago that this conversation reminds me of and I found it. Is that all right if I read like a piece of it and paraphrase part of it? MAE: Yes, please. CHELSEA: Okay. So this is what he says. He says, “The weirdest thing about being a teacher for young geek minds: I am teaching them things…that their actual first jobs will most likely forbid them to do. The young'uns I work with are actually nearly all hire-able as is, after 18 months of instruction, without any intervention from me. The problem they're going to face when they get to The Show isn't technical, or intellectual at all. No language, or framework, or OS, or library, or algorithm is going to daunt them, not for long. No, the problem they're going to face is how to sustain their connection to the well of geek joy, in a trade that is systematically bent on simultaneously exploiting that connection while denying it exists and refusing any and all access to it. It is possible, to stick it out, to acquire enough space and power, to re-assert one's path to the well. Many have done it; many are doing it today. But it is very hard. Very hard. Far harder than learning the Visitor pattern, or docker, or, dart, or SQL, or even Haskell. How do you tell people you've watched “become” as they bathed in the cool clear water that, for some long time, 5 years or more, they must…navigate the horrors of extractive capitalist software development? The best answer I have, so far, is to try and teach them how and where to find water outside of work. It is a lousy answer. I feel horrible giving it. But I'd feel even more horrible if I didn't tell them the truth.” CASEY: I just saw this thread and I really liked it, too. I'm glad you found it. MAE: Oh, yeah. I find it honestly pretty inspiring, like people generally who get involved in the kinds of consulting gigs that we three are talking about, which is a little different than just any random consulting, or any random freelancing. CASEY: Like impact consulting, I might call that. MAE: Yeah. It's awesome if the money comes, but it's almost irrelevant [chuckles] provided that basic needs are meant. So that's kind of been my angle. We'll see how – talk to me in 20 more years when I'm [chuckles] trying to retire and made a lot of choices that I was happy with at the time. CASEY: This reminds me of a conversation I had with a friend who's an executive director of an orchestra in the nonprofit space and he was telling me that so many nonprofits shoot themselves in the foot by not doing enough fundraising, by not raising money, and that comes from not wanting to make money in a way because they're a nonprofit, money is not a motive, and everybody's very clear about that. That's noble and all, but it ends up hurting them because they don't have the money to do the impactful things they would as a nonprofit. Money is a necessary evil here and a lot of people are uncomfortable with it. Including me a lot of the time. Honestly, I have to tell myself not to. What would I tell a friend? “No, charge more money.” Okay, I guess I'll tell myself to do that now. I have this conversation with myself a lot. MAE: Yeah. I've been very aware that when I become anti-money, the well dries up. The money well. [laughs] CASEY: Yeah. MAE: And when I am respectful of and appreciative of money in the world, more comes my way. There is an internal dousing, I think that happens that one needs to be very careful about for sure. CASEY: One of the techniques I use with myself and with clients is a matrix where I write out for this approach, this thing that I'm thinking about how much money will it make, how much impact will it have on this goal, and all the different heuristics I would use to make the decision, or columns and all the options arose. I put numbers in it and I might weight my columns because money is less important than impact, but it's still important. It's there. I do all this math. In the end, the summary column with the averages roughly matches what's in my head, which is the things that are similar in my head are similar on paper, but I can see why and that's very clarifying for me. I really like being able to see it in this matrix form and being able to see that you have to focus on the money some amount. If you just did the high impact one, it wouldn't be on the top of the list. It's like, it's hard to think about so many variables at once, but seeing it helps me. CHELSEA: It is. GeePaw speaks to that some later in the thread. He says, “You've got to feed your family. You've got to. That's not negotiable. But you don't got to forget the well. To be any good at all, you have to keep finding the well, keep reaching it, keep noticing it. Doesn't matter whether it's office hours, or after hours. Matters whether you get to it. The thing you've got to watch, when you become a professional geek, isn't the newest tech, and it sure as hell isn't the org's process. You've got to watch whether, or how you're getting to the well. If you're getting to the well, in whatever way, you'll stay alive and change the world.” I think I'm curious as to y'all's thoughts on this, but like I mentioned earlier, I have a full-time job and I also do this consulting on the side. I also teach. I teach at the Master's program in computer science at University of Chicago. I do some mentoring with an organization called Emergent Works, which trains formerly incarcerated technologists. The work situation that I have pieced together for myself, I think manages to get me the income I need and also, the impact that I'm looking for and the ability to work with people and those kinds of things. I think my perspective at this point is that it's probably difficult, if it's realistic at all, to expect any one position to be able to meet all of those needs simultaneously. Maybe they exist, but I suspect that they're relatively few and far between and I think that we probably do ourselves a disservice by propagating this idea that what you need to do is just make yourself so supremely interview-able that everybody wants to hire you and then you get to pick the one position where you get to do that because there's only one in the entirety of tech, it's that rare. Sure, maybe that's an individualist way to look at it. But when we step back and look more closely, or when we step back and look more broadly at that, it's like, all right, so we have to become hypercompetitive in order to be able to get the position where we can make enough while helping people. Like, the means there seem kind of cutthroat for the ends, right? [laughs] CASEY: This reminds me of relationships, too and I think there's a lot of great parallels here. Like you shouldn't expect your partner to meet all of your needs, all of them. MAE: I was thinking the same thing! CASEY: Uh huh. Social, emotional, spiritual, physical, all your needs cannot possibly by one person and that is so much pressure to put on that person, CHELSEA: Right. CASEY: It's like not healthy. CHELSEA: Right. CASEY: You can choose some to prioritize over others for your partner, but you're not going to get a 100% of it and you shouldn't. CHELSEA: Well, and I find that being a conversation fairly regularly in monogamous versus polyamorous circles as well. Like, how much is it appropriate to expect of a partner? But I think it is a valid conversation to have in those circles. But I think that even in the context of a monogamous relationship, a person has other relationships—familial relationships, friend relationships—outside of that single romantic relationship. CASEY: Co-workers, community people, yeah. CHELSEA: Right. But even within that monogamous context, it's most realistic and I would argue, the most healthy to not expect any one person to provide for all of your needs and rather to rely on a community. That's what we're supposed to be able to do. CASEY: Yeah. MAE: Interdependence, not independence. CHELSEA: Right. CASEY: It's more resilient in the face of catastrophe, or change in general, mild, more mild change and you want to be that kind of resilient person for yourself, too. Just like you would do a computer system, or an organization. They should be resilient, too. MAE: Yes. CASEY: Your relationship with your job is another one. MAE: Totally. CHELSEA: Right. And I think that part of the reason the burnout is so quick – like the amount of time, the median amount of time that somebody spends at a company in tech is 2.2 years. MAE: I know, it's so weird. CHELSEA: Very few companies in tech have a large number of lifers, for example, or something like that. There are a number of reasons for that. We don't necessarily have to get into all of them, although, we can if you want. But I think one of them is definitely that we expect to get so much out of a full-time position. Tech is prone. due to circumstances of its origin, to an amount of idealism. We are saving the world. We, as technologists, are saving the world and also, we, as technologists, can expect this salary and we, as technologists, are a family and we play ping pong, and all of these things – [laughter] That contribute to an unrealistic expectation of a work environment, which if that is the only place that we are getting fulfillment as programmers, then people become unsatisfied very quickly because how could an organization that's simultaneously trying to accomplish a goal, meet all of these expect for everybody? I think it's rare at best. CASEY: I want to bring up another example of this kind of thing. Imagine you're an engineer and you have an engineering manager. What's their main job? Is it to get the organization's priorities to be done by the team, like top-down kind of thing? We do need that to happen. Or is it to mentor each individual and coach them and help them grow as an engineer? We need that somewhere, too, yeah. Or is it to make the team – like the team to come together as a team and be very effective together and to represent their needs to the org? That, too, but we don't need one person to do all three of those necessarily. If the person's not technical, you can get someone else in the company to do technical mentorship, like an architect, or just a more senior person on, or off the team somewhere else. But we put a lot of