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Best podcasts about as israel

Latest podcast episodes about as israel

Living in God's Rhyme
Season 8, Episode 6, The World and God

Living in God's Rhyme

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2022 46:48


76-8-6, SHOW  NOTES & COPYRIGHTS,  (Scheduled 9/29/2022)                         Today we are going to read poems about and discuss man's rebellion against God;  what it has done and what we can do about it. BROKEN HEARTED (God's Rhyme, pg. 141) A chosen people led to a land promised by God, And in another land God chosen by the people. I. The Promised Land After the fall of man sin prevailed. There were times when sin was hailed. Amid that sin in which the world regaled Lived a people, God's chosen ones. Throughout their history in Old Testament times, Through prosperity and captivity, perils and dangers, Whether living a promise or amidst strangers, They were at times distracted from looking toward the manger.  Though they had the Law, All around they saw The perversions of idols As their faith became idle. If they could only have seen God at the end of the prophesies. Knowing what it would mean, Would they have forsaken idolatry? the rebellion the forgiveness again and again and over again God's chosen people since the time in the Garden Sinned and mocked their Father Creator, Then the sacrifice of a spotless lamb of wool To forgive the sins of their hearts so full. year after year tear after tear a new sacrifice for the after life After so many years and so many tears The ultimate sacrifice had to be made, Sorrow upon sorrow Left no time to borrow. Discussion: II.  God As Man So . . .  God, through Jesus, by human birth became man, To become one of His own creation, To live in this world as one of us So He could complete His saving plan. Jesus, one with God, humbled Himself, The ultimate and eternal sacrifice, To pay the price, not by earthly deeds or self,  But by His precious shed blood. Not a sacrifice to be repeated year after year, Jesus died for sins from the time of the Garden,  Now and until the end of days So we  may stand before God without fear. Discussion: III, The Days Anew Then as an hour in a day Of a thousand years, A people persecuted for their faith Left where they could no longer stay. Their ocean voyage a second journey to the promised land. Believing they were fulfilling what God had planned; As Israel became the first Jerusalem, America was to become as a new Jerusalem. * God prevailed a people thrived the land was hailed for those deprived now able to worship to pray to God without the kingship commands of man but the world interrupted and lives were corrupted idols revered God not feared As in ages before. though a revival or two Man still ate from the tree of strife.. They were so many more than a few Never, not ever, foreseeing their life. Discussion: IV, Yesterday And Today The chosen ones, worshiping false gods, Sacrificed their children on altars of sin; Hundreds, thousands, breathing now dead. Hoping ... , forgetting ... , denying God. Now today, a people who chose God Are taking their children, those unborn, And, though not understanding the sacrifice, Are killing their children at the altar of Satan. There are those today who believe we are falling Again - failing and flailing as we turn, Not just our backs, but our hearts, from God; As those before us, so do we burn. Yesterday, today and tomorrow Worshiping all but what is right, Seeking, then reeking, lying in sin, Rebelling openly and eagerly in His sight. For seventy years in Old Testament times Jerusalem  besieged, taken captive by Babylon. Today, the new Jerusalem can look to the future To destruction by the rise of the new Babylon. Discussion: V. The Broken Hearted "My God, my God, why have you...

The Least Of These - His Love Ministries
ROMANS 6:15-23 BUT NOW HAVING BEEN SET FREE FROM SIN YOU HAVE YOUR FRUIT TO HOLINESS

The Least Of These - His Love Ministries

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022 42:02


Romans 6:15 What then? Shall we sin because we are not under law but under grace? Certainly not! 16 Do you not know that to whom you present yourselves slaves to obey, you are that one's slaves whom you obey, whether of sin leading to death, or of obedience leading to righteousness?  17 But God be thanked that though you were slaves of sin, yet you obeyed from the heart that form of doctrine to which you were delivered. 18 And having been set free from sin, you became slaves of righteousness. 19 I speak in human terms because of the weakness of your flesh. For just as you presented your members as slaves of uncleanness, and of lawlessness leading to more lawlessness, so now present your members as slaves of righteousness for holiness. 20 For when you were slaves of sin, you were free in regard to righteousness. 21 What fruit did you have then in the things of which you are now ashamed? For the end of those things is death. 22 But now having been set free from sin, and having become slaves of God, you have your fruit to holiness, and the end, everlasting life. 23 For the wages of sin is death, but   is eternal life in Christ Jesus our Lord.                 In Chapter 6 Paul declares that God, through the death of Jesus, not only died for us, but we also died with him. That is a great truth. When God says he set us free from the life of Adam and linked us to the life of Christ, he really did. Through for quite a long time our feelings will tell us differently, God wants us to understand this. We are to believe it regardless of how we feel, because what he says is true. If we will believe it, despite our feelings, we will soon discover that it is true. More and more we shall enter into the realization of this tremendous thing -- that we can be good in Christ as easily as we were bad in Adam.Choose Your MasterII. WE SHOULD BE SLAVES TO GOD! (15-23)Another reason not to continue in sin is explained in terms of servitude.  We become slaves to that which we obey, either sin to death or God for righteousness (15-16).   A. WE BECOME SLAVES TO WHOM WE OBEY (15-18)      1. Either of sin to death, or of obedience to righteousness         (15-16)v15 Look at v1, it is different than 15 Shall we continue in sin that grace may abound.V15  What then? Shall we sin because we are not under law but under grace? Certainly not!As Charles Spurgeon put it, "An unchanged life is the mark of an unchanged heart, and an unchanged heart is a sign of an unregenerate life."If there is no change, if your attitudes are the same, if your outlook is the same -- then there is a very serious doubt as to whether you ever became a Christian at all! That is what is involved in the question of Romans 6:1.V15 The other question is not, "Shall we continue to abide in sin," but, rather, "Should we sin even once now that we are not under law but under grace?"See how God so beautifully uses these Old Testament stories to illustrate the tremendous truths of the New Testament. One of the most effective books of the Old Testament in this respect is the book of Joshua, for it gives us the picture of Israel entering the land -- and the land is always a picture of the fullness of the Spirit, the walk in Christ, that we are talking about here in Romans. As Israel came out of the wilderness of self-effort across the river Jordan and into the land, the first obstacle that lay in their pathway was the tremendous city of Jericho, with its great, high walls -- tremendous walls, we are told. Archeologists, who have now laid bare the foundations of these very walls, tell us that they were very likely over 100 feet high and some 50-60 feet thick. This was an impregnable fortress. "Joshua fought the battle of Jericho and the wa

Two Nice Jewish Boys
#299 - Campuses, Temples and Politics (Ofir Dayan)

Two Nice Jewish Boys

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2022 56:25


Support us on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/2njb *** Never a dull day in the Middle East. As Israel is entering another round of elections, Iran is on the brink of getting a new deal which will allow it to become stronger than ever. And as if that's not enough, the entire global economy is threatened by inflation. It is in these delightful circumstances that we invited, once again, our seasoned guest Ofir Dayan, to talk about recent events and much more. Ofir recently came back from five years in the United States, where she was getting a Bachelor's and Masters degree in at Columbia University's School of International and Public Affairs. Ofir is a fierce advocate for the Jewish right to visit the Temple Mount, as part of the ‘Beyadenu' NGO. We're super excited to have Ofir with us again on the show today! Beyadenu NGO: https://www.templeheritage.com/en

The Land of Israel Network
Israel Uncensored: Terror and Temperatures Heating Up In Israel

The Land of Israel Network

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2022 28:43


As Israel is in the midst of a country-wide heat wave, Jihadi terrorists are keeping things hot as well, with attempted attacks taking place throughout Judea and Samaria. At the same time, the IDF is busy carrying out nightly raids, making arrests, and seizing weapons, in their heroic efforts to keep the people of Israel safe. These stories, and much more news from Israel, on this week's Israel Uncensored, with Josh Hasten. Photo Credit: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Sun_in_ocean.JPG

Chattanooga Valley Baptist Church
Firmly Committed (Joshua 1:10-18)

Chattanooga Valley Baptist Church

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 22, 2022 35:17


As Israel continues to prepare to enter the Promised Land, they have to deal with an early challenge to their unity as a nation. Unlike the last time, they found themselves on the brink of the Promised Land. they are firmly committed to God's plan, his promises, and their unity as a people.

Sharper Iron from KFUO Radio
Not Because of Righteousness, but Despite Rebellion

Sharper Iron from KFUO Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 18, 2022 55:12


Rev. Carl Roth, pastor at Grace Lutheran Church in Elgin, TX, joins host Rev. Timothy Appel to study Deuteronomy 9:1-29. As Israel prepares to drive out peoples with great power and might, Moses assures them that the LORD will go before them to destroy their enemies for them. Israel must not let this turn to pride in their hearts, as if they have some kind of inherent righteousness. The LORD is punishing the Canaanites' great wickedness; He is not rewarding a righteousness that Israel has done. In fact, Moses reminds them that they have been rebellious over and over again. Even at Sinai, where the LORD graciously spoke to them, Israel worshiped a golden calf. Their rebellion was seen at other places in their wilderness wandering. Yet the LORD was gracious to listen to the intercession of Moses, proclaiming the even greater intercession of Christ on behalf of us sinners. “The Law of God is Good and Wise” is a series on Sharper Iron that goes through the book of Deuteronomy. Though Moses' lengthy sermons in Deuteronomy may be tempting to skip, this influential book is essential reading for Christians. As Moses strengthened Israel on the plains of Moab before the people entered the Promised Land, so the book of Deuteronomy still strengthens the Church as we prepare to enter the Resurrection with Christ, the Prophet greater than Moses.

Sovereign Grace Community Church
Sonship as a Life of Praise

Sovereign Grace Community Church

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2022 57:00


As Israel's songs of sonship, the psalms proclaim and extol the rich blessings of love and care that God gives to His children. His goal is to perfect His own life in them, such that they would be characterized by love as He is love. And He is the supreme object of their love, which expresses itself in devotion, gratitude and praise. God's children are a grateful and praising people, and thus the psalms have this as a central and pervasive theme.

Carnegie Connects
A Conversation With the President of Israel Isaac Herzog

Carnegie Connects

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 38:14


As Israel approaches its fifth election in four years, it faces a series of challenges and opportunities. Worries over Iran's nuclear ambitions remain, and a peace with the Palestinians remains elusive. Meanwhile, Israel has an opening to expand relations with the Gulf states and a longstanding relationship with the United States under a Biden administration keen on working together with Israel.  Listen as Aaron David Miller sits down with Israel's eleventh president, Isaac Herzog, to talk about the presidency, the U.S.-Israeli relationship, Iran, Palestine, and more.  Want to listen to Carnegie Connects live? Visit our website to sign up for invitations. 

From The Pulpit of DUMC
#234. Rev. David Hockett - July 24

From The Pulpit of DUMC

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 18:19


It is an old story and yet a very contemporary one. We often doubt God's providential care, we fail to trust God with our lives, believing we can secure our own future. We often fail to nurture the most essential and important relationship we have and the failure to trust God with our lives and to nurture the most important relationship we have leads to bondage and death. As Israel would discover over and over, when we neglect or take for granted our relationship with God, things don't go well, life becomes off balance, and the hardships and struggles that life surely brings our way become all the more difficult to navigate. The prophet Hosea knew this and called Israel to give themselves wholeheartedly to God. To a people who had turned to idols and toxic politics for their survival and security, Hosea speaks the words of a broken-hearted God who loves his people and longs to be in relationship in spite of and perhaps even because of their infidelity.

Kirby Woods Podcast
Christian Draft Dodgers

Kirby Woods Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022 34:49


As Israel was preparing to cross into the promised land, two of its tribes made a strange request to Moses; they wanted to settle down outside the promised land. Moses is greatly concerned with the discouraging effect this would have on the other tribes. In what ways might our apathy and dedication to comfort provide a spirit of discouragement to our church family? Part 13 of our series, "In The Wilderness." Number 32. Preached by Jared Kress on July 31st, 2022. 

