Podcasts about Chesapeake Bay

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An estuary in the U.S. states of Maryland and Virginia

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Latest podcast episodes about Chesapeake Bay

The SmallmouthCrush Podcast
Brett Carnright talks Smallmouth Bass Fishing and gives up some great tips and techniques!

The SmallmouthCrush Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2021 64:41


Catching trophy smallmouth bass on a consistent basis can be a challenge.  So many techniques and so many different patterns can sometimes make it confusing where to start when targeting smallmouth bass.  Each Sunday join Travis Manson as he interviews guests who are at the top of their game when it comes to catching smallmouth bass.Season 1 Episode 48 Travis talks with Brett Carnright.  Brett has been extremely consistent in bass tournaments around the region and knows a thing or two about Smallmouth Fishing.  Not only does he have things dialed in on his home body of water Lake Champlain but is a threat anywhere in upstate New York on lakes like Oneida and The St Lawrence River.  This is a great interview if you are looking at becoming a better smallmouth angler!The Reel Shot is where I recommend you purchase your tackle! Use my Code SmallmouthCrush15 and get 15% your order today!https://bit.ly/2YtVLRLSMALLMOUTHCRUSHMonsterBass is a subscription full of great fishing tackle delivered to you monthly!  https://bit.ly/MonsterBassSmallmouthCrushWant to save money on Tackle and get sponsorship pricing?  Click the link below and use code CRUSH50 to get 50% off your membership!https://club.outdoorsponsors.com/St Croix Rods - The Best Rods on Earth!https://stcroixrods.link/smallmouthcrushBest Line Management system that I have found!  Get your Spool Mates Here! Use Code SmallmouthCrush10 to save 10% off your orderhttps://www.anglerconcepts.com/spool-mates.htmlSome of my favorite Baits can be found here at Nikko BaitsUse Code Smallmouthcrush10 to save 10% off your orderhttps://nikko-fishing.com/NEW VIDEOS UPLOADED WEEKLY and the WORLD FAMOUS LIVE STREAM with Co Host Epic Eric---------------------------------------Sunday – The SmallmouthCrush PodcastMonday - 8:00 PM Est LIVESTREAMFishing Videos throughout the week---------------------------------------Follow on Instagram @SmallmouthCrush https://www.instagram.com/smallmouthcrush/Follow The Bass Lab Tackle Freak Himself Epic Eric @epicericoffical https://www.instagram.com/epicericofficial/WOW CHECK THIS OUT!! Special LIVE Show every month for Patreons MembersGet special access to member only videos once a month - Secret Tips and Techniques and information we only share with Patreon Members!Join my Patreon to get access to a special live show once a month!https://www.patreon.com/smallmouthcrushWho is SmallmouthCrush?Travis Manson was born and raised in Wisconsin. He started fishing from the bank at a young age and spent most of his childhood with a rod in his hand.  Travis is primarily a self-taught angler that is always learning and experiencing this amazing sport of fishing.  He started out fishing for walleyes and fishing in local walleye tournaments, but then in his mid 20's, he caught the BASS BUG and has been hooked ever since.  He competed at the highest level in bass fishing on the Bassmaster Elite Series for a number of years.  He is a full time fishing guide offering trips on the Chesapeake Bay for largemouth bass(year round) and trophy smallmouth bass guided trips in Upstate New York on Lake Ontario and the St Lawrence River. His Youtube Channel is named after his passion for the smallmouth bass and will be used as a platform for "how-to" videos, on the water instruction, crazy on and off the water topics on the day in the life of a fishing addict!  Hope you enjoy, and until next time we will see you on the water!#fishing #bassfishing #smallmouth #largemouth

Chesapeake Almanac
November: Oysters

Chesapeake Almanac

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 6:55


Sometimes it can be easy to forget that oysters share the basic processes of life with us--like eating. In this episode of "Chesapeake Almanac," John Page Williams explains the intricate system of how oysters eat and what makes them so plump in November and December (prime time for oyster stuffing and oyster stew!). https://www.cbf.org/news-media/multimedia/podcasts/chesapeake-almanac/podcast-november-oysters-transcript.html (TRANSCRIPT) Subscribe to Chesapeake Almanac, find us on your favorite podcast platform, or visit our podcast page at https://www.cbf.org/ChesapeakeAlmanac (https://www.cbf.org/ChesapeakeAlmanac). Chesapeake Almanac is provided by the Chesapeake Bay Foundation - Saving the Bay through Education, Advocacy, Litigation, and Restoration. Find out more about our work to save the Chesapeake Bay and its watershed's rivers and streams, and what you can do to help, at https://www.cbf.org (https://www.cbf.org). These readings are from John Page Williams, Jr.'s book, Chesapeake Almanac: Following the Bay through the Seasons. The publication is available in print at https://www.amazon.com/Chesapeake-Almanac-Following-Through-Seasons/dp/0870334492/ref=sr_1_1 (Amazon.com). Support this podcast

Good Company in the Car
Kevin loved his first real job! Let‘s listen to him reminisce about the hijinks at the Crab Claw!

Good Company in the Car

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 28:06


St. Michaels is a quaint, historic village on the Eastern Shore of the Chesapeake Bay in Maryland. Many restaurants line the idyllic harbor, none being more famous than the Crab Claw! Back in the early 1980's, working at the Crab Claw was a local teen rite of passage. It was literally the movie Caddy Shack except it's a restaurant not a country club...

Virginia Water Radio
Episode 604 (11-22-21): Canvasbacks Come Back to the Chesapeake as Winter Approaches

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021


CLICK HERE to listen to episode audio (4:33).Sections below are the following: Transcript of Audio Audio Notes and Acknowledgments ImagesExtra Information Sources Related Water Radio Episodes For Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.). Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 11-19-21. TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the week of November 22, 2021.  This revised episode from January 2014 is part of a series this year of winter-related episodes. SOUND – ~5 sec That's the landing sound of a large, distinctive duck that can be found in winter on Virginia's coastal waters.  Have a listen for about 10 seconds to some more of this species' sounds, and see if you know this bird.  And here's a hint: the bird's name, and the male's beautiful color, may remind you of a painting.SOUND – ~12 secIf you guessed a Canvasback, you're right!  Canvasbacks breed on water bodies in the prairies of Canada and the northern United States, but they winter in large sections of the U.S. and Mexico, with one concentration in the Chesapeake Bay area.  According to the Chesapeake Bay Program, at one time almost half of North America's Canvasbacks wintered around the Chesapeake, but that number has decreased to about 20 percent because of reductions in Bay submerged aquatic vegetation, or Bay grasses, a valuable winter food for this species.  Canvasbacks are diving ducks, meaning they typically go completely underwater to obtain food and avoid predators.  In winter, Canvasbacks feed largely on plant roots and buds, while in summer they'll add to their plant diet a variety of aquatic insects and other animals.  Predators on adult and young Canvasbacks include mink, coyotes, foxes, owls and other birds, some reptiles and fish, and human hunters, while Canvasback eggs are eaten by various mammals and birds. The Canvasback is considered one of the most distinctive North American ducks.  The following quote from the Cornell Lab of Ornithology's “Birds of the World” Web site describes how the bird stands out.  Quote: “This exclusively North American species is considered the ‘aristocrat of ducks.'  The male's striking appearance—rich chestnut-red head and neck, black chest, white back, and long, sloping, blackish bill—along with its large size distinguish it in the field.”  Unquote. Thanks to Lang Elliott for permission to use the Canvasback sounds, from the Stokes Field Guide to Bird Songs.  We close with about 50 seconds of music appropriate for the Canvasback's Chesapeake Bay connection.  Here's “Chesapeake Bay Ballad,” by Torrin Hallett, a graduate student at the Yale School of Music. MUSIC - ~51 sec – instrumental SHIP'S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech's College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Stewart Scales for his banjo version of Cripple Creek to open and close this episode.  In Blacksburg, I'm Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The Virginia Water Radio episode revises and replaces Episode 197, 1-20-14, and the sounds segment of Episode 50, 1-24-11. Emily Whitesell helped write this original script for this episode during a Virginia Tech English Department internship in Spring 2011 with the Virginia Water Resources Research Center. The Canvasback sounds were from the Stokes Field Guide to Bird Songs-Eastern Region CD set, by Lang Elliott with Donald and Lillian Stokes (Time Warner Audio Books, copyright 1997), used with permission of Lang Elliott.  Lang Elliot's work is available online at the “Music of Nature” Web site, http://www.musicofnature.org/. “Chesapeake Bay Ballad” is copyright 2020 by Torrin Hallett, used with permission.  Torrin is a 2018 graduate of Oberlin College and Conservatory in Oberlin, Ohio; a 2020 graduate in Horn Performance from Manhattan School of Music in New York; and a 2021 graduate of the Lamont School of Music at the University of Denver.  He is currently a graduate student at the Yale School of Music.  More information about Torrin is available online at https://www.facebook.com/torrin.hallett.  Thanks very much to Torrin for composing the piece especially for Virginia Water Radio.  This music was used previously by Virginia Water Radio most recently in Episode 565, 2-22-21. Following are other music pieces composed by Torrin Hallett for Virginia Water Radio, with episodes featuring the music.“A Little Fright Music” – used most recently in Episode 601, 10-31-21, on connections among Halloween, water, and the human body.“Beetle Ballet” – used in Episode 525, 5-18-20, on aquatic beetles.“Corona Cue” – used in Episode 517, 3-23-20, on the coronavirus pandemic. “Flow Stopper” – used in Episode 599, 10-18-21, on “Imagine a Day Without Water.”“Geese Piece” – used most recently in Episode 440, 10-1-18, on E-bird. “Ice Dance” – used in Episode 556, 12-21-20, on how organisms survive freezing temperatures.“Lizard Lied” – used in Episode 514, 3-2-20, on lizards. “New Year's Water” – used in Episode 349, 1-2-17, on the New Year. “Rain Refrain” – used most recently in Episode 559, 1-11-21, on record rainfall in 2020.“Runoff” – used in Episode 585, 7-12-21 – on middle schoolers calling out stormwater-related water words.“Spider Strike” – used in Episode 523, 5-4-20, on fishing spiders.“Tropical Tantrum” – used most recently in Episode 580, 6-7-21, on the 2021 Atlantic tropical storm season preview.“Tundra Swan Song – used in Episode 554, 12-7-20, on Tundra Swans.“Turkey Tune” – used in Episode 343, 11-21-16, on the Wild Turkey.  Click here if you'd like to hear the full version (1 min./11 sec.) of the “Cripple Creek” arrangement/performance by Stewart Scales that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Scales and the group New Standard, with which Mr. Scales plays, is available online at http://newstandardbluegrass.com. IMAGESMale Canvasback (location and date not identified).  Photo by Lee Karney, made available for public use by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's National Digital Library, online at http://digitalmedia.fws.gov; specific URL for this photo was https://digitalmedia.fws.gov/digital/collection/natdiglib/id/1645/rec/2), as of 11/22/21.Female Canvasback in Anchorage Coastal Wildlife Refuge in Alaska in May 2005.  Photo by Donna A. Dewhurst, made available for public use by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's National Digital Library, online at http://digitalmedia.fws.gov; specific URL for this photo was https://digitalmedia.fws.gov/digital/collection/natdiglib/id/14/rec/9), as of 11/22/21.EXTRA INFORMATION ABOUT CANVASBACK DUCKS The scientific name of the Canvasback is Aythya valisineria. Here are some points about Canvasbacks, excerpted from the Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources (formerly Department of Game and Inland Fisheries), “Fish and Wildlife Information Service/Canvasback,” online at https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/booklet.html?&bova=040064&Menu=_.Taxonomy&version=18949.Physical Description “The adult male has a head that is rusty red, shading to almost black near the bill.  The breast is grayish-black and the sides and back are light gray to white.  The wings and speculum are gray, and the eye is red.  The bill is long and sloping, black, with decidedly long sloping profile that clearly distinguishes it from the redhead. …The adult female head is light brown.  The sides and breast are olive-brown to gray-brown, and the underparts are light gray. The back is gray, finely barred with darker gray, and the wings are grayish brown.  …They have short wings, and a rapid wingbeat.  This species has difficulty leaving the water.  It is one of the fastest flying ducks.  …It is one of the largest ducks.”Breeding “The breeding season is from May to June… This species breeds in Alaska, western Canada, northwest United States, western North America from the prairie provinces of Canada, south into the central and western states and occasionally as far east as Hudson Bay with a few as far north as Alaska.  Spring and early summer they are found in marshes with shallow waters [and in] flooded farmland.  In mid-summer they frequent large marshes and lakes, sloughs, and swampy areas.” Migration and Winter Habitat and Behavior “During migration, they fly in large ‘V' shaped flocks at high altitudes. … They are also associated with larger bodies of water.  …Late migration is in the fall, and early migration in the spring.  This species migrates cross country from the northwestern United States to the Atlantic Coast, principally the Chesapeake Bay.  The migration corridors shift annually, and they have a strong tendency to return to the same breeding ground.  … The heaviest flight is from the Canada pothole country to the Chesapeake Bay. … They arrive at Chesapeake Bay later than most other ducks.  The Chesapeake Bay fall migration is from October 15 to December 15, with a peak from November 15 to December 15.  The spring migration is from February 20 to May 1, with the peak from March 1 to March 30.  They occupy specific and traditional rivers, lakes, and marshes on migratory areas.  … This species winters to Mexico [and to the] Atlantic and Gulf Coast.  ...Virginia is one of best areas for canvasbacks.  …  They are found in lakes, salt bays and estuaries, brackish and alkaline waters near the coast, estuaries and shallow bays, [and] rarely on the open sea. … The optimum in Chesapeake Bay areas is in fresh and brackish estuarine bays with extensive beds of submerged plants or abundant invertebrates, primarily in brackish rather than salt or freshwater areas. … There has been a 53% decline in wintering populations in the United States.  There has also been a decrease in the Atlantic flyway.”  [Population decreases have been caused by several factors, including drainage of breeding marshland, food supplies being depleted by carp and swan, pollution of wintering areas, disappearance of submerged aquatic vegetation in the Chesapeake Bay, droughts on breeding grounds, oil spills, and illegal hunting and trapping.] Diet “This species dives and obtains food from the bottoms of ponds, lakes, large rivers, open marshes, and muddy bottoms.  Plants are uprooted and the roots are eaten.  This species dives to 20-30 feet. … Important foods include…aquatic plants…, molluscs, insects, caddisfly and midge larvae, dragonflies, [and] small fish.  Chesapeake Bay foods include wild celery, widgeon grass, eelgrass, pondweed, clams and mud crabs.  Juvenile foods include caddisfly larvae, midge larvae, and mayfly nymphs.” SOURCES Used for Audio Mike Burke, “The big, beautiful canvasback: What's not to love?”  Bay Journal, November 2021, available online at https://www.bayjournal.com/eedition/page-43/page_136f4325-b978-5e55-bcec-907f0a04b1fc.html. Chesapeake Bay Program, “Birds,” online at https://www.chesapeakebay.net/discover/field-guide/all/birds/all; the Canvasback entry is online at https://www.chesapeakebay.net/discover/field-guide/entry/canvasback. Cornell University Lab of Ornithology, “All About Birds,” online at https://www.allaboutbirds.org/news/.  The Canvasback entry is online at https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Canvasback/. Cornell University Lab of Ornithology, “Birds of the World” online at https://birdsoftheworld.org/bow/home(subscription may be required).  The Canvasback entry is online at https://birdsoftheworld.org/bow/species/canvas/cur/introduction. Alice Jane Lippson and Robert L. Lippson, Life in the Chesapeake Bay-3rdEdition, Johns Hopkins University Press, Baltimore, Md., 2006. Chandler S. Robbins et al., A Guide to Field Identification of Birds of North America, St. Martin's Press, New York, N.Y., 2001. Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources (formerly Department of Game and Inland Fisheries), “Fish and Wildlife Information Service,” online at https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/; the Canvasback entry is online at https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/booklet.html?&bova=040064&Menu=_.Taxonomy&version=18949. For More Information about Birds in Virginia and Elsewhere Cornell University Lab of Ornithology, “Merlin Photo ID.”  The application for mobile devices allows users to submit a bird photograph to get identification of the bird. Information is available online at http://merlin.allaboutbirds.org/. Cornell University Lab of Ornithology and the Audubon Society, “eBird,” online at https://ebird.org/home.  Here you can find locations of species observations made by contributors, and you can sign up to contribute your own observations. Stan Tekiela, Birds of Virginia Field Guide, Adventure Publications, Inc., Cambridge, Minn., 2002. University of Michigan Museum of Zoology, “Animal Diversity Web,” online at https://animaldiversity.org/. Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources (formerly Department of Game and Inland Fisheries), “List of Native and Naturalized Fauna in Virginia, August 2020,” online (as a PDF) at https://dwr.virginia.gov/wp-content/uploads/virginia-native-naturalized-species.pdf. Virginia Society of Ornithology, online at http://www.virginiabirds.org/.  The Society is a non-profit organization dedicated to the study, conservation, and enjoyment of birds in the Commonwealth. Xeno-canto Foundation, online at http://www.xeno-canto.org/.  This site provides bird songs from around the world. RELATED VIRGINIA WATER RADIO EPISODES All Water Radio episodes are listed by category at the Index link above (http://www.virginiawaterradio.org/p/index.html).  See particularly the “Birds” and “Weather/Climate/Natural Disas

