Podcasts about Clinton

Share on
Share on Facebook
Share on Twitter
Share on Reddit
Copy link to clipboard
  • 5,653PODCASTS
  • 13,885EPISODES
  • 53mAVG DURATION
  • 4DAILY NEW EPISODES
  • Oct 16, 2021LATEST

POPULARITY

20112012201320142015201620172018201920202021


Best podcasts about Clinton

Show all podcasts related to clinton

Latest podcast episodes about Clinton

KFI Featured Segments
@ConwayShow: Dr. Ray Casciari Updates Us On Bill Clinton's Hospitalization

KFI Featured Segments

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2021 9:06


Our favorite doctor, Dr. Ray Casciari, joined the Tim Conway Jr. Show to discuss former President Bill Clinton's UC Irvine hospital ICU visit.

The Rachel Maddow Show
American workers gain upper hand to demand better working conditions

The Rachel Maddow Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2021 43:53


Tonight's guests are Rep. Pete Aguilar, member of the January 6th Committee; Evan McMullin, Utah independent candidate for Senate; Dr. Celine Gounder, infectious disease specialist; and Robert Reich, former Clinton administration labor secretary.

The Lead with Jake Tapper
Biden pitches spending plans as negotiations intensify; Key FDA panel unanimously recommends J&J booster shot; Biden admin plans to revive controversial Trump-era border policy;

The Lead with Jake Tapper

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 36:31


Manchin & Sinema detail key disagreements over Biden agenda; One-on-one with White House press secretary Jen Psaki; CNN Poll: only 25% of Americans see economic bills helping them; Klain retweets economist saying inflation is a “high class” problem; Psaki's mention of VA governor's race raises objections; FDA panel recommends J&J booster 2 months after first shot; CDC: unvaccinated adults have 11x higher risk of dying, 6x higher chance of testing positive; CDC: more than 90% of people who got J&J may be eligible for booster; NIH study: mixing & matching boosters seems effective; Migrant surge complicating VP Harris's border assignment; DHS watchdog report criticizes ICE's use of solitary confinement; Bill Clinton in hospital aster infection spread to bloodstream; Bill Clinton hospitalized for infection but “on the mend”; Source: Biden called Clinton, talked politics & VA gov race; British lawmaker stabbed to death at meeting with voters; British counter-terrorism police to lead investigation into stabbing death of member of British parliament; To learn more about how CNN protects listener privacy, visit cnn.com/privacy

Tom Sullivan Show
Tom Sullivan Show, October 15, Hour 2

Tom Sullivan Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 37:40


US plans on allowing people to cross the Northern Canadian border as soon as November 8th. President Clinton is hospitalized with sepsis. A Dec 8th vaccine mandate looms.

Last Word
Abdul Qadeer Khan (pictured), R. Allen Gardner, Joyce Jackson, Beresford King-Smith

Last Word

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 28:06


Matthew Bannister on Dr. Abdul Qadeer Khan, once described as the world's most dangerous man - but hailed as a hero in his native Pakistan for leading the country's development of nuclear weapons. Dr. R. Allen Gardner, the American ethologist who trained a chimpanzee to use sign language. Beresford King-Smith, who played a key backstage role in the success of the City of Birmingham Symphony Orchestra. And memories of the long life of Joyce Jackson who has died aged 107. Interviewed guest: Stephen Maddock OBE Interviewed guest: Mary Lee Jensvold Interviewed guest: Umer Farooq Interviewed guest: Gordon Corera Interviewed guest: Mary Lee Jensvold Interviewed guest: Sarah Allatt Archive clips used: DocsOnline, Nuclear Tango 26/05/2009; AP, Clinton condemns Pakistans Nuclear Tests 28/05/1998; Al Jazeera English, Abdul Qadeer Khan 10/10/2021; Geo News, Funeral prayers for Dr Abdul Qadeer Khan 10/10/2021; WGBH, BBC Horizon - Washoe the Chimp 04/11/1974; YouTube, Unidentified clip of Beatrix and Allen Gardner with Washoe the Chimp 13/02/2009; Sarah Allatt, Private interviews of Joyce Jackson 2021; BBC, Scrapbook for 1924 23/02/1955; British Pathé, Sir Alan Cobham shows how he will refuel in the air 1934; Inter-Pathé History, British Declaration of War 03/09/1939; BBC Radio 4, On The Town - Birmingham 02/01/1980; Central Television, Simon Rattle on the Record 1988.

The Ricochet Audio Network Superfeed
Mock and Daisy: Daily Dish: Clinton sepsis, Pete's paternity leave, and more

The Ricochet Audio Network Superfeed

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021


Bill Clinton in the hospital for a urinary tract infection. FIgures. The BEST Taco date story you will ever hear and more!

Mock and Daisy's Common Sense Cast
Daily Dish: Clinton sepsis, Pete's paternity leave, and more

Mock and Daisy's Common Sense Cast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 32:13


Bill Clinton in the hospital for a urinary tract infection. FIgures. The BEST Taco date story you will ever hear and more!

Murphology Podcast
Episode 90: Solo Female Bikepacker Pedals the Katy Trail

Murphology Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 31:40


On this episode meet Kim who recently completed an epic solo bikepacking adventure by completing the Katy Trail on her bike after being inspired by a female colleague who did the same adventure while back. At nearly 240 miles long, the crushed limestone Katy Trail spans nearly the full width of Missouri and is the country's longest continuous rail-trail, intersecting with rural farmland, scenic small towns, and centers of commerce and government on its route paralleling the Missouri River. And if you listened to episode 89 with Kevin Belanger from the Rails to Trail Conservancy, we talked a bit about the Rail Trail Hall of Fame. Back in 2007 the Katy Trail became the second member in the Rail-Trail Hall of Fame. Kim, who is a well versed solo female traveller, took a little over 5 days to pedal from Clinton, Missouri to Machens, Missouri, staying in hotels and bnbs along with way while carrying everything she needed in her waterproof and dustproof Ortlieb bike panniers. So here is Kim to talk about her Katy Trail bike adventure. www.murphologypodcast.com www.Patreon.com/Murphology

Do It With Dan
Roar Into The Second Half of Your Life | Michael Clinton

Do It With Dan

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 31:44


Is it ever too late to start over? Given our ever-increasing life expectancy, do old career paths hold any value for us anymore? It's time to start looking at our professional lives in a different light, bringing ourselves into alignment with who we are and living in integrity with that. Welcome once again Dreamers, to the Do it with Dan Podcast! The place to truly dream with your eyes open. It's time to expand our experience with some more great discussion on the power of the mind in all things. Whether you want to manifest more wealth, emotional abundance or love in your life; this is the podcast for you. This week, Daniel has the great pleasure of speaking with American writer, photographer and former magazine publishing executive - Michael Clinton. Michael was publisher of GQ magazine from 1988 to 1994 and subsequently senior vice president and executive vice president of publisher Condé Nast until 1997. He joined Hearst Magazines as senior vice president and chief marketing officer and soon after added the publishing director title at Hearst. From 2010, he was the president, marketing and publishing director of Hearst Magazines and also served on the board of directors of The Hearst Corporation. After retiring in 2020, he remains as senior media advisor to the CEO of Hearst. Please share your stories with me over at dreamwithdan.com. Connect with Michael here: Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/michael-anthony-clinton/ Buy ‘ROAR' here: https://www.simonandschuster.com/books/Roar/Michael-Clinton/9781582708133 To subscribe to my YouTube channel, please go here: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCMdAvGk6xa5fptmdULliJrg Want to manifest money now? Play the 'Money Game' to harness the power of micro-shifting to attract abundance immediately. Get your Ebook for $1. Buy NOW. Do you want inevitable & sustainable financial abundance, based on your own unique 'Money DNA'? Watch our brand new webinar Interested in working with Dan 1-2-1? In collaboration with other highly successful experts, he will help you reach financial freedom in 6 months or less: Apply Here *PLEASE RATE US AND SHARE* Join me on: Facebook Instagram Twitter Music Credit: "The Dreamer", Common Timestamps of interest: 01:09 - Welcome Michael 03:00 - There is no “too late” 07:10 - What steps can you take? 10:13 - SWAT analysis 19:44 - Wasting energy on the things we think we want to do 22:50 - Starting from $60 and a sofa 26:50 - Relationship capitol & ROAR 29:24 - Parting words & where to find Michael

Holmberg's Morning Sickness
10-15-21 - Guad Squares - w/Mo Hosting - Clinton - Shatner - Eastwood And Tommy Lee Jones - Lesbian Sex Questioning Brady - Gruden - Barry White Trip

Holmberg's Morning Sickness

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 21:46


Holmberg's Morning Sickness - Guadalupe Squares - Friday October 15, 2021

1010 WINS ALL LOCAL
Former President Clinton is in the hospital this morning being treated for an infection. A 14 year old boy was getting on a bus in Harlem when somebody opened fire on him. Cops think this might have been gang related. Teachers who oppose the City's vacci

1010 WINS ALL LOCAL

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 6:44


All Local Morning for 10/15/21 See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Langsam gesprochene Nachrichten | Deutsch lernen | Deutsche Welle
15.10.2021 – Langsam gesprochene Nachrichten

Langsam gesprochene Nachrichten | Deutsch lernen | Deutsche Welle

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 9:23


Trainiere dein Hörverstehen mit den Nachrichten der Deutschen Welle von Freitag – als Text und als verständlich gesprochene Audio-Datei.USA nach drei Jahren wieder in den UN-Menschenrechtsrat aufgenommen Die USA sind rund drei Jahre nach ihrem von Ex-Präsident Donald Trump angeordneten Rückzug aus dem UN-Menschenrechtsrat wieder in das Gremium aufgenommen worden. Die UN-Generalversammlung wählte sie mit 168 von 193 Stimmen für drei Jahre in den Rat mit Sitz in Genf. Auch Eritrea, das wegen mutmaßlicher Menschenrechtsverletzungen immer wieder in der Kritik steht, wurde in das 47 Mitglieder umfassende Gremium aufgenommen. Ebenfalls gewählt wurden Finnland, Luxemburg, Litauen, die Vereinigten Arabischen Emirate, Indien und Argentinien sowie zehn weitere Länder. Ehemaliger US-Präsident Bill Clinton auf Intensivstation Der ehemalige US-Präsident Bill Clinton liegt seit zwei Tagen mit einer Harnwegsinfektion auf der Intensivstation eines kalifornischen Krankenhauses. Die Infektion habe sich in seinem Blutkreislauf ausgebreitet, sagten die behandelnden Ärzte dem Fernsehsender CNN. Auf der Intensivstation sei Clinton vor allem deshalb, weil er dort die nötige Ruhe habe und engmaschig überwacht werden könne. Sein Sprecher Angel Urena schrieb auf Twitter, Clinton erhole sich gut und sei den Ärzten und dem Pflegepersonal dankbar für die gute Betreuung. Ehemaliger Boeing-Testpilot wegen Falschaussage in Krise um 737 Max angeklagt Der ehemalige Chef-Testpilot von Boeing ist wegen seiner Rolle bei der Krise um die problematische Software des Pannenflugzeugs 737 Max angeklagt worden. Ihm wird vorgeworfen, US-Behörden falsche und unvollständige Angaben zu der Software mit dem Namen MCAS gemacht zu haben, wie das US-Justizministerium mitteilte. Dadurch habe er die Arbeit der US-Luftfahrtbehörde FAA behindert. Die Software hatte bei zwei Abstürzen eine Rolle gespielt, bei denen 346 Menschen ums Leben kamen. Die 737 Max war während der Untersuchungen für 20 Monate mit Flugverboten belegt worden. Staatsanwaltschaft in Mexiko will nach U-Bahn-Unglück Anklage erheben Rund fünf Monate nach einem verheerenden U-Bahn-Unglück in Mexiko will die Generalstaatsanwaltschaft Anklage wegen Mordes, Körperverletzung und Sachbeschädigung erheben. Die Staatsanwältin erklärte, man werde gegen eine Reihe von Unternehmen und Menschen vorgehen. Der Einsturz der U-Bahn-Brücke war nach Ansicht von Ermittlern durch mangelhafte Balken und Bolzen verursacht worden. Am 3. Mai war in Mexiko-Stadt eine zwölf Meter hohe U-Bahn-Brücke der Linie 12 eingestürzt, als gerade eine U-Bahn darüber fuhr. 26 Menschen kamen ums Leben und etwa 80 weitere wurden verletzt. US-Staatsanwälte machen Facebook Druck Generalstaatsanwälte aus 14 US-Bundesstaaten wollen von Facebook wissen, ob prominente Impfgegner bei dem Online-Netzwerk von Sonderregeln profitiert haben. In einem Brief an Facebook-Chef Mark Zuckerberg beziehen sie sich auf Medienberichte, wonach das Online-Netzwerk Ausnahmen bei der Durchsetzung seiner Inhalte-Regeln gemacht hatte. Die Ankläger fragen, ob Beiträge von Impfgegnern aus finanziellen Gründen nicht gelöscht worden seien. Insider hatten berichtet, Facebook habe ein System aufgebaut, das hochkarätige Nutzer von den Regeln gegen Falschbehauptungen ausnehme. Erstmals Michelin-Sterne für russische Spitzenrestaurants Der französische Restaurantführer Michelin hat erstmals Spitzenköche aus Moskau mit den begehrten Michelin-Sternen ausgezeichnet. Als bestes Restaurant wurde das "Twins Garden" der Zwillingsbrüder Iwan und Sergej Beresuzki gekürt. Ebenfalls zwei Sterne bekam Artjom Jestafjew vom "Artest". Sieben weitere Restaurants erhielten einen Stern. Anlass für die Auszeichnungen war ein Michelin-Sonderband über die Gastro-Szene in Moskau. Nach Angaben des Verlags haben die Tester fünf Jahre lang die Lokale inkognito und nach festgelegten Standards geprüft. Geschreddertes Banksy-Werk zu Rekordpreis versteigert Gut drei Jahre nach seiner teilweisen Zerstörung am Ende einer Auktion ist das Werk "Love is in the Bin" des Streetart-Künstlers Banksy für knapp 19 Millionen Euro plus Gebühren versteigert worden. Der neue Eigentümer des Werks wurde zunächst nicht bekanntgegeben. Das ursprünglich "Girl with Balloon" betitelte Werk hatte im Oktober 2018 rund 1,1 Millionen Pfund erlöst. Direkt im Anschluss zerstörte ein im Rahmen versteckter Schredder einen Großteil des Bildes. Banksy, dessen Identität unbekannt ist, bezeichnete die Aktion als eine Kritik am Kunstmarkt.