Thinking on Scripture with Dr. Steven R. Cook
Deuteronomy 28:1-14 - God's Promise of Blessings on Israel

Thinking on Scripture with Dr. Steven R. Cook

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 24, 2022 65:56


Introduction      Deuteronomy 28:1-68 presents the blessings and cursings of the bilateral Mosaic Covenant (בְּרִית berith) which God promised to bring upon Israel depending on their obedience or disobedience to His commands. God's written directives assume the integrity of language in which His meaning was infused in the words and phrases He selected, and that language itself served as a reliable vehicle concerning His expectations. The Israelites were responsible to know what was communicated and would be blessed or cursed based on whether they responded to it positively or negatively. God's directives meant there were fixed categories of blessing and cursing, which allowed the Israelites to know with certainty what to expect from Him depending on how they treated their relationship with Him. This did not mean the Israelites could manipulate God to do their bidding; rather, it simply meant He was predictable and would do what He promised. A healthy relationship relies on clear and honest communication as well as predictable behavior.      For the sake of emphasis, Moses repeated the conditional aspects of God's blessings (Deut 28:1-2, 9, 13-14), and cursings (Deut 28:15, 20, 45-47, 58, 62; cf., Deut 29:24-28; 30:17-20). The word blessing translates the Hebrew noun בְּרָכָה berakah, which appears twelve times in Deuteronomy and sixty-seven times in the OT (TWOT). In Deuteronomy 28, the word refers to the tangible goodness that makes life enjoyable and rich, which God promised to His covenant people, Israel, if they would simply obey His commands. Areas of blessing would include: 1) healthy offspring, crops, and livestock (Deut 28:4-5, 8, 11), 2) military success (Deut 28:7), 3) fruitful labor (Deut 28:8, 12a), 4) international recognition and respect (Deut 28:9-10), 5) financial prosperity (Deut 28:12b), and 6) serving as an international leader to other nations (Deut. 28:13). God also promised to bring curses, which would undo all the blessings and bring Israel down, if they disobeyed (Deut 28:15-68). In Deuteronomy 28:16-19, Moses used the Hebrew verb אָרָר arar six times, which means, “to bind with a curse.”[1] The form of the verb is passive, which means a curse is received by the nation of Israel if they turn away from God. These blessings and cursings were predictable, depending on Israel's knowledge of God's directives and their adherence or insubordination to them (Deut 11:26-28; 29:29; 30:15-20).      When considering the Mosaic Covenant, it is important to realize God's blessings and cursings for Israel were tied to their moral behavior (see Lev 26:3-4; Deut 11:13-17; Jer 5:23-25; Amos 4:7; Mal 3:10).[2] When Israel abided by God's Word, advancing on the moral high ground of His ethical standards, the Lord would bless His people in the everyday affairs of their lives. God's blessings came directly in the form of rain, crop production, national health, etc. However, His blessings also came indirectly through His people who learned and lived His Word as it spoke to their marriages, families, education, labor, economic decisions, social activities, and welfare for the less fortunate in society. For example, God's blessings of protection and provision for Ruth and Naomi came through Boaz, who modeled godliness and compassion in his words and actions (Ruth 2:1-23). Boaz' choice to be a godly man meant he would serve as a conduit of God's grace to others.      Additionally, God's blessings should not be thought of as producing equal outcomes to all, as social and economic stratification would continue within Israelite society. It also did not mean everyone would have perfect health, as the general effects of sin in humanity continued. It did mean, however, that even those at the lowest place in society would have their basic needs met; needs such as food, shelter, and clothing. The poor in Israel would be wealthier and better off than those of other nations.[3]      But if God's people turned from the Lord and His Word and adopted an alternate ethical standard, then they would forfeit His blessings and bring judgment upon themselves (Deut 11:16-17; 2 Ch 6:24-27). However, God's judgments on Israel did not always happen in an instantaneous manner, as the Lord is patient, longsuffering, and slow to anger (Ex 34:6; Psa 86:15; 103:8; 145:8; Joel 2:13; Jon 4:2). And God often sent warnings to His people (Jer 7:25-26; 25:3-7; 29:18-19), which at times went on for centuries, and discipline came in stages. And even when God's judgment fell, it sometimes took the form of lesser punishment (Psa 103:10-12; Ezra 9:13). And if His people humbled themselves, He would offer forgiveness and restore their blessings (2 Ch 7:13-14). God is always quick to forgive, and He prefers to bless rather than punish. Any loving parent understands this.      A conundrum appears in the Old Testament as the righteous struggle from day to day while some evil people grow rich and seem to enjoy all the blessings this world can give. Asaph, a godly man, felt this struggle deeply (Psa 73:1-16). However, when considered from the divine perspective, worldly wealth does not always come with God's blessing, and the life and final days of the evil person will be less than desirable (Psa 73:17-20). The godly desire the Lord more than the things of this world (Psa 73:21-28), and they have joy and peace with whatever He provides. For whatever God gives to His obedient children will include joy and peace that they might appreciate it, “For who can eat and who can have enjoyment without Him? For to a person who is good in His sight He has given wisdom and knowledge and joy” (Eccl 2:25-26a). According to Solomon, “It is the blessing of the LORD that makes rich, and He adds no sorrow to it” (Prov 10:22), and “Better is a little with the fear of the LORD than great treasure and turmoil with it” (Prov 15:16). The godly are content with the Lord's daily provisions (Phil 4:11-13; 1 Tim 6:8; Heb 13:5).[4] Deuteronomy 28:1-14 - The Lord's Blessings      Moses opens the blessing section by saying, “Now it shall be, if you diligently obey the LORD your God, being careful to do all His commandments which I command you today, the LORD your God will set you high above all the nations of the earth” (Deut 28:1). This opening introduces a conditional clause (Deut 28:1), which is repeated several times in this section (cf., Deut 28:2, 9, 13). As Israel's Judge, Lawgiver, and King (Isa 33:22), the Lord had provided His people with clear directives concerning how they were to live, and if they chose righteousness, blessing would follow (Deut 11:26-28). God's blessings (בְּרָכָה berakah) pertained to agricultural, national, social, and material prosperity. God promised to set His people “high above all the nations.” According to Eugene Merrill, “What it means to be set high above all the nations is answered in part by the string of blessings that follow in Deuteronomy 3:3-8. Inasmuch as Israel's economy rested on an agrarian base, most of the blessing is associated with abundance in field and flock, but other aspects of safe and wholesome life are not ignored.”[5]      Moses continued, saying, “All these blessings will come upon you and overtake you if you obey the LORD your God” (Deut 28:2). The hiphil form of the Hebrew word overtake (נָשַׂג nasag) meant God would cause His blessings to come upon obedient-to-the-Word believers. That is, God's blessings would chase them wherever they were in order to overtake them. The obedient believer would not be able to escape the Lord's blessings. This is confirmed by the next clause, which reads, “Blessed shall you be in the city, and blessed shall you be in the country” (Deut 28:3). God's blessing would hunt them down, and their location was incidental. The word blessed (בָּרָךְ barak) means “to endue with power for success, prosperity, productiveness, longevity, etc.”[6] God wants to bless His people and He does not have to be cajoled or manipulated to do it.      God's blessings would not only be personal but would also spill over onto one's children and the production of one's labor, which included the ground as well as the animals. Moses said, “Blessed shall be the offspring of your body and the produce of your ground and the offspring of your beasts, the increase of your herd and the young of your flock” (Deut 28:4). Here is the concept of blessing by association. The adult Israelite who learned God's Word and walked with Him would be blessed, and so would all who were in contact with him. Boaz was a good example of God's blessings overflowing into the lives of others.      God would also provide an abundance of food for His people to eat, as Moses said, “Blessed shall be your basket and your kneading bowl” (Deut 28:5). Eugene Merrill states, “Abundant produce would, of course, result in abundant food supplies. Harvest baskets would overflow, and bakers would have more than enough wheat with which to bake their bread (v. 5).”[7] There would be no food insecurity among God's people.      And God's blessing would touch His people wherever they were, whether in the home or out in the community. Moses said, “Blessed shall you be when you come in, and blessed shall you be when you go out” (Deut 28:6). To come in and go out is a merism—a figure of speech—that refers to all of one's life and activities. According to Earl Kalland, “Going out and coming in is a common descriptive phrase of going out to one's daily tasks and returning home after the day's work is done, whatever that activity entails.”[8]      Having God's blessing did not mean Israel would not have enemies. God's people always have enemies, as we live in a fallen world that is temporarily governed by Satan and those who align with him (John 12:31; 14:30; 16:11; 1 John 3:13; 5:19). However, though opposition would arise against God's people, He would secure their victory, as Moses said, “The LORD shall cause your enemies who rise up against you to be defeated before you; they will come out against you one way and will flee before you seven ways” (Deut 28:7). When the text says, “they will come against you one way,” it's speaking of an intelligent coordinated attack against God's people. However, though the attack represents man's best military strategies and actions, God will neutralize their efforts and cause them to be defeated. That the enemy “will flee before you seven ways” meant their enemies could not flee the battle fast enough. This promise of military victory could be trusted because God had already displayed His power over the Egyptians when He brought Israel out of captivity. Having defeated the greatest superpower of the day, lesser powers would be of no concern.      The Israelite farmers would be blessed both in their efforts and the production of the land itself. Moses said, “The LORD will command the blessing upon you in your barns and in all that you put your hand to, and He will bless you in the land which the LORD your God gives you” (Deut 28:8). Eugene Merrill states, “Verse 8 forms a conclusion to this first set of blessings by summarizing the blessings according to the categories of what Israel would have and what Israel would do (the “barns” and “hand” respectively).”[9] Again, God's promised blessings were tangible in nature.      God's intention of blessing His people was that they might be an example to the rest of the world of what it means to be set apart to the Lord, to walk with Him in holiness. Moses said, “The LORD will establish you as a holy people to Himself, as He swore to you, if you keep the commandments of the LORD your God and walk in His ways” (Deut 28:9). The word holy (קָדוֹשׁ qadosh) means “commanding respect, awesome, treated with respect.”[10] It denotes being singled out for special use, to be consecrated for a unique purpose. But God's people were not mere objects one could set apart, but rather, volitional creatures that were called into a special relationship with the Lord. For this reason, we see the conditional clause, “if you keep the commandments of the LORD your God and walk in His ways.”      If Israel, as God's people, would learn and live His Word, then “all the peoples of the earth will see that you are called by the name of the LORD, and they will be afraid of you” (Deut 28:10). God was concerned about His image among the Gentiles. Being called by the name of the Lord meant being His representative in the world for others to see. God's values were to be reflected in the words and actions of His people. If His people would represent Him well, then Gentiles would be afraid of them. The word afraid (יָרֵא yare) most often means “to fear, [or] to be afraid.”[11] However, at times, the word connotes reverence, respect, or awe. This latter meaning might be preferred, as other translations suggest, saying, “they will stand in awe of you” (Deut 28:10 CSB), and “they will respect you” (Deut 28:10 NET). For those possessed with negative volition, they would fear God and His people. However, for those possessed with positive volition, they would be awed by God and His goodness and would respect His people. Earl Kalland states, “By being God's obedient and holy people (cf. 26:19), the Israelites would enjoy such an intimacy with God that they would become a testimony to all the peoples on earth who would fear or stand in awe of Israel (cf. 2:25; 11:25).”[12]      God's blessing would be obvious to His people as well as the Gentiles nations around them. Moses said, “The LORD will make you abound in prosperity, in the offspring of your body and in the offspring of your beast and in the produce of your ground, in the land which the LORD swore to your fathers to give you” (Deut 28:11). To abound (יָתַר yathar) with prosperity meant to “be left over, remain over.”[13] The idea is that God would give His people more than enough prosperity that they would consider themselves blessed, and others would as well.      Part of God's blessing meant predictable weather patterns in which the Lord would send rain on the land and cause their crops to be productive. Moses said, “The LORD will open for you His good storehouse, the heavens, to give rain to your land in its season and to bless all the work of your hand; and you shall lend to many nations, but you shall not borrow” (Deut 28:12). God created the universe and the world, and He controlled all His creation, including the earth's climate. God promised He would cause the rain to fall on the soil at optimal times so as to maximize the soil's production. Peter Craigie states: "One of the roles of God in the promised land would be the provision of fertility; fertility depended primarily on the rains. Without the rains, the crops could not grow, and without the crops and the other produce of the field, neither man nor his domestic animals could survive. Thus in v. 12, there is a very rich expression of the blessing of God, for in providing the rains, God was providing what would be the mainspring of life in Israel's land."[14]      God's blessings meant Israel would know economic stability in such a way that they would not have to borrow from others to engage in business ventures. In fact, Israel would be so prosperous, they would serve as bankers to others, in that they would lend to many nations and never have to borrow.      In Deuteronomy 28:13-14, Moses provided a summary statement of all God's goodness to His people as well as a final conditional clause. Moses said, “The LORD will make you the head and not the tail, and you only will be above, and you will not be underneath, if you listen to the commandments of the LORD your God, which I charge you today, to observe them carefully, 14 and do not turn aside from any of the words which I command you today, to the right or to the left, to go after other gods to serve them” (Deut 28:13-14). If Israel would listen (שָׁמַע shama) to God's directives and observe them carefully, staying faithful in their walk with Him and not pursuing other gods, then His blessings would overtake them. Earl Kalland notes:      Israel would move upward from her current status to that of the head among the nations, rather than become (or continue to be) the tail (v.13). She would “always be at the top, never at the bottom.” But all this would be determined by the adherence of the people to the stipulations of the covenant-treaty that they had accepted from the Lord. They must “carefully follow them” and “not turn aside … to the right or to the left” (v.14) from any of the commands Moses was rehearsing to them that day.[15]      In closing, the specific body of laws that Israel would need to follow had been provided by Moses in Deuteronomy chapters 5 through 26. There was no guessing about God's expectations for His people, and His blessings or cursings would follow, depending on whether Israel would obey or disobey the Lord (Deut 11:26-28). To be clear, the Mosaic Law was never intended to be a means of salvation, but a rule for life that could be obeyed by Israel who were in a covenant relationship with Him and who walked humbly with their Lord (see Deut 5:33; 8:6; 10:12-13; 29:29; 30:15-16; 31:11; Psa 1:2-3; 119:9-11).   [1] Ludwig Koehler et al., The Hebrew and Aramaic Lexicon of the Old Testament (Leiden: E.J. Brill, 1994–2000), 91. [2] In the larger picture, God gives common grace to everyone (Matt 5:44-45; Acts 14:16-17), and this in order to win their hearts to Him, as He “is patient toward you, not wishing for any to perish but for all to come to repentance” (2 Pet 3:9). However, God's common grace does not last forever, and if people turn away from Him and pursue wickedness (Rom 1:18-23), He will let them go their sinful way (Rom 1:24-32; cf., Psa 81:12-13), and they will eventually perish in their sin. For the rebel-believer, it means being least in the kingdom of heaven (Matt 5:19; cf. 1 Cor 3:15), but for the unbeliever, it means suffering eternally in the Lake of Fire (Rev 20:11-15). [3] Blessing is a relative term even in our own societies. According to The World Bank, as of 2018, half the world's population lives on less than $5.50 a day (https://www.worldbank.org/en/news/press-release/2018/10/17/nearly-half-the-world-lives-on-less-than-550-a-day). According to Pew research data in 2015, the poor in the US are much better off than the poor in other countries (https://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2015/07/09/how-americans-compare-with-the-global-middle-class/). [4] Remember that Israelites, in the wilderness, were not content with the God's provision of manna and complained to the Lord to give them meat (Num 11:4-6). God gave them what they asked for, but they did not enjoy it (Num 11:18-20, 31-34), as “He gave them their request, but sent a wasting disease among them” (Psa 106:15). [5] Eugene H. Merrill, Deuteronomy, vol. 4, The New American Commentary (Nashville: Broadman & Holman Publishers, 1994), 353. [6] John N. Oswalt, “285 בָּרַך,” ed. R. Laird Harris, Gleason L. Archer Jr., and Bruce K. Waltke, Theological Wordbook of the Old Testament (Chicago: Moody Press, 1999), 132. [7] Eugene H. Merrill, Deuteronomy, vol. 4, 354. [8] Earl S. Kalland, “Deuteronomy,” in The Expositor's Bible Commentary: Deuteronomy, Joshua, Judges, Ruth, 1 & 2 Samuel, ed. Frank E. Gaebelein, vol. 3 (Grand Rapids, MI: Zondervan Publishing House, 1992), 167. [9] Eugene H. Merrill, Deuteronomy, vol. 4, 354. [10] Ludwig Koehler et al., The Hebrew and Aramaic Lexicon of the Old Testament, 1066. [11] Ibid., 433. [12] Jack S. Deere, “Deuteronomy,” in The Bible Knowledge Commentary: An Exposition of the Scriptures, ed. J. F. Walvoord and R. B. Zuck, vol. 1 (Wheaton, IL: Victor Books, 1985), 311–312. [13] Francis Brown, Samuel Rolles Driver, and Charles Augustus Briggs, Enhanced Brown-Driver-Briggs Hebrew and English Lexicon (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1977), 451. [14] Peter C. Craigie, The Book of Deuteronomy, The New International Commentary on the Old Testament (Grand Rapids, MI: Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing Co., 1976), 337. [15] Earl S. Kalland, “Deuteronomy,” in The Expositor's Bible Commentary, 168.

