Podcasts about Bondi

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Best podcasts about Bondi

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Latest podcast episodes about Bondi

Just TALK, Seruan Hati
Cerita Triski dari Paris semasa pandemi

Just TALK, Seruan Hati

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2022 24:13


Triski yang sudah tinggal 5 tahun di Bondi ,Paris menceritakan bagaimana keadaan di sana dan salah satu tempat brunch favoritnya yaitu HolyBelly membagi-bagikan bahan makanan ketika transisi dari dine in ke delivery. --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/stephan-tambunan/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stephan-tambunan/support

Seize the Yay
D'Leanne Lewis // From Blacktown to Bondi and Luxe Listings Sydney

Seize the Yay

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2022 49:46


Lovely yayborhood we're back into our regular recording schedule and I'm SO pumped to have an epic guest for our first episode back. I had the privilege of sitting down with D'Leanne Lewis, a real estate mogul and star of Luxe Listings Sydney – many of you have probably already binged the first two seasons showing the ins and outs of one of the most cutthroat real estate markets in the world (and some seriously insane properties) and Season 3 is NOW available on Prime Video from today September 30. D'Leanne is a powerhouse in so many ways – not only is she widely considered one of Australia's leading real estate agents with 30 years of experience under her belt, she was also a single working mother of two at the time of recording and in the week since then has become a mother of THREE at 50 years old!!! But in what you know is my favourite kind of pathyay, she never expected to become a celebrity real estate agent or TV show star… In fact, she spent her earlier years in Johannesburg before moving to Blacktown Sydney and had never heard of Double Bay until she applied for a PA job she saw in the newspaper with Laing + Simmons as a 20 year old. Now, she is a part owner and on the board of Laing + Simmons and absolutely tearing it up on our screens…   I'll let her tell you the rest but what an incredible pathYAY from Blacktown to Bondi and beyond!!! Don't forget to tune into the show from today on Prime Video! WATCH LUXE LISTINGS SEASON 3 HERE   + Announcements on Insta at @spoonful_of_sarah + Join our Facebook community here + Subscribe to not miss out on the next instalment of YAY!

Live Learn Survive - Life hacks to live life to the Max.
Accept what is, let go of what was, have faith in what will be.

Live Learn Survive - Life hacks to live life to the Max.

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2022 34:25


Can you remember when talk about how Maxi met Leigh and Sunrise at Bondi, their sustainable swimwear range. We continue the fashion theme celebrating all things slow fashion! Maxi talk about his swim for the this seasons Lifeguard test and we add the Italian song of summer to the playlist, enjoy this weeks catch up of all things Live Learn Survive.

Astro arXiv | all categories
Numerical Simulation of Hot Accretion Flow around Bondi Radius

Astro arXiv | all categories

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 0:48


Numerical Simulation of Hot Accretion Flow around Bondi Radius by Amin Mosallanezhad et al. on Tuesday 20 September Previous numerical simulations have shown that strong winds can be produced in the hot accretion flows around black holes. Most of those studies focus only on the region close to the central black hole, therefore it is unclear whether the wind production stops at large radii around Bondi radius. Bu et al. 2016 studied the hot accretion flow around the Bondi radius in the presence of nuclear star gravity. They find that when the nuclear stars gravity is important/comparable to the black hole gravity, winds can not be produced around the Bondi radius. However, for some galaxies, the nuclear stars gravity around Bondi radius may not be strong. In this case, whether winds can be produced around Bondi radius is not clear. We study the hot accretion flow around Bondi radius with and without thermal conduction by performing hydrodynamical simulations. We use the virtual particles trajectory method to study whether winds exist based on the simulation data. Our numerical results show that in the absence of nuclear stars gravity, winds can be produced around Bondi radius, which causes the mass inflow rate decreasing inwards. We confirm the results of Yuan et al. which indicates this is due to the mass loss of gas via wind rather convectional motions. arXiv: http://arxiv.org/abs/http://arxiv.org/abs/2209.09461v1

Astro arXiv | all categories
The Effect of Stars on the Dark Matter Spike Around a Black Hole: A Tale of Two Treatments

Astro arXiv | all categories

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 0:47


The Effect of Stars on the Dark Matter Spike Around a Black Hole: A Tale of Two Treatments by Stuart L. Shapiro et al. on Monday 19 September We revisit the role that gravitational scattering off stars plays in establishing the steady-state distribution of collisionless dark matter (DM) around a massive black hole (BH). This is a physically interesting problem that has potentially observable signatures, such as $gamma-$rays from DM annihilation in a density spike. The system serves as a laboratory for comparing two different dynamical approaches, both of which have been widely used: a Fokker-Planck treatment and a two-component conduction fluid treatment. In our Fokker-Planck analysis we extend a previous analytic model to account for a nonzero flux of DM particles into the BH, as well as a cut-off in the distribution function near the BH due to relativistic effects or, further out, possible DM annihilation. In our two-fluid analysis, following an approximate analytic treatment, we recast the equations as a "heated Bondi accretion" problem and solve the equations numerically without approximation. While both the Fokker-Planck and two-fluid methods yield basically the same DM density and velocity dispersion profiles away from the boundaries in the spike interior, there are other differences, especially the determination of the DM accretion rate. We discuss limitations of the two treatments, including the assumption of an isotropic velocity dispersion. arXiv: http://arxiv.org/abs/http://arxiv.org/abs/2209.08105v1

The EO Business Podcast for APAC
Ep 93 New member Linh Podretti reverse engineers herself out of her VA business

The EO Business Podcast for APAC

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 18, 2022 26:45


On a rainy day in Bondi, I met Linh at a local cafe and she was full of beans! Linh is a new member, originally from Melbourne but now living in Sydney. It's great to Her energy levels are infectious and fun.Linh's first business came out of a failed e-commerce business. Lots of people asked her how she did marketing and Outsourcing Angel was born. Just a few years ago Linh made a local hire for her Virtual Assistant business who has helped her transform how she ran it. So much so that Linh went from being really busy to having lots of time on her hands.Dawn Media Productions in the next marketing business Linh is spending most of her time with. This time using offshore staff to grow brands using effective social tools.More info on Linh's businesseshttps://outsourcingangel.com/https://dawnmediaproductions.com/

Astro arXiv | all categories
Multi-group Radiation Magneto-hydrodynamics based on Discrete Ordinates including Compton Scattering

Astro arXiv | all categories

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 0:58


Multi-group Radiation Magneto-hydrodynamics based on Discrete Ordinates including Compton Scattering by Yan-Fei Jiang. on Wednesday 14 September We present a formulation and numerical algorithm to extend the scheme for grey radiation magneto-hydrodynamics (MHD) developed by Jiang (2021) to include the frequency dependence via the multi-group approach. The entire frequency space can be divided into arbitrary number of groups in the lab frame, and we follow the time dependent evolution of frequency integrated specific intensities along discrete rays inside each group. Spatial transport of photons is done in the lab frame while all the coupling terms are solved in the fluid rest frame. Lorentz transformation is used to connect different frames. Radiation transport equation is solved fully implicitly in time while the MHD equations are evolved explicitly so that time step is not limited by the speed of light. A finite volume approach is used for transport in both spatial and frequency spaces to conserve radiation energy density and momentum. The algorithm includes photon absorption, electron scattering as well as Compton scattering, which is calculated by solving the Kompaneets equation. The algorithm is accurate for a wide range of optical depth conditions and can handle both radiation pressure and gas pressure dominated flows. It works for both Cartesian and curvilinear coordinate systems with adaptive mesh refinement. We provide a variety of test problems including radiating sphere, shadow test, absorption of a moving gas, Bondi type flows as well as a collection of test problems for thermal and bulk Compton scattering. We also discuss examples where frequency dependence can make a big difference compared with the grey approach. arXiv: http://arxiv.org/abs/http://arxiv.org/abs/2209.06240v1

Deep in the Weeds - A Food Podcast with Anthony Huckstep
Sushil Aryal (Miss Pearl Bar and Dining) - Engineering a career in food

Deep in the Weeds - A Food Podcast with Anthony Huckstep

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 28:13


He came to Australia from Nepal to study engineering, but Sushil Aryal (Miss Pearl Bar and Dining) fell in love with cooking while working part time in a renowned restaurant in Bondi. Fascinated by food and immersed in the energy of a commercial kitchen, he trained under some of the best chefs in Australia before securing a $50,000 loan and travelling the world for inspiration. Now, having built a new life and family in Australia he leads the team of an exciting new venue. https://www.misspearl.com.au Follow Deep In The Weeds on Instagram    https://www.instagram.com/deepintheweedspodcast/?hl=en Follow Huck https://www.instagram.com/huckstergram/ Follow Rob Locke (Executive Producer) https://www.instagram.com/foodwinedine/ LISTEN TO OUR OTHER FOOD PODCASTS https://linktr.ee/DeepintheWeedsNetwork

Doctors of Running Virtual Roundtable
#105 Reviewing Two Very Different Max Cushion Shoes (Hoka Bondi 8!)

Doctors of Running Virtual Roundtable

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 45:44


These days, max cushion midsoles aren't just for racing shoes. Maximally cushioned trainers are a staple in many runners' rotations. Today, Matt & DJ review two max-stack offerings, one a veteran to the scene and the other a newcomer. First up is the HOKA Bondi 8, the latest update to one of the original max cushion shoes. Next is Mizuno's Wave NEO Ultra, which offers not only maximum cushioning, but sustainability with over 50% of the materials used made from sustainable or recycled materials. They compare/contrast this two cushioned shoes and explore whether a sustainable shoe can offer real running performance. The Subjective: what's your favorite easy day shoe? Chapters 0:00 - Intro 2:20 - The Subjective: what's your favorite max-cushion training shoe? 7:03 - Hoka Bondi 8 Review 18:30 - What would you change about the Bondi 8? 22:16 - Mizuno Wave NEO Ultra Review 27:36 - Sustainability vs. performance 32:57 - Bondi 8 & NEO Ultra comparisons 42:10 - Wrap-up --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/doctors-of-running/support

Behind The Brand
Bondi Blades with Ali Clarke

Behind The Brand

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2022 52:36


This week's guest has taken the Australian beauty industry by storm, giving customers the option to bring what was traditionally a salon-only treatment into the comfort of their own homes. In this incredibly candid and down to earth chat, Ali Clarke, founder of Bondi Blades, talks me through the highs of lows starting a business during lockdowns, dealing with copycats - or as she calls them 'product validators', and how she was able to convince women all over the world to shave their face! Find Ali and Bondi Blades on IG @bondiblades and @aliclarke82 Want more Behind the Brand? Find us on Instagram and TikTok @behindthebrand.podcast

Female Startup Club
6 Quick Questions with Ali Clarke, Founder of Bondi Blades (part 2)

Female Startup Club

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2022 8:18


Welcome back to the Female Startup Club podcast! It's Doone here, your host and hype girl. Today we're learning from Ali Clarke, the woman behind Bondi Blades - Australia's first at home derma razor company. Bondi Blades launched as a pandemic baby with just a few hundred bucks and quickly turned into more than just a side hustle. Last year she did 1 million in revenue and is now stocked in more than 1000 stores in Australia alone! This episode is SO good because she breaks down her exact blueprint to getting her business off the ground and what she recommends every new founder do TODAY. The gem in this ep is where she breaks down her experience with cosmoprof trade show; what it cost her and the impact. Today's episode is powered by the lovely folks at DYMO which Ali uses every single day to help her business grow. They've been helping small biz owners just like Ali for over 60 years. And while I've got you here -we have got something cooking and the time is fast approaching for us to release it!!! and I'm just so excited because it's relevant to every single person listening to the show. Whether you own a business or not! If you head over to femalestartupclub.com/waitlist and pop your name there - you'll be the first to know about it when we make the announcement. I would love for you to be part of it! Lets get into this episode, this is Ali for Female Startup Club LINKS WE MENTION: Bondi Blades' Instagram Ali's Instagram Ali's TikTok Visit Upscribe.io/femalestartupclub to learn more and receive your first month FREE Try LinkedIn Jobs for free today by going to LinkedIn.com/FSC SIGN UP FOR 1800-HYPEGIRL HOTLINE HERE: femalestartupclub.norby.live Female Startup Club's Instagram   Doone's Instagram   Doone's TikTok   To redeem 1 month free of Norby's Basic Plan use code "FSC" here: https://join.nor.by/   In partnership with Klaviyo, the best email marketing tool for eCommerce businesses   Female Startup Club's YouTubeFemale Startup Club's Private Facebook Group   Say hello to Doone: hello@femalestartupclub.com   Female Startup Club + Clearco: Clear.co/partner/female-star

Female Startup Club
DYMO Presents: Bondi Blades founder Ali Clarke bootstrapped her biz from $50 bucks to $1M in ARR, here's her exact blueprint to success

Female Startup Club

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2022 48:43


Welcome back to the Female Startup Club podcast! It's Doone here, your host and hype girl. Today we're learning from Ali Clarke, the woman behind Bondi Blades - Australia's first at home derma razor company. Bondi Blades launched as a pandemic baby with just a few hundred bucks and quickly turned into more than just a side hustle. Last year she did 1 million in revenue and is now stocked in more than 1000 stores in Australia alone! This episode is SO good because she breaks down her exact blueprint to getting her business off the ground and what she recommends every new founder do TODAY. The gem in this ep is where she breaks down her experience with cosmoprof trade show; what it cost her and the impact. Today's episode is powered by the lovely folks at DYMO which Ali uses every single day to help her business grow. They've been helping small biz owners just like Ali for over 60 years. And while I've got you here -we have got something cooking and the time is fast approaching for us to release it!!! and I'm just so excited because it's relevant to every single person listening to the show. Whether you own a business or not! If you head over to femalestartupclub.com/waitlist and pop your name there - you'll be the first to know about it when we make the announcement. I would love for you to be part of it! Lets get into this episode, this is Ali for Female Startup Club LINKS WE MENTION: Bondi Blades' Instagram Ali's Instagram Ali's TikTok Visit Upscribe.io/femalestartupclub to learn more and receive your first month FREE Try LinkedIn Jobs for free today by going to LinkedIn.com/FSC SIGN UP FOR 1800-HYPEGIRL HOTLINE HERE: femalestartupclub.norby.live Female Startup Club's Instagram   Doone's Instagram   Doone's TikTok   To redeem 1 month free of Norby's Basic Plan use code "FSC" here: https://join.nor.by/   In partnership with Klaviyo, the best email marketing tool for eCommerce businesses   Female Startup Club's YouTubeFemale Startup Club's Private Facebook Group   Say hello to Doone: hello@femalestartupclub.com   Female Startup Club + Clearco: Clear.co/partner/female-star

Drive with Jim Wilson
Tradie about to set off on record-breaking run from Perth to Bondi

Drive with Jim Wilson

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2022 7:18


Tradie turned marathon runner Nedd Brockmann chats with Jim.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Deep in the Weeds - A Food Podcast with Anthony Huckstep
Nathan Dalah (Fishbowl) - Bowl of goodness

Deep in the Weeds - A Food Podcast with Anthony Huckstep

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2022 29:25


While at university, Nathan Dalah (Fishbowl) was constantly searching for healthy, delicious and affordable meals on the go but found it hard to find. Keen to leave his degree and start his own company, he teamed up with two friends and leant on his love and passion for food. Inspired by his love for Japanese food and salads, Fishbowl was born in a hole in the walls in Bondi. Now, just 6 years later its grown into 32 stores in three states and is setting a new benchmark in sustainability and quality in the quickservice market downunder. https://fishbowl.com.au Follow Deep In The Weeds on Instagram    https://www.instagram.com/deepintheweedspodcast/?hl=en Follow Huck https://www.instagram.com/huckstergram/ Follow Rob Locke (Executive Producer) https://www.instagram.com/foodwinedine/ LISTEN TO OUR OTHER FOOD PODCASTS https://linktr.ee/DeepintheWeedsNetwork

japanese goodness keen bondi fishbowl
Bible Chicks with Carole Brewer

Singer, author, and teacher, Renee Bondi explains the easy and the hard of spending her adult life in a wheelchair and how God has made all the difference. With her husband by her side and the support of faithful caregivers, Renee has a vibrant ministry! Be encouraged by her story and be blessed by Renee's rendition of the beautiful song ‘Praise You in This Storm'. Host Carole Brewer opens the podcast by singing her scripture song, ‘O Most High' based on Psalm 9 and Psalm 92. For information about Carole's ministry, visit: www.CaroleBrewer.com

RMC Bonjour !
L'info éco/conso du jour d'Emmanuel Lechypre : Les voyages en jets privés ont bondi de plus de 30% cet été en Europe - 30/08

RMC Bonjour !