The NewsWorthy
Expand the High Court?, Clinton Hospitalized & Instagram Live Improves - Friday, October 15th, 2021

The NewsWorthy

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 13:10


The news to know for Friday, October 15th, 2021! What to know about COVID-19 booster shots coming to more Americans, a Boeing pilot facing criminal charges, and a new report raising red flags about possible changes to the U.S. Supreme Court. Plus, why John Deere employees are on strike, new features coming to Instagram Live, and how one woman turns a two-day event into a year's worth of kindness. Those stories and more in around 10 minutes! Head to www.theNewsWorthy.com/shownotes for sources and to read more about any of the stories mentioned today. This episode is brought to you by Rothys.com/newsworthy and BetterHelp.com/newsworthy Become a NewsWorthy INSIDER! Learn more at www.TheNewsWorthy.com/insider            

The 11th Hour with Brian Williams
DAY 268: Former President Clinton hospitalized in California

The 11th Hour with Brian Williams

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 43:14


The 42nd president's spokesperson says he is “on the mend.” Back in Washington, the Jan 6 Committee has begun the referral process to hold Steve Bannon in contempt of Congress after he defied the Select Committee's subpoena. The other three Trump allies had their depositions postponed. And an FDA advisory panel is recommending Moderna boosters for some people. Eugene Daniels, Kimberly Atkins Stohr, Barbara McQuade, Don Calloway, Mark McKinnon and Dr. Vin Gupta all join.

Law Abiding Biker | Street Biker Motorcycle Podcast
LAB-282-Guest Patron Member Brad Johnston-Biker Talk & More!

Law Abiding Biker | Street Biker Motorcycle Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 75:39


Official Website: https://www.lawabidingbiker.com Since creating Law Abiding Biker™ Media about 8 years ago, I have had the opportunity to meet so many awesome bikers within the motorcycle community.  This community is so giving and has helped us so much along the way. There are so many unique backgrounds and life stories within the community. I love interviewing bikers and sharing their stories and experiences as I did so in this episode.  I had the pleasure of interviewing Patron Member Brad Johnston of Redmond, Oregon. Prior to recording the podcast, we had spent the day in the Law Abiding Biker shop filming a rear Rockford Fosgate speaker install on his 2017 Harley Road Glide Special. That video will eventually release along with other stereo install videos here! SUPPORT US AND SHOP IN THE OFFICIAL LAW ABIDING BIKER STORE Brad is another great example of the supportive biker community that surrounds Law Abiding Biker™ Media. He supports us financially as a Patron Member so we can continue to help, educate, entertain, and inspire as many bikes as we can worldwide. There are many benefits to becoming a Patron Member and one of them is being able to attend ride and meetup events, such as  Brad has several times. In fact, Brad hosted a Patron Member ride in Oregon in 2020 and I produced a documentary film on that ride titled, Riding Motorcycles in Real America! CHECK OUT OUR HUNDREDS OF FREE HELPFUL VIDEOS ON OUR YOUTUBE CHANNEL AND SUBSCRIBE! Lurch and I had a great time talking with Brad, who is a retired law enforcement officer. In fact, he rose to be the Chief of the Astoria, Oregon Police Department. After retirement, Brad took on a new career of teaching but he still finds plenty of time to ride his Harley local and long-distance. He is very involved with the Patron community in the Private Facebook Group and we love having him as a member.  NEW FREE VIDEO RELEASED: Sena High Definition (HD) Motorcycle Helmet Speakers & Harley/Sena Boom Audio Headsets! Sponsor-Ciro 3D CLICK HERE! Innovative products for Harley-Davidson & Goldwing Affordable chrome, lighting, and comfort products Ciro 3D has a passion for design and innovation Sponsor-RickRak CLICK HERE The Ultimate Motorcycle Luggage Rack Solution Forget those messy straps and bungee cords Go strapless with a RickRak quick attach luggage system & quality bag Sponsor-Butt Buffer CLICK HERE Want to ride longer? Tired of a sore and achy ass? Then fix it with a high-quality Butt Buffer seat cushion? New Patrons: Mark Pledger of Addison, Texas Loren Baugh of Benld, Illinois Antonio Sandoval of Livermore, California Dennis Jackson of Columbus, Nebraska Dave Burton of Richland, WA Donovan Goshien of APO, AE (US Military) Edward Fritz of Punta Gorda, Florida Ryan Cabral of Temple, TX Larry Lockman of Spokane Valley, WA Paul Pomeroy of Happy Valley, Oregon Kirk Willis of Chesterfield, Virginia Jose Colon of Clinton, Massachusetts If you appreciate the content we put out and want to make sure it keeps on coming your way then become a Patron too! There are benefits and there is no risk. Thanks to the following bikers for supporting us via a flat donation: Elias Casanas of Lawrenceville, GA Victor Stango of Chestertown, MD Edward Piquette of Lake Orion, MI ________________________________________________________ FURTHER INFORMATION:   Official Website: http://www.LawAbidingBiker.com   Email & Voicemail: http://www.LawAbidingBiker.com/Contact   Podcast Hotline Phone: 509-731-3548 HELP SUPPORT US! JOIN THE BIKER REVOLUTION! #BikerRevolution #LawAbidingBiker

Game Goose
Dead Snakes?

Game Goose

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 51:52


This episode was supposed to be about content warnings in games and developers giving players options to mitigate certain phobias. Instead, we learned that Dan has some really strange fears, Clinton is a well adjusted adult human, and Neal is suspicious of shrubbery.

2020 Politics War Room
108: Paul Begala

2020 Politics War Room

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 62:39


James and Al are joined by Democratic campaign mastermind Paul Begala for his take on Texas politics and how liberals can start to regain ground there going into 2022.  Then, they look at ways to unite the progressive and moderate wings of the party and the critical need to defeat Trumpism.  Is returning to Clinton era politics the answer? Email your questions to James and Al at politicswarroom@gmail.com or tweet them to @politicon.   Make sure to include your city, we love to hear where you're from! Paul Begala's Recent Article Paul on the need for Democrats to make a deal. The Trevor Project Please Support This Week's Sponsors: Blinkist For a 7 day free trial and 25% off a premium membership go to blinkist.com

Supreme Court Opinions
United States constitutional law (2022): Overview (Part 2 of 2)

Supreme Court Opinions

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 13:22


The Executive: Powers committed to the President of the United States (Article II). Article II, Section 1, vests the executive power in the President of the United States of America. Unlike the commitment of authority in Article I, which refers to Congress only specifically enumerated powers "herein granted" and such powers as may be necessary and proper to carry out the same, Article II is all-inclusive in its commitment of the executive power in a President of the United States of America. Enumerated powers of the President Several important powers are expressly committed to the President under Article II, Section 2. These include: Commander-in-chief of the armed forces. Power to pardon offenses against the United States. Power to make treaties (with consent of the Senate); and the Power to appoint judges, ambassadors, and other officers of the United States (often requiring Senate consent). The Presentment Clause (Article I, Section 7, cl. 2-3) grants the president the power to veto Congressional legislation and Congress the power to override a presidential veto with a supermajority. Under the clause, once a bill has been passed in identical form by both houses of Congress, with a two thirds majority in both houses, it becomes federal law. First, the president can sign the bill into law. In this scenario there is Congressional agreement. Second, if not in agreement, the president can veto the legislation by sending the bill back to Congress, within ten days of reception, unsigned and with a written statement of his objections. Third, the president can choose not to act at all on the bill, which can have one of two effects, depending on the circumstances. If Congress is in session, the bill automatically becomes law, without the president's signature, only with a two thirds majority of both houses. If, however, Congress adjourns during that 10-day period, the bill fails to become law in a procedural device known as the "pocket veto". The bill becomes "mute". The president approves or rejects a bill in its entirety; he is not permitted to veto specific provisions. In 1996, Congress passed, and President Bill Clinton signed, the Line Item Veto Act of 1996, which gave the president the power to veto individual items of budgeted expenditures in appropriations bills. The Supreme Court subsequently declared the line-item veto unconstitutional as a violation of the Presentment Clause in Clinton v City of New York, (1998). The Court construed the Constitution's silence on the subject of such unilateral presidential action as equivalent to "an express prohibition," agreeing with historical material that supported the conclusion that statutes may only be enacted "in accord with a single, finely wrought and exhaustively considered, procedure", and that a bill must be approved or rejected by the president in its entirety. The Court reasoned that a line-item veto "would authorize the President to create a different law--one whose text was not voted on by either House of Congress or presented to the President for signature," and therefore violates the federal legislative procedure prescribed in Article I, Section 7. Foreign affairs and war powers. The president has power as commander in chief to control the army. Article I grants congress the power to declare war and raise and support the army and the navy. However, Article II grants the president the power as commander-in-chief. The Supreme Court rarely addresses the issue of the president's use of troops in a war-like situation. Challenges to the president's use of troops in a foreign country are likely to be dismissed on political question grounds. The Supreme Court does not review political questions like whom to go to war with or how to handle rebellions since that is the power of the Federal Executive and Legislative branches. --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

Coffee and Cases Podcast
E102: Don Henry and Kevin Ives (Part 1)

Coffee and Cases Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 65:32


When a train coming through Benton, Arkansas, ran over two young men on the tracks in the early morning hours of August 23rd, 1987, law enforcement seemed immediately convinced that this was an accident or a double-suicide. The medical examiner ruled their deaths an “accident.” However, after a legal battle headed by the parents forced a re-examination of details from the scene as well as a second autopsy, their deaths were ruled “probable homicide.” In addition to the normal cold case question of who could possibly have hurt 16-year-old Don Henry and 17-year-old Kevin Ives, in this case, we also have much larger questions: why is no one, even today, willing to investigate this case as a murder? And, if Kevin's mother, Linda, were right and the unwillingness to investigate is part of a cover-up, how far up the ladder does the corruption go?If you would like to start your OWN podcast on Buzzsprout, please consider using our promo code so you can earn a $20 gift card after your second month on a paid plan:https://www.buzzsprout.com/?referrer_id=709643Support the show (https://www.buymeacoffee.com/CoffeeAndCases)

Dr. Duke Show
Hillary Releases State Of Terror | Katie Petrick

Dr. Duke Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 9:52


Some people may argue we are living in a state of fiction. Well, Hillary Clinton is, at least with her first fiction novel, State of Terror, co-authored with Canadian novelist Louise Penny. In writing the novel, Clinton found a way to make Orange Man still bad. And while promoting the book, Clinton let everyone know that she is not going away: ever.