Living Words
Hallelujah!

Living Words

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 17, 2022


Hallelujah! Revelation 19 by William Klock When I was an undergrad I had the chance to hear a lecture given by a missionary Bible translator.  There was a lot about that lecture that was fascinating and encouraging.  Up to that point it wasn't a subject to which I'd given much thought, but when I left, for the first time, I'd started thinking about the possibility of studying biblical languages.  It was encouraging to hear about people working to preach the gospel and to provide the Bible in their own languages—even sometimes going to all that effort when only a tiny handful of people speak that language or dialect.  What didn't sit well with me that night was the way this missionary talked about eschatology.  Why do we have to hunt down unreached people groups—even tiny groups—to proclaim Jesus to them?  Because if we don't, Jesus can't come back—and we really, really want Jesus to come back, because the world is an awful place and it's just getting worse and worse.  Revelation 7 describes a multitude of every tribe and tongue, after all.  The impression we were left with that night is that all we have to do is make contact with every tribe and tongue on earth and win at least one person to Jesus from each and when someone believes from the last unreached people group it'll be like flipping a switch.  Jesus will come back and we can all finally get out of here!  As if what matters is that there be at least one person from every tribe and tongue in heaven, not that what's really at issue is Jesus' conquest of the present age through the preaching of the gospel.  “That's pessimistic,” I thought that night.  And years later I discovered a term has actually been coined to describe much of contemporary Evangelical eschatology: “pessimillennialism”.  The point of John's bit about every tribe and tongue is summed up well in Isaac Watts' well-known hymn: Jesus shall reign where'er the sun Doth his successive journeys run; His kingdom stretch from shore to shore, Till moons shall was and wane no more.   Jesus shall reign wherever the sun shines.  Not, Jesus shall win at least a few converts.  But that pessimistic view of things has been the norm in a lot of Evangelical eschatology for the last century or so.  This idea that sort of says, “Things are just going to get worse and worse, but as soon as at least one person in every tribe and tongue believes the gospel, then Jesus can come, get us out of here, and take us to heaven.”  It wasn't always like that.  As Abraham Kuyper famously said, “There is not a square inch in the whole domain of our human existence over which Christ, who is Sovereign over all, does not cry, Mine!”  Historically, Christians have tended to have a much more optimistic view of the future of the people of God and of Jesus' kingdom and, as we come to Revelation 19, I think we finally see this. Revelation began with that wonderful vision of Jesus as risen Lord, before he spoke directly to those seven churches in John's part of Asia Minor.  Jesus exhorted and warned them.  Tribulation was coming—and in some cases had already come—but he exhorted them to persevere, because his kingdom was come—because he has claimed every square inch of life and of this world as his own.  And then John saw God's judgement fall first on rebellious and unbelieving Jerusalem and then, these last several chapters, on Rome and its empire.  These were the two sources of opposition and tribulation and both have fallen—or from John's perspective, were just about to fall.  Now in Revelation 19 God's people rejoice.  You might say that John gives a tale of two women and then a tale of two feasts.  Look at 19:1-5. After this I heard what seemed to be the loud voice of a great multitude in heaven, crying out, “Hallelujah! Salvation and glory and power belong to our God, for his judgments are true and just; for he has judged the great prostitute          who corrupted the earth with her immorality, and has avenged on her the blood of his servants.” Once more they cried out, “Hallelujah! The smoke from her goes up forever and ever.”   And the twenty-four elders and the four living creatures fell down and worshiped God who was seated on the throne, saying, “Amen. Hallelujah!” And from the throne came a voice saying, “Praise our God,          all you his servants, you who fear him,          small and great.”   We're back in the heavenly throne room with the elders and the living creatures gathered around the throne, worshipping God.  We met them all back in Chapter 5 as they celebrated the entrance of the lamb, the only one who could unseal the scroll of God's judgement and set everything finally to rights.  Now they cry out “Hallelujah!”  That's Hebrew for “Praise Yahweh!”  “Praise the Lord!”  It's interesting that as often as hallelujah is used in the Old Testament, this is the only place it's used in the New.  But maybe that's fitting, because here we finally see the victory of God in Jesus.  “Salvation and glory and power belong to our God,” they sing.  Why?  Because his judgements are true and we've just seen his judgement on the great prostitute.  Remember the woman John saw in the last chapter, to all appearance, beautiful and regal, but in reality her chalice was full, not of wine, but of unimaginable filth and with the blood of Jesus and the saints.  She represented Rome, backed by the power and authority of the devil, and she had enticed the nations to join her in her wickedness—especially in her idolatry.  But praise the Lord!  He has thrown her down.  Again, the heavenly court cries out, “Hellelujah!”  Because “the smoke from her goes up forever and ever”.  She's done.  Forever.  As I said when we looked at Chapter 18, the point is not that the city of Rome or even her empire and the institution of Emperor are gone, but that the power of the beast manifest in her has been broken.  The Lord has ordained earthly governments to maintain order and justice—to punish those who do evil and to reward those who do good.  It's not the way it was supposed to be, but it's what must be as a result of humanity's rebellion against God.  So the wickedness of Rome has been judged and the demonic power behind it broken.  We'll come back to this in a bit, but for now and in short it means that the gospel, the good news about Jesus, can advance.  It will conquer Rome and the nations.  And in response a voice from the throne calls the heavenly court again to praise: “Praise our God, all you his servants, you who fear him, small and great.” The whore who personified everything wrong with humanity, backed by the power of the devil, has been cast down.  She and her lovers, the pagan nations, were a parody of the marriage to come.  So in verses 6-9 the scene shifts—in stark contrast—from the prostitute to the bride. Then I heard what seemed to be the voice of a great multitude, like the roar of many waters and like the sound of mighty peals of thunder, crying out, “Hallelujah! For the Lord our God          the Almighty reigns. Let us rejoice and exult          and give him the glory, for the marriage of the Lamb has come,          and his Bride has made herself ready; it was granted her to clothe herself          with fine linen, bright and pure”— for the fine linen is the righteous deeds of the saints.   And the angel said to me, “Write this: Blessed are those who are invited to the marriage supper of the Lamb.” And he said to me, “These are the true words of God.”   Now the voice of a multitude sings out in praise.  This is the 144,000 of Chapter 14, those who have been “redeemed from mankind as firstfruits for God and the Lamb.”  These are they who kept themselves pure and remained faithful to the point of death and in doing so conquered “the beast and its image and the number of its name” (14:4-5, 15:2).  In 12:10 John wrote that it was through the faithfulness of their testimony that the “salvation and the power and the kingdom of our God and the authority of his Christ have come”.  The whole Church is the bride of the lamb, but what has made her ready, what has made her marriage to the lamb possible, is the faithful endurance of those men and women who persevered even in the face of persecution and death.  The bride stood up to the prostitute and maintained her integrity and her virtue.  The Church is pictured as a virgin bride, dressed in white—bright and pure and faithful. This marriage imagery goes back to the Old Testament to the story of the Lord and Israel.  He rescued her from Egypt, wooed her in the wilderness, married her at Mount Sinai.  She was repeatedly unfaithful, but the prophets—Isaiah in particular—looked forward to a day when the Lord would woo her again. In overflowing anger for a moment          I hid my face from you, but with everlasting love I will have compassion on you,”          says the Lord, your Redeemer. (Isaiah 54:8) For the mountains may depart          and the hills be removed, but my steadfast love shall not depart from you,          and my covenant of peace shall not be removed,”          says the Lord, who has compassion on you.  (Isaiah 54:10) Isaiah looked forward to a day when the Lord would redeem his people and renew his covenant with them.  But this time it would be different.  Not only would he set fickle and unfaithful Israel to rights, but with her all of creation.  And this renewal would be celebrated with a feast.  Here's what's written in Isaiah 25:6-10: On this mountain the Lord of hosts will make for all peoples          a feast of rich food, a feast of well-aged wine,          of rich food full of marrow, of aged wine well refined. And he will swallow up on this mountain          the covering that is cast over all peoples,          the veil that is spread over all nations. He will swallow up death forever; and the Lord God will wipe away tears from all faces,          and the reproach of his people he will take away from all the earth,          for the Lord has spoken. It will be said on that day,          “Behold, this is our God; we have waited for him, that he might save us.          This is the Lord; we have waited for him;          let us be glad and rejoice in his salvation.” For the hand of the Lord will rest on this mountain,          and Moab shall be trampled down in his place,          as straw is trampled down in a dunghill.   Of course, Jesus drew on this imagery too, looking forward to the day of this great banquet.  It's what Israel had been waiting for ever since her exile to Babylon.  It's what the world had been waiting for when St. Paul wrote about creation groaning in eager longing for the revealing of the sons of God.  Finally, the satan's power is broken.  The shockwave of new creation that went out with Jesus from that empty tomb outside Jerusalem on Easter morning has finally hit Rome and new creation is set to take over the word after its long sad story of rebellion, sin, and death. This is all so wonderful, John is overcome.  Look at verses 10. Then I fell down at his feet to worship him, but he said to me, “You must not do that! I am a fellow servant with you and your brothers who hold to the testimony of Jesus. Worship God.” For the testimony of Jesus is the spirit of prophecy.   Usually it's “Don't shoot the messenger,” but in this case the news is so wonderful John has to be told, “Don't worship the messenger!”  It's an odd thing considering John's just seen the heavenly courts and the bride herself worshiping God and the lamb, but it serves as a transition to the second half of the chapter.  Don't worship the angel; worship Jesus!  And now we see Jesus and we see again why he's so gloriously worthy of our worship.  Look at verses 11-16: Then I saw heaven opened, and behold, a white horse! The one sitting on it is called Faithful and True, and in righteousness he judges and makes war. His eyes are like a flame of fire, and on his head are many diadems, and he has a name written that no one knows but himself. He is clothed in a robe dipped in blood, and the name by which he is called is The Word of God. And the armies of heaven, arrayed in fine linen, white and pure, were following him on white horses. From his mouth comes a sharp sword with which to strike down the nations, and he will rule them with a rod of iron. He will tread the winepress of the fury of the wrath of God the Almighty. On his robe and on his thigh he has a name written, King of kings and Lord of lords.   