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2022 3:08


Tous les jours à 6h20, on parle éco et conso avec Emmanuel Lechypre, dans Charles Matin, sur RMC. Chaque matin dans "Charles matin", écoutez un show radio/télé unique en France. Un rendez-vous exceptionnel mêlant infos, débats, réactions et intervention d'experts. En simultané de 6h à 8h30 sur RMC Story. En simultané de 8h35 à 9h sur BFMTV. RMC est une radio généraliste, essentiellement axée sur l'actualité et sur l'interactivité avec les auditeurs, dans un format 100% parlé, inédit en France. La grille des programmes de RMC s'articule autour de rendez-vous phares comme Apolline Matin (6h-9h), les Grandes Gueules (9h-12h), Estelle Midi (12h-15h), Super Moscato Show (15h-18h), Rothen s'enflamme (18h-20h), l'After Foot (20h-minuit).

Stories Behind the Story with Better Reading
Larry Emdur: on being Happy As

Stories Behind the Story with Better Reading

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 28, 2022 39:59


Australian TV personality Larry Emdur talks to Cheryl Akle about his career on television, growing up in Bondi and how it shaped the person he is today. His memoir, Happy As, is out now. Our GDPR privacy policy was updated on August 8, 2022. Visit acast.com/privacy for more information.

Panic: Queer True Crime
Bashed: The Gay Bondi Cliff Murders

Panic: Queer True Crime

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 21, 2022 15:12


For decades murders of gay men were happening on the cliffs of Bondi Beaches. Between 1970 and 2010 gay men were hunted, brutally attacked, and in some cases thrown to their deaths from the cliffs of cruising spots above the beautiful beaches of Sydney, Australia. Many of these murders remain unsolved.  John Russell was a barmen in Bondi he'd spent the night with his friends then capped the evening off with a visit to the gay cruising spots above the beaches of Bondi, Australia his body was found the next morning. Ross Warren was an up and coming newsreader who never showed up for his on air job. His body has never been found. Scott Johnson was a brilliant mathematician who was approaching the end of Ph.D. studies when his naked body was found on craggy rocks of Manly beach. Decades of terror and violence in Sydney, Australia treated like sport and a right of passage. Thanks for joining me for Bashed.

Running Matters
Ep112 - Wayne Larden - Sydney Running Festival Race Director

Running Matters

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 18, 2022 57:21


The World Marathon Majors are coming to Sydney! In Ep112 Wolf and Haddy talk to Sydney Running Festival Race Director, Wayne Larden (2:16 Marathon guy!) and find out the process to make the Sydney Marathon the next official World Major and join the ranks of London, New York & Berlin. We discuss the success of the Sydney Running Festival since Wayne took over in 2005 and the enormous logistical operation behind shutting down the iconic Sydney Harbour Bridge and putting on a Gold Label event for over 40000 runners. Wayne details the massive financial benefit to Australia of hosting a World Major event and how all Aussies and runners can get behind it. He also lets us know about the serious A-list runners heading out for this years race. It's gonna be fast! Wayne is also heavily involved in bringing the World Cross Country to Australia next year and we get some details on what promises to be an incredible event. Looking forward to Mt Panorama 2023! The shiny new Bondi to Manly Ultra is also on Wayne's books so plenty of chat for the Ultra frothers too! Sean 'The Godfather' Tindale pops in to review the Hoka Tecton X with Wolf.  Enjoy! Please subscribe or follow Running Matters to be notified when each episode is released. Feel free to use the online discount codes below: GU Energy Australia (15%): RUNNINGMATTERS Fractel Performance Running Caps (15%): runningmatters T8 Running kit (10%): RUNNINGMATTERS20 Runnulla (10%): Mention Running Matters in store. Raidlight (20%): runningmatters20 Raffertys Coastal Run entry discount: RMPOD21 Cronulla Beer Co (10%): CBC10 Koda Nutrition (15%): RUNMAT15 #runnulla #raidlight #fractel #gymeaalliedhealth #basecampaltitude #guenergy #cronullabeerco #runningmatterscoaching #kodanutrition        

The Opposite of Small Talk
E71: Ask Like an Auctioneer, Dia Bondi

The Opposite of Small Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2022 40:56


After attending auctioneering school for fun, Dia Bondi translated the techniques she learned into a program called Ask Like an Auctioneer that prepares women to ask for more and leave nothing on the table. In this episode, Dia shares what the zone of freaking out is and why it's a good thing, the importance of knowing the why behind your ask, and how shaping your question to get a yes is limiting your potential.

Nights with Steve Price: Highlights
Larry Emdur's Memoir - Happy As

Nights with Steve Price: Highlights

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 16, 2022 26:24


Larry Emdur, one of Australia's most popular and enduring TV personalities, chats to John Stanley about his new book a memoir Happy As.  John and Larry reminisce and share stories about growing up in Bondi as kids in the 1970s and 80s. While also chatting about Larry's colourful career in television and what inspired his book Happy As.   Larry's book can be purchased from all good book stores, or you can buy the book online. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Uncharted Podcast
Uncharted Podcast #136: The 3 Lessons Learned Going From Operator to Founder and The Importance of Focusing on Your Strengths & Health with Kris Bondi

Uncharted Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 16, 2022 17:37


Kris Bondi is the CEO and Co-Founder of Mimoto. Prior to founding, Mimoto, Kris was a seasoned marketing professional with more than 20 years of international marketing experience. Kris brings her history of creating hockey stick adoption, prominent brand reputation, and substantial mindshare to her role. Kris has served as a marketing leader for companies such as LogDNA, Bitnami, Iron.io, Moka5, TIBCO and Mashery. Prior to that, Kris advised global brands on GTM and strategic positioning where her clients included Visa, Starbucks, NEC and Qlik. Kris holds a BA in communications rhetoric and political science from the University of Pittsburgh. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/uncharted1/support

Powerful Stories with Tory Archbold
It's not working, I can do better' with Keira Rumble

Powerful Stories with Tory Archbold

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 14, 2022 25:41


I am so excited to bring you the incredible guest on today's episode of the Powerful Stories podcast. I have known Keira Rumble since my Torstar days – and what I've always loved about this global entrepreneur is that she's always been fabulous and fearless, and she always backs herself.   Keira first told me about a big dream she had during a coffee date at Bills in Bondi, and I left that date buzzing, feeling no doubt she was going to translate that dream into reality. She has since managed to do just that, and here she talks us through the how and the why – as well as the personal challenges she has faced behind the scenes.   A health diagnosis in her teens sparked a big aha moment for Keira, which was the catalyst for eventually launching her first business, Krumbled Foods. She is truly passionate about loving and nurturing yourself from the inside out, and her own lived experience means that she is so invested, making her brand a truly heart-led business.    Keira is transparent about the hurdles and roadblocks she has encountered along the way, including making the bold decision to pull her first product off the shelves. I love how  she started with an idea, but she wasn't afraid to say, ‘It's not working, I can do it better' all the while wholeheartedly backing herself. She bravely made a business U-turn, and in true fabulous Keira fashion, emerged bigger and bolder, with a global business to her name.    Today, Keira can proudly say that one Beauty Bite is sold every 15 second around the globe!    But it's not all gloss and wins, however – Keira has also faced significant personal challenges, including a fertility struggle that saw her endure seven pregnancy losses. Her honesty and transparency around her personal journey has helped her build an incredibly supportive and loyal community, and from her story we can learn that each challenge we face is in fact serving us, as it propels us to the next level in life!     Topics Discussed   [1:18]: Keira talks about where her success mindset came from.   [1:45]: Keira's morning ritual has changed dramatically since having her beautiful baby boy.   [3:19] We discuss loving and nurturing yourself from the inside out, and how a diagnosis in her teens was the aha moment that inspired Keira to start her first business, Krumbled Foods.   [5:50] Keira shares how (and why) one of her early products failed; and describes how in that process, she wrote the road map of ‘what not to do' – one which she still follows today.    [6:50] Finding a gap in the marketplace saw Keira create a new category in the Australian market; the process of pitching it to Priceline before she even had any products to show them, and the confidence this gave her to become a global brand.   [8:40] We discuss how Keira protects her brand from copycats - including dealing with a case in the Supreme Court over IP theft - and how her incredibly loyal customers play a big part in this.   [10:50] Behind the scenes, Keira was navigating a dark journey with infertility, including 7 pregnancy losses, and she reveals how throwing herself into her business at the time helped save her.   [11:36] Keira undertook IVF, followed by a difficult pregnancy and a premature birth, which saw her launch her second business 5 days after her baby boy was born.   [12:59] She talks about feeling like she's ‘in half' every time she's not with her son, and how she has successfully managed motherhood with running her global business by enlisting incredible support.   [14:13] Keira has overcome the internal voice telling her that she ‘should be doing it all', and now proudly leans on her village so she can live out her dreams, give her son financial stability and show him what women can do.    [16:24] She spills the tea on self-funding all her businesses with her partner; building a team and how it took years until she hired her first staff member.    [18:56] Keira bravely listened to her intuition and decided not to take on investors, despite multiple offers.   [20:13] All of Keira's brands have been launched due to a personal need, and because of this she has relentlessly trusted her heart and believed that her businesses will be a success.   [21:11] We talk about the magic ingredients you need in order to build a community and a large following.   [24:12] Keira has big, beautiful plans for expansion, both professionally and personally.     Links   Where to find Keira Rumble Personal Instagram: @krumble Krumbled Foods: @krumbledfoods Habitual Beauty: @habitualbeauty.co   Where to Find Tory Archbold Are you ready to take a powerful step forward in business and in life? You can join Tory's dynamic community of top women entrepreneurs by signing up to the Powerful Steps Coffee Challenge (it's free!): https://powerful-steps.com/coffee-challenge/.   You can also connect with Tory Archbold and her business mentoring offerings, including the Business Attraction Program, here: Instagram: @powerfulsteps LinkedIn: Powerful Steps by Tory Archbold YouTube: Powerful Steps – YouTube Business Attraction Program: click hereSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Live Learn Survive - Life hacks to live life to the Max.
A little progress each day adds up to big results.

Live Learn Survive - Life hacks to live life to the Max.

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2022 42:07


We are back, refreshed, and ready for a big second half of the year for Live Learn Survive and the Rescue Squad. We catch up on Maxi's return to the Fire Station, some cool facts about Bondi and talk about the videos we are going to record to ourselves sharing our future goals for the company.

Ecom Growth Leaders
12 - Brand Awareness with Bondi Born's Dale Mccarthy

Ecom Growth Leaders

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2022 50:57


Your host, Samir ElKamouny, talks to Dale Mccarthy, founder and CEO of Bondi Born, an Australian based swimwear and apparel brand focused on sustainability. Bondi Born is majority female owned and run and they are committed to producing high quality clothing with ethically sourced materials. To learn more about Dale's work click https://bondiborn.com/ (HERE) If you'd like to be a guest on Ecom Growth Leaders, click https://go.ecomgrowthleaders.com/podcast-guest (HERE)

Strong Enough
James Pratt: Malibu Crush

Strong Enough

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2022 51:46


Episode 65 of Strong Enough Podcast brings James Pratt, an award-winning actor, director, producer, writer, and luxury auctioneer. He is the recipient of various accolades including: (2021) Best actor at American Golden Picture International Film Festival, (2020) Europe Film Festival – Special Jury Award, and Next Rush Magazine's 2019 Top 5 Under 35 in Australia for Entertainment. He is also a Three Time REB Australian Auctioneer of the Year Winner, (2019, 2020, 2021).  During this episode, James shares how spending time in the Australian Outback as a young man led him to appreciate the beauty of the world amidst tragedy and turmoil and inspired him to follow his dreams. He talks about his newest feature film, Malibu Crush, and what it was like working both in front of and behind the camera. James gives great advice on reaching your goals in life and why focusing on the positives will bring more happiness your way. You don't want to miss this intimate look into the life of this Australian and Hollywood star. #actor #film #entrepreneur Strong Enough Podcast:Merch: StrongEnoughPod.comEpisodes: StrongEnoughPodEpisodes.comSocials: @strongenoughpodstrongenoughpod@gmail.com Guest:James PrattSocials: @james_pratt7mogulproductions.com

Green-ish
Gut Instinct with Carla Oates, Founder of the Beauty Chef

Green-ish

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 49:37


#8. Have you ever wondered what it's like to quit your job as Beauty Editor of a newspaper? Be the girl that makes everyone ask “how does she glow like that?!” Launch a company with 3,000 employees and a mission you refuse to give up on? Pave the way for ingestible beauty? Turn $3,000 into the “magic purple powder” that has amassed a cult following?In season one, “The Inside-Out,” we focus on women spearheading the philosophy that beauty begins inside—from healing our heart, mind, and microbiome—& radiates outward. The pioneering of this philosophy? Carla Oates is the author of “Feeding Your Skin” & was named a “skincare innovator” by Net-a-Porter. Carla created The Beauty Chef in 2009 after healing her family's skin issues and discovering that beautiful, radiant skin begins with a healthy gut. She began experimenting with lacto-fermenting skin-loving superfoods in her Bondi kitchen and that's how “GLOW,” The Beauty Chef's first inner beauty powder, was created.In this episode, we discuss:— The revolutionary discovery that caused her to leave her job as Beauty Editor— How to negotiate in business—from manufacturers to employees to investors— The difference between pre and postbiotics & the most important ingredient for a healthy glow— How to hold people accountable in business— The true sign of market validation for your product— Why you are not subject to predisposed genetic disorders— The main contributor to mental health issues… that you never would have suspectedSTAY UP-TO-DATEFollow us on Instagram.Sign up for our newsletter.BRANDS WE LOVEGo to Pique or use code "GREENISH" for 5% off.Go to HRBLS and use code “GREENISH” for 15% off.Go to Suckerz and use code “GREENISH15” for 15% off.Go to Karma Nuts and use code “GREENISH” for 20% off.Go to ChikiChikiBoomBoom and use code “GREENISH20” for 20% off.Go to BUBBLE Goods and use code “GREENISH10” for $10 off $50+.Tune in every other Friday at 9am PT / 12pm ET for your dose of greens.Let's chat! Email us at contact@agreenishlife.com.

