Podcasts about Maryland School

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  • 356PODCASTS
  • 554EPISODES
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  • Jun 29, 2022LATEST

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Best podcasts about Maryland School

Latest podcast episodes about Maryland School

Peruvians of USA
49 (English) Giving Politics a Chance, with Maricé Morales, Candidate for Montgomery County Council

Peruvians of USA

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 58:35


Maricé Morales's parents are immigrants from Peru. She lived in Peru from age 12 to 17, when she returned to the United States to attend college. She graduated from George Mason University with a bachelor's degree in Global Affairs and French and a master's degree in public policy. She received a juris doctorate from the University of Maryland School of Law and received a public service award from the law school. During this time, she was involved in legal work extended from the Public Defender's Office in New Orleans, LA to San Jose, Costa Rica at the Inter-American Court of Human Rights. From canvassing neighborhoods to encouraging jury participation in Louisiana, to contributing to the international legal framework around discrimination and excessive force against Afro-descendants. Still, while in law school, Morales competed in the National Latina/o Law Student Association's sixth annual moot court competition. In 2014, she was elected to the Maryland House of Delegates, as the first Latina to represent District 19 in Montgomery County, MD. Maricé received the Governor's Award for her work combating Human Trafficking and was recognized in 2019 as one of the top 100 Most Influential Latina Leaders in the D.C., Maryland, and Virginia metropolitan area. Maricé currently practices law in the greater Washington, D.C. area, in her Law Office focusing on immigration, criminal defense, and personal injury law. She currently serves on the Montgomery College Board of Trustees, and the boards for the Jewish Council on Aging and Emerge Maryland. Mentioned in the episode: LatinoUSA episode: Foreigner at Birth - Haitians and birthright citizenship in the Dominican Republic Book recommendation: Brown is the New White by Steve Phillips Connect with Maricé Website: https://www.maricemorales.com/event IG: @morales4moco Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/morales4moco LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/maric%C3%A9-morales-6b43242a Ways to support the podcast: Give us a review on Apple Podcast Become a Listener Supporter, see link in bio Visit our Online Store and help us change the narrative with our t-shirt: “El Mejor Amigo de un Peruano es otro peruano.” Also available in feminine (“peruana”) and gender-neutral (“peruanx”) versions Follow Peruvians of USA Podcast on IG: @peruviansofusa Like our page on Facebook! --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/peruviansofusa/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/peruviansofusa/support

Anthropological Airwaves
S04E03: Archaeological Identities - Part One

Anthropological Airwaves

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 28:45


This episode is the first of a three-part series produced by Eleanor Neil, contributing editor at American Anthropologist and Anthropological Airwaves. From the African American Burial Ground in New York City to the memorialization of violence in Northern Ireland to professional archaeology in the eastern Mediterranean, Eleanor asks archaeologists with different regional and methodological specialties to choose a single object or site, and, in their own words describe how this this site or artefact speaks to the interaction between archaeology and political or social identity across time and place. Here, Dr. Cheryl Janifer LaRoche discusses the African American Burial Ground in lower Manhattan and the influence it has had on public engagement, perceptions of slavery in the northern United States, and the empowerment inherent in recognizing one's own past in the archaeological record. Dr. LaRoche's is Associate Research Professor at the University of Maryland School of Architecture, Planning, and Preservation. Her research on 18th and 19th-century free Black communities, institutions, and spaces combines law, history, oral history, archaeology, geography and material culture to define Black cultural landscapes, often navigating the convergences of public, private, political and social interests. Further Reading: LaRoche, Cheryl J. and Michael L. Blakey, ‘Seizing Intellectual Power: The Dialogue at the New York African Burial Ground', Historical Archaeology, Vol. 31, No. 3 (1997), pp. 84-106. Leone, Mark P. and Cheryl J. LaRoche, Jennifer J. Babiarz, ‘Archaeology of Black Americans in Recent Times', Annual Review of Anthropology, Vol. 35 (2005), pp. 575-598. Transcript: https://www.americananthropologist.org/podcast/season-04-episode-03-archaeological-identities-part-one Close-captioned: https://youtu.be/XVlc4t1ZH8A Credits: Writing, Production & Editing: Eleanor Neil Production Support: Anar Parikh Thumbnail Image: Wally Gobetz, “NYC - Civic Center: African American Burial Ground National Monument” (2008) African American Burial Ground Memorial Featured Music: “Spirit Blossom” by Roman Belov Executive Producer - Anar Parikh Intro/Outro: "Waiting" by Crowander

Champions of Change: The RISE Podcast
How We Talk, Teach and Tackle Racism in College Athletics - Maryland Sports Business Conference

Champions of Change: The RISE Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2022 47:12


As we approach Juneteenth, the celebration of the end of slavery in this country, we share this RISE critical Conversation from the recently held University of Maryland Sports Business Conference. With lawmakers across the country seeking to restrict the way issues of race, diversity and inclusion are discussed and taught in schools and places of work, this conversation addresses how we talk, teach and tackle racism in the collegiate space, particularly in athletics. With such legislative efforts rising in various states, Juneteenth serves as a reminder for the need to acknowledge and learn from our history and continue to push in the modern day fight for racial and social justice. In this conversation, we tackle these issues head-on, addressing athlete activism, amateurism and racial equity in college sports and the importance of engaging in honest conversations around racism and inclusivity. Moderated by University of Maryland Assistant Athletic Director of Student-Athlete Development, Resa Lovelace, the conversation features RISE CEO Diahann Billings-Burford; Kevin Blackistone, Professor of the Practice at the Phillip Merrill College of Journalism, Washington Post columnist and ESPN Around The Horn panelist; Maryland Women's Volleyball Player Rainelle Jones; and Dr. Ronald Mower, Lecturer Kinesiology, Maryland School of Public Health.

GI Insights
Fighting Food Allergies & Intolerances in GI

GI Insights

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 13, 2022


Host: Peter Buch, MD, FACG, AGAF, FACP Guest: Frances Onyimba, MD Over the last two decades, up to 20 percent of the population in industrialized nations have reported an abnormal physical response to food ingestion, also known as an adverse reaction to food. So what key information do we need to know about food allergies and intolerances amid this recent rise around the world? To find out, Dr. Peter Buch is joined by Dr. Frances Onyimba, Assistant Professor of Medicine at the University of Maryland School of Medicine. Together, they'll discuss how we can better identify and diagnose food allergies and intolerances.

Finding Genius Podcast
How You Can Prevent And Recover From Stress With Resilience Training

Finding Genius Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 12, 2022 32:10


Stress-related conditions affect a vast array of individuals. Many health professionals are finding innovative and effective ways to not only manage these disorders, but also prevent them from happening. In this episode, we connect with Dr. Glenn R. Schiraldi. Dr. Schiraldi is a retired Lieutenant Colonel in the U.S. Army Reserves, Adjunct Professor at The University of Maryland School of Public Health, Author, and founder of Resilience Training International. Throughout his career in public health, Dr. Schiraldi has primarily focused his research on preventing stress-related mental disorders such as post-traumatic stress disorder.  Tune in now to hear Dr. Schiraldi discuss: What resilience training is, and how it helps individuals who suffer from stress conditions. Types of adult and childhood trauma that contribute to medical and psychological diseases. The benefits of implementing effective stress management practices. Offer: This episode is sponsored by Viome. Use the code GENIUS to get an extra $20 off on Health Intelligence Test. Check it out now: Viome You can find out more about Dr. Schiraldi and his approach by visiting www.resiliencefirst.com Episode also available on Apple Podcast: http://apple.co/30PvU9C

If You've Come This Far
Dr. Geoffrey Greif

If You've Come This Far

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 8, 2022 52:26


In this episode, Shaun and Chris talk with Dr. Geoffrey Greif, Professor, University of Maryland School of Social Work. The guys dig into Dr. Greif's book, Buddy System: Understanding male friendships, explore must, trust, rust and just friendships, the difference between family and friends, trust, loyalty, being understood and other aspects of Grief's work on relationships.

The Table at UMB
Why White Feminism Hurts

The Table at UMB

Play Episode Listen Later May 31, 2022 39:11


This episode is dedicated to unpacking the historic and present day harms of white feminism. We're calling out these harmful practices so that we can move forward towards collective liberation for all bodies, not just those of white women.  Joining us for this episode is Kinley Millett, a student at the University of Maryland School of Social Work and a leader of the Intersectional Feminism and Social Work student organization. 

The DotCom Magazine Entrepreneur Spotlight
Dr. Lyn Yaffe, Chairman & CEO, EPR-Technologies, Inc, A DotCom Magazine Interview

The DotCom Magazine Entrepreneur Spotlight

Play Episode Listen Later May 25, 2022 40:30


About Dr. Lyn Yaffe and EPR-Technologies: Dr. Lyn J. Yaffe is a family medicine doctor in Gaithersburg, Maryland. He received his medical degree from University of Maryland School of Medicine and has been in practice for more than 20 years. Today, we have Lyn Yaffe joining us. Lyn is the Co-founder, Chairman, and CEO of EPR-Technologies. EPR Technologies is a biomedical spinoff of the Safar Center for Resuscitation Research, University of Pittsburgh. EPR Technologies is committed to the preservation of human life through rapid profound hypothermia, by pursuing techniques and patented products for emergency preservation and resuscitation (EPR) to save a life when standard cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) fails. In the past decade, Lyn has been actively involved in research and development programs related to patient/casualty monitoring strategies, emergency hypothermia and rapid cooling techniques for point-of-injury care to induce ultra-profound cooling and temporary suspended animation (EPR), and semi-automated to automated, rapid vessel access techniques for therapeutic hypothermia, and a range of automated needle/catheter guidance and placement technologies. About Lyn Yaffe Lyn Yaffe, M.D., was instrumental to the development of the concept of EPR during the research and development work at the Safar Center of Resuscitation Research, University of Pittsburgh, School of Medicine. Lyn has been dedicated to the concept and knowledgeable with regard to its emergency life-saving utility and potential applications in the field of resuscitation. Given the complexities of the EPR procedure and the demanding setting in which it will be used, these points take on special importance in this regard. Lyn and his team are therefore the best group to bring EPR forward successful development and product commercialization. Lyn completed undergraduate education at the Johns Hopkins University, School of Arts and Sciences, majoring in biophysics, in 1968. He received his M.D. degree at the University of Maryland, School of Medicine, in 1972, and completed pathology and research post-graduate training at Columbia University, New York, NY, with additional molecular biology research experience at the Roche Institute of Molecular Biology, in 1978. In the past decade, Lyn has been actively involved in research and development programs related to (1) patient/casualty monitoring strategies, (2) emergency hypothermia and rapid cooling techniques for point-of-injury care to induce ultra-profound cooling and suspended animation (EPR), and (3) semi-automated to automated, rapid vessel access techniques for therapeutic hypothermia, and a range of automated needle/catheter guidance and placement technologies. About EPR-Technologies Our Vision is that EPR is the next emergency life-saving “Standard of Care” procedure following failure of CPR on any victim of cardiac arrest. And that every victim is able to come home from the hospital and live a normal life. The company is a biomedical spinoff of the Safar Center for Resuscitation Research, University of Pittsburgh, and is committed to the preservation of human life through rapid profound hypothermia by introducing patented products for “Emergency Preservation and Resuscitation” (EPR) to save a life when standard cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) fails.