The prostitute has been overthrown, but the beast remains.  The background for this lies back in Chapters 16 and 17 where we saw the assembly, the alliance of the “kings of the whole earth”.  The beast and the ten kings allied with him brought down Rome and whether the battle—described with that language about Armageddon—is literal or symbolic, the point is that this alliance stands opposed to the Lord.  They will “make war on the lamb,” but they will also be defeated by him “for he is Lord of lords and King of kings, and those with him are called and chosen and faithful” (Revelation 17:14).  So Rome—her demonically inspired heart, at any rate—was judged and has fallen.  That judgement—which first fell on unbelieving Jerusalem, then Rome—now extends to the pagan nations who have stood watching all this happen.  That description of Jesus from Chapter 17: Lord of lords, King of kings, called, chosen, and faithful is echoed here as he rides out to battle.  He is faithful and true and on his thigh is written his name: King of kings and Lord of lords. John's vision also highlights Jesus' victory over death.  He is “faithful”—even as the powers of evil rose to their full height and put him to death on the cross.  He was faithful to the end—and because of that what everyone thought was the end turned out to be the beginning!  His robe is dipped in blood—the blood he shed in faithfulness at the cross.  And the “name written that no one else can learn” links him with the 144,000 on whose foreheads is written the name of the lamb and who sing a new song no one else can learn (14:3).  As he charges out to war on his white horse, he's accompanied by an army “arrayed in fine linen, white and pure” and also mounted on white horses.  It's the same description used to describe the bride clothed in white.  The bride rides out to war with the lamb.  These are they who conquered—who persevered in the face of tribulation—and have overcome death just as the lamb has. John's vision of Jesus also highlights his sovereignty, drawing on the language of Psalm 2—the bit about ruling the nations with a rod of iron.  Here's what we read in Psalm 2: Why do the nations rage          and the peoples plot in vain? The kings of the earth set themselves,          and the rulers take counsel together,          against the Lord and against his Anointed, saying, “Let us burst their bonds apart          and cast away their cords from us.” He who sits in the heavens laughs;          the Lord holds them in derision. Then he will speak to them in his wrath,          and terrify them in his fury, saying, “As for me, I have set my King          on Zion, my holy hill.” I will tell of the decree: The Lord said to me, “You are my Son;          today I have begotten you. Ask of me, and I will make the nations your heritage,          and the ends of the earth your possession. You shall break them with a rod of iron          and dash them in pieces like a potter's vessel.” Now therefore, O kings, be wise;          be warned, O rulers of the earth. Serve the Lord with fear,          and rejoice with trembling. Kiss the Son,          lest he be angry, and you perish in the way,          for his wrath is quickly kindled. Blessed are all who take refuge in him.   With the defeat of Rome, the fulfilment of the psalm begins to unfold.  The nations will be brought into submission to Jesus, the powers that have opposed his people will be judged, and the saints themselves will be vindicated.  We'll come back to the sword proceeding from his mouth, but first let's look at the rest of Chapter 19, beginning at verse 17:   Then I saw an angel standing in the sun, and with a loud voice he called to all the birds that fly directly overhead, “Come, gather for the great supper of God, to eat the flesh of kings, the flesh of captains, the flesh of mighty men, the flesh of horses and their riders, and the flesh of all men, both free and slave, both small and great.” And I saw the beast and the kings of the earth with their armies gathered to make war against him who was sitting on the horse and against his army. And the beast was captured, and with it the false prophet who in its presence had done the signs by which he deceived those who had received the mark of the beast and those who worshiped its image. These two were thrown alive into the lake of fire that burns with sulfur. And the rest were slain by the sword that came from the mouth of him who was sitting on the horse, and all the birds were gorged with their flesh.   It's impossible to miss the violent way Jesus' victory over the nations is described.  The reason for that is that John uses language drawn from the Old Testament prophets to describe all of this and he does that not to say that Jesus and the Church are going to literally go out and slaughter the nations, but to highlight that in this victory, Jesus is fulfilling the promises the Lord made through the prophets.  In keeping with those images, we see another feast.  As the bride stood in such stark contrast to the great prostitute, the glorious marriage supper of the lamb is now contrasted with this horrific “great supper of God”, in which the corpses of the kings of the earth and all their minions are fed on by the birds.  The beast and his false prophet—the spiritual powers that stand behind this opposition to God—they are captured and thrown into “the lake of fire that burns with sulfur”.  That's imagery drawn from Daniel, where a beast symbolic of Rome “was killed, and its body destroyed and given over to be burned with fire” (Daniel 7:11).  The beast's power is no more.  But, John writes, the rest were slain by the sword that issues from Jesus' mouth. It's that sword that makes sense of everything here.  John writes that it's with this sword that Jesus will strike down the nations.  It's not a sword held in his hand, but rather issuing from his mouth.  What John's getting at with this vivid imagery is the victory of the gospel, the good news of Jesus crucified, risen, and Lord, over the false gods, the false ideologies, and kings of the earth.  The imagery of devastation and carnage drawn from the prophets points to the total victory that will be had by Jesus—over every square inch of human life and of creation—but the sword issuing from his mouth tells us that this victory comes not by the literal sword, not by military might, but by the proclamation of the good news by the Church—by that host clothed in white and with the name of Jesus written on their foreheads.  B. B. Warfield writes about this text: “What we have here, in effect, is a picture of the whole period between the first and second advents, seen from the point of view of heaven.  It is the period of the advancing victory of the Son of God over the world, emphasizing…the completeness of the victory.  It is the eleventh chapter of Romans and the fifteenth chapter of I Corinthians in symbolical form: and there is nothing in it that was not already in them—except that, perhaps, the completeness of the triumph of the Gospel is possibly somewhat more emphasized here.”[1] The sword was Caesar's means of conquest and it was through the sword that he imposed his false and fragile peace and made his claims of divinity.  In contrast, Jesus wins his victory by allowing Caesar to do his worst.  Jesus conquers by the cross and his bride, his Church, conquers by the proclamation of that good news and, following in Jesus' steps, even with its own blood.  The poet Robert Southwell wrote: With tears he fights, and wins the field, his naked breast stands for a shield. His battering shot are babish cries, his arrows made of weeping eyes. His martial ensigns cold and need, and feeble flesh his warrior's steed.[2] I think we often need this reminder that Jesus won his victory at the cross and that we win our victory by means of the gospel and even as we may face opposition, persecution, and even death ourselves.  Caesar can be our friend—even our brother—as history shows—when he is himself conquered and captured by the gospel.  But sometimes we forget that it is by the gospel that the world will be won for Jesus and the gospel's victory often comes through persecution of the Church as we see in Revelation.  Tertullian famously—and rightly—said that the blood of the martyrs is the seed of the Church. But the day after I wrote this, a friend posted some quotes on Facebook that were excerpted from Nate Wilson's podcast this week.  Wilson made a good point that's very apropos here.  He said, “When empires compost it is really rich soil.  The blood of the martyrs is the seed of the church, but the rot of empires is the soil in which those seeds grow.”[3]  That was certainly true of Rome and has been true of so many other empires, kingdoms, and countries.  Brothers and Sisters, we of all people ought to have an optimistic view of the future.  Jesus has won and the truth of his gospel has been advancing ever since.  It's not always linear.  As Israel was in the Old Testament, the Church is God's means of making him known and sometimes we need his discipline.  He may, at times, lead us into exile, that we come out the other side restored, purified, and ready to accomplish our task.  I think we here in the West are in one of those periods right now.  But that the Lord disciplines his people is all the more reason to be optimistic.  He does not and has not given up.  Jesus has won and he will continue to win.  Our mission is not to accomplish some bare minimum of evangelism to trigger deliverance from an ever-worsening world by Jesus.  Dear Friends, we are the means of the world's transformation.  Jesus has defeated the powers that stood behind the pagan empires of the past.  He has brought them down and created the rich soil in which the gospel grows and we can be sure—we can live in faith and hope—that his Church, proclaiming the gospel and empowered by the Spirit, will accomplish the mission he has given.  Not some bare minimum carved out of a wicked people and a wicked age, but every square inch.  One day the knowledge of the glory of the Lord will cover the earth as the waters cover the sea.  We are sure of this for Christ has died, Christ has risen, and Christ will come again. Let's pray: Grant, O Lord, that the course of this world may be peaceably governed by your providence; and that your Church may joyfully serve you in confidence and serenity; through Jesus Christ our Lord, who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever.  Amen. [1] “The Millennium and the Apocalypse”, Princeton Theological Review, v. 2, 1904, p. 603. [2] From “New Heaven, New War”. [3] https://mycanonplus.com/tabs/search/podcasts/309

The FOX News Rundown
What Israelis Hope Comes From President Biden's Mideast Trip

The FOX News Rundown

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 16, 2022 18:09 Very Popular


President Biden began his historic trip to the Mideast earlier this week. As Israel prepared for his arrival, FOX News Radio's Eben Brown spoke with the Deputy Mayor of Jerusalem Fleur Hassan-Nahoum about her expectations for the trip and what progress she hoped to see from it. Fleur Hassan-Nahoum also discussed Israel's relationship with the region, Biden's administration's policies toward Palestine and the current state of her city. Due to time limitations, we could not include the conversation in our weekday editions of the FOX News Rundown, but we can let you listen to it all here on the FOX News Rundown Extra.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Fox News Rundown Evening Edition
What Israelis Hope Comes From President Biden's Mideast Trip

Fox News Rundown Evening Edition

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 16, 2022 18:09


President Biden began his historic trip to the Mideast earlier this week. As Israel prepared for his arrival, FOX News Radio's Eben Brown spoke with the Deputy Mayor of Jerusalem Fleur Hassan-Nahoum about her expectations for the trip and what progress she hoped to see from it. Fleur Hassan-Nahoum also discussed Israel's relationship with the region, Biden's administration's policies toward Palestine and the current state of her city. Due to time limitations, we could not include the conversation in our weekday editions of the FOX News Rundown, but we can let you listen to it all here on the FOX News Rundown Extra.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

StocktonAfterClass
Is Israel an Apartheid State? What does that term mean, and what difference would it make?