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Midday
350.org's May Boeve: Assessing COP26 and new US climate policy

Midday

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 17:30


The COP26 UN Conference on Climate Change in Glasgow, Scotland, ended 10 days ago, with deep divisions between some of the world's largest contributors to global warming still intact. President Joe Biden tried to re-assert American leadership on climate, and following his return from Scotland, the House passed his bipartisan infrastructure bill, which contains $47 billion in environmental funding, including money to help clean up the Chesapeake Bay and to deal with the effects of climate change. That alone is the largest spending package on environmental provisions in American history, and days later, the House sent the much larger Build Back Better Act to the Senate which, at the moment, contains more than $550 billion dollars in climate provisions. Joining Tom to discuss the COP 26 Conference and the way forward in confronting climate change is May Boeve(pron. BOO-vee), the co-founder and executive director of the environmental advocacy group, 350.org. May Boeve joins us on Zoom from Oakland, California. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Duck Season Somewhere
Abundant Waterfowl, Endless Hunter Opportunities and Delta Waterfowl, with Dr. Frank Rohwer

Duck Season Somewhere

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 67:54


Dr. Frank Rohwer grew up duck hunting the Chesapeake Bay, pursued a career in waterfowl-related applied sciences, and is currently President and Chief Scientist for Delta Waterfowl. After spending time together in a North Dakota duck blind, Rohwer and Ramsey Russell discuss Delta Waterfowl's origins and pertinent North American waterfowl management issues, to include a new proposed management scenario for northern pintails. How'd Rohwer's earlier hunting experiences influence career direction? What are Delta Waterfowl's origins? Why are pintail populations struggling? Is the restrictive US pintail bag limit working? Why might increased bag limits be beneficial, and what are the hurdles? How's the drought going to affect future US bag limits? Does hunter harvest harm duck populations? How does pintail management differ from canvasbacks or mallards? Delta Waterfowl's vision is abundant waterfowl and endless opportunities for hunters. Never has it been more obvious than in today's enlightening discussion.    Podcast Sponsors: BOSS Shotshells Benelli Shotguns Kanati Waterfowl Taxidermy Mojo Outdoors Tom Beckbe Flash Back Decoys GetDucks USHuntList   It's really duck season somewhere for 365 days per year. Follow Ramsey Russell's worldwide duck hunting adventures as he chases real duck hunting experiences all year long: Instagram @ramseyrussellgetducks YouTube @GetDucks Facebook @GetDucks.com   Please subscribe, rate and review Duck Season Somewhere podcast. Share your favorite episodes with friends! Business inquiries and comments contact Ramsey Russell ramsey@getducks.com  

Chesapeake Uncharted
So You Think You Can Save the Chesapeake

Chesapeake Uncharted

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 33:11


A massive effort to clean up the Chesapeake Bay faces more problems with a hotter, stormier world because of climate change.

Chesapeake Almanac
November: Diatoms - Cold-Water Jewel Boxes

Chesapeake Almanac

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 6:47


In this episode of Chesapeake Almanac, John Page Williams introduces us to a group of microscopic plants that live in the Bay thrive over the fall and winter. Diatoms--microscopic algae--are stunningly abundant this time of year. In Edwardian England, those interested in natural history made a hobby of collecting diatoms, looking at them under a microscope and marveling at their complex shapes, which have been referred to as "intricately carved glass jewel boxes." But those intricate designs are more than stunning to look at. They play an important role in the organism's survival. Listen now and learn more with John Page. https://www.cbf.org/news-media/multimedia/podcasts/chesapeake-almanac/podcast-november-diatoms-transcript.html (TRANSCRIPT) Subscribe to Chesapeake Almanac, find us on your favorite podcast platform, or visit our podcast page at https://www.cbf.org/ChesapeakeAlmanac (https://www.cbf.org/ChesapeakeAlmanac). Chesapeake Almanac is provided by the Chesapeake Bay Foundation - Saving the Bay through Education, Advocacy, Litigation, and Restoration. Find out more about our work to save the Chesapeake Bay and its watershed's rivers and streams, and what you can do to help, at https://www.cbf.org (https://www.cbf.org). These readings are from John Page Williams, Jr.'s book, Chesapeake Almanac: Following the Bay through the Seasons. The publication is available in print at https://www.amazon.com/Chesapeake-Almanac-Following-Through-Seasons/dp/0870334492/ref=sr_1_1 (Amazon.com). Support this podcast

Conversations at the Washington Library
Previewing Episode 1 of Intertwined: The Enslaved Community at George Washington's Mount Vernon

Conversations at the Washington Library

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 42:15


On this week's show, we bring you Episode 1 of Intertwined: The Enslaved Community at George Washington's Mount Vernon. Entitled "Passages," it features the life of Sambo Anderson, who was just a boy when he was captured in West Africa, survived the Middle Passage, and purchased by an ambitious George Washington sometime in the late 1760s. During his years of enslavement at Mount Vernon, Anderson became a carpenter, a husband, and a father. In this episode, we tell the story of Anderson's life to explore the rise of slavery in the Chesapeake Bay region, George and Martha Washington's connections to the transatlantic slave trade, and the laws that marked the boundaries between slavery and freedom in Virginia. Featuring: Dr. Brenda Stevenson, Hillary Rodham Clinton Endowed Chair in Women's History, St. John's College, Oxford University Dr. Lorena Walsh, Research Historian Emerita, Colonial Williamsburg Dr. John C. Coombs, Professor of History, Hampden-Sydney College Dr. Lynn Price Robbins, historian of George and Martha Washington and Early America Jessie MacLeod, Associate Curator, George Washington's Mount Vernon Full transcripts, show notes, and bibliographies available at www.georgewashingtonpodcast.com. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/mountvernon/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/mountvernon/support