Neil Rogers Show
Neil Rogers Show (August 27, 1998)

Neil Rogers Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 138:38


Neil Rogers and his faithful sidekick Jorge Rodriguez watch as the stock market takes a dump while they are waiting for President Clinton's press conference. More Post Office talk, call in, and win tickets to see Rod Stewart!

The Duran Podcast
Durham targets investigation towards Clinton side of Russiagate (Part 2)

The Duran Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 21:27


Durham targets investigation towards Clinton side of Russiagate (Part 2) The Duran: Episode 1112 Durham Investigates Pentagon Contractors Who Helped Clinton Campaign Plot Russia Hoax https://thefederalist.com/2021/10/08/durham-investigates-pentagon-cybersecurity-contractors-who-helped-clinton-campaign-plot-russia-hoax/

MCU In Review
We Didn't Like Venom: Let There Be Carnage. Sorry.

MCU In Review

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 105:30


So, we reviewed Venom: Let There Be Carnage... it didn't go well. This movie was very divisive for many folks, but Brandon and Clinton take exception took this movie. Emmy tries so hard to bring a positive spin to this podcast, but we didn't get too far.If you like this movie, you probably shouldn't listen to this podcast. We are negative here, and we are sorry. We will be back to our normal happy selves next week!If you want to support this show, visit us on our Patreon at http://www.Patreon.com/AbingersPodcast.For business inquiries, send us an email at AbingersPodcast@gmail.com.

Part Of The Problem
Tragedy And Hope

Part Of The Problem

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 57:13


Dave Smith returns! On this episode of Part Of The Problem, Dave tells us about the trials and tribulations around the birth of his new son, his extended absence and his new motivations for the future. Check it out! This Episode Was Recorded On 10/10/21 Support Our SponsorsStamps.com - https://www.stamps.com/ click on the microphone at the TOP of the homepage and type in PROBLEMQuip.com - https://www.getquip.com/problem to get your first refill freeCuts Clothing - https://www.cutsclothing.com/potpFollow the show on social media:Twitter: https://twitter.com/ComicDaveSmithhttps://twitter.com/RobbieTheFirehttps://www.instagram.com/bmackayisrightInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/theproblemdavesmith/https://www.instagram.com/robbiethefire/https://www.instagram.com/bmackayisrightSubscribe On YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/user/DSmithcomicBuy Daves Album : Dave Smith Libertas - https://bit.ly/2Nq5seMDave Smith and Robbie The Fire Bernstein bring you the latest in Politics three times a week, with the promise of bonus episodes! Libertarian Philosophy mixed with a sense of humor, POTP is one of the leading voices in libertarianism.Dave Smith is a New York based stand-up comedian, radio personality, and political commentator. Dave can be seen regularly on “The Greg Gutfeld Show” and “Red Eye” on Fox News, as well as “Kennedy” on Fox Business Network. In 2013 Dave was featured as one of the New Faces at the prestigious Just For Laughs Comedy Festival in Montreal. He was also a featured performer on the New York Comedy Festival's “New York's Funniest” showcase in 2014 and 2015. Dave's outlet for his social commentary is his podcast, “Part of the Problem,” which is available on iTunes. Dave is also co-host of “The Legion of Skanks” podcast, available on the GaS Digital Network.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Late Night with Seth Meyers Podcast
Hillary Clinton & Louise Penny | Scalise Embraces Trump's Big Lie; Lindell's 850-Year-Old Voter Claim: A Closer Look

Late Night with Seth Meyers Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 26:36


Seth takes a look at Rep. Steve Scalise refusing to say the 2020 election was not stolen while the Biden administration blocks Trump's attempt to hide records from the coup investigation.Then, Hillary Clinton and author Louise Penny talk about events in Washington D.C. becoming stranger than fiction and Clinton comments on the United States' withdrawal from Afghanistan.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Death To Tyrants Podcast
Ep. 178: The Red Pills Don't Always Go Down Easy, with Debra and Adam

Death To Tyrants Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 70:59


My guests this week are Adam and Debra from the . Debra is Adam's mother-in-law and comes from a neoliberal/progressive political background and lives in the San Francisco Bay Area. She supported Obama, Clinton, Biden, and so on. Adam is from the libertarian space, and he discusses various ideas, current events, etc. with Debra to get her take on things. As they get into their discussions, he drops red pills on her and tries to get her to see the way things actually are. She has started to see things much differently after months of doing their show. I brought them both on because I love talking to them. I ask Debra and Adam some tough questions, and I think you'll love this discussion. Sponsors: Texas Scorecard: , , Nomad Network: Paloma Verde CBD ( ): Enter code BUCK at checkout for 25% off any purchase over $75! ...and join their mailing list for an additional 10% off! Visit my website: Donate to the show here: Audio Production by Podsworth Media: Leave us a review and rating on iTunes! Thanks!

This Day in Esoteric Political History
Perot Crashes The Debate (1992)

This Day in Esoteric Political History

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 15:54


It's October 12th. This day in 1992, Ross Perot joined Bill Clinton and incumbent George HW Bush on stage for the first three-person debate in modern presidential election history. Jody, NIki, and Kellie discuss Perot's candidacy, how he was able to destabilize both Clinton and Bush on stage — and whether he was actually a “spoiler” in that election. This Day In Esoteric Political History is a proud member of Radiotopia from PRX. Your support helps foster independent, artist-owned podcasts and award-winning stories. If you want to support the show directly, you can do so on our website: ThisDayPod.com Get in touch if you have any ideas for future topics, or just want to say hello. Our website is thisdaypod.com Follow us on social @thisdaypod Our team: Jacob Feldman, Researcher/Producer; Brittani Brown, Producer; Khawla Nakua, Transcripts; music by Teen Daze and Blue Dot Sessions; Julie Shapiro, Executive Producer at Radiotopia

Change The Game Podcast
Open-Book Management from an Employee Owner Perspective

Change The Game Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 17:36


In recognition of ESOPtober, we pulled from the vault, a recording of Rob Zicaro, former frontline employee at Web industries. Rob is now an ESOP Crusader spreading the word on employee ownership. In this speech at a past Great Game of Business Conference, Rob talked about open-book management through the eyes of an employee owner, and he shared a clip from the 1990s when he addressed President Clinton about ESOP companies.