StocktonAfterClass

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 16, 2022 41:04


As you know, I am an academic, not an activist.  Maybe I should be an activist, but I am not. In recent months (this is July of 2022) the word apartheid has become almost universally used by those who are critical of Israeli occupation policies. This podcast  is an attempt to discuss the comparisons between South African Apartheid, which ended in the early 1990s after the release of Nelson Mandela from prison, and the Israeli policies in the occupied territories.    Back in 2005 I had an article in The Middle East Journal ("The Presbyterian Divestiture Vote and the Jewish Response").  That is available on the UM virtual archive site Deep Blue. It specifically discusses the debate over this topic.  Here are some passages from that article. Nobel Laureate Archbishop Desmond Tutu (of South Africa) visited Palestine and saw definite parallels. He used words such as “disenfranchised,” “voiceless,” “injustice,” “oppression,” “collective punishment,” and “home demolitions” to describe the Palestinian situation. “I've been very deeply distressed in my visit to the Holy Land; it reminded me so much of what happened to us black people in South Africa. I have seen the humiliation of the Palestinians at checkpoints and roadblocks, suffering like us when young white police officers prevented us from moving about.” As Israel's highly respected columnist Nahum Barnea put it, “thirty-seven years after the occupation, in the eyes of a large part of the world, Israel has become a pariah country."  That reminded me what a young South African woman said to me, "It was not pleasant being the polecat of international politics." The Anti-Defamation League preferred to focus on Israel rather than the occupation: "In no way can the treatment of Arabs by the State of Israel be compared to the treatment of the Blacks of South Africa under apartheid. There is no Israeli ideology, policy or plan to segregate, persecute or mistreat the Arab population. Apartheid was a uniquely repressive system, through which South Africa's white minority enforced its dominion over the black and other non-white racial groups who made up more than 90 percent of the population. Apartheid—which means ‘separate development' in the Afrikaans language—was enabled through a host of laws which banned blacks from ‘white areas,' prevented blacks and whites from marrying or even having sexual relations with each other, and regulated the education of black children in accordance with their subservient social position. No such laws exist in Israel, which pledged itself to safeguard the equal rights of all citizens in its Declaration of Independence. Arab citizens of Israel have the full range of civil and political rights, including the right to organize politically, the right to vote and the right to speak and publish freely. Moreover, Israel has declared its acceptance, in principle, of a sovereign Palestinian state in most of the West Bank and Gaza Strip. Whatever your view of Israel, the Palestinians and the conflict, it is obvious that there can be no comparison to apartheid."Former Jerusalem Deputy Mayor Meron Benvenisti  noted that the South African regime was isolated.  but  “Israel receives massive, unshakable support from a unified Diaspora Jewry and American aid” and is protected from “effective sanctions” by post-holocaust concerns."Finally, while many white South Africans felt uneasy about the morality of an ethnic regime, few Israelis question the ethics of a Jewish state. Most argue that the Jews are a national people inhabiting their historic homeland. There is “no feeling of guilt,” and the occasional cracks in the “national consciousness” are “plastered over” by raising the specter of an “existential threat.” I hope you find this discussion informative.  

From Washington – FOX News Radio
What Israelis Hope Comes From President Biden's Mideast Trip

From Washington – FOX News Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 16, 2022 18:09


President Biden began his historic trip to the Mideast earlier this week. As Israel prepared for his arrival, FOX News Radio's Eben Brown spoke with the Deputy Mayor of Jerusalem Fleur Hassan-Nahoum about her expectations for the trip and what progress she hoped to see from it. Fleur Hassan-Nahoum also discussed Israel's relationship with the region, Biden's administration's policies toward Palestine and the current state of her city. Due to time limitations, we could not include the conversation in our weekday editions of the FOX News Rundown, but we can let you listen to it all here on the FOX News Rundown Extra.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Land of Israel Network
Israel Uncensored: Agreeing (Somewhat) with the Iranian Foreign Minister?

The Land of Israel Network

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 11, 2022 28:57 Very Popular


As Israel gears up for the visit of US President Joe Biden, Iran's Foreign Ministry issued a statement saying that "the entry of foreigners in the region...will not create security and stability but itself is the main cause of tension and regional rift." While Iran was most likely referring to a potential peace deal between Israel and Saudi Arabia, on today's Israel Uncensored with Josh Hasten, Josh argues that when it comes to Israel and the PA, any outside intervention over the years has just made things worse. Whether it was the Oslo Accords, or other agreements in which Israel offered concessions to the PA (with pressure from outside parties), Israel ended up paying the price in blood. Josh says that Israel must stand firm and learn from past mistakes, and refuse concessions to the PA, which continues to offer "pay for slay," and carries out daily incitement against the Jewish State. Photo Credit: Commons Wikimedia

New Books in Communications
Matt Reingold, "Reenvisioning Israel Through Political Cartoons: Visual Discourses During the 2018-2021 Electoral Crisis" (Lexington, 2022)

New Books in Communications

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 11, 2022 57:41


Reenvisioning Israel Through Political Cartoons: Visual Discourses During the 2018-2021 Electoral Crisis (Lexington Books, 2022) by Matt Reingold, published by Lexington Books as part of its Lexington Studies in Jewish Literature series, offers an incisive—and prescient, given the recent dissolution of the incumbent government—consideration of how political cartoonists in Israel broaden the conversation about the various challenges faced by the country. Organized thematically around issues that emerged at various points across the three-year period under consideration (including political mudslinging, the ultra-Orthodox community, the Coronavirus pandemic, and coverage of Benjamin Netanyahu in the right-leaning press), analysis of the cartoons complemented by interviews with many of the cartoonists whose works feature in the book, Reenvisioning Israel Through Political Cartoons moves the conversation about the Jewish State away from its typically partisan (and thus limiting) vistas. Reingold shows how with humor, satirical nous, and a sophisticated awareness of their audiences, the cartoonists' work often cut across the traditional faultlines of Israeli society (Religious/Secular; Ashkenazi/Mizrachi; Cosmopolitan/Narrow; and of course, “Left”/”Right”), engaging with a more representative (if, of necessity, less tidy) discussion about Israel today. As Israel prepares for its fifth election in three years, following the collapse of the most broad-based coalition government in the country's history (led, not-entirely-incidentally, by the country's first religiously observant prime minister), Reingold's book gives nuance and context to the conversation about Israel in Israel. Matt Reinhold has a PhD in Jewish Education. He teaches Jewish history and Jewish thought at Tanenbaum CHAT, a community Jewish high school in Toronto, Canada. Akin Ajayi (@AkinAjayi) is a writer and editor, based in Tel Aviv. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/communications

New Books in Art
Matt Reingold, "Reenvisioning Israel Through Political Cartoons: Visual Discourses During the 2018-2021 Electoral Crisis" (Lexington, 2022)

New Books in Art

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 11, 2022 57:41


Reenvisioning Israel Through Political Cartoons: Visual Discourses During the 2018-2021 Electoral Crisis (Lexington Books, 2022) by Matt Reingold, published by Lexington Books as part of its Lexington Studies in Jewish Literature series, offers an incisive—and prescient, given the recent dissolution of the incumbent government—consideration of how political cartoonists in Israel broaden the conversation about the various challenges faced by the country. Organized thematically around issues that emerged at various points across the three-year period under consideration (including political mudslinging, the ultra-Orthodox community, the Coronavirus pandemic, and coverage of Benjamin Netanyahu in the right-leaning press), analysis of the cartoons complemented by interviews with many of the cartoonists whose works feature in the book, Reenvisioning Israel Through Political Cartoons moves the conversation about the Jewish State away from its typically partisan (and thus limiting) vistas. Reingold shows how with humor, satirical nous, and a sophisticated awareness of their audiences, the cartoonists' work often cut across the traditional faultlines of Israeli society (Religious/Secular; Ashkenazi/Mizrachi; Cosmopolitan/Narrow; and of course, “Left”/”Right”), engaging with a more representative (if, of necessity, less tidy) discussion about Israel today. As Israel prepares for its fifth election in three years, following the collapse of the most broad-based coalition government in the country's history (led, not-entirely-incidentally, by the country's first religiously observant prime minister), Reingold's book gives nuance and context to the conversation about Israel in Israel. Matt Reinhold has a PhD in Jewish Education. He teaches Jewish history and Jewish thought at Tanenbaum CHAT, a community Jewish high school in Toronto, Canada. Akin Ajayi (@AkinAjayi) is a writer and editor, based in Tel Aviv. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/art

New Books Network
Matt Reingold, "Reenvisioning Israel Through Political Cartoons: Visual Discourses During the 2018-2021 Electoral Crisis" (Lexington, 2022)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 11, 2022 57:41


Reenvisioning Israel Through Political Cartoons: Visual Discourses During the 2018-2021 Electoral Crisis (Lexington Books, 2022) by Matt Reingold, published by Lexington Books as part of its Lexington Studies in Jewish Literature series, offers an incisive—and prescient, given the recent dissolution of the incumbent government—consideration of how political cartoonists in Israel broaden the conversation about the various challenges faced by the country. Organized thematically around issues that emerged at various points across the three-year period under consideration (including political mudslinging, the ultra-Orthodox community, the Coronavirus pandemic, and coverage of Benjamin Netanyahu in the right-leaning press), analysis of the cartoons complemented by interviews with many of the cartoonists whose works feature in the book, Reenvisioning Israel Through Political Cartoons moves the conversation about the Jewish State away from its typically partisan (and thus limiting) vistas. Reingold shows how with humor, satirical nous, and a sophisticated awareness of their audiences, the cartoonists' work often cut across the traditional faultlines of Israeli society (Religious/Secular; Ashkenazi/Mizrachi; Cosmopolitan/Narrow; and of course, “Left”/”Right”), engaging with a more representative (if, of necessity, less tidy) discussion about Israel today. As Israel prepares for its fifth election in three years, following the collapse of the most broad-based coalition government in the country's history (led, not-entirely-incidentally, by the country's first religiously observant prime minister), Reingold's book gives nuance and context to the conversation about Israel in Israel. Matt Reinhold has a PhD in Jewish Education. He teaches Jewish history and Jewish thought at Tanenbaum CHAT, a community Jewish high school in Toronto, Canada. Akin Ajayi (@AkinAjayi) is a writer and editor, based in Tel Aviv. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in Jewish Studies
Matt Reingold, "Reenvisioning Israel Through Political Cartoons: Visual Discourses During the 2018-2021 Electoral Crisis" (Lexington, 2022)

New Books in Jewish Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 11, 2022 57:41


Reenvisioning Israel Through Political Cartoons: Visual Discourses During the 2018-2021 Electoral Crisis (Lexington Books, 2022) by Matt Reingold, published by Lexington Books as part of its Lexington Studies in Jewish Literature series, offers an incisive—and prescient, given the recent dissolution of the incumbent government—consideration of how political cartoonists in Israel broaden the conversation about the various challenges faced by the country. Organized thematically around issues that emerged at various points across the three-year period under consideration (including political mudslinging, the ultra-Orthodox community, the Coronavirus pandemic, and coverage of Benjamin Netanyahu in the right-leaning press), analysis of the cartoons complemented by interviews with many of the cartoonists whose works feature in the book, Reenvisioning Israel Through Political Cartoons moves the conversation about the Jewish State away from its typically partisan (and thus limiting) vistas. Reingold shows how with humor, satirical nous, and a sophisticated awareness of their audiences, the cartoonists' work often cut across the traditional faultlines of Israeli society (Religious/Secular; Ashkenazi/Mizrachi; Cosmopolitan/Narrow; and of course, “Left”/”Right”), engaging with a more representative (if, of necessity, less tidy) discussion about Israel today. As Israel prepares for its fifth election in three years, following the collapse of the most broad-based coalition government in the country's history (led, not-entirely-incidentally, by the country's first religiously observant prime minister), Reingold's book gives nuance and context to the conversation about Israel in Israel. Matt Reinhold has a PhD in Jewish Education. He teaches Jewish history and Jewish thought at Tanenbaum CHAT, a community Jewish high school in Toronto, Canada. Akin Ajayi (@AkinAjayi) is a writer and editor, based in Tel Aviv. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/jewish-studies

New Books in Israel Studies
Matt Reingold, "Reenvisioning Israel Through Political Cartoons: Visual Discourses During the 2018-2021 Electoral Crisis" (Lexington, 2022)

New Books in Israel Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 11, 2022 57:41