Virginia Water Radio
Episode 603 (11-15-21): Last Bird Out

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021


CLICK HERE to listen to episode audio (4:35).Sections below are the following: Transcript of Audio Audio Notes and Acknowledgments Images Sources Related Water Radio Episodes For Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.). Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 11-12-21. TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the week of November 15, 2021.  This revised episode from October 2013 is the first in a series this year of winter-related episodes. MUSIC – ~ 21 sec – Lyrics: “Summer's over, winter's coming.  Summer's gone, the days were long; now the moonlight froze the dawn.  Summer's over, winter's coming.” That's part of “Winter is Coming,” from the Harrisonburg and Rockingham County, Va.-based band, The Steel Wheels.  It sets the stage for exploring a characteristic feathered feature of the transition from fall to winter.  To start, we drop in on a chattering crowd of eager flyers, who then hear their long-distance flights being announced but no planes are taking off.  If this sounds like a huge airport headache instead of a water event, well, just have a listen for about 35 seconds.SOUNDS and VOICES - ~36 sec – Voice call-outs: “Sora.  Snowy Egret.  Green Heron.  Osprey.  Least Tern.  Piping Plover.  Broad-winged Hawk.”You've been listening to the names and sounds of seven kinds of birds that are known to spend summer in Virginia and then typically migrate out of the Commonwealth for winter.  Fall's arrival means the departure from the Commonwealth of many species of birds—including the first six you just heard—who may nest in spring and summer around Virginia's aquatic areas.  Fall also brings seasonal migrations of land-based birds—including the seventh species you heard, the forest-dwelling Broad-winged Hawk—that travel over watery areas of Virginia, particularly the Chesapeake Bay and the Delmarva Peninsula.  In fact, the concentration of hawks and other migrants along Virginia's Eastern Shore makes it an important and popular location for monitoring bird migration, and the Coastal Virginia Wildlife Observatory maintains a migrant-counting platform in Kiptopeke State Park in Northampton County.  Among various programs at the Observatory, Kiptopeke Hawkwatch has been conducted at that location since 1977.  In fall 2021, over 17,000 migrating hawks and other raptors had been recorded as of late October. Thanks to Lang Elliott for permission to use the other bird sounds, from the Stokes Field Guide to Bird Songs, and to several Virginia Tech colleagues for calling out the bird names.  Thanks also to The Steel Wheels for permission to use this week's music, and we close with about 20 more seconds of “Winter is Coming.” MUSIC – ~23 sec – Lyrics: “Summer's gone, we're movin' on, can't regret that frozen dawn.  Summer's over, winter's coming.  Summer's over, winter's coming.” SHIP'S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech's College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Ben Cosgrove for his version of “Shenandoah” to open and close the show.  In Blacksburg, I'm Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This Virginia Water Radio episode revises and replaces Episode 183, 10-14-13. “Winter is Coming,” from the 2015 album “We've Got a Fire,” is copyright by The Steel Wheels, used with permission.  More information about The Steel Wheels is available online at http://www.thesteelwheels.com/.  This music was used previously by Virginia Water Radio in Episode 292, 11-30-15. The sounds of Sora, Snowy Egret, Green Heron, Osprey, Least Tern, Piping Plover, and Broad-winged Hawk were taken from the Stokes Field Guide to Bird Songs-Eastern Region CD set, by Lang Elliott with Donald and Lillian Stokes (Time Warner Audio Books, copyright 1997), used with permission of Lang Elliott, whose work is available online at the “Music of Nature” Web site, http://www.musicofnature.org/.Thanks to Eli Heilker, Sarah Karpanty, Kevin McGuire, and Tony Timpano for recording bird names.  Thanks to Dr. Karpanty also for her help in developing the idea for this episode. Click here if you'd like to hear the full version (2 min./22 sec.) of the “Shenandoah” arrangement/performance by Ben Cosgrove that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Cosgrove is available online at http://www.bencosgrove.com. IMAGES An observation station for the Coastal Virginia Wildlife Observatory in Kiptopeke State Park, Northampton County, Virginia, October 7, 2007.  The chart listed the birds of prey that had been counted to date during that year's fall migration on Virginia's Eastern Shore. North American migratory bird flyways.  Map by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, accessed online at https://www.fws.gov/birds/management/flyways.php, 11/16/21. SOURCES Used for Audio Coastal Virginia Wildlife Observatory, online at http://www.cvwo.org/. Alice Jane Lippson and Robert L. Lippson, Life in the Chesapeake Bay-3rdEdition, Johns Hopkins University Press, Baltimore, Md., 2006. Chandler S. Robbins et al., A Guide to Field Identification of Birds of North America, St. Martin's Press, New York, N.Y., 2001. Cornell University Lab of Ornithology, “All About Birds,” online at http://www.allaboutbirds.org. Cornell University Lab of Ornithology, “Birds of the World,” online at https://birdsoftheworld.org/bow/home (subscription required).U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service/Eastern Shore of Virginia National Wildlife Refuge, online at https://www.fws.gov/refuge/eastern_shore_of_virginia/. Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources (formerly Department of Game and Inland Fisheries):Fish and Wildlife Information Service, online at https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/.  Entries for the species mentioned in this episode are located online as follows:Broad-winged Hawk: https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/booklet.html?&bova=040089&Menu=_.Taxonomy&version=18943.Green Heron: https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/booklet.html?&bova=040028&Menu=_.Taxonomy&version=18943.Least Tern: https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/booklet.html?&bova=040186&Menu=_.Taxonomy&version=18943.Osprey: https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/booklet.html?&bova=040095&Menu=_.Taxonomy&version=18943.Piping Plover: https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/booklet.html?&bova=040120&Menu=_.Taxonomy&version=18943.Snowy Egret: https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/booklet.html?&bova=040033&Menu=_.Taxonomy&version=18943.Sora: https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/booklet.html?&bova=040108&Menu=_.Taxonomy&version=18943. For More Information about Birds in Virginia and Elsewhere Chesapeake Bay Program, “Birds,” online at https://www.chesapeakebay.net/discover/field-guide/all/birds/all. Cornell University Lab of Ornithology, “Merlin Photo ID.”  The application for mobile devices allows users to submit a bird photograph to get identification of the bird. Information is available online at http://merlin.allaboutbirds.org/. Cornell University Lab of Ornithology and the Audubon Society, “eBird,” online at https://ebird.org/home.  Here you can find locations of species observations made by contributors, and you can sign up to contribute your own observations. Stan Tekiela, Birds of Virginia Field Guide, Adventure Publications, Inc., Cambridge, Minn., 2002. University of Michigan Museum of Zoology, “Animal Diversity Web,” online at https://animaldiversity.org/. Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources (formerly Department of Game and Inland Fisheries), “List of Native and Naturalized Fauna in Virginia, August 2020,” online (as a PDF) at https://dwr.virginia.gov/wp-content/uploads/virginia-native-naturalized-species.pdf.Virginia Society of Ornithology, online at http://www.virginiabirds.org/.  The Society is a non-profit organization dedicated to the study, conservation, and enjoyment of birds in the Commonwealth.Xeno-canto Foundation, online at http://www.xeno-canto.org/.  This site provides bird songs from around the world. RELATED VIRGINIA WATER RADIO EPISODES All Water Radio episodes are listed by category at the Index link above (http://www.virginiawaterradio.org/p/index.html).  See particularly the “Birds” and “Weather/Climate/Natural Disasters” subject categories. Following are links to several other winter-related episodes, including episodes on some birds that reside in Virginia typically only in winter (listed separately).  Please note that some of these episodes are being redone in late 2021 and early 2022; in those cases, the respective links below will have information on the updated episodes. Frost – Episode 597, 10-4-21.Freezing and ice – Episode 403, 1-15-18 (especially for grades K-3).Ice on ponds and lakes – Episode 404, 1-22-18 (especially for grades 4-8).Ice on rivers – Episode 406, 2-5-18 (especially for middle school grades).Polar Plunge®for Special Olympics – Episode 356, 2-20-17.Snow terms – Episode 300, 1-25-16.Snow physics and chemistry – Episode 407, 2-12-18 (especially for high school grades).Snow, sleet, and freezing rain – Episode 461, 2-25-19.Surviving freezing (by animals) – Episode 556, 12-21-20.Winter precipitation and water supplies – Episode 567, 3-8-21.Winter preparedness – Episode 553, 11-30-20.Water thermodynamics – Episode 195, 1-6-14. Bird-related Episodes Audubon Christmas Bird Count – Episode 294, 12-14-15.American Avocet – Episode 543, 9-21-20.Brant (goose) – Episode 502, 12-9-19.Canvasback (duck) – Episode 197, 1-20-14.Common Goldeneye (duck) – Episode 303, 2/15/16.Green-winged Teal (duck) – Episode 398, 12-11-17.Grebes (Horned and Red-necked) – Episode 233, 9-29-14.Loons – Episode 445, 11-5-18.Snow Goose – Episode 507, 1/13/20.Tundra Swan – Episode 554, 12-7-20.Winter birds sampler from the Chesapeake Bay area – Episode 565, 2-22-21. FOR VIRGINIA TEACHERS – RELATED STANDARDS OF LEARNING (SOLs) AND OTHER INFORMATION Following are some Virginia Standards of Learning (SOLs) that may be supported by this episode's audio/transcript, sources, or other information included in this post. 2020 Music SOLs SOLs at various grade levels that call for “examining the relationship of music to the other fine arts and other fields of knowledge.” 2018 Science SOLs Grades K-4: Living Systems and Processes1.5 – Animals, including humans, have basic life needs that allow them to survive.2.4 – Plants and animals undergo a series of orderly changes as they grow and develop, including life cycles.2.5 – Living things are part of a system.3.4 – Adaptations allow organisms to satisfy life needs and resp

new york society bay university agency guide music ice broad natural earth fire state audio living game college north america frost world change surviving map accent animals cd dark north american steel wheels tech water xeno web index fall sora land rain pond press research ocean weather government education birds plants foundation voice chesapeake bay native baltimore fish chesapeake snow environment images green va cambridge adaptations msonormal commonwealth stream menu robbins normal worddocument zoom donotshowrevisions citizens voices hawk environmental dynamic times new roman calibri trackmoves trackformatting punctuationkerning saveifxmlinvalid ignoremixedcontent compatibility breakwrappedtables dontgrowautofit latentstyles deflockedstate latentstylecount latentstyles style definitions msonormaltable table normal donotpromoteqf lidthemeother lidthemeasian x none snaptogridincell wraptextwithpunct useasianbreakrules mathpr mathfont cambria math brkbin brkbinsub smallfrac dispdef lmargin rmargin defjc centergroup wrapindent intlim subsup narylim undovr defunhidewhenused defsemihidden defqformat defpriority lsdexception locked priority semihidden unhidewhenused qformat name normal name title name default paragraph font name subtitle name strong name emphasis name table grid name placeholder text name no spacing name light shading name light list name light grid name medium shading name medium list name medium grid name dark list name colorful shading name colorful list name colorful grid name light shading accent name light list accent name light grid accent name revision name list paragraph name quote name intense quote name dark list accent name colorful shading accent name colorful list accent name colorful grid accent name subtle emphasis name intense emphasis name subtle reference name intense reference name book title name bibliography name toc heading shenandoah biology teal grade special olympics colorful md brant signature bio freezing watershed transcript ornithology virginia tech ls atlantic ocean natural resources wildlife service grades k observatory name normal indent name list name list bullet name list number name closing name signature name body text name body text indent name list continue name message header name salutation name date name body text first indent name note heading name block text name document map name plain text name e name normal web name normal table name no list name outline list name table simple name table classic name table colorful name table columns name table list name table 3d name table contemporary name table elegant name table professional name table subtle name table web name balloon text name table theme name plain table name grid table light name grid table light accent dark accent colorful accent name list table processes entries harrisonburg ar sa eastern shore zoology minn taxonomy cosgrove msohyperlink wildlife resources audubon society all about birds osprey sections life sciences ben cosgrove birdsongs stormwater canvasback delmarva peninsula lang elliott loons policymakers msobodytext bmp rockingham county acknowledgment virginia department michigan museum robert l johns hopkins university press cumberland gap sols kevin mcguire northampton county tmdl virginia society polar plunge inland fisheries ebird living systems virginia standards water center space systems audio notes
Meat + Three
Iconic Regional Foods: Blue Crabs, Hot Chicken, and Coneys

Meat + Three

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 20:42


Environment, cultural traditions, gentrification - all of these forces shape what we eat and are deeply rooted in where we are. Regional foods are more than just their flavors and ingredients. They are a culmination of local culture and generations of experience. But how are historic foodways being altered by factors like warming oceans and rapidly evolving urban landscapes? In our increasingly interconnected world, does truly regional cuisine still exist? Join us in taking a look at some iconic regional dishes and the stories behind them. Further Reading:To learn more about the University of Arizona's Center for Regional Food Studies, visit their website here.To learn more about your impact on the Chesapeake Bay, you can check out this tool on the Chesapeake Bay Foundation website here.Want to get in on the Cincinnati Chili debate? Read the original Deadspin article and a 2017 Vice piece defending the dish.To read Rachel Martin's full article chronicling hot chicken's history, you can read her Bitter Southerner article here. You can also read her book, Hot Hot Chicken: A Nashville Story To make reservations and learn more about Komah, Paulo Shin's restaurant, feel free to browse his website here.Keep Meat and Three on the air: become an HRN Member today! Go to heritageradionetwork.org/donate. Meat and Three is powered by Simplecast.

PreserveCast
Using History and Heritage to Engage Minorities in Aquaculture

PreserveCast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 29:29


On this week's PreserveCast, we're heading to the brackish waters of the Chesapeake Bay to talk with Imani Black, founder of Minorities in Aquaculture, a dynamic new organization that is using heritage and history and a host of other innovative tools to develop opportunities for minorities to engage in this growing and sustainable industry. Like many guests, I read about Imani in an article and knew we had to get her on PreserveCast – especially because of her background, heritage and focus on using history to get minorities interested and engaged in careers in aquaculture. We're talking sustainability, environmentalism, history and the bay on this week's PreserveCast.

The Annapolis Podcast
Jay Fleming on "Island Life"

The Annapolis Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 13, 2021 29:15


Photographer Jay Fleming discusses his new book: "Island Life"  Jay Fleming's second book, Island Life, is a visual narrative of the environment, communities and commercial fisheries of Smith Island, Maryland and Tangier Island, Virginia—the last inhabited offshore islands in the Chesapeake Bay. Buy it here

With Good Reason
Saving Endangered Species

With Good Reason

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 51:59


The red colobus monkey is one of the most endangered primates in the world. Found in West, East, and Central Africa, the once thriving species has been decimated by over-hunting. Josh Linder has devoted his career to studying and conserving these peaceful primates. Plus: A few months ago, Francesco Ferretti led an expedition to be the first to ever tag endangered great white sharks in the Mediterranean. While he and his crew didn't end up tagging any sharks, they uncovered exciting new evidence of great white activity in the water. Later in the show: The bald eagle has been the national bird of the United States since 1782. But only a few decades ago, it was on the brink of extinction. Bryan Watts has been monitoring the bald eagle population in the Chesapeake Bay for 30 years. He says the bald eagle is one of the biggest success stories in the history of conservation. And: In the small island-nation of Sri Lanka, elephants are sacred animals. But Sujan Henkanaththegedara says the rich and powerful are illegally capturing wild and critically endangered elephants to have as symbols of wealth.