Savage Minds Podcast
Michael Hudson

Savage Minds Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 64:18


Michael Hudson, American economist and author of Super Imperialism: The Economic Strategy of American Empire (1972) discusses the rentier economy that accounts for the growing disparity in wealth due to finance capitalism. Giving a history of the the polarisation of the US economy since the 1960s through the present, Hudson discusses how the high costs of education and housing have led to a growing problem of student debt, higher costs of living and increasing austerity. Noting how 80% of bank loans are made for real estate in the US, Hudson expounds upon how loans and exponentially growing debts outstrip profits from the economy proving disastrous for both the government and the people who are paying increasing amounts on housing with little to no money left to spend on goods and services. Hudson contends that finance capitalism is a “self-terminating” oligarchical system leaving workers traumatised, afraid to strike or react to working conditions, while they are pushed towards serfdom as US and Europe are heading towards a debt crisis on par with that of Argentina and Greece.TranscriptIntroduction: Welcome to Savage Minds. I'm your host, Julian Vigo. Today's show marks the launch of our second season with a very special guest: Michael Hudson. Michael Hudson is a financial analyst and president of the Institute for the Study of long term economic trends. He is a distinguished research professor of economics at the University of Missouri Kansas City, and the professor at the School of Marx studies, Peking University in China. He's also a research fellow at the Levy Institute of Bard College, and he has served as an economic adviser to the US Canadian, Mexican, and Latvian governments. He's also been a consultant to UNITAR, the Institute for Research on Public Policy and the Canadian Science Council, among other organisations. He holds a BA from the University of Chicago and an MA and PhD in economics from New York University. Professor Hudson is the author of Killing the Host: How Financial Parasites and Debt Bondage Destroy the Global Economy (2015), and most recently, J is for junk economics, a guide to reality in an age of deception. His super imperialism, the economic strategy of the American Empire has just been translated into German after its appearance in Chinese, Japanese and Spanish. He sits on the editorial board of lap times quarterly and has written for the Journal of International Affairs, Commonweal, International Economy, Financial Times, and Harper's, and he's a regular contributor to CounterPunch. I welcome Michael Hudson, to Savage Minds.Julian Vigo: Class analysis in the United States is rather subterfuge amidst all these other narratives of the American dream as it's framed—that being the right to own one's home. In the UK, that became part of the Trojan horse, that Thatcher built to win her election. It was a very smart move. She won that election—she won her elections—by the reforms in the “right to buy” scheme as I'm sure you know. I t was really clever and disastrous for human rights in the country. I've spent quite a bit of my life in the UK and to see that in 1979 was, I believe, 49% of all residential housing was council housing. And when I wrote a piece on this for the Morning Star about eight, nine years ago, that rate was reduced to under 11%. So we're seeing the haves- and have-nots. And this is where your work really struck a chord for me. And let's kick into the show at this point. I have written over the years, about rentier capitalism, a term that is increasingly used to describe economies dominated by rentier, rents and rent-generating assets. And you discuss this quite a bit in your work, more recently, your article from July, “Finance Capitalism versus Industrial Capitalism: The Rentier Resurgence and Takeover.” And in this article, you discuss how today the finance, insurance and real estate sectors have regained control of government creating a “neo-rentier” economy as you put it, while you note—and I quote you: “The aim of this postindustrial finance capitalism is the opposite of industrial capitalism as known to nineteenth-century economists: it seeks wealth primarily through the extraction of economic rent, not industrial capital formation.” Unquote. I was wondering if we might begin our talk by branching out from this piece you wrote in July. And if you could explain for our listeners why discerning rentier capitalism is essential for understanding the global push to privatise and financialise those sectors that formerly existed in the public domain such as—and we see this everywhere, including in the EU—transportation, health care, prisons, policing, education, the post office, etc.Michael Hudson: Well, most textbooks depict a sort of happy world that almost seems to exist in the 1950s. And this “happy world” is when wealthy people get money, they build factories and buy machinery and hire workers to produce more goods and services. But that's not what the credits created for today, it's the textbooks that pick the banks that take in people's deposits and lend them out to people who build industrial production, and you'll have a picture of workers with lunchboxes working in. But actually, banks only lend money against assets. And the main assets do not make a profit by employing people to produce things there. They simply are opportunities to extract rent, like real estate 80% of bank loans are made for real estate. And that means they're made against primarily buildings that are in land that are already there. And the effective more and more bank credit is to raise the price of real estate. And in the United States, in the last year, housing prices have gone up 20%. And typically, in America, if you go to a bank and take out a loan, the government is going to guarantee the bank that you will pay the loan up to the point where it absorbs 43% of your income.So here's a big chunk of American income going to pay simply for housing, those price increases, not because there's more housing, or better housing. But in fact, the housing is built worse and worse every year, by lowering the standards, but simply inflation. There are other forms of rent, other people pay, for instance, 18% of America's GDP is healthcare, much higher than the percentage in any other country for much lower quality of service. So you know, that's sort of taken out of people's budgets. If you're a worker in the United States, right away, you get your paycheque 15%—a little more, maybe 16% now—is deducted for Social Security and medical care for when you're older. They also need up to maybe 30%, for income tax, federal, state and local income tax before you have anything to spend. And then you have to spend for housing, you have to pay for transportation, you have to pay for your own medical insurance contributions, your own pension contributions. So there's very, very little that is left over in people's budgets to buy goods and services. Not only have real wages in the United States, gone down now for three decades, but the disposable income that people and families get after they meet their sort of monthly “nut,” what they can spend on goods and services is shrunk even more. So while they're getting squeezed, all this money is paid to rentiers as at the top. And because of the miracle of compound interest, the amount that the 1% of the economy has grows exponentially. Any rate of interest is a doubling time. And even though people know that there's only a 0.1% rate of interest, now for the banks, and for large wall firms, it's about 3% if you want to buy a mortgage. and so this, the 0.1% is lent out to large companies like Blackstone that are now buying up almost all of the housing that comes onto the market in the United States. So in 2008, 69% of homeowners of Americans own their own homes. Now it's fallen by more than 10%. It's fallen to about 51%. All this difference has been basically the financial sector funding a transformation away from home ownership into landlordship—into absentee ownership. And so the if you're part of the 1%, the way that you make money is by buying stocks or bonds, or corporate takeovers, or buying real estate and not building factories. And that's why the factories and the industry have been shifting outside of the United States over to China, and other countries. So, what we're having is a kind of…I won’t say its post-industrial capitalism, because people thought that the what was going to follow industrial capitalism was going to be socialism. They thought that there will be more and more government spending on providing basic needs that people had. And instead of socialism, and a more, egalitarian distribution of wealth and income, you've had a polarization of wealth and income, you've had the wealthy people making money financially, and by real estate, and by rent seeking, and by creating monopolies, but not by building factories, not by producing goods and services. And that is why the economy's polarizing, and so many people are unhappy with their conditions. Now, they're going further and further into debt and their student debt. Instead of education here being a public utility that's provided freely, it's become privatised at NYU, it's now $50,000 or $60,000 a year. There is no way in which the United States can compete industrially with other countries when they've loaded down new entrants into the labor force with huge housing costs, student debt, huge taxes have been shifted off the 1% onto the 99%. So in the United States, finance capitalism basically is self-terminating. It leads to a polarised economy, it leads to austerity. And it leaves countries looking like Greece looked after 2015, after its debt crisis, it looks like Argentina is trying to struggle to pay its foreign debts. And that seems to be the future in which the US and Europe are moving towards.Julian Vigo: I posted on my Facebook wall about this about maybe five weeks ago, that the rentier class, I'm not just including the likes of Blackstone, but the middle class that are multiple home dwellers. I noted that during the lockdown, I was reading through accounts on social media of people who were being threatened by landlords, landlords, who actually had no mortgage to pay. And I had to wonder at that point, what is the input of the rentier class by the landowning class who are not necessarily part of the 1%. These are people who, as some of these people came on my wall and said, “I worked hard to buy my second and third houses!” And I thought, “Well, let me pull out my violins.” One thing that really alerted me during lockdown was the lack of sympathy for renters. And I don't just mean in the US, in fact, I think the US had a kinder response to renting in some sectors such as New York state where there has been—and still—is a massive pushback against any form of relaxation of rent forgiveness, since lockdown in the EU and Italy and France. It's appalling the kind of treatment that renters received here. I spoke to people in Bologna, who were doing a rent strike, but fearful of having their name mentioned. I ended up not being able to run the piece because of that. And there are so many people who don't have money to pay their rent in the EU, in the UK, and yet, we're somehow focusing oftentimes on these meta-critical analyses of the bigger corporations, the 1%. But where does the middle class fit into this, Michael, because I do have to wonder if maybe we should be heading towards the model I hold in my mind and heart is St. Ives in Cornwall, which about eight years ago set a moratorium saying no second homes in this city. Now, they didn't do it because of any allegiance to Marxism or socialism. They did it in part because of that, and because of a left-leaning politics, but mostly because they didn't want to have a ghost town that when the summer was over, you had very few people living in town. What are the answers to the rentier class that is also composed of people who consider themselves hard-working people who just want someone else to pay for their house, as one person on Twitter, put it.Michael Hudson: This is exactly the problem that is plaguing left wing politics, from Europe to America in the last fifty years.Julian Vigo: Exactly. It's astounding because there was a lot of debate on Twitter around last summer, when one woman wrote, I just did the math, I'm almost 29 years old, and I paid and she listed the amount in rent, I have just bought my landlord a second house. And people are adding it up that we are back to understanding. And I think in terms of the medieval period, remember in high school in the US when you study history, and you learn about feudalism, and the serfs coming in from far afield having to tend to the Masters terrain. And I think, are we heading back to a kind of feudalism under a new name? Because what's dividing those who can afford rents and those who can, it's not only your eligibility to receive a bank loan in this climate, which is quite toxic in London. I know many architects, lawyers, physicians who cannot get bank loans. Ironically, the bar is being raised so high that more and more people in London are moving on to the canal system—they're renting or buying narrowboats. The same is happening in other parts of the world where people are being barred out of home ownership for one reason or another and at the same time, there's a class of people often who got loans in a period when it was quite easy in the 80s and early 90s, let's say and they hold a certain control over who's paying—43% of income of Americans goes on housing. And as you know, in New York City that can be even higher. How can we arrive at a society where there's more equality between these haves and have-nots? Because it seems that the middle class is playing a role in this. They're trying to come off as being the hard-working schmoes, who have just earned their right to own their second or third homes, and then the others who will never have a foot on that ladder, especially given the crash?Michael Hudson: Well, I think you've put your finger on it. Most people think of economies being all about industry. But as you've just pointed out, for most people, the economy is real estate. And if you want to understand how modern economies work, you really should begin by looking at real estate, which is symbiotic with with banking, because as you pointed out that in a house is worth whatever a bank will lend. And in order to buy a house, unless you have an enormous amount of savings, which hardly anyone has, you'll borrow from a bank and buy the house. And the idea is to use the rent to pay the interest to the bank. And then you end up hoping late hoping with a capital gain, which is really land price gain. You borrow from the bank hoping that the Federal Reserve and the central bank or the Bank of England is going to inflate the economy and inflate asset prices and bank credit is going to push prices further and further up. As the rich get richer, they recycle the money in the banks and banks lend it to real estate. So, the more the economy is polarised between the 1% and the 99%, the more expensive houses get the more absentee landlords are able to buy the houses and outbid the homebuyers, who as you pointed out, can't get loans because they're already loaned up. If they can't get loans in England to buy a house, it's because they already owe so much money for other things. In America, it would be because they own student debt or because they own other bank loans, and they're all loaned up. So the key is people are being squeezed more than anywhere else on housing. In America, it rents care too and on related sort of monopoly goods that yield rent. Now the problem is why isn't this at the centre of politics?Is it because— and it's ironic that although most people in every country, Europe and America are still homeowners, or so they only own their own home—they would like to be rocky as a miniature? They would like to live like the billionaires live off the rents. They would like to be able to have enough money without working to get a free lunch and the economy of getting a free lunch. And so somehow, they don't vote for what's good for the wage earners. They vote for well, if I were to get richer, then I would want to own a house and I would want to get rent. So I'm going to vote in favour of the landlord class. I'm going to vote in favour of banks lending money to increase housing prices. Because I'd like to borrow money from a bank to get on this treadmill, that's going to be an automatic free lunch. Now, I not only get rent, but I'll get the rising price of the houses that prices continue to rise. So somehow, the idea of class interest, they don't think of themselves as wave generators, they think of themselves as somehow wouldn't be rentiers in miniature without reaising that you can't do it in miniature. You really have to have an enormous amount of money to be successful rentier.So no class consciousness means that the large real estate owners, the big corporations like Blackstone, that own huge amounts can sort of trot out a strapped, homeowner and individual, and they will sort of hide behind it and say, “Look at this, poor family, they use their money to buy a house, the sort of rise in the world, and now the tenants have COVID, and they can't pay the rent. Let's not bail out these, these landlords.” So even though they're not getting rent, we have to aid them. And think of them as little people, but they're not little people. They're a trillion dollar, money managers. They're huge companies that are taking over. And people somehow personify the billionaires and the trillion dollar real estate management companies as being small people just like themselves. There's a confusion about the economic identity.Julian Vigo: Well, certainly in the United States, we are known to have what's called the “American dream.” And it's, it's quite interesting when you start to analyse what that dream has morphed into, from the 1960s to the present, and I even think through popular culture. Remember Alexis, in Dynasty, this was the go-to model for success. So we've got this idea that the super rich are Dallas and Dynasty in the 80s. But 20 years after that, we were facing economic downfalls. We had American graduates having to go to graduate school because they couldn't get a job as anything but a barista. And the model of getting scholarships or fellowships, any kind of bursary to do the Masters and PhD. When I was doing my graduate work, I was lucky enough to have this, but that was quickly disappearing. A lot of my colleagues didn't have it. And I imagine when you went to school, most of your colleagues had it. And today, and in recent years, when I was teaching in academia, most of my students doing advanced degrees had zero funding. So, we've got on the one hand, the student debt, hamster wheel rolling, we have what is, to me one of the biggest human rights issues of the domestic sphere in countries like the US or Great Britain, frankly, everywhere is the ability to live without having to be exploited for the payment of rent. And then we have this class of people, whether they're Blackstone, and huge corporations, making billions, or the middle class saying, “But I'm just living out the American dream.” How do we square the “American dream,” and an era where class consciousness is more invisible than ever has it been?Michael Hudson: I think the only way you can explain that is to show how different life was back in the 1960s, 1950s. When I went to school, and the college, NYU cost $500 a semester, instead of 50,000, that the price of college has gone up 100 times since I went to college—100 times. I rented a house in a block from NYU at $35 a month on Sullivan Street. And now that same small apartment would go for 100 times that much, $3,500 a month, which is a little below the average rent in Manhattan these days. So, you've had these enormous increases in the cost of getting an education, they cost of rent, and in a society where housing was a public utility, and education was a public utility, education would be provided freely. If the economy wanted to keep down housing prices, as they do in China for instance, then you would be able to work if the kind of wages that Americans are paid today and be able to save. The ideal of China or countries that want to compete industrially is to lower the cost of living so that you don't have to pay a very high wages to cover the inflated cost of housing, the cost of education.If you privatise education in America, and if you increase the housing prices, then either you're going to have to pay labor, much higher rates that will price it out of world markets, at least for industrial goods, or you'll have to squeeze budgets. So yes, people can pay for housing, and education, but they're not going to buy the goods and services they produce. And so and that's one of the reasons why America is not producing industrial manufacturers. It's importing it all abroad. So the result of this finance capitalism that we have the result of the rent squeeze, that you depict, and the result of voters not realising that this is economic suicide for them is that the economy is shrinking and leaving people basically out in the street. And of course, all of this is exacerbated by the COVID crisis right now. Where, right now you have, especially in New York City, many people are laid off, as in Europe, they're not getting an income. Well, if your job has been closed down as a result of COVID, in Germany, for instance, you're still given something like 80% of your normal salary, because they realise that they have to keep you solvent and living. In the United States, there's been a moratorium on rents, they realise that, well, if you've lost your job, you can't pay the rent. There's a moratorium on evictions, there's a moratorium on bank foreclosures on landlords that can't pay their mortgage to the bank, because their tenants are not paying rent. All of that is going to expire in February, that’s just in a few months.  So they're saying, “OK, in New York City, 50,000 tenants are going to be thrown out onto the street, thousands of homes are going to be foreclosed on.” All over the country, millions of Americans are going to be subject now to be evicted. You can see all of the Wall Street companies are raising private capital funds to say, “We're going to be waiting for all this housing to come onto the market. We're going to be waiting for all of these renovations to take place. We're going to swoop in and pick it up.” This is going to be the big grab bag that is going to shape the whole coming generation and do to America really what Margaret Thatcher did to England when she got rid of—when she shifted from housing, the council housing that you mentioned, was about half the population now dow to about 1/10 of the population today.Julian Vigo: This is what I wonder is not being circulated within the media more frequently. We know that major media is not...