Reenvisioning Israel Through Political Cartoons: Visual Discourses During the 2018-2021 Electoral Crisis (Lexington Books, 2022) by Matt Reingold, published by Lexington Books as part of its Lexington Studies in Jewish Literature series, offers an incisive—and prescient, given the recent dissolution of the incumbent government—consideration of how political cartoonists in Israel broaden the conversation about the various challenges faced by the country. Organized thematically around issues that emerged at various points across the three-year period under consideration (including political mudslinging, the ultra-Orthodox community, the Coronavirus pandemic, and coverage of Benjamin Netanyahu in the right-leaning press), analysis of the cartoons complemented by interviews with many of the cartoonists whose works feature in the book, Reenvisioning Israel Through Political Cartoons moves the conversation about the Jewish State away from its typically partisan (and thus limiting) vistas. Reingold shows how with humor, satirical nous, and a sophisticated awareness of their audiences, the cartoonists' work often cut across the traditional faultlines of Israeli society (Religious/Secular; Ashkenazi/Mizrachi; Cosmopolitan/Narrow; and of course, “Left”/”Right”), engaging with a more representative (if, of necessity, less tidy) discussion about Israel today. As Israel prepares for its fifth election in three years, following the collapse of the most broad-based coalition government in the country's history (led, not-entirely-incidentally, by the country's first religiously observant prime minister), Reingold's book gives nuance and context to the conversation about Israel in Israel. Matt Reinhold has a PhD in Jewish Education. He teaches Jewish history and Jewish thought at Tanenbaum CHAT, a community Jewish high school in Toronto, Canada. Akin Ajayi (@AkinAjayi) is a writer and editor, based in Tel Aviv. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/israel-studies

New Books in Middle Eastern Studies
Matt Reingold, "Reenvisioning Israel Through Political Cartoons: Visual Discourses During the 2018-2021 Electoral Crisis" (Lexington, 2022)

New Books in Middle Eastern Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 11, 2022 57:41


Reenvisioning Israel Through Political Cartoons: Visual Discourses During the 2018-2021 Electoral Crisis (Lexington Books, 2022) by Matt Reingold, published by Lexington Books as part of its Lexington Studies in Jewish Literature series, offers an incisive—and prescient, given the recent dissolution of the incumbent government—consideration of how political cartoonists in Israel broaden the conversation about the various challenges faced by the country. Organized thematically around issues that emerged at various points across the three-year period under consideration (including political mudslinging, the ultra-Orthodox community, the Coronavirus pandemic, and coverage of Benjamin Netanyahu in the right-leaning press), analysis of the cartoons complemented by interviews with many of the cartoonists whose works feature in the book, Reenvisioning Israel Through Political Cartoons moves the conversation about the Jewish State away from its typically partisan (and thus limiting) vistas. Reingold shows how with humor, satirical nous, and a sophisticated awareness of their audiences, the cartoonists' work often cut across the traditional faultlines of Israeli society (Religious/Secular; Ashkenazi/Mizrachi; Cosmopolitan/Narrow; and of course, “Left”/”Right”), engaging with a more representative (if, of necessity, less tidy) discussion about Israel today. As Israel prepares for its fifth election in three years, following the collapse of the most broad-based coalition government in the country's history (led, not-entirely-incidentally, by the country's first religiously observant prime minister), Reingold's book gives nuance and context to the conversation about Israel in Israel. Matt Reinhold has a PhD in Jewish Education. He teaches Jewish history and Jewish thought at Tanenbaum CHAT, a community Jewish high school in Toronto, Canada. Akin Ajayi (@AkinAjayi) is a writer and editor, based in Tel Aviv. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/middle-eastern-studies

New Books in Political Science
Matt Reingold, "Reenvisioning Israel Through Political Cartoons: Visual Discourses During the 2018-2021 Electoral Crisis" (Lexington, 2022)

New Books in Political Science

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 11, 2022 57:41


Reenvisioning Israel Through Political Cartoons: Visual Discourses During the 2018-2021 Electoral Crisis (Lexington Books, 2022) by Matt Reingold, published by Lexington Books as part of its Lexington Studies in Jewish Literature series, offers an incisive—and prescient, given the recent dissolution of the incumbent government—consideration of how political cartoonists in Israel broaden the conversation about the various challenges faced by the country. Organized thematically around issues that emerged at various points across the three-year period under consideration (including political mudslinging, the ultra-Orthodox community, the Coronavirus pandemic, and coverage of Benjamin Netanyahu in the right-leaning press), analysis of the cartoons complemented by interviews with many of the cartoonists whose works feature in the book, Reenvisioning Israel Through Political Cartoons moves the conversation about the Jewish State away from its typically partisan (and thus limiting) vistas. Reingold shows how with humor, satirical nous, and a sophisticated awareness of their audiences, the cartoonists' work often cut across the traditional faultlines of Israeli society (Religious/Secular; Ashkenazi/Mizrachi; Cosmopolitan/Narrow; and of course, “Left”/”Right”), engaging with a more representative (if, of necessity, less tidy) discussion about Israel today. As Israel prepares for its fifth election in three years, following the collapse of the most broad-based coalition government in the country's history (led, not-entirely-incidentally, by the country's first religiously observant prime minister), Reingold's book gives nuance and context to the conversation about Israel in Israel. Matt Reinhold has a PhD in Jewish Education. He teaches Jewish history and Jewish thought at Tanenbaum CHAT, a community Jewish high school in Toronto, Canada. Akin Ajayi (@AkinAjayi) is a writer and editor, based in Tel Aviv. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/political-science

New Books in Journalism
Matt Reingold, "Reenvisioning Israel Through Political Cartoons: Visual Discourses During the 2018-2021 Electoral Crisis" (Lexington, 2022)

New Books in Journalism

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 11, 2022 57:41


Reenvisioning Israel Through Political Cartoons: Visual Discourses During the 2018-2021 Electoral Crisis (Lexington Books, 2022) by Matt Reingold, published by Lexington Books as part of its Lexington Studies in Jewish Literature series, offers an incisive—and prescient, given the recent dissolution of the incumbent government—consideration of how political cartoonists in Israel broaden the conversation about the various challenges faced by the country. Organized thematically around issues that emerged at various points across the three-year period under consideration (including political mudslinging, the ultra-Orthodox community, the Coronavirus pandemic, and coverage of Benjamin Netanyahu in the right-leaning press), analysis of the cartoons complemented by interviews with many of the cartoonists whose works feature in the book, Reenvisioning Israel Through Political Cartoons moves the conversation about the Jewish State away from its typically partisan (and thus limiting) vistas. Reingold shows how with humor, satirical nous, and a sophisticated awareness of their audiences, the cartoonists' work often cut across the traditional faultlines of Israeli society (Religious/Secular; Ashkenazi/Mizrachi; Cosmopolitan/Narrow; and of course, “Left”/”Right”), engaging with a more representative (if, of necessity, less tidy) discussion about Israel today. As Israel prepares for its fifth election in three years, following the collapse of the most broad-based coalition government in the country's history (led, not-entirely-incidentally, by the country's first religiously observant prime minister), Reingold's book gives nuance and context to the conversation about Israel in Israel. Matt Reinhold has a PhD in Jewish Education. He teaches Jewish history and Jewish thought at Tanenbaum CHAT, a community Jewish high school in Toronto, Canada. Akin Ajayi (@AkinAjayi) is a writer and editor, based in Tel Aviv. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/journalism

The Wisdom Journey
Lesson 132 - Another Family Feud

The Wisdom Journey

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 5, 2022 12:29


As Israel's king and with his own failures to draw on, David had a unique opportunity to warn others to resist temptation and avoid sin. Instead, his life became a sad example of the consequences of sin, and the powerful king proved to be a weak father. 2 Samuel 13 - 14 LINKS: Join The Crew: https://www.wisdomonline.org/lp/join-the-crew Make a donation: https://www.wisdomonline.org/give Free issue of our magazine: https://www.wisdomonline.org/lp/magazine

ThePrint
Cut The Clutter: Who's Israel's new PM Yair Lapid, why its politics is so unstable & headed for its 5th fifth polls in 3 years?

ThePrint

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 5, 2022 19:29


As Israel moves to its fifth election in three years, Shekhar Gupta explains how the Israeli coalition government collapsed. Episode 1029 of Cut The Clutter looks at what led to the collapse of the Bennett-Lapid coalition in Israel.  

Governor Asa Hutchinson's Weekly Address
Strengthening Arkansas’s Relationship with Israel

Governor Asa Hutchinson's Weekly Address

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 3:18


June 17, 2022 I signed a Memorandum of Understanding with the Israel Innovation Authority this week, and today I'd like to talk about what this means to Arkansas. On Tuesday, my economic development team gathered with Dr. Ami Appelbaum, Chairman of the Innovation Authority, and Livia Link, Consul General of Israel. We gathered at the Melrose Hotel in Washington for the signing ceremony. Dr. Appelbaum and I signed copies of the agreement in English and in Hebrew. This agreement affirms the mutual interest of Arkansas and Israel to share ideas and to work together to produce technology that will benefit our nations and the world. In the official language of the MOU, the purpose of this agreement is to promote activities to foster mutual cooperation in the innovation and development of technology. I met Dr. Appelbaum last year when I was in Israel for the Prime Minister's Smart Mobility Summit. This MOU is a logical next step to strengthen our robust relationship with one of the United States' most important allies. It affirms the deep friendship and mutual respect between Arkansas and Israel. Our relationship with the Jewish community dates to 1823 when businessman Abraham Block and his family were the first Jewish family to take up residence in Arkansas. Mr. Block and his sons opened businesses in four Arkansas counties, in New Orleans, and in Texas. The Blocks' home in Washington is a museum in Historic Washington State Park. I have had the privilege of expressing our support of Israel by signing bills that allow Arkansas to invest in Israel bonds and that prohibit state and local governments from conducting business with companies that boycott Israel. As Israel's ambassador said at the bill signing that day in August 2017, we were sending a message that Arkansas stands against hate and against anti-Semitism, and that Arkansas stands with Israel. This agreement is a natural progression of our relationship with Israel. My friendships within the Arkansas Jewish community have led to many personally enriching opportunities, such as participating in the annual Menorah lighting ceremony in Little Rock. I was equally enriched by the brief time we spent with our friends from Israel on Tuesday. As I prepared to sign the Hebrew version of the MOU, I suggested that I was going to use my Hebrew name, which brought some laughter. The joke, of course, is that Asa is a Hebrew name. Now that we have signed the MOU, we will explore what's next in this mutually beneficial partnership between two leaders in innovation and technology as we embark on the next stage of our long relationship.

Israel News Talk Radio
Leadership Lessons to Change Your Life - News From The Torah

Israel News Talk Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 42:51


As Israel is entering yet another phase of its leadership crisis, join me to explore Torah's leadership lessons that will change your life. News From The Torah 22JUNE2022 - PODCAST

Sharper Iron from KFUO Radio
There and Back Again

Sharper Iron from KFUO Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2022 54:28


Rev. Luke Zimmerman, pastor at Calvary Evangelical Lutheran Church in Mechanicsburg, PA, joins host Rev. Timothy Appel to study Acts 20:1-16. By this point in his third missionary journey, Paul has his face to return to Jerusalem. He leaves Ephesus to visit churches in Macedonia and Achaia. Several companions travel with Paul, including Luke. In Troas, Paul stays an entire week, allowing him and his companions to worship with the saints there. The extended worship service leaves Eutychus tired; he falls asleep, falls out of a window, and dies. Yet Paul, through the power of Jesus, restores life to Eutychus. From Troas, Paul and his companions continue their journey at a brisk pace in an attempt to reach Jerusalem by Pentecost. As Israel once celebrated this harvest festival, so Paul desires to bring news of the harvest of the Lord among the Gentiles. “To the End of the Earth” is a mini-series on Sharper Iron that goes through the book of Acts. In his second volume, St. Luke records all the things that Jesus continued to do through the ministry of His Church. By the end of the book, the proclamation of the Lord's Word that began in Jerusalem grows all the way to Rome. By God's grace, even now, that same Word is proclaimed to us.

Hadar Institute Online Learning
R. Aviva Richman on Parashat Bemidbar: Dismantling Holiness with Love

Hadar Institute Online Learning

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 1, 2022 9:03 Very Popular


As Israel traveled through the desert, they frequently erected the mishkan (tabernacle) anew. This means that they also deconstructed the mishkan frequently, dismantling what had been sacred. When we are so aware of the logistics involved in creating spaces to facilitate a sublime experience, it can become demystifying, for better and for worse. In Parashat Bemidbar, we get a behind the scenes view of the logistics of holiness, and a profound message about how to balance the mystique of kedushah alongside the very mundane—and relentless—work to sustain it.

ccdelco Podcast with Bob Guaglione
S2E8: Reason #8 — May 14th, 1948 | Reasons I Believe

ccdelco Podcast with Bob Guaglione

Play Episode Listen Later May 31, 2022 27:11


What occurred on May 14th, 1948 was a modern day miracle. Throughout all of history, no other nation has ever ceased to be a nation and come back. In this episode, Bob Guaglione uncovers Israel's return as a recognized nationstate as his 8th reason for belief in God. We'll cover Jewish history, prophecy, Zionist movements, and Biblical references that all point towards evidence of God's involvement. As Israel continues to make newspaper headlines and continues to be a hot topic in the intersection of politics, religion, and history, we encourage you to think more about the God of Israel, the story of the Jewish people, and what that means for us today.

