Podcasts about Chesapeake Bay

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An estuary in the U.S. states of Maryland and Virginia

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Chesapeake Bay

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Best podcasts about Chesapeake Bay

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Latest podcast episodes about Chesapeake Bay

Larry Wilmore: Black on the Air
Baratunde Thurston On 'America Outdoors'

Larry Wilmore: Black on the Air

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 2, 2022 76:46


Larry is joined by comedian, writer, and cultural critic Baratunde Thurston to discuss his new PBS series 'America Outdoors' and they begin their conversation by discussing how the show came together and was produced. They then pivot to Thurston's intentions for the program, including providing a conduit for inner city kids to appreciate the diverse American topography in an appreciative way.(9:40) Next, they talk about how nature can play a part in unifying people using the history and restoration of the L.A. River as context.(25:00) Baratunde then breaks down the process of selecting the locations for the show and shares some of the profound experiences he had filming in the Great Dismal swamps outside of Chesapeake Bay which profoundly connected him with the racial history of that region in a spiritual way.(32:18) Larry and Baratunde conclude their conversation by talking about the complex connection black people have to the outdoors and complications of loving America despite the imperfections within its history, current political climate, and the machinations of the recent Supreme Court decisions.(49:32) Host: Larry Wilmore Guest: Baratunde Thurston Producer: Chris Sutton Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Virginia Water Radio
Episode 631 (7-4-22): Frogs and Fireworks

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2022


CLICK HERE to listen to episode audio (4:22).Sections below are the following: Transcript of Audio Audio Notes and Acknowledgments ImageExtra Information Sources Related Water Radio Episodes For Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.). Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 6-30-22. TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the weeks of July 4 and July 11, 2022.  This is a repeat of a 2016 episode celebrating the July 4th holiday.  The episode features Virginia Tech master's degree graduate Kriddie Whitmore as a guest voice. SOUNDS - ~ 4 sec – Gray Treefrogs and fireworks. This week, for Independence Day episode, we drop in on a most unusual July 4th conversation: two Gray Treefrogs, surrounded by fireworks, are debating U.S. water history.  Sound unimaginable?  Well, just have a listen. SOUNDS - ~2 sec – Frogs and fireworks. Frog 1 – There those humans go again, shootin' off their fireworks and makin' it hard for us frogs to hear each other's calls!  What's all the ruckus about, anyway? Frog 2 - Why, it's July 4th!  They're celebrating this country's Declaration of Independence in 1776 from Great Britain.  I think it's cool—at least it's a break from hearing YOU guys calling every evening. Frog 1 – And just why are YOU so excited about the birthday of this big, bustling, human country?  Seems to me that it's been nothing but trouble for aquatic habitats and creatures like us since those first ships came over here from that Europe place.  Everywhere we try to hop, there's polluted rivers and lakes, lost wetlands and other habitats, and hot, dry pavement. Frog 2 – Well, yeah, you're right, partly.  This country's waters have had a pretty hard history.  And we amphibians have had the worst of it in some cases and places, with this permeable skin we have.  But you're forgetting about some positive things.  The humans' Congress passed the Clean Water Act in 1972, and a bunch other important acts, too.  And right here in this state, Virginia, the constitution says it's the Commonwealth's policy to protect its atmosphere, lands, and waters from pollution, impairment, or destruction. Frog 1 - Have all those things done any good? Frog 2 – Well, not always or everywhere.  Just in Virginia, hundreds of water bodies are impaired and need expensive clean-up programs.  For instance, I've got cousins living near that Chesapeake Bay, and they tell me every year it's some things good, other things fair, and still others needing a ton of work.  But many rivers and lakes certainly are in better shape than they were 40 or 50 years ago; the Potomac River's one example.  Those humans have many competing interests, so sometimes what they do isn't so good for water, or lands, or creatures like us. But other times, it is.  People have learned a lot over the years about using and managing natural resources more sustainably, and all kinds of people work hard trying to do that. Frog 1 - Yeah, I guess you're right.  You know, it's not easy being a frog, but I guess it's pretty tough being a person, too. Frog 2 – Now that's a pretty realistic call! SOUNDS - ~3 sec – fireworks.Frog 2  – Hey, there's the fireworks finale.  And that sounds like the Air Force Concert Band playing one of my favorites, “The Washington Post,” by John Philip Sousa.  Let's have a quick listen, then we better get back under cover.  All the humans will be coming back from the fireworks soon. Both frogs – Happy July 4th!MUSIC - ~ 14 sec – instrumental. SHIP'S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech's College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Ben Cosgrove for his version of “Shenandoah” to open and close this episode.  In Blacksburg, I'm Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This Virginia Water Radio episode replaces Episode 323, 7-4-16, and Episode 427, 7-2-18. Virginia Water Radio thanks Kriddie Whitmore, a 2016 master's degree graduate in Forestry from Virginia Tech, for participating as the guest voice in this episode. Thanks also to Jennifer Gagnon, Virginia Tech Department of Forest Resources and Conservation, for reviewing a draft of the episode. This episode's frog and fireworks sounds were recorded Blacksburg, Va., around 9:30 p.m. on July 4, 2015. This episode's music was an excerpt of “The Washington Post,” written by John Philip Sousa in 1889, and performed here by the United States Air Force Concert Band on their 2001 album “I Am An American,” accessed online at http://www.allmusic.com/album/i-am-an-american-mw0002256231, as of 6-29-22.  Information about “The Washington Post” is available from the United States Marine Band, “Sousa-The Washington Post” (3:30 video), online at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Mxrh1CrMmTY; and “The President's Own/John Philip Sousa,” online at http://www.marineband.marines.mil/About/Our-History/John-Philip-Sousa/. Click here if you'd like to hear the full version (2 min./22 sec.) of the “Shenandoah” arrangement/performance by Ben Cosgrove that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Cosgrove is available online at http://www.bencosgrove.com. IMAGE (Unless otherwise noted, photographs are by Virginia Water Radio.) Gray Treefrog (Hyla versicolor) on the deck of a residence in Blacksburg, Va., Sep. 23, 2009. EXTRA INFORMATION ABOUT CONSERVATION IN THE VIRGINIA CONSTITUTION Following are the four sections of Article XI, “Conservation,” of the Virginia Constitution, as accessed at the Virginia Legislative Information System, online at https://law.lis.virginia.gov/constitution/article11/, on June 30, 2022.Section 1. Natural resources and historical sites of the Commonwealth.To the end that the people have clean air, pure water, and the use and enjoyment for recreation of adequate public lands, waters, and other natural resources, it shall be the policy of the Commonwealth to conserve, develop, and utilize its natural resources, its public lands, and its historical sites and buildings.  Further, it shall be the Commonwealth's policy to protect its atmosphere, lands, and waters from pollution, impairment, or destruction, for the benefit, enjoyment, and general welfare of the people of the Commonwealth. Section 2. Conservation and development of natural resources and historical sites. In the furtherance of such policy, the General Assembly may undertake the conservation, development, or utilization of lands or natural resources of the Commonwealth, the acquisition and protection of historical sites and buildings, and the protection of its atmosphere, lands, and waters from pollution, impairment, or destruction, by agencies of the Commonwealth or by the creation of public authorities, or by leases or other contracts with agencies of the United States, with other states, with units of government in the Commonwealth, or with private persons or corporations.  Notwithstanding the time limitations of the provisions of Article X, Section 7, of this Constitution, the Commonwealth may participate for any period of years in the cost of projects which shall be the subject of a joint undertaking between the Commonwealth and any agency of the United States or of other states. Section 3. Natural oyster beds. The natural oyster beds, rocks, and shoals in the waters of the Commonwealth shall not be leased, rented, or sold but shall be held in trust for the benefit of the people of the Commonwealth, subject to such regulations and restriction as the General Assembly may prescribe, but the General Assembly may, from time to time, define and determine such natural beds, rocks, or shoals by surveys or otherwise. Section 4. Right of the people to hunt, fish, and harvest game. The people have a right to hunt, fish, and harvest game, subject to such regulations and restrictions as the General Assembly may prescribe by general law.SOURCES Used for Audio Chesapeake Bay Program, online at https://www.chesapeakebay.net/; and “Slight improvements in Bay health and new economic data added in 2021 Chesapeake Bay Report Card,” June 7, 2022, news release, online at https://www.chesapeakebay.net/news/blog/slight_improvements_in_bay_health_and_new_economic_data_added_in_2021_chesa.Commonwealth of Virginia, Constitution of Virginia, “Article XI Conservation,” accessed online at https://law.lis.virginia.gov/constitution/article11/. John D. Kleopfer and Chris S. Hobson, A Guide to the Frogs and Toad of Virginia, Special Publication Number 3, Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries (now Department of Wildlife Resources), Richmond, Va., 2011. Bernard S. Martof, et al., Amphibians and Reptiles of the Carolinas and Virginia, University of North Carolina Press, Chapel Hill, 1980. Metropolitan Washington Council of Governments, “Water Quality Monitoring in the Potomac Estuary,” online at http://www.mwcog.org/environment/water/potomacestuary.asp.Thomas V. Cech, Principles of Water Resources: History, Development, Management, and Policy, John Wiley & Sons, Inc., New York, N.Y., 2003.U.S. Environmental Protection Agency:“National Aquatic Resources Surveys,” online at https://www.epa.gov/national-aquatic-resource-surveys;“Summary of the Clean Water Act,” online at https://www.epa.gov/laws-regulations/summary-clean-water-act.Virginia Department of Environmental Quality, “Water Quality Assessments/Integrated Report,” online at https://www.deq.virginia.gov/water/water-quality/assessments/integrated-report.Zygmunt J. B. Plater et al., Environmental Law and Policy: Nature, Law, and Society, West Publishing Co., St. Paul, Minn., 1998. For More Information about Amphibians in Virginia and Elsewhere AmphibiaWeb, https://amphibiaweb.org/index.html. University of Michigan Museum of Zoology, “Animal Diversity Web,” online at https://animaldiversity.org. J.C. Mitchell and K.K. Reay, Atlas of Amphibians and Reptiles in Virginia, Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries/Richmond (1999); available online (as a PDF) at https://www.virginiaherpetologicalsociety.com/atlases/mitchell-atlas.pdf, courtesy of the Virginia Herpetological Society.  (Herpetology is the study of amphibians and reptiles.) Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources (formerly Department of Game and Inland Fisheries):“A Guide to Virginia's Frogs and Toads,” online at https://dwr.virginia.gov/wildlife/frogs-and-toads/;“A Guide to the Salamanders of Virginia,” online at https://dwr.virginia.gov/wildlife/salamanders/;“Fish and Wildlife Information Service,” online at https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/(the Gray Treefrog entry is online at https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/booklet.html?&bova=020007&Menu=_.Taxonomy&version=19173);“List of Native and Naturalized Fauna in Virginia, August 2020,” online (as a PDF) at https://dwr.virginia.gov/wp-content/uploads/virginia-native-naturalized-species.pdf;“Virginia is for Frogs,” online at https://dwr.virginia.gov/wildlife/virginia-is-for-frogs/;“Wildlife Information,” online at https://dwr.virginia.gov/wildlife/information/. Virginia Herpetological Society, “Frogs and Toads of Virginia,” online at https://www.virginiaherpetologicalsociety.com/amphibians/frogsandtoads/frogs_and_toads_of_virginia.htm. For More Information about Federal Environmental and Natural Resources LawsCornell University Law School/Legal Information Institute:“Environmental Law,” online at https://www.law.cornell.edu/wex/environmental_law; “Natural Resources,” online at https://www.law.cornell.edu/wex/natural_resources. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), “Laws and Regulations,” online at https://www.epa.gov/laws-regulations.  The section for the Clean Water Act is online at https://www.epa.gov/laws-regulations/summary-clean-water-act; the section for the Endangered Species Act is online at https://www.epa.gov/laws-regulations/summary-endangered-species-act; the section for the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) is online at https://www.epa.gov/nepa. For More Information about Virginia Natural Resources Laws Virginia Secretary of Natural Resources Web site, online at http://naturalresources.virginia.gov/.  See the “Agencies” link to access the various Virginia state agencies involved with resources regulation and management. RELATED VIRGINIA WATER RADIO EPISODES All Water Radio episodes are listed by category at the Index link above (http://www.virginiawaterradio.org/p/index.html).  See particularly the “Amphibians” and “History” subject categories. Following is the link to another episode on Gray Treefrogs.Episode 528, 6-8-20. Following are links to other episodes done for July 4th. Episode 168, 7-1-13 – Water and the Revolutionary War.Episode 220, 6-30-14 – Water origins of Virginia Declaration signers.Episode 273, 7-6-15 – The Great Road on the Virginia Peninsula.FOR VIRGINIA TEACHERS – RELATED STANDARDS OF LEARNING (SOLs) AND OTHER INFORMATION Following are some Virginia Standards of Learning (SOLs) that may be supported by this episode's audio/transcript, sources, or other information included in this post. 2020 Music SOLs SOLs at various grade levels that call for “examining the relationship of music to the other fine arts and other fields of knowledge.” 2018 Science SOLs Grades K-4: Living Systems and ProcessesK.7 – Plants and animals have basic needs and life processes.1.5 – Animals, including humans, have basic life needs that allow them to survive.2.5 – Living things are part of a system.3.5 – Aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems support a diversity of organisms.4.3 – Organisms, including humans, interact with one another and with the nonliving components in the ecosystem. Grades K-5: Earth and Space Systems3.7 – There is a water cycle and water is important to life on Earth. Grades K-5: Earth ResourcesK.11 – Humans use resources.1.8 – Natural resources can be used responsibly, including that most natural resources are limited; human actions can affect the availability of natural resources; and reducing, reusing, and recycling are ways to conserve natural resources.3.8 – Natural events and humans influence ecosystems.4.8 – Virginia has important natural resources. Grade 66.6 – Water has unique physical properties and has a role in the natural and human-made environment.6.8 – Land and water have roles in watershed systems.6.9 – Humans impact the environment and individuals can influence public policy decisions related to energy and the environment. Life ScienceLS.9 – Relationships exist between ecosystem dynamics and human activity. Earth ScienceES.6 – Resource use is complex.ES.8 – Freshwater resources influence and are influenced by geologic processes and human activity.ES.10 – Oceans are complex, dynamic systems subject to long- and short-term variations. Biology&