Curious Conversations with Tully and Sarah

Back with a new season of CC and we are kicking it off with a bang with none other than one of Australia's most trending reality stars Ella May Ding from channel 9's MAFS. We get the tea on what it was like on the show and most importantly what happened after the show, after that reunion episode. Like we do though, we get deep with Ella on who she actually is as a person and how she still remains grounded after going from 2,000 people interested in her life to over 600,000. Ella dishes some wise words throughout the chat and even gives Sarah some advice on her dating life. Thanks to our friend, best mate Christian at @bondiproteinco for providing the snacks and laughs for our blind taste test with Ella which you can watch on Tully's instagram and TikTok. Bondi's new slim it bars with only 150 calories - only available at Chemist Warehouse. Follow Ella here@ellamaydingStay up to date with the Tully & Sarah @tullyhumphrey @spasini To shop Tully Lou visitwww.tullylou.com.au @tullylou Check out @FeFi_au - we simplify investing & educate women on stocks & crypto to close the financial gap. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Imperfects
Dr Emily - You Are Not Your Emotions

The Imperfects

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 31, 2022 52:03


She's back again! Our very own psychologist, Dr Emily! In this emisode, Dr Emily reflects on a very moving chat we had with comedian Steen Raskopoulos.  She talks with Hugh, Ryan and Josh about the concept of Emotional Awareness, and explains why it's not only important to identify your unpleasant emotions, but why it's even more important to express them when they arise. Oh, Hugh and tells us about going to Bondi. For book recommendation Atlas of The Heart by Brene Brown, follow this link: https://bit.ly/3zmHW9Y For Susan David's Ted Talk, The Gift and Power of Emotional Courage, follow this link: https://bit.ly/3OQvFAm To learn more about Matthew Lieberman's study on ‘affect labelling', (putting emotions into words) and its impact on our negative emotional experience, follow this link: https://bit.ly/3PQrUMO To learn more about Dr Dan Siegel's research into ‘mindsight' and how we can ‘name and tame' emotions, follow this link: https://bit.ly/3Q8PLqM To learn more about The Resilience Project's Journals, follow this link: https://bit.ly/3cSVItf For app recommendation Day One, follow this link: https://dayoneapp.com/

HOW TO START UP by FF&M
How to survive a trademarking battle with a huge global brand - Belinda Everingham, Founder of Bondi Wash

HOW TO START UP by FF&M

Play Episode Play 60 sec Highlight Listen Later Jul 26, 2022 25:27 Transcription Available


In this episode, we hear from Belinda Everingham, founder and CEO of Australian natural products brand Bondi Wash. Founded in 2013, as a natural alternative to chemical-laden products that continually caused her headaches, Belinda began experimenting with essential oils and Australian botanicals in her kitchen and soon decided to leave her management consulting career behind to take the leap to start Bondi Wash.Belinda shares with us her advice on how to fight your corner when a huge competitor doesn't play ball, more details on trademarking and why there is always a silver lining to any crisis in a startup.Belinda's advice:Do you research when it comes to trademarking Get your brand name right early onCheck for global trademarking Seek legal advice that can support your business Focus on doing one thing at a time really well Trust your gut feeling when it comes to listening to advice Get good at hiringMistakes will always have a silver liningPracticse the Pareto principle - focus 80% of your energy on 20% of the most important things Financial success is important but only because it gives you the freedom to do more with your brand's journeyBe aware of what you're trying to achieve and conscious of how to enjoy the business Get pricing right early on, as it's not easy to changeAsk for honest feedback and listen to everyone who is keen to offer it Different parts of the business will need your attention at different times A part of your business will always be in crisis but investing the time in solutions is always worth it for the long run If you'd like to contact Belinda you can her reach on hello@bondiwash.com.auHead over to Speakpipe to leave your voice note for future guests too.FF&M enables you to own your own PR.Recorded, edited & published by Juliet Fallowfield, 2022 MD & Founder of PR & Communications consultancy for startups Fallow, Field & Mason. Edited and managed by Milun Haggipavlou.FF&M recommends: LastPass the password-keeping site that syncs between devices.Google Workspace is brilliant for small businessesBuzzsprout podcast 'how to' & hosting directoryCanva has proved invaluable for creating all the social media assets and audio bites.For contracts check out  Law Depot.MUSIC CREDIT Funk Game Loop by Kevin MacLeod.  Link & Licence

Beatfreak Radio Show by D-Formation
Beatfreak Radio Show By D-Formation #271 | OPPAACHA

Beatfreak Radio Show by D-Formation

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 25, 2022 57:35


Track List 1. Mees Salomé feat. Celine Cairo - Fool's Paradise (Joris Voorn Remix) 2. Yacine Dessouki & NDRK - Touch, Dance (Original mix) 3. Alter - Cycles of Life (Original mix) 4. Dirty Doering - Mafalda (Enamour Remix) 5. Oppaacha - Speak Easy (Original mix) 6. Jimi Jules, Dixon - Never Alone (ft. Dix_On The Phone) 7. Perel - Star (Extended mix) [Running Back] 8. Bar.ba  Odagled - Festival (Sasha Carassi Remix) 9. Oppaacha - Uroboros (Original mix) 10. Martin HERRS - Lantus (Original mix) 11. Bondi & Sinus - Head Over (Original mix) 12. Johannes Brecht - Voicing Something feat. Luke Marzec

Sex, Sass and Soul
#48. The Eloquent Bitch AKA THAT WOMAN Who Takes No Bullshit

Sex, Sass and Soul

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 20, 2022 45:18


Babes! We're shaking things up! It's about to get a whole lot bigger, better and wetter around here. In this episode Asti reflects on how everything good in her life right now.... ★ Her new dream Bondi apartment ★ Her new investment property purchase (incoming....) ★ Her being on holiday, living her best life, making money with ease. ★ Her not having to choose between this or that and instead having it ALL. Is a direct reflection of the boundaries she started setting 2 years ago. Two years ago she created the course Bold Boundaries. The 5 steps inside are the 5 steps she continues to use over and over and over again for the constant up and up and up up-levelling that is happening. Tune in to get a little taste and to find out how having strong boundaries can and WILL change your life ;) ................. Watch the replay of The Eloquent Bitch Masterclass HERE - (Expires 28th July) JOIN BOLD BOUNDARIES HERE Join Asti's secret life and join her close friends HERE Follow Asti on Instagram Enquire about working 1:1 with Asti NOW

Cosmechix
Couch With Cosmechix: Imagine living AND working, full-time, with your bestie!

Cosmechix

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 18, 2022 24:52


Guys we are back (for the 100th time) with a bigger and better weekly segment..Introducing Couch with Cosmechix, our new style of podcast that brings you BTS of the Cosmechix from being best friends who live together, run two businesses and of course share love for all things beauty.Each week join us for a weekly catch up, as we talk shit on the Cosmechix couch.This week we covered:Our recent move to Bondi, and how we are now 100% bought in to the 'Bondi bubble'Ella losing her virginity (filler virginity that is....)QUITTING OUR JOBS!Hinge (need I say more)Our favourite beauty hacks.This weeks Hacks:The BEST beauty pillow - La Luna PillowSkin Therapy Emu Oil (This will SAVE your skin)And as always, we love to hear from you.. so please go ahead and slide into our DMS ;)Cosmechix

One Step Beyond: The Cadence Leadership Podcast
You Can’t Force Passion – Vic Bondi

One Step Beyond: The Cadence Leadership Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 13, 2022 103:22


On this episode of One Step Beyond, we are joined by Vic Bondi. Vic Bondi is the Principal Technical Program Manager at Remitly Inc, in Seattle. Vic has spent over [...]Read More...

Daily Telegraph News & Politics
Job Offers To Guests As Venues Struggle To Fill Roles 12/07/22

Daily Telegraph News & Politics

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 11, 2022 3:31


The battle to recruit hospitality staff during the ongoing staff shortage crisis continues to intensify, forcing a glitzy Bondi restaurant to email its customer database to try to fill positions.  The woman rejected for a New York trade position in favour of John Barilaro has told an inquiry she was informed the job would be “a present for someone” else when her job offer was revoked.  A newly announced Beauty and the Geek contestant, who says she's the loudest person at every party, has expressed regret over being convicted of drink-driving at more than three times the legal limit. And in sport, the Wests Tigers may explore the prospect of reuniting club icons and 2005 grand final heroes Benji Marshall and Robbie Farah on their coaching staff next season if they appoint Tim Sheens.  For updates and breaking news throughout the day, take out a subscription at dailytelegraph.com.auSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Art of Photography With Stanley Aryanto
Ep 40 - How David Fairs dig himself out of burn out to find balance in his life and sold out his NFT project on Solana