Zoe Dallas
What Good Is a King?

Zoe Dallas

Play Episode Listen Later May 29, 2022 43:40


As Israel is finally united under David's kingship, an overview of his reign shows us how God fulfills His promises, defeats His enemies, and blesses His people through His anointed one.

Living Words
The Song of Moses and of the Lamb

Living Words

Play Episode Listen Later May 29, 2022


The Song of Moses and of the Lamb Revelation 15 by William Klock There is a long history of songs sung by the people of God in praise of his faithful deliverance.  His people experienced the problems of life, they knew that this is not how things are meant to be, they knew also the promises of God to set things to right, and that sang out his praises.  Sometimes it was in response to his mighty and saving deeds.  Other times it was in faithful anticipation of what they knew he would do, because of his past history of faithfulness.  These songs often begin with the big picture of the Lord's deliverance of Israel, then they narrow their focus.  If the Lord has such love and shows such care for Israel, he will also show his love and will care for me.  Hannah, for example, sings of the greatness of the Lord, she alludes to his past faithfulness to his people, and then praises him for meeting her own need, for giving her a son, before singing again of the Lord's judgement, which extends to the ends of the earth.  Or Mary's Magnificat, in which she too sings of the Lord's faithfulness, this time beginning with herself—“My soul doth magnify the Lord, and my spirit hath rejoiced in God my Saviour.  For he hath regarded the lowliness of his handmaiden.”—and then expands as she sees what he has done for her as part of his faithfulness to Israel: “He remembering his mercy hath holpen his servant Israel; as he promised to our forefathers, Abraham and his seed, for ever.”  The Bible is full of these songs that praise the Lord.  They praise him for his faithfulness, but they see that faithfulness manifest in his judgement—in his vindication of the righteous and his punishment of the wicked. These songs give us a sense of the plight of God's people and of what justice looked like for them.  Poor Hannah not only bore the shame of barrenness, but also the daily contempt of her husband's other wife.  Mary's song gives us a general sense of the difficult state in which Israel found herself: The humble and meek under the boot of the prideful and strong.  The rich full and satisfied, while the poor hungered.  Both songs echo the words of many of the psalms.  Think of the final words of Psalm 96 we sing each day in Morning Prayer: “For he cometh, for he cometh to judge the earth; and with righteousness to judge the world, and the peoples with his truth.” Think of the daily injustices that people like Hannah and Mary and the people of their villages faced.  This man's property marker was moved by his neighbour.  Another man's sheep was stolen in the night.  An old woman was taken advantage of by a shady workman.  One of the merchants in the market had two set of weights and was ripping off people who didn't know better.  These were all things the provincial judge would set to rights when he made his rounds and held court in the village. But then there were the things the judge would not fix, because he was part of the system that itself was the problem: The tax collector who took and took and took, far above what was actually owed.  The Roman soldier who raped a local girl.  The rich man who manipulated the poor to put them in debt, then took their land in payment knowing that the jubilee would never be observed or enforced, so he'd never have to give the land back.  The Romans and their rich and powerful friends just took and took and took, all while mocking the God of Israel.  It wasn't right.  The world wasn't supposed to be this way. But it wasn't just in Israel.  John has given us a good view of the plight of the people of God, in these little churches, trying to get by and be faithful to Jesus in the midst of the wider world of the Greeks and Romans.  Even far away from Jerusalem, on the west coast of Turkey, they found themselves at the mercy of local Jews who rejected Jesus.  As Jesus warned in our Gospel today, “They will put you out of the synagogues. Indeed, the hour is coming when whoever kills you will think he is offering service to God” (John 16:2).  First it happened in Jerusalem, but even in the Greek cities, Christians were facing tribulation.  If they were lucky it was just being kicked out of a trade guild for refusing to worship false gods.  At worst they were dragged off to the arena to be eaten by lions.  Again, it wasn't right.  The world wasn't supposed to be this way. But the Lord is God and justice will be done.  Someday Jesus will set everything to rights and wipe away every tear.  We know it, because he was raised from the dead and set the wheels of re-creation in motion.  We've tasted this new world ourselves in the pouring out of God's Spirit on us.  It's begun, the hardest part has been accomplished, so we know that God will finish what he's begun—and we live in hope and faith because of that.  Last Sunday, in Chapter 14, we saw those First Century Christians, the ones who had been through that time of great tribulation, standing before the heavenly throne singing a song that only they could sing.  They were the blameless ones, the firstfruits of the redeemed, who had refused to compromise with the beast.  They had remained faithful to Jesus, because they, too, knew that what Jesus had started he will surely finish, they had tasted it, and they wanted to be part of it.  Three angels announced their vindication and the judgement to fall on Babylon, on Rome.  This morning we're looking at Chapter 15, where this scene continues.  In verse 1 John writes: Then I saw another sign in heaven, great and amazing, seven angels with seven plagues, which are the last, for with them the wrath of God is finished.   In Chapter 14 the announcement was made.  One angel proclaimed the message: “Fallen, fallen is Babylon the great, she who made the nations drink the wine of the passion of her sexual immorality.”  Another announced that anyone who had drunk of that wine “also will drink the wine of God's wrath, poured full strength into the cup of his anger.”  The wickedness of the nations has been put into the Lord's winepress and the angels have trod it.  Now the wine of wrath is prepared: seven plagues.  Seven seals and seven trumpets have announced the wrath of the Lord so far.  Now there are seven plagues.  John writes that this is the culmination of God's wrath.  That doesn't mean God won't ever act again to bring judgement and justice.  Revelation shows us the early church vindicated over against unbelieving Israel and the pagan Greco-Roman empire.  That's the context here.  And the plagues call back to the Lord's deliverance of Israel from Egypt—the prototype for his deliverance and salvation.  That gives us a sense of what's going on and we'll come back to it in a few verses.  First, there's more imagery borrowed from the exodus.  Look at verse 2: And I saw what appeared to be a sea of glass mingled with fire—and also those who had conquered the beast and its image and the number of its name, standing beside the sea of glass with harps of God in their hands.   The martyrs, the faithful people of Jesus who had faced the great tribulation and stood firm, now appear again.  In Chapter 14 John saw them before the throne singing.  Here they are again.  These are those whom the world despised.  The gears of wicked Jerusalem and corrupt Rome had ground them up and spit them out and their enemies had declared, “Good riddance!”  Just like the wicked people who had crucified Jesus and thought they'd won, these people thought they'd done away with these weirdos, these deviants who refused to worship the beast.  But anyone who was paying attention that first Easter morning knows that's not how it ends for the God of Israel, for his Messiah, or for his people.  Now they stand before the Lamb and, writes John, beside “a sea of glass mingled with fire”.  What does that mean? I think there's a two-fold explanation to this imagery.  As these saints stand there, they sing and in verse 3 John says they sing the song of Moses.  Remember Moses and the Israelites praising the Lord after he led them through the Red Sea and drowned the chariots of Pharaoh?  Something similar is happening here.  Like Israel in the Exodus, these saints have been delivered by the Lord.  He's led them through their own Red Sea waters and now they stand on the far side, and even though they've died, they have experienced the deliverance of the Lord—like Israel did in the Exodus, but in an even more spectacular way.  This is the exodus for which the old Exodus was merely a type and shadow.  This is the exodus towards which all of redemptive history had been moving.  They stood firm. These men and women have conquered the beast.  The Lord has delivered them.  And now they stand by sea and sing his praises. But, too, the word for “sea” is the same one used in the Greek Old Testament for the laver, the basin in the tabernacle and later the temple, where the priests would purify themselves.  In the tabernacle it was fairly small, but in Solomon's temple it was a massive basin of water that sat on the back of four great bulls.  That sea in the temple was symbolic of the Red Sea, through which the Lord had purified his people and purchased them for his own.  And something similar has happened here with these saints who have passed through this great tribulation.  Here they have been purified and made God's people.  I think, too, that there's some sacramental imagery going on.  Repeatedly in Revelation, the Lord has paused before acting out his judgements, paused so that he can mark out his people.  A Passover of sorts, as when the Israelites marked their homes with the blood of the lamb so that the Lord's judgment would pass over them.  Repeatedly, too, John uses the imagery of the beast's mark—an anti-sacrament, which marks out the wicked as belonging to the beast.  So here, the saints are marked by their baptism as belonging to the Lord and judgement passes over them.  They have passed through a baptism of fire, and just as Pharaoh's army was destroyed by the same sea through which Israel was delivered, the fire through which the saints have been delivered is about to be poured out on Rome in judgement. Look now at verses 3 and 4: And they sing the song of Moses, the servant of God, and the song of the Lamb, saying, “Great and amazing are your deeds,          O Lord God the Almighty! Just and true are your ways,          O King of the nations! Who will not fear, O Lord,          and glorify your name? For you alone are holy.          All nations will come          and worship you, for your righteous acts have been revealed.”   The saints here don't literally sing the same song that Moses sang, but they sing something that gets at the same themes as the song of Moses and the Israelites in Exodus 15.  You all know the song of Moses—or at least parts of it.  “I will sing to the Lord, for he has triumphed gloriously, the horse and his rider he has thrown in to the sea” (Exodus 15:1).  The first half of that song is all about God's defeat of the Egyptians.  That's the part we sing in Sunday school.  It's the—for lack of a better term—the “theological” part that follows that we don't know as well, which is ironic, because that's what explains the whole thing. The second half of Moses' song highlights two important things.  The first is that the Lord does these things because he is holy and just.  “Who is like you, O Lord, among the gods?  Who is like you, majestic in holiness, awesome in glorious deeds, doing wonders?” sings Moses.  The Lord cannot and will not allow injustice to continue forever and to go unjudged.  Second, the Lord does these things and his people proclaim them so that the nations will take note.  So that the nations will fear the Lord, and come to him in repentance and faith.  Moses sings, “The peoples have heard; they tremble; pangs have seized the inhabitants of Philistia.  Now are the chiefs of Edom dismayed; trembling seizes the leaders of Moab; all the inhabitants of Canaan have melted away.  Terror and dread fall upon them, because of the greatness of your arm.” Brothers and Sisters, the Lord's purpose in calling Abraham out of the pagan nations and then, through him, creating a people for himself, was that through that people, he would make himself known to the world.  In everything he did with and for his people, whether it was blessing or judgement, deliverance or discipline, the Lord's goal was to draw the nations to himself.  And the song of the saints here in Revelation 15 is full of these same themes.  “Great and amazing are your deeds,” they sing.  “Just and true are your ways, O King of the nations.”  “All nations will come and worship you, for your righteous acts have been revealed.”  That's always been the Lord's purpose—when he acts and for his people.  He desires to make himself known.  And the purpose of his people, whether the old Israel or the new, has always been to witness his mighty deeds.  It's interesting that it was on the other side of the Red Sea, at Mount Sinai, that the Lord gave his people instructions for building the tabernacle, the place where they would witness or meet with him.  Now, with that in mind, look at verses 5-8. After this I looked, and the sanctuary of the tent of witness in heaven was opened, and out of the sanctuary came the seven angels with the seven plagues, clothed in pure, bright linen, with golden sashes around their chests.  And one of the four living creatures gave to the seven angels seven golden bowls full of the wrath of God who lives forever and ever, and the sanctuary was filled with smoke from the glory of God and from his power, and no one could enter the sanctuary until the seven plagues of the seven angels were finished. The heavenly tabernacle which the earthy tabernacle and temple were but a shadow now opens.  Seven angels emerge and they carry with them seven golden bowls containing seven plagues.  These bowls are the heavenly counterpart of the bowls used in the earthly tabernacle to present and pour out drink offerings.  As John wrote in the last chapter, the wicked were to “drink the wine of God's wrath, poured full strength into the cup of his anger”.  In the next chapter the angels sing, “For they have shed the blood of saints and prophets, and you have given them blood to drink.  It is what they deserve!” (16:6). In the daily service of the tabernacle, just as here in John's vision, the trumpets are blown and then the bowls containing the drink offering were poured out.  It was the last ritual act that completed the service of the altar.  And, again, I think John has the imagery of the sacraments in mind.  The sea, an image of the Red Sea, before which the saints stand recalls the deliverance of Israel and now their baptism into Jesus and the Spirit, into the life of God.  But it also recalls the reversal of those saving waters to drown the army of Pharaoh.  Now I think we also see the Lord's Supper in the bowl or chalice that carries the drink offering—the blood of Jesus given for the redemption of the world, but which, when poured out, also bears the wrath of God for the wicked who have unjustly spilled the blood of both the saints and of Jesus. And then John sees this awesome image of the glory of the Lord as the heavenly tabernacle fills with smoke.  It was this awesome cloud of glory that consumed the sacrifices.  It was this awesome cloud of glory that led the Israelites in the wilderness. It was this awesome cloud of glory that descended to fill the tabernacle and later the temple.  And it was the sign of the Lord's presence with is people—a source of comfort and of hope—but in its awesome terribleness it was also a reminder of his absolute holiness—a holiness to make sinners tremble before it.  No one could bear the weight of that holiness when it was present.  So, once again, the Lord is here, he is present, for his people in the midst of their tribulation, but he is also present to pour out his wrath and judgement on sin.  Brothers and Sisters, if we sinners, broken by the fall, can so easily look at the world and know that things are not the way they should be, how much more is the one who created all things and grieves its corruption aware of the problem?  He who loves his creation and loves his people, he who gave his only Son for our sake, he who is supremely righteous, will surely see that justice is done and that all is set to rights. For those saints living in the First Century, who knew first-hand the persecution of both Jerusalem and Rome, many who died rather than renounce the Lord Jesus, vindication and justice were coming.  The heavenly tabernacle was opened.  And just as the Lord's righteousness was once poured out on Egypt, it was once again about to be poured out on the nations.  As they sang: His righteous acts were about to be revealed” with the result that “all the nations would come and worship him”.  And, once again as we've seen before, the church has an integral role to play in all of this.  Christians do not simply sit by—me, my Bible, and Jesus—while God does his mighty deeds.  As Israel before, the Church is part of those mighty deeds.  We experience the wickedness of the world—from the neighbour who robs us in the dark of night, the shady workman who rips us off, the acquaintances who mock our faith, the central bank with its unjust weights and measures that debases our currency, to the government that rules the proclamation of the gospel to be “hate speech”.  God's people are in the thick of the world's injustices.  We are meant to know by our own mournful experiences that this is not how the world was meant to be.  And so, like those saints before the throne, we can declare to the nations the mighty acts of God—the acts that have brought both judgement and deliverance, both wrath and hope—from the Red Sea to the Cross and the empty tomb to the fall of wicked Jerusalem and the conversion of an empire and the nations.  Brothers and Sisters, we know the fallenness of the world and we know ourselves the Lord's saving hand.  We are his people and he has filled us with his Spirit.  We are now the tabernacle in which he dwells.  May the smoke of his holy presence now arise from us as we proclaim the good news of his justice and mercy, his wrath and his grace, to this world so desperately in need of the hope of the good news.  We do so in sure and certain faith, knowing that Christ has died, Christ is risen, and Christ will come again. Let's pray: O God, the King of glory, you have exalted your only Son Jesus Christ with great triumph to your kingdom in heaven: Do not leave us comfortless, but send us your Holy Spirit to strengthen us, and exalt us to that place where our Savior Christ has gone before; who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit, one God, in glory everlasting.  Amen.