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Virginia Public Radio
Eagles again in need of protection

Virginia Public Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022


Scientists say Virginia and other states around the Chesapeake Bay may once have been home to 3,000 breeding pairs of bald eagles, nourished by a rich supply of fish.  Their numbers fell dramatically, rebounded and could now be in danger again, as Sandy Hausman reports.

Class Talkers
PowerBoat Racer

Class Talkers

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 4:55


Murder Mystery involving southern race relations and powerboat racing in the Chesapeake Bay. Great characters and dialog as a veteran reporter seeks to right wrongs in a bigoted town in the USA.

Virginia Outdoor Adventures
Bonus Episode: The Green Tunnel Podcast with Mills Kelly

Virginia Outdoor Adventures

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 33:26


In this bonus episode, I'm sharing another fantastic Virginia-based podcast called, The Green Tunnel, which is a show about the history of the Appalachian Trail. You may already know that Virginia contains more miles of the Appalachian Trail than any other state, with 544 miles of the trail right here in Virginia. If you're a history buff like me and you love hiking and the outdoors, this is a show you don't want to miss. The Green Tunnel is one of my favorite podcasts to enjoy, usually when I'm driving to my next outdoor adventure. It contains interesting, quirky, and fascinating history about the AT in an entertaining, story-telling style show. Many episodes contain rare, never before heard audio of legendary AT hikers and influencers like Benton MacKaye, who dreamed up the whole idea of a multi-state long-distance hiking trail, and Grandma Gatewood, the first woman to thru hike the trail alone. The show also includes contributions by hikers, volunteers, park rangers, and leaders in the trail community. The Green Tunnel Podcast is hosted by my friend, Mills Kelly, who is a professor of history at George Mason University and the Director of the Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media. He has been hiking the AT since 1971 and researching its history since 2016.If you're looking for more inspiration from the AT here in Virginia, there are two recent episodes of Virginia Outdoor Adventures you might enjoy. In Episode 22, Diana Christopulos from the Roanoke Appalachian Trail Club, talks about hiking McAfee Knob and Virginia's Triple Crown. She provides insight into what it takes to maintain and preserve the most photographed spot on the entire Appalachian Trail.In Episode 27, Senator Tim Kaine shares his experience completing the Virginia Nature Triathlon, which includes hiking the Virginia portion of the Appalachian Trail, as well as cycling the Blue Ridge Parkway and adjacent Skyline Drive, and paddling the James River, from the mountains to the mouth of the Chesapeake Bay.The Green Tunnel Podcast:Website I Facebook I Instagram I TwitterFollow Virginia Outdoor Adventures Podcast:Website I Facebook I Instagram I TwitterSend Questions, Comments, and Suggestions: Jessica@virginiaoutdooradventures.comSupport the show

I Love A Lifetime Movie
Suitcase Killer: The Melanie McGuire Story

I Love A Lifetime Movie

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 99:47


Megan is back, baby - and with a baby! This episode welcomes our new mama back by Naomi's side with Suitcase Killer: The Melanie McGuire Story. The movie follows the beautiful and gregarious fertility nurse Melanie McGuire whose life seems so perfect until her husband is found cut up in three suitcases in the Chesapeake Bay, and it seems Melanie is the most likely suspect. Megan and Naomi welcome the hosts of the new Lifetime podcast Crime of a Lifetime to give us the tea about the real story behind the movie! See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Bart Talks Beer Podcast
019 - Homaide

Bart Talks Beer Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 47:58


Episode 019 – HomaideToday I review 6 different beers from Homaide Brewing out of Williamsport, MD:Stachestrong - Lager Bunches – Cream AleDoggo – LagerCoattails  -Double IPAStraight Outta Lupulin – West Coast Style IPANuclear Hibernation – Imperial StoutYou can find the breweries on the web and Facebook.  https://www.homaidebrewing.com/ Thanks for listening to the Bart Talks Beer Podcast.  Bart Talks Beer is recorded in Southern Maryland in the heart of the Chesapeake Bay.The music in today's episode is used with Permission by ShallowDeep.  The Intro is the song Maybe Never from the 2006 Album Ammunition.  The Interlude/Outro song is their new song ‘A Cautious Retreat'.  You can find their music on Spotify, Amazon, and other outlets.  https://www.facebook.com/shallowdeepmusic/Please Remember to check out BartTalksBeer.com to find where you can find this podcast.  Find my quick 60 second reviews on Instagram (BartTalksBeer), Facebook (BartTalksBeer) and TikTok (BartTalksBeer)  To interact with me, please reach out through Instagram and Facebook, by finding @BartTalksBeer or drop me an email at BartTalksBeer@gmail.comThanks again for listening.  Cheers

Chesapeake Uncharted
Season 2 Trailer: Tropical Storm Agnes at 50

Chesapeake Uncharted

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 3:53


Fifty years ago, “America's Estuary” was beginning to show signs of ecological collapse. But outside of a handful of environmentalists and academics, few people took much note. When a seemingly harmless tropical storm charged up from the Gulf of Mexico, few people took much note of that either. But within a few wild and tragic days in June of 1972, Tropical Storm Agnes changed the way people thought about the Chesapeake Bay and the power of storms in the Mid-Atlantic. This is the story of how Agnes ushered in a dark new era for the Bay -- an era we're still living in.

Roads Taken
The Deep End: Lara Fowler on Staying Curious and Nurturing Expertise

Roads Taken

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 27:27


Guest Lara Fowler had been a cross-country ski racer and studied Japanese in high school in Portland, Oregon. She took those two pursuits to college and pursued them to their highest. With all of the language requirements and a study abroad program that she wanted to undertake, she had nearly completed a major in Asian Studies. But she also had a long-standing interest in water. So in fulfilling her distribution requirements, she found ways to study water from multiple angles, did off-campus research in the topic, and ultimately won a senior fellowship to devote her final year to writing a book on water policy, in effect creating her own second major in water resource management.After graduation, she took a year to pursue ski racing but decided to hang up the skiis and get a job in the water world. Recognizing that much of the discourse around water intersected with the law, she went to law school and ultimately worked as a water mediator, bringing disparate voices together to find solutions in water allocation. When her husband got the academic job he had long wanted, she found a new way to apply her skills and spark new interests.In this episode, find out from Lara how keeping curiosity alive and being willing to ask questions helps you move from novice to expert…on Roads Taken with Leslie Jennings Rowley. About This Episode's GuestLara Fowler is an attorney and mediator who focuses on environmental, energy, and natural resource law, with a specific focus on water-related issues. She has a joint appointment at Penn State Law where she teaches natural resource law and negotiations and the Penn State Institutes of Energy and the Environment where she is working on questions related to water, the Chesapeake Bay, and systems-level behavioral change. She lives in Pennsylvania with her husband and two children. Executive Producer/Host: Leslie Jennings RowleyMusic: Brian Burrows Find more episodes at https://roadstakenshow.com Email the show at RoadsTakenShow@gmail.com

The Archaeology Podcast Network Feed
Pirates and Privateers from Long Island Sound to Delaware Bay with Dr. Jamie L. H. Goodall - Ruins 113