pressure on the engineering managers to do that and this applies to so many roles. That's just one I know that I can define pretty well. There's an article that explains that pretty well. We'll put in the show notes. MAE: Yes! So what I am currently doing is I have a not 40 hours a week job as an engineering manager and especially when I took the gig, I was still doing all of these pandemic charity things and I'm like, “These are more important to me right now and I only have so many hours in the day. So do you need me to code at this place? I can, but do you need me to because all those hours are hours I can go code for all these other things that I'm doing,” and [laughs] it worked. I have been able to do all three of the things that you're talking about, Casey, but certainly able to defer in different places and it's made me – this whole thing of not working full-time makes you optimize in very different ways. So I sprinkle my Slack check-ins all day, but I didn't have to work all day to be present all day. There's a lot that has been awesome. It's not for everyone, but I also have leaned heavily on technical mentorship happening from tech leads as well. CASEY: Sounds good. MAE: But I'm still involved. But this thing about management, especially in tech being whichever programmer seems like the most dominant programmer is probably going to be a good needs to be promoted into management. Just P.S. management is its own discipline, has its own trajectory and when I talk to hiring managers and they only care about my management experience in tech, which is 6 years, right? 8, but I have 25 years of experience in managing. So there's a preciousness of what it is that we are asking for the employees and what the employees are asking of the employer, like you were talking about Chelsea, that is very interesting. It's very privileged, and does lead a lot of people to burnout and disappointment because their ideas got so lofty. I just want to tie this back a little bit too, something you read in that quote about – I forget the last quote, but it was something about having enough to be able to change the world and it reminded me of Adrienne Maree Brown, pleasure activism, emergent strategy, and all of her work, and largely, generations of Black women have been saying, “Yo, you've got to take care [chuckles] of yourself to be able to affect change.” Those people have been the most effective and powerful change makers. So definitely, if you're curious about this topic, I urge you to go listen to some brilliant Black women about it. CASEY: We'll link that in the show notes, too. I think a lot about engineering managers and one way that doesn't come up a lot is you can get training for engineering managers to be stronger managers and for some reason, that is not usually an option people reach for. It could happen through HR, or it could happen if you have a training budget and you're a new EM, you could use your training budget to hire coaching from someone. I'm an example. But there's a ton of people out there that offer this kind of thing. If you don't learn the leadership skills when you switch roles, if you don't take time to learn those skills that are totally learnable, you're not going to have them and it's hard to apply them. There's a lot of pressure to magically know them now that you've switched hats. MAE: And how I don't understand why everyone in life doesn't have a therapist, [laughs] I don't understand why everyone in life doesn't have multiple job coaches at any time. Like why are we not sourcing more ideas and problem-solving strategies, and thinking we need to be the repository of how to handle X, Y, Z situation? CASEY: For some reason, a lot of people I've talked to think their manager is supposed to do that for them. Their manager is supposed to be their everything; their boss. They think the boss that if they're bad, you quit your job. If they're good, you'll stay. That boss ends up being their career coach for people, unless they're a bad career coach and then you're just stuck. Because we expect it so strongly and that is an assumption I want everyone listening to question. Do you need your manager at work to be that person for you? If they are, that's great. You're very fortunate. If not, how can you find someone? Someone in the community, a friend, family member, a professional coach, there's other options, other mentors in the company. You don't have to depend on that manager who doesn't have time for you to give you that kind of support. CHELSEA: So to that end, my thinking around management and mentorship changed about the time I hit – hmm. It was a while ago now, I don't know, maybe 6 years as a programmer, or something like that. Because before that, I was very bought into this idea that your manager is your mentor and all these types of things. There was something that I realized. There were two things that I realized. The first one was that, for me, most of my managers were not well set up to be mentors to me and this is why. Well, the truth is I level up quickly and for many people who are managers in a tech organization, they were technologists for 3 to 5 years before they became managers. They were often early enough in their career that they didn't necessarily know what management entailed, or whether they should say no based on what they were interested in. Many managers in tech figure out what the job is and then try to find as many surreptitious ways as possible to get back into the code. MAE: Yeah. CHELSEA: Additionally, many of those managers feel somewhat insecure about their weakening connection to the code base of the company that they manage. MAE: Yeah. CHELSEA: And so it can be an emotionally fraught experience for them to be mentor to someone whose knowledge of the code base that they are no longer in makes them feel insecure. So I learned that the most effective mentors for me – well, I learned something about the most effective mentors for me and I learned something of the most effective managers for me. I learned that the most effective managers for me either got way out ahead of me experience wise before they became managers, I mean 10 years, 15 years, 20 years, because those are not people who got promoted to management because they didn't know to say no. Those are people who got promoted to management after they got tired of writing code and they no longer staked their self-image on whether they're better coders than the people that they manage. That's very, very important. The other type of person who was a good manager for me was somebody who had never been a software engineer and there are two reasons for that. First of all, they trended higher on raw management experience. Second of all, they were not comparing their technical skillset to my technical skillset in a competitive capacity and that made them better managers for me, honestly. It made things much, much easier. And then in terms of mentors, I found that I had a lot more luck going outside of the organization I was working for mentors and that's again, for two reasons. The first one is that a lot of people, as they gain experience, go indie. Just a lot of people, like all kinds. Some of my sort of most trusted mentors. Avdi Grimm is somebody I've learned a lot from, indie effectively at this point. GeePawHill, like I mentioned, indie effectively at this point. Kenneth Mayer, indie effectively at this point. And these are all people who had decades of experience and the particular style of programming that I was doing very early in my career for many years. So that's the first reason. And then the second reason is that at your job, it is in your interest to succeed at everything you try—at most jobs. And jobs will tell you it's okay to fail. Jobs will tell you it's okay to like whatever, not be good at things and to be learning. But because if I'm drawing a paycheck from an organization, I do not feel comfortable not being good at the thing that I am drawing the paycheck for. MAE: Same. CHELSEA: And honestly, even if they say that that's the case, when the push comes to shove and there's a deadline, they don't actually want you to be bad at things. Come on! That doesn't make any sense. But I've been able to find ambitious projects that I can contribute to not for pay and in those situations, I'm much more comfortable failing because I can be like, “You know what, if they don't like my work, they can have all their money back.” And I work on a couple projects like that right now where I get to work with very experienced programmers on projects that are interesting and challenging, and a lot of times, I just absolutely eat dirt. My first PR doesn't work and I don't know what's wrong and the whole description is like somebody please help and I don't feel comfortable doing that on – if I had to do it at work, I would do it, but I'm not comfortable doing it. I firmly believe that for people to accelerate their learning to their full capacity for accelerating their learning, they must place themselves in situations where they not only might fail, but it's pretty likely. Because that's what's stretching your capacity to the degree that you need to get better and that's just not a comfortable situation for somewhere that you depend on to make a living. And that ended up being, I ended up approaching my management and my mentorship as effectively mutually exclusive things and it ended up working out really well for me. At this particular point in time, I happened to have a manager who happened to get way out ahead of me technically, and is willing to review PRs and so, that's very nice. But it's a nice-to-have. It's not something that I expect of a manager and it's ended up making me much more happy and manage relationships. MAE: I agree with all of that. So well said, Chelsea. CHELSEA: I try, I try. [laughs] Casey, are there things that you look for specifically in a manager? CASEY: Hmm. I guess for that question, I want to take the perspective inward, into myself. What do I need support on and who can I get that from? And this is true as also an independent worker as a consultant freelancer, too. I need support for when things are hard and I can be validated from people who have