Sound On
Sound On: President's Asia Trip and Monkeypox Explained (Radio)

Sound On

Play Episode Listen Later May 23, 2022 38:06


Daveed Gartenstein-Ross, Founder and chief executive officer of Valens Global discusses the global state of war and security Dr. Matt Laurens, Professor at University of Maryland School of Medicine, on the state of the pandemic and Monkeypox Bloomberg Politics Contributors Jeanne Sheehan Zaino and Rick Davis discusses President Biden's trip to Asia and the 2022 Midterm elections.   See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Retrieving the Social Sciences
Episode 19: UMBC/UMB Gerontology w/ Dr. John Schumacher, Dr. Rob Millar, Dr. Sarah Holmes, Min-Hyung Park, Jenn Haddock, & Rachel McPherson

Retrieving the Social Sciences

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 39:26


Today's episode features the remarkable work of the UMBC/UMB doctoral program in Gerontology. First we hear from Dr. John Schumacher, co-director of the program and Associate Professor in the Department of Sociology, Anthropology, and Public Health at UMBC. Dr. Schumacher's profile In the episode, we also hear from three current Ph.D. students working on dissertations in gerontology: Min-Kyoung Park Rachel McPherson Jenn Haddock Kirk And finally, we hear from Dr. Rob Millar, Policy Analyst Advanced at the Hilltop Institute, and Dr. Sarah Holmes, Assistant Professor in the University of Maryland School of Nursing: Dr. Roberto Millar Dr. Sarah Holmes   Check out the following links for more information on UMBC, CS3, and our host: The UMBC Center for the Social Sciences Scholarship The University of Maryland, Baltimore County Ian G. Anson, Ph.D. Retrieving the Social Sciences is a production of the UMBC Center for Social Science Scholarship.  Our podcast host is Dr. Ian Anson, our director is Dr. Christine Mallinson, our associate director is Dr. Felipe Filomeno and our production intern is Sophia Possidente. Our theme music was composed and recorded by D'Juan Moreland.  Special thanks to Amy Barnes and Myriam Ralston for production assistance.  Make sure to follow us on Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, and YouTube, where you can find full video recordings of recent UMBC events.

The Science Hour
Portrait of the monster black hole at our galaxy's heart

The Science Hour

Play Episode Listen Later May 15, 2022 64:36


The heaviest thing in the Galaxy has now been imaged by the biggest telescope on Earth. This is Sagittarius A*, the supermassive black hole at the centre of our Galaxy – a gas and star-consuming object, a 4 million times the mass of the Sun. The Event Horizon Telescope is not one device but a consortium of radio telescopes ranging from the South Pole to the Arctic Circle. Their combined data allowed astronomers to focus in on this extreme object for the first time. Astronomer Ziri Younsi from University College London talks to Roland Pease about the orange doughnut image causing all the excitement. Also in the programme… Climatologist Chris Funk talks about the role of La Niña and climate change in the record-breaking two year drought that continues to threaten the lives and livelihoods of millions of people in East Africa. Was a pig virus to blame for the death of the first patient to receive a pig heart transplant? We talk to the surgeon and scientist at the University of Maryland School of Medicine who led the historic animal to human transplant operation this year. How easy will it be to grow plants in lunar soil on future moon bases? Plant biologist Anna Lisa Paul has been testing the question in her lab at the University of Florida, Gainesville, with cress seeds and lunar regolith collected by the Apollo missions. And…. Does photographic memory exist? Most people are great at remembering key points from important events in their lives, while the finer details - such as the colour of the table cloth in your favourite restaurant or the song playing on the radio while you brushed your teeth - are forgotten. But some people seem to have the power to remember events, documents or landscapes with almost perfect recall, which is widely referred to as having a photographic memory. CrowdScience listeners Tracy and Michael want to know if photographic memory actually exists and if not, what are the memory processes that allow people to remember certain details so much better than others? Putting her own memory skills to the test along the way, presenter Marnie Chesterton sets out to investigate just what's happening inside our brains when we use our memories, the importance of being able to forget and why some people have better memories than others. Photo: First image of Sgr A*, the supermassive black hole at the centre of our galaxy Credit: EHT Collaboration, Southern European Observatory Presenter: Roland Pease and Marnie Chesterton Producer: Andrew Luck-Baker and Hannah Fisher

Science in Action
Portrait of the monster black hole at our galaxy's heart

Science in Action

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 29:22


The heaviest thing in the Galaxy has now been imaged by the biggest telescope on Earth. This is Sagittarius A*, the supermassive black hole at the centre of our Galaxy – a gas and star-consuming object, a 4 million times the mass of the Sun. The Event Horizon Telescope is not one device but a consortium of radio telescopes ranging from the South Pole to the Arctic Circle. Their combined data allowed astronomers to focus in on this extreme object for the first time. Astronomer Ziri Younsi from University College London talks to Roland Pease about the orange doughnut image causing all the excitement. Also in the programme… Climatologist Chris Funk talks about the role of La Niña and climate change in the record-breaking two year drought that continues to threaten the lives and livelihoods of millions of people in East Africa. Was a pig virus to blame for the death of the first patient to receive a pig heart transplant? We talk to the surgeon and scientist at the University of Maryland School of Medicine who led the historic animal to human transplant operation this year. How easy will it be to grow plants in lunar soil on future moon bases? Plant biologist Anna Lisa Paul has been testing the question in her lab at the University of Florida, Gainesville, with cress seeds and lunar regolith collected by the Apollo missions. Photo: First image of Sgr A*, the supermassive black hole at the centre of our galaxy Credit: EHT Collaboration, Southern European Observatory Presenter: Roland Pease Producer: Andrew Luck-Baker

Design Lab with Bon Ku
EP 72: Designing on the Front Lines, Part 3 | Safer Spaces

Design Lab with Bon Ku

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 54:11


This is part 3 of a special 3-part virtual talk in partnership with Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum and the Health Design Lab at Thomas Jefferson University. Architects are reimagining the places where we live, work, and gather. Many modern indoor spaces are sealed shut and climate-controlled. The pandemic prompted people to open the windows, move activities outside, and control the flow of indoor air. From plastic sneeze guards to graphics for social distancing, new norms sprang quickly into place. What worked and what didn't? How can everyone have access to healthier spaces? Panelists include Jennifer D. Roberts, University of Maryland School of Public Health; Jennifer Tobias, Researcher, New York City Streateries; and Andrew M. Ibrahim, University of Michigan and HOK The panel was moderated by Morgan Hutchinson and Ellen Lupton. Video archives of the series are also available at CooperHewitt.org. Watch videos of previous episodes of DOTFL Season 1 and Season 2 Episode website link: https://mailchi.mp/designlabpod/dotfl3 More episode sources & links Sign-up for Design Lab Podcast's Newsletter Newsletter Archive Follow @DesignLabPod on Twitter Instagram and LinkedIn Follow @BonKu on Twitter and Instagram Check out the Health Design Lab Production by Robert Pugliese Cover Design by Eden Lew Theme song by Emmanuel Houston

CEO Podcasts: CEO Chat Podcast + I AM CEO Podcast Powered by Blue 16 Media & CBNation.co
IAM1360 - After Practicing for Over 20 Years, Physician Follows Her Life's Calling

CEO Podcasts: CEO Chat Podcast + I AM CEO Podcast Powered by Blue 16 Media & CBNation.co

Play Episode Listen Later May 4, 2022 12:06


Dr. Nicole Rochester is a physician, former caregiver to her late father, and the CEO of Your GPS Doc, LLC. She obtained her undergraduate degree from Johns Hopkins University, attended the University of Maryland School of Medicine, and completed her residency training in Washington, DC. After practicing medicine for almost 20 years, she left a rewarding career in clinical and academic medicine to follow what she believes is her life's calling. Website: http://www.yourgpsdoc.com/ Facebook: www.facebook.com/yourgpsdoc Twitter: www.twitter.com/yourgpsdoc Instagram: www.instagram.com/yourgpsdoc LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/in/nicole-rochester-m-d-40700812

About IBD
How to Be Happy & Healthy With IBD: Reducing the Day-to-Day Burden

About IBD

Play Episode Listen Later May 2, 2022 35:05


Whether in remission or not, the day-to-day of life with IBD can be challenging. Living with Crohn's disease or ulcerative colitis, even when feeling well, might mean making lifestyle changes, going to doctor's appointments, and taking medications. Many people are diagnosed young, at a time when their friends aren't going through anything similar. To understand how people might deal effectively with these changes, Amber talks with Dr Sandra Quezada, a gastroenterologist who specializes in IBD at the University of Maryland Medical Center and Varada Srivastava, a Crohn's disease patient and biotechnology major who is also a 2022 Crohn's and Colitis Young Adults Network fellow Concepts discussed on this episode include: Crohn's and Colitis Young Adults Network Your Guide to Preparing for College with IBD IBD in College: 10 Easy Ways Students Can Manage Effects of Drinking Alcohol With IBD Find Sandra Quezada, MD on Twitter and at University of Maryland School of Medicine. Find Varada Srivastava on Instagram and at Crohn's and Colitis Young Adults Network (CCYAN). Find Amber J Tresca at AboutIBD.com, Verywell, Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, and Instagram. Credits: Mix and sound design is by Mac Cooney. Theme music, "IBD Dance Party," is from ©Cooney Studio. Episode transcript and more information at https:/bit.ly/AIBD115

A Little Bit Healthier
01. My Story

A Little Bit Healthier

Play Episode Listen Later May 1, 2022 16:26


Welcome to A Little Bit Healthier Podcast.    After almost two decades of practicing in conventional medicine I decided to follow my heart and make a life changing shift to Functional Medicine.    In this episode I share my journey into Functional Medicine both personally and professionally.  Sharing my own personal transformation and why I'm on a mission to help people know they have the power to take their health into their own hands and make choices everyday to feel their best and live the life they love!     Dr. Meg Mill is a Functional Medicine Health Practitioner and Clinical Pharmacist. In her practice, she works with patients all over the world to focus on healing the root cause of their health struggles through advanced diagnostic testing and personalized support.     Before practicing Functional Medicine, Meg spent almost two decades practicing as a Clinical Pharmacist. She graduated with a PharmD from Duquesne University and continued her education with a residency at the University of Maryland School of Pharmacy. Meg then practiced in various clinical settings before pursuing Functional Medicine certifications.Meg is a best-selling author and speaker.  She has also been seen in national publications such as Fox News Channel, ABC, NBC, CBS, CNN, Yahoo, Reader's Digest, Health, Authority Magazine, VeryWell Heath, Giddy, Life & Style, Sunset, Thrive Global, Drug Topics, and Circle Magazine as well as several national blogs and podcast guest appearances.     With her conventional and functional medicine expertise, she can help her patients improve their health naturally while still understanding and respecting conventional practice protocols.   For more info on the host, visit www.megmill.com and follow Meg on Instagram @drmegmill.  I would love for you to screenshot the episode and tag me so we can connect!  Don't forget to leave a review!   Having trouble getting started or staying connected with your health goals?  Download my Health Goal Strategy Guide for a clear plan today.  

How I Lawyer Podcast with Jonah Perlin
#062: Danielle Citron - Law Professor, Privacy Scholar & MacArthur Genius Fellow

How I Lawyer Podcast with Jonah Perlin

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 20, 2022 52:55


In this episode I speak with Professor Danielle Citron who is the Jefferson Scholars Foundation Schenck Distinguished Professor in Law and Caddell and Chapman Professor of Law at the University of Virginia Law School, where she writes and teaches about privacy, free expression, and civil rights. She is the recipient of numerous awards including the MacArthur Genius Grant in 2019 for her work on cyberstalking and intimate privacy. She also serves as the inaugural director of the school's LawTech Center. She is a gifted teacher and prolific writer including two books Hate Crimes in Cyberspace and the forthcoming The Fight for Privacy: Protecting Dignity, Identity, and Love in the Digital Age (available for pre-order here) and more than 50 law review articles. More than that, she is a public intellectual who has published in popular outlets, given testimony to lawmakers, and has worked directly with legislators on issues related to technology and privacy. Before joining UVA Law, Professor Citron taught at the Boston University School of Law and the University of Maryland School of Law where she progressed from Visiting Assistant Professor to a named professorship with the rank of tenure. She started her legal career as a litigation associate at Wilkie Farr in New York and served as a law clerk to United States District Court Judge Mary Johnson Lowe. She is a graduate of Duke University and Fordham Law. In our conversation we discussed her largely unplanned path to legal academia in a field that did not even really exist when she graduated law school, how disappointment and being told no is an important part of growing as a junior lawyer, ways to become a part of a scholarly community even as a law student or junior lawyer, her writing process and how she crafts scholarship that speaks to academic and more general audiences, the fast-growing area of technology and data privacy (and the jobs that are being created as a result), and the importance of being a life-long student as a lawyer. If you enjoy this episode, please make sure to sign up for future episodes at www.howilawyer.com or to subscribe wherever you get your podcasts. This episode is sponsored, edited, and engineered by LawPods, a professional podcast production company for busy attorneys.