The Archaeology Podcast Network Feed

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 56:13


On this episode of A Life in Ruins Podcast, we get the best pirate scholar, Dr. Jamie L. H. Goodall, back on the show. We discuss how she has been since we last talked and discuss what she actually does at her current job. Carlton and Connor then pepper her with questions about her new book, "Pirates and Privateers from Long Island Sound to Delaware Bay" which was released in May 2022. She details the differences in pirating between the Chesapeake Bay and the more northern bays/sounds. She helps us understand pirates personal lives and tells us that they even got married. Carlton and Connor then keep asking her questions because they are nerds and love pirate history. If you have left a review of the podcast on iTunes or Spotify, please email us at alifeinruinspodcast@gmail.com so we can get shipping information to send you a sticker. If you are listening to this episode on the "Archaeology Podcast Network All Shows Feed," please consider subscribing to the "A Life in Ruins Podcast" channel to support our show. Listening to and downloading our episodes on the A Life in Ruins channel helps our podcast grow. So please, subscribe to the A Life in Ruins Podcast, hosted by the Archaeology Podcast Network, on whichever platform you are using to listen to us on the "All Shows Feed." Support our show by following our channel. Interested in learning about how to use X-Rays and similar technology in archaeology? Check out the linked PaleoImaging course from James Elliot! Connect with James on Twitter: @paleoimaging Interested in sponsoring this show or podcast ads for your business? Zencastr makes it really easy! Click this message for more info. Start your own podcast with Zencastr and get 30% off your first three months with code RUINS. Click this message for more information. For rough transcripts of this episode go to https://www.archpodnet.com/ruins/113 Links Dr. Goodall's Website Literature Recommendations Why We Love Pirates: The Hunt for Captain Kidd and How He Changed Piracy Forever by Rebecca Simon The Life and Tryals of the Gentleman Pirate, Major Stede Bonnet by Jeremy R. Moss Pirate Queens: The Lives of Anne Bonny & Mary Read by Rebecca Simon Guest Contact Dr. Goodall's Instagram and Twitter: @l_historienne Contact Email: alifeinruinspodcast@gmail.com Instagram: @alifeinruinspodcast Facebook: @alifeinruinspodcast Twitter: @alifeinruinspod Website: www.alifeinruins.com Ruins on APN: https://www.archaeologypodcastnetwork.com/ruins Store: https://www.redbubble.com/people/alifeinruins/shop ArchPodNet APN Website: https://www.archpodnet.com APN on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/archpodnet APN on Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/archpodnet APN on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/archpodnet Tee Public Store Affiliates Wildnote TeePublic Timeular Motion

Airplane Owner Maintenance - By Dean Showalter
202 – Pax River Navy Test Pilot: Trace Bowen

Airplane Owner Maintenance - By Dean Showalter

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2022 50:50


Recently, I had the amazing opportunity to visit NAS Pax River, a United States naval air station located in St. Mary's County, Maryland, on the Chesapeake Bay. My friend, Trace Bowen, picked me up in his Cessna 310, flew me to St. Marys Airport, and drove me over to the base for a tour. Up […]

PreserveCast
Crabbing with Luke McFadden: The History and Future of Maryland's Watermen

PreserveCast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 13, 2022 28:11


On this week's PreserveCast, we're setting a course for the Chesapeake Bay with first-generation Maryland crabber Luke McFadden. Luke's story is anything but typical – from beginning crabbing at age 12 to developing a social media following to help build a brand – but his atypical approach to crabbing might just be what the industry needs at this challenging moment. We're talking with Luke about the beautiful swimmers, maintaining crab boats, and how his can-do approach may just help sustain Maryland's iconic watermen heritage.

XtremeAg: Cutting The Curve Podcast

Temple Rhodes farms on Maryland's eastern shore, operates a couple other business ventures, and he's now contributing to XtremeAg. Throughout the season we'll tune in to see what Mr. Rhodes is doing with fungicide treatments, seed plots, and micronutrient products to increase fertility uptake — a big issue for his geography. Because Temple farms in the Chesapeake Bay watershed, he's under an environmental microscope. Enjoy meeting Temple and hear about how he runs his operation to “never become complacent.” This episode is presented by AgXplore.

VPM Daily Newscast
06/08/22 - Richmond Public Schools to seek design firm for new Fox Elementary

VPM Daily Newscast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 8, 2022 4:40


The Richmond school board has approved an emergency procurement route to award a contract for the design of a new Fox Elementary; The Chesapeake Bay watershed received a C+ on its latest report card; Former Representative Denver Riggleman says he's no longer a Republican; and other local news stories.

Eye On Annapolis Daily News Brief
June 7, 2022 | Daily News Brief | Shots Fired. Case Closed. Groping Guard. Healthy Bay. Irish Fest!

Eye On Annapolis Daily News Brief

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 7, 2022 11:25


Give us about ten minutes a day and we will give you all the local news, local sports, local weather, and local events you can handle.   SPONSORS: Many thanks to our sponsors... Solar Energy Services because solar should be in your future! The Kristi Neidhardt Team. If you are looking to buy or sell your home, give Kristi a call at 888-860-7369!  And- Rehab 2 Perform Today... Shots were fired in two Annapolis neighborhoods within 36 minutes of each other. Annapolis Police make an arrest in a 2020 murder. A jail guard was charged with groping an inmate. Under Armour is underperforming and has been booted from the S&P 500. The Annapolis Irish Festival is coming and tickets are on sale now. The Chesapeake Bay has improved its grade a little. Rams Head Ticket Tuesday and some more pod news! And as usual, George from DCMDVA Weather is here with your local weather forecast! Please download their APP so you can keep on top of the local weather scene! The Eye On Annapolis Daily News Brief is produced every Monday through Friday at 6:00 am and available wherever you get your podcasts and also on our social media platforms--All Annapolis and Eye On Annapolis (FB) and @eyeonannapolis (TW) NOTE: For hearing impaired subscribers, a full transcript is available on Eye On Annapolis  

Eastern Current Fishing
Bull Redfish & Cobia in the Chesapeake Bay (tactics that work everywhere)

Eastern Current Fishing

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 2, 2022 48:57


Fishing the Chesapeake Bay for Redfish, Trout & Stripers  In the episode of The Eastern Current Saltwater Inshore Fishing Podcast we talk with Capt. Steve griffin all about fishing the "Middle Bay" of the Chesapeake Bay for Bull Redfish, Speckled Trout & Striped Bass. Steve is dialed in when it comes to catching Bull Redfish, Cow Striped Bass and gator Trout! Hope you enjoy the podcast! Book A Trip with Griffins Guide Service!  https://www.griffinsguideservice.com -J&J Boat Services- Be sure to use the promo code EC2022 for 10% off! https://www.jjsboatservices.com/ 910-679-9844 T & L Table Company  https://tltable.co 573-205-4888 Do you love Eastern Current and want to help support us as well as gain access to tons of extra content that has never been released to the public? Donate through our PATREON Account! https://www.patreon.com/user?u=31609753&fan_landing=true Be Sure to checkout Eastern Current on Youtube, Facebook and Instagram as well as anywhere that you can listen to podcasts. Check out Eastern Current's website! https://etcurrent.com/ Book a Fishing Trip -Jud Brock - https://www.easternangling.com/ Book a Hunt  -Jud Brock- https://www.easternwaterfowl.com/

Charlottesville Community Engagement
June 2, 2022: Virginia Supreme Court rules in favor of Albemarle developer in transit proffer case