similar experiences, that kind of like emotional support. I need technical support and skills, like the sales I don't have yet and I have support for that, thank goodness. Individuals, I need ideally communities and individuals, both. They're both really important to me and some of these could be in a manager, but lately, I'm my own manager and I can be none of those things, really. I'm myself. I can't do this external support for myself. Even when I'm typing into a spreadsheet and the computer's trying to be a mirror, it's not as good as talking to another person. Another perspective that I need support on is how do I know what I'm doing is important and so, I do use spreadsheets as a mirror for that a lot of the time for myself. Like this impact is having this kind of magnitude of impact on this many people and then that calculates to this thing, maybe. Does that match my gut? That's literally what I want to know, too. The numbers aren't telling me, but talking to other people about impact on their projects really kind of solidifies that for me. And it's not always the client directly. It could be someone else who sees the impact I'm having on a client. Kind of like the manager, I don't want to expect clients to tell me the impact I'm having. In fact, for business reasons, I should know what the impact is myself, to tell them, to upsell them and continue it going anyway. So it really helps me to have peers to talk through about impact. Like that, too types of support. What other kinds of support do you need as consultants that I didn't just cover? MAE: I still need – and I have [laughs] hired Casey to help me. I still need a way to explain what it is that I am offering and what the value of that really is in a way that is clear and succinct. Every time I've gone to make a website, or a list of what it is that I offer, I end up in the hundreds of bullet points [laughs] and I just don't – [overtalk] CASEY: Yeah, yeah. MAE: Have a way to capture it yet. So often when people go indie, they do have a unique idea, a unique offering so finding a way to summarize what that is can be really challenging. I loved hearing you two when you were talking about knowing what kinds of work you want to do and who your ideal customer is. Those are things I have a clearer sense of, but how to make that connection is still a little bit of a gap for me. But you reminded me in that and I just want to mention here this book, The Pumpkin Plan, like a very bro business book situation, [chuckles] but what is in there is so good. I don't want to give it away and also, open up another topic [laughs] that I'll talk too long about. So I won't go into it right now, but definitely recommend it. One of the things is how to call your client list and figure out what is the most optimal situation that's going to lead toward the most impact for everybody. CASEY: One of the things I think back to a lot is user research and how can we apply that this business discovery process. I basically used the same techniques that were in my human computer interaction class I took 10, or 15 years ago. Like asking open ended questions, trying to get them to say what their problems are, remembering how they said it in their own words and saying it back to them—that's a big, big step. But then there's a whole lot of techniques I didn't learn from human computer interaction, that are sales techniques, and my favorite resource for that so far is called SPIN selling where SPIN is an acronym and it sounds like a wonky technique that wouldn't work because it's just like a random technique to pull out. I don't know, but it's not. This book is based on studies and it shows what you need to do to make big ticket sales go through, which is very different than selling those plastic things with the poppy bubbles in the mall stand in the middle of the hallway. Those low-key things they can manipulate people into buying and people aren't going to return it probably. But big-ticket things need a different approach than traditional sales and marketing knowledge and I really like the ideas in SPIN selling. I don't want to go into them today. We'll talk about it later. But those are two of the perspectives I bring to this kind of problem, user research and the SPIN selling techniques. I want to share what my ideal client would be. I think that's interesting, too. So I really want to help companies be happier and more effective. I want to help the employees be happier and more effective, and that has the impact on the users of the company, or whoever their clients are. It definitely impacts that, which makes it a thing I can sell, thankfully. So an organization usually knows when they're not the most happy, or the most effective. They know it, but my ideal client isn't just one that knows that, but they also have leadership buy-in; they have some leader who really cares and can advocate for making it better and they just don't know how. They don't have enough resources to make it happen in their org. Maybe they have, or don't have experience with it, but they need support. That's where I come in and then my impact really is on the employees. I want to help the employees be happier and more effective. That's the direct impact I want, and then it has the really strong, indirect impact on the business outcomes. So in that vein, I'm willing to help even large tech companies because if I can help their employees be happier, that is a positive impact. Even if I don't care about large tech companies' [chuckles] business outcomes, I'm okay with that because my focus is specifically on the employees. That's different than a lot of people I talk to; they really just want to support like nonprofit type, stronger impact of the mission and that totally makes sense to me, too. MAE: Also, it is possible to have a large and ever growing equitably run company. It is possible. I do want to contribute toward that existing in the world and as much as there's focus on what the ultimate looking out impact is, I care about the experience of employees and individuals on the way to get there. I'm not a utilitarian thinker. CASEY: Yeah, but we can even frame it in a utilitarian way if we need to. If we're like a stakeholder presentation, if someone leaves the company and it takes six months to replace them and their work is in the meantime off board to other people, what's the financial impact of all that. I saw a paper about it. Maybe I can dig it up and I'll link to it. It's like to replace a person in tech it costs a $100K. So if they can hire a consultant for less than a $100K to save one person from leaving, it pays for itself. If that number is right, or whatever. Maybe it was ten employees for that number. The paper will say much better than I will. CHELSEA: I think that in mentioning that Casey, you bring up something that businesses I think sometimes don't think about, which is some of the hidden costs that can easily be difficult to predict, or difficult to measure those kinds of things. One of the hidden costs is the turnover costs is the churn cost because there's how much it takes to hire another person and then there's the amount of ramp time before that person gets to where the person who left was. CASEY: Right, right, right. CHELSEA: And that's also a thing. There's all the time that developers are spending on forensic software analysis in order to find out all of the context that got dropped when a person left. CASEY: Yeah. The one person who knew that part of the code base, the last one is gone, uh oh. CHELSEA: Right. CASEY: It's a huge trust. And then engineering team is often really interested in conveying that risk. But if they're not empowered enough and don't have enough bandwidth time and energy to make the case, the executive team, or whoever will never hear it and they won't be able to safeguard against it. MAE: Or using the right language to communicate it. CASEY: Right, right. And that's its own skill. That's trainable, too thankfully. But we don't usually train engineers in that, traditionally. Engineers don't receive that training unless they go out of their way for it. PMs and designers, too, honestly. Like the stakeholder communication, everybody can work on. MAE: Yeah. CASEY: That's true. MAE: Communication. Everyone can, or not. Yes. [laughs] I learned the phrase indie today. I have never heard it and I really like it! It makes me feel cool inside and so love and – [overtalk] CASEY: Yeah, I have no record label, or I am my own record label, perhaps. MAE: Yo! CASEY: I've got one. I like the idea of having a Patreon, not to make money, but to have to help inspire yourself and I know a lot of friends have had Patreons with low income from it and they were actually upset about it. So I want to go back to those friends and say, “Look, this prove some people find value in what you're doing.” Like the social impact. I might make my own even. Thank you. MAE: I know I might do it too. It's good. That's good. CHELSEA: Absolutely. Highly recommended. One thing that I want to take away is the exercise, Casey, that you were talking about of tallying up all of the different things that a given position contributes in terms of a person's needs. Because I think that an exercise like that would be extremely helpful for, for example, some of my students who are getting their very first tech jobs. Students receive a very one-dimensional message about the way that tech employment goes. It tends to put set of five companies that show remain unnamed front and center, which whatever, but I would like them to be aware of the other options. And there is a very particular way of gauging the value of a tech position that I believe includes fewer dimensions than people should probably consider for the health of their career long-term and not only the health of their career, but also their health in their career. CASEY: One more parting thought I want to share for anyone is you need support for your career growth, for your happiness. If you're going to be a consultant, you need support for that. Find support in individuals and communities, you deserve that support and you can be that support for the people who are supporting you! It can be mutual. They need that, too.