[laughts] They like to call themselves left-of-centre but they're neoliberal which I don't look at anything in the liberal, the neoliberal sphere, as “left.” I look at it as a sort of strain of conservatism, frankly. But when you were speaking about paying $35 a month for an apartment on Sullivan Street, get me a time machine! What year was that? Michael?Michael Hudson: That was 1962.Julian Vigo: 1962 And roughly, the minimum wage in New York was just over $1 an hour if I'm not mistaken.Michael Hudson: I don't remember. I was making I think my first job on Wall Street was 50 to $100. A year $100 a week.Julian Vigo: So yes, I looked it up because I was curious when you said 100 times certainly we see that. If the tuition at New York when and New York University when I left was $50,000 a year you were paying $500 a semester. This is incredible inflation.Michael Hudson: And I took out a student loan from the state because I wanted to buy economic books. I was studying the history of economic thought and so I borrowed, you know, I was able to take out a loan that I repaid in three years as I sort of moved up the ladder and got better paying jobs. But that was the Golden Age, the 1960s because in that generation there was the baby boom that just came online. There were jobs for everybody. There was a labor shortage. And everybody was trying to hire—anyone could get a job. I got to New York and I had $15 in my pocket in 1960. I'd shared a ride with someone, [I] didn't know what to do. We stayed in a sort of fleabag hotel on Bleecker Street that was torn down by the time you got there. But I,  took a walk around and who should I run into that Gerde's Folk City, but a friend of mine had stayed at my house in Chicago once and he let me stay at his apartment for a few weeks till I can look around, find a place to live and got the place for $35 a month,Julian Vigo: When there was that debate on Twitter—there were many debates actually about renting on Twitter—and there were a few landlords who took to Twitter angry that they learned that their renters had received subsidies in various countries to pay their rent. And instead of paying their rent, the people use this to up and buy a downpayment on a home. And they got very upset. And there was a bit of shadow on Friday there with people saying, “Well, it's exactly what you've done.” And I find this quite fascinating, because I've always said that the age of COVID has made a huge Xray of our society economically speaking. And it's also telling to me that in countries that I would assume to be more socialist leaning, if not socialist absolutely, in the EU, we saw very few movements against rent. Very few people or groups were calling for a moratorium on rent. It's ironic, but it was in the US where we saw more moratoria happen. What is happening where—and this reaches to larger issues, even outside of your specialty of economics and finance—but why on earth has it come to be that the left is looking a lot more like the right? And, don't shoot me, but you know, I've been watching some of Tucker Carlson over the past few years, someone who I could not stand after 9/11. And he has had more concern and more investigations of the poor and the working class than MSBC or Rachel Maddow in the biggest of hissy fits. What is going on politically that the valences of economic concern are shifting—and radically so?Michael Hudson: Well, the political situation in America is very different from every other country. In the Democratic Party, in order to run for a position, you have to spend most of your time raising money, and the party will support whatever candidates can raise the most money. And whoever raises the largest amount of money gets to be head of a congressional committee dealing with whatever it is their campaign donors give. So basically, the nomination of candidates in the United States, certainly in the Democratic Party, is based on how much money you can raise to finance your election campaign, because you're supposed to turn half of what you raised over to the party apparatus. Well, if you have to run for an office, and someone explained to me in in the sixties, if I wanted to go into politics, I had to find someone to back up my campaign. And they said, “Well, you have to go to the oil industry or the tobacco industry.”And you go to these people and say, “Will you back my campaign?” And they say, Well, sure, what's your position going to be on on smoking on oil and the the tax position on oil, go to the real estate interest, because all local politics and basically real estate promotion projects run by the local landlords and you go to the real estate people and you say, “Okay, I'm going to make sure that we have public improvements that will make your land more valuable, but you won't have to pay taxes on them.” So, if you have people running for office, proportional to the money they can make by the special interests, that means that all the politicians here are representing the special interests that pay them and their job as politicians is to deliver a constituency to their campaign contributors. And so the campaign contributors are going to say, “Well, here's somebody who could make it appear as if they're supporting their particular constituency.” And so ever since the 60s, certainly in America, the parties divided Americans into Irish Americans, Italian Americans, black Americans, Hispanic Americans. They will have all sorts of identity politics that they will run politicians on. But there's one identity that they don't have—and that's the identity of being a wage earner. That's the common identity that all these hyphenated Americans have in common. They all have to work for a living and get wages, they're all subject to, they have to get housing, they have to get more and more bank credit, if they want to buy housing so that all of the added income they get is paid to the banks as mortgage interest to get a home that used to be much less expensive for them. So basically, all of the increase in national income ends up being paid to the campaign contributors, the real estate contributors, the oil industry, the tobacco industry, the pharmaceuticals industry, that back the politicians. And essentially, you have politics for sale in the United States. So we're really not in a democracy anymore—we're in an oligarchy. And people don't realise that without changing this, this consciousness, you're not going to have anything like the left-wing party.And so you have most Americans out wanting to be friendly with other Americans, you know, why can't everybody just compromise and be in the centre? Well, there's no such thing as a centrist. Because you'll have an economy that's polarising, you have the 1% getting richer and richer and richer by getting the 99% further and further in debt. So the 99% are getting poorer and poor after paying their debts. And to be in the centre to say, and to be say, only changes should be marginal, that means—a centrist is someone who lets this continue. With that we're not going to make a structural change, that's radical, we're not going to change the dynamic that is polarising the economy, between creditors at the top and debtors is at the bottom, between landlords at the top and renters at the bottom between monopolists and the top and the consumers who have to pay monopoly prices for pharmaceuticals, for cable TV, for almost everything they get. And none of this is taught in the economics courses. Because you take an  economics course, they say, “There's no such thing as unearned income. Everybody earns whatever they can get.” And the American consciousness is shaped by this failure to distinguish between earned income and unearned income and a failure to see that dynamic is impoverishing them. It's like the proverbial frog that's been boiled slowly in water. So, with this false consciousness people have—if only they can save enough and borrow from a bank—they can become a rentier in Miniature. They're just tricked into a false dream.Intermission: You're listening to savage minds, and we hope you're enjoying the show. Please consider subscribing. We don't accept any money from corporate or commercial sponsors. And we depend upon listeners and readers just like you. Now back to our show.Julian Vigo: I don't know if you saw the movie called Queen of Versailles. It was about this very bizarre effort to construct a very ugly Las Vegas-style type of Versailles by a couple that was economically failing. And it spoke to me a lot about the failings of the quote unquote, “American dream.” And I don't mean that dream, per se. I mean, the aspiration to have the dream, because that is, as you just pointed out, unearned income, that is the elephant in the room. And it almost seems to be the elephant maybe to keep using that metaphor, that the blind Sufi tale: everyone's feeling a different part of it, but no one is naming it. And I find this really shocking, that we can't speak of unearned income and look at the differences as to which country's tax inheritance and which do not—this idea that one is entitled to wealth. Meanwhile, a lot of US institutions are academically, now formally, being captured by the identity lobbies and there are many lobbies out there—it's a gift to them. They don't have to work on the minimum wage, they don't have to work on public housing, they don't have to work on housing.They can just worry about, “Do we have enough pronoun badges printed out?” And I find this really daunting as someone who is firmly of the left and who has seen some kind of recognition have this problem bizarrely, from the right. We seem to have a blind spot where we're more caught up in how people see us, rather than the material reality upon which unearned and earned income is based. Why is it that today people are living far worse than their grandparents and parents especially?Michael Hudson: Well, I think we've been talking about that, because they have to pay expenses as their parents and grandparents didn't have to pay, they have to pay much higher rent. Everybody used to be able to afford to buy a house, that was the definition of “middle class” in America was to be a homeowner. And when I was growing up in the 50s and 60s, everybody on the salary they were getting could afford to buy their house. And that's why so many people bought the houses with working class sell rates. As I told you, I was getting $100 a week. At least if you were quiet you could do it. If you were black, you couldn't do it. The blacks were redlined. But the white people could buy the houses. And that's why today, the white population has so much more wealth than the black population, because the white families would leave the house to the children and housing prices have gone up 100 times. And because they've gone up 100 times, this is endowed with a whole white hereditary class of kids whose family own their own homes, send them to schools. But America was redlined. Now Chicago was redlined, blacks were redlined. In New York City, the banks would not lend money to black neighbourhoods or to black borrowers. I was at Chase Manhattan and they made it very clear: they will not make a loan to a mortgage if they're black people living in my block. And they told me that when I was on Second Street and Avenue B. I won't repeat the epithet racist epithets they used. But what has caused the racial disparity today is what we've been talking about: the fact that whites could buy their own homes, blacks could not.And the reason I'm bringing this up is that if—we're working toward a society where white people are now going to be reduced to the position that black people are in today: of not having their own homes, of not being able to get bank credit. One friend of mine at the Hudson Institute, a black economist, wanted to—we were thinking of cowriting a book, The Blackening of America. The state of, well, the future of the whites, is to become blacks if you don't solve this situation. And I've been unable to convince many black leaders about reparations—that the reparations, very hard to get reparations for slavery, which was to their grandparents, their reparations are due to the blacks today who do not have housing, their own homes, because of the redlining that they have been experiencing right down to today.So, you have this, you do have a separation in this country. But this is not the kind of hyphenated politics that the politicians talk about. Not even the black politicians, the fact that if you're going to hyphenated American, how did this hyphenisation affect the real opportunities for real estate, for homeownership, for education, and all of these other things. I think maybe if people begin to think as to how there is a convergence of what was diverging before—now you're having the middle class pushed down into its real identity which was a dependent wage-earning class all along—you're going to have a change of consciousness. But we're still not to that. People don't realise this difference.And at the top of the pyramid, at New York University, for instance, where we both went to school, I have professor friends there and there was recently an argument about getting more salaries for professors, because they're hiring adjunct professors at very low prices instead of appointing them full time. And one professor turned to my friend and said, “They’re treating us like wage earners.” And my friend said, “Yes, you are a wage earner. You’re dependent on the wage you get from New York University.” And he said, “But I’m a professor,” as if somehow being a professor doesn't mean that you're not a wage earner, you're not dependent on salary, you're not being exploited by your employer who's in it to make money at your expense.Julian Vigo: Oh, absolutely. We've got the push from NYU in the 1990s by adjunct professors to get health insurance, and to have a certain modicum of earnings that would allow them to pay rent in an extremely expensive city. I find it amazing how many of my students at the time had no idea how much I was being exploited at the time, I was at lunch after the graduation of two of my students, they invited me to lunch, and they were having a discussion about how well we must be paid. And I laughed. I didn't go into the details of my salary. But later in later years, they came to understand from other sources, how exploitation functions within the university where they were paying almost quarter of a million to go to school, and graduate school, and so forth. So it's quite shocking that even though we have the internet and all the information is there, anyone can see precisely how much NYU or Columbia cost today, or how much the cost of living is, as opposed to 1961, for instance, that people are still not putting together that when you have housing, that is like income. For most of us, if housing is affordable, the way one lives, the efficiency to live, the ease, the mental health, and physical health improves. And it's fascinating to me that during lockdown, people were told, just to bite the bullet, stay inside, and how many publications, how much of the media went out to discover the many people being locked down in extremely small hovels? Multiple families living in three bedroom houses, even smaller. And I just kept thinking throughout these past 20 months or so that the media has become complicit in everything you've discussed, we've seen an extra tack added on where the media is another arm of industry and the 1% they are able sell lockdown stories: stars singing, Spaniards singing, accordionists from Neapolitan balconies, everyone's happy. But that was a lie. And that was a lie being sold conveniently.I regularly post stories from CNN, where their recent yacht story—they love yachts—their recent yacht story from about five or six days ago was how the super-rich are “saving” the world's ecology. And it was a paid advertisement of a very expensive yacht that uses nuclear power, what you and I hope: that all the rich people are running around with little mini nuclear reactors on the seas. And I keep thinking: what has happened that you mentioned campaign financing? Remember what happened to Hillary Clinton when she suggested campaign finance reform? That went over like a lead balloon. And then we've got CNN, Forbes, all these major publications that run paid sponsored news articles as news. It's all paid for, they legally have to see it as but you have to find the fine print. And we're being sold the 1% as the class that's going to save the planet with this very bizarre looking yacht with a big ball on it. And another another CNN article about yacht owners was about how it's hard for them to pay for maintenance or something and  we're pulling out our tiny violins.And I keep wondering, why is the media pushing on this? We can see where MSNBC and CNN and USA today are heading in a lot of their coverage over class issues. They would much rather cover Felicity Huffman, and all those other stars’ children's cheating to get into a California University scandal which is itself its own scandal, of course. That gets so covered, but you rarely see class issues in any of these publications unless it refers to the favelas of Brazil or the shanty towns of Delhi. So, we're sold: poverty isn't here, it's over there. And over here, mask mandates, lock up, shut your doors stay inside do your part clap for the cares and class has been cleared. Cut out. Even in the UK, where class consciousness has a much more deeply ingrained fermentation, let's say within the culture, it's gone. Now the BBC. Similarly, nightly videos at the initial part of lockdown with people clapping for the cares. Little was said about the salaries that some of these carriers were getting, I don't mean just junior doctors there, but the people who are cleaning the hallways. So, our attention has been pushed by the media away from class, not just the politicians doing the dirty work, or not just the nasty finance campaign funding that is well known in the US. What are some of the responses to this, Michael, that we might advance some solutions here? Because my worry, as a person living on this planet is enough is enough: Why can't we just try a new system? Is it that the fall of the Berlin Wall left a permanent divide in terms of what we can experiment with? Or is there something else at play?Michael Hudson: Well, recently, Ukraine passed a law about oligarchs, and they define an oligarchy as not only owning a big company, but also owning one of the big media outlets. And the oligarchy in every country owns the media. So, of course, CNN, and The New York Times and The Washington Post, are owned by the billionaire class representing the real estate interests and the rentier interests. They're essentially the indoctrination agencies. And so of course, in the media, what you get is a combination of a fantasy world and Schadenfreude—Schadenfreude, when something goes wrong with people you don't like, like the scandal. But apart from that, it's promoting a fantasy, about a kind of parallel universe about how a nice world would work, if everybody earned the money that they had, and the wealth they had by being productive and helping society. All of a sudden, that's reversed and [they] say, “Well, they made a lot of fortune, they must have made it by being productive and helping society.” So, everybody deserves the celebrity, deserves the wealth they have. And if you don't have wealth, you're undeserving and you haven't made a productivity contribution. And all you need is to be more educated, managerial and intelligent, and you can do it. And it doesn't have anything to do with intelligence. As soon as you inherit a lot of money, your intelligence, your IQ drops 10%. As soon as you don't have to work for a living and just clip coupons, you write us down another 30%. The stupidest people I've met in my life are millionaires who don't want to think about how they get their money. They just, they're just greedy. And I was told 50 years ago, “You don't need to go to business school to learn how to do business. All you need is greed.” So what are all these business schools for? All they're doing is saying greed is good and giving you a patter talk to say, “Well, yeah, sure, I'm greedy. But that's why I'm productive.” And somehow they conflate all of these ideas.So, you have the media, and the educational system, all sort of combined into a fantasy, a fantasy world that is to displace your own consciousness about what's happening right around you. The idea of the media is that you don't look at your own position, you imagine other people's position in another world and see that you're somehow left out. So, you can say that the working class in America are very much like the teenage girls using Facebook, who use it and they have a bad self image once they use Facebook and think everybody else is doing better. That's the story in Congress this week. Well, you can say that the whole wage earning class once they actually see how awful the situation is they think, “Well, gee, other people are getting rich. Other people have yard spots, why don't I have my own house? Why am I struggling?” And they think that they're only struggling alone, and that everybody else is somehow surviving when other people are struggling just the way they are. That's what we call losing class consciousness.Julian Vigo: Yes, well, we're back to Crystal and Alexis wrestling and Dynasty’s fountain. Everyone wants to be like them. Everyone wants a car. You know, I'll never forget when I lived in Mexico City. One of the first things I learned when you jumped into one of those taxis were Volkswagen beetles,  Mexicans would call their driver “Jaime.” And I said to them, why are you guys calling the taxi drivers here “Jaime”? And they said, “We get it from you.” And I said, “What do you mean you get it from us? We don't call our taxi drivers Jaime.”And then I thought and I paused, I said,  “James!” Remember the Grey Poupon commercials? That's what we do—we have James as the driver in a lot of these films that we produced in the 1970s and 80s. And the idea became co-opted within Mexico as if everyone has a British driver named James.Now, what we have turned into from this serialised, filmic version of ourselves to the present is dystopic. Again, you talked about the percentage of rent that people are paying in the US, the way in which people are living quite worse than their parents. And this is related to student debt, bank debt, credit card debt, we've had scandals directly related to the housing market. We saw that when there were people to be bailed out, they had to be of the wealthy class and companies to be bailed out. There was no bailout for the poor, of course. I was in London during the Occupy Wall Street. In London, it was “occupy the London Stock Exchange” (Occupy LSX) right outside of not even the London Stock Exchange. It was outside of St. Paul's Cathedral. And there was a tent city, and people were fighting ideological warfare from within their tents. There wasn't much organising on the ground. It was disassembled months later. But I wonder why Americans, even with what is called Obamacare, are still not pushing for further measures, why Hillary Clinton's push for or suggestion merely of finance reform within the campaigning system, all of this has sort of been pushed aside.Are there actors who are able to advance these issues within our current political system in the United States? Or will it take people getting on the streets protesting, to get housing lowered to maybe have national rent controls, not just of the form that we have in New York, which, before I got to New York in the late 80s, everyone was telling me how great rent control was. Now it's all but disappeared? What is the answer? Is it the expropriation of houses? Is it the Cornwall style, no owning more than one house type of moratorium on homeownership? What are the solutions to this, Michael?Michael Hudson: There is no practical solution that I can suggest. Because the, you're not going to have universal medical care, as long as you have the pharmaceuticals. funding the campaign's of the leading politicians, as long as you have a political system that is funded by campaign contributors, you're going to have the wealthiest classes, and decide who gets nominated and who gets promoted. So, I don't see any line of reform, given the dysfunctional political system that the United States is in. If this were Europe, we could have a third party. And if we had an actual third party, the democratic party would sort of be like the social democratic parties in Europe, it would fall about 8% of the electorate, and a third party would completely take over. But in America, it's a two-party system, which is really one party with different constituencies for each wing of that party, and that one party, the same campaign contributors funds, both the Republicans and the Democrats. So it's possible that you can think of America as a failed state, as a failed economy. I don't see any means of practical going forward, just as you're seeing in the Congress today, when they're unwilling to pass an infrastructure act, there's a paralysis of change. I don't see any way in which a structural change can take place. And if you're having the dynamics that are polarising, only a structural change can reverse this trend. And nobody that I know, no politician that I know, sees any way of the trends being reversed.Julian Vigo: The funny thing is that scandal, quote-unquote, scandal over Ocasio Cortez's dress at the Met Gala was quite performative to me. It's typical that the media does. “Tax the rich,” as she sits at a function that I believe cost $35,000 to enter. And she socialised the entire night even if she allegedly did not pay either for her dress nor for the entrance. And I'm thinking, isn't this part of the problem: that we have so much of our socio-cultural discourse wrapped up in politics in the same way that Clinton's suggestion that campaign finance reform disappeared quite quickly? Is there any hope of getting campaign finance reform passed in the States?Michael Hudson: No. Because if you had campaign finance reform, that's how the wealthy people control politics. If you didn't, if you didn't have the wealthy, wealthy people deciding who gets nominated, you would have people get nominated by who wanted to do what the public ones, Bernie Sanders says, “Look, most of them are all the polls show that what democracy, if this were a democracy, we would have socialised medicine, we'd have public health care, we would have free education, we would have progressive taxation.” And yet no party is representing what the bulk of people have. So by definition, we're not a democracy. We're an oligarchy, and the oligarchy controls. I mean, you could say that the media play the role today that the church and religion played in the past to divert attention away from worldly issues towards other worldly issues. That's part of the problem.But not only the pharmaceutical industries are against public health care, but the whole corporate sector, the employer sector, are against socialised medicine, because right now workers are dependent for their health insurance on their employers. That means Alan Greenspan, the Federal Reserve Chairman said, this is causing a traumatised workers syndrome, the workers are afraid to quit, they're afraid to go on strike. They're afraid of getting fired because if they get fired, first of all, if they're a homeowner they lose their home because they can't pay their mortgage, but most importantly, they lose their health care. And if they get sick, it wipes them out. And they go broke and they lose their home and all the assets.Making workers depend on the employer, instead of on the government means you're locked into their job. They have to work for a living for an employer, just in order to survive in terms of health care alone. So the idea of the system is to degrade a dependent, wage-earning class and keeping privatising health care, privatising education, and moving towards absentee landlordship is the way to traumatise and keep a population on the road to serfdom. Get full access to Savage Minds at savageminds.substack.com/subscribe