Charlottesville Community Engagement

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 2, 2022 17:00


What’s in a day? According to one source, it’s National Bubba Day but I’m not sure what all the hubbub is about. More realistically, it’s American Indian Citizenship Day, which marks the 98th anniversary of an act of Congress where the people who had lived here for millennia before colonization finally received some rights, if not universal recognition. Somehow it’s also National Rocky Road Day. Coincidence or something else? This episode of Charlottesville Community Engagement cannot provide the answers. But this and all of the nearly 400 installments to date are intended to encourage you to think. If you’re not ready for a paid subscription, please send this on to people you think might be interested! The newsletter is made available for free thanks to the hundreds so far who are paying! On today’s program:The Virginia Supreme Court has ruled that Albemarle County was wrong to charge a developer for transit service that stops at the Hollymead Town CenterAn update on one way how area transit agencies may address driver shortagesJABA gets some funding due to one hospital’s employee surveyAnd the Albemarle Planning Commission reviews a study that seeks to help the Rio Road corridor become more of a human-scale First shout-out goes to a RoadDucks concert at Groovin’ in Greene In today’s first subscriber supported shout-out, this Saturday in Stanardsville, Virginia’s house band, the RoadDucks, will take the stage at Greene Commons to headline an evening of music. The event kicks off at 4 p.m. with local music from Keith Samuels, Todd Sansom, Chad Aylor & Jon Kougher. That’s followed by singer-songwriter Jenny Marie McAdams. Then, the RoadDucks will draw upon their 46 years to perform all kinds of music. Various members of the Greene Chamber of Commerce are sponsoring the event, with proceeds from beverage and drink sales going to Artistic Remedies for Creative Hearts. For more information on this latest in the Groovin’ in Greene series, visit their Facebook page. Virginia Supreme Court rules against Albemarle in Jaunt proffer caseAlbemarle County acted unconstitutionally when it demanded the developer of the Hollymead Town Center begin making $50,000 annual payments for a transit route operated by Jaunt. That’s according to a Virginia Supreme Court opinion issued this morning by Justice S. Bernard Goodwyn. (read the opinion)“While a state, under its police power, may regulate land use to further legitimate state interests, it may not use this power as a cudgel to coerce concessions from a land-use applicant who seeks to repurpose her property,” reads the opinion. The Board of Supervisors approved the Hollymead Town Center development in September 2007 and under one of the proffered conditions, a company called Octagon Partners agreed to pay $50,000 a year “within thirty days after demand by the County after public transportation service is provided to the Project.” In November 2015, the Board voted 4-1 to work with Jaunt to develop a commuter route called Route 29 Express to serve the area with a stop at the Kohl’s. By that point, the property had transferred to United Land through a subsidiary known as Route 29 LLC. Developer Wendell Wood had previously sought to change the proffer but was unsuccessful. He argued that the triggering of the proffer as presented was unreasonable, but he offered to pay a smaller amount. At the time, Rio District Supervisor Brad Sheffield was executive director of Jaunt but he recused himself from the vote. He did not seek re-election to the Board in 2017. In late 2020, Jaunt’s Board of Directors asked him to resign for financial matters not related to this lawsuit. Soon after the Route 29 Express service began in May 2016, the county sent two bills to Route 29 LLC demanding payment, and issued a zoning violation in the summer of 2018. Wood refused to pay. Wood sued in January 2019 challenging that violation and both parties agreed to a certain set of facts. In May of that year, the county sought dismissal based on a claim that those facts admitted Wood’s acceptance that he needed to pay for the transit service. Albemarle Circuit Court Judge Cheryl Higgins denied that dismissal request and the case went to trial. During the trial, the county also sought to dismiss testimony and evidence introduced by the plaintiff to support their argument that the commuter route did not have any benefits of reducing traffic on U.S. 29. Higgins did not grant a motion to strike and then ruled in favor of Route 29 LLC. The county appealed, and now the Virginia Supreme Court affirmed Higgins was correct in not granting the county’s request to dismiss and to strike the evidence. The Court sided with Route29 LLC about the unreasonability of the proffer. “In essence, the County contends that when a municipality conditions the grant of a land use permit on acceptance of a conditional proffer, voluntarily entered into, the payment required by the proffer need not possess an essential nexus, nor be roughly proportional, to the impact of the development allowed by the permit in order for the proffer to be legally enforceable,” reads the analysis on page 9 of the opinion.“We disagree,” the opinion continues. The ruling does not dismiss the transit proffer completely. “The Owner acknowledges, and we agree, that a different public transportation service may trigger Transit Proffer payments that are enforceable at law,” the opinion continues. “However, the Commuter Route, as it is presently designed, does not.”A spokeswoman for Jaunt said the organization had no comment on the ruling, but did say that the North 29 Express is still operating and led to several other commuter buses such as one that serves Crozet. Albemarle County did not have a comment on the ruling. See also:Supervisors agree to use proffer to fund daily Hollymead commuter route, November 7, 2015Hollymead developer seeks changes to transit proffer, April 23, 2016Developer Wendell Wood keeping tabs on proffer-funded JAUNT route, July 5, 2016County says developer Wendell Wood owes $150,000 for bus service, December 6, 2018If you are interested in all of these stories about transportation, do consider a paid subscription to this newsletter. Every initial payment through Substack is matched by Ting to help ensure the continuance of this community journalism resourceAlbemarle Schools working on way to use public transportation for pupil transportIn April, transit officials from Vermont briefed the Regional Transit Partnership on efforts in the Green Mountain State to use public transportation to get students to their schools. (read the story)That has led to further discussion on the matter in Albemarle County. Charmane White is the new director of the transportation division for Albemarle schools and she spoke at the partnership’s meeting on May 26. “I am having conversations now with our my supervisors and the Superintendent to look at how we would roll this out and of course we would have to get our community ready for this and parents and the administrators because this is just a different approach to what we have taken,” White said. White said the division continues to try to recruit new drivers with a series of job fairs. One possible way to alleviate the shortage is to purchase vehicles that don’t require a commercial driver’s license (CDL). Garland Williams, director of Charlottesville Area Transit, said city schools are also looking at this approach. “They are looking at the type A bus model themselves,” Williams said. “Fourteen [passengers] or less. They’re going to do to two at this point of time and see how the model works and then just scale up from there.” The University Transit System also has issues with a driver shortage.“One of the approaches we’re taking a looking at is that CDL license barrier and how can we sort of attack that in creative ways,” said Kendall Howell of UTS. Howell said he would return to the partnership with some of those ideas later this summer. Sentara employee survey leads to $65,000 grant for JABAAn organization that provides services and assistance to older community members will receive $65,000 from Sentara Martha Jefferson Hospital. According to a press release, the funding for JABA is the result of an employee satisfaction survey which had a question that asked respondents to name an organization that embodies the company’s values. “JABA got one of the highest vote totals in the survey," says Johnsa Morris, Vice President of Patient Care & Chief Nurse Executive at Sentara Martha Jefferson Hospital.JABA was created in 1975 as the Jefferson Area Board for Aging to serve as a “gateway” for resources for seniors and adults with disabilities. The $65,000 gift is unrestricted and can be used for any purpose by the organization. If you or someone you know is interested in applying for a grant from Sentara, the window runs from June 15 to July 15. Second Shout-out is for the Charlottesville Area Tree Stewards In today’s second subscriber-supported Public Service Announcement, the Charlottesville Area Tree Stewards continues to offer classes this spring and summer to increase your awareness of our wooden neighbors and to prepare for the future. Coming up on June 7 is a tree identification course taught on Zoom by tree steward Elizabeth Ferguson followed by a separate hike on June 11 at the Department of Forestry’s headquarters near the Fontaine Research Park. That’s followed by a tree identification walk at the University of Virginia on June 12 for the public. On June 14, Rachel Keen will give a lecture on Zoom on the Social Life of Trees. Do trees really communicate with one another? What is a 'mother tree'? Can a tree do anything to repel a pest? Learn more at charlottesvilleareatreestewards.org.Albemarle Planning Commission gets look at Rio Road Corridor On Wednesday, the Board of Supervisors appointed Lonnie Murray to represent the White Hall District on the Planning Commission. Murray has been elected three times to serve as one of Albemarle’s representatives on the Thomas Jefferson Soil and Water Conservation District. He’s also a member of the Natural Heritage Committee. At their most recent meeting, the Planning Commission minus Murray reviewed a transportation study intended to turn one of Albemarle’s major roadways into something with more of a human scale. The county hired Line + Grade to conduct a review of Rio Road from city limits at Melbourne Road up to near the intersection with U.S. 29. (read the draft plan)“The goal of this project was to develop a community vision and plan that will guide the future design and improvements to the Rio Road Corridor,” said David Benish, development process manager for Albemarle. Benish said the concepts in the plan are not intended to be final, but will be used in the future for candidates for funding through the Virginia Department of Transportation. A list of priorities will be reviewed during the Comprehensive Plan review that’s underway. Dan Hyer of Line + Grade lists some of the intentions of the plan, which is split into two geographic phases.  “How to make it a safe corridor, how to improve environmental and public spaces along the corridor, keep traffic moving effectively and optimally,” Hyer said. “And try to make access equitable for all those who live and use the corridor.” Hyer said to balance all of those goals, his team took both a qualitative and quantitative approach to craft a roadway for the county’s 21st century needs. “At some point in the past, roadways were not just designed for their quantitative aspects but the quality of the experience was also important,” Hyer said. “And so we devised our own metrics on how to analyze both of these corridors from a qualitative standpoint. What’s it like to walk on the sidewalk? Is it hot? Are there trees? Are there crosswalks? Are their lights? Can you see the bus stops?” Hyer said traffic growth is expected as the area builds out with more housing. New intersection approaches are suggested to avoid the backups that come with the four-way signals of the 20th century.  Two traffic signals at the Hillsdale / Old Brook / Northfield intersections would be replaced with a peanut-shaped roundabout to eliminate left-hand turn movements. The Belvedere intersection would be converted into a continuous “Green T” intersection that would close off left-hand movements from the side road. Hyer said this would not preclude a future traffic signal. Line + Grade has offered several different alternatives for the roundabout at John Warner Parkway, but he acknowledged VDOT’s selection will be the one that goes forward. In the second phase, the Rio Road Corridor Study offers fewer specific intersection improvements but provides guidance such as lowering speed limits and laying out a way forward for creation of a shared-use path. “What you have currently is you have a bunch of land widths that are inconsistent,” Hyer said. “You’ve got some that are 14 feet, some that are ten feet. You have a bus stop where you don’t need one. There’s a bunch of infrastructure that can be reallocated and that’s what you see here in our proposed plan.” Hyer said one difficulty identified in the study was trying to figure out how to find a way to make it safe to walk on Rio Road between Stonehenge Road and the city limits. He said that might need a plan of its own.“Very complicated there,” Hyer said. “The creek is eroding. It’s coming closer to eroding the roadbed. It’s just an entirely different conversation and not worth trying to build a sidewalk there right now. There’s other low-hanging fruit for us to pursue.” Commission Chair Karen Firehock urged the inclusion of bioswales and other innovative ways to build in drainage that supports the ecology. She said the roundabouts might be a good place.“Because there’s going to be a lot of grading going along to put in a roundabout in the first place and a lot of times in some lazy places they are just boring lawns and they’ve done nothing with that space,” Firehock said. “It’s an opportunity besides just having more turf grass which is the number one crop in the Chesapeake Bay drainage.”The Board of Supervisors will be briefed on the plan at a later date, possibly in August. Watch the presentation on YouTube:Town Crier Productions has a sponsorship thing with Ting!For over a year one year now, Town Crier Productions has had a promotional offering through Ting!Are you interested in fast internet? Visit this site and enter your address to see if you can get service through Ting. If you decide to proceed to make the switch, you’ll get:Free installationSecond month of Ting service for freeA $75 gift card to the Downtown MallAdditionally, Ting will match your Substack subscription to support Town Crier Productions, the company that produces this newsletter and other community offerings. So, your $5 a month subscription yields $5 for TCP. Your $50 a year subscription yields $50 for TCP! The same goes for a $200 a year subscription! All goes to cover the costs of getting this newsletter out as often as possible. Learn more here! This is a public episode. If you’d like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit communityengagement.substack.com/subscribe

Dish City
Maryland Blue Crabs

Dish City

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 2, 2022 30:16


Blue crabs are messy, time-consuming, and expensive to harvest and eat. And yet, no summer on the Chesapeake Bay is complete without a crab feast. Many Washingtonians are happy to set aside a couple hours, and maybe a few hundred dollars, to enjoy this meal with loved ones. But how many of us know what it takes to get crabs and crab cakes to your table? Ruth and Patrick learn how these iconic crustaceans get from the boat to your throat. Patrick will be at the Dupont Circle farmer's market in Maryland on Sunday, June 5, from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Stop by and grab a sticker! Fill out our survey: dishcity.org/survey Leave us a tip at wamu.org/supportdishcity. Follow us on Twitter: twitter.com/dishcity Follow us on Instagram: instagram.com/dishcity

EWN - Engineering With Nature
EWN Practice Leads Sharing Expertise through the EWN Cadre