The Art of Photography With Stanley Aryanto

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 50:47


Hey Wicked Hunters, I'm excited to be talking to an Australian artist who has made good wins in NFT world. New Light Visuals is the label for all visual work by artist David Fairs. David has been a photographer, designer, animator, cinematographer, editor, sound designer and colourist for over fifteen years. Working his way up the chain to the role of Creative Director, being on sets and in studios with some of the biggest talent and crews in Australia.  David now defines his art as an important escape from the stresses and anxiety of daily life. A process akin to meditation that has resonated with many and will now be the focus of his work going forward. Supporting mental health institutions and viewers to provide as much relief from the negative energies we all experience regularly. Taking time out to produce these images is as therapeutic witnessing them as it is appreciating them for the viewer.    If you want to learn more about David's work, you can find it here: Link to social media: Website - Newlightvisual.com/ Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/newlightvisuals/  Twitter - https://twitter.com/newlightvisuals/  NFT Arts - https://www.newlightvisual.com/nft-art  Other ways to listen and subscribe to the podcast: • Spotify - http://bit.ly/twhspotify   • Apple Podcast - https://bit.ly/Theartofphotography   • Google Podcast: https://bit.ly/TheArtOfPhotographyWithStanleyAr   • Website: https://podcast.thewickedhunt.com      • Tune In (Alexa) - https://bit.ly/TuneInTheArtOfPhotographyPodcastWithStanleyAr     For those of you who want to learn more about The Wicked Hunt Photography by Stanley Aryanto: • Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/thewickedhunt/    • Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/thewickedhunt/  • Masterclass: https://www.TheWickedHuntPhotography.com      • Photo print: https://www.TheWickedHunt.com/   Don't forget to leave a review on the podcast if you enjoy this conversation. It would help us to get found and help to inspire other photographers.  ----------------------- Transcription: David Fairs  0:00   So I really went 24/7 Like I was sleeping as little as I possibly could just so I could keep up. You know, when I when I get hold of something and with work, I go all in like I really do. And it's kind of to my detriment sometimes. So, in January, I burned out properly like I literally couldn't even listen to a conversation in real life Stanley Aryanto - The Wicked Hunt  0:28   Hey, we can do is welcome back to The Art of Photography podcast, where we share artists journey, and we get to learn how they get to where they are today and find inspiration to the journey. And today we have somebody from down under. And he's very, he loves the ocean, he takes beautiful, beautiful photograph of the ocean. I know him from the NFT space, and you have a beautiful collection of that as well. So let's welcome David David, how's it going? David Fairs  1:03   Good. Thank you. How are you? Stanley Aryanto - The Wicked Hunt  1:05   Doing? Well, I see that you have a little bit of flu there. Hopefully, it's not too bad. David Fairs  1:12   No, it's got me. I've been out for a few days. But I'm glad to be here. And I'm happy to do the podcast, we'll get through it. Stanley Aryanto - The Wicked Hunt  1:20   Yeah, you're working too hard, man, you need to take it easy. So, you know, thanks for being here. And I know we have a little bit of mismatch to, you know, to have this recording. So I'm glad to finally, you know, sit with you and make this happen. I've been following your journey in the NFC journey, as well as following your, your photography and your creative world. So it's been like an inspiration just to see that right. And that's why I want to talk with you. I want to chat with you about your journey. I know that more often than not, you know, we don't get to share our life story, but it's more about the photograph or the art. So I'm excited to be able to learn more from you. Um, I guess let's start with, you know, how did you find photography and what it is that makes you fall in love with it? David Fairs  2:19   That's a good question. So it kind of fell in my lap. I have always been an artist for as long as I can remember. And I got into graphic design quite late as a career. And I worked my way up to creative director role, which was a really good, proud moment. For me, I was happy to have achieved that. And then I was working in the studio with a lot of really talented photographers and cinematographers directing shoots, and I just started to get obsessed with the gear and the settings. And you know, what we saw on set, and then the final product, and it was just, it was mind blowing to me that they could shape light and, you know, create these amazing images from what looks like a fairly rudimentary set in the studio. So I just started to go down that path, and I got sucked in big time. And little did my boss know, but I was grilling my photographers every day and finding out there settings that we're using and what equipment I should start out with. And actually, I invested in my own little setup and just started exploring the world of photography and video. And it's been amazing. Yeah, I fell in love with it, as you said. Stanley Aryanto - The Wicked Hunt  3:33   That's amazing. And, you know, it's, it's interesting, you know, how everyone can fall in love with photography or fall into photography. So it's great to hear that. And was there a moment in time where you know, you do photography, or you go out for an adventure, and you capture a photo or whatever it is in your life that makes you you know, like, was there like a time that you can put that was the turning point or that makes you like, wow, you know, I want to do this. I want to do more of this. I want to do the rest of my life. David Fairs  4:11   Yeah, I think there was a couple actually. So the first was I it was a bit crazy. And I took a client on. And I'd never shot video or audio or anything before. And the client flew me from Sydney to Las Vegas to shoot a child Expo convention which was mentally I was also all my instincts. Were telling me Don't do it, you're going to fail, you know, it's going to be terrible. You're going to embarrass yourself and my wife just said just do it. You know, and this is a chance for you to find something else that you love and who knows where it will take you and so, so I did I flew to Vegas. I stuffed up so many shots and settings and audio and made all the terrible mistakes you can make under the sun. But the client were really happy Be and they, they invited me back two years subsequent after. So I did three years on that job actually. So that moment in time gave me the belief in myself that you just have to do it and you just have to, you know, do the best you possibly can with the equipment you have. And your knowledge and skill set will come as you build. And that's what's been, that's what's happened, I've, I've been able to over the past five years, just build up that skill set to a really high professional level now where I'm confident, and I don't have that voice saying don't do it, you're gonna fail. You know, so that was one moment. The other moment for photography was when I got a drone, and as part of my sort of video offering, or my business, and I started to shoot more photography to just work on composition, and work out sort of angles and light. And, and that was yeah, that was a moment when I when I realised that I had a really good eye for composition in life in drone photography. And it was quite a unique thing back at the time. There were a few big accounts doing it. But now there's, you know, 1000s, whereas before, it was more like 10s, and hundreds. And so I thought that that was a niche that I could really kind of accelerating excel in. Sorry. So yeah, those two moments really defined my journey in photography and video. And so Stanley Aryanto - The Wicked Hunt  6:16   wow, that's really cool. You know, I think I already find inspiration in that. I think that's really cool to, to take a leap of faith like that, especially if you've never heard shot one before, like you say, or you know, like, No, not in that setting. And you flew all the way to Las Vegas. David Fairs  6:34   It was terrifying. Stanley Aryanto - The Wicked Hunt  6:37   That is crazy. David Fairs  6:38   So my friend that friend lent me a Canon seven D and I literally spent two days before flying out learning how to function and the menu settings. And he gave me a quick rundown on some things, but that was it was really baptism of fire. Stanley Aryanto - The Wicked Hunt  6:54   You know, that's, that's, that's really awesome. Because I mean, I don't know, if you do ever have this feeling, you know, when you want to post something on the website or on Instagram, you always think like, you know, it's, it's not perfect, yeah, like, I need to do this. And then you know, you edit this part of Angola. I still don't like it, it's something about it. And you keep going back and forth, back and forth, and back and forth. You know, and you ended up not posting it anyway. Right? You ever have that moment? David Fairs  7:26   Yeah, definitely. I know that feeling? Well, I have pieces that I've been sitting on for four years that I'm still not happy with. And then some days, you know, you've got your own presets there that you've crafted over the years, and you just click a button and boom, the image is perfect. You know, so it's, it's funny how it works. But yeah, I know exactly what you mean. Stanley Aryanto - The Wicked Hunt  7:46   Yeah, that's exactly right. And you know, this, what you did in this, it basically in, in that first key was like, literally just crush all that, you know, doubts and just go you know, what, again, I fly all the way halfway around the world. You know, for those of you for the listeners who don't know where David is, he's in, you're in the East Coast, you're in Sydney or Melbourne? Yeah, just just a little bit south of Sydney will let go of Sydney. Exactly. So you know, you flew all the way around the world and just pick up the skin so that is amazing, you know, and that just goes to show that sometimes a lot of this thing a lot of doubts are only in our head, you know, it turns out that your client really loves it even though you know you say that you just screw up a lot of settings a lot of audio and stuff like that. So that's really awesome. So I do see a lot of your your photography are are mainly from drones, you know, there's a lot of beautiful photos of the coast as well as you know, the wildlife especially ocean wildlife. Is that Is that something that you draw to because I know that around Sydney there's a lot of waterfalls and stuff like that but is there a reason that makes you you know shoot because that means you follow people surfing or you know the wildlife around water David Fairs  9:21   so I'm a big fan of hikes and waterfalls and all things mountain as well. However, I tend to go off the track when I go out there and don't don't take gear or anything. I just take my family and we go and enjoy that bushwalking and just be really what mods nature so I haven't had the chance I've shot some wildflowers and a few things just to play around. But I haven't really found a passion in that side of things. I kind of tend to feel freer when I'm just out there enjoying it. That's just personally for me, I do admire waterfall shots with the long exposure and think wow, I'd love to give that a go but I haven't got there yet. Maybe one day um But I think the coast stuff. So I've always gravitated towards surfing and my dad got me into surfing when I was about five. And so it's been a part of my life, as long as I can remember, in the photography side, it was a real tug of war because I like go to shoot sunrise, and there'll be waves and I'll be like, Oh, just go surfing. So I go surfing more than I go shooting still to this day. But I really do love the fact that I can be there, go for a surf, get some waves, and then, you know, come back out launch the drone and get some shots as well. Sounds fine. But it's quite an enjoyable way to kick off the day for me for sure. Stanley Aryanto - The Wicked Hunt  10:41   Ah, that's an example that explains it. That's why you're, you know, you go out there take a lot of people serving so that's, that's really cool. You know, I'm, I try by just not that I try. I tried to get back to surfing the other day and I got rocked by the waves real hard. Like that's, you know, we get robbed in in crypto space, but I got robbed. And you know, coming back seeing the craters base crashing and it's just like, I felt like I almost drawn like, Okay, I still alive. But it's man certainly is a lot of fun in capturing, I'm gonna say capturing people serving from a drone is a lot of fun. And are they it's, it's a lot, it's very difficult as well to capture because, you know, like, sometimes they speed up, right, they turn and they speed up, and sometimes they came back and then slow down. So like, you kind of need to know where to go, when to stop and have that? Is it because that you know, you're a surfer yourself that you're able to understand that movement so that you could capture this photograph better? David Fairs  11:58   Yeah, I think that's definitely the case. I see. I see a lot of guys who haven't been in that sort of culture. And though they'll message me and say, you know, how do you get these shots? Like, I just can't get these guys in frame, you know, and it's about predicting where they're going to be. That's a lot of it. Because you can line up a shot. And then next thing you know, they've dropped in and they're out of frame, they're gone. So yeah, even for me as a surfer, it's really difficult. Like, I think that's what I really love about it is the challenge. You might shoot 1000 shots and get three that you're happy with. If that, you know you might get zero. So, I mean, that's with everything, right? Every genre, every subject, we all put a lot of time and effort into perfecting those shots. So that's definitely why I love it. It's a real adrenaline rush, as well been flying a drone in the sky for one while trying to think about your settings. Think about composition, you know, light direction. All those things at once. It's like a video game almost. It's yeah, it's really enjoyable. Stanley Aryanto - The Wicked Hunt  13:01   Yeah, no, I think you're right. You know, a lot of people kind of see, you know, all of our beautiful images and they think you know, oh yeah, all you got to do is just get a good camera and take a few hours of lesson and take a couple of shots but what they don't realise is the amount of shots that you take, you know, I mean, I think I have like about 200,000 shots or something on my life now and being good 10% of them you know that is that I'm really truly proud of but if that probably last year probably. Yeah, exactly. So it's such an important important thing to kind of talk about because a lot of people don't understand that journey and when they give that a try you know I I have taught a few students where they just given up and you're like you know what, I'm not good enough for this because my photo is just doesn't look like you're so like this other people in Instagram. It's like well, do you know how long we take us to get there? Right? So yeah, it's such an important thing to talk about. But I see that most of your shot from drone is that is there do you actually take photo from a camera as well? Or is that where you find your passion and that's where you get, you know, energised and excited about what photography drone David Fairs  14:30   but think I do shoot stills with DSLR I've got a mirrorless sorry, the Panasonic GH five I got that predominantly for video because it's a it was a very affordable based on the camera like for what it was, you know for what you pay for it. I was getting 4k 60 180 frames per second attend it. This was back in 2017 So it was a beast beast of a camera and could shoot stills that it's not the best stills camera and you know and there's a bit of noise in there with Low light so it's not perfect, but I do use it. But I'm most proud of those images through the drone in the they just, they sum up they summarise my art more than anything else you I still shoot with the camera there stills camera in the water, I've got a water housing. So I'll jump in the surf and swim out and get some shots of surfers and I'm still not at a level with that and I'm proud of yet that's still a very much a work in progress and a learning curve for me, which is fine, I enjoy that I'm still learning, you know, I think having a art form to practice and get better at is a gift you know, so I really enjoy that. But in terms of selling art, and putting it out there into the community, those images that you've seen, they're there. They're my best work they're what I love to put forward and show people what I can do that's incredible. Stanley Aryanto - The Wicked Hunt  15:59   You know, it's I you know, your photo is just breathtaking it it really reminds me of the beautiful cars of Australia. I believe we have the best cars in the world. Probably I'm a bit biassed is over Australia myself. But But um, so when you think photo these surfers and stuff, how low do you go? Are you Are you not afraid of can I you know, because you got an offshore wind with the waves and all that stuff is that of concern when you fly the drone close, or do you try to kind of you know, keep the distance so that you are further away from from the from the water. David Fairs  16:44   So I like to get really low like one to two metres off the surface, it just, it just provides such a great image, I've tried other angles and things like that. And they just don't work out quite as well, it kind of you lose that impact of the subject. And one of my favourite compositions is to shoot directly at this with a surfer silhouetted by the sunlight, but just be close enough that you can still get detail in the surfer. I will keep my distance with people I don't know. But if I've got people that are local break, where I serve, everyone knows me, you know that I'm a drone photographer in that space, I quite enjoy getting shots of themselves anyway, I will get quite close. And so they're fine with that. I try not to get above people too much. Because if it was to fail and fall out of the sky, then you're probably going to hurt someone quite badly. So more directly in front and get sort of within I don't know, a good a good distance that you can still see detail in the person in the subject so that they're not too noisy. Stanley Aryanto - The Wicked Hunt  17:52   That's a good advice, man. You know, I think there's a lot of people that doesn't consider that when they fly a drone is that when it fails, it could definitely hurt people. David Fairs  18:01   Yeah. It's actually illegal to fly above people. So yeah, Stanley Aryanto - The Wicked Hunt  18:06   yeah. So it's good that you mentioned that. Yeah. So I love to talk about, you know, some of the work that you continuously put out on, you know, on your SNMP as well as in your Twitter of, you know, whales and you know, some of the wildlife in the water. How do you go about finding this? Creatures, beautiful creatures, as well as you know? Like, what does it take to be able to capture or fine and David Fairs  18:41   captured? Yes, I wish I knew is the answer. It's just potluck. It's just like, I mean, there's been a couple of times where I've been in some group chats. And people will say, you know, oh, there's a pod coming up the coast right now, and they're being seen at this place. So you can kind of predict, but I genuinely like just deciding like today, I'm probably going to go drive down to chi ama around Golden Hour, and hope for the best because they're on the move at the moment. And so it's really just about being out there and you know, experiencing what nature has to offer so I've gotten very lucky in the past but I've also lucked out a lot of times you know, you go hear these reports as Wales around blah blah blah and then you go looking for them and even if you can see them sometimes you can't even find them with the drone. So it's really just luck and just consistency just trying to find them by turning up and you know, there's always something to shoot if they're not there. So, you know, you might get another composition or the sunset or whatever. It's just about being out there and shooting for me. Stanley Aryanto - The Wicked Hunt  19:54   That is a great advice, man. You know, I think a lot of us photographers put x periences For on top of all the photos that we're going to capture, you know, so we would still go out there and take our chances, even if we might not get anything out of it. So I think that's that's what energises us. That's what makes us excited about ally. So that that's, it's cool that you get to do more of that. And, you know, so what? What are you? You know, like you have, you have put up a few collections out on NFT. And you know, congratulations, by the way on this. On this Ilana, David Fairs  20:39   it does make you guys more mind blowing that was absolutely mind blowing. I couldn't believe it. In a bear market. It was just like, what is happening. So you know, I probably focus on salida for a little bit to be honest, just at the moment, may as well ride that momentum. And it allows me to put some work out that, you know, I can, I can actually choose a bigger collection of work and curate bodies of work, because on open sea and foundation and things like that I've, I've had some sales and success, but I've never sold out a collection. So it's nice to see the enthusiasm on Solana and collectors are very keen for photography. So yeah, I was blown away by that. It's just been wild to see that actually happening. I think it was two days or 12 pieces, which is gone. So yeah, I'm dropping something this Friday, because it's second collection, and then keep going from there. Stanley Aryanto - The Wicked Hunt  21:34   That's incredible. Yeah. So for those of you who don't know, what's NFP, I actually have a podcast, talking about what's in ft and the Solana and Etherium that David's talking about, it's basically kind of the the currency that become the platform of where you could sell the NFT. But I'd like to hear more about your NFT journey as well. You know, so what, what makes what drawn you into the NFT in the first place? And how did you find out about it? David Fairs  22:07   Yeah, so I was really lucky in that, I was in a great community on Instagram, with a lot of drone photographers, and just artists in general. And I built up a pretty good following on there, through just networking and sharing my work. A lot of opportunities came up through Instagram, so it was really good. And then it just started to just started to die off quite suddenly, when Facebook took over and they did you know, all the changes, and I think most photographers would understand what I'm talking about. So it just became quite discouraging. And I started to, to just, I don't know, not get depressed that it wasn't really a healthy space to be in for me. So I stepped away, and just focus on my family. And my job. And I was basically thinking that I had to get a pretty, you know, solid job to secure like, for security for my family that didn't really have anything to do with art because I was like, I've given it a go, I've tried and it's not it's more of a side hustle. And I need to focus on my career and just get a job, you know, maybe in finance or something where there's better money. You know, which would probably be soul crushing for someone like me. But anyway, long story short, I saw some friends get into the NFT game, and they had huge success. And my brother had told me about it the year before and I sort of thought, I don't know what your sounds dodgy. I don't know what you're talking about. You know, I didn't, I didn't want to have to go to another platform and start again, what I've done with Instagram, I thought I just don't have the energy to do that again. But I should have at that point, because it was like November 2019. And that's when you know, everything was kind of exploding. But anyway, I saw some friends had success and then I messaged them and said, you know what's, what's the goal here? What's going on? Because they sold 60 pieces overnight, you know, massive success on Aetherium. And they just ran me through everything and I thought okay, I'm gonna just go you know, I'll just start slow and I'll take my time and and then when I came in, everyone was just killing it like everyone was making sale. So I started to get really quite anxious and think I've