Pharmacist's Voice
Interview with Leah Sera, PharmD about the MS Degree in Medical Cannabis Science and Therapeutics at The University of Maryland School of Pharmacy

Pharmacist's Voice

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 20, 2022 49:02


Today is Wednesday, April 20, 2022.  I don't typically publish podcast episodes on Wednesdays, but I have a good reason to publish one today!  According to a Time Magazine article, both marijuana smokers and non-smokers agree that April 20 (or 420) is recognized as a national holiday for cannabis culture.  In honor of 420, today's episode is an interview with Leah Sera, PharmD, Program Director of the Master of Science Degree in Cannabis Science and Therapeutics at the University of Maryland School of Pharmacy.  It's the only MS Program in the US devoted to the comprehensive and holistic study of cannabis science.  If you want to hear about the program and how Dr. Sera uses her voice as an educator, you're in the right place. Thank you for listening to episode 145 of The Pharmacist's Voice ® Podcast!   To read the full show notes with links and highlights from the interview, visit https://www.thepharmacistsvoice.com/podcast/ and click on episode 145.     Subscribe to or Follow The Pharmacist's Voice Podcast! Apple Podcasts Google Podcasts Spotify Amazon/Audible   Bio: Dr. Leah Sera is an Associate Professor in the Department of Pharmacy Practice and Science and Program Director for the Master of Science in Medical Cannabis Science and Therapeutics (MCST) program at the University of Maryland School of Pharmacy. Dr. Sera received her PharmD from the University of Maryland School of Pharmacy in 2010. She completed a pharmacy practice residency at Suburban Hospital in Bethesda, MD and a specialty residency in pain management and palliative care at the University of Maryland School of Pharmacy. She is a board-certified pharmacotherapy specialist and completed a Master of Arts in Instructional Systems Development at the University of Maryland Baltimore County in 2017.   Dr. Sera teaches in several courses in the MCST program, including an introduction to medical cannabis history, culture, and policy; a course introducing students to patient care and the clinical uses of medical cannabis; she also mentors students in their capstone projects. In the Doctor of Pharmacy program, Dr. Sera teaches a variety of topics in required and elective courses in the Doctor of Pharmacy curriculum. Additionally, Dr. Sera holds an associate faculty position at the University of Maryland Graduate School. Dr. Sera maintains an active clinical practice in the Transitional Care Center at the University of Maryland Baltimore Washington Medical Center in Glen Burnie, MD.   Dr. Sera has been invited to speak on pain management, palliative medicine, and cannabis therapeutics topics at professional pharmacy conferences and at medical centers such as the National Institutes of Health. She received a Leader in Healthcare Award in the category of medical cannabis from the Baltimore Business Journal in 2020.   Mentioned in this episode Here's the Real Reason We Associate 420 with Weed.  (From the website time.com, link accessed 4-18-22. The article was updated 4-13-2018, and originally published April 19, 2016.) Leah Sera, PharmD LinkedIn Profile MS Degree in Medical Cannabis Science and Therapeutics at The University of Maryland School of Pharmacy National Academies of Science, Engineering, and Medicine Marijuana and Medicine Report PubMed Clinical Cannabinoid Pharmacy Certificate (CCPC) International Society of Cannabis Pharmacists (ISCPh) Society of Cannabis Clinicians International Cannabinoid Research Society (ISRS) Cannabis Conferences Cannabis Pharmacy: The Practical Guide to Medical Marijuana by Michael Backes Cannabis:  A Clinician's Guide by Betty Wedman-St. Louis (Editor)

The Ortho Show
Hosted by Dr. Michael Redler – “Dr. Scott Sigman”

The Ortho Show

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 20, 2022 32:26


This episode is brought to you by ModMed. To learn more and see a demo of the #1 EHR system, EMA®, as well as Practice Management, Revenue Cycle Management, Analytics, Patient Engagement tools and more, visit modmed.com/orthopod. ModMed — it's about time. We're turning the tables and bringing you an interview with Dr. Scott Sigman. Dr. Michael Redler is our guest host for this switch-up and was a founding partner of The Orthopaedic and Sports Medicine Center, which merged with Connecticut Orthopaedics in 2018. He specializes in sports medicine as well as hand and upper extremity surgery. Dr. Scott A. Sigman is a board-certified orthopaedic surgeon providing comprehensive care to patients at Orthopedic Surgical Associates of Lowell since 1996.  Specializing in Sports Medicine, Dr. Sigman possesses the skills and experience to diagnose and treat sports injuries and conditions affecting the knee and shoulder. In addition to his practice duties, he has served as the Team Physician for the US Ski Jump Team, and serves for the last 20 years as the Team Physician at UMASS Lowell, and is the past Chief of Orthopaedics at Lowell General Hospital. Find out more about Dr. Scott Sigman: -He graduated cum laude with his Bachelor's degree in Biology from Tufts University, where he played varsity lacrosse and was President of the Alpha Epsilon Pi fraternity.  He then received his medical degree as a cum laude graduate of the University of Maryland School of Medicine and member of the prestigious Alpha Omega Alpha medical honor society. -Dedicated to furthering his training, he also completed a fellowship in Sports Medicine at the prestigious Kerlan-Jobe Orthopaedic Clinic, during which he was responsible for the orthopaedic care of the Los Angeles Lakers, Los Angeles Dodgers, LA Angels, LA Kings, Anaheim Mighty Ducks, LA Galaxy and USC football. -Dr. Sigman was elected as a Fellow of the Royal College of Physicians of Ireland, Faculty of Sports & Sports Medicine. This certificate is a culmination of his ongoing efforts to change the paradigm of postoperative pain management. -How does he get it all done? He says it's all about being efficient and setting reasonable goals. Find out in the episode what he does for 20 minutes every day to recharge. -Why did he become an orthopedic surgeon? He injured his knee in 10th grade and looked up to local surgeon mentors in his area. There was no looking back after this injury and the rest is history in orthopedics. -We discuss how private equity is the hot topic in orthopedics. -We talk about he's orthopreneurship with Ortholazer. It was born out of his desire for opioid-sparing alternatives and was an uphill battle to get the franchise to where it is today. We also discuss how laser therapy is now part of the recommendations in the AAOS Guidelines for Osteoarthritis of the Knee released in 2021. Lasers are listed in the AAOS guidelines as FDA-approved laser treatment may be used to improve pain and function in patients with knee osteoarthritis. The full AAOS Guidelines for Osteoarthritis of the Knee can be found here. Find out more about Dr. Scott Sigman here.

Change Makers: A Podcast from APH
2022 National Coding Symposium

Change Makers: A Podcast from APH

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 14, 2022 67:21


It's time for the 2022 National Coding Symposium, presented by APH and Partners. We'll learn what to expect from this year's event and hear what's new and exciting. We'll also speak with one keynote speaker, who invented a well-known computer screen reader. After that, we'll hear what's available for students interested in learning how to code. Participants (In Order of Appearance)Jack Fox, APH Talking Book NarratorSara Brown, APH Public Relations ManagerLeanne Grillot, APH National Director of Outreach ServicesGina Fugate, Maryland School for the Blind's, Technology & Lego Engineering InstructorKen Perry, APH Senior Software Engineer, Technology Product ResearchJason Martin, Center for Assistive Technology Training, Assistive Technology TrainerTed Henter, Computer Programmer and Businessperson (retired)Tai Tomasi, APH ABIDE DirectorAdditional LinksJAWS for Windows 20th Anniversary VideoAPH Youtube Videos Featuring JAWS2022 National Coding Symposium WebsiteRegister for the 2022 National Coding Symposiumaccessibility@aph.orgttomasi@aph.org

On The Record on WYPR
Microplastics found in human blood

On The Record on WYPR

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 7, 2022 24:57


We know all too well that plastics are clogging our landfills, swirling in our oceans and now, research shows, microplastics have been detected in the blood of humans. Dr. Lynn Grattan, a practicing neuropsychologist with the University of Maryland Medical Center and professor at the University of Maryland School of Medicine, explains how plastics can enter the human body, and what can happen once they get there: “These particles are bio available for uptake in the human bloodstream. That means when you eat or inhale the plastics, they can enter the human bloodstream and then circulate to all other parts of the body.”  Plus, how to minimize your exposure to plastics. Hint: it's time to stop drinking out of flimsy one-use water bottles! Links: Environment International Research Report,Guardian article, Dr. Lynn Grattan at UMMC. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

レアジョブ英会話 Daily News Article Podcast
How has the COVID-19 pandemic changed after two years?

レアジョブ英会話 Daily News Article Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 5, 2022 2:02


How has the COVID-19 pandemic changed after two years? More countries are shifting toward a return to normal and learning to live with the virus. Safe, effective vaccines have been developed and there's better understanding of how to treat people sickened by the virus. Two years after the pandemic began, questions remain about the coronavirus. But experts know a lot more about how to keep it under control. The virus mainly spreads through the air when an infected person exhales, talks, coughs or sneezes. It's why health officials have encouraged the use of masks and ventilating spaces, instead of focusing on advice to wipe down surfaces as they did early on. Treatment has also evolved for people who get sick or need to be hospitalized. Among the options are antivirals, such as the drug remdesivir, or newer pills from Pfizer and Merck; anti-inflammatory drugs including steroids; and depending on what variant is circulating, lab-made antibodies to attack the virus. “The world has watched us learn in real-time how to treat COVID-19,” says Neil J. Sehgal, an assistant professor of health policy and management at the University of Maryland School of Public Health. COVID-19 vaccines were also developed in record time. As of early March, 10 vaccines have been cleared for emergency use by the World Health Organization. Still, distribution of vaccines has been unequal despite an international effort to deliver shots more fairly and misinformation has fueled hesitancy about the shots. And there's still much left to learn. Studies are underway to better understand long COVID-19, which can persist for months after an initial infection. And scientists are on the lookout for the next fast-spreading variant. “Eventually every country will have to learn to live with COVID,” says Sehgal. This article was provided by The Associated Press.

Understanding Congress
What does the Congressional Budget Office do? (with Philip Joyce)

Understanding Congress

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 4, 2022 23:30


The topic of this episode is, “What does the Congressional Budget Office do?” My guest is https://spp.umd.edu/our-community/faculty-staff/philip-joyce (Professor Philip Joyce). He is the senior associate dean at the University of Maryland School of Public Policy, where he also is a professor of public policy. There, Philip Joyce teaches and researches public budgeting, performance measurement, and intergovernmental relations. He's the author of many publications — far too many to recite, but I will mention one that is germane to today's podcast. Phil is the author of the book https://amzn.to/3BYPmBb (The Congressional Budget Office: Honest Numbers, Power, and Policymaking) (2011), which makes him an ideal guest to answer the question, “What does the Congressional Budget Office do?” Kevin Kosar: Welcome to Understanding Congress, a podcast about the first branch of government. Congress is a notoriously complex institution, and few Americans think well of it, but Congress is essential to our republic. It's a place where our pluralistic society is supposed to work out its differences and come to agreement about what our laws should be. And that is why we are here: to discuss our national legislature and to think about ways to upgrade it so it can better serve our nation. I'm your host, Kevin Kosar, and I'm a resident scholar at the American Enterprise Institute, a think tank in Washington, DC. Professor Joyce, welcome to the podcast. Philip Joyce: It's great to be with you. Kevin Kosar: Let's start simply. The https://www.cbo.gov/ (Congressional Budget Office), AKA, “CBO.” When did Congress create it and why? Philip Joyce: CBO was created in 1974. You have to sort of go back in time if you can. Well, probably a lot of people can't go back that far in time that are listening to this podcast, but I can. As you recall, in 1974, at least early 1974, Richard Nixon was president. There was something that became referred to as the imperial presidency, and it essentially involved President Nixon being viewed at least by many people in the Congress as overstepping his bounds, doing things like withholding funds that the Congress had appropriated. So the Congress was trying to reassert its role in the budget process. And it did this by passing something called the Congressional Budget and Empowerment Control Act of 1974, which did basically three things. It created the budget committees; it created the budget resolution, which is the blueprint that the Congress establishes for the budget; and it created CBO. Why did it create CBO? It created CBO in particular to provide the Congress with its own source of information on the budget and the economy. And why did it need to do that? Because the alternative was to rely on the https://www.whitehouse.gov/omb/ (Office of Management and Budget), which was attached to the president — and not just any president, but Richard Nixon. So the idea that the Congress was going to reassert its role in budgeting, but have to rely on Richard Nixon's OMB for information, just didn't make a lot of sense to a lot of people in the Congress. The other thing I think it's important to note up front is that according to the law, this was all to be done on a nonpartisan basis, which means that CBO doesn't work for the party in control of the Congress. It works for the Congress as a whole, and tries very hard to make sure that it is responsive to both political parties. Kevin Kosar: Yes, I should elaborate a touch further for listeners who are not familiar with this period of time, the early '70s. After being pushed around and eclipsed by a burgeoning executive branch, one that often didn't play straight and sometimes transcended the law in its activities, Congress decided to reassert itself. It took the Legislative Reference Service and beefed it up into the https://crsreports.congress.gov/ (Congressional Research Service). They created the Office of Technology Assessment. It wrote a new law on...