EWN - Engineering With Nature

Play Episode Listen Later May 31, 2022 34:09


In Episode 2 we had a high energy roundtable with the EWN Practice Leads who play a critical role in broadening and expanding the application of Engineering With Nature practices and nature-based solutions within the US Army Corps of Engineers. In Episode 3, the EWN Practice Leads return to talk about how they're solving challenges, advancing EWN implementation through the EWN Implementation Cadre, and sharing what they are learning with other practitioners.   Host Sarah Thorne and Jeff King, Deputy Lead of the Engineering With Nature Program at the US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), are joined again by a roundtable of the EWN Practice Leads. Elizabeth Godsey is the Technical Lead for Coastal Engineering and Regional Sediment Management with Mobile District; Danielle Szimanski is a Project Manager and Ecologist with Baltimore District; Eddie Brauer is a Senior Hydraulic Engineer with St. Louis District; and Dave Crane is an Environmental Resource Specialist with Omaha District. We asked each to talk about their current projects.   Danielle, a Coastal Practice Lead, describes her work in the Chesapeake Bay where rising sea level is already occurring and is expected to increase. She and her team are restoring barrier islands and marshes to combat the loss of habitat and for flood risk management of inland areas. “Being able to restore these marshes, especially if they're degraded and fragmented, and being able to stave off that future loss and stop them from turning into open water is critical for the Chesapeake Bay.” Danielle also discusses work underway at Deal Island: “The Deal Island project is a maintenance dredging project on the Wicomico River. We're going to use the dredge material to restore approximately 70 acres of degraded and fragmented marsh. This will restore that wetland for migratory birds, and provide nesting habitat specifically for the Saltmarsh Sparrow, which is a threatened species.” She adds, “there's been a lot of work with other federal, state and non-government agencies to create this design and complete pre- and post-monitoring to assess how these wetlands are actually going to provide habitat once they are created.”   Elizabeth, also a Coastal Practice Lead, has worked on a number of coastal restoration projects in the Gulf to restore habitats for threatened and endangered species including sea turtles and piping plovers: “In Mississippi alone we've restored over 2,500 acres across the coastal zone habitats, including beach, dune, wetlands, and island restoration. That's about 2000 football fields of restoration work in that state alone.” She's taking that first-hand knowledge and experience and, as a Practice Lead, sharing leading practices and key learnings with others: “The biggest thing that we're doing is our monitoring and adaptive management. It's a long-term look at the project performance and the ecological benefits that come from the projects. We give that back to scientists, to universities, to people at the Engineer Research and Development Center (ERDC), and the US Geological Survey (USGS) so they can improve their modeling tools and reduce uncertainty in their predictions.” She also stresses the importance of combining multiple benefits to help achieve whatever the mission goal is, whether it is storm risk management, navigation and economic benefit, or ecosystem protection and restoration: “We're able to integrate each of those benefits and provide that value-add to the nation. We're getting that message out and showing people how to do that, and how you communicate the benefits of this approach to decision-makers.”   Turning to the Riverine Practice Leads, Eddie describes the importance of taking a holistic perspective of riverine systems. “There are so many people that have a day-to-day connection to the river beyond just the projects that the Corps is doing. It's our responsibility to ensure that we account for everyone's needs on all the projects that we construct. To do that, it's critical to understand that each project is part of a broader system.” He goes on to describe a project that the Corps participated in on the Madeira River in Brazil, the largest tributary of the Amazon River and a critical navigation corridor for transporting goods and people. “It was extra critical for us to be to take a watershed approach, to understand the system before doing anything. We spent four years studying the system prior to making a single recommendation. Through this analysis, we understood that because of the geology of the river, we were able to manage it in smaller reaches instead of very large engineering projects, similar to what you'd see on the Missouri or the Mississippi Rivers. We were able to nudge the river through potentially temporary river training structures and spark natural geomorphic processes to accomplish our goals, as opposed to using a brute force engineering approach.”   Dave is working on a project on a 12-mile stretch of the Platte River that runs through the city and county of Denver where the Corps had built dams in the past. By rethinking the approach and applying EWN principles, he and his team are achieving multiple benefits: “We're doing things like completely removing or modifying drop structures in the river that allow for better fish passage and better in-channel habitat, while also helping to reduce sedimentation the channel. In some areas we're able to pull back the riverbanks to allow more flood water conveyance capacity. Working within an urban area, that has a very direct and large connection to a much larger landscape, laterally and upstream and downstream.”   Working together, the four Practice Leads have learned from each other and developed shared priorities. As Elizabeth notes: “Connecting practitioners of different backgrounds like us with this overarching vision of Engineering With Nature was the thing that really made it easy for us to figure out our group's strengths and differences; how we could come together and work, and also what those priorities needed to be, because we could find those common grounds across the landscape.”   One of their top priorities was expand the practice of EWN across the Corps. In 2021 the Practice Leads established the EWN Implementation Cadre. As Dave explains, “It's an informal internal network of EWN and natural and nature-based features practitioners. We have a space where we connect and share experiences, knowledge, ideas, upload documents to a shared drive and have discussions online.” Danielle describes the process of sharing that goes on across the Cadre: “The key word that we were looking for, for the Cadre hub was ‘crowdsourcing'. Project managers from anywhere in the country that have become a member of this hub can pose a question to the entire group, the multiple hundreds of Cadre members.” As Eddie notes, in addition to leveraging resources and connections, the Cadre provides an opportunity to bring new ideas into the Corps.   According to Jeff, the Cadre as an unqualified success: “When the Cadre was launched, the Leads invited anyone within the Corps who was interested in learning more about the EWN Cadre to attend their opening webinar – 800 Corps employees participated in that first meeting! And the interest has continued. It's just been incredible to see the number of people coming to this space, wanting to learn more about Engineering With Nature, offering their thoughts, and their questions. Creating this repository of information has become so valuable. It's a special place and just a real testimony to the hard work that the Practice Leads are doing.”   Related Links EWN Website ERDC Website Jeff King at LinkedIn Jeff King at EWN   Elizabeth Godsey at LinkedIn Elizabeth Godsey at EWN Mississippi Coastal Improvements Program Gulf Islands National Seashore – Ship Island Gulf Islands National Seashore – Cat Island Deer Island Aquatic Ecosystem Restoration Project Monitoring and Adaptive Management Alabama Island Restoration-Dauphin Island   Danielle Szimanski at LinkedIn Danielle Szimanski at EWN Wicomico River - Deal Island Project Raising the Bar for Salt Marshes on Deal Island – Audubon   Edward Brauer at EWN USACE St. Louis District: An Inland Proving Ground Madeira River Navigation Improvement Planning Study PIANC – Working with Nature for Climate-Resilient Ports and Waterways   David Crane at EWN USACE Omaha district to partner with city of Denver on $350M waterway restoration, flood mitigation project South Platte River – Final Integrated Feasibility Report and Environmental Impact Statement   EWN Implementation Cadre Network of Engineering With Nature EWN Atlas Series   EWN Podcast S4E2: High Energy Roundtable with the EWN Practice Leads  

Big Dad Energy
Dad talks! Chesapeake Bay

Big Dad Energy

Play Episode Listen Later May 27, 2022 22:27


Welcome to Dad Talks! Where we send you some knowledge to digest. Could be conspiracies, could be recipes, could be movie summaries, could be life lessons. Who knows what you'll find. This week, Chesapeake Bay! You can find us on Instagram, Twitter, and Facebook @Bigdadenergypod and email us at bigdadenergypod@gmail.com Thanks to Planet Ant Media for having us on their network! @planetantpodcasts @planetantdet @PlanetAntDigital

Dish City
The Old Bay Obsession

Dish City

Play Episode Listen Later May 26, 2022 31:23


Old Bay is everywhere in the Chesapeake Bay region. It's on chips, popcorn, ice cream, beer, and even chocolate. You can even find the brand tattooed on people's bodies. But, most importantly, it's associated with the state's favorite food: blue crabs. Ruth and Patrick dive into Old Bay's origin story, why people love it, and whether Old Bay is actually on your crabs. We'll be at the Silver Spring farmer's market in Maryland on Saturday, May 28, from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Come hang out! Like this episode? Leave a review! Fill out our survey: dishcity.org/survey Leave us a tip at wamu.org/supportdishcity. Follow us on Twitter: twitter.com/dishcity Follow us on Instagram: instagram.com/dishcity

Midday
Bay's blue crab numbers lowest in 30 years, according to DNR survey

Midday

Play Episode Listen Later May 24, 2022 14:04


Memorial Day weekend is right around the corner, and in anticipation of all those summer crab feasts folks are looking forward to, we thought we'd take a look at the status of crabs in the Chesapeake Bay. Since 1990, the MD Department of Natural Resources has conducted a Baywide Blue Crab Winter Dredge Survey, to determine the size of the blue crab population in the Bay. And this year, the news is not great. The survey found fewer crabs than at any time in more than 30 years. Why is that, and what can be done to increase the crab population in the Bay? Tom's guest is Michael Luisi, DNR's Acting Director of Fishing and Boating Services.  He joins us on Zoom from Annapolis. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Paranormal Punchers
Ep. 139 - Point Lookout Lighthouse

Paranormal Punchers

Play Episode Listen Later May 24, 2022 45:05


The Point Lookout Lighthouse, located in Scotland, MD, sits at the entrance of the Potomac River at the southernmost tip of the Chesapeake Bay and is said to be the most haunted lighthouse in the United States. On May 3, 1825, it was decided that a light was needed at the entrance to the Potomac River in order to warn ships about the shoals and to prevent shipwrecks from continuing to happen at the entrance to the river. After five years of delays, it was first lit on September 20, 1830, and ran without too many issues through the years. Things changed for a time when the Civil War began. A hospital was built in the area to care for wounded Union soldiers, and when Camp Hoffman was built, it held as many as 20,000 prisoners at a time, which was double its occupancy limit, and at least 3,000 to 8000 died there due to limited rations and poor conditions.Because of the death permeating the ground in the area due to the Civil War and the several shipwrecks that occurred near the lighthouse, the lighthouse is incredibly haunted. People have heard footsteps in the hall and stairway, heard doors slamming shut, and heard voices and even snoring coming from nowhere. Several paranormal investigations have occurred here, where they were able to catch numerous EVPs, felt cold spots, and witnessed full-body apparitions. It has been discovered that there are 24 distinct voices in the lighthouse. Join us on episode 139 to hear more about Point Lookout Lighthouse, the most haunted lighthouse in America! Sources: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Point_Lookout_Light, ptlookoutlighthouse.com, lighthousefriends.com/light.asp?ID=436, dnr.maryland.gov/Pages/Spirits-of-Point-Lookout.aspx, southernmarylandchronicle.com/2018/10/11/scariest-stories-of-the-chesapeake-bay-region-part-6-point-lookout-lighthouse/ ###Follow Us:https://www.paranormalpunchers.comhttps://twitter.com/ppunchershttps://instagram.com/paranormalpunchershttps://www.facebook.com/paranormalpunchersSupport the Show:https://www.teepublic.com/stores/paranormal-punchershttps://www.patreon.com/paranormalpunchers

Agricultural Law Podcast
212. HPAI Confirmed Throughout the U.S. & USMCA Dispute Continues Over Canadian Dairy Tarif-Rate Quotas

Agricultural Law Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 23, 2022 24:10


Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza (HPAI) has been confirmed at 13 Pa. and 178 national commercial poultry operations and the United States has twice rejected Canada's dairy tariff-rate quota proposals. Also, EPA found “no confidence” in Pa.'s Chesapeake Bay Phase III Watershed Implementation Plan and the Supreme Court denied certiorari to Kansas's appeal of the Tenth Circuit's ruling that its “ag-gag” is unconstitutional.   Hosted by Audry Thompson, Research Assistant—With Brook Duer, Staff Attorney—Produced & Written by Audry Thompson   Penn State Center for Agricultural and Shale Law https://aglaw.psu.edu/  Follow us on Twitter @AgShaleLaw  Like us on Facebook Penn State Center for Agricultural and Shale Law This material is based upon work supported by the National Agricultural Library, Agricultural Research Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture. Music is “Caazapá (Aire Popular Paraguayo)” by Edson Lopes is licensed under CC BY 3.0.

Delmarva's Own Podcast
Brent Lewis: Delmarva's Own Hollywood Reporter Guy

Delmarva's Own Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 71:59


Brent Lewis was born and raised on Delmarva, in the Kent Narrows region. He learned to appreciate reading and writing from his mother, and learned the value and art of storytelling from his father and other watermen like him. Given his understanding of Delmarva and its people, there wasn't really any better person to tell the story of how Hollywood has made it's mark on the region, for better or worse. Brent joins Jeff and Randy in this episode to talk about his most recent book, Stardust by the Bushel: Hollywood on the Chesapeake Bay's Eastern Shore. Visit www.delmarvasown.com to read a bonus article about Brent. Visit www.easternshorebrent.com to read Brent's blog posts about Delmarva, primarily the Kent Island area. They're fantastic. Visit Secant Publishing to purchase Brent's book and other locally published works. Visit www.voiceofrandy.com for all your voice talent needs. Have a message for the podcast? Click this link! --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/jeffrey-scott3/message

Sailing the East
EP- 58 Amy Alton - YouTube Channel Out Chasing Stars Part 2

Sailing the East

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 53:41


Today we have part 2 with Amy Alton, who along with her husband David Alton purchased a new catamaran in 2014 and sailed around the world. They finished their circumnavigation in 2020 a few weeks before the COVID pandemic hit. They have a YouTube channel, Out Chasing Stars, where they documented their around-the-world travel. They spent the better part of 2021 sailing on the Chesapeake Bay, which is also on their YouTube channel. We have a great conversation that is broken into 2 parts. Part 1 is about the circumnavigation and part 2, this episode is about the Chesapeake and Amy's writing career. Yep, she is an author also!. Here are some links you should check out. https://outchasingstars.com/ https://www.youtube.com/outchasingstars https://www.instagram.com/outchasingstars/ https://www.lizalden.com/ We love to hear from our listeners, send us your questions, comments, and suggestions at sailingtheeast@gmail.com. If you know someone that would be an interesting guest on the show, please reach out to us and let us know. If you would like to support the podcast, click on the sponsorship link below. For as little as 99 cents a month, you can help defray the costs of producing this podcast. Wishing you fair winds, and calm seas. Bela and Mike --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/bela-l-musits/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/bela-l-musits/support

WHRO Reports
Blue crab count in Chesapeake Bay at record low

WHRO Reports

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022


Virginia and Maryland officials released the results this week from their annual winter survey of the crab population.