got to get in before it's too late. So I rushed my whole thing and like I just grabbed a whole bunch of images that I was really proud of and put them out there quite a high price as a newbie and thought, you know, all these other guys are selling work for that. Why can't I so I launched this collection and I sold a few pieces straight off the bat. It was really quite amazing. And then it just snowballed from there. And I was like stuck with this all this art that no one was buying. And so it was a mixed journey, to be honest. But yeah, the entry was good. I launched people received it well. And I've just been welcomed by the community and connected with people like itself. And it's been incredible that side of it has just been absolutely amazing. And that's why I'm still here to be honest, because my art stalled. And I didn't have a lot of energy to just keep marketing stuff that wasn't going to provide me any return on investment of the time. Being a family, man, my time is so important. So I started to think, you know, what am I doing, but just the friends and everyone building each other up and connecting some positive, then something like Facebook or Instagram or any other platform, I get to talk with, you know, have these podcasts and connect on Zoom calls with other creatives. And it's just kept me really focused as an artist to believe in myself and think you know, that this is something that's really special that we've all found, and I want to stick with it. Even though times are tough right now, as you know, I think it's important to keep focus on your art and be positive. So yeah, that's pretty much journey, I guess, how I got into it, and why I'm still here. Stanley Aryanto - The Wicked Hunt  26:00   Yeah, that's, that's cool. And, you know, I know that a lot of people are sceptical about the NFT. And, you know, what's, what's what's possible. And it's, it's, it's crazy to see what's possible in the NFT space, because at the end of the day, it's, it's not a it's not, it's not a way to make money, it's just a tool, and you know, how you make how you plan to use that tool, it's really entirely up to you. So I'm really excited actually, to see, you know, where is this NFT kind of going to Def flop to, you know, in the future? Because it's yeah, I just see that so many people already coming up with so many creative ideas. So, who are you, you know, you have a family, you, you do your photography, and you know, now you jump into the NFT world, which is, you know, going like Samsung miles per second or kilometres per hours, right? Whatever metric you're using, how do you find the time to be able to do all that, you know, because that all of that takes time. And, you know, it's, it's always hard to be able to find a time to be to be active and to be present in so that you can stay relevant in the social media, let alone, you know, with everything that has happened with, you know, family and everything in real life. So how do you find the time and what it is that you do to be able to balance that? David Fairs  27:38   Yeah, it's a really good question on that, I'm still figuring it out. To be honest. I just dedicate as much time as I can to my family first. But my wife is very supportive and understands the success that could the potential success in this space with web three. And so I, we've worked out kind of a routine around it, where I say, Do I need to do this much shooting to create art, for one, that's the most important and then also need to do the networking and the marketing as well. And so it is, I am treating it like a business in that I lock in for a certain amount of time. I make sure I'm very productive. And then I log off. And I, you know, I'm not just scrolling my phone and all that sort of software's. We don't join the space. The reason I've gotten to that part is I learned the hard way. So when I joined the space, I was just on 24/7, like you said, it's like moving 1000 miles per hour, my brain was absorbing, you know, information so fast that I didn't really know how to keep up. And I burnt out to be honest. And so I joined officially joined, I rented a collection in March of 2021. And then I officially joined NFT Twitter in September, because I didn't I have no idea that that's where you did all your marketing. I thought you did it on open sea. So anyway, that's another story. But I then from September, I felt like I had to play catch up because everyone was, you know, go go go. And then people were killing it. Like I was blown away at how many sales were being made every day. It was horrible. Like, I've never experienced anything like it before. I never want to again, and I don't want anyone else to have to go through it. And that was just purely because I wasn't looking after myself. And I was just focused on NF T's. So at that point, I was forced to take a break and step away. I missed a whole lot of opportunities. I felt really horrible. And it was a really negative experience. But I've come back from that arrested, I focus on family and just what I could do to get myself back to normal and then now that I'm in a better place, I'm very weary of that reality and making sure that you know, my time is spent very well when I'm alone Stanley Aryanto - The Wicked Hunt  30:00   That's incredible. And, you know, thanks for sharing that. You know, I think burnout is a really difficult thing to avoid, especially when you try to achieve something very hard and like, for people who are in the office, you know, if they working for to make a living when they get burnout, it's, it's gonna work but for us, because it's the things that it's our passion, it's what energise us, though is what makes us alive. So when you burn out, you cannot lose, you know, everything and you know, lose that passion. So, I'm glad that, you know, you take your time off and reprioritize. So, how can you share with us a little bit? How, what what did you do when you when you have that burnout? You know, did you lose your passion for photography? If so, how did you get that passion back? And you know, I know that I see you more active again, you know, and of course, you're, you're crushing it as well with the with the NFB collection. Solana. Right. So how did you kind of spring back from that, and basically, stand stronger, and you know, taller from that experience. David Fairs  31:26   So several things have contributed to that. And one of it is the community, whatever it is a really good friend of mine that I've made online called Jason O'Rourke, you might know him Jason iPhoto. He literally just carried me through even though it wasn't online, I was I was literally I couldn't be I had deleted Twitter, I was off line completely. Because I was like, just a mess. You know, I feel so bad for my family. Because my wife had to pick up the slack. I couldn't even help with the kids or anything. It was it was very serious. And the only reason I'm sharing this is not to be a victim, you know, feel sorry for me, it's to let people know how serious it isn't it what can happen. I think it's very important for us all to kind of share those experiences and look out for each other. So Jason, he basically was my marketing manager at that point in time. And he just, he was sharing my staff while I wasn't there and checking in with me, and, and then he was making sure everyone else was helping to. And I think that's one of the things that kept me alive in the space is that like, you know, it's not just about the art, it's about the community as well. And the friends that I've made and the connections, everyone is generally trying to help each other succeed, which is just, I've never experienced anything like that before in the art space, it's usually dog, a dog come from corporate background as well. It's like everyone's climbing over each other to get to the top right. So that, and I never lost the passion for art, I just was really upset that I wasn't able to even go out and create anything, because I just couldn't make I was just sleeping like I was so mentally exhausted, that I couldn't even fathom driving to the beach to take some shots. So I think it was like more of a disappointment than I'd gotten to that point without realising what I was doing. And I just promised myself that it was never going to happen again. And then I would get better. And eventually, you know, it didn't take long, it wasn't months or anything. It was just a few weeks of rest. And then my wife said to me, like, look, I've got the kids, why don't you go to wherever you want your favourite place and just shoot some photos, like just take the day and go and do some photography, because I know you miss it. And then, you know, how lucky am I to have a partner like that that's supportive like that just, I felt guilty leaving it with the kids. But then that day is a bit that's a very important day for me because I did get that joy back and I realised that it is a part of what I want to do and who I am. And I just loved it. I didn't even get any photos that I was happy with. But I just really relish that day to shoot from sunrise all the way through to sunset and go home. So yeah, that would be probably the biggest point for me. And I was like, okay, I can do this now. Like, let's go. And like I said, it's just more balanced and more healthy approach to the whole side of it. And I've just been lucky to have that success. Like you said recently that fired me up. Okay, I can do this. Let's go. Let's go. Stanley Aryanto - The Wicked Hunt  34:29   That's fantastic, man. Thanks for sharing. You know, I think it's really important to share that thing because I know that when when people see us on social media, you know, they might not seen this, not only because not only because there's a lot more successes we share on the social media, but also the algorithm makers so that you know, we don't see everything so even if we share it, they might not see that so it's exactly you know, the reason why I started this podcast is that you know, I want to share with you People who are trying to get their, to realise that it is simple, but it is not easy, you know, to get there and you just share a whole lot of jam there. So, I know Jason Jason is, is such a beautiful human is it is. So it's great to be able to, you know, to build relationship like that through social media, right? Of all As and he's like, all the way in Hawaii, right. So I think that's what's really cool about it. And, you know, a lot of people say a lot of negative thing about whatever it is. But I think if they focus on the good, they might find more benefit than focusing on the bad itself. I think at the end of the day, there's always something bad about whatever it is we're doing whatever it is in life, and it looks like you have that approach. So that's, that's incredible. Actually, when you share that story, I have like a goosebumps because I know exactly how that feel where you just go out, you know, you just you just take photo, you don't get any photo. That's, that's like crazy, beautiful or anything like that. But it just feels sort of happy to be able to get that feeling back. So I'm glad that you're able to do that made. You know, suddenly, like you have an an amazing wife, who is supportive of you showing up and that takes you through this whole thing. And you know, just hearing that I was like, Wow, maybe I should have her into podcasts. David Fairs  36:38   Next time. She's, she's an amazing woman. Yeah, she is. She's just been such an incredible mom. And got me through some really hard times. So you have to shout it out. For sure. Stanley Aryanto - The Wicked Hunt  36:50   That's fantastic. Yeah, I think that's you know, that's, that's, that's, that's, that's the real partner in life right? Through thick and thin. Yeah, that's, that's really cool. So, you mentioned earlier that there are some pieces you know, that you have, you know, that takes a long, long time for you to put out there. You know, you keep dabbling on that you keep playing around with until you finally happy with it. Is there any piece that come in mind, I would love to hear a story behind that. And what makes it so difficult to put it out there? David Fairs  37:30   Yeah, that's a good question. There's a few that come to mind. I guess the the pieces I have on foundation definitely fit that bill at the moment. They're the ones that there's a picture of Bronte rock pool that I designed as a guitar. It took me a good year to get happy with that. And to create that pace. Just because I had to keep returning from I was originally living over in northern beaches, and having to drive to Bondi and Bronte was like an hour or two like to get there in traffic. So I think I went back like seven times to get the light in the way I wanted a wave coming over the pool. And, you know, that sort of approach, it took me a lot of work to get that and then finally to get the shot, and then create the composite with the guitar image over the top. And I think there's like hundreds of layers in Photoshop for that one. So that is the kind of thing I'm talking about in terms of like the process and, and how I just keep pushing and pushing until I'm 100% happy with it. I'm still not 100% happy with that one. Like I still see things in and I'm like, Oh, I could have got one of the shadows is slightly off. But I don't know people don't seem to notice. But I've got actually one that like I said he's about four years old. Yeah. Which was a picture that Mr. Watson shared. I don't know if you remember from the she's a drone, Archie did a free FFA challenge where people could edit her work and a bunch of other people on Instagram as well. And I entered a trial to try to enter a pitch of hers I entered another shot from another photographer, which did really well but MERS one was Bromo volcano in Indonesia. And what I wanted to do is actually cut out the volcano itself, the smoke all the layers, the foreground background middle ground, I wanted to animate a 3d camera through it. And so like I've done the work but it's it doesn't look quite right. And I don't want to share it because it's not like to in my head, I've got the picture of what it needs to look like and it's not there. So that's one that I'll keep working on and keep brushing up my skills on and you know, I could easily just outsource it to someone to like get you know, a really high tech animator and say hey, this is the brief and and get it done. But I'm determined to make it work myself and to keep improving those skills. So yeah, that's probably one I've got heaps of others if you want to hear more stories Stanley Aryanto - The Wicked Hunt  40:00   Yeah, that's, that's awesome, man. Yeah, I think it's, it's, it's cool that you have some that, you know, you just put out there and you you don't procrastinate and you just, you know, you're okay with those imperfection. But there's some that you're really close to and you have that vision in your head. I think, you know, a lot of us I think that's, that's what makes it makes makes it hard to put out there because we have this vision. We have been thinking about it, we have been picturing it, but it's just doesn't seem right. It's like, you know, so I totally, I totally can relate to that. That's, that's fantastic. Well, David, so you know, you you share the law with a lot of how you get started with your photography, also, you know, where some of the struggles that you came across, and you made a lot of success in the NFT world, as well as you know, in in the Solana blockchain. What, what's what are you excited about in the in the coming future? Is there anything that you're excited about, you know, in real life as well as you know, maybe in the in the metaverse or in the NFT? World? David Fairs  41:14   Yeah, so in real life, I definitely am looking forward to this whale season and getting some more what captures around the whales, I've been documenting them for about five years now. So it's been awesome to kind of follow that journey with the calves coming back down the coast in September as well, they keep having babies every year, and the numbers are getting stronger, which is really, you know, it's such a positive thing to see in our world at the moment with, you know, a lot of doom and gloom in around the environment and nature. So I think for me, being a lover of animals and nature, seeing something positive every year happening is is very important for me to keep hoping in what's going on around the world. So I'm excited about that. I'm excited about being a dad and raising my kids well, and, you know, just focusing more on that challenge. And you know, because I've sort of gravitated to work more than looking at after them because I'm good at working hard. And I can sit on the computer and edit videos and have a powerhouse behind the behind the keyboard. But when it comes to kids, it scares the hell out of me. They're challenging, and I'm not, you know, I'm not a master of it. I don't think anyone is. So I kind of need to, I'm excited about being a better dad and spending time with them and getting out in the on the trampoline and the, you know, the fort and watching them just enjoy life and taking them out to experience photography as well. You know, that's something that I'm really excited about. They're not at a level now where they can handle, you know, sunrise and sunset missions. But I think once they're old enough, I've already got cameras for them. And yeah, I really want to share that with them and pass on the love of the ocean and hiking in the wilderness that my dad did to me, you know, that was one of the best gifts he ever gave me. And so if I can do that for them, I'll be very proud. In terms of the metaverse excitement is just building that base, like you said, I think on Solana, I've been able to get 12 New collectors. And that's been huge. And I've realised that, you know, it's not just about the money, it's more about connecting with people who connect with your art and building that base. And then I think eventually the business will side of it will take care of itself as long as you can get more people sharing your art and be interested in your artwork. So I'm really excited about where Solana is gonna go, actually. And yeah, like I said, we focus there a lot. The community is amazing, like the collectors, thanking me for my art and DMing me and going wow, so glad I got your piece. Thanks so much. And it's like, I hang on No, thank you. So it's really refreshing to see that I've had, you know, I've had some success on the theory and but like, it's so saturated and so competitive. I think it's a different, a different world and some other sort of more up and coming so yeah, I'm very excited about that. Stanley Aryanto - The Wicked Hunt  44:10   Yeah, that's great, man. I think that's, you know, that's, that's what we look for as an artist. I mean, of course, you know, it's important to sell our art because we, you know, that's our social currency. Like to survive, we need money, but being able to sell an art to someone who truly appreciated that, you know, that's, that's, that's priceless. You know, the appreciation just, I know that feeling and I know how, how much it's more important than than the money so that's amazing, man. Kudos to you and massive congratulations on your success. I'm very happy for you to make that happen. David Fairs  44:53   That's Thank you. I appreciate that. Thank you so much. Stanley Aryanto - The Wicked Hunt  44:56   No worries and you definitely deserve it because, ya know, because we were like, we're gonna do like a podcast and you're like, No, I'm busy doing this. I was like, yes, that's cool. And you know, and the next thing you know, like, so that was like, it's crazy, man. That's awesome. Yeah, so we're coming to the end of our podcast. Now, David. And one thing they are always asked my guess is, if there is one advice that you could give to the audience out there, whether it's photography, advice, life advice, whatever it may be, what would that be? David Fairs  45:33   I think my biggest lesson that I've learned in his past sort of couple of years is, whatever you're doing, I do it with intention. Like don't just kind of, you know, social media, particularly in this this space that I'm in, we're talking about NF T's. You can get caught up in just doing and doing and doing and trying to get into every single thing that's happening in a very fast kind of rapid pace environment. But one thing that's really helped me is to sit back and breathe and go, What am I actually trying to achieve here right now in this moment, like, what am I doing? Is it going to be productive for me? Is it important? Do I need to do it right at this moment? or is there other things that I can focus on. So just bringing consciousness and awareness into your everyday routines and trying to get things done quickly and efficiently. So you have more time for enjoying the things you enjoy. And getting outdoors is very important for me, and everyone, I think, and not just trapped at a computer focused on, you know, the social media and all these things. I think that's quite toxic for human beings to have too much of that. So yeah, that'd be my best advice is just to be really kind to yourself, look after yourself. And then those your friends and family that you love around you make sure you spend time with them. And, you know, you could balance it out them with what you'd love to do online, and we've got outside of things as well. Stanley Aryanto - The Wicked Hunt  47:09   Fantastic, man. Yeah, I think that's really important to be able to find that balance. And you said it yourself, you know, how you kind of share your burnout. So yeah, thanks a lot for that advice. And, you know, I'm sure that audiences will find that inspiring. Now, for the people who want to learn about, you know, who you are, and your art and your photography, you know, where, where can they find you. David Fairs  47:41   So Twitter's probably the best place to connect at the moment, that's where I'm most active. So at New Light visuals is my handle. But I'm in the middle of crap, creating a link on my website, I have new light visual.com as a website, you can contact me there for anything and check out my work. And I'll be creating a page or layer with all of my web three, as well, instead of my link tree. Stanley Aryanto - The Wicked Hunt  48:06   Incredible, man, that's awesome. So we'll Don't worry, guys, we'll put all of that link on, you know, on the description below. So you could literally just click on it. But thanks a lot for being here. Thanks a lot for sharing your journey, you know, not only your successes, but also the struggles that you come across. I know for every success, there's always a struggle, I never seen somebody succeed without it. So I think it's really important to be able to recognise that and to be able to acknowledge that so that you don't, you know, fall to this false belief that is just an overnight success. So David, thank you very much for being here and sharing this knowledge. And, yeah, is there anything you want to share? Or before we wrap up? David Fairs  49:01   No, man, I just wanted to say thanks very much for having me on. I really appreciate the opportunity. And I know it took us a while to get here, but I'm stoked to finally meet up with you and see you in person. You know, you've been such a great supporter of me, and I love your work. And we've connected quite a lot online. So it's, it's really good. And I look forward to doing more with you there. Stanley Aryanto - The Wicked Hunt  49:21   That's amazing. Yeah, I think that's what's really cool about the online world, you know, like, you get to connect with people all over the world. But that's also what's not cool about is like, when you're in an online world, you cannot be in real life. And that's hard balances, right? Like you say, like, I remember when I came back from Nepal and came back to Twitter, I was like, Oh, I get to see these people again and talk to these people and see there are so it's you're right, the balance is really difficult, and it's really important, but I'm glad to to have met you to have seen your art and came across your art and have you here so that's incredible. Well We can't do this. Thank you very much for tuning in and check out David's work. He has some incredible work I love, you know, his pieces on on the coast on Australia close, capturing this beautiful moments while people are serving as well as some of really unique moments of the wildlife that came across his drone. So that's really incredible to be able to see that and see how much it it it energises him as a creator. But for those of you who enjoy this podcast, don't forget to hit the subscribe button and give a little bit of review. And with that being said, I'll see you guys next week.  