Healthy Wealthy & Smart
584: Dr. Philip Goldsmith: What's Your Value? A Novel Payment Model for Home Health

Healthy Wealthy & Smart

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 4, 2022 36:24


In this episode, Owner amd Founder of Goldsmith Therapy Solutions, Dr. Philip Goldsmith, talks about value based purchasing in home health. Today, Dr. Phil talks about the pros and cons of value based purchasing, and prioritising results over productivity. How will value based purchasing in home health turn out? Hear about OASIS assessments, the difficulties of working with insurances, and get Dr. Phil's valuable advice, all on today's episode of The Healthy, Wealthy & Smart Podcast.   Key Takeaways “It looks like value based purchasing in home health is going to be a good thing.” “Home health therapists are probably, unfortunately, some of the worst offenders at underdosing strength training.” “Professional communication is where the good are going to be separated from the bad.” “Most of the private insurances base their policies on payment on what Medicare does.” “You've got to be involved with advocacy if you want to see change.”   More about Dr. Philip Goldsmith Philip Goldsmith, PT, MSPT, EMT, DScPT, COS-C, is the owner and founder of Goldsmith Therapy Solutions, a provider of high-quality management, consulting, and clinical solutions for home health providers. Dr. Goldsmith has been a practicing physical therapist for more than twenty years, with experience in home health, skilled nursing, and outpatient orthopedic environments. Dr. Goldsmith received his BS in Health Studies from Boston University in 1996, his MSPT from Boston University in 1998, and his DScPT from University of Maryland School of Medicine in 2011. Additionally, Dr. Goldsmith has extensive experience in leadership and financial management of small and mid-sized not-for-profit corporations and has won more than $200,000 in grants for public safety organizations with which he is affiliated. Dr. Goldsmith lives in Hanover, PA, with his wife and son.   Suggested Keywords Healthy, Wealthy, Smart, Healthcare, Physiotherapy, Results, APTA, Home Health, Value Based Purchasing, Insurances, Advocacy,   To learn more, follow Dr. Phil at: Email:              pgoldpt@gmail.com LinkedIn:         https://www.linkedin.com/in/philip-goldsmith-a81a692 Twitter:            @pgoldpt APTA Home Health: https://www.homehealthsection.org/leadership   Subscribe to Healthy, Wealthy & Smart: Website:                      https://podcast.healthywealthysmart.com Apple Podcasts:          https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/healthy-wealthy-smart/id532717264 Spotify:                        https://open.spotify.com/show/6ELmKwE4mSZXBB8TiQvp73 SoundCloud:               https://soundcloud.com/healthywealthysmart Stitcher:                       https://www.stitcher.com/show/healthy-wealthy-smart iHeart Radio:               https://www.iheart.com/podcast/263-healthy-wealthy-smart-27628927   Read the Full Transcript Here:  Alright, let's go. Hello, healthy, wealthy and smart. I am Jenna canter here with the Dr. Philip Goldsmith, who we're going to refer to as Dr. Phil, don't you love it? I'm so grateful to have Phil here, because he has a small business owner who runs a business in which he provides Oh, I'm gonna mess this up. And I'm so excited to where he brings stuff to the home health people and they're happy and they smile and say thank you. Without it and I get it.   04:05 That's pretty close.   04:08 Would you mind summarizing in that perfect sentence you just said a second ago of what it is you're more details on your business, like   04:14 elevator speech. It's called Goldsmith Therapy Solutions. And I provide high quality clinical consulting and management services to the home health industry.   04:26 I love it. And that's an elevator speech we all need to have you know for each of our own individual businesses, anybody who interviews with me knows I don't spend too much time going into the bio stuff because that will just be in the people can read it and then Wounaan go oh my gosh, I love Dr. Phil, you know, look at this. Wow, incredible. We are going to dive right into the topic which I know nothing about. I'm a cash pay cash based out of network PT working with performers. So I'm going to ask all the base questions to fully understanding the situation so everyone can better get on the on the same page with this apparently, and I I'm, I'm not saying it's not but just for me, it's new, apparently topic that's like a hot topic, and that is value based purchasing in home health. I know nothing about it. So let's talk about what is that? What is the value? What is that   05:21 value based purchasing is Medicare's new payment model for certified home health services provided to Medicare party beneficiaries.   05:33 Why is that important right now,   05:36 because it's different, how Medicare is moving away from the you go do a visit or provide a service and we pay you for a service to a model where they pay you based more on your outcomes, and how good a job you do at taking care of those Medicare beneficiaries that have chosen to avail themselves of your services.   06:05 That sounds great to me from a physical therapy standpoint, because that's what we care about. So how was this? Let's start with how this is good. And then we can go how this is potentially something that could get in the way of providing care to people fully. So how is this good?   06:20 This is good, because it removes a lot of the artificial drivers that were skewing utilization. Meaning, excuse me until about three years ago. The more visits you the more therapy visits you made, the more money you got. And that was unfortunately driving practice patterns and everybody Medicare, not Medicare kind of agreed. This isn't working. Yeah, yeah. And   06:55 because that's about productivity, not about results. Yeah.   06:59 Right. And it was it was too much widget counting, and a lot of home health agencies were making a lot of money on providing therapy visits that weren't necessarily necessary. Hmm, Mm hmm. So, you know, the the interim step on the way was this thing called pdgm that we're in now where it's all based on functional states and diagnoses? And that's about it.   07:28 Yeah, it's not nothing to push getting them to where we need to get them or to protect them from getting worse. If we're talking about home health. Yes, yes. Okay. Okay. So then let's talk about where this could potentially be problematic.   07:45 So the, the concern is, are you comparing apples to apples, meaning they're dividing the agencies up by state by geography and buy large versus small volume, to try to make apples to apples. But the big issue is, this system works literally by robbing Peter to pay Paul, somebody is going to make money. And somebody is going to lose money. So the other people at the other end of the scale can make money.   08:25 Where could you go and give some details on this? Because I'm not really following on on how this could be? Yeah,   08:31 Medicare is gonna say, Okay, we're gonna take all of the large volume agencies in the state of Pennsylvania. And we're gonna line them up by the outcomes we've chosen, they haven't told us the outcomes yet.   08:46 Deciding what the outcome what outcomes matter,   08:49 they are in the process of that now, who are the consulting   08:52 with doctors?   08:57 So there is what's called a technical expert panel, and we could do that alone. The concept of technical expert panels could be its own podcast, where basically they bring in people in the industry and ask them, What do you think is important? Um, do they pay them? They cover their expenses, do they? Do   09:25 they start to get a financial interest to sway certain ways and their responses? Okay, okay.   09:32 They're representing their industries. So, you know, they can, I could volunteer to be on a technical expert panel. And my job is to bring the perspective of the physical therapy industry. Hmm. They also do us, you know, these big beltway consulting firms that you hear so much about, and they have policy wonks that work at CMS that do this stuff. A lot of its actuaries accountants and lawyers? Because one of the big rules is this is supposed to be budget neutral, meaning the pot of money doesn't change. It's who gets how much of that pot changes, specifically, the agencies that are the bottom performers, they're going to lose it as much as 5% of their reimbursement, so that the top performing agencies gain 5%. See,   10:25 there we go. That's where I think a financial interest could sway what people say, because this could be less money towards their industry. Well, it's problematic,   10:37 home health in general. I mean, this is, it's already, you know, you're already getting paid a lump sum for the care of each individual. And that varies based on those clinical and diagnostic factors that that I talked about before. Right. The scuttlebutt is,   10:55 I don't, but I just need to highlight that. I know I love that you said scandal, but this is great. That means rumors, love it scuttlebutt, I'm going to start using that every day.   11:06 One of the big outcomes they're going to look at is readmission to the hospital, did you keep your patient out of the hospital? Because that costs Medicare more money. And they're gonna look at functional outcomes, like transfers and ambulation. And there may even be a patient satisfaction component because did you know that Medicare mandates patient satisfaction surveys in most settings, you get those annoying Press Ganey surveys? Because Medicare says Thou shalt, and they track those, and those are actually publicly reported data.   11:41 That's actually great. I think the patient what their happiness is everything. Yeah, I think that's great. That's, yeah. Okay. Okay.   11:52 So it's your secrets here.   11:54 So it's it sounds though, like it's a bit of a gamble on where things are going to lie. And what's going to be decided on what these outcome measures are? That sounds like the biggest concern, what are these outcome measures that we're going to be using? Because if we're talking about movement stuff, you   12:15 aren't talking about movement stuff. But, you know, they've already established that all of the measures, the outcomes that are going to be looked at are either Oasis based Oasis being the clinical assessment that's done in homecare at a minimum every 60 days. Okay, Mission recertification discharge, hospitalization, return from hospitalization. That standardized assessment gets done. I have   12:47 a question about that, actually. And this is just from my own experience, it's a completely different audience that I work with. So when I'm working with my performers, I'm reassessing every single time I work with them. I'm a niche practice, though. I'm, I'm small and keeping it small. And so therefore, they get like real top, you know, I know them inside out what's going on in their lives and stuff, so I can best help them. So that is very, very specific. And and I'm lucky to be in that position. So when you're saying 90 days, that sounds like a long time for like a formal reassessment. I believe in oh, gosh, PT, school, it was it was a matter of like two months. So is it because of the the age where things may take longer to see results? Why it's a 90 day spot? Like, why is that? I'm honestly asking, it's not for judgment, I'm trying to be very transparent on my own bias. So I can learn   13:37 that every 60 days, well, every 60 days, that OASIS assessment gets done. However, that doesn't change, that your state Practice Act still applies that you may have to reassess every 30 days or every 10 visits or every 14 days, whatever your state Practice Act says, and Medicare still has the every 10th Visit reassessment requirement in home health, where they expect you to be using objective functional measures, and looking at your plan of care and your goals and saying, Are we getting where we need to be,   14:16 which is what we do in physical therapy. That is we're always asking ourselves that question.   14:19 Okay. This is more of a you know, it's more of a big picture thing. Yeah. Okay. For example, the emulation question. There's independent, there's independent but needs a one handed device independent but uses a two handed device can walk but need supervision at all times. And then there's a couple of answers for wheelchair bound, or bed bound.   14:46 Yeah, I'm not familiar with this, but I'm learning as you're talking about, is there anything about risk of falls because that's like the big a big one.   14:53 They look at that from a process measure standpoint, meaning they ask you, did you assess for fall risk, and there's criteria given a multifactorial objective. So really, it's got to be a two pronged thing. They're not looking at the results. They're looking at. Did you do it? Yeah.   15:17 Yeah. Is there room for? And this may be you don't know, because this is a bit of mind reading. As far as you know, right now, is there room for measurements for neurological disorders where we know that things may they're going to decline over time? You know, are immune immune? Am I saying the wrong thing? I think he's doing the wrong thing. But is there room for that where they have a health situation where things are going to decline? We know that but we're trying to keep them functioning their best as they're going through their process?   15:50 The answer is yes and no. Okay, the questions and answers don't change. What changes is, they can tease out by diagnostic grouping and by what they call risk adjustment, where if your agency has a high population of clients with progressive neurologic disorders, that's the the term in favor now. Okay, thank you, they're going to risk adjust your statistics to reflect that, meaning, we see that you have a larger population of people who probably aren't going to get better. And we're going to do some statistical mumbo jumbo in the background to adjust for that. But that doesn't change the answers that the clinician is using. Okay. There's no, I have to pull a different document because I have a different diagnostic group. There's no, I answer these questions for this diagnosis. And that questions for that diagnosis? Yeah. Yeah, the people who very much a big picture of   17:03 the people behind the scenes, I think I know the answer this question, but I'm still going to ask it, the people behind the scenes who will be assessing the the progress progress, and, you know, if it's fitting, looking at the outcome measures and what we need for that patients, are they medical professionals? Are these just people who are trained to work for this company? Who are the Who are these people?   17:28 So field clinicians who work with clients answer the oasis for each client, the agency, then submits it electronically to CMS. And the risk adjustment is baked in to the computers at CMS that process all this information.   