EWN - Engineering With Nature
High Energy Roundtable with the EWN Practice Leads

EWN - Engineering With Nature

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 28:50


Welcome to Episode 2 of Season 4! EWN Practice Leads play a critical role in broadening and expanding the application of Engineering With Nature practices and nature-based solutions. Host Sarah Thorne and Jeff King, Deputy Lead of the Engineering With Nature Program at the US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), are joined by a roundtable of EWN Practice Leads who are all with USACE. Elizabeth Godsey is the Technical Lead for Coastal Engineering and Regional Sediment Management with Mobile District; Danielle Szimanski is a Project Manager and Ecologist with Baltimore District; Edward Brauer is a Senior Hydraulic Engineer with St. Louis District; and David Crane is an Environmental Resource Specialist with Omaha District.   Consistent with this season's theme—Up, Up, Up, with Engineering With Nature—EWN Practice Leads were established to enable the continued expansion of EWN. According to Jeff, “Back in March of 2021, we were experiencing a lot of growth within the EWN Program, and we realized that for this growth to continue, we really needed to reach beyond this national-level program and get out into the field more. We strived to identify individuals who would help us grow the program so, we put out a call internal to the Corps. Eddie, Elizabeth, Danielle, and Dave stepped up and answered the call. It's been really exciting working with all four of them.”   The Leads had various levels of experience with EWN, but all were motivated by an opportunity to help expand the application of EWN principles and practices throughout the Corps by acting as the connection between the Engineer Research and Development Center (ERDC), and the districts. Elizabeth called it an “aha moment,” describing it as “a leadership opportunity to be a mentor and to connect other practitioners with cutting-edge science and engineering with nature solutions.” Danielle was excited about signing on: “I love the idea of sharing opportunities for EWN with others that haven't had that experience before—being able to put EWN at the forefront and show that even if you haven't done it before, you don't need to be afraid of it.”     As Jeff says, it's a two-way opportunity: “For me sitting at a higher level, I do engage with the Corps's districts quite a bit, but there's an opportunity to learn more about what's happening on the ground. The Practice Leads provide incredible insight that helps EWN leadership really get the full picture of what is happening in the districts and where future opportunities are located. All four Leads are dedicated, motivated, and really inspire us to do more.”   The Practice Leads lead the EWN Implementation Cadre—an informal network of US Army Corps of Engineers practitioners, representing a variety of disciplines across the enterprise, that is working to advance the application of EWN principles, practices, and technologies to deliver nature-based solutions (which will be discussed in more detail in Episode 3). The Leads represent two practice areas—Coastal and Riverine. We discuss their experiences applying EWN in their districts and share how EWN approaches, including large, landscape-scale nature-based features, can be translated to other practitioners.   Elizabeth, a Coastal Practice Lead, describes the challenges Mobile District is facing along the Northern Gulf of Mexico coast associated with tropical storms, heavy rainfall, and rising seas: “Those coastal hazards can increase the stressors to our natural and manmade systems that serve as a frontline of defense and increase the risk to our growing coastal populations, critical infrastructure, as well as nationally significant habitats and species. Following Hurricane Katrina in 2005, Congress authorized the Mississippi Coastal Improvements Program to address long-term risk reduction. An element of this was to restore offshore Mississippi barrier islands. This resulted with estimated annual storm-damage-reduction benefits of over $20 million to the mainland coast.” These were also discussed in S2E1: Expanding Engineering With Nature.   Danielle, a Coastal Practice Lead, describes work being doing in the Chesapeake Bay on the Swan Island Project that has been mentioned in previous podcast episodes (S1E5: Collaborating to Create Wildlife Habitat While Restoring Islands and Improving Community Resilience and S4E1: Scaling Up, Up, Up with CSTORM and EWN). The Swan Island restoration is intended to work as a natural breakwater against storm impacts to protect coastal areas by using dredged material to increase elevation, along with vegetation (on shore and submerged). The data gathered is being used to improve modeling. “There's been a lot of work across agencies to be able to combine all this information together for the CSTORM model so we can use it, not just in the Chesapeake Bay but across the nation for other island restoration projects, to be able to reduce these storm impacts.” A couple of articles about the model have already been published; and once finalized, the model will be available for anyone to use. The hope is that it will enable completion of more natural breakwater projects by the Corps. As Jeff notes, sharing how EWN is being applied in the districts is important as it serves as a model for other districts.   Eddie, a Riverine Practice Lead, describes some of the challenges St. Louis District faces in its riverine systems, which he notes have been engineered for decades. “We're having to go back and reimagine the way that we're implementing solutions, finding other ways that we can, for instance, have navigation on a system but also create additional habitat without increasing flood risk. It's really important to understand that there are many people with diverse needs out there that we need to accommodate. The solution to both of these problems are Engineering With Nature fundamentals—looking at this as a system and incorporating other people's benefits and needs and partnerships.”   Dave, a Riverine Practice Lead, has been doing innovative work in Omaha District: “It's been neat finding ways to incorporate nature-based features, not only in ecosystem restoration projects but across the full spectrum of our mission.” He adds, “There's a lot of talk about aging infrastructure throughout the country. Maybe levees aren't something that a lot of people think about when they think about aging infrastructure, but some flood risk management infrastructure, including levees, are almost a hundred years old. In large rural areas along the Missouri River, they've been damaged by floods and been repaired in place. Over time, it takes a toll. As we repair flood risk management infrastructure, we're partnering with conservation programs and NGOs and thinking differently about constructing things like setbacks. These can help address ecosystem restoration while improving the infrastructure because you're able to rebuild to modern levee design standards that are more resilient and can withstand over topping without as much erosion damage.”   As we close, Jeff highlights the value of the EWN Practice Leads: “This group of Practice Leads are creating real boots-on-the-ground projects and they're expanding the practice of EWN in their own work, while also being leaders, coaches, and mentors for others that they work with on a regular basis.” Sarah and Jeff invite the Leads to return for Season 4 Episode 3 to talk about how they're solving challenges, advancing EWN implementation through the EWN Cadre, and sharing what they are learning with other practitioners.   Related Links EWN Website ERDC Website Jeff King at LinkedIn Jeff King at EWN   Elizabeth Godsey at LinkedIn Elizabeth Godsey at EWN Mississippi Coastal Improvements Program     Danielle Szimanski at LinkedIn Danielle Szimanski at EWN Coastal Storm Modeling System (CSTORM) Swan Island Restoration: Engineering With Nature (EWN) Principles In Practice   Edward Brauer at EWN USACE St. Louis District: An Inland Proving Ground   David Crane at EWN   EWN Implementation Cadre Network of Engineering With Nature EWN Atlas Series   EWN Podcast S1E5: Collaborating to Create Wildlife Habitat While Restoring Islands and Improving Community Resilience EWN Podcast S2E1: Expanding Engineering With Nature EWN Podcast S4E1: Scaling UP, UP, UP with CSTORM and EWN

The SmallmouthCrush Podcast
Jim Barczak talks fishing deep grass and his approach to fishing new bodies of water!

The SmallmouthCrush Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 15, 2022 53:49


If you are a hard-core angler, you have come to the right place. This is a weekly podcast that will interview some of the top local and regional anglers in North America. Anglers who consistency finish near the top in both Largemouth and Smallmouth bass fishing tournaments. Travis and his guest will discuss techniques and strategies used to help these anglers stay so consistent and help you become a better angler and gain an edge on your body of water. This interview I chat with Jim Barczak who lives in Wisconsin.  He has a great track record fishing tournaments and dominates the waters of NE Wisconsin.  He moved to the western part of the state and fished a lot of Minnesota waters now.  He talks about some of his favorite techniques to fish those MN lakes and goes into great detail some of his secrets to getting on fish! The Reel Shot is where I recommend you purchase your tackle! Use my Code SmallmouthCrush15 and get 15% your first order today!https://bit.ly/2YtVLRLSMALLMOUTHCRUSHNEW VIDEOS UPLOADED WEEKLY and the WORLD FAMOUS LIVE STREAM with Co Host Epic Eric---------------------------------------Sunday – 2:00 PM Est The SmallmouthCrush PodcastMonday - 8:00 PM Est LIVESTREAMFishing Videos throughout the week---------------------------------------Follow on Instagram @SmallmouthCrush https://www.instagram.com/smallmouthcrush/Follow The Bass Lab Tackle Freak Himself Epic Eric @epicericoffical https://www.instagram.com/epicericofficial/SmallmouthCrush VIP Members LIVE Show - WOW CHECK THIS OUT!! Special LIVE Show once per month!Get special access to a member's only LIVE once a month - Secret Tips and Techniques and information we only share with our VIP Members!Join Today!https://smallmouthcrush.com/product-category/vip-membership-live/Are you interested in booking a One on One session with SmallmouthCrush?  Now you can set up a personal online meeting to talk anything fishing related.  Do you want to learn how to search for fish on your body of water or perhaps you have a tournament coming up on a specific body of water that you want to break down.  This is the place to get all your questions answered!Click here to SUBSCRIBE to my channel:http://bit.ly/SmallmouthCrushYouTubeChannelCheck out some of these Money Saving Codes!The Reel Shot is where I recommend you purchase your tackle! Use my Code SmallmouthCrush15 and get 15% your first order today!https://bit.ly/2YtVLRLSMALLMOUTHCRUSHWant to save money on Tackle and get sponsorship pricing?  Click the link below and use code CRUSH50 to get 50% off your membership!https://club.outdoorsponsors.com/Who is SmallmouthCrush?Travis Manson was born and raised in Wisconsin. He started fishing from the bank at a young age and spent most of his childhood with a rod in his hand.  Travis is primarily a self-taught angler that is always learning and experiencing this amazing sport of fishing.  He started out fishing for walleyes and fishing in local walleye tournaments, but then in his mid 20's, he caught the BASS BUG and has been hooked ever since.  He competed at the highest level in bass fishing on the Bassmaster Elite Series for a number of years.  He is a full time fishing guide offering trips on the Chesapeake Bay for largemouth bass(year round) and trophy smallmouth bass guided trips in Upstate New York on Lake Ontario and the St Lawrence River. His Youtube Channel is named after his passion for the smallmouth bass and will be used as a platform for "how-to" videos, on the water instruction, crazy on and off the water topics on the day in the life of a fishing addict!  Hope you enjoy, and until next time we will see you on the water!

Earthaven Ecovillage Podcast
Mentors, Elders, and Groundhogs with Doug Elliott

Earthaven Ecovillage Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 21:20


Doug Elliott is a naturalist, herbalist, storyteller, basket maker, back-country guide, philosopher, and harmonica wizard. For many years made his living as a traveling herbalist, gathering and selling herbs, teas, and remedies. Doug currently lives in Rutherford County, near Earthaven Ecovillage. Doug shares his early mentor experience while growing up in an estuary of the Chesapeake Bay. Later he moved to North Carolina as part of the back-to-the-land movement, learning from old timers. Along the way, he shares how shoestrings made from groundhog led to him meeting his wife and how important it is to help older people be who they are.