WSJ Your Money Briefing
Companies Boost 401(k) Benefits to Retain Workers

WSJ Your Money Briefing

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 9:46


While some companies are increasing wages to lure new workers and retain existing staff, others are increasing contributions they make to employees' 401(k) retirement accounts. WSJ retirement reporter Anne Tergesen joins host J.R. Whalen to discuss. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

XChateau - Navigating the Business of Wine
Selection and Differentiation in Grocery Wine w/ Curtis Mann MW, Albertson's

XChateau - Navigating the Business of Wine

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 34:44


Grocery stores are one of the biggest sales channels for wine. Curtis Mann, Group Vice President of Alcohol of the Albertson's Companies, gives us the inside scoop on buying trends, how to sell into Albertson's, and the rise of the use of digital. Learn about the dynamics of the grocery wine market and what makes Albertson's “locally great, nationally strong.”Don't forget - you can support the show on Patreon to help us keep bringing you great wine business content! Detailed Show Notes: Curtis' backgroundMBA at UC Davis in Wine Marketing and AccountingMarketing at Trinchero Family EstatesWorked in wine retail at a small placeMoved to IRI in category management in wine and spirits insightsWas Raley's wine buyer for 8 yearsGrocery as part of the wine marketMulti-outlet wine market ~$12-13B / yearTotal wine market ~$60-70B / year (multi-outlet ~20% of the total market)Albertson's Companies' wine overview~25 different grocery brands, ~2,000 storesWine is a key element of business - it drives sales and customer loyalty; some customers come to stores because of the wine selectionSome stores have up to 3,000 wine SKUsStores with more premium selections are correlated with location (high socio-economic demographics) vs. by grocery store brandFocus is more on the “premium” price segment ($9+ based on IRI)Top brands - Barefoot, Kendall Jackson, up-and-coming brands - Butter, Josh, but wine is very diversified. Big brands are still a small part of the marketPremiumization helping imports, including New Zealand Sauvignon BlancWine buying trendsConsumers are called to authenticity - they want to know what's in their wine, the appellation, sustainability, and organicConvenience - cans, seltzer, ready to drink Premiumization - $10-20/bottle, $30-50/bottle, up to $100/bottle (e.g., high-end Bordeaux, Napa Cabernet) ranges all doing well, some categories accelerating with potential out-of-stocksCovid trends - return to cooking, consumers go to Albertson's as a one-stop-shopWith restaurants reopening, a little bit of regression in sales, but still robust as cooking at home has been stickyCustomer demographics (for wine)Gen X / Baby Boomers - still buying a lot (more in bulk and volume), but less than beforeMillennials are the new customers - buying more, less loyal to wine vs. other drinks, and have less expendable income; their preferences are different from Gen X and Baby BoomersTo meet the changing demographics, Curtis looks forward 3-5 years to develop his shelf set/selections of wineConsiderable diversity of reasons people buy wine - occasion based purchasing (e.g., going to a party)Many people exploring and learning about wine (proof point - the massive increase in people taking WSET classes, including lots of consumers, not just professionals)Promotions / discountingLimited brand loyalty in wine, customers often default to priceGiven that, promotions are pretty importantWe need to work between price and product to optimize sales and not over-rely on priceWine selectionWhat does it mean to customers? Each wine must have a purpose vs. the other ~1,500 SKUs on the shelfThis could be style, story, or location/appellationWant to remove redundancy on the shelfTagline - ‘locally great, nationally strong'; try to give local stores more voice (e.g., Portland stores have more Willamette Valley Pinot Noirs)Flagship Stores (e.g., Andronico's, Pavilions) - higher-end, eclectic offeringsSteps to sell into Alberston's - have the 4 P's put together - distribution network, pricing, product, and where you fit on the shelfGenerally need to place wine 4-6 months in advanceIt requires a UPC code on the bottlePrivate Label / “Own Brand” winesThe goal is to provide the best price to value for customersThe intent is to drive loyaltyNot a dominant part of the businessTrying to create wines that are a draw and get good scoresSelection is built around education, desire to learn about wine category through own brandsSuppliers have connections to maintain supply, which can help Own Brands overcome supply challenges (e.g., 2020 Napa, 2021 New Zealand)Digital AdoptionVirtual tastings - have done well, 1,000s of people sign up, people buy the wines beforehand or buy wines later and watch the tasting on YouTubeAppeals to groups of customers who don't get to visit wine countryWill continue post-CovidDo education tastings 1x/monthKeys to engagement - consumers have lots of questionsThe team engages with customers via chatKeep it educational - need a balance of explaining concepts but keep it understandableConsumers using their phones more for education want to reduce the complexity of wineWine e-commerce - working on expanding this, challenging due to state regulationsExpanding drive up and go (“DOAG”)Delivery (e.g. - Instacart) growingStill a small portion of salesCore elements of success for the grocery channelThe selection keeps people in the storeRelating the wine to the food in the store (food - wine pairing)E-commerceConvenience (e.g., ready to drinks)

The Leadership Podcast
TLP290: "How can I be a good person and do well at work?"

The Leadership Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 44:36


Scott Shute was the Head of Mindfulness and Compassion Programs at LinkedIn, and specializes in combining the practicalities of leading in the modern business world with the wisdom of ancient traditions to help individuals and companies be leaders in conscious business. He is also the author of “The Full Body Yes,” that shows how to find a meaningful life, and meaningful work. Scott brings his years of expertise in mental well-being to share how leaders can better support their staff when so many people are currently disengaged.   Key Takeaways [3:50] Companies that have fully transferred into the information age, like LinkedIn, have no hard assets. Their only asset of value is their people. [6:15] Jobs aren't fun. Leaders need to think about different ways on how to design a job that's engaging. [6:20] Scott shares his definition of compassion and how it works in a business setting. [7:45] If you only focus on shareholder interests, you are less profitable. However, if you focus on providing value for employees and customers, you perform better than the S&P 500. [9:00] If you treat all of your employees the same, then guess what, they'll look for a more engaging boss that cares. [10:50] You often hear, “bring your whole self to work” but no one wants to hear about your messy divorce every day at work. Scott explores what this phrase really means. [13:25] Scott realizes that most of the classes he took in university were useless for the real world. [13:55] Our well-being used to be taboo to talk about, but now the dialogue has opened up because of what we're going through as a collective. [21:15] When you want truth as much as you want air to breathe, then that's when you'll find it. [27:20] Scott talks about the concept of Ikigai and how it can be used as a good filter to determine whether you're on the right path. [32:50] Every tough situation we go through only builds self-awareness and compassion for other people. [37:50] A good exercise is to keep asking yourself why. Why do you want what you currently want? Why, why, why? You'll often discover that you just want to be fulfilled and achieve happiness. [39:55] With everything happening “now” or in an instant, Scott shares how leaders can help train their team to practice delayed gratification. [42:00] Listener challenge: Take a moment to say I love you to yourself.   Quotable Quotes “Fifty-six percent of Americans are currently actively looking for their next role. My belief is that that 56% will find leaders that do invest in them.” “To be a great leader, you have to be a student of the game. You watch great leaders and listen to podcasts, and have a growth mindset.” “Why are you being so upset? I realized it was because I was so invested and attached to the outcome.” “It starts with self-compassion. It starts with the idea that you love yourself.”   Resources Mentioned Sponsored by: Darley.com Scottshute.com Scott on LinkedIn Grab Scott's book, The Full body Yes  