Chesapeake Almanac
November: Loon's - Fall's Finest Fishermen?

Chesapeake Almanac

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 6:20


Loons are as well loved in summer by people on North Country lakes as ospreys are by us here. But at this time of year, they descend on the Chesapeake Bay in the thousands. In this episode, John Page shares his personal introduction to the Chesapeake's fall loons and their extraordinary "banquets" of menhaden. https://www.cbf.org/news-media/multimedia/podcasts/chesapeake-almanac/podcast-november-loons-transcript.html (TRANSCRIPT) Subscribe to https://chesapeake-almanac.captivate.fm/listen (Chesapeake Almanac), find us on your favorite podcast platform, or visit our podcast page at https://www.cbf.org/ChesapeakeAlmanac (https://www.cbf.org/ChesapeakeAlmanac). Chesapeake Almanac is provided by the Chesapeake Bay Foundation - Saving the Bay through Education, Advocacy, Litigation, and Restoration. Find out more about our work to save the Chesapeake Bay and its watershed's rivers and streams, and what you can do to help, at https://www.cbf.org (https://www.cbf.org). These readings are from John Page Williams, Jr.'s book, Chesapeake Almanac: Following the Bay through the Seasons. The publication is available in print at https://www.amazon.com/Chesapeake-Almanac-Following-Through-Seasons/dp/0870334492/ref=sr_1_1 (Amazon.com). Support this podcast

Bug in a Rug
Ep. 104 Michael C. Rockefeller

Bug in a Rug

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 50:36


Drowning, saltwater crocodiles, cannibals out for revenge... all totally reasonable ways for the heir to the Rockefeller legacy and fortune to have died. But the question we are all left with is... where exactly is the Chesapeake Bay?   Twitter and Instagram - @biarpodcast Facebook - Bug in a Rug Email us your ideas at biarpodcast@gmail.com   Sources: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Catamaran https://historyofyesterday.com/michael-rockefeller-ba42d5f245f https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Northern_river_shark https://www.sfzoo.org/salt-water-crocodile/#:~:text=The%20saltwater%20crocodile%20is%20the,years%20old%20in%20the%20wild. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Michael_Rockefeller https://www.metmuseum.org/about-the-met/collection-areas/the-michael-c-rockefeller-wing

Chesapeake Uncharted
Unmaking History

Chesapeake Uncharted

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 36:43


Rising waters are swallowing historic sites along shorelines, portending a future in which we've lost key pieces of our past.

Chesapeake Almanac
November: Menhaden Migrations

Chesapeake Almanac

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 7:20


Where do the menhaden go as they get older? And how do we know? Tagging fish that are caught by the tens of thousands requires an ingenious system. What about winter migrations? In this episode, John Page shares observations of scientists and watermen about the most important fish in the sea. [To find out why menhaden are considered "the most important fish in the sea," go to our video at https://www.cbf.org/news-media/multimedia/video/why-are-menhaden-the-most-important-fish-in-the-sea.html (https://www.cbf.org/news-media/multimedia/video/why-are-menhaden-the-most-important-fish-in-the-sea.html)] https://www.cbf.org/news-media/multimedia/podcasts/chesapeake-almanac/podcast-november-menhaden-migrations-transcript (TRANSCRIPT) Subscribe to https://chesapeake-almanac.captivate.fm/listen (Chesapeake Almanac), find us on your favorite podcast platform, or visit our podcast page at https://www.cbf.org/ChesapeakeAlmanac (https://www.cbf.org/ChesapeakeAlmanac). Chesapeake Almanac is provided by the Chesapeake Bay Foundation - Saving the Bay through Education, Advocacy, Litigation, and Restoration. Find out more about our work to save the Chesapeake Bay and its watershed's rivers and streams, and what you can do to help, at https://www.cbf.org (https://www.cbf.org). These readings are from John Page Williams, Jr.'s book, Chesapeake Almanac: Following the Bay through the Seasons. The publication is available in print at https://www.amazon.com/Chesapeake-Almanac-Following-Through-Seasons/dp/0870334492/ref=sr_1_1 (Amazon.com). Support this podcast

Travelers In The Night
153E-165-One Two Punch

Travelers In The Night

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 2:01


About 35 million years ago the Earth was impacted by two large asteroids creating the more than 50 mile diameter Popigai [pop a gay i] Crater in Russia and a similar crater in Chesapeake Bay in the USA.  Analysis of fragments indicate that the impacting objects were not made of the same material. This finding has led scientists to speculate that there may be an astronomical process which changes conditions in the inner asteroid belt and causes the Earth's orbit to change slightly.  This combination could have triggered the ice age which caused the first significant ice sheet in Antarctica to form and led to the last major extinction event in the Earth's history.

Ducks Unlimited Podcast
Ep. 27 – Collectors Series: Historian C. John Sullivan

Ducks Unlimited Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 33:44


C. John Sullivan, historian and collector joins host, Katie Burke, to talk about the history of waterfowling on the Chesapeake Bay. The pair discuss topics ranging from historic guns clubs to market hunters to the rise of conservation on this infamous waterfowling landscape. www.ducks.org/DUPodcast

Life on the Water
The conservative church. Why people leave and where they go

Life on the Water

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 58:18


Matt and Merry talk about the recent exodus from conservative evangelical churches.  Why do people leave, and where do they go?  Along the way, we chat about running across the Chesapeake Bay, trick or treating, and our awesome family costume theme.   

Virginia Water Radio
Episode 601 (10-31-21): Halloween, Water, and the Human Body

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021


CLICK HERE to listen to episode audio (4:53).Sections below are the following: Transcript of Audio Audio Notes and Acknowledgments Image Sources Related Water Radio Episodes For Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.). Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 10-29-21. TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for Halloween 2021.  Besides focusing on autumn's festival of fun and fright, this episode is part of a series this fall about water connections to the human body and human biology. SOUND – ~9 sec That eerie sound of a tree creaking in October wind sets a seasonal stage for a Halloween challenge: exploring how Halloween, water, and human biology all connect.  Sound like quite a trick?  Well, have a listen to some Halloween music for about 50 seconds, and then we'll treat you to some examples. MUSIC - ~50 sec – instrumental You've been listening to “A Little Fright Music,” by Torrin Hallett, a graduate student at the Yale School of Music.  And here are six matches of Halloween creatures or images with water in the human body. 1.  Skeleton images rattle around everywhere for Halloween, and in living skeletons water is a significant component of bones and cartilage.  2.  Pretend blood covers many-a Halloween costume, and over half of the volume of blood is plasma, which in turn is over 90 percent water, and water is also a major component of blood cells. 3.  A muscular costume is part of pretending to be a super-strong character like Wonder Woman or Superman; and water plays a significant role in muscle structure and function; in turn, muscle is an important water-storage area for the body. 4.  The monster in movie versions of “Frankenstein” was brought to life by electricity, and the cells of our nervous system transmit messages though electrochemical impulses, using sodium and potassium ions in a water-based solution. 5.  If fiery or icy creatures need some temperature regulation, water's the body fluid that does it. And 6.  Flashing and watching from many creatures on Halloween night are eyes, either scary, suspenseful, or super-powered; and eyes have chambers containing aqueous humor and vitreous humour, two fluids that consist mostly of water and that maintain the shape of the eyes. This Halloween, imagine being a creature that's about 60 percent composed of an amazing substance with unique powers to dissolve other substances, absorb and release heat, and withstand being compressed.  What would you be?  Why, the water-based human being that you are! Thanks to Torrin Hallett for composing this week's music for Virginia Water Radio, and we close with another listen to the last few seconds of “A Little Fright Music.” MUSIC - ~13 sec – instrumental SHIP'S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech's College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Ben Cosgrove for his version of “Shenandoah” to open and close the show.  In Blacksburg, I'm Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The wind and creaking tree sounds were recorded by Virginia Water Radio in Blacksburg, Va., on October 5, 2014.  “A Little Fright Music” is copyright 2020 by Torrin Hallett, used with permission.  Torrin is a 2018 graduate of Oberlin College and Conservatory in Oberlin, Ohio; a 2020 graduate in Horn Performance from Manhattan School of Music in New York; and a 2021 graduate of the Lamont School of Music at the University of Denver.  He is currently a graduate student at the Yale School of Music.  More information about Torrin is available online at https://www.facebook.com/torrin.hallett.  Thanks very much to Torrin for composing the piece especially for Virginia Water Radio.  This music was previously used in Episode 548, 10-26-20. Following are other music pieces composed by Torrin Hallett for Virginia Water Radio, with episodes featuring the music. “Beetle Ballet” – used in Episode 525, 5-18-20, on aquatic beetles.“Chesapeake Bay Ballad” – used in Episode 537, 8-10-20, on conditions in the Chesapeake Bay.“Corona Cue” – used in Episode 517, 3-23-20, on the coronavirus pandemic.“Flow Stopper – used in Episode 599, 10-28-21, on the “Imagine a Day Without Water” campaign.“Geese Piece” – used most recently in Episode 440, 10-1-18, on E-bird. “Ice Dance” – used in Episode 556, 12-21-20, on how organisms survive freezing temperatures.“Lizard Lied” – used in Episode 514, 3-2-20, on lizards.“New Year's Water” – used in Episode 349, 1-2-17, on the New Year. “Rain Refrain” – used most recently Episode 559, 1-11-21, on record rainfall in 2020.“Runoff” – in Episode 585, 7-12-21 – on middle-school students calling out stormwater-related water words.“Spider Strike” – used in Episode 523, 5-4-20, on fishing spiders.“Tropical Tantrum” – used most recently in Episode 580, 6-7-21, on the 2021 Atlantic tropical storm season preview.“Tundra Swan Song – used in Episode 554, 12-7-20, on Tundra Swans.“Turkey Tune” – used in Episode 343, 11-21-16, on the Wild Turkey.  Click here if you'd like to hear the full version (2 min./22 sec.) of the “Shenandoah” arrangement/performance by Ben Cosgrove that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Cosgrove is available online at http://www.bencosgrove.com. IMAGE Water uses in the human body.  Illustration from the U.S. Geological Survey, “The Water in You: Water and the Human Body,”  https://www.usgs.gov/special-topic/water-science-school/science/water-you-water-and-human-body?qt-science_center_objects=0#qt-science_center_objects. SOURCES Used for Audio Peter Abrahams, ed., How the Body Works: A Comprehensive, Illustrated Encyclopedia of Anatomy, Metro Books, New York, 2007. American Red Cross, “Blood Components,” online at https://www.redcrossblood.org/donate-blood/how-to-donate/types-of-blood-donations/blood-components.html. Erin Blakemore, “How Twitching Frog Legs Helped Inspire ‘Frankenstein,'” Smithsonian Magazine, December 4, 2015, online at https://www.smithsonianmag.com/smart-news/how-twitching-frog-legs-helped-inspire-frankenstein-180957457/. Fandom, “Monster Wiki/Frankenstein's Monster,” online at https://monster.fandom.com/wiki/Frankenstein%27s_Monster. Mayo Clinic Health System, “Water: Essential to your body,” online at https://www.mayoclinichealthsystem.org/hometown-health/speaking-of-health/water-essential-to-your-body. Science Direct:“Aqueous Humor,” online at https://www.sciencedirect.com/topics/medicine-and-dentistry/aqueous-humor;“Vitreous Humour,” online at https://www.sciencedirect.com/topics/veterinary-science-and-veterinary-medicine/vitreous-humour. University of Michigan Health, “Eye Anatomy and Function,” as of August 31, 2020, online at https://www.uofmhealth.org/health-library/hw121946. U.S. Geological Survey, “The Water in You: Water and the Human Body,” https://www.usgs.gov/special-topic/water-science-school/science/water-you-water-and-human-body?qt-science_center_objects=0#qt-science_center_objects. U.S. National Institutes of Health/National Cancer Institute, SEER Training Modules:“Composition of the Blood,” online at https://training.seer.cancer.gov/leukemia/anatomy/composition.html;“Skeletal System,” online at https://training.seer.cancer.gov/anatomy/skeletal/. For More Information about Human Biology, Including Water Aspects American Society of Hematology, “Blood Basics,” online at https://www.hematology.org/education/patients/blood-basics.Cleveland [Ohio] Clinic:“Heart & Blood Vessels: How Does Blood Travel Through Your Body,” online at https://my.clevelandclinic.org/health/articles/heart-blood-vessels-blood-flow-body;“Lymphatic System,” online at https://my.clevelandclinic.org/health/articles/21199-lymphatic-system. Eric Cudler, “Neuroscience for Kids,” online at https://faculty.washington.edu/chudler/neurok.html. The Franklin Institute of Philadelphia, Penn., “Blood Vessels,” online at https://www.fi.edu/heart/blood-vessels. Isabel Lorenzo et al., “The Role of Water Homeostasis in Muscle Function and Frailty: A Review,” Nutrients, Vol. 11, No. 8 (August 2019, accessed online at https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6723611/(subscription may be required for access). Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, “Facts About Blood and Blood Cells,” online at https://www.mskcc.org/cancer-care/patient-education/facts-about-blood-and-blood-cells. Science Direct, “Synovial Fluid: Structure and Function,” excerpted from Textbook of Pediatric Rheumatology, 5th Edition, Elsevier, Amsterdam, Netherlands, 2005; accessed online at https://www.sciencedirect.com/topics/medicine-and-dentistry/synovial-fluid(subscription may be required for access). University of Bristol (England), School of Medical Sciences, “Brain Basics: The Fundamentals of Neuroscience,” online at http://www.bris.ac.uk/synaptic/basics/basics-0.html. U.S. National Institutes of Health/National Cancer Institute, SEER Training Modules:“Blood, Heart and Circulation,” online at http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/bloodheartandcirculation.html;“Muscular System,” online at https://training.seer.cancer.gov/anatomy/muscular/;“Nervous System,” online at https://training.seer.cancer.gov/anatomy/nervous/. RELATED VIRGINIA WATER RADIO EPISODES All Water Radio episodes are listed by category at the Index link above (http://www.virginiawaterradio.org/p/index.html).  See particularly the “Science” subject category. Following are links to other episodes on connections of water to human biology (much of the information in this week's episode was taken from these previous episodes). Overview of water's roles in the body – Episode 592, 8-30-21.Disease: COVID-19 – Episode 517, 3-23-20 and Episode 519, 4-6-20.Disease: influenza – Episode 393, 11-6-17.Disease: viruses – Episode 600, 10-25-21.Circulatory system connections to water – Episode 593, 9-6-21.Muscular system connections to water – Episode 596, 9-27-21.Neurological system connections to water – Episode 594, 9-13-21.Skeleton system connections to water (with a Halloween theme) – Episode 595, 9-20-21.Water intake and exercise – Episode 466, 4-1-19.Water thermodynamics – Episode 195, 1-6-14. Following are links to other Halloween-themed episodes. Episode 238, 10-31-14 – focusing on the plant Witch-hazel.Episode 548, 10-26-20 – focusing on water-related readings that are supernatural, mysterious, or imaginative. FOR VIRGINIA TEACHERS – RELATED STANDARDS OF LEARNING (SOLs) AND OTHER INFORMATION Following are some Virginia Standards of Learning (SOLs) that may be supported by this episode's audio/transcript, sources, or other information included in this post. 2020 Music SOLs SOLs at various grade levels that call for “examining the relationship of music to the other fine arts and other fields of knowledge.” 2018 Science SOLs Grades K-3 plus 5: MatterK.4 – Water is important in our daily lives and has properties.3.3 – Materials interact with water. Grades K-4: Living Systems and Processes4.2 – Plants and animals h