Art Heals All Wounds
Art Heals All Wounds: Michael O. Snyder, Photographer and Filmmaker

Art Heals All Wounds

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 42:56


Today, I'm joined by photographer, filmmaker, and educator Michael O. Snyder. His work focuses on the intersectionality of environmental and cultural change. Our conversation is centered around his project called The Coming Coast. In this photography project, Michael explores the impact of rising seas and how it will affect the Chesapeake Bay in the Mid-Atlantic region of the United States. The area is important both strategically and infrastructurally, and it is predicted to be one of the places most highly impacted by rising sea levels. We also talk about some of his other work, including a film called Into the Dark, how he brings visibility and awareness to abstract concepts, and his approach for reaching diverse audiences. Topics Covered:● The impact on the ecology, infrastructure, and cultures of the communities affected by coastline change ● What the term ‘value-action gap' means ● The direction and vision for The Coming Coast project, and how that changed when the pandemic hit● The underlying role that climate change plays in migration ● Transforming the documentary material into other art forms to reach a wider audience Guest Info:● Michael's Website ● Michael's Instagram Resources: ● Raincoast Conservation Foundation ● Third Act Special Offer: ● Check out https://newsly.me and use the promo code ARTHEALS for a free one-month premium subscription.Promoted Podcast● Goodniks podcast Follow Me:● My Instagram ● My LinkedIn● My Twitter● Art Heals All Wounds Website● Art Heals All Wounds Instagram● Art Heals All Wounds Twitter ● Art Heals All Wounds Facebook● Art Heals All Wounds Newsletter See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Dog Talk ® (and Kitties Too!)
Best Friend NYC Immigrants—One Ukrainian, One Russian—Saving Pets!

Dog Talk ® (and Kitties Too!)

Play Episode Listen Later May 8, 2022


Sending money to animal rescues in Ukraine; how Kradle's calming products are created; Earth Animal's new dog food uses invasive blue catfish destroying Chesapeake Bay

After the Fact
Ocean, People, Planet: A Wildlife Refuge On The Brink

After the Fact

Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2022 29:29


Stat: 2.1 feet—Scientists have forecast an increase of as much as 2.1 feet in the Chesapeake Bay by 2050. Story: In this episode, we travel to Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge on the Chesapeake Bay in Maryland, where the refuge is losing ground to climate change and rising sea levels. Through interviews with experts—including Joseph Gordon, who directs Pew's work on coastal marine life in the U.S.; Marcia Pradines Long, manager of Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge; Kristin Thomasgard,  program director with the Department of Defense; Julie M. Schablitsky, chief archaeologist at the Maryland Department of Transportation; and Kate Larson, a historian and author—we explore the threats facing this refuge because of the changing climate, and the path ahead for its environmental, cultural, and economic future.

Charlottesville Community Engagement
May 5, 2022: Supervisors agree to adopt $586.3M budget but stalemate on athletic fields continues

Charlottesville Community Engagement

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 16:36


May moves most quickly, and here we are again with another edition of Charlottesville Community Engagement, a newsletter and program that seeks to capture as much as possible about the rapid movement that appears to be experienced by so many. The goal is to give a quick look or listen at what’s going on as often as possible. This is the 374th episode hosted by me, Sean Tubbs.Charlottesville Community Engagement is a reader-supported publication. To receive new posts and support my work, consider becoming a free or paid subscriber.On today’s program:The Charlottesville Area Association of Realtors releases its latest analysis of the Charlottesville market Albemarle and Waynesboro are receiving more funds to electrify busesVirginia localities to get more funding for Chesapeake Bay pollution reduction The Albemarle Board of Supervisors adopts its budget for FY23But the six elected officials are in a stalemate over how to proceed with grass or artificial turf at new athletic fields First shout to JMRL’s How To FestivalIn today’s first subscriber-supported shout-out, the Jefferson Madison Regional Library will once again provide the place for you to learn about a whole manner of things! The How To Festival returns once more to the Central Library in downtown Charlottesville on Saturday, May 14 from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. There is something for everyone in this fast-paced, interactive and free event! There will be 15-minute presentations and demonstrations on a diverse set of topics. Want to know how to do a home DNA test? Tune a guitar? What about using essential oils to repel mosquitoes? Visit the library website at jmrl.org to learn more. Schedule is coming soon! That’s the How To Festival, May 14, 2022. CAAR reports on activity in first three months of 2022A lower inventory of available homes continues to drive up the sales prices in some parts of the region. That’s according to the latest quarterly report from the Charlottesville Area Association of Realtors covering the first three months of this year. . “In the first quarter, the median sales price was $389,900, which was up 13 over a year ago, a gain of nearly $45,000,” reads the report. A total of 888 homes were sold during January, February and March. That’s 177 units fewer than in the same period in 2021. The report notes that inventory may be on the rise. A total of 1,327 building permits were issued in 2021 in the six localities covered by CAAR and that’s the highest number since 2006. Activity has increased this year as well. “In January and February, there were 286 new construction permits, which is up significantly from prior years,” the report continues. “In the first two months of 2022, more than 70 percent of new housing permits were for the construction of single-family homes.” However, the report also notes that interest rates are beginning to climb with the average interest rate for a 30-year mortgage at five percent for the first time in eleven years. As for sales prices, all six localities saw increases in the median sales price. Albemarle’s average is $476,750, an 11 percent increase since 2021’s first quarterCharlottesville’s average is $412,000, a four percent increase Fluvanna’s average is $335,263, a 24 percent increaseGreene’s average is $335,000, a seven percent increaseLouisa’s average is $282,651, a 22 percent increase Nelson’s average is $308,500, a 17 percent increaseTomorrow I will be posting an anecdotal summary of transactions in the city of Charlottesville and paid subscribers to this newsletter will get a first look. Take a look at the past 15 on the Information Charlottesville archive. Virginia DEQ to award $14 million for electric school busesMore state funding is on the way to help localities make the transition from diesel-powered school buses to electric ones. The Virginia Department of Environmental Quality announced Wednesday that the Clean School Bus Program will award more than $14 million across Virginia, and that includes Albemarle County.The funding comes from Volkswagen, a company that lied to its customers about the fuel efficiency of some vehicles. Virginia received $93.6 million from the Volkswagen Environmental Mitigation Trust.“DEQ has also committed funds for innovative clean transportation projects including electric transit buses, medium and heavy duty trucks, electric equipment at the Port of Virginia and development of a statewide charging network for electric vehicles,” reads a press release.Albemarle County will get $464,754 for two more electric buses, bringing the total fleet to four. Last year, the county received $530,000 from the same fund. (previous story)Waynesboro will receive $1.4 million for six buses. For more information about the Volkswagen settlement, visit this dedicated website.Virginia gets funding for Bay clean-up effortsLast November, President Joe Biden signed the Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act which included $238 million in funding for programs to reduce pollution that makes its way into the Chesapeake Bay. This week, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency announced that $40 million will be made available through two separate programs. “I am pleased to announce the new funding that will help support ready-to-go projects throughout the 64,000-square-mile Chesapeake Bay watershed,” said EPA Deputy Administrator Janet McCabe in a news release. “This unprecedented funding can go straight into projects that will protect public health, improve water quality and help restore lands, rivers and streams that impact the Chesapeake Bay – from farm fields to suburban neighborhoods to city streets.”First, $15 million will come from the Most Effective Basins (MEB) program. Virginia will get over $3 million from this pool of funding. “The funding will largely support farm-based actions to improve local rivers and streams in locations most beneficial to the downstream Chesapeake Bay,” the release continues. The other $25 million will be administered by the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation through two grant programs. Specific awards will be made in September. One group that is often a forum for local efforts to meet pollution reduction controls is the Rivanna River Basin Commission. They meet next virtually tomorrow at 2 p.m. (meeting info) (RRBC agendas)Second shout-out: The Plant Northern Piedmont Natives Campaign It’s springtime, and one Patreon subscriber wants you to know the Plant Northern Piedmont Natives Campaign is a grassroots initiative of motivated citizens, volunteers, partner organizations, and local governments who want to promote the use of native plants. This spring the group is working with retailers across the region to encourage purchase of plants that belong here and are part of an ecosystem that depends on pollination. There are plenty of resources on the Plant Northern Piedmont Natives Facebook page, so sign up to be notified of lectures, plant sales, and more!Albemarle Board adopts $586.3 million budgetThe Albemarle Board of Supervisors took eight actions yesterday to complete the process of development and adopting a budget for FY23. They began with the tax rates. (view the presentation)“We have the real estate, mobile homes and public service tax rate of 85.4 cents (per $100 of assessed value) that is the calendar year 2022 rate,” said Andy Bowman, chief of the Office of Management and Budget in Albemarle. “For personal property rate, which also applies to machinery and tool taxes, the current rate is currently $4.28 cents per $100 and it is proposed to be reduced to $3.22 per $100 of assessed value.” The reduction is due to the increase in value of used vehicles due to reduced production. Many localities in Virginia opted to decrease this amount, though Charlottesville City Council opted to keep their rate at the higher one. In the next three items, Supervisors had to vote on an increase in the food and beverage tax from four percent to six percent and an increase in the transient lodging tax from five percent to eight percent.“And finally the disposable plastic bag tax which would be five cents for each disposable bag and that would go into effect on January 1 of 2023,” Bowman said. Supervisors adopted those tax rates with no discussion. All of that took place at the seven work sessions held since the budget was introduced in late February. All of those tax rates add up to a budget that anticipated $586.282,008 in total revenues for FY 23.“That is a number than is greater than the Board last saw, due to some changes primarily in the school budget,” Bowman said. Those changes include additional funds for the school system related to reclassification of federal funds as well as $12 million in funding for the school that came down from the American Rescue Plan Act. Virginia has not yet adopted its budget as the divided General Assembly did not reach consensus on one. Bowman said that means there is about $5 million in funds in question currently set aside as a placeholder. “The current county budget includes $3.6 million in state funding that is currently in question with the impasse at the state budget,” Bowman said. “The Board of Supervisors previously asked the public schools what is the fallback plan if that state funding comes through? This plan is responsive to that direction so if the state keeps that $3.6 million intact, the school board would use that $3.6 million in one way. If that $3.6 million were to fall out of the state with an alternative approval for how that would be used. Stalemate continues on synthetic turf fields One issue that has come up during the budget process has been how to proceed with plans to update athletic fields managed by the Parks and Recreation Department. The original budget envisioned those being installed as grass fields at the future Biscuit Run Park, but at least three Supervisors sought to instead move forward with a previous plan to build synthetic turf fields at Darden Towe Park. Some such as Supervisor Ann Mallek continued to want to keep those fields natural. The topic was discussed extensively at the work session on April 27, and the county executive prepared a potential way to move forward. “If the Board were to show a majority or a consensus today that we would like to explore increasing the quality of the fields at Darden Towe, the first step would be to go out and get an expert in the turf management world to come in and do an assessment,” said County Executive Jeffrey Richardson.That process could take a year and might mean taking the fields off line for some time. Richardson said the first step would cost about $20,000 and he asked the Board if they supported that pathway forward. However, that proposal was not included in the budget before the Board. Supervisor Ned Gallaway asked what this study would give the county that it didn’t already know before. “What it gives us is a detailed plan of execution,” said Trevor Henry, the assistant county executive. “A nutrient plan, things like aeration, lime, fertilizer, a seeding schedule, weed and pest control, a mowing schedule, a watering schedule, and a rotation. Those would be some of the outcomes of that.” Supervisor Diantha McKeel made a motion to adopt the budget that did not include spending that $20,000 for the consultant. Supervisor Ann Mallek made a counter motion to amend the budget to include that funding. Supervisor McKeel wanted to move forward with synthetic turf as recommended by staff in 2019 to put lighting and artificial turf at Darden Towe. “In 2019, Albemarle County had nine organizations representing over 7,000 participants that were requesting rectangular field space,” McKeel said. “It was evident in ‘19 that Albemarle County not only lacked the available fields but lacked the ability to provide quality fields based on high usage.”McKeel said artificial turf was not her first choice for grass athletic fields, but she supported their use at Darden Towe, which is considered an urban park. “A mudhole is not an environmental success, nor is asking people to play in goose poop an environmental success,” McKeel said. Supervisor Mallek said natural grass fields are safer for those who play on them. The topic was discussed extensively at the April 27 work session. Gallaway said he did not support the motion because it would delay what he said was a need to provide fields. He supported synthetic.“We’ve had in front of us an option that would fix our system of fields that would increase capacity, that would increase quality everywhere, not just for the current fields but for the future fields that would come into the system,” Gallaway said. Supervisor Donna Price also did not support the motion.“I call foul on that proposal and think we’re just simply kicking the can down the road,” Price said. “It’s been years that we’ve known our fields are inadequate and that we needed to do something like this.” Mallek’s proposal failed 3-3, which is a stalemate. That means the adopted budget does not include a decision point on how to proceed with athletic fields. . Other actions taken to complete the budget include a resolution for appropriation of $18 million for FY23 in FY22, a borrowing resolution, and a resolution to adopt the Capital Improvement Plan for FY23 through FY27. Now that the budget is complete, the process will next begin on creating a new strategic plan. Help support Town Crier Productions with a paid subscription to this newsletter!For one year now, Town Crier Productions has a promo with Ting!Are you interested in fast internet? Visit this site and enter your address to see if you can get service through Ting. If you decide to proceed to make the switch, you’ll get:Free installationSecond month of Ting service for freeA $75 gift card to the Downtown MallAdditionally, Ting will match your Substack subscription to support Town Crier Productions, the company that produces this newsletter and other community offerings. So, your $5 a month subscription yields $5 for TCP. Your $50 a year subscription yields $50 for TCP! The same goes for a $200 a year subscription! All goes to cover the costs of getting this newsletter out as often as possible. Learn more here! This is a public episode. If you’d like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit communityengagement.substack.com/subscribe