17:50 Also, it's a computer thing. It's all very,   17:53 and that's part of the reason the assessment is somewhat limited in big picture. Yes, it's a it's a computer thing. Ah, it's a i. i, maybe maybe not. But it's a lot of higher level statistics. That's way above my head.   18:11 Right, right. Yeah. Oh, wow. That's what this is so negative for me to say, but what an easy way as a person in CMS to point away and go, Oh, no, it's the system's. That's what they computed. Like, I can't. I'm like, Who created it? Who designed the code? Fine. We'll look at the code person I need to understand. Okay. Okay. So, I mean, it just sounds a little bit like a trip to Las Vegas, where you studied a little bit. So you know, a bit about gambling, you say, let's say you're very educated about that, and you but it's still gambling? You don't really know. I don't know, I just I,   18:53 you know, it's, it's pretty well known how they do the risk adjustment. You know, it's just the statistics of how it's done is pretty high level, but we have a good feel for what they're risk adjusting for and what questions they used to do the risk adjusting.   19:15 I mean, do you think the physical and physical therapy industry home health for this, because that's what we're focusing on? Do you think what the way we have things set up now, the way I mean, that's the whole point is to be measuring their outcomes? That is literally what we're doing all the time. Do you think we're pretty safe with this adjustment? If anything, it'll probably be for the better if you're just overall? I mean, because we did the good versus the bad. Where do you think it's, it's gonna turn out for us?   19:46 It looks like value based purchasing a home health is going to be a good thing. It is going to reward you for doing your job well, and being aware of your outcomes and delivering good health. Quality physical therapy that drives the outcomes? Yeah, there's going to be, it's going to challenge the physical therapist and the PTA to work at the top of their license and to collaborate with the other professionals. Because some of these measures don't happen in a vacuum for lack of a better term, they don't happen unless you're working as a team, and everybody's on the same page. Yeah. And that's really that interprofessional communication is where the good are gonna be separated from the bad.   20:40 Yeah. This isn't my world. Oh, continue,   20:44 there's, you know, definitely the agency is going to have to be very aware of their outcomes and their data. And the understanding of that data is going to be huge. Yeah. And I can tell you, that there are consulting firms and companies, and that can look at those outcomes at a clinician level. And they're going to tease out high performing clinicians and low performing clinicians.   21:16 Yeah, yeah. Yeah. And I'm assuming that's where the concern is, what is, oh, I'm gonna backtrack to actually what I was originally thinking of asking. What is the hot talk on the streets regarding this? What are the big things that other physical therapists and people in the industry are going like, hey, about it? Or do we already cover those things?   21:41 We've covered a lot of it. I think there's a lot of optimism around this. Because the more recent changes over the past couple of years, starting in October 2019 really pulled back on the number of visits. We were seeing clients. And some of that is real. And some of that is artificial. Yeah. And it's gotten me up on my soapbox a number of times, because home health therapists are probably, unfortunately, some of the worst offenders at underdosing strength training. Oh, yeah, you want to get me started? Don't get me started.   22:34 Yeah, yeah. So it's, it would force that that push, I would love. It   22:39 forces us to understand how to deliver strength training, how to deliver the most the best outcomes we can in in fewer treatments.   22:52 Yeah, how to get trust, motivation.   22:55 really gotta understand you've got to be a high performing clinician, yeah. To survive in this market. Yeah, because a home health agency literally cannot afford to have lower performing clinicians that can't deliver the outcomes. Yeah. And a lower number of visits.   23:16 Yeah. Yeah. Absolutely. Absolutely. I definitely get that. So I I mean, I'm all about the outcomes. I've had people a different dance physical therapists asked me about how I do my outcomes and it really does depend on my patient and everything but I have a very I have a special circumstance you know, like I'm very lucky to have this niche that I have. i There are from an outpatient not out push out. Yeah. Out not outpatient. Wait, I'm getting so confused. Ortho. From an ortho standpoint, I'm calling because I'm not, I'm not home health. So I'm just like trying to get back to my my world. There are definitely I'm gonna choose my words specifically. So if you are a person who does own a clinic, that sees a lot of patience, you are a mill, there is no way to paint that there is a reason why there is a name for that. That's like saying, I, you know, I was you know, born from two Jewish parents and I grew up I have my Bar Mitzvah and then and like, I still observe Passover, and then be saying, I don't I'm not Jewish. Like what? Like, no, I'm Jewish, you know. It's very weird comparison. But whatever. That's what I chose. And I'll go with it. We   24:41 get to the point of mills.   24:44 I've always thought that the it was because of the problem with insurance and reimbursement and it's one of those like chicken or the egg kind of thing. What happened first, which I use in defense for any clinic. I'm like, hey, they're trying to figure out how to get reimbursed but at the same time, does in this horrible circle of terrible reimbursement trying to communicate what you did and everything, and people are trying to make money, which is fine, it's okay to want to make money Hello. Is   25:15 we as a profession do wrong to allow an industry to devalue our services like that?   25:24 It's because when trying to guess this is me, because I'm not a network. So, but from what I've seen, it's it's clinics trying, they're doing their best to report what they're doing. They outcomes with the patients, while at the same time speaking the language that the insurances say, they will reimburse. And then also these insurances saying they're going to reimburse, but they're not actually reimbursing, then there are administrative staff calling over and over again, fighting to get those reimbursements, you know, getting better at that. So that's why you have certain people working on the at the front desk, and then and so then they increase the number of patients during that time, because while they're gambling per patient on honestly, this is how I look at it for a patient on getting that reimbursement. Through, you know, the paperwork we've we've been trained to do to report outcome measures and everything. They're not they're not getting paid for it. They're fighting to get paid even on the basic level. So I think, but I don't know what happened first if insurance happened first, or, and, or the, you know, provision of the services, and they decided for it to be a lot of people that's the chicken or the egg thing. I mean, I'm sure somebody could look up the history, but I think that's where people just say, Oh, the healthcare system is messed up needs to be fixed. I, that's where I kind of lean back on to kind of be fair to everyone. Not that there has to be a middle ground. But I mean, that is kind of the truth. If I owned a big business, you're constantly you're like, Okay, I've hired this, these EMR systems, you know, we're we're gonna track and write down things. I hope this is the right system. Okay, this one's not working. Let's do a new one. And then you have your clinicians going, Ah, dang it, we have a new one, I have to readjust. But it's because we're trying to do it. Honestly, we're trying to do it legally. And then insurances just go, now, we're just not gonna reimburse you, we're not gonna explain why. And we're gonna be difficult to get in contact with to discuss and figure things out. So I don't know it's a random tangent, I'm sure people will go be like, Jenna said something wrong. I'm not the person to attack here. I'm just speaking. If you have problems, go talk to the insurance companies and figure it out if you already know how it works. But that's kind of how I look at it being problematic in the Ortho world specifically, because there is a lot of measuring of my brain out there. There's a lot of measuring of what was the word that we use, the more patients you see.   27:56 Counting widgets, counting widgets.   27:58 It happens, it does happen at the larger clinics. But yeah, can you I mean, I'm not saying I'm not saying I'm not saying I agree with it. But also, can you blame on? You know, like,   28:12 you started this to make money. I get that, you   28:17 know, but, but I mean, what I am in the business to hear, I mean, that's what I'm doing my own thing, is it easy to do what I'm doing, is it easy to get the patient Oh, my God. But that's I that's where I put my energy where I put my energy. But I feel like what is happening in the home house, like, Oh, my God, this is hilarious, full circle, but I'm going to connect it, it's going to be amazing. Feel like the Home Health what you're doing with pushing that pushing forth. The outcomes, I would love that I would, but I would love to actually be that not than just saying that. We love their beat. Let's make it all about the outcomes. And honestly, I feel like that's what we've been trying to do the whole time. It's just people aren't. insurances aren't saying there aren't following through with it, what they say they're going to reimburse, they say, We can reimburse up to this amount. It doesn't mean anything. It's horrible. So I would love there to be fixing in that way.   29:13 And I think someday Medicare will come around to a value driven system for outpatient therapies. And until Medicare does, nobody else will mean, Medicare very much still drives that bus.   29:31 Yeah. Wow. I never realized that. That's yeah. How do you know how do you I mean, honestly, asking, How do you know that they're the ones driving the bus?   29:43 Because most of the private insurance is based their policies on payment on what Medicare does,   29:53 because they're so huge. Yes. Mm hmm. Oh, gosh. Not saying it. It's easy to say there's no easy road.   30:02 That's where all the that's the root of all the CPT codes and everything else. Medicare needed a common terminology to wash claims through a computer to pay people. Let's boil everything down to a five character code.   30:21 Right, right, right. Wow. Huh? She's What a hot mess. It just gives me a headache thinking about all of it. I don't like it. It makes I need cake. Or pizza. Oh, not chocolate though. My dad loves chocolate cake. Are you a chocolate cake person?   30:43 I am a chocolate person head on.   30:46 We only put like chocolate cake is so different from chocolate bars come on.   30:51 Yes. But they both have their merits   30:54 F No. Disagree? Absolutely not. All right, if you are a person that if you would handle your stress from chocolate cake, just as much as chocolate bars. Okay, your team Dr. Phil. If you're like No, chocolate, just chocolate actual chocolate, your team? Jenna. I'm interested to see if there's going to be any written debate on this or discussions I'm sure there already has, which is why you were meeting Dr. Phil was like, let's do this topic. And like, I don't know anything about this, which is good. I think it's good because then I get to learn everybody else who listens gets to learn. And oh, I'm going to just say this just because I am not a fan of meanness. Don't attack either of us in this discussion. If that's in your if that's in, if that's in your intention in in hearing this and your response, oh, just at this as a message just for you get out of here. Well, we got to be better together, we need to be able to have these discussions, talk about it, totally fine to speak on your concerns about it or all that stuff. But we're just attacking each other that is not helping out the patients at large. This is about the people we serve. So we're discussing this to see what's going on to better understand what's going on. If you are in an estate, you are close to somebody who is in legislature, the then do talk to them, or see if there's a pre written letter from a PTA right now regarding this through their app, if you're in a PTA member or see if you can get a hold of that letter through a friend or something or I'm sure it's honestly on their webpage for you to easily access to advocate sending a letter to fight this or fight for it, whatever it is, because there's there's positives and negatives and everything. I mean, sometimes there's you know, it's leaning one way, obviously, but we got to just take action. If you want to see something you got it don't just reply on here take action. Well, I just gave so many different messages and one thing at the end, but that's okay, I'm fine with it. Any last words you want to say on this matter that you that we haven't covered? Dr. Phil?   33:15 I think the take homes are twofold. You just said the first one. You've got to be involved in advocacy if you want to see change. Second, value based purchasing, like we're talking about it today is just in the home health arena right now. It is what Medicare wants to bring across the board across all settings. And, you know, they don't they want to get away from fee for service. They want to get away from ID to units. If they're x and a unit. If they're X, a unit of East M and A unit of manual therapy and you need to pay me for it. They want to know a client walked in your clinic with this problem. They had these issues that we're able to quantify. And at the end of it, the client left our clinic and the issues were gone and here's how we've quantified it. That's what they want to be able to pay you for. And if you can't be excellent with that. You're not going to have a successful practice 510 years from now.   34:34 Thank you. Thank you so much. Where can people they wanted to get in contact with you Where can they connect with you on either social media or email?   34:44 I am P gold PT on Twitter. I do have a personal Facebook. I am not fancy or cool enough to have Instagram or Tik Tok or any of those. I have LinkedIn. My email is Easy it's P gold pt@gmail.com. The other place that's really easy to find me is if you go to a PTA home health.org on the leadership page, you'll find my name. Currently the treasurer of APGA Home Health formerly known as the Home Health section. And in two weeks in two days I become the President   35:29 didn't say that at the beginning. I was like, I wonder if you want me to and you didn't say bring it and bring it out? So yes, this is a person. This is a person who's very involved with fighting and spin keeping on top of what's going on for home health. So thank you so much, Dr. Phil, for coming on for your name. I love just saying Dr. Phil over and over again. And just sending you the biggest hug from afar. We got a meet at a conference recently and you are a gem. Thank you so much, and everyone send love to Dr. Phil for for his time.