True Crime Conversations
The Kidnapping Of Eight-Year-Old Graeme Thorne

True Crime Conversations

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 41:20


On July 7, 1960, eight-year-old Graeme Thorne went missing from the corner store near his family's Bondi home.  It was five weeks after his parents, Bazil and Freda, had won a massive $100,000 in an Opera House lottery.  His disappearance was the country's first well-known kidnap for ransom, and would lead to the biggest manhunt in Australia's history. In this episode, Gemma Bath is joined by Mark Tedeschi QC to discuss how the case unfolded and why it's imprinted in the Australian psyche.  THE END BITS Subscribe to Mamamia CREDITS Guest: Mark Tedeschi QC You can read more about his work on this case in his book Kidnapped. Host: Gemma Bath Executive Producer: Gia Moylan Audio Producer: Rhiannon Mooney GET IN TOUCH: Feedback? We're listening! Call the pod phone on 02 8999 9386 or email us at truecrime@mamamia.com.au Join our closed Facebook community to discuss this episode. Just search True Crime Conversations on Facebook or follow this link https://bit.ly/tcc-group If any of the contents in this episode have caused distress, know that there is help available via Lifeline on 13 11 14 or Beyond Blue on 1300 22 4636 Mamamia acknowledges the Traditional Owners of the Land we have recorded this podcast on, the Gadigal people of the Eora Nation. We pay our respects to their Elders past and present and extend that respect to all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures. Just by reading or listening to our content, you're helping to fund girls in schools in some of the most disadvantaged countries in the world - through our partnership with Room to Read. We're currently funding 300 girls in school every day and our aim is to get to 1,000. Find out more about Mamamia at mamamia.com.au  Support the show: https://www.mamamia.com.au/mplus/ See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Ace The Gram
#138: WE'RE BACK! Europe tales + why the cultural shift happening on social media will affect you

Ace The Gram

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 44:01


We're back!!!! After our extended break while Tash was in Europe and Viv was living it up in Bondi, we're back for another episode Today we cover: - the cultural shift happening on social media and what it means for the future of Instagram/TikTok/content - Tasha's Europe stories she didn't share on Instagram - Alllllllll the TV/Movie recommendations you need to know to keep you busy for the next 2 weeks For more on Viv and Tash check out: @tastefullytash @vivconway_ @acethegrampodcast

New Books in Australian and New Zealand Studies
Douglas Booth, "Bondi Beach: Representations of an Iconic Australian" (Palgrave Macmillan, 2021)

New Books in Australian and New Zealand Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 68:39


Today we are joined by Douglas Booth, Dean of Adventure, Culinary Arts and Tourism at Thompson Rivers University in British Columbia, Canada and Professor Emeritus at the University of Otago. He is also the author of Bondi Beach: Representations of an Iconic Australian (Palgrave MacMillan, 2022). In our conversation, we discussed the geological and climatological origins of Bondi Beach; the contested histories of iconic Australian archetypes such as surf bathers, surf life savers, and surf boarders; and what it might mean to write an autobiography of Bondi Beach. In Bondi Beach, Booth works across the boundaries of the social and physical sciences, encompassing anthropology, geography, geology, history, and hydrology. In the first two chapters of the book, he critically assesses the role of sand and storms as actors in shaping the beach, which only arose in its current instantiation 6,500 years ago. Current debates over the shape of the beach can take the “natural” as desirable, but as Booth shows in his chapters “Nature and Culture” and “Pavilion,” powerful civic forces can also help to remake the environment to suit human needs. When it comes to the beach, Booth seems to argue that the only constant is change. His chapters on the Eora (Indigenous Australians) and Berewalgal (European settler-colonists) trace the changes in beach use. Contrary to later colonial officials' assertions, the Eora did not leave Bondi barren, nor was their use of the land static, but instead Indigenous Australians use of the land altered in response to the environment and the development of new fishing and manufacturing techniques. Eora and Berewalgal people possessed different ontological understandings of their relationship to the country. Indigenous Australians saw themselves as part of the land and as a consequence worked within its homeostatic limits. Settler-colonial people saw their role as one of management and consequently they sought policies to make the land more useful from an economic point of view, causing significant changes to the geographic and social landscape of the Bondi-Rose Bay Valley. Booth's work challenges assumptions that underpin the historical discipline: how do we recapture the past, what facts do we include and what do we leave out, and how do organize our histories into narratives. His chapters on avatars of Australian beach culture: surf bathers, surf life savers, and surf boarders simultaneously highlight the impossibility of writing origins stories while they also highlight the various narrative possibilities of different mythological types. There is no single authoritative history of surfing in Bondi – but it is open to numerous story arcs: surfers as heroes or victims, surfers as environmental crusaders or landscape devastators, and surfers as counter-cultural icons or social problems. In his last chapter, “Autobiography” Booth writes a biography from the perspective of Bondi Beach. This “autobiography” is of Booth's imagination, but it's daring narrative form offers new possibilities for thinking through what the natural environment might think of man's stewardship of space. Booth's work has broad appeal – clearly of interest to people who are focused on sports studies, but also broadly to scholars from a range of fields, both physical and social sciences, who want to re-think the assumptions of our disciplines. Keith Rathbone is a Senior Lecturer at Macquarie University in Sydney, Australia. He researches twentieth-century French social and cultural history. His book, entitled Sport and physical culture in Occupied France: Authoritarianism, agency, and everyday life, (Manchester University Press, 2022) examines physical education and sports in order to better understand civic life under the dual authoritarian systems of the German Occupation and the Vichy Regime. If you have a title to suggest for this podcast, please contact him at keith.rathbone@mq.edu.au and follow him at @keithrathbone on twitter. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/australian-and-new-zealand-studies

New Books in Sports
Douglas Booth, "Bondi Beach: Representations of an Iconic Australian" (Palgrave Macmillan, 2021)

New Books in Sports

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 68:39


Today we are joined by Douglas Booth, Dean of Adventure, Culinary Arts and Tourism at Thompson Rivers University in British Columbia, Canada and Professor Emeritus at the University of Otago. He is also the author of Bondi Beach: Representations of an Iconic Australian (Palgrave MacMillan, 2022). In our conversation, we discussed the geological and climatological origins of Bondi Beach; the contested histories of iconic Australian archetypes such as surf bathers, surf life savers, and surf boarders; and what it might mean to write an autobiography of Bondi Beach. In Bondi Beach, Booth works across the boundaries of the social and physical sciences, encompassing anthropology, geography, geology, history, and hydrology. In the first two chapters of the book, he critically assesses the role of sand and storms as actors in shaping the beach, which only arose in its current instantiation 6,500 years ago. Current debates over the shape of the beach can take the “natural” as desirable, but as Booth shows in his chapters “Nature and Culture” and “Pavilion,” powerful civic forces can also help to remake the environment to suit human needs. When it comes to the beach, Booth seems to argue that the only constant is change. His chapters on the Eora (Indigenous Australians) and Berewalgal (European settler-colonists) trace the changes in beach use. Contrary to later colonial officials' assertions, the Eora did not leave Bondi barren, nor was their use of the land static, but instead Indigenous Australians use of the land altered in response to the environment and the development of new fishing and manufacturing techniques. Eora and Berewalgal people possessed different ontological understandings of their relationship to the country. Indigenous Australians saw themselves as part of the land and as a consequence worked within its homeostatic limits. Settler-colonial people saw their role as one of management and consequently they sought policies to make the land more useful from an economic point of view, causing significant changes to the geographic and social landscape of the Bondi-Rose Bay Valley. Booth's work challenges assumptions that underpin the historical discipline: how do we recapture the past, what facts do we include and what do we leave out, and how do organize our histories into narratives. His chapters on avatars of Australian beach culture: surf bathers, surf life savers, and surf boarders simultaneously highlight the impossibility of writing origins stories while they also highlight the various narrative possibilities of different mythological types. There is no single authoritative history of surfing in Bondi – but it is open to numerous story arcs: surfers as heroes or victims, surfers as environmental crusaders or landscape devastators, and surfers as counter-cultural icons or social problems. In his last chapter, “Autobiography” Booth writes a biography from the perspective of Bondi Beach. This “autobiography” is of Booth's imagination, but it's daring narrative form offers new possibilities for thinking through what the natural environment might think of man's stewardship of space. Booth's work has broad appeal – clearly of interest to people who are focused on sports studies, but also broadly to scholars from a range of fields, both physical and social sciences, who want to re-think the assumptions of our disciplines. Keith Rathbone is a Senior Lecturer at Macquarie University in Sydney, Australia. He researches twentieth-century French social and cultural history. His book, entitled Sport and physical culture in Occupied France: Authoritarianism, agency, and everyday life, (Manchester University Press, 2022) examines physical education and sports in order to better understand civic life under the dual authoritarian systems of the German Occupation and the Vichy Regime. If you have a title to suggest for this podcast, please contact him at keith.rathbone@mq.edu.au and follow him at @keithrathbone on twitter. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/sports

New Books Network
Douglas Booth, "Bondi Beach: Representations of an Iconic Australian" (Palgrave Macmillan, 2021)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 68:39


Today we are joined by Douglas Booth, Dean of Adventure, Culinary Arts and Tourism at Thompson Rivers University in British Columbia, Canada and Professor Emeritus at the University of Otago. He is also the author of Bondi Beach: Representations of an Iconic Australian (Palgrave MacMillan, 2022). In our conversation, we discussed the geological and climatological origins of Bondi Beach; the contested histories of iconic Australian archetypes such as surf bathers, surf life savers, and surf boarders; and what it might mean to write an autobiography of Bondi Beach. In Bondi Beach, Booth works across the boundaries of the social and physical sciences, encompassing anthropology, geography, geology, history, and hydrology. In the first two chapters of the book, he critically assesses the role of sand and storms as actors in shaping the beach, which only arose in its current instantiation 6,500 years ago. Current debates over the shape of the beach can take the “natural” as desirable, but as Booth shows in his chapters “Nature and Culture” and “Pavilion,” powerful civic forces can also help to remake the environment to suit human needs. When it comes to the beach, Booth seems to argue that the only constant is change. His chapters on the Eora (Indigenous Australians) and Berewalgal (European settler-colonists) trace the changes in beach use. Contrary to later colonial officials' assertions, the Eora did not leave Bondi barren, nor was their use of the land static, but instead Indigenous Australians use of the land altered in response to the environment and the development of new fishing and manufacturing techniques. Eora and Berewalgal people possessed different ontological understandings of their relationship to the country. Indigenous Australians saw themselves as part of the land and as a consequence worked within its homeostatic limits. Settler-colonial people saw their role as one of management and consequently they sought policies to make the land more useful from an economic point of view, causing significant changes to the geographic and social landscape of the Bondi-Rose Bay Valley. Booth's work challenges assumptions that underpin the historical discipline: how do we recapture the past, what facts do we include and what do we leave out, and how do organize our histories into narratives. His chapters on avatars of Australian beach culture: surf bathers, surf life savers, and surf boarders simultaneously highlight the impossibility of writing origins stories while they also highlight the various narrative possibilities of different mythological types. There is no single authoritative history of surfing in Bondi – but it is open to numerous story arcs: surfers as heroes or victims, surfers as environmental crusaders or landscape devastators, and surfers as counter-cultural icons or social problems. In his last chapter, “Autobiography” Booth writes a biography from the perspective of Bondi Beach. This “autobiography” is of Booth's imagination, but it's daring narrative form offers new possibilities for thinking through what the natural environment might think of man's stewardship of space. Booth's work has broad appeal – clearly of interest to people who are focused on sports studies, but also broadly to scholars from a range of fields, both physical and social sciences, who want to re-think the assumptions of our disciplines. Keith Rathbone is a Senior Lecturer at Macquarie University in Sydney, Australia. He researches twentieth-century French social and cultural history. His book, entitled Sport and physical culture in Occupied France: Authoritarianism, agency, and everyday life, (Manchester University Press, 2022) examines physical education and sports in order to better understand civic life under the dual authoritarian systems of the German Occupation and the Vichy Regime. If you have a title to suggest for this podcast, please contact him at keith.rathbone@mq.edu.au and follow him at @keithrathbone on twitter. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

SBS Italian - SBS in Italiano
Ricetta: "Mortadella fritta cacio e pepe" del ristorante Da Orazio di Bondi

SBS Italian - SBS in Italiano

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 8:17


Orazio D'Elia, proprietario del ristorante Da Orazio di Bondi Beach, spiega come fare la "Mortadella fritta".  