Field Gulls: for Seattle Seahawks fans
3 IN, 3 OUT: Today Russell Wilson salutes you Mr. Podcaster

Field Gulls: for Seattle Seahawks fans

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 45:55


Despite the injury to Russell Wilson, the Seahawks were still in position to win a game against the NFC West rival Los Angeles Rams. As much heat as the defense has been taking, they did enough at the beginning of the game and enough at the end to help deliver a win. So who is to blame? According to Clinton in this episode, Russell Wilson ends up directly or indirectly taking some of the blame. We also talk about how Penny Hart showed enough on a couple touches to show that he needs the ball more. But after watching Ryan Neal get the ball less after a solid week against the 49ers, we saw no corresponding increase to playing time.   Subscribe to the Field Gulls Podcast via: Apple Podcasts | Google Podcasts | Spotify |Overcast | Pocket Casts | Stitcher | Castbox | Subscribe on Android | PlayerFM | RSS Help support the show with a yearly or recurring monthly donation: patreon.com/flock Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

FratChat Podcast
Season 4 Ep#1: Presidents That F*cked!

FratChat Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 69:36


This week! On our sweet sweet return to the airwaves, the FratChat Podcast takes a look back at some classic US Presidential history to find the horniest of the Commander in Chiefs! Which Presidents turned the Oval Office into the Oral Office? Find out now on the FratChat Podcast! Get 20% OFF + Free Shipping on all MANSCAPED products with promo code FRATCHAT at MANSCAPED.com! Follow us on all social media: Instagram: http://Instagram.com/FratChatPodcast Facebook: http://Facebook.com/FratChatPodcast Twitter: http://Twitter.com/FratChatPodcast Follow Carlos and CMO! Carlos on Instagram: http://Instagram.com/CarlosDoesTheWorld CMO on Instagram: http://Instagram.com/Chris.Moore.Comedy

Aced Out Podcast
EP 23: Muruga Booker [P-FUNK, et al]