JBS: Jewish Broadcasting Service
In the News: Israel's Coalition Future

JBS: Jewish Broadcasting Service

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022 27:54


As Israel's Knesset reconvenes amid terror attacks, what lies ahead for Naftali Bennett's government and Israel's unorthodox coalition? Carrie Keller-Lynn, Political and Legal Correspondent for the Times of Israel shares her insights. WIth Shahar Azani.

Today in the Word Devotional

The Hallel Psalms are a set of six Psalms, 113–118. These psalms of praise were sung by God’s people on joyous occasions. Psalm 118 is the final song in the collection and was sung to celebrate Passover. In fact, this was probably the hymn which Jesus and His disciples sang at their last Passover supper together. In this song of thanksgiving, the worship leader calls Israel to confess that God’s faithful love endures forever (Ps. 118:1–5). Israel was not delivered from Egyptian slavery because they had a powerful army or brilliant military tactics. Rather, they were delivered because they trusted in our great and powerful God. The psalm reminds Israel that “It is better to trust in the LORD than to trust in humans. It is better to take refuge in the LORD than to trust in princes” (vv. 8–9). As Israel streamed toward the Temple to celebrate Passover, they would remember not only God’s deliverance from Egypt but also His work in saving them from their foes in their past: the Philistines, Midianites, and the Amalekites to name just a few (vv. 10–14). Remembering what God had done in the past encouraged Israel to trust Him with their present and future. As the psalm celebrates what God has done in the past, it also looks forward to a future deliverer (vv. 22–26). When Jesus was faced with the unbelief and opposition of the teachers of the law and priests, He reminded of them of this psalm: “Haven’t you read this passage of Scripture: ‘The stone that the builders rejected has become the cornerstone; the Lord has done this, and it is marvelous in our eyes’?” (Mark 12:10–11). God’s salvation demands a response of faith and gratitude. >> The same words start and end our reading: “Give thanks to the LORD, for he is good; his love endures forever” (vv. 1, 29). Pause today to thank God for what He has done in your past and what He has promised to do in the future.

Jack Hibbs Podcast
All Eyes Off America

Jack Hibbs Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 16:17


In just a short time, we have seen America's leadership and strength rapidly decline. As Israel's closest ally weakens, the stage is being set for the End Times. Join Pastor Jack in this discussion of how America's drift from the limelight fits into Bible prophecy. Learn more and get all the notes on this podcast by visiting https://jackhibbs.com/podcast - sign up for our mailing list and get the latest podcast information and updates!

Kan English
News Flash May 4, 2022

Kan English

Play Episode Listen Later May 4, 2022 5:57


As Israel remembers its fallen, leaders call for unity. Prime Minister Bennett heckled  at Mount Herzl ceremony. Transition ceremony on Wednesday evening will mark start of Israel's 74th Independence Day celebrations. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Israel News Talk Radio
It's All A Choice - News From The Torah

Israel News Talk Radio

Play Episode Listen Later May 4, 2022 42:49


As Israel marks Memorial Day and Independence Day, this week we will discuss the choices that God sends our way News From The Torah 04MAY2022 - PODCAST

Growing In God with Gary Hargrave
GIG89 Roots of Anti-Semitism

Growing In God with Gary Hargrave

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 27, 2022 40:03


As Israel observes Holocaust Remembrance Day, this podcast challenges Christians to look honestly at our doctrines and beliefs that contain anti-Semitism. Because of its anti-Semitism, and actual Jew hatred, the Church bears a great deal of responsibility in the history of the Holocaust. That, in my mind, requires us to work at ending the roots of anti-Semitic beliefs in the Church. I think these things still exist in our midst, and therefore this is something that needs to be focused on and corrected.

Christian Center Shreveport
Urgent Israel Update!

Christian Center Shreveport

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 7, 2022 16:13


On today's Podcast we bring an urgent update about Israel and events occurring there that will effect the nations.  As Israel goes, so goes the nations and we must be on the wall concerning these events.  

The Pulse of Israel
Eternal Truths from the Foot of the Temple Mount

The Pulse of Israel

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 4, 2022 7:31


As Israel experiences another resurgence of the 100+ year Arab Muslim terror against us, be inspired by these truths and the beautiful view of the holiest place, right in the center of Jerusalem, right behind me.

Unholy: Two Jews on the news
A Conversation with Former Israeli PM Ehud Barak

Unholy: Two Jews on the news

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 1, 2022 54:40 Very Popular


As Israel faces a new wave of terror attacks, Yonit and Jonathan are joined by Ehud Barak, former Israeli Prime Minister. He shares his insights: what can be done to break the cycle of violence, and why he is still optimistic about peace even though the signs point in the opposite direction. We discuss Israel's moral ambiguity on Ukraine, and what Barak Thinks should be the global plan to prevent a nuclear Iran. And for the mensch award of the week we go to the Oscars but make a surprising pick… See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Dream City Church Omaha Podcast

As Israel faced down the Promised Land, a small number of tribes asked to stay just beyond its borders. To that, Moses had one question: will you just sit here? Join Dream City Omaha as Pastor John Weasel reminds us that we cannot just sit there. And as we battle for each other in Christ's kingdom, we must remember that the fight isn't over until it's over, we must know which fights are worth having, and always remember who's fighting for you.

Jonny Gould's Jewish State
74: El Al Israel Airlines: Israel's skies are open again, book with confidence

Jonny Gould's Jewish State

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 13, 2022 23:56


As Israel's skies reopen to the world, it's time to reacaquaint ourselves with Israel's national airline, El Al. This is the story of two torrid years for the airline industry, just as things were getting really good for air travel in early 2020. So how did El Al deal with the darkest days of Covid lockdown, what lessons did they learn from this unprecedented business crisis - and what's in store for passengers now we're all invited back on board? Meet El Al Israel Airline's Oranit Bethalachmi, regional manager for Western Europe and Africa as Israel's skies reopen. Book your flight now at elal.co.uk

Rania Khalek Dispatches
Palestine, the Squad & How the Right To Resist Imperial Violence Is Universal, w/ Ali Abunimah

Rania Khalek Dispatches

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 7, 2022 67:42


As Israel enters its 74th year of occupying Palestine, labeling all its critics as antisemitic, world public opinion is finally changing. But is it shifting fast enough for those being pushed off their land? What is the relationship between, and relative importance of, Western public opinion in connection with regional resistance? How should we deal with the new brand of political leaders who claim solidarity with Palestinians while campaigning but then disappoint when in office?  Also, is a multipolar world good for Palestine and what does 2022 have in store for the Middle East?To discuss this Rania Khalek was joined by Ali Abunimah, director of The Electronic Intifada and author of the Battle for Justice In Palestine.

Voices of the Valley
How to Become an Agtech Impact Rainmaker

Voices of the Valley

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021 35:06


As Israel has long been known as an innovator in water usage, the country's technologists have helped farmers achieve 30% more yield while using 60% less water. How? Ethy Levy, fund manager at Kinneret Impact Ventures, reveals that collaboration is the key. Listen as she shares tips on adopting innovation, creating the right infrastructure for innovation inside an organization and successfully connecting to up-and-coming startups. Ethy will also dive into Israel's new tech innovations, discuss water solutions for a global marketplace and provide insight into the right tools needed for commercializing innovations.

The Jerusalem Post Podcast
What‘s more important: Israel‘s relations with the world or its own Arab citizens?

The Jerusalem Post Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 62:32


Jerusalem Post Editor-in-Chief Yaakov Katz and Diplomatic Correspondent Lahav Harkov sit down this week to discuss the latest news around Israel in the Jewish world on this week's edition of The Jerusalem Post Podcast. On this week's episode, Katz and Harkov discuss the bombshell Prime Minister Naftali Bennett dropped on the Knesset floor earlier this week, claiming that the Mossad carried out an operation to find the remains and information about Israeli Air Force Navigator Ron Arad, who went missing over Lebanon in 1986 after he was forced to eject from his aircraft after it took on damage. As Israel tries to piece the puzzle together of what exactly happened and why Bennett chose to share this information now, Katz and Harkov sift through the latest revelations coming out from across the world, giving their own opinions and expertise on the matter. Later on in the episode, the duo speak with former AIPAC executive Johnathan Kessler about his organization called Heart of a Nation and its mission to find new ways to bring progressives into the Israeli conversation.  To wrap things up, Katz and Harkov chat with the Post's Palestinian Affairs Correspondent Khaled Abu Toameh to talk about the wave of violence and murders that have been sweeping across Israel's Arab sector.

Life Lessons with Dr. Bob
EP4 Israeli Ambassador Danny Danon - What America & Israel Can Learn from Each Other

Life Lessons with Dr. Bob

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 40:38 Transcription Available


Ambassador Danny Danon sits down with Dr. Bob to find the common ground between the United States and Israel.   As Israel's 17th Permanent Representative to the UN, Danny Danon has had his hand in public policy and international relations for over a decade.  

Verse/Verse Bible Podcast

As Israel's reputation for divine military prowess precedes them, the people of Gibeon trick the Israelites into a non-agression pact. The Israelites unwittingly enter into this alliance against God's direction, and yet they must honor this covenant. As such, they go into battle on behalf of the protection of the Gibeonites. God miraculously sees to the victory of this battle. The chapters proceed through a history of the servants and children of God versus the kings of men.