kids new york science bay university agency music natural halloween state audio college sound composition materials accent dark tech water frankenstein superman web cells index rain pond research ocean government education plants fandom wonder woman vol school illustration philadelphia netherlands chesapeake bay ohio chesapeake snow penn environment neuroscience skeleton heart witch oberlin college va disease anatomy amsterdam monster msonormal new year blood atlantic stream flashing normal worddocument zoom donotshowrevisions citizens environmental american society times new roman trackmoves trackformatting punctuationkerning saveifxmlinvalid ignoremixedcontent compatibility breakwrappedtables dontgrowautofit latentstyles deflockedstate latentstylecount latentstyles style definitions msonormaltable table normal donotpromoteqf lidthemeother lidthemeasian x none snaptogridincell wraptextwithpunct useasianbreakrules mathpr mathfont cambria math brkbin brkbinsub smallfrac dispdef lmargin rmargin defjc centergroup wrapindent intlim subsup narylim undovr defunhidewhenused defsemihidden defqformat defpriority lsdexception locked priority semihidden unhidewhenused qformat name normal name title name default paragraph font name subtitle name strong name emphasis name table grid name placeholder text name no spacing name light shading name light list name light grid name medium shading name medium list name medium grid name dark list name colorful shading name colorful list name colorful grid name light shading accent name light list accent name light grid accent name revision name list paragraph name quote name intense quote name dark list accent name colorful shading accent name colorful list accent name colorful grid accent name subtle emphasis name intense emphasis name subtle reference name intense reference name book title name bibliography name toc heading shenandoah biology chemical conservatory grade nutrients oberlin colorful national institutes yale school signature bio wild turkey manhattan school human body watershed transcript nervous system virginia tech neurological ls atlantic ocean natural resources grades k function pretend erin blakemore name normal indent name list name list bullet name list number name closing name signature name body text name body text indent name list continue name message header name salutation name date name body text first indent name note heading name block text name document map name plain text name e name normal web name normal table name no list name outline list name table simple name table classic name table colorful name table columns name table list name table 3d name table contemporary name table elegant name table professional name table subtle name table web name balloon text name table theme name plain table name grid table light name grid table light accent dark accent colorful accent name list table processes medical science circulation smithsonian magazine textbooks bristol england blacksburg american red cross franklin institute memorial sloan kettering cancer center cosgrove msohyperlink hematology runoff sections life sciences ben cosgrove stormwater policymakers elsevier human biology blood vessels bmp acknowledgment muscular virginia department cumberland gap sols tmdl michigan health geological survey mayo clinic health system lymphatic system peter abrahams torrin circulatory blood cells living systems virginia standards water center audio notes
Free Library Podcast
Woody Holton | Liberty Is Sweet: The Hidden History of the American Revolution

Free Library Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 71:22


In conversation with Adam McNeil, host of the New Books in African American Studies podcast The McCausland Professor of History at the University of South Carolina, Woody Holton teaches early U.S. history, specializing in economics, African American history, Indigenous history, and women's history. His many books include the Bancroft Prize–winning biography Abigail Adams; Forced Founders, winner of the Merle Curti Award from the Organization of American Historians; and Unruly Americans and the Origins of the Constitution, a National Book Award finalist. He is also the recipient of fellowships from the National Endowment for the Humanities and the Guggenheim Foundation. In Liberty Is Sweet, Holton uses more than a thousand primary accounts to offer a wide-ranging reassessment of marginalized peoples' contributions to U.S. independence and their conflicts with the values, decisions, and agendas of the Founding Fathers. Adam McNeil is a Ph.D. Candidate in the Department of History at Rutgers University, where he writes about Black Women from the Chesapeake Bay during the Revolutionary and Founding eras. Adam's research has been supported by fellowships from the University of Michigan's Clements Library, the David Center for the American Revolution at the American Philosophical Society, and the Omohundro Institute of Early American History & Culture. In addition to academic writing, Adam regularly contributes to academic blogs Black Perspectives and The Junto, and regularly interviews scholars on the New Books in African American Studies podcast, where he has interviewed nearly one hundred scholars about their works in African American Studies and African American History.  (recorded 10/28/2021)

Chesapeake Almanac
October: River Meanders

Chesapeake Almanac

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 8:00


Vienna is an old town built on the outside of a sweeping curve, called a meander, in the Nanticoke River. In this episode, John Page explains how meanders shape the landscape, why so many early settlements were established on the outsides of these curves, and why wildlife habitat flourishes on the insides. https://www.cbf.org/news-media/multimedia/podcasts/chesapeake-almanac/podcast-october-river-meanders-transcript.html (TRANSCRIPT) Subscribe to our https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLZl3AavpVQS882rCUi-CREBsfPEPgN0mf (Chesapeake Almanac playlist). Or subscribe on your favorite podcast platform or visit our podcast page at https://www.cbf.org/ChesapeakeAlmanac (https://www.cbf.org/ChesapeakeAlmanac). Chesapeake Almanac is provided by the Chesapeake Bay Foundation - Saving the Bay through Education, Advocacy, Litigation, and Restoration. Find out more about our work to save the Chesapeake Bay and its watershed's rivers and streams, and what you can do to help, at https://www.cbf.org (https://www.cbf.org). These readings are from John Page Williams, Jr.'s book, Chesapeake Almanac: Following the Bay through the Seasons. The publication is available in print at https://www.amazon.com/Chesapeake-Almanac-Following-Through-Seasons/dp/0870334492/ref=sr_1_1 (Amazon.com). Support this podcast

Bleav in Bravo! East Coast Housewives
Gordon 'Licking' Out for Karen...Yes, Not 'Looking'

Bleav in Bravo! East Coast Housewives

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 42:56


The eastern shore trip ends with the happiest ending in housewives history...umm, yeah, depending on which housewife producers spoke to...Wendy gave herself a 10/10 as a hostess, while Robyn ranked her as -5. Gordon was coming for Ashley, who was sleeping in the van on the ride home, saying he was having fun with her. Heaven forbid Karen pops out of a big cake for Ray for their pre-vow renewal celebration while Gordon is licking out for her. All these shenanigans bring out the best and worst of our gals, so tune in now for my thoughts on all RHOP and the upcoming season finale. WTB covers Teresa's engagement, LVP's daughter, Pandora, my thoughts on Winter House, and Andy Cohen giving us Bravoholics what we want!Follow ME @bravoyinzerFollow us @bleavpodcasts and @bleavpopcultureon the IG, honey!See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

The History of the Americans
Set Fair for Roanoke Part 4

The History of the Americans

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 36:21


This episode looks at the fate of the 15 settlers Sir Richard Grenville had left on Roanoke Island in 1586, and the expedition of 1587, which Sir Walter Ralegh, John White, and more or less everybody else intended to land at Chesapeake Bay. They never got there, and after August 26, 1587, no English person would ever see them again. Oh, and we meet Virginia Dare! Link to the Merch! (Scroll down) Selected references for this episode James Horn, A Kingdom Strange: The Brief and Tragic History of the Lost Colony of Roanoke David Beers Quinn, Set Fair for Roanoke: Voyages and Colonies, 1584-1606 Mary Queen of Scots (2018) execution scene

Chesapeake Uncharted
Animal Upheaval

Chesapeake Uncharted

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 36:26


What oysters in the sea and birds in the marsh tell us about our changing Chesapeake.

Our Numinous Nature
THE INVESTIGATION OF GHOSTS & THE ROUTING OF DEMONS | Paranormal Investigator | Linda Cassada

Our Numinous Nature

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 135:19


Linda Cassada is a paranormal investigator with VAPI: Virginia Paranormal Investigations out of Hampton, VA on the Chesapeake Bay. With her grounded & unique Christian approach, we get straight to the brass tacks of residential paranormal investigation: fake ghost reality-TV; the equipment; folks reaching out for help; theories for what ghosts are; & how 90% of cases have natural & mundane explanations. It's the remaining 10% that enters the dark waters of infinite mystery, Linda describes cases with ghost communication, activity around mirrors, & most unnerving of all when the haunting is no traditional ghost, but a malevolent entity that wreaks havoc on people & their homes.  For story time, Linda shares a terrifying personal account of just such one investigation around a grisly crime & the parasitic nature of these demonic forces. On a lighter note, she tells her Halloweeny love story about how she got into the calling through a series of events that led straight to her partner & his mutual passion for the paranormal.  We end hearing about local hot spots & accounts of some disturbing, yet comical run-ins with people in deranged states.Check out Virginia Paranormal Investigators and Linda or the VAPI team on Instagram.Follow Our Numinous Nature & my naturalist illustrations on InstagramCheck out my shop of shirts, prints, and books featuring my artContact: herbaceoushuman@gmail.com