Aced Out Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 158:24


** visit acedoutpodcast.com to see photos and more **“The funk is the stench that you smell after you work really hard.” So says MURGA BOOKER, drummer, percussionist, shaman & card-carrying funkateer. And he would know. After all, from 1980 to ‘85, Booker was deeply embedded in the P-Funk camp, working with George Clinton and everyone else around Disc Ltd. Studios in Detroit. He was snatched up by Rubber Band drummer Frankie “Cash” Waddy and Bootsy Collins himself after they had heard him play the Moroccan clay drums at his pad. They were also impressed by Booker's work with Weather Report, bassist Michael Henderson, and Detroit soul group the Fantastic Four. By then, Muruga had figured out how to make himself indispensable to producers and bandleaders alike. “I saw everybody in Detroit at Motown playing congas and bongos and maybe some timbales.” He explains. “So I went to Israeli and Greek doumbek and Moroccan clay drums… By having those instruments, I was not in any direct competition.” This explains the sounds of albums like the Electric Spanking of War Babies, which you might have noticed has a lot more varied and freaky percussion in the mix than Funkadelic records previous. Muruga's funky hands are also busy on Clinton solo joints such as Computer Games (1982) and You Shouldn't Nuf Bit Fish (1983), the P-Funk AllStars' Urban Dance Floor Guerillas (1983), and the lesser known gem, a Bootsy project called GodMama (1981). But that's not all. Being around George during this period also put Murugua in direct proximity to Sly Stone, whom Booker was able to entice to play bass (!) on his project, Muruga and the Soda Jerks, a quirky, New Wave-sounding version of the P signed and produced by Clinton. But Muruga's contribution to Parliament-Funkadelic was not only musical but also medicinal. He served as the group's masseuse and yoga instructor, teaching Bernie Worrell, George, Sly, et al breathing techniques in between bites of Booker's mother's paprikash. But Muruga's musical journey didn't start with the P — not by a long shot. In fact, as a teenager in 1960, Steve (not yet Muruga) Booker already had a hit. The band was called the Low Rocks and the song was “Blueberry Jam,” a super-sped up reworking of “Blueberry Hill” by Fats Domino. “We were the young garage punks of the era” says Booker, who was recruited directly from the audience when the previous Low Rocks drummer abruptly quit at a house party. The gig wound up lasting only a year, but the band had some exciting opportunities, including backing up Little Stevie Wonder in a battle of the bands. Soon after that, Steve Booker began to see the drums not just as an instrument but also as a theory of life. He basically moved into Detroit's legendary blues and folk club the Chess Mate, where he would eventually become bandleader. There he would play hours-long drum solos every night. But the young Serbian stickman still lacked some key ingredients. One night, after he had finished yet another one of his extended excursions, a Black gentleman approached. “I see what you're trying to do,” he told Booker. But rather then launching into a lecture, the man handed him a cassette tape of Drums of Passion by Nigerian drummer Babatunde Olatunji. And just like that, Booker's life changed. He spent the next two weeks in his mom's living room, eight hours per day, dancing to Drums and seeing how the music made his body move. Things were starting to make sense. “If you do not love Africa or it's people, then you cannot love the blues, or jazz, or rock and roll,” he says. The lessons came in handy when he played support for none other than John Lee Hooker, whom he grew to admire deeply. “I realized that Hooker was not just a blues man, but he was a spiritual ju ju man, a healer,” says Booker. “Also he was a storyteller… That comes from griot. The griot is the storyteller of the tribe.” The pairing of the two went so well they were featured as a double bill, “Hooker & Booker.” Booker also had some of the best jams in his life at The Scene club in New York, where the top musicians of the day would go to let it all hang out musically when they weren't in the studio or on tour. There the Band of Gypsys' Buddy Miles served as a musical lightning rod of sorts. “When you go play the top clubs like The Scene,” Booker explains, “it's top musicians going there, but jamming and intermingling and exchanging with each other… That's the place where a George Clinton or a Sly Stone or a Mitch Mitchell or a Larry Coryell could go. But Buddy Miles… He was creating an atmosphere that drew all of those musicians like bees to honey.” By the late 60's into the 70s, Booker's deep plunges into musical depths had evolved into an intense curiosity and appreciation for spiritual contemplation—even more so than many peers of the era. This phase of his journey truly began on Day 1 of the iconic Woodstock Festival, where he landed in a helicopter to perform with Tim Hardin. It was there that he found himself in the presence of Swami Satchidananda, with whom Booker would live in ashram for two years as a celibate monk. In fact, it was Satchidananda who gave Muruga his name.As a result of such intense studies, Muruga became very adept at tuning in rather than tuning out, and adapting his more avant garde, exploratory tendencies to a centered principle. “A musician has to listen,” he explains. “Then you respond.” But he contends that he reached his highest plateau as a drummer once he mastered the concept of ambience and space, which he defines as: “to play the space as well as the note, and to create ambience with the space within the notes.” This seemingly unlikely marriage of freedom and discipline ultimately leads to Muruga's theory of employing “law and grace” when serving up the Funk. “1-2-3-4 is a law,” he teaches. “On the one is the law… But grace is ‘I'm being in the oneness' while I am playing.” In other words, the law guides you until you are ready to transcend it, to exist in the groove. “You must know this,” he insists. “Otherwise you don't even know funk.” Today, Muruga lives in Ann Arbor and is as jovial and active as ever, an orthodox priest and patented inventor of the Nada drum with a catalog of music that is deep and wide. In this expansive, inspiring and often hilarious interview, Muruga talks about how he used to add wah-wah's and phasers to his cymbals in order to “wake people up” by reenacting the then-ongoing Vietnam War onstage—causing half an audience in the South to give him a standing ovation, and the other half to walk out. Muruga also talks about why the rhythmic concept of “the push and drag” is the essence of life, mistakes drummers tend to make when playing the blues, and why he got scared the first time he heard the drum machine. As if that weren't enough, Muruga also describes being made fun of by Don Rickles for 20 minutes straight, the magic of Sly Stone's recording techniques, why Richie Havens is an “illuminary,” and that time he jammed one-on-one with JIMI HENDRIX on bass.Produced & Hosted by Ace AlanCohosted by Jay Stonew/ Content Produced by Aaron Booker & AndreFoxxeWebsite & Art by 3chardsEngineered by Nick “Waes” Carden at the Blue Room in Oakland, CABut we couldn't have done it without Mawnstr and especially Scott SheppardIntro track “I Can Never Be” from Basic Instructions Before Leaving Earth by the Funkanauts. Go get it wherever music is sold. RIP Brotha P. Rest in Power ROBIN RUSSELL of New Birth(Aug 27, 1952 — Sep 8, 2021) ** visit acedoutpodcast.com to see photos and more **

Quiz and Hers
S14 E1 - Route Canals

Quiz and Hers

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 45:45


We're back for our the premiere of our fourteenth (!) season, and this week, Justin has written six trivia questions all about canals! We also sail into discussions of Irish music, video games, and one of the weirder events of the past couple of very weird years.3:03: Q1 (Times & Places): What famous canal was derisively referred to as “Clinton's Big Ditch” while it was being constructed, but saw 33,000 commercial shipments in 1855?9:21: Q2 (Music): In a song that has become an Irish standard, what titular object “went jingle-jangle, all along the banks of the Royal Canal”?16:44: Q3 (Sports & Games): The Panama Canal is one of the “wonders” that you can build in what series of turn-based strategy games, originally developed by Sid Meier?24:45: Q4 (Movies & TV): The canals of Venice, California, appear prominently in what 1984 horror movie, which featured Johnny Depp in his film debut, and introduced us to the murderous Freddy Krueger?33:58: Q5 (Arts & Literature): Canaletto's The Entrance to the Grand Canal is one prominent work from a later incarnation of what “School” of art, which is named for the city where you would find the Grand Canal?38:43: Q6 (Everything Else): What was the name of the ship that obstructed the Suez Canal earlier this year, single-handedly grinding global trade to a halt?Theme music: "Thinking it Over" by Lee Rosevere, licensed under CC BY 2.0E-Mail: quizandhers@gmail.com Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/quizandhers/Twitter: https://twitter.com/quizandhersInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/quizandhers/History of the Atlantic World Podcast: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/history-of-the-atlantic-world/id1363411819Brain Ladle Podcast: http://www.brainladletrivia.com/Cormac on Twitter: @CormacsThoughts  

Clinton Baptiste’s Paranormal Podcast
Series 4 - Episode 2 - Ghost Stations

Clinton Baptiste’s Paranormal Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 29:11


Clinton is asked to contact a dignitary from the 1700s by a radical student who decides to take matters into his own hands. He is then contacted by an irate son of a retired war hero and finally Clinton and Ruth take to the Underground to discover the spooky goings-on in London's disused stations. But the best news of all arrives when celebrated US psychic Tony Joseph offers Clinton a tour of America!CLINTON BAPTISTE – Alex LoweMARK- Mark StobbartTONY JOSEPH - Lewis MacleodNEIL - Neil FitzmauriceBOB CLARKE - Bob Golding RUTH Sally –Anne HaywardWritten and performed by Alex Lowe with Lewis Macleod as Ramone.With additional material by Lewis Macleod and the cast.Produced by Andy Hughes for 11-29 Media.With thanks to Goodnight Vienna Productions.Clinton is on a live UK tour from Sept- Dec 2021 in his solo show “STRATOSPHERIC!” For dates and tickets go to clintonbaptiste.com/live

The NPR Politics Podcast
How Much Has The Country Really Changed Since Clinton's Impeachment?

The NPR Politics Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 13:53


The TV show Impeachment: American Crime Story dramatizes the Bill Clinton's impeachment through the stories of three women at the heart of the proceedings, including Monica Lewinsky. We discuss how the country and its politics have and haven't changed in the two decades since the impeachment unfolded.This episode: White House correspondent Asma Khalid, demographics and culture correspondent Danielle Kurtzleben, and national political correspondent Mara Liasson.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Listen to our playlist The NPR Politics Daily Workout.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.

The View
Monday, Oct. 11: Hillary Clinton and Louise Penny

The View

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 40:31


Former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton explains why the U.S. is in the middle of a constitutional crisis, her thoughts on former Pres. Trump possibly running for president in 2024 and Pres. Biden's Build Back Better agenda. Then, author Louise Penny joins Clinton to discuss their new thriller novel, “State of Terror.” Plus, former co-host Sherri Shepherd joins the panel this week as guest co-host! In Hot Topics, they discuss Kim Kardashian hosting “SNL,” and more.

Bad Brothers Pod
0067: This means you.

Bad Brothers Pod

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 46:12


This week on the pod: How to win friends and  influence people—Gig Harbor edition. Michael introduces a new segment and welcomes in Han Solo SZN. Will stops thinking about beer long enough to offer some advice. Also: Stacy and Clinton, stare downs, getting the block poppin', and city-approved pretension. Instagram here. Apple here. Spotify here. YouTube here. Will's 2021 Playlist here. Bad Brothers Pod. Michael and Will Browning. Port Orchard, Washington's Finest Podcast.

A Seat at the Table
7. Barbara Chow - Part 1

A Seat at the Table

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 24:05


In the first of a special 2-part episode of A Seat at the Table: Conversations on Leadership, Equity and Innovation, Dr. Lynette Fraga talks with Barbara Chow, the education director at Heising-Simons, a family foundation based in Los Altos and San Francisco, California.  Barbara Chow, with a professional background in civil service and an expert on K through 12 issues, began her portfolio on child care and early learning four years ago. Barbara Chow shares her educational and professional journey, which began with an interest in government, and shares how mentors and her own family's journey gave her a passion for social justice issues. Together, Barbara Chow and Dr. Fraga discuss the current landscape of child care and how government and philanthropy can make a difference for our youngest learners.  Look for the second half of this conversation coming in a few weeks! About Barbara Chow Barbara Chow is the Education Program Director at the Heising-Simons Foundation. Prior to joining the Foundation, she served as the Education Program Director for the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation.  Barbara Chow has also served as the Policy Director of the House Budget Committee and the Executive Director of the National Geographic Education Foundation. During the Clinton administration, she served as deputy director of the Domestic Policy Council, associate director for Education, Income Maintenance, and Labor programs at the Office of Management and Budget, and special assistant to the president for White House Legislative Affairs.  Barbara Chow has a master's degree in public policy from the University of California, Berkeley. Show Notes:Learn more about Heising-Simons: https://www.hsfoundation.org/ Subscribe to this special series of intimate interviews to hear how other leaders are creating space for all types of voices to be heard. Rate and review on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher or wherever you stream. This podcast is a production of Child Care Aware® of America. Learn more at www.childcareaware.org/thetable. Music for A Seat at the Table is Retro Groovy by EightBallAudio.