AfterGate
Ep 2.5- Dena Robinson

AfterGate

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 2, 2022 53:12


Alvin and German conduct a great conversation with civil rights attorney Dena Robinson, '12. A a former educator and community organizer, Dena graduated from the University of Maryland School of Law in May 2017. While studying in law school, she had many high-profile internships. She offers diversity, equity, and inclusion training with nonprofits and companies around the country through her consulting business, Radical Root. While at Colgate, she was heavily involved in student activities and received her Bachelor of Arts (B.A.), Political Science and Women's Studies.

Radio Active Kids
RAK 4/2/22 - Zovi interview!

Radio Active Kids

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 2, 2022 116:20


This week on Radio Active Kids, we'll get all weird and noisy in an interview with experimental musician Zovi, whose new all-ages songs about plushies are great fun! Also, new songs by Formidable Vegetable, Danny Weinkauf - Red Pants Band, Little Miss Ann (ft. Suzi Shelton & Uncle Jumbo!), Captain Festus McBoyle, Phredd, Silly Goose & Val and The Maryland School for the Blind, Brett Campbell Children's Musician, Nature Out Loud & more, plus some older songs by POCO DROM, ChIPS (with BENNY TIME & The Vegetable Plot) & #HollowGodric! The playlist is here.

Beyond The Fame with Jason Fraley

WTOP Entertainment Reporter Jason Fraley chats with Matthew Ogens, director of Netflix's "Audible," which is nominated for Best Documentary Short tonight at the Oscars. They're also joined by Jennifer Yost Ortiz of the Maryland School for the Deaf in Frederick, Maryland as the documentary chronicles the school's football team.

Here & Now
'Audible' movie on deaf football team; Pro-democracy Russian activists take a stand

Here & Now

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 17, 2022 41:36


"Audible," a documentary about the football team at the Maryland School for the Deaf, has been nominated for an Oscar for Best Documentary (Short Subject). We speak with director Matt Ogens. And, Dmitry Valuev, regional coordinator in Virginia for the group Russian America for Democracy in Russia, describes his and other Russians' efforts to support Ukrainians at home and abroad.

MTR Podcasts
Alicia Wilson, Esq.

MTR Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 17, 2022 34:46


About the guestAlicia Wilson, Esq. is Vice President of Economic Development for Johns Hopkins University and Johns Hopkins Health System and Associate Professor in the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, in Baltimore, Maryland. At Johns Hopkins, Alicia leads a core team focused on developing and implementing Hopkins' institution-wide strategies and initiatives as an anchor institution in and around its campuses both within the United States and abroad.  Alicia spearheads the elevation and expansion of Hopkins signature commitment to its communities through investments in real estate, economic and neighborhood development, healthcare, and education.  Prior to joining Hopkins, Alicia served as the Senior Vice President of Impact Investments and Senior Legal Counsel to the Port Covington Development Team.  Port Covington is a 235-acre redevelopment project located in Baltimore, Maryland and is one of the largest urban revitalization efforts in the United States.  As Senior Vice President of Impact Investments and Senior Legal Counsel, Alicia ensured that the $5.5 billion Port Covington Development Project generated a measurable beneficial social and environmental impact alongside a financial return for its equity investors in the project (i.e. Goldman Sachs, Kevin Plank, and other equity investors).  She led a team focused on measuring and reporting the social and environmental performance and progress of the Port Covington Project to maximize both performance and impact, while ensuring transparency and accountability to stakeholders.   Prior to being promoted to Senior Vice President of Impact Investments and Senior Legal Counsel, Alicia served as Vice President of Community Affairs and Legal Advisor to Sagamore Development Company, a Plank Industries Company.  During the 2016 Baltimore City Council legislative session, Alicia drafted key pieces of Tax Increment Financing (TIF) legislation and served as the principal negotiator of the TIF legislation and the two largest Community Benefit Agreements in the history of Baltimore associated with the passage of a $660 million TIF bill, the largest TIF awarded in the history of the United States at that time.  The negotiations of the community benefit agreements involved over 200 stakeholder groups representing tens of thousands of residents from across the City of Baltimore.  Prior to joining Sagamore Development Company, Alicia was partner at the downtown Baltimore law firm of Gordon Feinblatt — the sixth-largest, law firm in the state of Maryland.  When Alicia made partner on the eve of her seventh year of practice, she made history by becoming the first African-American to be named partner in the sixty-year history of the firm.  Alicia is a talented trial attorney and sought-after legal advisor to individuals and business owners on all aspects of real estate, financial services, and employment and labor law matters.  In her legal practice, Alicia established herself as a strategic communicator, shrewd negotiator and savvy architect of complex deals involving multiple of stakeholders and robust community engagement.    Alicia is actively involved in civic and charitable organizations.  She currently serves on the boards of the Center for Urban Families, the University of Maryland School of Law Board of Visitors, the Walters Art Museum, and the National Diverse Attorney Pipeline Program. Most notably, Alicia was recently elected as Chair of the CollegeBound Foundation and as such is the first CollegeBound Foundation alum, first woman, first African-American and youngest Board Chair in the thirty history of the organization.  Alicia also serves as Parliamentarian within the Harbor City Chapter of the Links, Incorporated and is a proud member of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Incorporated.   Alicia is a graduate of the University of Maryland Baltimore County (UMBC) and the University of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law.  At the University of Maryland Baltimore County, Wilson was a Blaustein and Sondheim Public Affairs Scholar and, in 2003, was named the Harry S. Truman Scholar for the state of Maryland. She is the first student in the history of UMBC to be awarded this honor. Alicia was named the 2004 Andrew Levy Leadership Scholar at the University of Maryland School of Law.  In late 2004, she was also named the 2004 George L. Russell Scholar at the School of Law.  While in law school, Alicia served as the co-captain of the Maryland Law National Trial Team and led her team to be ranked the number one trial team in the country. For her accomplishments and public service, Alicia has received numerous awards and honors.  Most recently, Alicia received the 2021 Humanity of Connection Award from AT&T for her commitment and leadership in advancing anchor strategies that elevate and expand communities through economic development, healthcare, and education. She was also recognized, in 2021, by Black Enterprise as one of the 40 leaders under 40 who are “changing the world at local, national, and global levels.” Her work within Baltimore was also recently honored by the Junior League of Baltimore naming Alicia their Inaugural Woman of Distinction.  In 2020, Alicia was named to the Maryland Daily Record's 2020 VIP List, the National Bar Association's 2019 40 Under 40 List of the Nation's Top Advocates, the 2019 Whitney M. Young Award Recipient by the Greater Baltimore Urban League, a 2019 Distinguished Women by the Girl Scouts of Central Maryland, and as one of Maryland's 2019 three most inspiring voices by Community Law In Action.  In 2018, Alicia was recognized as an Unstoppable Women by the UWAC Collective, as one of two Power Women of the Year by the Baltimore Leadership School for Young Women, and as Community Advocate of the Year by the Baltimore City Chamber of Commerce.Her professional and civic leadership have propelled her to the forefront of local and national media attention.  Most recently, Alicia was named by the Afro-American Newspaper as the Newsmaker of the Year for 2021.  In late 2021, Alicia was featured in Baltimore Style Magazine as one of Baltimore's Six Women of Strength for her leadership and civic involvement. In 2020, she was recognized as one of the Top 25 Emerging Leaders in Healthcare by Modern Healthcare, by Baltimore Magazine as one of the 30 Women Shaping the Future of Baltimore, and by the Maryland Daily Record as one of Maryland's Very Important Professionals in Business.  In 2019, Alicia was profiled in Forbes magazine as the “The Black Millennial Lawyer Making Michelle Obama More Accessible to Baltimore's Youth” and Savoy magazine named her one of the “Most Influential Women in Corporate America.” Also, in 2019, Alicia was featured in the Maryland Daily Record as one of the Top 50 Influential Marylanders.  In late 2018, the National Business Journal named Alicia as one of the nation's Top 50 Influencers under 40 and in that same year Black Enterprise produced a television feature on Alicia for her work in securing the $660 million tax increment financing for the Port Covington Project.  In early 2017, Wilson was featured and honored by WBFF Fox 45 as one of Baltimore's four Champions of Courage.  And, in 2016, the Baltimore Sun profiled Alicia as one of “Baltimore's 25 Women to Watch.”  The Truth In This ArtThe Truth In This Art is a podcast interview series supporting vibrancy and development of Baltimore & beyond's arts and culture.Mentioned in this episode:Hopkins Connects - Entrepreneurship MattersTo find more amazing stories from the artist and entrepreneurial scenes in & around Baltimore, check out my episode directory.Stay in TouchNewsletter sign-upSupport my podcastShareable link to episode★ Support this podcast ★

The
"Raise-The-Wage Episode #4 -Feat. Ms. Sarah C. Butts, LMSW Director of Public Policy, NASW

The

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 17, 2022 32:09


Sarah Christa Butts, LMSW Is the Director of Public Policy with the National Association of Social Workers, in Washington, DC. Ms. Butts is responsible for leading the association's public policy, political and legislative affairs agenda, overseeing field organizing, working at both the national level and with NASW chapters, political candidates' fundraising and endorsement efforts, as well as developing and advancing the association's strategic goals and objectives related to influencing the legislative and executive branches of government. Prior to joining NASW, Sarah served as executive director of the Grand Challenges for Social Work at the University of Maryland School of Social Work. She was also a Senior Administrator within the Dean's office at University of Maryland, School of Social Work. Ms. Butts is the founding administrator of the American Academy of Social Work and Social Welfare (AASWSW) and played a significant role in the organization's development as a 501c3 and launching of Grand Challenges from 2013-2017. She is a co-author on the AASWSW working paper to End Homelessness and contributing author on a new book, Grand Challenges for Social Work and Society, published by Oxford University Press. Prior experience includes roles at the Family League of Baltimore, Maryland Department of Human Services, Social Services Administration and Baltimore County Department of Social Services. Ms. Butts holds an MSW from University of Maryland Baltimore and a BSW from University of Maryland Baltimore County, where she is currently pursuing a PhD in Public Policy. Ms. Butts also played a major role in developing The National Association of Social Workers (NASW) 2021 Blueprint of Federal Social Policy Priorities articulates meaningful actions the Biden-Harris Administration and Congress should take to address the COVID-19 crisis, promote mental and behavioral health, eliminate systemic racism and ensure civil and human rights for all. The Blueprint's 21 issue areas are organized according to the Grand Challenges for Social Work, a research-informed social policy agenda, developed by the social work profession, to address our society's most pressing social problems. NASW's Blueprint is a roadmap for social progress and reflects social work's best thinking on the pathway to a more just and equitable society. --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/kelsunn-on-the-air/support