Brick & Mortar Reborn
PODCAST 74: Talkdesk's Devon Mychal & Kustomer's Vikas Bhambri: Rethinking Employee Management & Experience Strategies in 2022

Brick & Mortar Reborn

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 44:50


Is the Great Resignation just a buzzword, or is it rea? Either way, employees are quitting their jobs and looking for new roles. And research shows that workers who are engaged in their work and workplace can actually be more likely to outperform competitors. It’s time to start rethinking employee management and come up with new strategies for improving the employee experience. Here to talk about this subject today is Vikas Bhambri from Kustomer and Devon Mychal from Talkdesk. In their conversation today, they’ll be exploring ways for companies to have a truly employee-centered workforce with top-down advocacy for employee wellbeing. Listen to the episode to hear them discuss why it’s more difficult to sustain engagement in the workforce, especially for deskless employees, how to address staff shortages and reductions, and what ripple effects a workforce experiences from high turnover. Topics Discussed in Today’s Episode: ✔ What Vikas does at Kustomer ✔ What Devon does at Talkdesk ✔ Why has it become more difficult to build and maintain an engaged workforce ✔ The perfect storm of legacy concepts, remote working, and bring-your-own-device ✔ Addressing staff shortages and reductions ✔ How to set up workers for success ✔The ripple effects of high turnover rates in a company ✔ Hits to morale due to turnover ✔ Training and updates due to new technology ✔ How recognition plays a role and how companies should manage it ✔ Trend changes that are going to have a future impact on workforce management Resources: Devon Mychal Vikas Bhambri Talkdesk Kustomer QUOTES: “The staffing shortage is real and companies are getting creative in terms of how they’re approaching these things.” –Devon Mychal “Even for very large legacy brands and companies, you’re seeing how a change in leadership can not only have an impact on the employee brand but ultimately the bottom line and the share price.” –Vikas Bhambri “Any individual leaving a company has a profound impact.” –Vikas Bhambri “Companies that aren’t investing in a strong customer experience brand and really making that a priority are having trouble attracting agents and keeping agents because they don’t want to be a part of something that doesn’t value the work that they do. –Devon Mychal “The recognition has to be meaningful, it

Action and Ambition
John Vitti Enables People Make Predictions On Favorite Brands, Musicians, and Companies For Rewards

Action and Ambition

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 29:05


Welcome to another episode of The Action and Ambition Podcast! Joining us today is John Vitti, CEO of VersusGame. VersusGame is an innovative gaming app that has already given away $7 Million in cash winnings, with a significant portion of this amount given during the pandemic. Its unique mobile platform is designed to put your money where your mouth is.VersusGame allows everyday people to compete one on one with A-List Celebs and other content creators as they make guesses about all sports, entertainment, and pop cultures. Tune in to learn more!

Tales from the Crypt
CD51: bitcoin companies keeping lists of bitcoiners and our transaction history with @BTCxZelko, @LaserHodl, @Diverter_NoKYC, and @stephanlivera

Tales from the Crypt

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 149:35


This is the last episode of Citadel Dispatch on the TFTC podcast feed. If you want to continue listening to the show search Citadel Dispatch in your favorite podcast app or click this link: https://www.podpage.com/citadeldispatch/ EPISODE: 51 BLOCK: 719340 PRICE: 2358 sats per dollar TOPICS: tradeoffs of kyc bitcoin, bitcoin companies keeping lists of bitcoiners and our transaction history, acquiring bitcoin without providing intimate personal information, personal responsibility @BTCxZelko: https://twitter.com/BTCxZelko @LaserHodl: https://twitter.com/LaserHodl @Diverter_NoKYC: https://twitter.com/Diverter_NoKYC @stephanlivera: https://twitter.com/stephanlivera streamed live every tuesday: https://citadeldispatch.com twitch: https://twitch.tv/citadeldispatch​ bitcointv: https://bitcointv.com/video-channels/citadeldispatch/videos podcast: https://anchor.fm/citadeldispatch​ telegram: https://t.me/citadeldispatch​ support the show: https://tippin.me/@odell stream sats to the show: https://www.fountain.fm/ join the chat: http://citadel.chat/

Citadel Dispatch
CD51: bitcoin companies keeping lists of bitcoiners and our transaction history with @BTCxZelko, @LaserHodl, @Diverter_NoKYC, and @stephanlivera

Citadel Dispatch

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 149:35


EPISODE: 51 BLOCK: 719340 PRICE: 2358 sats per dollar TOPICS: tradeoffs of kyc bitcoin, bitcoin companies keeping lists of bitcoiners and our transaction history, acquiring bitcoin without providing intimate personal information, personal responsibility @BTCxZelko: https://twitter.com/BTCxZelko @LaserHodl: https://twitter.com/LaserHodl @Diverter_NoKYC: https://twitter.com/Diverter_NoKYC @stephanlivera: https://twitter.com/stephanlivera streamed live every tuesday: https://citadeldispatch.com twitch: https://twitch.tv/citadeldispatch​ bitcointv: https://bitcointv.com/video-channels/citadeldispatch/videos podcast: https://anchor.fm/citadeldispatch​ telegram: https://t.me/citadeldispatch​ support the show: https://tippin.me/@odell stream sats to the show: https://www.fountain.fm/ join the chat: http://citadel.chat/

1A
Remote Learning Ushered In A New Era Of Online Academic Surveillance. What's Next?

1A

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 29:43


According to a recent survey from the Center for Democracy and Technology, around 80 percent of K-12 schools are now using software that tracks students' computer activity. Companies can monitor students' online activity while on school accounts or devices and will flag warning signs for suicide or violence.Even so, some privacy advocates are concerned about the growing surveillance and how the data is stored and used.Colleges also expanded their monitoring capabilities. Proctoring programs meant to prevent cheating use artificial intelligence to try to identify when a student's eyes move away from the screen. They have provoked privacy concerns and proven unreliable.How should schools monitor students online? How do we keep kids safe while also protecting their privacy?Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find us on Twitter @1A.

The Quest with Justin Kan
Eren Bali Explains How He Founded Two $2B+ Companies

The Quest with Justin Kan

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 61:56


Welcome to The Quest Pod Season 2: Episode 37 with Eren Bali.Eren was the founding CEO of Udemy, an open online course provider which now offers 180K+ courses to 40M students. He is now the co-founder and CEO of Carbon Health, a vertically integrated, tech-enabled healthcare provider which started in 2015 and was most recently valued at $3.3B. Eren started the company after his mother fell ill and the traditional healthcare system took several months to reach the proper diagnosis and treatment. It began as a mobile app enabling patients to communicate directly with doctors, store medical records and facilitate telehealth appointments. It now has 90 physical clinics located in 14 states within the US.In this episode, Eren talks about the up and downs of founding Udemy and Carbon Health, the importance of perseverance and many other valuable learnings.Check out Eren's LinkedIn ► https://twitter.com/erenbaliFollow Eren on Twitter ► https://www.linkedin.com/in/erenbali/ 

Squawk on the Street
Microsoft Gaming and Activision Blizzard CEOs on Their Companies' Mega-Deal, Goldman Sachs Misses and Stocks Tumble, Exxon's Net Zero Carbon Emissions Goal, and BlackRock's Fink on "Woke" Capitalism

Squawk on the Street

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 46:31


Carl Quintanilla, Jim Cramer and David Faber led off the show with news of a mega-deal: Microsoft agreeing to acquire "Call of Duty" videogame publisher Activision Blizzard for $95 per share or $68.7 billion in cash. Becky Quick, Jim and David interviewed Microsoft Gaming CEO Phil Spencer and Activision Blizzard CEO Bobby Kotick in a CNBC Exclusive. There was more for the anchors to discuss on a busy Tuesday: Markets in sell-off mode as yields rise and Goldman Sachs posts a fourth-quarter earnings miss, BlackRock CEO Larry Fink out with his annual letter in which he says stakeholder capitalism is not "woke," Exxon Mobil aims for net zero greenhouse gas emissions by 2050, the tech sector extends its 2022 slump and GlaxoSmithKline rejects Unilever's $68.4 billion offer to acquire GSK's consumer health business.