The Man of God
The Law & the Gospel in Our Ecclesiology w/ Steve Meister | Modern Marrow Men

The Man of God

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 21:03


What is the relationship between biblical ecclesiology and the law and the gospel? Pastors Tom Hicks and John Divito interview Steve Meister to discuss church government, membership, and sacraments. Thank you for listening to Modern Marrow Men: Conversations on the Law and the Gospel featuring Tom Hicks and John Divito. Modern Marrow Men is a weekly conversation on the Law & the Gospel intended to help church leaders and Christian laypeople rightly divide the Word of truth. Tom Hicks is Pastor of First Baptist Church of Clinton, LA. https://fbcclintonla.com/. #pastortomhicks John Divito is Pastor of Cornerstone Fellowship Church of Newburgh, IN. http://cornerstone-fellowship.org/ Covenant Baptist Theological Seminary is a Confessional Reformed Baptist Seminary providing affordable online theological education to help the Church in its calling to train faithful men. To learn more about CBTS, visit https://CBTSeminary.org. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/cbtseminary/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/cbtseminary/support

CBS Sunday Morning with Jane Pauley
CBS Sunday Morning, October 10, 2021

CBS Sunday Morning with Jane Pauley

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2021 50:10


On this week's CBS Sunday Morning with Jane Pauley, abortion is becoming more and more restricted in many states, and with a majority-conservative Supreme Court primed to decide on a woman's constitutional right to an abortion, access to the procedure in the future is unclear, and the return of "back-alley abortions" is feared. Correspondent Rita Braver looks at how women, civil rights proponents, doctors, and anti-abortion advocates are fighting over the viability of Roe v. Wade, and whether compromise is possible on one of the most contentious issues of today. After years of development, the BlackFly personal aerial vehicle will soon be on sale. John Blackstone set out to see how someone with no flying experience could manage behind the controls. Actor-dancer-singer-director Billy Porter has won Tony, Emmy and Grammy Awards, and is author of a new memoir, "Unprotected." He talks with correspondent Seth Doane about a childhood filled with years of rejection, doubt and abuse – and about how he survived and triumphed. Beginning with her smash hit single, "Drivers License," 18-year-old Olivia Rodrigo is on a run that few singer-songwriters can even dream about, with her very first album, "Sour," debuting at #1 earlier this year. She talks with Tracy Smith. Finally, Bestselling mystery writer Louise Penny and former Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Rodham Clinton forged a friendship having experienced loss – Penny, of her husband; Clinton, of an election; and together, of a beloved mutual friend. Together they've collaborated on a novel, "State of Terror." Correspondent Martha Teichner talks with Clinton and Penny about how co-writing the ripped-from-the-headlines conspiracy thriller during the pandemic, featuring two middle-aged female heroes, was a form of therapy for both.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Defense & Aerospace Report
Defense & Aerospace Podcast [Washington Roundtable Oct 08, 21]

Defense & Aerospace Report

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 45:19


On this Washington Roundtable episode of the Defense & Aerospace Report Podcast, sponsored by Bell, our guests are Dov Zakheim, PhD, former DoD comptroller, now with the Center for Strategic and International Studies, Michael Herson, President and CEO, American Defense International, Dr Gordon Adams, the senior White House budget official for national security during the Clinton administration who is now a distinguished fellow at the Quincy Institute and the Stimson Center as well as an American University professor emeritus, and Dr. Patrick Cronin of the Hudson Institute. Topics: — Update on NDAA and appropriations, increased borrowing limit that will forestall debt default until after Dec. 3, and slimmed down Democratic spending — Beijing's increasingly larger formations of aircraft that are testing Taiwanese air defenses — Risks of the new strategy as scores of Chinese fighter, bombers and patrol aircraft operate near Taiwan — Outlook for Chinese economy as Evergrande and other institutions suffer setbacks — Prospects that Beijing, sensing decline, will move against Taiwan sooner than later — Whether a shift in US policy toward Taiwan would improve deterrence or undermine it — Bombing of Shiite mosque in Afghanistan that killed 48 — USS Connecticut's mystery collision in the South China Sea that injured 11 aboard the Seawolf-class attack sub

Rush Limbaugh Morning Update
The Path To October 8th: Timeline

Rush Limbaugh Morning Update

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 3:45


RUSH: Here is the path, by the way, to October 8th. The Path to October 8th is the sequel to The Path to 9/11. The Path to October 8th — of course that's when Kim Jong ll tests his little nuke.  1993: North Korea shocks the world by saying it will quit the Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty and then layered suspends its withdrawal.  1994: North Korea and the United States sign an agreement in Geneva, North Korea pledging to freeze and eventually dismantle its nuclear weapons program in exchange for help building two power producing nuclear reactors.  That was the sucker deal made with Madeleine Albright — Jimmy Carter did some advance work — and with the Clinton administration. So it was 1994, Clinton's second year in office that North Korea ran the sucker deal to perfection against the United States.  https://www.rushlimbaugh.com/daily/2006/10/09/the_path_to_october_8th_timeline/ Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

Your Aunties Favorite Podcast
Air is Life (Ft. Clinton D. Isham)

Your Aunties Favorite Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 102:35


Clinton D. Isham joins the Uncs to discuss a smoke-free initiative that is important to Hersh. They discuss the meaning "Air is Life."Follow us on our socials:IG: yafpodFB: Your Aunties' Favorite    

Inside Sources with Boyd Matheson
The Volley of Bears Ears and Grand Staircase Escalante

Inside Sources with Boyd Matheson

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 8:47


It was just announced that President Biden will reset the boundaries of Bears Ears and Grand Staircase Escalante National Monuments. Boyd looks at the back and forth of the boundaries of these monuments over the years and why what's done by executive order will probably be undone by it in the future. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Critical Hour
EUROPEAN UNION GAS PRICES EXPLODE

The Critical Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 115:51


K. J. Noh, peace activist, writer, and teacher, joins us to discuss China. President Joe Biden has reportedly advised the Japanese Prime Minister that the US is willing to go to war with China over the Senkakus Islands. Also, Taiwan's leader has been arguing that her nation is at the forefront of democracy worldwide and must therefore be protected from China.RT European correspondent Peter Oliver joins us to discuss gas prices in Europe. Gas prices in Europe have skyrocketed to the highest numbers in a decade, as political wrangling over the Nord Stream 2 pipeline dampens hope for immediate relief. The pipeline project is complete and the system is ready to transport badly needed fuel to European households.Dr. Jack Rasmus, professor in economics and politics at St. Mary's College in California, joins us to discuss the economy. Democrats are working on the major spending bills, as indications from Capitol Hill spell major concessions from the left flank of the party. Also, President Biden is discussing the filibuster, and the discussion of minting a trillion-dollar coin has gained enough credibility for a mainstream discussion.Oscar Chacon, co-founder and executive director of Alianza Americas, joins us to discuss immigration. Immigrants and like-minded activists are gathering outside of the Brooklyn home of Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer to pressure him for action on a comprehensive immigration reform bill. In the absence of comprehensive legislation, activists want a path to citizenship added to the current spending bill.Ajamu Baraka, 2016 US vice-presidential candidate for the Green Party, joins us to discuss Africom. The Black Alliance for Peace (BAP) has begun an "International Month of Action Against Africom." In their press release, the BAP explains that "The Black Alliance for Peace's International Month of Action Against AFRICOM aims to raise the public's awareness about the U.S. military's existence in Africa, and how the presence of U.S. forces exacerbates violence and instability throughout the continent."Jim Kavanagh, writer at thepolemicist.net & CounterPunch and the author of "Danger to Society: Against Vaccine Passports," joins us to discuss the John Durham investigation. The probe into the origins of the Russia-gate operation has revealed a tangled web of lies directly implicating the 2016 Clinton campaign. Is this investigation an honest inquiry or further insider dealings to cover the FBI's complicity in the project?Ted Rall, political cartoonist and syndicated columnist, joins us to discuss press freedom. Patrick Lawrence has a new article in consortiumnews.com in which he argues "in the failed corporate coverage of Steven Donziger and Julian Assange there is an imposition of darkness, ignorance inflicted on Americans with intent." Lawrence describes the way the news and information are controlled and corrupted in the US empire.Laith Marouf, broadcaster and journalist based in Beirut, joins us to discuss Iran. The US State Department has spoken with China in an attempt to reduce their purchases of oil from Iran. US attempts at crushing the Iranian economy have been thwarted consistently by Russia and China. The acceptance of the Islamic Republic into the Shanghai Cooperation Organization appears to signal little or no future cooperation with US sanctions.

The Best Storyteller In Texas Podcast
Bill Clinton Made You Feel Good

The Best Storyteller In Texas Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 2:11


Bill Clinton is a master politician.  When John McClain knew Clinton wasn't telling the truth, he just enjoyed it. 

Mason & Ireland
HR 3: Scherzer v Wainwright

Mason & Ireland

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 45:35


Clinton doesn't think the Dodger fans shouldn't be afraid of Adam Wainwright. Also, an affiliate in Cleveland is getting rid of its 11 o clock news and putting a comedian in . Plus, Urban Meyer situation in Jacksonville is getting worse and worse and Mase wants him to be no part of the USC team. And the guys have a discussion about Many Saints of Newark and if we are going to watch it despite the bad reviews. Can a caller guess the LIE OF THE DAY in order to win EAGLES tickets at the Forum and another edition of GAME OF GAMES!

My History Can Beat Up Your Politics
Joe Manchins of History, Clinton's 50-50 Senate, and Harold Wilson's 1970's Virtual School

My History Can Beat Up Your Politics

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 54:05


We take a look at a few topics, the "Joe Manchins" of History, Senators who have disagreed with their own parties Presidents, while also helping in some ways. FDR, Clinton and Lyndon Johnson dealt with their own versions of the dynamic in politics today. We are also reminded in telling this story that Clinton had a 50-50 Senate, in a form. And a bit about British Prime Minister Harold Wilson and his idea for a University of The Air, long before today's online learning. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

True Underdog
#94: Get Familiar with Clinton Sparks

True Underdog

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 80:57


Get familiar with Clinton Sparks, a Grammy-nominated music producer, renowned DJ, the founder of Get Familiar Radio and XSET, a professional e-sports and entertainment organization. In this episode, Clinton shares his philosophies in life, how he finds happiness from within, and how he brings people together through music and culture. Load up on your business knowledge, get hyped and spark up your life! Social‌ ‌Media:‌  Follow‌ ‌True‌ ‌Underdog‌ ‌on‌ ‌IG:‌ ‌‌ https://www.instagram.com/true_underdog ‌ Check‌ ‌out‌ ‌The‌ ‌True‌ ‌Underdog‌ ‌website:‌ ‌‌ https://trueunderdog.com/‌ ‌ Check out Jayson's website: https://www.jaysonwaller.com/ ‌ Follow‌ ‌Jayson‌ ‌on‌ ‌Linkedin:‌‌ https://www.linkedin.com/in/jayson-waller-/ ‌ Follow‌ ‌Jayson‌ ‌on‌ ‌Instagram:‌ ‌‌ https://www.instagram.com/jaysonwallerbam/ ‌ Follow‌ ‌Jayson‌ ‌on‌ ‌Twitter:‌ ‌‌ https://twitter.com/JaysonWaller ‌ ‌ Follow‌ ‌Jayson‌ ‌on‌ ‌Clubhouse:‌ ‌ @Jaysonwaller‌ ‌ ‌ Follow‌ ‌Jayson‌ ‌on‌ ‌Facebook:‌ ‌‌ https://www.facebook.com/JaysonWallerBAM ‌ Follow True Underdog on Youtube:   https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCwTHT2Q-omcIjTOwOa2imTQ True Underdog on IHeart: www.iheart.com/podcast/1269-true-underdog-58953823/ True Underdog on Apple Podcasts: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/true-underdog/id1500778745 True Underdog on Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/50zYg4F5Am58EzIKnZrtVQ True Underdog is a Top 3 Entrepreneurship podcast on Apple hosted by Jayson Waller, CEO of POWERHOME Solar, one of the fastest-growing private companies in the USA, and his high-profile guests share motivational tips, inspiring stories and business-building lessons to help each listener grow in their entrepreneurial journey. Reach‌ ‌out‌ ‌to‌ ‌Jayson‌ ‌directly‌ ‌at:‌ ‌ Jayson@trueunderdog.com‌ ‌

Trumpcast
The Waves: Does the New Clinton Impeachment Show Do Monica Lewinsky Justice?

Trumpcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 2, 2021 41:57


On this week's episode of The Waves, Slate executive producer of podcasts Alicia Montgomery and The Waves producer, Cheyna Roth talk about the Clinton impeachment and the why, decades later, we can't seem to let go of this story. They start out by unpacking Ryan Murphy's new show, American Crime Story: Impeachment and how feminist thinking has evolved since the mid-90s. After the break they talk about the characters surrounding Monica Lewinsky, and whether the show treats them fairly.  In Slate Plus's “Is This Feminist” segment, Alicia and Cheyna talk about whether the ongoing Britney Spears saga is feminist.  Recommendations: Alicia: Diving headfirst into Fall.  Cheyna: Lindy West's new Substack Butt News.    Podcast production by Cheyna Roth with editorial oversight by Susan Matthews and June Thomas.  Send your comments and recommendations on what to cover to thewaves@slate.com Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices