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Learn more about your world through in-depth analysis and on-the-ground reports. (Updated periodically)

PBS NewsHour


    • Oct 21, 2021 LATEST EPISODE
    • daily NEW EPISODES
    • 6m AVG DURATION
    • 814 EPISODES


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    Latest episodes from PBS NewsHour - World

    Group aims to reintroduce Jaguars -- once nearly hunted to extinction -- to Argentina

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 8:23

    The Jaguar, the biggest cat in the Americas, was hunted and poached to extinction in parts of Argentina about 70 years ago. They are in critical danger of vanishing completely. Only a few hundred are left in the country. Rewilding Argentina, a conservation nonprofit, has embarked on an audacious plan to reintroduce the species to its long lost home. Science correspondent Miles O'Brien reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

    Uganda's Batwa tribe, considered conservation refugees, see little government support

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 8:19

    The Batwa people are one of the oldest surviving Indigenous tribes in Africa. They live high in the mountain forests, straddling several East African countries. The Batwa are now also called conservation refugees, as governments scramble to cope with the pressures of population growth and climate change. Special correspondent Fred de Sam Lazaro reports from western Uganda. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

    News Wrap: NYC to mandate COVID vaccine for all public employees

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 5:27

    In our news wrap Wednesday, New York City ordered 46,000 police, firefighters and other city employees to get vaccinated by Nov. 1 -- or get placed on unpaid leave. Russian President Vladimir Putin ordered most Russian workers to take off for at least a week as COVID cases and deaths keep rising. Nikolas Cruz pleaded guilty to murdering 17 people at a high school in Parkland, Florida in 2018. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

    Idlib, Syria's final rebel stronghold, struggles to get lifesaving aid amid COVID spike

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 6:05

    Government shelling killed a dozen people in Syria's northwest Idlib province Wednesday. Idlib is the final stronghold for rebels still fighting the Assad regime. But the province is also under attack from a different threat -- its most severe wave of COVID-19. The delta variant is hitting hospitals already weakened by war. Nick Schifrin reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

    Pilot oxygen backup system offers new hope for Ugandan hospitals plagued by power cuts

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 5:09

    The pandemic is bringing new attention to a critical health care challenge plaguing many countries: A shortage or unreliable supply of medical oxygen. It's also prompting many medical providers to look at ways to fix the problem. Special correspondent Fred de Sam Lazaro reports on one example in Uganda. This report is part of our "Breakthrough" series. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

    Many Jews fleeing Nazi rule spent years hiding in forests. A new book tells their stories

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 7:46

    During the early Nazi occupation of Europe, they forced more than a million Jews to live and work in ghettos. Most were killed in a brutal process called liquidation, or sent to concentration camps. Some 25,000 Jews escaped the ghettos and hid in Eastern European forests. The members of one family that survived years in the woods tell their story in Rebecca Frankel's new book, "Into the Forest." PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

    Kidnapping of American missionaries in Haiti a jab at the U.S., expert says

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 6:37

    A group of majority American missionaries in Haiti have not been heard from since their kidnapping over the weekend, a. As Yamiche Alcindor reports, there has been a growing number of abductions in Haiti, amid a number of crises there. Gary Pierre-Pierre, founder of The Haitian Times, an English-language publication serving the Haitian diaspora, joins Yamiche to discuss. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

    News Wrap: Suicide attack in Afghanistan kills 47, wounds dozens

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 4:41

    In our news wrap Friday, at least 47 people were killed and 70 were wounded in Afghanistan when a suicide bomber attacked a Shiite mosque in the city of Kandahar, attorneys for Nikolas Cruz say he will plead guilty for murdering 17 people at a high school in Parkland, Florida in 2018, and the Biden administration says it will go to the U.S. Supreme Court to stop a Texas ban on abortions. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

    International community joins forces as ransomware attacks create major disruptions

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 6:47

    Thirty countries have been meeting virtually with the Biden administration this week to coordinate efforts against the growing problem of ransomware cyber attacks, which have caused major disruptions around the world in recent months. Anne Neuberger, the deputy national security advisor for Cyber and Emerging Technology who organized the conference, joins Nick Schifrin to discuss. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

    Why energy prices are spiking globally and how it affects green initiatives

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 7:36

    Gasoline prices are on the rise, along with the cost of home-heating oil and natural gas. But international energy officials at the Russian Energy Week event on Thursday warned of a global energy crunch that could slow the economic recovery from the pandemic. Nick Schifrin has more. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

    Targeted assassinations, violent protest crackdowns keep Iraqi voters away from polls

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 8:36

    Iraq's recent elections were in large part driven by a protest movement that erupted two years ago, denouncing government corruption and lack of services. Prime Minister Mustafa al-Kadhimi is vying for a second term while trying to balance relations with the U.S. -- which still has 2,500 troops in Iraq -- and Iran, which supports powerful militia in Iraq. Special correspondent Simona Foltyn reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

    How Biden plans to combat 'longstanding weaknesses' in American supply chain

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 3:25

    Combating the global supply chain delays that are negatively impacting the U.S. economy topped President Joe Biden's agenda Wednesday, as he promised new efforts to restore the supply chain and tame inflation. White House correspondent Yamiche Alcindor reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

    Sec. Raimondo 'optimistic' about clearing supply logjam at U.S. ports by Christmas

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 9:05

    Judy Woodruff takes a closer look at how the Biden administration plans to address global supply chain challenges and combating inflation with Secretary of Commerce Gina Raimondo. Raimondo addresses both the supply shortage of general consumer goods and also vital items like semiconductors. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

    Government, private sector cooperation necessary to clear supply bottleneck, expert says

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 6:34

    Judy Woodruff looks at the limits of what President Joe Biden can do about the supply and delivery issues facing the United States, and other problems affecting the economy simultaneously, with David Lynch of The Washington Post. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

    How U.S. can help crumbling Afghan economy and support international aid efforts

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 7:58

    It's been two months since the Taliban took control of Kabul and solidified their grip on Afghanistan. The country's banking system and economy is all but collapsing. Afghanistan needs urgent help, according to the head of one of the largest humanitarian aid organizations operating in the country. Jan Egeland, the secretary general of the Norwegian Refugee Council joins Nick Schifrin with more. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

    N. Korea flexes nuclear power amid regional arms race, wants U.S. to end 'hostile policy'

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 8:28

    With the many crises both domestic and global facing the Biden White House, one key challenge -- North Korea -- has decided to make its presence known. Surrounded by missiles and other weaponry, North Korean leader Kim Jong Un put his nuclear-armed state front and center. Nick Schifrin explains. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

    A look at the life of A.Q. Khan, scientist behind Pakistan's nuclear weapons program

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 4:16

    The father of Pakistan's atomic bomb and a proponent of nuclear proliferation, Abdul Qadeer Khan, died Sunday at the age of 85 after a lengthy battle with COVID-19. He was a figure mired in controversy who launched Pakistan's nuclear weapons program, but also admitted to sharing nuclear technology secrets with Iran, Libya, and North Korea. Nick Schifrin reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

    How poetry helps this young Afghan refugee 'empty' her pains and share her dreams

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 3:03

    October 11 is the International Day of the Girl. Tonight, we hear from one girl, a young Afghan poet, who left her country a few years ago with her family for security reasons. Aryan Ashory now lives in a refugee settlement in Germany, and shared her thoughts and writing with the NewsHour's Student Reporting Lab as part of our arts and culture series, CANVAS. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

    Taliban face growing problems running Afghanistan as talks begin with the U.S.

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2021 4:32

    U.S. and Taliban representatives met in Doha, Qatar, this weekend for the first direct talks since the Taliban took control of Afghanistan. The talks will reportedly focus on terrorism, evacuations and a growing humanitarian crisis as winter approaches. Wall Street Journal reporter Saeed Shah joins from Kabul. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

    Iraqi protesters allege election corruption, vow to boycott polls

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2021 8:36

    Iraq's elections will be held on Sunday, but members of the country's protest movement are already planning on boycotting the event. They say that the election process is corrupt, with paramilitary wings of incumbent parties attacking opposition supporters. With low turnout, the Shi'ite cleric Moqtada Al Sadr's party is expected to win a large share of seats and possibly control of the government. Special Correspondent Simona Foltyn reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

    Why the Nobel Peace Prize was won by 2 journalists, and what that means for press freedom

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 7:49

    The Nobel Committee often likes to make a statement when it awards the Nobel Peace Prize every year, and 2021 is no different. Two journalists, one from the Philippines, the other from Russia, were recipients -- at a time when the free press is under global attack, and the truth is hard to find. Nick Schifrin reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

    Fiona Hill reflects on impeachment testimony, Trump presidency and opportunity in America

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 8:51


    Russia expert Fiona Hill captured national attention two years ago when she testified during then-President Donald Trump's first impeachment hearing. Now she's out with a new book, "There Is Nothing for You Here: Finding Opportunity in the 21st Century." She joins Judy Woodruff to discuss her career as a presidential advisor and why she fears the U.S. is going down a dangerous path. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders


    Deportation to turmoiled Haiti an act of 'violence' against migrants, advocate says

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 5:49

    Thousands of mostly Haitian migrants gathered at the border town of Del Rio, Texas in September hoping to gain asylum in the United States. While the migrants have been removed and the encampment cleared, the crisis is far from over. Yamiche Alcindor gets more on the issue with Guerline Jozef, president of the Haitian Bridge Alliance. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

    Ethiopia's 'sophisticated campaign' to withhold food, fuel and other aid from Tigray

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 10:56

    Wednesday in the United Nations Security Council, the secretary general criticized the Ethiopian government for recently kicking out UN aid workers. He urged the government to allow aid to flow into the northern region of Tigray, where for nearly the last year, Ethiopia and its allies have been fighting an ethnic, regional force. Nick Schifrin reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

    Florida has a dengue problem. The solution may be more mosquitoes

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 7:45

    In a major milestone, the World Health Organization endorsed widespread use of a vaccine aimed at stemming the effects of the parasitic disease malaria, particularly in sub-Saharan Africa. Miles O'Brien looks at efforts to tackle other diseases carried by mosquitoes in the Florida Keys, where scientists are testing a way to kill mosquitoes -- with mosquitoes. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

    Russia sees dialogue opportunity with Taliban decades after its own messy Afghanistan exit

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 5:56

    As the United States continues to manage the fallout from its withdrawal from Afghanistan, in Moscow there's a sense of deja vu. Russia's departure after the Soviet war there led to a protracted period of chaos and civil war, which culminated with the U.S. invasion in 2001. But Russian veterans see some essential differences between both withdrawals. Special correspondent Stuart Smith reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

    A Brief But Spectacular take on the importance of creating a global health system

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 3:28

    Priti Krishtel started her career working with low-income communities in India where she saw her clients suffering, and even dying, because they couldn't afford the lifesaving medicines they needed. Now, she is advocating for a more equitable healthcare system in the U.S. and around the world. She gives us her Brief But Spectacular take on the importance of building a system that works for all. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

    Biden officials to enforce Trump trade deal with China, work toward 'durable coexistence'

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 4:07

    The Biden administration on Monday unveiled its long awaited approach to trade relations with China. U.S. trade representative Katherine Tai said she would restart trade talks with Beijing, but maintain most Trump-era tariffs on china. Nick Schifrin explains. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

    What's at stake at the upcoming world climate conference

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2021 4:10

    Global environmental leaders met in Milan for a summit, weeks ahead of COP26, the UN climate conference world leaders will attend in Glasgow, Scotland. As temperatures rise and climate pledges by major polluters go unmet, the pressure is on. Somini Sengupta, international climate reporter at New York Times joins. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

    How Brexit played a role in Britain's gas shortages

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 4:50

    The British government is warning that the country's fuel crisis is likely to last for another week. Gas stations across Britain have had to shut down because a lack of truckers has caused huge supply difficulties. As special correspondent Malcolm Brabant reports from Brighton, on the southern coast of England, the problems appear to be one of the side effects of Brexit. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

    Sexual abuse allegations upend National Women's Soccer League, FIFA to investigate

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 6:03

    The National Women's Soccer League suspended all its weekend matches amid allegations of sexual abuse by former coaches. The North Carolina Courage fired coach Paul Riley following reports he sexually coerced multiple players, and the Washington Spirit coach was fired after reports he verbally and emotionally abused players. Amna Nawaz discusses with The Washington Post's Molly Hensley-Clancy. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

    Exploring Evergrande's financial failures and why China's government is stepping in

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 5:04

    "Too big to fail" was a phrase used during the global financial crisis for large companies so over-extended that their collapse could cripple global finance. China is now trying to take a too-big company with too much debt, and manage its failure. The company is a real estate giant called "Evergrande". Nick Schifrin has more. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

    Mozambicans fleeing IS-affiliated insurgents feel failed by government, exploited by big business

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 9:34

    The Southeast African nation of Mozambique is being terrorized by "Al Shabaab," an ISIS-affiliated insurgency that has killed 3,000 people and displaced many more. With the support of the Pulitzer Center, special correspondent Neha Wadekar and filmmaker Ed Ram report from Mozambique on the drivers of this conflict. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

    News Wrap: Milley says years of bad decisions to blame for Afghanistan pullout failures

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 4:29

    In our news wrap Wednesday, Gen. Mark Milley blamed years of bad decisions behind the failures of the U.S. exit from Afghanistan during the second day of a House hearing with military leaders. The Biden administration says North Korea's latest missile test is "destabilizing" and poses a regional threat. Japan's former foreign minister Fumio Kishida is now in line to become prime minister. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

    Here's what contributed to the extinction of ivory-billed woodpecker, 22 other species

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 5:07

    The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service proposed moving 23 animals and plants off the endangered species list, declaring them extinct. Perhaps the most well-known of the species deemed gone forever is the ivory-billed woodpecker. These extinctions are part of an accelerating crisis driven by human actions. John Yang and Tierra Curry, a senior scientist at the Center for Biological Diversity, discuss. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

    News Wrap: Italy sees largest migrant rush in 5 years as 700 arrive on boat in Sicily

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 5:56

    In our news wrap Tuesday, an overloaded boat docked in Sicily overnight with nearly 700 migrants on board -- marking the biggest arrival in Italy in 5 years. A federal appeals panel upheld New York City's vaccine mandate for teachers, but teachers said they'll appeal to the U.S. Supreme Court. Stocks had one of their worst days in months as inflation worries and rising bond yields took a toll. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

    Many Ugandan children forced into hard labor, sex trafficking as COVID closes schools

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 9:01

    The effects of the pandemic on children vary dramatically depending on the country. With schools still shuttered in Uganda and other developing nations, many children have no choice but to work to survive. In Africa, more than one-fifth of children -- around 87 million kids -- work. Special correspondent Fred de Sam Lazaro reports from Kampala. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

    News Wrap: R&B star R. Kelly found guilty of racketeering, immoral acts across state lines

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 4:35

    A federal jury in New York found rhythm and blues star R. Kelly guilty of racketeering and crossing state lines for immoral acts. President Joe Biden defended giving booster shots for COVID-19 now that the Centers for Disease Control has approved Pfizer's third dose for certain groups. At least two-thirds of Britain's gas stations are out of fuel due to a shortage of truckers and panic buying. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

    How prejudice affects official search for missing Indigenous women, other women of color

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 5:47

    While Gabby Petito's death has captured national attention, tens of thousands of people are reported missing or murdered every year in the U.S. Native women are murdered at rates 10 times the national average. In Wyoming alone, 710 indigenous people were reported missing from 2011 to 2020. Amna Nawaz discusses those statistics with Abigail Echo-Hawk, director of the Urban Indian Health Institute. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

    Germany's deadlock election highlights voters' generational divide

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 5:48

    Angela Merkel is staying on as interim German chancellor after the country's election ended in virtual deadlock. Talks aimed at establishing a new coalition government are underway, but could take months. Special correspondent Malcolm Brabant reports from Berlin. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

    With Angela Merkel leaving, Germany goes to polls in landmark election

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2021 3:16

    Exit polls show a neck-and-neck race in Germany's parliamentary elections held on Sunday. More than 60 million adults are eligible to vote in the landmark election. Chancellor Angela Merkel who has served for 16 years is stepping down, marking the start of a new era in German politics. Deutsche Welle Television Political Correspondent Thomas Sparrow joins to discuss the hotly contested election and how a new government will be formed. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

    How the expulsion of Haitian migrants is affecting the crisis-torn nation

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 25, 2021 4:30

    Thousands of Haitian migrants who have been deported by the U.S. have been arriving home as authorities scramble for resources including food and medical supplies. Haiti is reeling from a convergence of crises -- a presidential assassination, an earthquake and chaos on the streets -- and critics say America's actions will worsen the humanitarian crisis. Widlore Merancourt, editor-in-chief of Ayibopost, joins from Port-Au-Prince. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

    Germany faces tight race to replace Angela Merkel, with climate change as top voter issue

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 6:47


    Germany is one of America's most important allies. Nearly every American president since George W. Bush has worked closely with German Chancellor Angela Merkel. But for the first time since 2005, she will not be a candidate when Germans head to the polls this Sunday to vote for her successor. Special correspondent Malcolm Brabant is in Berlin with a preview of this upcoming election. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders


    Lack of access, infrastructure and government accountability hurt Ugandan vaccine goals

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 8:28

    The U.S. plan to donate 500 million vaccines to developing countries aims to address the lopsided distribution and exacerbated impact of the virus. In Africa, Uganda is still struggling to vaccinate those most at-risk. It has recorded more than 120,000 cases of COVID-19 and over 3100 deaths, but the true toll is likely much higher. Special correspondent Fred de Sam Lazaro reports from Kampala. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

    U.S. and E.U. climate envoys on how China, developing nations can help combat crisis

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 8:55


    The U.N. warns that unless the world acts faster than promised, Earth's temperatures will rise to catastrophic, irreversible levels. The U.S. calls the upcoming climate summit the last chance for the world to avoid disaster. Nick Schifrin discusses the crisis with John Kerry, the president's special envoy on climate, and Frans Timmermans, executive vice president of the European Commission. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders


    U.S. plan to share Pfizer shots globally 'too little and too late,' ex-CDC director says

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 6:45

    The Biden administration announced Wednesday that the U.S. was purchasing an additional 500 million Pfizer COVID vaccines to donate to other nations. The move is what critics and organizations like the WHO have been calling for -- a much more robust effort on behalf of rich countries. Yet some are saying this still isn't enough. William Brangham discusses with Tom Frieden, former head of the CDC. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

    China's vaccine faces scrutiny as Indonesians die despite shots, U.S. pledges donations

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 7:01

    As the U.S. commits to vaccine distribution, Indonesia has recorded more than 4 million COVID cases. More than 140,000 people have died. Initially, Indonesia turned to China for vaccine aid. But Nick Schifrin explores how the U.S. and its allies are trying to achieve vaccine inroads in China's backyard. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

    EU's top diplomat says it can deploy military forces without U.S., NATO approval

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 6:35

    President Joe Biden spoke with French President Emmanuel Macron Wednesday for the first time since France erupted with anger over a new Indo-Pacific defense alliance between the United States, United Kingdom and Australia. Nick Schifrin looks at European-U.S. relations with Josep Borrell, the high representative for foreign affairs and security policy and vice president of the European Commission. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

    As Biden touts American democracy, here are the issues allies want U.S. to deliver on

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 9:37

    President Joe Biden on Tuesday delivered his first speech to the United Nations as part of its annual general assembly. Biden touted diplomacy and the endurance of democracy as he faces tensions with old allies, and global challenges, like COVID and climate change. Nick Schifrin reports from New York, and white house correspondent Yamiche Alcindor joins with more from the White House north lawn. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

    As high temperatures hurt Sicily's food production, rising sea levels threaten housing

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 6:44

    Climate change experts in Sicily, Italy are warning that rising sea waters are threatening some of the island's most crucial heavy industrial plants. They are also forecasting food shortages because crops are being destroyed. The island endured record temperatures this summer. Special correspondent Malcolm Brabant reports from Sicily for NewsHour's climate change series. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

    As U.S. deports Haitian migrants, fate of DACA immigrants also hangs in the balance

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2021 8:20

    Thousands of migrants -- most of whom are from Haiti -- have been removed from an encampment in the town of Del Rio, Texas, along the U.S. southern border as U.S. officials have started to take more aggressive steps to stop the encampment from growing further. Major recent developments in Congress will also touch on the broader U.S. immigration policy. Yamiche Alcindor and Lisa Desjardins report. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

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