HBR IdeaCast
How Companies Reckon with Past Wrongdoing

HBR IdeaCast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 22:58


Sarah Federman, assistant professor at the University of Baltimore, studies how companies handle their historical misdeeds and what that means for employees and customers. From insurance firms that backed slave owners to railroad companies that transported victims of the Holocaust, many legacy companies can find they played a role in past transgressions. Federman makes a moral and practical argument for uncovering and addressing these misdeeds, even though there may no longer be legal repercussions. And she shares how some leaders have been transparent, apologized, and found meaningful ways to make up for their organization's difficult history. Federman wrote the HBR article “How Companies Can Address Their Historical Transgressions: Lessons from the Slave Trade and the Holocaust.”

B2B Revenue Leadership - CEO, CRO, CMO, VC, Sales and Marketing Growth Hacking
THE SECRETS TO WINNING IN ANY B2B INDUSTRY AS A SALES LEADER

B2B Revenue Leadership - CEO, CRO, CMO, VC, Sales and Marketing Growth Hacking

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 28:07


Here is a FAQ Video on the Courses: https://youtu.be/0F7imrzjXWs Here is a deep dive into which course is best for you: https://youtu.be/JM_jgS8M-iU   https://www.b2bRevenue.com - Get Your Free E-Book on How Companies make Decisions. FAQ: 1 YEAR ACCESS, PAY MONTHLY OR ANNUALLY NOT A SUBSCRIPTION OFFICE HOURS EVERY  OTHER WEEK VIA ZOOM. 1 HOUR GROUP Q&A. UNLIMITED 1-ON-1'S  ARE FREE AS LONG AS THEY CAN BE SHARED IN THE COURSE. 1-ON-1 ARE FULL ACCESS ON DAY ONE - NOTHING IS GATED OR TIME RELEASED. ALL CONTENT IS VIDEO BASED AND SELF PACED I RECOMMEND TAKE COURSE ONCE WITHOUT NOTES OR APPLYING IT SO YOU UNDERSTAND THE BIG PICTURE FIRST. THEN TAKE AND APPLY IT STEP BY STEP. YOU START WHEN YOU WANT AND GO AS FAST OR SLOW AS NEEDED.   Email me additional questions: briangburns@me.com     — SAMPLE EMAIL TO EXPENSE THE COURSE MGR,   I have been listening to the brutal truth about sales podcast for X months and it speaks to the issues we face.   They currently offer a course that includes video instruction, group Q&A and One-on-One coaching. I'm committed to my own personal development and would like your help in expensing the course.   It would pay for itself if I closed only one new deal of $X value.   Please let me know by Friday if I can move forward with this 1 year course.   Thanks, ME ———————————————————————————————————— Audible 30 day Free Trial: http://www.audibletrial.com/BrutalTruth     Check out my YouTube channel and watch my Free Sales/Social Selling Course. https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=MaverickMethod       Listen to The Sales Questions PodCast: https://itun.es/i67d3Ry     Listen to The B2B Revenue Leadership Show: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/b2b-revenue-leadership-show/id1174976428?mt=2     Twitter: @briangburns LinkedIn: Brian G. Burns Facebook: Brian Burns YouTube: Brian Burns SALES PODCAST

FactSet U.S. Daily Market Preview
Financial Market Preview - Tuesday 18-Jan

FactSet U.S. Daily Market Preview

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 5:25


US futures are indicating a lower as of 05:00 ET, following the MLK day holiday. European equity markets lower, with technology underperforming amid backup in yields. This follows mostly weaker levels in Asia. Bond volatility remains elevated with front end of US curve leading broader backup in rates. Companies mentioned: Toyota, NeoGames, Aspire Global, Unilever, GlaxoSmithKline, Citigroup, DBS

The Bricks King Podcast: LEGO
BREAKING NEWS LEGO Ideas The Globe

The Bricks King Podcast: LEGO

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 11:39


This is a breaking news edition to discuss the new LEGO Ideas The Globe set coming February 1st. Find us everywhere thanks to https://linktr.ee/thebrickskingLEGO, the LEGO logo, the Minifigure, and the Brick and Knob configurations are trademarks of the LEGO Group of Companies. ©2022 The LEGO Group.THE BRICKS KING PODCAST IS NOT ENDORSED BY THE LEGO GROUP OR AFFILIATED IN ANY WAY.

Leadership Beyond Borders
Forging an adaptable mindset in both individuals and companies

Leadership Beyond Borders

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 60:00


Why does it seem that adaptable people and organizations process change more quickly and with what is perceived as seamless effort? In March 2020, as the pandemic came into full force, the companies that grasped the new situation and were able to provide innovative solutions to their successful organizations succeeded. The individuals that embraced change and adjusted their expectations around how they needed to carry out their jobs and their lives that came out on top. What was the common denominator, adaptability? Though adaptability is an innate human skill, most people have lost it along the way. But it is possible to regain this ability. Adaptability helps us get through difficult times even when the situation seems hopeless. Its adaptability makes it possible to move smoothly through life and career changes. An adaptable organization has more engaged employees and fosters innovation. In this episode, we speak with an expert that helps individuals and organizations become more adaptable.

The Bricks King Podcast: LEGO
News On A Tues Jan 18th

The Bricks King Podcast: LEGO

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 26:20


Today this episode of News On A Tues rears up and smacks you in your designer face, gives you some designer insight, plus more!Find us everywhere thanks to https://linktr.ee/thebrickskingMusic: www.bensound.comLEGO, the LEGO logo, the Minifigure, and the Brick and Knob configurations are trademarks of the LEGO Group of Companies. ©2022 The LEGO Group.THE BRICKS KING PODCAST IS NOT ENDORSED BY THE LEGO GROUP OR AFFILIATED IN ANY WAY.

Short Wave
When Tracking Your Period Lets Companies Track You

Short Wave

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 14:13


Health apps can be a great way to stay on top of your health. They let users keep track of things like their exercise, mental health, menstrual cycles — even the quality of their skin. But health data researchers Giulia De Togni and Andrea Ford have found that many of these health apps also have a dark side — selling your most personal data to third parties like advertisers, insurers and tech companies.Email us at shortwave@npr.org.

Montgomery Companies
Montgomery Companies Podcast: Chris Prefointaine

Montgomery Companies

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 26:38


Chris Prefontaine is a 3-time best-selling author of Real Estate on Your Terms, The New Rules of Real Estate Investing, and Moneeka Sawyer's Real Estate Investing for Women. After many years of coaching and constantly doing deals himself independently, Chris Prefontaine founded Smart Real Estate Coach in 2014, bringing in his son Nick, daughter Kayla, and son-in-law Zachary as the company began to grow.

The Onside Zone with Big O
Podcast Monday - How Difficult It Is For Service Driven Companies 01 17 2022

The Onside Zone with Big O

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 2:31


Big O discusses the service industry.

Supply Chain Revolution
Human Rights Transparency and Risk Resilience in Supply Chains: MLK Special Release with Justin Dillon of FRDM

Supply Chain Revolution

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 23:42


While environmental sustainability goals have become a high priority for consumers and businesses with a global call to action on climate change, other ESG issues haven't gotten as much attention. For many organizations advocating for human rights in the supply chain is a material priority, and one of the most pressing issues involves ensuring there is no forced labor and child labor in supply chains. But how do you know? -In its 2016 study, the International Labour Organization (ILO) estimated that 40.3 million people worldwide were victims of modern slavery at any given time, 25 million of whom were in forced labor. -To narrow the focus further, an estimated 16 million people were exploited in the private sector. A few years earlier, in 2014, the ILO estimated that forced labor generated annual profits estimated at USD 150 billion. -Women and girls are disproportionately affected, accounting for 71% of those affected by modern slavery. Children represent one-quarter of the total number of victims. President Biden on Dec 23, 2021 signed into law the Uyghur Forced Labor Prevention Act, a bipartisan bill that bans imports from China's Xinjiang region unless the importer can prove they were not made with forced labor. https://www.washingtonpost.com/politics/biden-uyghur-labor-law/2021/12/23/99e8d048-6412-11ec-a7e8-3a8455b71fad_story.html In Episode 68, Justin Dillon, CEO of FRDM shares that, “The COVID-19 pandemic has taught us how broken and opaque supply chains truly are. Supply chain operations and oversight has lagged far behind the innovation curve. Companies today are expected to solve bigger and deeper problems in their supply chains, such as environmental and human rights risks.” ➡️ I am proud to have Justin back as a retuning guest on MLK day to kick off 2022 and to help organizations ensure human rights are protected across global networks by: – Understanding and mapping your network -Organizing your company's supplier and spend data – Creating a predictive bill of materials for everything you buy and applying estimates about environmental, social and business continuity risks – Helping you engage with suppliers, using its toolkit to reduce risk and increase your resilience – Producing helpful reports for your team, stakeholders and regulators – Helping you track improvements to your supply chain and constantly improving your resilience FRDM is the next wave in predictive and proactive ESG risk resilience to realize sustainable outcomes. Organizations that lead on sustainability and impact do not approach them as secondary objectives. They integrate the related objectives into their core motivation, radically altering the corporate equation for success. Companies face numerous barriers to addressing modern slavery, but technology can be an enabler for change. Modernizing the supply chain for greater transparency can create a more visibility and equity for all. FREE WHITE PAPER ➡️ https://lnkd.in/eEr_hWv7 Learn more FRDM and Justin here - FRDM.co

The David Pakman Show
1/17/22: More Rioter Sentences, More Anti-Vax Nonsense (CLASSIC EPISODE FROM 11/18/21)

The David Pakman Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 62:18


MARTIN LUTHER KING DAY / CLASSIC EPISODE FROM NOVEMBER 18, 2021 --On the Show: --Geoffrey West, theoretical physicist and professor at the Sante Fe Institute, joins David to discuss his book Scale: The Universal Laws of Growth, Innovation, Sustainability, and the Pace of Life in Organisms, Cities, Economies, and Companies. Get the book: https://amzn.to/30L0Ytg --Jacob Chansley, known as the "Q-Anon Shaman" from the January 6 Trump riots, is sentenced to 41 months in prison --Polish nationalists shout "death to Jews" while burning books about Jews at a rally --Notable discussions from the David Pakman Show subreddit, including about the Kyle Rittenhouse trial, Hatriot Mail, and more --The FBI raids the home of Republican Congresswoman Lauren Boebert's former campaign manager, Tina Peters, in what doesn't look like an auspicious situation for anyone involved --Lunatic anti-vaccine osteopathic doctor Sherri Tenpenny delivers an insane rant at the "Re-Awaken America" rally where she says vaccinating children against COVID is a "late term abortion" --Bruce Schroeder, the judge in the Kyle Rittenhouse trial, tells a story about when "a black" was in a jury for one of his trials --Possibly the most xenophobic voicemail that we've ever received --On the Bonus Show: Republican Paul Gosar censured over AOC anime video, Republican-backed bill would decriminalize marijuana, investigating high gas prices, much more...

The Bricks King Podcast: LEGO
Ep. 220 Lovebirds On A Train

The Bricks King Podcast: LEGO

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 19:31


On this episode we discuss two new sets from the 2022 catalog. Find us everywhere thanks to https://linktr.ee/thebrickskingMusic: www.bensound.comLEGO, the LEGO logo, the Minifigure, and the Brick and Knob configurations are trademarks of the LEGO Group of Companies. ©2022 The LEGO Group.THE BRICKS KING PODCAST IS NOT ENDORSED BY THE LEGO GROUP OR AFFILIATED IN ANY WAY.

Woman's Hour
Winter Olympics; Ashling Murphy; Gender roles and parenting; Investing in female-founded companies

Woman's Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 56:25


The Winter Olympics begin on 4th February in Beijing and Team GB will be sending around 50 athletes with the hopes of bringing back a clutch of medals. The run up to the Games has been challenging – Covid has made competition extremely difficult for athletes and there have been diplomatic rows over China's human rights records - but who are our medal prospects? Chloe Tilley speaks to Georgina Harland, Britain's first ever female Chef de Mission and Lizzy Yarnold, Britain's most successful Winter Olympian. On Wednesday afternoon, 23-year-old school teacher Ashling Murphy was murdered while jogging along the banks of the Grand Canal in Tullamore, Ireland. It is believed that she was assaulted and killed by a man acting alone. The case has shocked the nation and revived concerns about women's safety in public spaces in Ireland and the UK. We speak to Irish Times reporter Jade Wilson and veteran activist Ailbhe Smyth, who spoke at a vigil for Ashling outside Irish parliament. Women diagnosed with cervical cell changes following cervical screening can be unprepared for the experience - they can feel ashamed, isolated and frightened, that's according to new research by Jo's Cervical Cancer Trust. Kate Sanger is head of policy, from the Trust. In a recent interview on Woman's Hour one guest talked about the limits having a child has placed on her and said she'd “make a better father than mother”. We explore what motherhood and fatherhood mean and the gender roles parents take on in society today. Lawyer Lucy McGrath is the biological mother of a six year old. She's also her family's main bread winner and known as mum. Her wife is mummy and the full time care giver. Do same sex relationships model alternative parenting styles or simply replicate the same power dynamics in a different guise? Lucy joins Emma Barnett to discuss the issues with the academic Dr Charlotte Faircloth. £29.4 billion was invested into UK tech companies in 2021. A record amount. Yet female founded companies only saw 1.1% of it. Down from 2.4% in 2020. Why are female run businesses finding it so hard to get investment funding? Debbie Wasskow OBE, entrepreneur and founder of Allbright, and Samira Ann Qassim, founder of Pink Salt Ventures, explain some of the problems women founders face when starting-up businesses - including finding funding. Presenter: Chloe Tilley Producer: Kirsty Starkey Interviewed Guest: Jade Wilson Interviewed Guest: Ailbhe Smyth Interviewed Guest: Georgina Harland Interviewed Guest: Lizzy Yarnold Interviewed Guest: Kate Sanger Interviewed Guest: Lucy McGrath Interviewed Guest: Dr Charlotte Faircloth Interviewed Guest: Debbie Wasskow Interviewed Guest: Samira Ann Qassim

The Next Generation
#51 – Rohan Gilkes – Creating 4 Million Dollar Companies, Bootstrapping, Should You Work For Someone Else?

The Next Generation

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 18:08


On Today's Mentor series we have on Rohan Gilkes. Rohan has self coined the nickname the Bootstrapped Stuntman because he has grown over 4 different businesses to doing $1M+/year and has done it across several categories like Software, E-commerce, even Service Businesses like Maid Cleaning. Let us know what you think on Twitter @c_gro and @gio__aa

Fck Work But Ima Go
Ep. 062 - Companies Need to Observe Black Holidays

Fck Work But Ima Go

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 44:42


Natasha, Jenna and Gip the Realtor vents about companies that aren't celebrating Black Holidays especially with society becoming more aware of racial injustice. Jenna and Natasha discussed the Employment Law, California's Governor Newsom ordered state workers, healthcare workers, and other employees who work in “high-risk congregate settings” to get vaccinated or submit weekly COVID-19 testing and wear masks. Natasha and Jenna covered the Career Topic, "Leaving a job because of Mental Health." Drug Test Stories! Drug Test Stories! Who Passed today?? Who failed today?? LMAO! IYKYK! Demarcus from Richmond, VA pulls up for an interview and onsite cheek swab drug test. Check out our website: http://www.fckworkpodcast.com --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/fckworkpodcast/message

REACH OR MISS
Ep. 250 – Only those who quit fail. never, ever give up. You just have to keep going

REACH OR MISS

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 50:55


There are a few reasons why so many entrepreneurs fail, and around 90% of the entrepreneurships fail. However, many of the most successful entrepreneurs I interviewed for my podcast told me the same thing; Keep going. Only those who quit fail. In today's episode, I chose to focus on the stories of three successful entrepreneurs. The main reason for their success was their state of mind; no matter what happened and how big the failures they experienced were, they never ever gave up until they succeeded. I think you will find those stories very inspiring. Brian Roland: “A lot of failures look like trial and error. It's an iterative process. It kind of hits the failure category but we learned so much through the process that it's hard to see it as a failure.” Brian Roland is a Social Entrepreneur and Founder of Abenity, the 6x Inc. 5000 Company that's powering corporate perks for top brands including U.S. Bank and MasterCard. And while Abenity provides millions of subscribers with private discounts, the company's social mission is fighting extreme poverty with every program they deliver. Abenity recently exceeded a million dollars of total giving and hired a CEO to accelerate growth with their fully remote team. Brian lives in Scottsdale with his wife and 3 daughters and is investing his time in efforts that help like-minded entrepreneurs establish a social mission of their own.   Most passionate about In 2006, my brother and I built a SAS company (software as a service) that helps large corporations offer employee perks and benefits to their people. We've negotiated discounts on everything from pizza and the zoo to movie tickets, oil changes, car rentals, and hotels. We put it all in one spot for our clients and brand it to look like the company and the employees saved coupons all over the United States and travel offers across the world where they can enjoy special corporate perks. When we founded our business, we really wanted to stand for something outside of our industry. So, we built our business with a social mission. There was an output to our cause for every input into the business. That is what gives me the most passion and mission at this point in my career. Brian's career and story As a third-grader, I was making laminated folders because my folders would tear apart. I started playing the trumpet when I was young. It teaches you to be the entrepreneurial solo artist, where you're running the show and everybody's looking at you. It teaches you to be a team player, where you're sitting in the symphony and blending in so that nobody notices your contribution, but they hear it, they see everything. That led to teaching trumpet lessons, which led to making a CD and moving to Nashville to go to school, which led me to sell cell phones—having the a-ha moment that the music industry is actually not that entrepreneurial. In that role, I discovered this gap: Companies would love to offer perks and benefits to their people but they had a hard time finding the perks to offer and vetting the purchase to make sure they were good. That's how we built Abenity. We've probably built five or six businesses inside of it. This is what led me, two years ago, to realize that the business had grown to a certain level of maturity where the number of businesses that I could launch within Abenity reached its peak in terms of what the team could have accomplished in a healthy way. There was this moment when it was like our business didn't need an entrepreneur anymore. It needed people to help execute and set standards and focus on growth. Those are areas that fell outside of my passion areas. So, there was time to put the right people in place to take the business to the next level. And that's what we did. Today I'm kind of the chief evangelist for the brand, which allows me to be available here talking to you. The biggest, most critical failure...

The Virtual Summit Podcast
How To Excel At Creating Summits In The Corporate Industry.

The Virtual Summit Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 31:00


EP230 How To Excel At Creating Summits In The Corporate Industry. Demishia Samuels walks us through her top strategies on creating incredible summits in the corporate space.  After 4 years of hosting summits she shares how to get Fortune 500 Companies on a summit, what components are most important for your audience, and how to structure your summit for success.  Plus whether you should run a free summit or a premium summit.  All that and more on today's episode of the Virtual Summit Podcast! https://podcast.virtualsummits.com/230  

The Brutal Truth About Sales & Selling - B2B Social SaaStr Cold Calling SaaS Salesman Advanced Hacker

Here is a FAQ Video on the Courses: https://youtu.be/0F7imrzjXWs Here is a deep dive into which course is best for you: https://youtu.be/JM_jgS8M-iU   https://www.b2bRevenue.com - Get Your Free E-Book on How Companies make Decisions. FAQ: 1 YEAR ACCESS, PAY MONTHLY OR ANNUALLY NOT A SUBSCRIPTION OFFICE HOURS EVERY OTHER WEEK VIA ZOOM. 1 HOUR GROUP Q&A. UNLIMITED 1-ON-1'S ARE FREE AS LONG AS THEY CAN BE SHARED IN THE COURSE. 1-ON-1 ARE FULL ACCESS ON DAY ONE - NOTHING IS GATED OR TIME RELEASED. ALL CONTENT IS VIDEO BASED AND SELF PACED I RECOMMEND TAKE COURSE ONCE WITHOUT NOTES OR APPLYING IT SO YOU UNDERSTAND THE BIG PICTURE FIRST. THEN TAKE AND APPLY IT STEP BY STEP. YOU START WHEN YOU WANT AND GO AS FAST OR SLOW AS NEEDED.   Email me additional questions: briangburns@me.com     — SAMPLE EMAIL TO EXPENSE THE COURSE MGR,   I have been listening to the brutal truth about sales podcast for X months and it speaks to the issues we face.   They currently offer a course that includes video instruction, group Q&A and One-on-One coaching. I'm committed to my own personal development and would like your help in expensing the course.   It would pay for itself if I closed only one new deal of $X value.   Please let me know by Friday if I can move forward with this 1 year course.   Thanks, ME ———————————————————————————————————— Audible 30 day Free Trial: http://www.audibletrial.com/BrutalTruth     Check out my YouTube channel and watch my Free Sales/Social Selling Course. https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=MaverickMethod     Listen to The Sales Questions PodCast: https://itun.es/i67d3Ry     Listen to The B2B Revenue Leadership Show: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/b2b-revenue-leadership-show/id1174976428?mt=2     Twitter: @briangburns LinkedIn: Brian G. Burns Facebook: Brian Burns YouTube: Brian Burns SALES PODCAST

The Howie Carr Radio Network
Paul Pelosi Jr. involved in 5 companies probed by feds plus Krazy Karen Friday - 1.14.22 - Hour 2

The Howie Carr Radio Network

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 39:35


This hour Grace talks about Nancy Pelosi's son Paul Pelosi Jr. and his involvement in 5 shady companies plus Krazy Karens.