Chesapeake Almanac
October: Oyster Toadfish: A Success at Parenting

Chesapeake Almanac

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 6:48


From an angler's point of view, the oyster toadfish might not be good for much. But their parenting technique varies greatly from most of the fish that end up on the dinner table. In this episode, John Page reflects on how his father shared the story of a why a fish with a face only a parent could love deserves some parenting respect. https://www.cbf.org/news-media/multimedia/podcasts/chesapeake-almanac/podcast-october-oyster-toadfish-transcript.html (TRANSCRIPT) Subscribe to our https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLZl3AavpVQS882rCUi-CREBsfPEPgN0mf (Chesapeake Almanac playlist). Or subscribe on your favorite podcast platform or visit our podcast page at https://www.cbf.org/ChesapeakeAlmanac (https://www.cbf.org/ChesapeakeAlmanac). Chesapeake Almanac is provided by the Chesapeake Bay Foundation - Saving the Bay through Education, Advocacy, Litigation, and Restoration. Find out more about our work to save the Chesapeake Bay and its watershed's rivers and streams, and what you can do to help, at https://www.cbf.org (https://www.cbf.org). These readings are from John Page Williams, Jr.'s book, Chesapeake Almanac: Following the Bay through the Seasons. The publication is available in print at https://www.amazon.com/Chesapeake-Almanac-Following-Through-Seasons/dp/0870334492/ref=sr_1_1 (Amazon.com). Support this podcast

Bleav in Bravo! East Coast Housewives
Ray and Gizelle Have a Moment

Bleav in Bravo! East Coast Housewives

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 45:58


The eastern shore trip continues at Foxy's with temper tantrums performed by our RHOP Candiace and Ashley. Will these ladies ever see eye to eye? Candiace and Chris have another 'father, daughter' type of moment that I question. Will someone please get Robyn a hotel room so she can tend to her cycle? Ray shows up to the house and do we see a rekindling moment between him and Gizelle? Tune in now to check out how the trip ends after their boat excursion and whether any apologies were made. WTB covers Lala and Randall's split, the Below Deck Med finale/reunion, Winter House, and why Austen Kroll is highly annoying me!Follow ME @bravoyinzerFollow us @bleavpodcasts and @bleavpopcultureon the IG, honey!See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Virginia Water Radio
Episode 599 (10-18-21): A Day to Weigh Water's Worth

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021


CLICK HERE to listen to episode audio (5:00).Sections below are the following: Transcript of Audio Audio Notes and Acknowledgments Images Sources Related Water Radio Episodes For Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.). Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 10-15-21. TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the week of October 18, 2021. SOUND – ~8 sec This week, those abrupt stops to the sounds of the Roanoke River, Gray Tree Frogs, and a household water faucet set the stage for an episode marking the observance of “Imagine a Day without Water,” to be held this year on October 21.  We start with some music designed to help you do such imagining.  Have a listen for about 40 seconds. MUSIC  - ~42 sec – instrumental You've been listening to “Flow Stopper,” by Torrin Hallett, a graduate student at the Yale School of Music.  Besides flowing rivers, calling frogs, and household faucets, almost any aspect of life could be affected by a lack of water, including the biological structures and functions that make life possible.  Increasing the awareness of water uses and needs is a goal of the “Imagine a Day Without Water” campaign.  According to the event's Web site, the effort is, quote, “a national education campaign that brings together diverse stakeholders to highlight how water is essential, invaluable, and in need of investment,” unquote.  The event is part of the “Value of Water Campaign,” focused on water infrastructure needs.  These campaigns are coordinated by the US Water Alliance, a non-profit organization made up of people from water utilities, government, business, other non-profits, communities, and research establishments. Worldwide, billions of people don't have to imagine lacking good water.  According to the United Nations, as of 2019 over 2 billion people lacked access to safely managed drinking water, and over 4 billion people lacked access to safely managed sanitation. In the United States, the American Society of Civil Engineers' water infrastructure “Report Card” for 2021 estimated over $1 trillion needed through 2029 for drinking water, wastewater, and stormwater, with $434 billion of that not yet funded. And in Virginia, the Department of Environmental Quality's 2020 “Water Resources Report” identified several water challenges, including maintaining groundwater availability over the next 50 years; coordinating water planning among localities; gauging the impact of unpermitted water withdrawals; understanding stream water quality and ecology; and investing in water-resources personnel, science, and education. Water is fundamental for energy, commerce, industry, agriculture, aquatic and terrestrial life, and human biology.  Imagining a day without water—and learning about where water's lacking—can help us envision and work toward well-watered future days. Thanks to Torrin Hallett for composing this week's music for Virginia Water Radio, and we close with another listen to the last 10 seconds of “Flow Stopper.” MUSIC  - 10 sec – instrumental SHIP'S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech's College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Ben Cosgrove for his version of “Shenandoah” to open and close the show.  In Blacksburg, I'm Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The sounds at the beginning of this episode, all recorded by Virginia Water Radio, are as follows:Roanoke River on from the Roanoke River Greenway between Franklin Road and Smith Park in Roanoke, Va., December 6, 2020;Gray Tree Frogs at Heritage Park in Blacksburg, Va., July 8, 2016;Household water faucet in a Blacksburg, Va., residence, November 17, 2013. “Flow Stopper” is copyright 2021 by Torrin Hallett, used with permission.  Torrin is a 2018 graduate of Oberlin College and Conservatory in Oberlin, Ohio; a 2020 graduate in Horn Performance from Manhattan School of Music in New York; and a 2021 graduate of the Lamont School of Music at the University of Denver.  He is currently a graduate student at the Yale School of Music.  More information about Torrin is available online at https://www.facebook.com/torrin.hallett.  Thanks very much to Torrin for composing the piece especially for Virginia Water Radio.  Following are other music pieces composed by Torrin for Virginia Water Radio, with episodes featuring the music. “A Little Fright Music” – used in Episode 548, 10-26-20, on water-related passages in fiction and non-fiction, for Halloween.“Beetle Ballet” – used in Episode 525, 5-18-20, on aquatic beetles.“Chesapeake Bay Ballad” – used in Episode 537, 8-10-20, on conditions in the Chesapeake Bay.“Corona Cue” – used in Episode 517, 3-23-20, on the coronavirus pandemic.“Geese Piece” – used most recently in Episode 440, 10-1-18, on E-bird. “Ice Dance” – used in Episode 556, 12-21-20, on how organisms survive freezing temperatures.“Lizard Lied” – used in Episode 514, 3-2-20, on lizards.“New Year's Water” – used in Episode 349, 1-2-17, on the New Year. “Rain Refrain” – used most recently Episode 559, 1-11-21, on record rainfall in 2020.“Runoff” – in Episode 585, 7-12-21 – on middle-school students calling out stormwater-related water words.“Spider Strike” – used in Episode 523, 5-4-20, on fishing spiders.“Tropical Tantrum” – used most recently in Episode 580, 6-7-21, on the 2021 Atlantic tropical storm season preview.“Tundra Swan Song – used in Episode 554, 12-7-20, on Tundra Swans.“Turkey Tune” – used in Episode 343, 11-21-16, on the Wild Turkey.  Click here if you'd like to hear the full version (2 min./22 sec.) of the “Shenandoah” arrangement/performance by Ben Cosgrove that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Cosgrove is available online at http://www.bencosgrove.com. IMAGES “Imagine a Day Without Water” campaign logo, accessed online at  https://imagineadaywithoutwater.org/resources. Roanoke River, looking upstream from the Roanoke River Greenway between Franklin Road and Smith Park in Roanoke, Va., December 6, 2020.  This is the location where the river sound heard in this Virginia Water Radio episode was recorded. SOURCES Used For Audio American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE), “2021 Report Card for America's Infrastructure,” online at https://infrastructurereportcard.org/. United Nations, “Global Issues/Water,” online at https://www.un.org/en/global-issues/water. U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), “Water Use Data for Virginia,” online at https://waterdata.usgs.gov/va/nwis/water_use/. US Water Alliance, online at http://uswateralliance.org/. Value of Water Campaign, online at http://thevalueofwater.org/. Virginia Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ), “Status of Virginia's Water Resources: A Report on Virginia's Water Resources Management Activities,” October 2020, online (as a PDF) at https://www.deq.virginia.gov/home/showpublisheddocument/2119/637432838113030000.  The section on”Water Resource Challenges and Priorities” starts of page 27. Value of Water Campaign, “Imagine a Day Without Water,” online at https://imagineadaywithoutwater.org/; this site is the source of the quote used in this episode's audio. World Health Organization (WHO), “Drinking Water,” June 14, 2019, online at https://www.who.int/news-room/fact-sheets/detail/drinking-water. For More Information on Current Water Infrastructure Needs and Funds PBS NewsHour, “How the infrastructure bill delivers on clean water—and how it falls short,” August 4, 2021 (7 min./2 sec. video, with online transcript). U.S. Department of Agriculture, “Biden-Harris Administration Invests $272 Million to Improve Rural Water Infrastructure for 270,000 People Living in Rural Communities Across the Country,” October 14, 2021, News Release. Virginia Governor's Office, “Governor Northam Announces Virginia to Reduce Water Pollution, Increase Access to Clean Water,” July 27, 2021, News Release. RELATED VIRGINIA WATER RADIO EPISODES All Water Radio episodes are listed by category at the Index link above (http://www.virginiawaterradio.org/p/index.html).  See particularly the “Overall Importance of Water” and “Water Quality, Waste Management, and Water/Wastewater Treatment” subject categories. Following are links to some previous episodes with information on water uses or needs. Episode 122, 8-6-12 – on worldwide water needs.Episode 372, 6-12-17 – on water infrastructure needs, including information from the American Society of Civil Engineers' “Report Card for America's Infrastructure” for 2017.Episode 592, 6-15-20 – on Virginia's biennial water-quality assessment in 2020. FOR VIRGINIA TEACHERS – RELATED STANDARDS OF LEARNING (SOLs) AND OTHER INFORMATION Following are some Virginia Standards of Learning (SOLs) that may be supported by this episode's audio/transcript, sources, or other information included in this post. 2020 Music SOLs SOLs at various grade levels that call for “examining the relationship of music to the other fine arts and other fields of knowledge.” 2018 Science SOLs Grades K-3 plus 5: MatterK.4 – Water is important in our daily lives and has properties, Grades K-5: Earth and Space Systems3.7 – There is a water cycle and water is important to life on Earth.4.7 – The ocean environment. Grades K-5: Earth ResourcesK.11 – Humans use resources.1.8 – Natural resources can be used responsibly, including that most natural resources are limited; and that human actions can affect the availability of natural resources.3.8 – Natural events and humans influence ecosystems.4.8 – Virginia has important natural resources.5.9 – Conservation of energy resources is important. Grade 66.6 – Water has unique physical properties and has a role in the natural and human-made environment.6.8 – Land and water have roles in watershed systems.6.9 – Humans impact the environment and individuals can influence public policy decisions related to energy and the environment. Life ScienceLS.9 – Relationships exist between ecosystem dynamics and human activity. Earth ScienceES.6 – Resource use is complex.ES.8 – Freshwater resources influence and are influenced by geologic processes and human activity. BiologyBIO.2 – Chemical and biochemical processes are essential for life, including that water chemistry has an influence on life processes.BIO.8 – Dynamic equilibria exist within populations, communities, and ecosystems, including that natural events and human activities influence local and global ecosystems and may affect the flora and fauna of Virginia. 2015 Social Studies SOLs Grades K-3 Economics Theme2.8 – Natural, human, and capital resources.3.8 – Understanding of cultures and of how natural, human, and capital resources are used for goods and services. Civics and Economics CourseCE.6 – Government at the national level.CE.7 – Government at the state level.CE.8 – Government at the local level.CE.10 – Public policy at local, state, and national levels. World Geography CourseWG.2 – How selected physical and ecological processes shape the Earth's surface, including climate, weather, and how humans influence their environment and are influenced by it.WG.4 – Types and significance of natural, human, and capital resources.WG.18 – Cooperation among political jurisdictions to solve problems and settle disputes. Government CourseGOVT.7 – National government organization and powers.GOVT.8 – State and local government organization and powers.GOVT.9 – Public policy process at local, state, and nati

new york office bay humans university agency america music national natural halloween relationships earth state audio college sound accent worldwide dark tech water web status index land rain united states pond research ocean government education public conservation chesapeake bay ohio chesapeake snow environment types images oberlin college cooperation agriculture united nations va msonormal new year atlantic stream normal worddocument zoom donotshowrevisions citizens arial environmental dynamic american society times new roman trackmoves trackformatting punctuationkerning saveifxmlinvalid ignoremixedcontent compatibility breakwrappedtables dontgrowautofit latentstyles deflockedstate latentstylecount latentstyles style definitions msonormaltable table normal donotpromoteqf lidthemeother lidthemeasian x none snaptogridincell wraptextwithpunct useasianbreakrules mathpr mathfont cambria math brkbin brkbinsub smallfrac dispdef lmargin rmargin defjc centergroup wrapindent intlim subsup narylim undovr defunhidewhenused defsemihidden defqformat defpriority lsdexception locked priority semihidden unhidewhenused qformat name normal name title name default paragraph font name subtitle name strong name emphasis name table grid name placeholder text name no spacing name light shading name light list name light grid name medium shading name medium list name medium grid name dark list name colorful shading name colorful list name colorful grid name light shading accent name light list accent name light grid accent name revision name list paragraph name quote name intense quote name dark list accent name colorful shading accent name colorful list accent name colorful grid accent name subtle emphasis name intense emphasis name subtle reference name intense reference name book title name bibliography name toc heading shenandoah water resources biology chemical conservatory civics grade oberlin colorful resource yale school signature bio priorities wild turkey manhattan school increasing govt watershed transcript infrastructure earth sciences waste management water quality household wg roanoke river freshwater virginia tech ls atlantic ocean natural resources weigh grades k roanoke drinking water imagining environmental quality name normal indent name list name list bullet name list number name closing name signature name body text name body text indent name list continue name message header name salutation name date name body text first indent name note heading name block text name document map name plain text name e name normal web name normal table name no list name outline list name table simple name table classic name table colorful name table columns name table list name table 3d name table contemporary name table elegant name table professional name table subtle name table web name balloon text name table theme name plain table name grid table light name grid table light accent dark accent colorful accent name list table clean water blacksburg virginia governor funds cosgrove pbs newshour msohyperlink world health organization who runoff sections life sciences ben cosgrove stormwater policymakers msobodytext bmp heritage park acknowledgment civil engineers virginia department cumberland gap news release sols people living tmdl report card torrin virginia standards water center space systems audio notes franklin road
Business with Purpose
Using Grit and Innovation to Grow a Multi-Million Dollar Business | EP 267: Mei Xu, Chesapeake Bay Candle Co.