New Books in Geography
Douglas Booth, "Bondi Beach: Representations of an Iconic Australian" (Palgrave Macmillan, 2021)

New Books in Geography

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 68:39


Today we are joined by Douglas Booth, Dean of Adventure, Culinary Arts and Tourism at Thompson Rivers University in British Columbia, Canada and Professor Emeritus at the University of Otago. He is also the author of Bondi Beach: Representations of an Iconic Australian (Palgrave MacMillan, 2022). In our conversation, we discussed the geological and climatological origins of Bondi Beach; the contested histories of iconic Australian archetypes such as surf bathers, surf life savers, and surf boarders; and what it might mean to write an autobiography of Bondi Beach. In Bondi Beach, Booth works across the boundaries of the social and physical sciences, encompassing anthropology, geography, geology, history, and hydrology. In the first two chapters of the book, he critically assesses the role of sand and storms as actors in shaping the beach, which only arose in its current instantiation 6,500 years ago. Current debates over the shape of the beach can take the “natural” as desirable, but as Booth shows in his chapters “Nature and Culture” and “Pavilion,” powerful civic forces can also help to remake the environment to suit human needs. When it comes to the beach, Booth seems to argue that the only constant is change. His chapters on the Eora (Indigenous Australians) and Berewalgal (European settler-colonists) trace the changes in beach use. Contrary to later colonial officials' assertions, the Eora did not leave Bondi barren, nor was their use of the land static, but instead Indigenous Australians use of the land altered in response to the environment and the development of new fishing and manufacturing techniques. Eora and Berewalgal people possessed different ontological understandings of their relationship to the country. Indigenous Australians saw themselves as part of the land and as a consequence worked within its homeostatic limits. Settler-colonial people saw their role as one of management and consequently they sought policies to make the land more useful from an economic point of view, causing significant changes to the geographic and social landscape of the Bondi-Rose Bay Valley. Booth's work challenges assumptions that underpin the historical discipline: how do we recapture the past, what facts do we include and what do we leave out, and how do organize our histories into narratives. His chapters on avatars of Australian beach culture: surf bathers, surf life savers, and surf boarders simultaneously highlight the impossibility of writing origins stories while they also highlight the various narrative possibilities of different mythological types. There is no single authoritative history of surfing in Bondi – but it is open to numerous story arcs: surfers as heroes or victims, surfers as environmental crusaders or landscape devastators, and surfers as counter-cultural icons or social problems. In his last chapter, “Autobiography” Booth writes a biography from the perspective of Bondi Beach. This “autobiography” is of Booth's imagination, but it's daring narrative form offers new possibilities for thinking through what the natural environment might think of man's stewardship of space. Booth's work has broad appeal – clearly of interest to people who are focused on sports studies, but also broadly to scholars from a range of fields, both physical and social sciences, who want to re-think the assumptions of our disciplines. Keith Rathbone is a Senior Lecturer at Macquarie University in Sydney, Australia. He researches twentieth-century French social and cultural history. His book, entitled Sport and physical culture in Occupied France: Authoritarianism, agency, and everyday life, (Manchester University Press, 2022) examines physical education and sports in order to better understand civic life under the dual authoritarian systems of the German Occupation and the Vichy Regime. If you have a title to suggest for this podcast, please contact him at keith.rathbone@mq.edu.au and follow him at @keithrathbone on twitter. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/geography

MOJO SPORTS
THE NRL SHOW- JAKE FRIEND, RTS VS VATUVEI, PLUS GOLD COAST TITANS

MOJO SPORTS

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 14, 2022 38:49


On this week's edition of ‘All Ball' we reflect on the incredible career of Sydney Roosters legend Jake Friend. We discuss his rocky start to his career with the Roosters, before his incredible development as a player and leader. Friend a three time premiership winner is regarded as one of the best modern day dummy halves and was unfortunate to not play more representative football. Trent Robinson evolved his offence most years and Jake's ability to adapt and help guide his team around the park was a weekly occurrence. It was a shame that his career ended prematurely but he was incredibly successful and build and unforgettable legacy at the Bondi club. In ‘the Match' we pair up two club legends from the New Zealand Warriors- Roger Tuivasa-Sheck and Manu Vatuvei. RTS had an impressive start to his career for the Sydney Roosters before moving home to the Warriors and establishing himself as one of the games best players. Dominating at fullback, RTS also showed incredible leadership moving into a captaincy role and helping to guide the Warriors through some challenging times. Despite his defection to rugby union, he still remains one of the clubs best ever players. While for Vatuvei, he inspired a generation of young kiwi players to strive to play rugby league and put fear in the opposition. Manu now finds himself in a challenging situation post career but will be remembered as a fierce rugby league player. And to round out the show in 'Rapid Fire',  we focus in on the Gold Coast Titans, as we ask the hard hitting questions including the improvements and repairs they need to make to turn their season around. Where to now for the Titans?~ Dan, Micki & Coz 

Drinks Adventures
Brewer turned distiller Ben Stevens of Bondi Liquor Co

Drinks Adventures

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 6, 2022 23:45


A podcast for lovers of wine, beer, liquor (incl. whisky, whiskey, bourbon, vodka tequila etc) and cocktails, Drinks Adventures hosts wine makers, brewing and distilling experts, sommeliers, bartenders & more.Founded by three friends with background in drinks and hospitality, Bondi Liquor Co is the first operating distillery in Sydney's eastern suburbs.Co-founder and distiller Ben Stevens has experience in both sales and production, having previously worked at Young Henrys, Clare Valley Brewing and Carlton & United Breweries.He joins us this episode for a chat about the challenges of being the first in a new area, where the authorities are unaccustomed to alcohol production.We'll explore the Bondi Liquor gin range, and the pros and cons of tying your brand name to a globally recognised place, like Bondi Beach.First up though, I asked Ben about the Bondi Liquor Co origin story.Tags:gin, distilling, distillery, distiller, liquor, craft spirits, cocktail, cocktails, Sydney, wine, winemaking, winemaker, viticulture, beer, craft beer, brewing,

Life's A Beach
Ep 72- Harris Saffron

Life's A Beach

Play Episode Listen Later May 29, 2022 58:48


Harris Saffron joins Hoppo for Life's a Beach this week to tell his stories and experiences living in Bondi for his whole life. He chats about his childhood and some of the changes to Bondi that he witnessed growing up. Josh Burke joins Hoppo for beach banter this week. For all things Life's a Beach, visit our site at https://www.lifesabeach.co/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/lifesabeachau/?hl=en See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Wake N' Make
Justin Bondi WNM #8

Wake N' Make

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022 92:56


Justin Bondi is one of the most level headed friends I have. His cool, calm demeanor sets the tempo of this conversation. Justin and I discuss the "why" we got into leather craft. We talk about our struggles with mental health and the tools we use to ease the pressures of life around us. This conversation is one I hope you'll get as much as I did out of. I can't wait to see all the amazing things happening for Justin and his family. Justin is such a good dude, you'll be rooting for him by the end of the podcast as well. YouTube description short cut. Find Justin here: Instagram @royal.peak.goods Website www.royalpeakgoods.com YouTube https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC-N3jQAUHECSmEYQKsJ6dYw Find Dennis here: Instagram @21grams_leathergoods Website http://21gramsleathergoods.com/ Podcast audio https://anchor.fm/dennis-forrester PLEASE SHOP USING OUR... Affiliate Links: Weaver Leather Supply https://www.weaverleathersupply.com/?ref=dennisforrester --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

Australian True Crime
The 1960 Crime That Shocked Then-Innocent Australia

Australian True Crime

Play Episode Listen Later May 8, 2022 33:20


Best-selling biographer and history author Peter FitzSimons has turned his attention to detailing the history of the Sydney Opera House - drama, scandals and even crimes. For this episode of Australian True Crime, Emily speaks to Peter about a crime linked with the Opera House and how it shocked the nation - the kidnapping and killing of Bondi schoolboy Graeme Thorne in 1960.Peter's book The Opera House is published by Hachette Australia.CREDITS:Host: Meshel Laurie. You can find her on Instagram Co-Host: Emily Webb. You can find her on Instagram here and listen to her podcast Killer Content here. Guest: Peter FitzSimonsProducer/Editor: Matthew TankardExecutive Producer: Jacqueline TonksArchival audio used in this episode is from https://www.nfsa.gov.au/ If you have been affected by anything discussed in this episode you can contact: Lifeline on 13 11 14 13 YARN on 13 92 76 (24/7 crisis support phone line for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people) Thanks for listening, we'll be back next week. GET IN TOUCH: Follow the show on Instagram @australiantruecrimepodcast and Facebook https://www.facebook.com/AustralianTrueCrimePod/ Email the show at team@smartfella.com.au Australian True Crime is a podcast by Smart Fella Media. Your story matters and how you tell it matters even more.Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/australiantruecrime. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Better Than Yesterday, with Osher Günsberg
Ep 430: Powerhouse Independent Candidate for Wentworth Allegra Spender LIVE IN BONDI. Wanting Climate Action, Strong Economy and Integrity in politics doesn't make you weird. It makes you human.

Better Than Yesterday, with Osher Günsberg

Play Episode Listen Later May 1, 2022 63:06


Allegra Spender is the Independent Candidate for the federal seat of Wentworth. Through her work as an analyst at McKinsey in London worked with Retail, Consumer Goods and Non Profit sectors before joining Her Majesty's Treasury as a Policy Analyst. Further work in the healthcare sector in the Uk and Australia was coupled with volunteer work at a horticulture non-profit in Kenya. For eight years she was the Managing Director of Carla Zampatti Pty Ltd a company that brings in over 30M a year in revenue across 30 retail stores and their online operations. She was the Chair at the Sydney Renewable Power company, an impact investment operation that among other things deployed a 520kw Solar Power Installation in the Sydney CBD And Until January Allegra was the CEO of The Australian Business and Community Network - which works to improve the educational and career outcomes of Australia's youth through corporate volunteers mentoring students in the workplace. That is until she decided to pull the pin on this incredible run and decide to run for office. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Your Brain on Facts
Fell on Black Days: Sunday (ep. 189)

Your Brain on Facts

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 29, 2022 34:46


(Get Surfshark VPN at https://surfshark.deals/MOXIE - Enter promo code MOXIE for 83% off and 3 extra months free!) T-shirt for Ukraine, all proceeds and matching donation to Ukraine Red Cross at yourbrainonfacts.com/merch There are four Sundays a month, but more than a dozen days we call "Black Sunday."  Here are three -- two forces of nature and one parade of schadenfreude. 02:42 Black Blizzard 12:45 Bondi Beach 24:42 Disneyland Quote reader: Vlado from It's Not Rocket Surgery Promo: Remnant Stew Links to all the research resources are on the website. Hang out with your fellow Brainiacs.  Reach out and touch Moxie on Facebook, Twitter,  or Instagram.  Become a patron of the podcast arts! Patreon or Ko-Fi.  Or buy the book and a shirt. Music: Dan Lebowitz,  Kevin MacLeod,  Want to start a podcast or need a better podcast host?  Get up to TWO months hosting for free from Libsyn with coupon code "moxie."   Every year, tens of millions people or so go through Denver International Airport, the fifth busiest in the country and in the top 20 busiest in the world.  That's a lot of bodies to get from hither to yon, so the airport relies heavily on Automated Guideway Transit System, a people-mover that connects all of the midfield concourses with the south terminal, providing the only passenger access to concourses B and C.  And in 1995, a day that will live in infamy for staff and passengers alike, the system failed.  They refer to that day as Black Sunday.  My name's…   So I said to myself the other day, you know what would make a good topic, days with colorful sobriquets, surely there are enough of those to write about.  In what they call a good problem to have, there are in fact, too many!  Most of the “black.”  So I'm starting with a few Black Sundays and if you thinks it's a fruitful area of discussion, I'll make it a series, maybe one a month.  I'd space them out because you don't hear about the planes that land and you don't call a day Black whatever if everything was chill.  As such, today's episode is two heavy topics and one packed with schadenfreude, so gauge how you're feeling today.,  I don't mind waiting – it's not how long you wait, it's who you're waiting for.  We're going to go heavy, heavy, light, as decided by folks in our Facebook group, the Brainiac Breakroom, where anyone can share clever or funny things they find; same goes to the ybof sud-reddit.   Speaking of social media, folks are starting to post pictures of themselves wearing their Russian Warship go F yourself shirts to raise money for the Ukraine red cross (url).  Thanks to them specifically and I want to send a sweeping cloud of thanks to people in other countries for taking in the refugees.  Speaking of refugees, there was a time when hundreds of thousands of Americans were refugees in their own country.  During WWI, wheat prices rose and farming in the open prairies of the great plains was an attractive proposition.  Homesteaders and farmers set up shop, ripping up or tilling under the native grasses that had evolved as part of that ecosystem, with long roots that both held onto lots of soil, but reached down far enough to reach water waaay below the topsoil, allowing it to better survive drought conditions.  But we don't like to eat those grasses, so they replaced it with shallow-rooted wheat.  The rain stopped falling in 1931, leaving instead a severe widespread drought that lasted the rest of the decade, eventually killed thousands of square miles of wheat fields.  No other crops, either, and nothing to feed livestock.  Without live plants to hold onto the topsoil, it blew away.  The prairie wind became a sandstorm and people's livelihoods blew away.  It got so bad, the dust clouds eventually reached the east coast and beyond.  At the same time, they had this Great Depression on, a real nuisance, you've seen the movies, Grapes of Wrath, Of Mice and Men, the other versions of Of Mice and Men, O Brother Where Art Thou (only time I enjoyed George Clooney), and dozens more.  The price of wheat [sfx raspberry] and people lost their jobs left right and center.  Many families were left with no choice but to pile whatever they still had left onto the family car and follow rumors of work, sometimes migrating all the way to California, where, even though they were regular ol' ‘Mericans, they were treated like foreign invaders.   Black Blizzard, American Dust Bowl, 1938   That's a broad-stroke quickie overview – and boy do I want to rewatch Carnivale for the fourth time (love me some Clancy Brown, rawr, I still would) – but we're here to talk about one day, a black Sunday, brought on by a black blizzard.  It's a blizzard but made up of dirt so thick, it blocks out the sun.  14 hit black blizzards hit in 1932, 38 in 1933, up to 70 by 1937 and so on.  The worst of it hit Kansas, New Mexico, Oklahoma and Texas.  The storms became so frequent that people could discern the origin of the storm by the color of its dirt – brown dust storms were from Kansas or Nebraska, gray from Texas, and red dust storms were from Oklahoma.    People tried to protect themselves from breathing the dust and cloth masks were the least of it.  They'd hang wet sheets over doorways and seal up windows, sometimes with a paste ironically made of wheat flour because that's what they could get. They'd rub petroleum jelly into their nostrils, anything to try to prevent the “brown plague,” dust pneumonia.  Constant inhalation of dust particles killed hundreds of people, babies and young children particularly, and sickened thousands of others.   1934 was the single worst drought year of the last millennium in North America, temperatures soared, exceeding 100 degrees everyday for weeks on much of the Southern Plains, absolutely *baking the soil.  When spring of 1935 rolled around, there was a whole lot more dry dirt ready to be thrown into the air.  After months of brutal conditions, the winds finally died down on the morning of April 14, 1935, and people jumped on the chance to escape their homes.  Hope springs eternal and people thought maybe it was finally over.   It was, of course, not over.  The worst was standing in the wings in full costume, waiting for its cue.  A cold front down from Canada crashed into warm air over the Dakotas.  In a few hours, the temperature fell more than 30 degrees and the wind returned in force, creating a dust cloud that grew to hundreds of miles wide and thousands of feet high as it headed south.  Reaching its full fury in southeastern Colorado, southwestern Kansas and the Texas and Oklahoma panhandles, it turned a sunny day totally dark.  Birds, mice and jackrabbits fled for their lives.  Have you ever heard the sound *one terrified rabbit makes?  I would not want to be on the ground while this was happening.  Domestic animals like cattle that couldn't get to shelter were blinded and even suffocated by the dust.   Drivers were forced to take refuge in their cars, while other residents hunkered down anywhere they could, from fire stations to tornado shelters to under beds if a bed was the closest you could find to safety.  Folksinger Woody Guthrie, then 22, who sat out the storm at his Pampa, Texas, home, recalled that “you couldn't see your hand before your face.” Inspired by proclamations from some of his companions that the end of the world was at hand, he composed a song titled “So Long, It's Been Good to Know Yuh.”  [sfx song] Guthrie would also write other tunes about Black Sunday, including “Dust Storm Disaster.”   The storm dragged on for hours and peoples' wits began to fray.  One woman reportedly thought the merciless howling wind blocking out the sky was the start of the Biblical end of the world – can't imagine how she arrived there-- contemplated killing her child to spare them being collateral damage in a war between heaven and hell.  By all accounts it was the worst black blizzard of the Dust Bowl, displacing 300,000 tons of topsoil.  That would be enough to cover a square area of .4mi/750 m on each side a foot deep.  “Everybody remembered where they were on Black Sunday,” said Pamela Riney-Kehrberg, a history professor at Iowa State University and the author of “Rooted in Dust: Surviving Drought and Depression in Southwestern Kansas.”  “For people on the Southern Plains, it was one of those defining experiences, like Pearl Harbor or Kennedy's assassination.”   The Black Sunday storm blew its dust all the way to the east coast, causing street lights to be needed during the day in Washington DC and even coating the decks of ships in the Atlantic ocean.  The next day, as the remnants of the storm blew out into the Gulf of Mexico, an Associated Press reporter filed a story in which he referred to “life in the dust bowl of the continent,” coining the phrase that would encapsulate a phenomenon, a place, and a time.  Inspired by the myriad tales of suffering that proliferated in Black Sunday's wake, the federal government began paying farmers to take marginal lands out of production. It also incentivized improved agricultural practices, such as contour plowing and crop rotation, which reduced soil loss roughly 65 percent. By then, however, many families had given up hope and ¼-⅓ of the most affected people fled the Southern Plains, never to return.  But in the win column, thanks to better agricultural management practices, the massive black blizzards never returned either. Bondi Beach, Australia, 1938   The phrase Black Sunday isn't exclusive to the US, of course.  My one sister's adoptive country of Australia has had their fair share as well.  Like Black Sunday from 1926, an especially bad day during an already disastrous bushfire season.  60 people were killed and 700 injured.  Or the Black Sunday bushfires across South Australia in 1955.  60 fire brigades and 1,000 volunteers were needed to get the fires under control.  Thankfully this time only 2 people died that time.     On the far side of the element wheel is the story of Bondi Beach, minutes east of Sydney, on a February Sunday in 1938.  Sydney had recently celebrated its 150th birthday, or sesqui-centenary, with a big old parade and events planned to last until April.  The city was a-bustle with visitors, many of whom joined the locals spending the hot, sunny day at Bondi Beach.     The sky was clear, but the sea was already acting a fool. A large swell was hitting the coast and lifeguards at Bondi were busy all day Saturday pulling people from the heavy surf, as many as 74 rescues in one hour.  Despite the heavy seas, beach inspectors gave a mayor of Amity-approved thumbs-up to opening the beach on Sunday, February 6.  Beachgoers started coming and coming and coming.  The morning started out relatively quiet for the lifeguards, but business got brisk, even as they tried to wave swimmers toward safer parts of the beach.  As the tide moved out, more and more people ventured out to a sandbar that ran parallel to the beach.  The crowd had grown to 35,000, enjoying the surf and sand.  Extra surf reels were brought out to the beach as they tried to keep pace with the ballooning battery of bathers.  A lifesaving reel is an Australian invention that was brilliant in its simplicity.  It was a giant reel of rope, with a belt or harness at the end, in a portable stand.  The life saver would attach the harness to his or her self then swim out to the struggling swimmer or surfer.  The lifeguard –and I am going to persist in saying the American lifeguard rather than the Australian lifesaver– then puts the rescuee in the harness and a lifeguard on the beach would reel them in.  The lifeguard in the water either accompanies that person back or goes on to rescue someone else.      Boat crews were out in the water dropping buoys to mark out a race course for weekly races held by and for the Bondi Surf Bathers' Life Saving Club.  This would turn out to be as fortuitous as when a woman had a heart attack on a trans-atlantic flight, but there were 15 cardiologists on board, going to a conference.  At about 3.00 p.m. two duty patrols were changing shifts at the Bondi surf club and some 60 club members were mingling around waiting for the competition.    Suddenly, five tremendous waves crashed high onto the beach, one right after the other, in such quick succession that the water could not recede.  Even though most bathers were only standing in water up to their waists, they were thrown onto the beach, and pummeled by the following waves.  Then the water receded.  What goes up must come down and what comes in must go back out.  The backwash, which is the term for water on the beach finding its level and returning to the ocean, swept people who'd been nowhere near the water, including non-swimmers who never planned to get in the water, into the water.  The people on the sandbar were then swept further out.  The club recorded 180 people, but news reports at the time put the figure as high as 250 – 250 people now in need of rescue, panicking and thrashing in the surf.     All hands from the Bondi Surf Bathers' Life Saving Club lept into action.  Beltmen took every available line out, many went in without belts and held up struggling bathers.  Lifesaver Carl Jeppesen is said to have simply dived into the surf to rescue six people without the aid of a surf reel.  One of the main problems was not lack of assistance but too much unskilled help from the huge crowd on the beach.  One beltman, George Pinkerton, was dragged under water by members of the public trying to haul him in. He ended up in need of medical attention. Once the lines had been cleared and a certain amount of order restored, the lifeguards could get on with the job.  Thankfully there were people who *could help.  “I was co-opted into the situation because I was a strong swimmer and they put me on a line,'' said Ted Lever, just 16 at the time, a member of the Bondi Amateur Swimming Club who would soon be invited to join the renowned Bondi lifesaving club.    Even when the well-meaning public had been cleared from the lines to leave them in trained hands, there were still problems. The beltmen often found themselves swamped by swimmers seeking assistance. Some of them had to punch their way through a wall of distressed bathers to get to others in more danger.  One beltman spoke of being seized by five men who refused to let go.  “I was trying to take the belt to a youngster who was right out the back but I didn't get the chance.  As I went by, dozens yelled for help and tried to grab me.  I told them to hang on to the rope as soon as I got it out.  I didn't think I had a chance when they all came at me.  One grabbed me around the neck, two others caught me by one arm, another around the waist and another one seized my leg.  I hit the man who had me around the neck, managed to get him on his chin and he let go.  I had to do it; but for that, I would have been drowned myself.”   The boat was still out after laying the buoys but the crew were waiting for the race to start, but they were completely unaware of the chaos just off the beach.  Nobody thought to signal them, but even if they had, the boat could have posed a danger to people in the water with overactive waves and rip currents.   It was difficult to tell exactly how many people had been rescued during the course of that chaotic 20 minutes.  Rescued swimmers were brought up the beach by the dozens.  About 60 needed to be resuscitated to one degree or another.  Five people died, including one man who died saving a girl.   American doctor Marshall Dyer, there on vacation, helped resuscitate swimmers.  “I have never seen, nor expect to see again, such a magnificent achievement as that of your lifesavers,'' he said. ``It is the most incredible work of love in the world.''   There were inarguably many heroes on Bondi Beach that day, but the Lifesavers' club stance afterwards was that “everyone did his job.”  “It must be realised that though perhaps less spectacular, the work on the beach and in the clubhouse was just as necessary if not more so,'' he told a newspaper.  Instead of recognising individuals for their efforts the Surf Life Saving Association of Australia recommended the entire club for a special meritorious award.   Opening day of Disneyland, 1955   even a potential COVID outbreak or the measles outbreak they had a few years ago would pale in comparison to the disaster that was opening day at Disney.  Disneyland is known as the happiest place on Earth.  But when the park opened on July 17, 1955, the now-ubiquitous nickname was downright ironic.  Disney employees who survived the day referred to it as Black Sunday.  So opening day at Disney was a bit more like the Simpsons episode where they went to itchy and scratchy world. The opening day was meant to be a relatively intimate affair, by invite only, not for every Huey, Dewey and Lewey.  If you were friends and family of the employees, members of the press, and celebrities of the day, you received a ticket in the mail.  If you were everyone else, you bought a counterfeit ticket.  The park was only expecting 15,000 guests; 28,000 showed up, nearly doubled what they prepared for.  Well, what they meant to prepare for, we'll ride the teacups back around to that in a sec.  The counterfeit tickets might have been better than the legit ones, as those were only good for half the day, morning or afternoon, to spread the workload out more evenly.  The morning tickets had an end time of 2:30 pm, when, assumably, they figured people would see that and just say, oh, bother, my time is up, guess I'll leave then.  Nobody did that.  One is stunned.  You buy a ticket for a theme park, you're there all day.  So the morning people were still milling about when the afternoon people started showing up.  And then there were the people who started just sneaking in.  One enterprising self-starter set a ladder up against the outside fence and charged people $5 to climb it.  That's about $50 adjusted for inflation, many many times over for schlepping along a ladder that I like to think he nicked from his neighbor's yard.    A lot of things were not ready on opening day, within the park and without.  The Santa Ana Freeway outside turned into a 7 mile long parking lot.  The opening of the park essentially shut the freeway down.  There were so many people waiting so long, according to some media reports, there was rampant [] relief on the side of the road and even in the Disney parking lot.  Like the video for Everybody Hurts, if folks couldn't hold their water.  If you just flashed back to your life when that video came out, be sure to stretch before you mow the lawn and don't forget your big sun hat.     Today might think of a Disney park as being meticulously manicured and maintained.  Opening day, not so much.  Walt Disney tried to have everything ready on time, hustling his people to work faster, but there's only so much you can do.  So there were bare patches of ground, some areas of bare ground that had been painted green, weeds where the lawns and flowers were meant to be.  Weeds and native flora that they couldn't get rid of in time, they instead put little signs with the Latin name of the plant in the weeds, so it kind of looks like it was meant to be there.  Turn a liability into an asset, I always say.  Returning to the topic of bathrooms, there was a plumber's strike going on during construction; Walt basically had to decide between working water fountains or working toilets.  Florida heat notwithstanding, he chose to have the toilets working, and I'd say that was probably a good call.  If you've ever played theme park tycoon or any of those games now, you know that a lack of water fountains means people *have to pay for drinks now…  Or they would… if the park's concessions had been fully stocked.  The overabundance of people meant that the food and drink sold out completely in just a couple of hours.  Did I mention it was literally 100 deg freedom/38C that day?  The asphalt had been finished so close to opening that it began sticking to people's shoes.  Some people even claimed to have gotten their shoes completely stuck to the pavement on Main Street, where lots of people spent lots of time, because the rides, kind of a big deal at a theme park, they were not ready.  A number of rides, like Peter Pan's Flight, 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea Submarine Voyage, and the famous Flying Dumbo either broke down or never opened at all.   Disney's Black Sunday lasted for weeks.  A Stagecoach ride in Frontierland permanently closed when it became clear that they were as safe against rollovers as a Bronco II with a roof rack loaded with building supplies.  36 cars in Autopia crashed due to aggressive driving on the part of the patrons.  I'm starting to wonder if Disney ever met people.  Ironically, the ride was designed to help children learn to be respectful drivers on the road.  There were a number of live animals in a circus attraction, which was not great when a Tiger and a Panther escaped, which resulted in a furious death struggle on Main Street, USA.  Now that's an attraction you can't pay for, like Baghera vs Sher Khan, 8 years before The Jungle Book.  Like the park, the Mark Twain Riverboat was over capacity on opening day with over 500 people cramming onto the boat, causing it to jump its tracks and sink in the mud.  It took about half an hour to get it back onto the rail, and as soon as it pulled up to the landing, everyone rushed to one side of the boat to get off…. and tipped it over.  Thankfully, the water was shallow and there were no injuries.  There was, however, a gas leak inside Sleeping Beauty's Castle, which could have been a serious problem and prompted the closing of Adventureland, Fantasyland and Frontierland for a few hours because, whoopsie-doodles, Sleeping Beauty's Castle is on fire.  Well, trying to catch fire.  Reports vary as to how severe it actually was.  Walt was so busy handling the press that he didn't even learn about the fire until the following day.  That's how chaotic things were.     Disney was a shrewd and clever businessman, so he thought, I am opening this park. Let's make this into a big live television event.  He partnered with ABC, which had also helped provide nearly a third of the funding.  In return, Walt Disney would host a weekly TV show about what people could expect to see in Disneyland for the year before it opened.  So on opening day, Walt hosted a 90 minutes live TV special with Art Linkletter and future President Ronald Reagan.  90 million people tuned in to see the happiest place on Earth and that kind of ratings was no mean feat for the 50's.  The cameras showed all of the fun and excitement of Disneyland, completely obscuring all of the disasters and unhappiness that was actually happening.  But if you think the live broadcast would go off without a hitch, you may have pattern-recognition problems.  It was riddled with technical difficulties.  Parkgoers kept tripping over camera cables that snaked all over the park.  They were on-air flubs, mics that didn't work, people who forgot their mic *did work, and unexpected moments caught on camera, such as co host Bob Cummings caught making out with one of the dancers.  “This is not so much a show as is a special event,” Art Linkletter said during the broadcast.  “The rehearsal went about the way you'd expect a rehearsal to go if you were covering three volcanoes, all erupting at the same time and you didn't expect any of them. So from time to time, if I say we take you now by camera to the snapping crocodiles in adventure land and instead somebody pushes the wrong button and we catch Irene done adjusting her bustle on the Mark Twain. Don't be too surprised.”  And that's…. The train system is essential for the airport to function at its full capacity since it provides the only passenger access to Concourses B and C. In rare instances of the train system being out of service, shuttle buses have been used. While the system is highly reliable, one major system failure took place on April 26, 1998. A routing cable in the train tunnel was damaged by a loose wheel on one of the trains, cutting the entire system's power. The system was out of service for about seven hours. United Airlines, DIA's largest airline (who operates a large hub out of Concourse B), reported that about 30 percent of their flights and about 5,000 passengers were affected by the failure.     Sources: find sources for Disney https://libertystreeteconomics.newyorkfed.org/2013/11/historical-echoes-what-color-is-my-day-of-the-week/ https://www.history.com/news/remembering-black-sunday https://www.dailytelegraph.com.au/news/black-sunday-1938-hundreds-washed-out-to-sea-on-bondi-beach-as-freak-waves-kill-five-injure-dozens/news-story/2f584af7365abc298d039d42e5f2ddf1 https://bondisurfclub.com/the-club/history/black-sunday/ https://www.history.com/news/dust-bowl-migrants-california https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NnEErB6sPRY https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1925%E2%80%9326_Victorian_bushfire_season https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Black_Sunday_bushfires https://web.archive.org/web/20110927091319/http://www.waverley.nsw.gov.au/__data/assets/pdf_file/0005/19553/Black_Sunday.pdf https://www.dailytelegraph.com.au/news/black-sunday-1938-hundreds-washed-out-to-sea-on-bondi-beach-as-freak-waves-kill-five-injure-dozens/news-story/2f584af7365abc298d039d42e5f2ddf1 http://www.waverley.nsw.gov.au/__data/assets/pdf_file/0009/159183/Bondis_Black_Sunday,_1938_rev.pdf https://bondisurfclub.com/the-club/history/black-sunday/ https://web.archive.org/web/20110927091319/http://www.waverley.nsw.gov.au/__data/assets/pdf_file/0005/19553/Black_Sunday.pdf https://www.history.com/news/remembering-black-sunday https://www.smithsonianmag.com/smart-news/1000-mile-long-storm-showed-horror-life-dust-bowl-180962847/ https://alchetron.com/Denver-International-Airport-Automated-Guideway-Transit-System