Wherever Jon May Roam, with National Corn Growers Association CEO Jon Doggett
33. 4-Time National Corn Yield Contest Record Holder David Hula's Winning Formula

Wherever Jon May Roam, with National Corn Growers Association CEO Jon Doggett

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 32:54


The NCGA National Corn Yield Contest is an annual tradition that dates back to 1965. But in that time, no one has had quite the sustained success as Charles City, Virginia's David Hula, who has won the contest with record-setting yields on four separate occasions. In this episode, we talk to David about his formula for success, which includes a combination of precisely-targeted fertilizer applications and a blend of strip-till and no-till. Plus, we discuss the unique environmental challenges he faces as he works tirelessly to preserve water quality in the Chesapeake Bay watershed, and how his farm traces its historic roots back to a time when growers planted a dead catfish with their corn seed. 

Today in PA | A PennLive daily news briefing with Julia Hatmaker

An amendment that's looking to eliminate race-based hair discrimination was introduced in York the other day. Pennsylvania is one of a number of states that'll get millions in federal funds to restore the Chesapeake Bay. The renovated site of the Tree of Life Synagogue will include a nonprofit institute which has one goal: ridding the world of antisemitism. And, appropriately on May the Fourth, stars will look like they're warring above Pennsylvania over the next couple of days.

Agricultural Law Podcast
211. USDA Confirms HPAI in Pa & PDA Sends Letter to EPA Over Conowingo Plan Funding

Agricultural Law Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2022 23:36


USDA confirmed highly pathogenic avian influenza in commercial layer flocks in Pennsylvania and the White House announced EPA will issue an E15 national emergency waiver in June. Then, the Chesapeake Bay Principals' Staff Committee and the Pa. Dept. of Environ. Protection sent letters responding to EPA's evaluation of ‘no confidence' for funding in the Conowingo Watershed Implementation Plan. Also, OMB is reviewing draft guidance on plant-based dairy alternative labeling and FDA opened the comment period for the scientific questions to guide the upcoming 2025 Dietary Guidelines. Hosted by Audry Thompson, Research Assistant—With Brook Duer, Staff Attorney—Produced & Written by Audry Thompson Material from the Agricultural Law Weekly Review—Week Ending April 15, 2022.  Penn State Center for Agricultural and Shale Law https://aglaw.psu.edu/  Follow us on Twitter @AgShaleLaw  Like us on Facebook Penn State Center for Agricultural and Shale Law This material is based upon work supported by the National Agricultural Library, Agricultural Research Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture. Music is “Caazapá (Aire Popular Paraguayo)” by Edson Lopes is licensed under CC BY 3.0.

The Voyages of Tim Vetter
Episode 270 Eastern Shore Painter Marc Castelli Part 2

The Voyages of Tim Vetter

Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2022 112:59


Greetings from Chestertown, Maryland! Marc Castelli joined the podcast for the second time to talk more about his artwork, history, philosophy, and life on the Eastern Shore of Maryland. Marc is well known for his paintings that depict the watermen of the Chesapeake Bay. His art can often be found at the Massoni Art Gallery in Chestertown, Maryland. Marc is one of my favorite people to talk to about books, art, and life, so it was a pleasure to catch up and record another episode. Check out Marc Castelli: https://www.marc-castelli.com/ https://massoniart.com/castelli/ Support TVTV on Patreon: www.patreon.com/thevoyagesoftimvetter

WiSP Sports
The Bolder Woman: Chris Stafford Bikes The Potomac Heritage Trail with Marci Kornegay

WiSP Sports

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 29, 2022 47:50


Marci Kornegay chats with Chris Stafford about the bike ride they did together when they took on the Potomac Heritage National Scenic Trail from Point Lookout State Park in Maryland, on the Chesapeake Bay, to Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania - a total of 427 miles over eight days. Marci, 42, and Chris, 70, combined their athletic backgrounds and adventure seeking spirits to take on their first long distance cycling challenge. The ride would involve two days on the road in southern Maryland to reach Washington, DC. From there they joined the Columbus & Ohio Canal Path (C&O) that runs from Georgetown, DC to Cumberland, MD, arriving three days later. it is there that the Great Allegheny Passage (GAP) begins and runs over the Allegheny Mountains reaching 2392 feet at the Eastern Continental Divide, shortly after crossing the Mason Dixon Line, arriving in downtown Pittsburgh, PA. It was an epic adventure for them both, not knowing what was around every corner along the way, and where some situations would mean facing real fears head-on. Marci takes on the role of host as she interviews Chris about the trip, what it felt like to take on such a big challenge, why she did it, what she learned from it, including her fear of heights, and what advice she would have for other women to dare to be bold.Marci and Chris were also raising money to feed Ukrainian refugees via World Central Kitchen. Visit https://www.justgiving.com/fundraising/RidingforUkraine to donate.#ridingforukraineFor more information, links and resources and hundreds more conversations from the world of women's sport including articles, blogs, videos and podcasts visit wispsports.com. WiSP Sports is the ONLY GLOBAL PODCAST FOR WOMEN'S SPORT with more than 60 hosts, 1600+ episodes across 50 shows and over 7 million downloads. Every episode is a WiSP SPORTS ORIGINAL PRODUCTION. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.We are ranked in the top 2% of more than 2.71 million podcasts worldwide. WiSP Sports is on all major podcast players. Follow WiSP Sports on social media @WiSPsports. Contact us at info@wispsports.com.

Weather Wise
E14: Tangier Island Sinking

Weather Wise

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 27, 2022 20:36


Tangier Island has been sinking due to climate change along with coastal flooding & beach erosion events. Meteorologists Ulises Garcia & Sloane Haines discuss how much the island has been decreasing & how people on the island are trying to save from sinking into the Chesapeake Bay.  

R.L. Stine's Story Club
S1E27 - Ivy's Chilling Tales: Chessie of Chesapeake Bay Revisited

R.L. Stine's Story Club

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 26, 2022 7:33


Join Ivy, caretaker of peculiar and spooky stories from the hidden vault of R.L. Stine, as she explores some of her favorite chilling tales from earlier this season.

Eye On Annapolis Daily News Brief
Bonus Podcast: Chesapeake Bay Blues Fest Reminiscing

Eye On Annapolis Daily News Brief

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 21, 2022 30:13


In this month's podcast with the beer gurus at Katcef Brothers we changed it up a bit and headed over to Katcef's conference room for a conversation about the end of an era! On April 8th, we got word that this year would be the final year for the Chesapeake Bay Blues Festival. For nearly 25-years, Don Hooker has brought the blues to the Bay with the help of Neal Katcef, the owner of Katcef Brothers. We take a walk down memory lane to the first festival, some favorite stories, favorite acts, and the divas.  And we found out the "why" as well.  With a very successful computer company under his belt, Don felt the need to give back to the community. That is why the event donates all profits to local non-profits and why it is nearly 100% volunteer. And this is exactly why Katcef Brothers became involved in 1998 as giving back to the community is part of the fabric of their organization as well.  And of course, we took a dive into this year's festival which will be epic (despite Don's daughter Sarah not allowing him to have fireworks) with some surprises to come.  Tickets are available at BayBlues.org Have a listen!

News Headlines in Morse Code at 15 WPM

Morse code transcription: vvv vvv Ronaldo and partner announce death of baby boy Unrest in Sweden over planned Quran burnings White House hosts first Easter egg roll since pandemic Operator error suspected in death of 14 year old on Orlando amusement park ride Evergreen vessel freed after a month aground in US waters San Jose Man arrested in connection with massive Home Depot fire Ukraine war Dramatic images appear to show sinking Russian warship Moskva Celebrity chefs Ukraine charity kitchen destroyed by Russian missile Police arrest two suspects in South Carolina mall shooting that injured 15 Russia Ukraine live updates Russias eastern offensive has begun, Ukraine says, as strikes rock Lviv Evergreen container ship freed after a month aground in Chesapeake Bay We should talk about our mental health every day Biden faces deepening Democratic rift over Title 42 Alex Jones Infowars files for bankruptcy after defamation suits New photos show Russian warship Moskva before it sank Federal Judge Strikes Down the Mask Mandate on Planes and Public Transit US judge throws out Biden mask mandate for planes and trains Egypt female TikTok star jailed for three years for human trafficking DeSantis defends math textbook rejection as Dems seek proof of critical race theory lessons US man wins 450k lawsuit after unwanted office birthday party