Business with Purpose

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 56:50


She is the author of Burn, which details her story of ingenuity, determination, and luck. Spanning three decades, from 1991 when she arrived at Washington's Dulles Airport, to today, Mei's story is one of stunning success. She built a multi-million-dollar company, met and counseled thousands of entrepreneurs and business people, and even advised the President of the United States Barack Obama on the topic of job creation. Mei successfully negotiated the sale of Chesapeake Bay Candle to Newell Brands in 2017, a conglomerate with a $14 billion portfolio of consumer goods. She is now focused on helping women-owned consumer product companies grow and prosper with the Yes She May product platform. 4:40 – Mei 101 Mei grew up in China and was one of two daughters. Her parents told them they could do anything boys could do. At age 12, she enrolled in a foreign language middle school, and that was a big turning point for her. It allowed her a chance to find out what it would be like to be a diplomat. 11:50 – Making candles Mei's dad found out she was making candles and was very confused. He said, “What does a candle do?” If you're afraid to start something new, Mei says, “You have to roll up your sleeves and find whatever it takes to get started.” 21:50 – Billion-dollar industry Candles are a billion-dollar industry. They speak to her audience and are popular, especially around Christmas. People didn't burn her candles in the beginning because they were too decorative and pretty. So, she realized she wanted people to burn them so they would buy more. 27:22 – Do it better We need to ask ourselves how to do things better and get more women involved in the supply chain and manufacturing.  36:13 – Yes She May Mei wants to connect consumers with brands that are owned by women They searched around the world for designers and brands in beauty, fashion and wellness. 41:52 – Women-owned businesses Mei says very few women-owned businesses make more than $250,000 a year. That can make it hard to get your products in Target, Macys or other large stores. 44:51 – Burn book Her book is about preservation and the immigrant story. You can never abandon where you came from. Your story could inspire other people. 50:14 – Get to know you Who would play Mei in a movie? Reese Witherspoon Hidden or unusual talents? She has great comedic timing and instinct Best vacation? Sardinia boat trip FEATURED QUOTES The pandemic also made me realize that we are really all connected. It sounds dazzling just to think, as a student, as a diplomat, how does she end up making candles? My dad was very confused. You have to roll up your sleeves and find whatever it takes to get started. CONNECT WITH MEI: https://www.meixu.com/ https://yesshemay.com/ ABOUT MEI XU: Mei Xu, a Chinese American entrepreneur, is the founder and CEO of two global companies, Yes She May and Chesapeake Bay Candle® and author of Burn which details her journey from China to starting and growing a multi-million-dollar business in the U.S. In June 2020, Mei created the e-commerce platform, Yes She May (www.YesSheMay.com) to help women-owned brands reach a larger audience and scale. Her team aims to provide consumers a curated collection of thoughtful, high quality products made by talented women vendors from around the world. THANK YOU TO OUR PARTNERS:  Ready to ditch the bleach forever but can't find a bleach alternative that actually works? You've got to meet this Extra Strength Oxygen Powder by MamaSuds. It launches July 15th and I've had the chance to try it out early and I love it so much! It really tackles the dirt and odor in our clothes. And as usual there are multiple uses for this new product. Not only is it a laundry booster and stain remover, but it's a great scouring agent on any non-porous surface. If you head to their website and sign up for their email list you'll get an email with an early bird special coupon when oxygen powder launches PLUS use discount code MOLLY and get an EXTRA 15% off! www.mamasuds.com ---- Speaking of stories behind brands that change the world, I'd like to introduce you to Deux Mains. In French, Deux Mains means two hands. Why ‘two-hands'? Because everything they create is made by trained artisans who use their two hands to make their life better while crafting beautiful products. Truly, this is a company that set out to change lives and make a positive impact in the world. It started when the founder, Julie, wanted to create dignified jobs in Haiti, a place she was growing to love, and that was exploding with creativity. She wanted to share this talent with the world. Julie set up an educational program to train people with artisan skills and then went on to build a factory that operates on 100% solar energy. Deux Mains now employs more than 40 artisans that handcraft premium leather goods, jewelry and sandals. Their lives are forever changed by their craft. What's also cool is their products incorporate an eco-friendly twist, working with responsibly sourced materials and repurposed inner-tube and tires in their designs. When you buy from Deux Mains, you get to be part of a movement that is making a difference in the world, while adding an incredibly well-made piece to your closet that supports conscious living! You can discover their products online at deuxmains.com and use code MOLLY for 15% off!

Chesapeake Almanac
October: Harvesttime

Chesapeake Almanac

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 9:01


As fall sets in, it's harvesttime around the Chesapeake. Finfish have fattened up on summer's bounty and the marshes provide a bumper crop of nutritious seed. Those who will enjoy this harvest are a remarkably varied lot. In this episode, John Page paints an autumn picture of the cornucopia of the Bay and the varied and ever-moving species partaking of its harvest feast. https://www.cbf.org/news-media/multimedia/podcasts/chesapeake-almanac/podcast-october-harvesttime-transcript.html (TRANSCRIPT) Subscribe to our https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLZl3AavpVQS882rCUi-CREBsfPEPgN0mf (Chesapeake Almanac playlist). Or subscribe on your favorite podcast platform or visit our podcast page at https://www.cbf.org/ChesapeakeAlmanac (https://www.cbf.org/ChesapeakeAlmanac). Chesapeake Almanac is provided by the Chesapeake Bay Foundation - Saving the Bay through Education, Advocacy, Litigation, and Restoration. Find out more about our work to save the Chesapeake Bay and its watershed's rivers and streams, and what you can do to help, at https://www.cbf.org (https://www.cbf.org). These readings are from John Page Williams, Jr.'s book, Chesapeake Almanac: Following the Bay through the Seasons. The publication is available in print at https://www.amazon.com/Chesapeake-Almanac-Following-Through-Seasons/dp/0870334492/ref=sr_1_1 (Amazon.com). Support this podcast

Bleav in Bravo! East Coast Housewives
It's Throuple Season, Not Couple Season

Bleav in Bravo! East Coast Housewives

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 50:02


It's the second day of the couples weekend at the eastern shore. Robyn and Gizelle finally arrive to introduce the newest season, throuple season. The green eyed bandits form the throuple with solo Ashley for the salad throwing extravaganza. They get the tea from her with the current status of Mia and Candiace. We finally see a lovely moment with Gizelle and Karen being friends. Is Wendy a good hostess for all the ladies? Why isn't there a bathroom in Gizelle and Robyn's room? Who ends up arguing at the final dinner scene of the episode? I'm sure you guessed correctly. WTB covers RHOA Phaedra Parks new venture, Erika Jayne, Lisa Vanderpump, and the old news about Nicki Minaj. Tune in now!Follow ME @bravoyinzerFollow us @bleavpodcasts and @bleavpopcultureon the IG, honey!See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

What'sHerName
THE PIRATE Ching Shih

What'sHerName

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 43:08


She was the most powerful pirate in the history of the world – and you've probably never heard her name. How did this brilliant, ruthless, utterly unstoppable woman manage to dodge the Chinese, British and Portuguese navies for a decade, and still end up left out of the history books? Our guest Dr. Jamie Goodall, author of Pirates of the Chesapeake Bay, introduces us to this enigmatic and fascinating figure.           … The post THE PIRATE Ching Shih appeared first on What'shername.

The SmallmouthCrush Podcast
Benjamin Nowak talks big water Smallmouth Bass Fishing

The SmallmouthCrush Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2021 57:59


GET 15% OFF ALL YOUR TACKLE HERE! The Reel Shot Tackle Store -https://bit.ly/2YtVLRLSMALLMOUTHCRUSHUSE CODE SMALLMOUTHCRUSH15 for 15% your order! Get your MONSTERBASS Here!https://bit.ly/CushMonsterBassCatching trophy smallmouth bass on a consistent basis can be a challenge.  So many techniques and so many different patterns can sometimes make it confusing where to start when targeting smallmouth bass.  Each Sunday join Travis Manson as he interviews guests who are at the top of their game when it comes to catching smallmouth bass.Season 1 Episode 41 Travis talks with Benjamin Nowak.  He discusses fishing some of his favorite bodies of water in Michigan and goes into great details some of his tricks he uses.Follow Benjamin Nowak on Instagram https://www.instagram.com/brnowak_fishing/Check out his Website here! https://www.brnowakfishing.com/His Youtube Channel https://www.youtube.com/c/benjaminnowak10Follow us on Instagram @SmallmouthCrush https://www.instagram.com/smallmouthcrush/Follow The Bass Lab Tackle Freak Himself Epic Eric @epicericoffical https://www.instagram.com/epicericofficial/WOW CHECK THIS OUT!! Special LIVE Show every month for Patreons!  Join my Patreon to get access to a special live show once a month!https://www.patreon.com/smallmouthcrushGet your SmallmouthCrush Merchandise Here! Still have plenty of Buffs in stock and you can get 2 buffs for $13.00 Shipped Today! https://bit.ly/SmallmouthCrushStoreAre you interested in booking a One on One session with SmallmouthCrush?  Now you can set up a personal Online meeting to talk anything fishing related.  Do you want to talk about how to search for fish on your body of water or perhaps you have a tournament coming up on a specific body of water that you want to break down.  This is the place to get all your questions answered!https://bit.ly/CRUSHOneOnOneClick here to SUBSCRIBE to my channel:http://bit.ly/SmallmouthCrushYouTubeChannelMY GEAR! My Boat Dealer https://www.bowersmarine.com/My Nitro Boat https://www.nitro.com/My Mercury Engine https://www.mercurymarine.com/en/us/My Power Poles https://www.power-pole.com/My Charging System https://www.power-pole.com/chargeSt Croix Rods https://stcroixrods.link/smallmouthcrushGet your MONSTERBASS BOX USE CODE TRAVIS10 https://monsterbass.com/Gajo Baits https://www.gajobaits.com/GET ALL YOUR TACKLE HERE! USE CODE SMALLMOUTHCRUSH15 for 15% your order! https://bit.ly/2YtVLRLSMALLMOUTHCRUSHWho is SmallmouthCrush?Travis Manson was born and raised in Wisconsin. He started fishing from the bank at a young age and spent most of his childhood with a rod in his hand.  Travis is primarily a self-taught angler that is always learning and experiencing this amazing sport of fishing.  He started out fishing for walleyes and fishing in local walleye tournaments, but then in his mid 20's, he caught the BASS BUG and has been hooked ever since.  He competed at the highest level in bass fishing on the Bassmaster Elite Series for a number of years.  He is a full time fishing guide offering trips on the Chesapeake Bay for largemouth bass(year round) and trophy smallmouth bass guided trips in Upstate New York on Lake Ontario and the St Lawrence River. His Youtube Channel is named after his passion for the smallmouth bass and will be used as a platform for "how-to" videos, on the water instruction, crazy on and off the water topics on the day in the life of a fishing addict!  Hope you enjoy, and until next time we will see you on the water!#fishing #bassfishing #smallmouth #largemouth 

American Revolution Podcast
ARP221 Collier-Mathew Raids

American Revolution Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2021 31:50