The Truman Charities Podcast: A Community of Caring
Ep 044: NAMI Supporting individuals and Families affected by Mental illness

The Truman Charities Podcast: A Community of Caring

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 16, 2022 29:50


Stephanie Rosen – The Truman Charities Podcast: A Community of Caring with Jamie Truman Episode 044 Stephanie Rosen Stephanie Rosen has been the Executive Director for the Montgomery County, National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI) located in Rockville, MD for over six years. Under her tenure as Executive Director: NAMI MC program participation has increased from 6,000 individuals a year to over 18,000, programs reaching youth and young adults (Ending the Silence and Sources of Strength) have been added, revenue from the Heroes annual fundraiser has increased by over 400%, and NAMI MC was awarded the largest grant in NAMI MC history. Prior to her role as Executive Director at NAMI MC, she was the Family and Youth Program Coordinator. Stephanie has over 10 years of clinical and pre-clinical neuroscience research experience at institutions including Georgetown University, the University of Maryland School of Medicine, and the National Rehabilitation Hospital. Listen to this uplifting Truman Charities episode with Stephanie Rosen  Here is what to expect on this week's show: Why helping build better lives for individuals in the community affected by mental illness is important to Stephanie and her personal story. Some of the stigma's Stephanie sees when it comes to talking about mental health The NAMI walks, what they are, and why people should get involved.  Where Stephanie sees NAMI in 5 years. Connect with Stephanie:  Guest Links: Website- https://namimc.org/about/staff/2017-stephanie-rosen-smaller LinkedIn- https://www.linkedin.com/in/stephanierosen Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Be Impactful by Impact Fashion
Having Voice with Dr. Shana Frydman (2021)

Be Impactful by Impact Fashion

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 14, 2022 97:04


One year after we wore #pinkforchava, I revisit a talk with Dr. Shana Frydman, the director of Shalom Task Force. She shares what it is and isn't domestic violence, the importance of having voice in a relationship, the barriers survivors have to leaving, and what the community can do to help.   Dr. Shoshannah D. Frydman, PhD, LCSW is the Executive Director of Shalom Task Force. A national organization with a mission to combats domestic violence and foster safe and healthy relationships. Shana has worked in the field of intimate partner violence with a specialty in the Jewish community for 20 years. Shana co-chairs the UJA Taskforce on Family Violence and serves on the NYC's Mayor's Office to End Domestic and Gender Based Violence Advisory Council. Shana regularly lectures about intimate partner abuse, sexual abuse, trauma and culturally informed practice where she has published on this and related subjects. Dr. Frydman graduated with her MSW from the University of Maryland School of Social Work with honors and earned her PhD at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York/Hunter College Silberman School of Social Work.    shalomtaskforce.org Click here to see The Lightweight Snuggle Dress, and sign up for the waitlist if your size is already gone. Click here to see The All American Dress and sign up for the waitlist if your size is already sold out To hear more episodes, subscribe and head over to Impactfashionnyc.com/blog/podcast. Be Impactful is presented by Impact Fashion, your destination for all things size inclusive modest fashion

Bleav No Script No Problem
Oscar-nominated Director Matt Ogens Talks "Audible"

Bleav No Script No Problem

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 12, 2022 30:13


The 2022 Academy Awards are set for March 27th, and my guest - MATT OGENS - will be there with his film - "AUDIBLE" - nominated for an Oscar in the category of Best Documentary Short. Streaming now on NETFLIX, "Audible" is a cinematic and immersive coming of age documentary film, which takes you inside a high school football season with the Maryland School for the Deaf, introducing the world to some incredibly talented and resilient student-athletes who face many obstacles — on and off the field. Twelve years in the making, Matt, a Maryland native, talks about how special and personal this project is to him and how this is much more than a "sports doc." We also discuss the stylistic choices he made to develop a sense of intimacy and how he made "sound a character." Along with Ogens, acclaimed "Friday Night Lights" director PETER BERG serves as an executive producer on the project, so don't be surprised if you feel some of those "clear eyes, full hearts, can't lose" chills when you watch "Audible." Check out the film on Netflix now and let's root for Matt on the 3/27/2022 at the Academy Awards! Trailer below.   Trailer for "Audible" on Netflix https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G5htMIBhdGk    

On The Record on WYPR
An 'Audible' coming-of-age story

On The Record on WYPR

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 11, 2022 18:26


Amaree McKenstry-Hall was in his senior year at the Maryland School for the Deaf in Frederick. Football, Homecoming, and his future weighed on his mind. That's why filmmaker Matt Ogens made Amaree the heart of his coming-of-age documentary, “Audible.” "Audible" was recently nominated for an Academy Award for Best Documentary - Short Subject. The Oscars air March 27. "Audible" is available on Netflix. TRANSCRIPT: Sheilah Kast Good morning, I'm Sheilah Kast. We're On the Record. The documentary “Audible” follows an important season in Amaree McKinstry Hall's life football season. It's his last. He's a senior at the Maryland School for the Deaf in Frederick. The stakes are high. The Orioles have not lost to a Deaf school in 16 years. Just minutes into the film, that winning streak is broken. In the film, we see the searing pain of that loss. But we also see that while that streak was broken, the Orioles are not. Over and over, "Audible" shows how Amaree and his friends persevere. The film, out on Netflix, was recently nominated for the Academy Award for Best Documentary -Short Subject. Joining us to talk about it is director Matt Ogens, a Maryland native. His other projects include the documentary, "Confessions of a Superhero," about the costumed superheroes who roam the Hollywood Walk of Fame and the Emmy nominated docu-series, "Why We Fight," which follows fighters from across the globe. Matt Ogens, welcome to the show. Matt Ogens Thank you so much, Sheilah. Thanks for having us. Sheilah Kast Also with us is Amaree McKinstry Hall, who graduated from the Maryland School for the Deaf in 2020. We're speaking to Amaree with the assistance of Anessa Hughes, an American Sign Language interpreter from the Centralized Interpreter Referral Service. Welcome, Amaree. Amaree McKinstry Hall Thanks. Happy to be here! Sheilah Kast Matt, where did the idea for this film come from? Matt Ogens So I grew up in Maryland, about 30 minutes away from from Maryland school for the Deaf in Frederick. But I had a lot of connections, so my aunt is an ASL interpreter in the D.C. Maryland area and interpreted at the Maryland school for the Deaf for about six years when I was a kid. But I think the biggest connection is my best friend, also from Maryland, is Deaf. We've been best friends since we were seven years old, I was just texting with him. And so it actually I came up with the idea of wanting, wanting to do something with Maryland School for the Deaf 12 years before I made the film. It took that long of just stops and starts and different partners and almost and maybes and getting it made until I connected with Netflix. And they really understood and believed in the story. And I think at the end of the day, in some ways, on a personal level, it was a way for me to try to understand and connect with my friend and the larger Deaf community. Sheilah Kast And why did you decide to make Amaree the main subject? Matt Ogens I wouldn't say this is a football or a sports documentary. It's a coming of age film. There's relationships, there's family, there's tragedy and there's sports. And when I say coming of age, I wanted, I knew I wanted the main character to be a senior. Because for every teenager, graduating high school, going off into the larger world or college or whatever you're going to, do is a pivotal moment. And imagine that if you're Deaf and going out into a more of a broader hearing world. But what that meant is over 12 years I tried to make the film. I wanted a senior. That means I had to recast every single year for 12 years because they would graduate. And I'm so glad it took 12 years because if I didn't wait 12 years, I wouldn't have met this man on on this as well, Amaree. And besides just being an amazing human, what I loved about his story, it has all the marks of a great of great storytelling. His relationship with his father or lack thereof when he was younger, his unlikely friendship with the cheerleader. And that friendship coming about through a tragedy through Teddy, it helped show the struggle, his struggle and perhaps others in the Deaf community. And I've never heard another filmmaker saying, I'm glad it took 12 years to get a film made, but I'm glad it took five years to get a film made. Sheilah Kast Amaree, how did Matt approach you about being in his movie? Amaree McKinstry Hall Well, to be honest, you know, Matt asked me about it and just told me that he wasn't, he was on my side. He wanted me to be able to tell my own story about becoming a man, and he wanted me to just get it all out. You know, the whole story and that it was a way for me to have some healing happen in that way. He just emphasized that he wanted other people to be able to relate to those frustrations and everything that I've been through. I mentioned it to a counselor and just described what the experience was going to be like, and I agreed with everybody else that it would be a perfect opportunity. I'm not sure how to describe that. Yeah. Sheilah Kast Amaree, that loss to the school from Texas. How did that moment feel? Amaree McKinstry Hall So, you know, that loss to Texas was so unexpected. You know, I just always had complete confidence that we would do what we needed to do, that they would do something wrong that we can add such pride in the Maryland school for the Deaf. And that moment that we lost, I was completely enraged. I mean, I wanted to start beating the ground. I wanted to get out of there. I just wanted to escape. I felt ashamed, just embarrassed to have it happen. But it was such a learning experience that I could apply it to the rest of my life. If something's getting in the way of me being successful somewhere else, if something happens on my job, I can't just walk away. You just can't just give up like that. So it was really it really threw me being at the real school for the Deaf and having that loss. Sheilah Kast You and your teammates are very close. What did you do to not let that loss weigh you down? Amaree McKinstry Hall After we had the loss, I just knew we needed to regroup. We had to do some exploration. We had to figure out how to grow from it. We'd go to practices. We might start at three o'clock and before then we would right at five o'clock sharp, just all walk away. And we decided, you know, we're not going to quit at exactly five. We're going to do what it takes. We're gonna stay late if that's what we need and just get back in the game and see if we can get back into a championship rating. So. It made me happy to have that happen because we saw that we could come back from it. We actually only had that one loss. We had nine more wins, so it wasn't as big of a deal as we thought it was definitely didn't give up. Sheilah Kast Matt, there are lots of personal moments in this film, conversations about dating, friends dancing at a party. What did you do to earn the trust of these teens? Matt Ogens Going back for 12 years. Obviously, they were just kids, but I think in general, going back every year because I'd go visit. I live in Los Angeles now, going back to visit my family in Maryland. Every year, every other year, I'd pop into the school and say, Hi, meet the new kids. And I think coming back over and over and really being invited in. Also, I met Amaree when he was a junior and and Lira. So, you know, I had a year of talking to them and actually, I didn't know there was a person named Teddy. They told me that story when I met them. I assume because they wanted to share that. And so I didn't know that. I think just showing up and talking to them and doing a lot more listening than talking. I mean, I'd say at the end of the day, I don't know that Amaree and them learned anything from me. I hope I was just a conduit for them to tell their story and created a space, a safe space for it to be about them. It's not an observational film, it's that it's their film. And I learned a lot from them. Sheilah Kast Amaree, Matt mentioned Teddy, Teddy Webster. You endured the death of your friend and fellow football player. He died by suicide in 2017. Tell us about Teddy. Amaree McKinstry Hall I'd be happy to. Teddy. He died in November 2017. And he was my best friend. We grew up together, we were at the Columbia campus of the Maryland school together up until eighth grade. We got our education together, and he was my best friend just because of all the experiences we had together, all the fun that we had. We didn't see ourselves as being any different from each other. He was so funny. He loved acting. He loved everything about Hollywood. Everybody knew him well. Everybody knew his name. It was one of those kind of kids. You wanted to go to some Ivy League school like Yale, Harvard or something like that. He had big goals in his life and we all knew he was capable. And then suddenly he was gone and died by suicide. Sheilah Kast You wrote Teddy's name on your wristband before the big homecoming game. Why? Amaree McKinstry Hall I did that was just to reinforce his memory you so many people actually didn't want to say his name when he actually died just because it's too painful, too painful to remember, too painful to think about. But I mean, we knew each other since we were little kids. So to me, I wanted to keep that, even after he was dead and gone. I feel like people who die by suicide leave behind friends and family who have a lot to work through when it comes to trying to understand why they felt the need for that. Teddy was the last person I would have guessed for someone to do something like that. So that's why I wanted his name on my wrist. Sheilah Kast This is On the Record on WYPR. I'm Sheilah Kast, speaking with Amaree McKinstry Hall, who graduated from the Maryland School for the Deaf in 2020, Anessa Hughes, an American sign language interpreter, is assisting. Also with us is filmmaker Matt Ogens, who directed "Audible," a coming of age film about Amaree and his peers. "Audible" was recently nominated for an Oscar. Matt, how did you approach the sound design for this film? Matt Ogens I knew I wanted to do something special with sound and make it a character kind of for obvious reasons way before I made the film. And lucky enough to have an A-list sound team, I mean way more than I can afford, but they really connected with the material. Our sound designers and sound mixers, our composer. I wanted to. There's a few reasons. One, I wanted for the hearing audience for them to, they'll never fully what it's like to be Deaf, but to be able to feel something. And so to show that spectrum of sound from silence like the very first frame to very vibrant and saturated, especially from different points of view, like, for example, a pretty important scene is a memory in the kitchen at his family home, and he's the only one that's Deaf and they're all talking around him. And so you switch to his point of view where it's very distant and muffled. So the audience, at least the hearing audience, can try to come close to putting themselves in his shoes. And then he leaves and goes upstairs and really playing with that. I did a lot of research, and that research mainly was talking to Amaree and his friends. What music do you listen to? How do you feel things. All of that they talk about in the film. So you'll hear a lot of the sounds having a lot of bassey sounds, a lot of distortion underneath. So if you turn up the volume, you're actually going to kind of feel something. And even if not, you sort of feel it emotionally in your gut. So that was sort of the idea. Also, something that I learned from Amaree and his friends in the Deaf community is that, their their minds, their worlds are not silent. I mean, certainly go in the locker room with Amaree before the game. There's nothing silent about that. They're not silent on the field and they have a voice and they have something to say. But also being Deaf is not, there's a spectrum of that. You know, Amaree's level of hearing is different than someone else. I also wanted to show that. Sheilah Kast Amaree, you talk in the movie about moments of isolation as a Deaf person out in the world and even in your own family, as Matt mentioned. Tell us more about that. Amaree McKinstry Hall Well, as Matt just described, you know, even in my own family, in the house, everybody, I can see their lips moving. People chatting and laughing, and I don't have access to any of that. So when everybody's chatting with each other, it's kind of exhausting to try to even figure out what's going on. Somebody says something and then another person laughs, and nobody's letting me in on what's going on. So, often I just want to get away from it. I'll go up to my room. I'll turn up the music, get the bass going, play a game, watch TV or something like that. Or especially, you know, face time with my friends and be able to communicate that way. Sheilah Kast Were you nervous about sharing those feelings on camera or worried that your family, how your family would react to knowing that you feel isolation? Amaree McKinstry Hall No, I wasn't nervous, actually. I wanted to be really open about that. I know that, you know, my mom honestly doesn't understand Deaf culture. She doesn't have the awareness. I wish she had. So I looked at it as a great opportunity for her to watch the film, and through the production of the film, get to see it from my side and then consider what had been going on in my family up until this point. And it's great exposure for any family, any hearing family who has a Deaf child to understand that they need to make things visual, especially when they get together. They need to have their hands up and signing, communicating with each other. If they're not doing that, they're excluding somebody in their family. Sheilah Kast I read, Amaree, that you are not only a football player, you also did track and field - the discus and javelin throw. Is that right? Amaree McKinstry Hall Right, I did discuss and it was actually one of my favorite sports. Then the javelin throw, that was a real way to get out some aggression. You know, just frustration just to let it all out. And sports in general, I really depended on. I know that's an individual thing. Not everybody has that feeling, but I love having something in my hands, like the discus or the javelin and being able to measure how I'm doing, how far I can throw it. Sheilah Kast Amaree, you graduated from high school two years ago. What are you doing now? Amaree McKinstry Hall After high school, I moved to Indiana, I've since moved to Minnesota, and I really wanted to start my own YouTube channel. I wanted to blog and I wanted to record more things about my life. I wanted to keep the film-making going. Then, when things didn't really work out in Indiana, no offense to Indiana, but there just wasn't a whole lot going on in the town I was living in. I'm not used to being so far out in the country. I decided to move to Minnesota because I could be on the Deaf Olympics wrestling team, Greco-Roman wrestling. So that way, you know, it was a sport where I could have my whole body involved, it's a head to toe kind of sport, and we'll be competing in 2022 in Brazil. Sheilah Kast Wow! And you have made one film and it was Oscar nominated, so more films might be in your future. Amaree McKinstry Hall I hope so. I love it. Yes, I don't have any expectation, but I'd love for that to happen. Matt Ogens I would, too. Sheilah Kast And Matt, what what are you working on next? Matt Ogens I can't say too much, but I'm currently directing a feature documentary that shoots in Nigeria and England about a ballet dancer. Amaree McKinstry Hall Go Matt! Sheilah Kast Good luck. Matt Ogens Thank you. Sheilah Kast Matt Ogens directed the documentary Audible. Amaree McKinstry Hall starred in the film. He graduated from the Maryland School for the Deaf in 2020. We spoke with the assistance of Anessa Hughes, an American sign language interpreter from the Centralized Interpreter Referral Service. Matt, Amaree, thank you and good luck. Matt Ogens Thank you, Sheilah. Thanks for having us. Amazing. Amaree McKinstry Hall That's great, thanks. Sheilah Kast Audible is available on Netflix. The Academy Awards air Sunday, March 27th. This is On the Record. I'm Sheilah Kast, short break now and then a Stoop Story. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