Seeking to destroy Continental supplies, the British under Naval Captain George Collier and Army General Edward Mathew attack the Chesapeake Bay area in spring 1779. Shortly after the raids, Thomas Jefferson replaces Patrick Henry as governor of Virginia. Blog https://blog.AmRevPodcast.com includes a complete transcript, as well as pictures, and links related to this week's episode. Follow the podcast on Twitter @AmRevPodcast Book Recommendations of the Week: Lion of Liberty: Patrick Henry and the Call to a New Nation, by Harlow Giles Unger Online Recommendation of the Week: Jefferson, Thomas as Governor of Virginia: https://encyclopediavirginia.org/entries/jefferson-thomas-as-governor-of-virginia Join the Facebook group, American Revolution Podcast: https://www.facebook.com/groups/132651894048271 Join the podcast mail list: https://mailchi.mp/d3445a9cd244/american-revolution-podcast-by-michael-troy ARP T-shirts and other merch: http://tee.pub/lic/AmRevPodcast Support this podcast on Patreon https://www.patreon.com/user?u=15621839 or via PayPal http://paypal.me/AmRevPodcast

American Revolution Podcast
ARP221 Collier-Mathew Raids

American Revolution Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2021 31:50


Seeking to destroy Continental supplies, the British under Naval Captain George Collier and Army General Edward Mathew attack the Chesapeake Bay area in spring 1779. Shortly after the raids, Thomas Jefferson replaces Patrick Henry as governor of Virginia. Blog https://blog.AmRevPodcast.com includes a complete transcript, as well as pictures, and links related to this week's episode. Follow the podcast on Twitter @AmRevPodcast Book Recommendations of the Week: Lion of Liberty: Patrick Henry and the Call to a New Nation, by Harlow Giles Unger Online Recommendation of the Week: Jefferson, Thomas as Governor of Virginia: https://encyclopediavirginia.org/entries/jefferson-thomas-as-governor-of-virginia Join the Facebook group, American Revolution Podcast: https://www.facebook.com/groups/132651894048271 Join the podcast mail list: https://mailchi.mp/d3445a9cd244/american-revolution-podcast-by-michael-troy ARP T-shirts and other merch: http://tee.pub/lic/AmRevPodcast Support this podcast on Patreon https://www.patreon.com/user?u=15621839 or via PayPal http://paypal.me/AmRevPodcast

Chesapeake Almanac
October Travelers: Ospreys and Canada Geese

Chesapeake Almanac

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 5:18


Two of the Bay's best-loved birds are traveling this month. Ospreys are migrating to South America, following their pattern of seeking endless summer. Canada geese are arriving for a more moderate wintering from the Ungava Peninsula in Quebec. In this episode, John Page provides some interesting insights into the October lives of these fall travelers. https://www.cbf.org/news-media/multimedia/podcasts/chesapeake-almanac/podcast-october-travelers-ospreys-and-canada-geese-transcript.html (TRANSCRIPT) Subscribe to our https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLZl3AavpVQS882rCUi-CREBsfPEPgN0mf (Chesapeake Almanac playlist). Or subscribe on your favorite podcast platform or visit our podcast page at https://www.cbf.org/ChesapeakeAlmanac (https://www.cbf.org/ChesapeakeAlmanac). Chesapeake Almanac is provided by the Chesapeake Bay Foundation - Saving the Bay through Education, Advocacy, Litigation, and Restoration. Find out more about our work to save the Chesapeake Bay and its watershed's rivers and streams, and what you can do to help, at https://www.cbf.org (https://www.cbf.org). These readings are from John Page Williams, Jr.'s book, Chesapeake Almanac: Following the Bay through the Seasons. The publication is available in print at https://www.amazon.com/Chesapeake-Almanac-Following-Through-Seasons/dp/0870334492/ref=sr_1_1 (Amazon.com). Support this podcast

Under The Sheets with the O'Kelly's
We're in a Movie Set

Under The Sheets with the O'Kelly's

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 29:45


This week we find ourselves in one of the most picturesque seaside towns in the Chesapeake Bay, St. Michaels. We update you on our new mainsail, a Leopard 46 meetup, and we chat about who exactly is out here cruising: retired? Sabbatical? Working and Cruising?

Chesapeake Almanac
September: Terns: Bright Sparks of Life

Chesapeake Almanac

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 8:55


Terns' flying skills make even ospreys look slow and ponderous--and make them captivating to watch. In this episode, John Page introduces us to some of the various species of terns in the Chesapeake--where they get their strength for their aerial acrobatics, their diet and habitat. And why human population pressure is harder on these bright sparks of life. TRANSCRIPT Subscribe to our https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLZl3AavpVQS882rCUi-CREBsfPEPgN0mf (Chesapeake Almanac playlist). Or subscribe on your favorite podcast platform or visit our podcast page at https://www.cbf.org/ChesapeakeAlmanac (https://www.cbf.org/ChesapeakeAlmanac). Chesapeake Almanac is provided by the Chesapeake Bay Foundation - Saving the Bay through Education, Advocacy, Litigation, and Restoration. Find out more about our work to save the Chesapeake Bay and its watershed's rivers and streams, and what you can do to help, at https://www.cbf.org (https://www.cbf.org). These readings are from John Page Williams, Jr.'s book, Chesapeake Almanac: Following the Bay through the Seasons. The publication is available in print at https://www.amazon.com/Chesapeake-Almanac-Following-Through-Seasons/dp/0870334492/ref=sr_1_1 (Amazon.com). Support this podcast

A Way with Words — language, linguistics, and callers from all over
Navel Gazing (Rebroadcast) - 27 September 2021

A Way with Words — language, linguistics, and callers from all over

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 51:26


In 1971, when a new public library opened in Troy, Michigan, famous authors and artists were invited to write letters to the city's youngest readers, extolling the many benefits of libraries. One of the loveliest was from E.B. White, author of Charlotte's Web. Plus, you may think navel-gazing is a relatively new idea -- but it goes back at least to the 14th century, when meditating monks really did look like they were studying their bellies! Also, why don't actors in movies say goodbye at the end of a phone conversation? For that matter, why don't some people answer their smartphones with "Hello"? Plus, a poetic puzzle, duke's mixture, small as the little end of nothing, Chesapeake Bay crabbing lingo, omphaloskepsis, nightingale, light a shuck, bumpity-scrapples, the big mahoff, and If a bullfrog had wings, he wouldn't bump his butt. Read full show notes, hear hundreds of free episodes, send your thoughts and questions, and learn more on the A Way with Words website: https://waywordradio.org/contact. Be a part of the show: call 1 (877) 929-9673 toll-free in the United States and Canada; worldwide, call or text/SMS +1 (619) 800-4443. Email words@waywordradio.org. Twitter @wayword. Copyright Wayword, Inc., a 501(c)(3) corporation.

Charleston Time Machine
Episode 215: The Roots of Spain's Claim to South Carolina, 1513–1670

Charleston Time Machine

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 25:46


From Spanish perspective, the colony of La Florida once encompassed all of the land from the Florida Keys to the southern edge of the Chesapeake Bay. The creation of the Carolina colony in the 1660s usurped the northern half of that broad landscape, however, and sparked a fierce rivalry that shaped the first century of South Carolina's early history.

Midday
The Midday News Wrap: Top Local Stories From The WYPR News Team

Midday

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 42:43


It's the Midday Newswrap. Today, we're going to focus on local stories with three members of WYPR's award-winning news team. John Lee covers Baltimore County for WYPR, and won a 2020 Chesapeake AP Broadcasters Association Award for his series of reports on COVID-19's impact on the Baltimore County Schools. He joins Tom today on our digital line to discuss the story he broke last week about a devastating auditor's report on the Baltimore County School system that described the school board as dysfunctional, the central office as bloated, and found systemic problems of low morale and poor communications. Rachel Baye, WYPR'S Statehouse and Maryland politics correspondent, whose reporting on kids in the Maryland foster care system won her a prestigious 2021 National Edward R. Murrow award, joins Tom on our digital line to discuss her recent coverage of the Columbia hotel that laid off its employees last year because of the pandemic and took $2.5 million in federal PPP loans this year, but has so far failed to rehire or compensate its laid-off workers. Rachel also describes the ongoing battles over mask mandates in the state's public schools, and the latest legislative efforts to legalize recreational marijuana in Maryland. Joel McCord has been WYPR's News Director since 2012, and also covers the Chesapeake Bay region and various counties throughout the state. In 2019, Joel won a Chesapeake AP Broadcasters Association Award for his moving commentary on the mass shooting that killed five staffers at the Capital Gazette newspaper, in his home town of Annapolis. Today he joins Tom on Zoom to discuss his recent reporting of improved prospects for a proposed Chesapeake Bay Bridge replacement, following signs of a compromise from a long-time critic of the plan, Anne Arundel County Supervisor Steuart Pittman. And Joel recaps his coverage of the Talbot County Council's vote on September 16 to remove the Talbot Boys Confederate monument from the courthouse lawn in Easton. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Chesapeake Uncharted
Let's Talk (More) Infrastructure

Chesapeake Uncharted

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 33:31


Fighting sea level rise doesn't have to mean a huge construction project. Here, we examine policies and green solutions that could save coastal communities in the Chesapeake Bay region.

The Environment in Focus
Final Episode: A Vanishing Island, the End of an Adventure

The Environment in Focus

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 4:28


The Chesapeake Bay is full of history that is slipping away before our eyes. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

VPM Daily Newscast
09/17/21 - Nurse Shortage Limits Testing Options in Chesterfield Schools

VPM Daily Newscast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2021 5:12


A shortage of nurses is limiting options for COVID-19 testing in Chesterfield County schools; The commission drawing Virginia's new General Assembly and congressional maps voted unanimously this week that it won't be guided by political data or where incumbents live; Nearly three-quarters of Virginia voters view the health of the Chesapeake Bay as important according to a new poll; and other local news stories.

The Fisheries Podcast
138 - Sampling Coastal Marine Ecosystems and Communicating Science with Carmen Ritter

The Fisheries Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2021 41:50


In this episode, Kadie interviews Carmen Ritter. Carmen is a biological technician for the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center where she works on a variety of coastal marine ecosystem projects. Kadie and Carmen chat about how a semester long sailing trip led Carmen to change her career trajectory from computer science to ocean conservation, her current work sampling coastal marine ecosystems in Alaska and the Chesapeake Bay, as well as the importance of science communication.   Main Point: Love other people well, and you'll have better conversations!   Follow Carmen on Instagram and Twitter @ocean_critter!   Get in touch with us! The Fisheries Podcast is on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram: @FisheriesPod  Become a Patron of the show: https://www.patreon.com/FisheriesPodcast Buy podcast shirts, hoodies, sticker, and more: https://teespring.com/stores/the-fisheries-podcast-fan-shop Thanks as always to Andrew Gialanella for the fantastic intro/outro music. The Fisheries Podcast is a completely independent podcast, not affiliated with a larger organization or entity. Reference to any specific product or entity does not constitute an endorsement or recommendation by the podcast. The views expressed by guests are their own and their appearance on the program does not imply an endorsement of them or any entity they represent. Views and opinions expressed by the hosts are those of that individual and do not necessarily reflect the view of any entity with those individuals are affiliated in other capacities (such as employers).

FUELED
FUELED #18: Chesapeake Bay Retrievers with Craig Klein

FUELED

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2021 52:26


In this episode of Fueled we talk with Craig Klein of Fischer Kennels and Hunt Club in Albany, MN (http://fischerskennels.com/). We talk about Craig's early years and what let him down the path of becoming a professional dog trainer. What sets his training program apart and the knowledge he would like people to have prior to getting a puppy or sending a puppy to training. From there we get a little more in-depth into the Chesapeake breed. We talk about what drew him to the breed and the unique characteristics that set the breed apart including some stereotypes that may not be deserved and why the chessie isn't necessarily the right breed for most. EukanubaSportingDog.com  

Wrongful Conviction with Jason Flom
Wrongful Conviction: False Confessions - Emerson Stevens BREAKING NEWS

Wrongful Conviction with Jason Flom

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2021 32:01


Sometimes when detectives can't get a confession they'll settle for a something else Laura Nirider and Steve Drizin explore the story of Emerson Stevens, a fisherman from Virginia's Chesapeake Bay. When a young mother was found murdered, it seemed all the evidence pointed to Emerson, until the case fell apart when a key witness was convicted of lying about the case and a forensic test technique was debunked and discredited. Since the initial release of this episode, Virginia Governor Ralph Northam heard our voices, reviewed the case, and issued a pardon based on actual innocence. Emerson Stevens is finally free.  Wrongful Conviction: False Confessions is a production of Lava for Good™ Podcasts in association with Signal Co No1. Learn more and get involved at https://www.wrongfulconvictionpodcast.com/false-confessions A portion of this podcast series' proceeds will be donated to the Center on Wrongful Convictions. To donate, learn more, or get involved, go to http://www.centeronwrongfulconvictions.org/ See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.