TheHealthHub
Functional Medicine Approach To Headache Relief With Dr. Meg Mill

TheHealthHub

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 11, 2022 51:38


In this episode we speak with Dr. Meg Mill about the Functional Medicine approach to dealing with headaches. Dr. Mill is a Functional Medicine Health Practitioner and Clinical Pharmacist. In her virtual practice, she works with patients to discover and heal the root cause of their health struggles through advanced diagnostic testing and personalized support. Before practicing Functional Medicine, Meg spent almost two decades practicing as a Clinical Pharmacist. She graduated with a PharmD from Duquesne University and continued her education with a residency at the University of Maryland School of Pharmacy. Meg then practiced in various clinical settings before pursuing Functional Medicine certifications through the Institute for Functional Medicine and School of Applied Function Medicine. Meg has been featured in several national publications such as Fox News Channel, Health, Authority Magazine, Thrive Global, Drug Topics, and Circle Magazine as well as several national blogs and podcast guest appearances. With her conventional and functional medicine expertise, she helps her patients improve their health naturally while still understanding and respecting conventional practice protocols. She is particularly passionate about helping people suffering from chronic headaches or migraines find relief and increase productivity and energy to enjoy their life again with her proven EAT Method. Learning Points: 1. How do headaches differ from migraines? 2. What are some underlying causes of headaches that need to be considered? 3. At what point should we consider headaches to be chronic? Social Media: websites: https://www.megmill.com/ Head Strong: Happiness beyond Headaches 10 week programhttps://megmill.kartra.com/page/earlyinterestlist Free Guide: www.megmil.com/headaches Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/drmegmill/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/drmegmill

Home Health Minute: Home Health | Physical Therapy | Geriatrics
Outcome Measures and the Toolbox Ii with Dr. Jack M Guralnik

Home Health Minute: Home Health | Physical Therapy | Geriatrics

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 7, 2022 27:22


In this Podcast, Ken Miller talks with Dr. Jack M Guralnik about outcome measures and the New Toolbox II resource from the Home Health Academy.  Dr. Jack Guralnik is currently Professor of Epidemiology and Public Health at the University of Maryland School of Medicine. He spent 25 years doing research at the National Institute on Aging and was Chief of the intramural Laboratory of Epidemiology, Demography and Biometry. He received his M.D. degree from Jefferson Medical College in Philadelphia and M.P.H. and Ph.D. degrees from the University of California, Berkeley. He is Board Certified in Public Health and General Preventive Medicine. Kenneth L Miller, PT, DPT is a board-certified geriatric clinical specialist, advanced credentialed exercise expert for aging adults and credentialed clinical instructor from APTA. He has over 26 years of clinical practice with the older adult population. Dr Miller is an assistant professor at the University of North Texas Health Science Center with dual appointments in the Department of Physical Therapy in the School of Health Professions and in the Department of Internal Medicine and Geriatrics in the Texas College of Osteopathic Medicine.    

Maryland CC Project
Smith – Trauma Radiology

Maryland CC Project

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 7, 2022 57:37


Dr. Elana Smith is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Diagnostic Radiology and Nuclear Medicine at the University of Maryland School of Medicine who presents on the Top 10 Radiology Diagnoses in Trauma.

On The Record on WYPR
Is Maryland meeting students' mental health needs?

On The Record on WYPR

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 2, 2022 24:35


The United States is in the midst of a mental health crisis among children, and the pandemic only made the situation worse.Sharon Hoover co-directs the National Center for School Mental Health at the University of Maryland School of Medicine. We ask her about Maryland's shortage of school psychologists and social workers. Check out America's School Mental Health Report Card. ShantayMcKinily directs the Positive Schools Center at the University of Maryland School of Social Work. She's a former principal now coaching schools on how to reduce suspensions by taking a restorative approach to conflict. And DiyaSlayton, elementary principal of the Belair-Edison School in Baltimore, tells us how this approach transformed her school.Check out the Positive Schools Center Facebook page. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

We Go There Podcast
S4 | E36 Circumcision, Vasectomies & more with Urologist Dr. Rena Malik

We Go There Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 1, 2022 38:38


From the surprising stats on vasectomies and erectile dysfunction, to the need-to-know info about circumcision - we go there with Urologist Dr. Rena Malik. Some questions answered include: 1. How does tubal ligation compare with a vasectomy procedure? Side effects? 2. Why aren't more people getting vasectomies? Cultural beliefs? 3. What are the global trends around infant circumcision? What do parents need to know? 4. How can men improve erectile dysfunction? Dr. Rena D. Malik is Assistant Professor of Surgery in the Division of Urology and Director of Female Pelvic Medicine and Reconstructive Surgery at the University of Maryland School of Medicine. She previously completed medical school at NYU School of Medicine followed by urologic residency training at the University of Chicago and fellowship at University of Texas at Southwestern Medical Center. She specializes in reconstructive urology including the management of female and male voiding dysfunction, urinary incontinence, vaginal and robotic surgery for pelvic organ prolapse, overactive bladder, neurogenic bladder, male and female urethral stricture, vesicovaginal fistula, urethral diverticulum, and mesh-related complications. She is currently a member of the American Urological Association (AUA), the Mid-Atlantic Section of the AUA, the Society of Women in Urology, and the Association for Women Surgeons. She is also the social media chair for the Society of Urodynamics, Female Pelvic Medicine and Urogenital Reconstruction (SUFU) and serves on the communications committee for the Association of Women Surgeons (AWS).   Dr. Malik is regularly featured by media outlets such as US News & World Report, MSN, and Bustle and has an active YouTube channel providing education on common urologic conditions. She was awarded Top Doctor 2019 and 2020 by Baltimore Magazine for Urology and Urogynecology. She has published over 40 peer-reviewed articles and book chapters. Her research interests include gender disparities, health literacy, and medical misinformation in social media.  For more of Dr. Rena Malik, please visit http://www.renamalikmd.com on the Web https://www.instagram.com/renamalikmd/ on Instagram https://www.facebook.com/RenaMalikMD/ on Facebook   For more of We Go There Podcast, please visit https://www.instagram.com/wegotherepodcast/ on Instagram https://wegotherepodcast.podbean.com/ on the Web *Warning- this podcast is completely unfiltered. If you are around young children, we suggest headphones.* *Disclaimer: All opinions of our guests are their own and in no way represent that of Lexi Miles Corrin and or Nikki Bergen.*